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Sample records for ecg-triggered axial ct

  1. Coronary CT angiography with prospective ECG-triggering: an effective alternative to invasive coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to coronary artery disease, radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing radiation-induced malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. Of these strategies, prospective ECG-triggering is one of the most effective techniques with resultant effective radiation dose similar to or even lower than that of invasive coronary angiography. Prospective ECG-triggered coronary CT angiography has been reported to have high diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease with image quality comparable to that of retrospective ECG-gating, but with significantly reduced radiation dose. Successful performance of prospective ECG-triggering is determined by strict exclusion criteria and careful patient preparation. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the diagnostic applications of coronary CT angiography with prospective ECG-triggering with focus on radiation dose reduction. Radiation dose measurements are discussed with aim of allowing accurate dose estimation. Diagnostic value of prospective ECG-triggered coronary CT angiography in patients with different heart rate is discussed. Finally, current status and future directions are highlighted. PMID:24282694

  2. Lowering heart rate with an optimised breathing protocol for prospectively ECG-triggered CT coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Husmann, L; Herzog, B A; Pazhenkottil, A P; Buechel, R R; Nkoulou, R; Ghadri, J R; Valenta, I; Burger, I A; Gaemperli, O; Wyss, C A; Kaufmann, P A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to prospectively characterise the effect of the level of breath-hold on heart rate in CT coronary angiography (CTCA) with prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) triggering and its impact on coronary artery attenuation. Methods 260 patients (86 women; mean age 59 ± 11 years) underwent 64-slice CTCA using prospective ECG triggering. Prior to CTCA, heart rates were recorded during 15 s of breath-hold at three different levels of inspiration (normal, intermediate and deep). The inspiration level with the lowest heart rate was chosen for actual CTCA scanning. Coronary artery attenuation was measured, and the presence of backflow of contrast material into the inferior vena cava (as an indicator of increased intrathoracic pressure) was recorded. Results The mean heart rate at breath-hold was significantly different for the three inspiration levels (normal, 60 ± 8 bpm; intermediate, 59 ± 8 bpm; deep, 57 ± 7 bpm; p<0.001). The maximum heart rate reduction in each patient at breath-hold averaged 5.3 ± 5.1 bpm, and was observed at a normal inspiration depth in 23 (9%) patients, at an intermediate inspiration depth in 102 (39%) patients and at deep inspiration in 135 (52%) patients. Overall, there was no association between the level of breath-hold and coronary vessel attenuation (p-value was not significant). However, the backflow of contrast material into the inferior vena cava (n = 26) was found predominantly at deep inspiration levels (p<0.001), and, when it occurred, it was associated with reduced coronary attenuation compared with patients with no backflow (p<0.05). Conclusion The breath-hold level to best reduce heart rate for CTCA should be individually assessed prior to scanning because a mean heart rate reduction of 5 bpm can be achieved. PMID:21849364

  3. Detection of coronary artery stenoses by low-dose, prospectively ECG-triggered, high-pitch spiral coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, Stephan; Goroll, Tobias; Seltmann, Martin; Pflederer, Tobias; Anders, Katharina; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner G; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael; Marwan, Mohamed

    2011-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a new prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch scan mode for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA), which allows an effective dose of less than 1 mSv. Coronary CTA provides increasingly reliable image quality, but the associated radiation exposure can be high. Seventy-five patients with suspected coronary artery disease and in sinus rhythm were screened for participation. After exclusion of 25 patients for body weight >100 kg or failure to lower heart rate to ≤ 60 beats/min, 50 patients were studied by prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral computed tomography (CT). Coronary CTA was performed using a dual-source CT system with 2 × 128 × 0.6-mm collimation, 0.28-s rotation time, a pitch of 3.4, 100-kVp tube voltage, and current of 320 mA. Data acquisition was prospectively triggered at 60% of the R-R interval and completed within 1 cardiac cycle. Diagnostic accuracy for detection of coronary artery stenoses ≥ 50% diameter stenosis was determined by comparison to invasive coronary angiography. Per-patient diagnostic performance was the primary form of analysis. In all 50 patients (34 males, 59 ± 12 years of age), imaging was successful. For the detection of 16 patients with at least 1 coronary artery stenosis, CT demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79% to 100%) and specificity of 82% (95% CI: 65% to 93%). The positive predictive value was 72% (95% CI: 49% to 89%) and the negative predictive value was 100% (95% CI: 87% to 100%). Sensitivity was 100% (95% CI: 88% to 100%) and specificity was 94% (95% CI: 89% to 97%) on a per-vessel basis. Per-segment sensitivity was 92% (95% CI: 80% to 97%), and specificity was 98% (95% CI: 96% to 98%). Mean dose-length product for coronary CTA was 54 ± 6 mGy · cm, the effective dose was 0.76 ± 0.08 mSv (0.64 to 0.95 mSv). In nonobese patients with a low and stable heart rate, prospectively ECG-triggered high

  4. An automatic machine learning system for coronary calcium scoring in clinical non-contrast enhanced, ECG-triggered cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Leiner, Tim; Takx, Richard A. P.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Presence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events. We present a system using a forest of extremely randomized trees to automatically identify and quantify CAC in routinely acquired cardiac non-contrast enhanced CT. Candidate lesions the system could not label with high certainty were automatically identified and presented to an expert who could relabel them to achieve high scoring accuracy with minimal effort. The study included 200 consecutive non-contrast enhanced ECG-triggered cardiac CTs (120 kV, 55 mAs, 3 mm section thickness). Expert CAC annotations made as part of the clinical routine served as the reference standard. CAC candidates were extracted by thresholding (130 HU) and 3-D connected component analysis. They were described by shape, intensity and spatial features calculated using multi-atlas segmentation of coronary artery centerlines from ten CTA scans. CAC was identified using a randomized decision tree ensemble classifier in a ten-fold stratified cross-validation experiment and quantified in Agatston and volume scores for each patient. After classification, candidates with posterior probability indicating uncertain labeling were selected for further assessment by an expert. Images with metal implants were excluded. In the remaining 164 images, Spearman's p between automatic and reference scores was 0.94 for both Agatston and volume scores. On average 1.8 candidate lesions per scan were subsequently presented to an expert. After correction, Spearman's p was 0.98. We have described a system for automatic CAC scoring in cardiac CT images which is able to effectively select difficult examinations for further refinement by an expert.

  5. Effect of Heart Rate and Body Mass Index on the Interscan and Interobserver Variability of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring at Prospective ECG-Triggered 64-Slice CT

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of heart rate, body mass index (BMI) and noise level on interscan and interobserver variability of coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring on a prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered 64-slice CT. Materials and Methods One hundred and ten patients (76 patients with CAC) were scanned twice on prospective ECG-triggered scans. The scan parameters included 120 kV, 82 mAs, a 2.5 mm thickness, and an acquisition center at 45% of the RR interval. The interscan and interobserver variability on the CAC scores (Agatston, volume, and mass) was calculated. The factors affecting the variability were determined by plotting it against heart rate, BMI, and noise level (defined as the standard deviation: SD). Results The estimated effective dose was 1.5 ± 0.2 mSv. The mean heart rate was 63 ± 12 bpm (range, 44-101 bpm). The patient BMIs were 24.5 ± 4.5 kg/m2 (range, 15.5-42.3 kg/m2). The mean and median interscan variabilities were 11% and 6%, respectively by volume, and 11% and 6%, respectively, by mass. Moreover, the mean and median of the algorithms were lower than the Agatston algorithm (16% and 9%, respectively). The mean and median interobserver variability was 10% and 4%, respectively (average of algorithms). The mean noise levels were 15 ± 4 Hounsfield unit (HU) (range, 8-25 HU). The interscan and interobserver variability was not correlated with heart rate, BMI, or noise level. Conclusion The interscan and interobserver variability of CAC on a prospective ECG-triggered 64-slice CT with high image quality and 45% of RR acquisition is not significantly affected by heart rate, BMI, or noise level. The volume or mass algorithms show reduced interscan variability compared to the Agatston scoring (p < 0.05). PMID:19568461

  6. Image quality and radiation dose of dual-source CT cardiac angiography using prospective ECG-triggering technique in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Jian; Zhao, Hongliang; Jia, Yan; Ren, Jing; Xu, Jian; Hao, Yuewen; Zheng, Minwen

    2016-04-09

    All studies involving use of ionizing radiation should be performed in accordance with the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle, especially in children. In this study, the prospective ECG triggering technique with low voltage was used in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) angiography to investigate if image quality with low radiation dose could be satisfactory in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. Sixty pediatric patients with suspected congenital cardiovascular anomalies were enrolled prospectively in the study. They were randomly assigned to two groups for DSCT angiography. Group A were scanned by prospective ECG-triggering computed tomography angiography (CTA) with 80 kV tube voltage, while group B by used non-ECG-gated CTA with the same tube voltage. The anomaly accuracy was evaluated based on the surgical and/or conventional cardiac angiography findings. The overall image quality was assessed on a five-point scale. And the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose was evaluated in both groups. There were 127 cardiovascular anomalies in Group A and 108 in Group B. The mean subjective image quality and diagnostic accuracy between these two groups were significantly different (P = 0.007 and 0.011, respectively). The mean effective dose in Group A and Group B was 0.38 ± 0.13 mSv and 0.35 ± 0.17 mSv, respectively. But there was no significant difference between two groups (P = 0.197). The prospective ECG triggering technique in DSCT scan can offer better image quality and diagnostic accuracy with low radiation exposure in pediatric patients with congenital heart diseases. This technique has potential to become a new clinical routine in pediatric cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging.

  7. Detection of coronary artery stenosis with sub-milliSievert radiation dose by prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral CT angiography and iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei-Hua; Lu, Bin; Hou, Zhi-Hui; Li, Nan; Han, Lei; Wu, Yong-Jian; Niu, Hong-Xia; Silverman, Justin R; Nicola De Cecco, Carlo; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sub-milliSievert (mSv) coronary CT angiography (cCTA) using prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral CT acquisition combined with iterative image reconstruction. Forty consecutive patients (52.9 ± 8.7 years; 30 men) underwent dual-source cCTA using prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition. The tube current-time product was set to 50 % of standard-of-care CT examinations. Images were reconstructed with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction. Image quality was scored and diagnostic performance for detection of ≥50 % stenosis was determined with catheter coronary angiography (CCA) as the reference standard. CT was successfully performed in all 40 patients. Of the 601 assessable coronary segments, 543 (90.3 %) had diagnostic image quality. Per-patient sensitivity for detection of ≥50 % stenosis was 95.7 % [95 % confidence interval (CI), 76.0-99.8 %] and specificity was 94.1 % (95 % CI, 69.2-99.7 %). Per-vessel sensitivity was 89.5 % (95 % CI, 77.8-95.6 %) with 93.2 % specificity (95 % CI, 86.0-97.0 %). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve on per-patient and per-vessel levels was 0.949 and 0.913. Mean effective dose was 0.58 ± 0.17 mSv. Mean size-specific dose estimate was 3.14 ± 1.15 mGy. High-pitch prospectively ECG-triggered cCTA combined with iterative image reconstruction provides high diagnostic accuracy with a radiation dose below 1 mSv for detection of coronary artery stenosis. • Cardiac CT with sub-milliSievert radiation dose is feasible in many patients • High-pitch spiral CT acquisition with iterative reconstruction detects coronary stenosis accurately. • Iterative reconstruction increases who can benefit from low-radiation cardiac CT.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT in young infant with complex congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zhong, Yu Min; Sun, Ai Min; Wang, Qian; Ouyang, Rong Zhen; Hu, Li Wei; Qiu, Han Sheng; Wang, Shi Yu; Li, Jian Ying

    2016-06-01

    To explore the clinical value and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sub-mSv low-dose prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT (CCT) in young infants with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). A total of 102 consecutive infant patients (53 boys and 49 girls with mean age of 2.9 ± 2.4 m and weight less than 5 kg) with complex CHD were prospectively enrolled. Scans were performed on a 64-slice high definition CT scanner with low dose prospective ECG-triggering mode and reconstructed with 80 % adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. All studies were performed during free breathing with sedation. The subjective image quality was evaluated by 5-point grading scale and interobserver variability was calculated. The objective image noise (standard deviation, SD) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. The effective radiation dose from the prospective ECG-triggering mode was recorded and compared with the virtual conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode. The detection rate for the origin of coronary artery was calculated. All patients also underwent echocardiography before CCT examination. 81 patients had surgery and their preoperative CCT and echocardiography findings were compared with the surgical results and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy were calculated for separate cardiovascular anomalies. Heart rates were 70-161 beats per minute (bpm) with mean value of 129.19 ± 14.52 bpm. The effective dose of 0.53 ± 0.15 mSv in the prospective ECG-triggering cardiac CT was lower than the calculated value in a conventional retrospective ECG-gating mode (2.00 ± 0.35 mSv) (p < 0.001). The mean CNR and SD were 28.19 ± 13.00 and 15.75 ± 3.61HU, respectively. The image quality scores were 4.31 ± 0.36 and 4.29 ± 0.41 from reviewer 1 and 2 respectively with an excellent agreement between them (Kappa = 0.85). The detection rate for the origins of the left and right coronary

  9. Coronary CT angiography with single-source and dual-source CT: comparison of image quality and radiation dose between prospective ECG-triggered and retrospective ECG-gated protocols.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2013-09-30

    This study is conducted to investigate and compare image quality and radiation dose between prospective ECG-triggered and retrospective ECG-gated coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with the use of single-source CT (SSCT) and dual-source CT (DSCT). A total of 209 patients who underwent CCTA with suspected coronary artery disease scanned with SSCT (n=95) and DSCT (n=114) scanners using prospective ECG-triggered and retrospective ECG-gated protocols were recruited from two institutions. The image was assessed by two experienced observers, while quantitative assessment was performed by measuring the image noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Effective dose was calculated using the latest published conversion coefficient factor. A total of 2087 out of 2880 coronary artery segments were assessable, with 98.0% classified as of sufficient and 2.0% as of insufficient image quality for clinical diagnosis. There was no significant difference in overall image quality between prospective ECG-triggered and retrospective gated protocols, whether it was performed with DSCT or SSCT scanners. Prospective ECG-triggered protocol was compared in terms of radiation dose calculation between DSCT (6.5 ± 2.9 mSv) and SSCT (6.2 ± 1.0 mSv) scanners and no significant difference was noted (p=0.99). However, the effective dose was significantly lower with DSCT (18.2 ± 8.3 mSv) than with SSCT (28.3 ± 7.0 mSv) in the retrospective gated protocol. Prospective ECG-triggered CCTA reduces radiation dose significantly compared to retrospective ECG-gated CCTA, while maintaining good image quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Improvement of Image Quality and Diagnostic Performance by an Innovative Motion-Correction Algorithm for Prospectively ECG Triggered Coronary CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Yan, Hong-Bing; Mu, Chao-Wei; Gao, Yang; Hou, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Kun; Parinella, Ashley H.; Leipsic, Jonathon A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of a novel motion-correction algorithm (Snap-short Freeze, SSF) on image quality and diagnostic accuracy in patients undergoing prospectively ECG-triggered CCTA without administering rate-lowering medications. Materials and Methods Forty-six consecutive patients suspected of CAD prospectively underwent CCTA using prospective ECG-triggering without rate control and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Image quality, interpretability, and diagnostic performance of SSF were compared with conventional multisegment reconstruction without SSF, using ICA as the reference standard. Results All subjects (35 men, 57.6 ± 8.9 years) successfully underwent ICA and CCTA. Mean heart rate was 68.8±8.4 (range: 50–88 beats/min) beats/min without rate controlling medications during CT scanning. Overall median image quality score (graded 1–4) was significantly increased from 3.0 to 4.0 by the new algorithm in comparison to conventional reconstruction. Overall interpretability was significantly improved, with a significant reduction in the number of non-diagnostic segments (690 of 694, 99.4% vs 659 of 694, 94.9%; P<0.001). However, only the right coronary artery (RCA) showed a statistically significant difference (45 of 46, 97.8% vs 35 of 46, 76.1%; P = 0.004) on a per-vessel basis in this regard. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting ≥50% stenosis was improved using the motion-correction algorithm on per-vessel [96.2% (177/184) vs 87.0% (160/184); P = 0.002] and per-segment [96.1% (667/694) vs 86.6% (601/694); P <0.001] levels, but there was not a statistically significant improvement on a per-patient level [97.8 (45/46) vs 89.1 (41/46); P = 0.203]. By artery analysis, diagnostic accuracy was improved only for the RCA [97.8% (45/46) vs 78.3% (36/46); P = 0.007]. Conclusion The intracycle motion correction algorithm significantly improved image quality and diagnostic interpretability in patients undergoing CCTA with prospective ECG triggering and

  11. Application of prospective ECG-triggered dual-source CT coronary angiography for infants and children with coronary artery aneurysms due to Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Y; Wang, X; Cheng, Z; Wu, D; Wu, L

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the initial application and value of prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered dual-source CT coronary angiography (DSCTCA) in the diagnosis of infants and children with coronary artery aneurysms due to Kawasaki disease. Methods 19 children [12 males; mean age 13.47 months, range 3 months to 5 years; mean heart rate 112 beats per minute (bpm), range 83–141 bpm] underwent prospective ECG-triggered DSCTCA with free breathing. Subjective image quality was assessed on a five-point scale (1, excellent; 5, non-diagnostic) by two blinded observers. The location, number and size of each aneurysm were observed and compared with those of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) performed within 1 week. Interobserver agreement concerning the subjective image quality was evaluated with Cohen's κ-test. Bland–Altman analysis was used to evaluate the agreement on measurements (diameter and length of aneurysms) between DSCTCA and TTE. The average effective dose required for DSCTCA was calculated for all children. Results All interobserver agreement for subjective image quality assessment was excellent (κ=0.87). The mean±standard deviation (SD) aneurysm diameter with DSCTCA was 0.76±0.36 cm and with TTE was 0.76±0.39 cm. The mean±SD aneurysm length with DSCTCA was 2.06±1.35 cm and with TTE was 2.00±1.22 cm. The Bland–Altman plot for agreement between DSCTCA and TTE measurements showed good agreement. The mean effective dose was 0.36±0.06 mSv. Conclusion As an alternative diagnostic modality, prospective ECG-triggered DSCTCA with excellent image quality and low radiation exposure has been proved useful for diagnosing infants and children with coronary artery aneurysms due to Kawasaki disease. Advances in knowledge Prospective ECG–triggered DSCTCA for infants and children allows rapid, accurate assessment of coronary aneurysms due to Kawasaki diseases, compared with TTE. PMID:22932064

  12. Adaptive prospective ECG-triggered sequence coronary angiography in dual-source CT without heart rate control: Image quality and diagnostic performance.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang-Jie; Qian, Nong; Wang, Tao; Tang, Xiao-Qiang; Xue, Yue-Jun

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of using second generation dual-source CT (DSCT) to obtain high quality images and diagnostic performance and to reduce the radiation dose in adaptive prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered sequence (CorAdSeq) CT coronary angiography (CTCA) without heart rate control. No prescan β-blockers were administered. Un-enhanced CT and CTCA with adaptive prospective CorAdSeq scanning without heart rate control were performed in 683 consecutive patients divided into two body mass index (BMI) groups: BMI <25 kg/m(2) (group A, n=412) and BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) (group B, n=271). The image quality and quantitative stenosis of all coronary segments with a diameter ≥1 mm were assessed. The mean heart rate (MHR), heart rate variability (HRV) and radiation dose values were recorded. In 426 cases, the diagnostic performance was evaluated using quantitative conventional coronary angiography as the reference standard. Diagnostic image quality was obtained in 98.5% of segments in group A and in 98.8% of segments in group B, with no significant differences between the groups. No correlations were observed between the image quality score and MHR or HRV (P=0.492, P=0.564, respectively). The effective radiation doses in groups A and B were 2.57±1.01 mSv and 6.36±1.88 mSv, respectively. The sensitivities and specificities of diagnosing coronary heart disease per patient were 99.6% and 97.8% in group A and 99.5% and 97.5% in group B, respectively (P>0.05). Adaptive prospective CorAdSeq scanning, without heart rate control, by second generation DSCT had a high image quality and diagnostic performance for coronary artery stenosis with lower radiation doses.

  13. Prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition for cardiac CT angiography in routine clinical practice: initial results.

    PubMed

    Kröpil, Patric; Rojas, Carlos A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Lanzman, Rotem S; Miese, Falk R; Scherer, Axel; Kalra, Mannudeep; Abbara, Suhny

    2012-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the mode of application, image quality (IQ), and radiation exposure resulting from introduction of a prospectively electrocardiogram-triggered high-pitch cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) acquisition mode into routine clinical practice. A total of 42 prospectively triggered cardiac CTAs were conducted on 34 patients (11 female, 23 male; mean age 56 ± 15 y) using a high-pitch mode (pitch 3.4) on a dual-source CT. In 8 of these patients with higher heart rates or occasional premature ventricular contractions, 2 immediately subsequent CTAs were performed ("double flash protocol"). Subjective IQ was assessed for coronary arteries using a 4-point scale (1=unevaluable to 4=excellent). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured in 9 locations. CT Dose Index and dose-length product were obtained, and the patients' effective dose was calculated. Mean effective doses were 2.6 ± 1.4 mSv (range: 1.1 to 6.4) for the entire cardiac examination and 1.4 ± 0.7 mSv (0.4 to 3.1) for individual high-pitch cardiac CTA. z-coverage ranged from 9.9 cm in a native coronary CTA to 31.4 cm in a bypass graft case. The overall subjective IQ was good to excellent (mean score: 3.5), with 1.5% unevaluable coronary segments. The "double flash protocol" resulted in a fully diagnostic CT study in all cases just after taking both scans into consideration. The mean CNR of all locations was 19.7 ± 2.6. Prospectively electrocardiograph-triggered high-pitch-mode cardiac CTA is a feasible and promising technique in clinical routine, allowing for evaluation of coronaries at good-to-excellent IQ and providing high CNR and minimal radiation doses. The "double flash protocol" might become a more robust tool in patients with elevated heart rates or premature ventricular contractions.

  14. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between prospectively ECG-triggered and retrospectively ECG-gated CT angiography: Establishing heart rate cut-off values in first-generation dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Emre; Yıldız, A Elçin; Güler, Ezgi; Karcaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Akata, Deniz; Kılınçer, Abidin; Atlı, Eray; Topçuoğlu, Melih; Hazırolan, Tuncay

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate radiation dose and image quality of prospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered and retrospectively ECG-gated coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography and to establish cut-off values of heart rates (HRs) for each technique in first-generation dual-source CT. A total of 200 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease were accepted into the study. Patients were selected randomly for each technique (prospective triggering group n=99, mean age 55.85±10.74 and retrospective gating group n=101, mean age 53.38±11.58). Two independent radiologists scored coronary artery segments for image quality using a 5-point scale. Also, attenuation values of each coronary artery segment and dose-length product values were measured. For each technique, cut-off HR values were determined for the best image quality. Mean image quality scores and attenuation values were found to be higher in the prospective triggering group (p<0.05). Mean radiation dose was 73% lower for the prospective triggering group (p<0.01). The cut-off HR values for good image quality scores were ≤67 beats per minute (bpm) and ≤80 bpm for the prospective triggering and retrospective gating groups, respectively (p<0.05). Increased HR (≥68 and ≥81 bpm, respectively) had negative effects on image quality (p<0.05). The prospective ECG triggering technique has better image quality scores than retrospective ECG gating, particularly in patients who have an HR of less than 68 bpm. Also, a 73% radiation dose reduction can be achieved with prospective ECG triggering. In patients with higher heart rates, retrospective ECG gating is recommended.

  15. Prospective ECG triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts compared with retrospective ECG gating on 256-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Symersky, Petr; Habets, Jesse; Westers, Paul; de Mol, Bas A J M; Prokop, Mathias; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2012-06-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has diagnostic value for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but it is hampered by artefacts. We hypothesised that image acquisition using prospective triggering instead of retrospective gating would reduce artefacts related to pulsating PHV. In a pulsatile in vitro model, a mono- and bileaflet PHV were imaged using 256 MDCT at 60, 75 and 90 beats per minute (BPM) with either retrospective gating (120 kV, 600 mAs, pitch 0.2, CTDI(vol) 39.8 mGy) or prospective triggering (120 kV, 200 mAs, CTDI(vol) 13.3 mGy). Two thresholds (>175 and <-45HU), derived from the density of surrounding structures, were used for quantification of hyper- and hypodense artefacts. Image noise and artefacts were compared between protocols. Prospective triggering reduced hyperdense artefacts for both valves at every BPM (P = 0.001 all comparisons). Hypodense artefacts were reduced for the monoleaflet valve at 60 (P = 0.009), 75 (P = 0.016) and 90 BPM (P = 0.001), and for the bileaflet valves at 60 (P = 0.001), 90 (P = 0.001) but not at 75 BPM (P = 0.6). Prospective triggering reduced image noise at 60 (P = 0.001) and 75 (P < 0.03) but not at 90 BPM. Compared with retrospective gating, prospective triggering reduced most artefacts related to pulsating PHV in vitro. • Computed tomographic images are often degraded by prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts • Prospective triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts in vitro • Artefact reduction at 90 beats per minute occurs without image noise reduction • Prospective triggering may improve CT image quality of moving hyperdense structures.

  16. Body physique and heart rate variability determine the occurrence of stair-step artefacts in 64-slice CT coronary angiography with prospective ECG-triggering.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Lars; Herzog, Bernhard A; Burkhard, Nina; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Valenta, Ines; Gaemperli, Oliver; Wyss, Christophe A; Landmesser, Ulf; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and characterize the frequency and extent of stair-step artefacts in computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) with prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggering and to identify their determinants. One hundred and forty three consecutive patients (55 women, mean age 57 +/- 13 years) underwent 64-slice CTCA using prospective ECG-triggering. Occurrence of stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the thoracic wall and the coronary arteries was determined and maximum offset was measured. If stair-step artefacts occurred in both cases, a difference between thoracic wall and coronary artery offset of 0.6 mm or greater was attributed to additional motion of the heart. Mean effective radiation dose was 2.1 +/- 0.7 mSv (range 1.0-3.5 mSv). Eighty-nine patients (62%) had stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the coronary arteries (mean offset of 1.7 +/- 1.1 mm), while only 77 patients had thoracic wall stair-step artefacts (mean offset of 1.0 +/- 0.3 mm; significantly different, P < 0.001). Stair-step artefacts in CTCA of the thoracic wall were determined by BMI and weight (P < 0.01), while artefacts in CTCA of the coronary arteries were associated with heart rate variability (P < 0.05). Stair-step artefacts in CTCA with prospective ECG-triggering are determined by (a) motion of the entire patient during table travel, particularly in large patients and (b) by motion of the heart, particularly when heart rates are variable.

  17. Image quality, radiation dose, and diagnostic accuracy of prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary CT angiography at 70 kVp in a clinical setting: comparison with invasive coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wang, Yining; Schoepf, U Joseph; Meinel, Felix G; Bayer, Richard R; Qi, Li; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Zhao, Yan E; Li, Xie; Gong, Jian Bin; Jin, Zhengyu; Lu, Guang Ming

    2016-03-01

    To investigate image quality, radiation dose, and diagnostic performance of prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary CT angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp compared to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as reference standard. Forty-three patients underwent prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch CCTA at 70 kVp using 30 cc (11 g iodine) contrast medium and ICA. Subjective and objective image quality was evaluated for each CCTA study. CCTA performance for diagnosing ≥50% stenosis was assessed. Results were stratified according to heart rate (HR), body mass index (BMI), Agatston score, and image quality. At CCTA, 94.3% (500/530) of coronary segments were of diagnostic quality. Using ICA as reference standard, sensitivity and accuracy were 100% and 93.0% on a per-patient basis. Per-vessel and per-segment performances were 92.2% and 89.5%; 79.5% and 88.3%, respectively. No differences were found in diagnostic accuracy between different HR, BMI, and calcification subgroups (all P > 0.05) on a per-patient basis. However, low image quality reduced diagnostic accuracy on a per-patient, per-vessel and per-segment basis (all P < 0.05). The mean effective radiation dose was 0.2 ± 0.0 mSv. Our presented protocol results in an effective radiation dose of 0.2 mSv and high diagnostic accuracy for stenosis detection in a selected, non-obese population. Prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch CCTA at 70 kVp is feasible. This protocol has a high diagnostic accuracy for stenosis detection. The mean effective radiation dose was 0.2 ± 0.0 mSv. Only 30 cc of contrast material is used in this protocol. Low image quality reduced diagnostic accuracy of CCTA.

  18. Reduction of X-ray induced DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes during coronary CT angiography using high-pitch spiral data acquisition with prospective ECG-triggering.

    PubMed

    Kuefner, Michael A; Hinkmann, Fabian M; Alibek, Sedat; Azoulay, Sascha; Anders, Katharina; Kalender, Willi A; Achenbach, Stephan; Grudzenski, Saskia; Löbrich, Markus; Uder, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Purpose of this study was to compare the effect of high-pitch spiral data acquisition with prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-triggering on the x-ray induced DNA damages to blood lymphocytes with commonly used low-pitch spiral scans. Thirty four patients underwent coronary computed tomography angiography either using high-pitch spiral data acquisition (n = 15; dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner, 38.4 mm collimation, 100-120 kV, 320-456 mAs/rotation, pitch value 3.2-3.4) or using a low-pitch protocol (n = 19; dual-source CT scanner, 19.2 mm collimation, 120 kV, 330-438 mAs/rotation, pitch 0.2-0.39, ECG-based tube current modulation). Blood samples were obtained before and 30 minutes after CT. Lymphocytes were isolated, stained against the phosphorylated histone variant gammaH2AX, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were visualized using fluorescence microscopy. Radiation dose to the blood was estimated by relating in vivo DSB levels to values of in vitro irradiated blood samples (50 mGy). Dose length product was registered as provided by the patient protocol. Total dose length product ranged from 101 to 237 (median 112) mGy cm in high-pitch and from 524 to 1283 (median 1025) mGy cm in low-pitch scans (P < 0.0001). The median CT induced DSB level 30 minutes after exposure was significantly lower after high-pitch (0.04 DSBs/cell, range 0.02-0.10 DSBs/cell) compared with low-pitch scans (0.39 DSBs/cell, 0.22-0.71 DSBs/cell, P < 0.0001). Both DSB levels and radiation dose to the blood showed a significant correlation to the dose length product (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001). The radiation dose to the blood was significantly reduced in the high-pitch (median 3.1, range 2.0-8.1 mGy) compared with the low-pitch group (median 26.9; range 14.2-44.9 mGy, P < 0.0001). Prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral data acquisition can considerably reduce the radiation dose to the blood in coronary CT angiography as compared with low pitch protocols.

  19. Prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary angiography with third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp tube voltage: feasibility, image quality, radiation dose, and effect of iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela M; Bittner, Daniel; Schuhbaeck, Annika; Muschiol, Gerd; Brand, Michael; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Low tube voltage reduces radiation exposure in coronary CT angiography (CTA). Using 70 kVp tube potential has so far not been possible because CT systems were unable to provide sufficiently high tube current with low voltage. We evaluated feasibility, image quality (IQ), and radiation dose of coronary CTA using a third-generation dual-source CT system capable of producing 450 mAs tube current at 70 kVp tube voltage. Coronary CTA was performed in 26 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease, selected for body weight <100 kg and heart rate <60 beats/min. High-pitch spiral acquisition was used. Filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms were applied. IQ was assessed using a 4-point rating scale (1 = excellent, 4 = nondiagnostic) and objective parameters. Mean age was 62 ± 9 years (46% males; mean body mass index, 27.7 ± 3.8 kg/m(2); mean heart rate, 54 ± 5 beats/min). Mean dose-length product was 20.6 ± 1.9 mGy × cm; mean estimated effective radiation dose was 0.3 ± 0.03 mSv. Diagnostic IQ was found in 365 of 367 (FBP) and 366 of 367 (IR) segments (P nonsignificant). IQ was rated "excellent" in 53% (FBP) and 86% (IR) segments (P = .001) and "nondiagnostic" in 2 (FBP) and 1 segment (IR) (P nonsignificant). Mean IQ score was lesser in FBP vs IR (1.5 ± 0.4 vs 1.1 ± 0.2; P < .001). Image noise was lower in IR vs FBP (60 ± 10 HU vs 74 ± 8 HU; P < .001). In patients <100 kg and with a regular heart rate <60 beats/min, third-generation dual-source CT using high-pitch spiral acquisition and 70 kVp tube voltage is feasible and provides both robust IQ and very low radiation exposure. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Accelerated free breathing ECG triggered contrast enhanced pulmonary vein magnetic resonance angiography using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Roujol, Sébastien; Foppa, Murilo; Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-11-22

    To investigate the feasibility of accelerated electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered contrast enhanced pulmonary vein magnetic resonance angiography (CE-PV MRA) with isotropic spatial resolution using compressed sensing (CS). Nineteen patients (59±13 y, 11 M) referred for MR were scanned using the proposed accelerated free breathing ECG-triggered 3D CE-PV MRA sequence (FOV=340×340×110 mm3, spatial resolution=1.5×1.5×1.5 mm3, acquisition window=140 ms at mid diastole and CS acceleration factor=5) and a conventional first-pass breath-hold non ECG-triggered 3D CE-PV MRA sequence. CS data were reconstructed offline using low-dimensional-structure self-learning and thresholding reconstruction (LOST) CS reconstruction. Quantitative analysis of PV sharpness and subjective qualitative analysis of overall image quality were performed using a 4-point scale (1: poor; 4: excellent). Quantitative PV sharpness was increased using the proposed approach (0.73±0.09 vs. 0.51±0.07 for the conventional CE-PV MRA protocol, p<0.001). There were no significant differences in the subjective image quality scores between the techniques (3.32±0.94 vs. 3.53±0.77 using the proposed technique). CS-accelerated free-breathing ECG-triggered CE-PV MRA allows evaluation of PV anatomy with improved sharpness compared to conventional non-ECG gated first-pass CE-PV MRA. This technique may be a valuable alternative for patients in which the first pass CE-PV MRA fails due to inaccurate first pass timing or inability of the patient to perform a 20-25 seconds breath-hold.

  1. Evaluation of superior vena cava syndrome by axial CT and CT phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Moncada, R.; Cardella, R.; Demos, T.C.; Churchill, R.J.; Cardoso, M.; Love, L.; Reynes, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    Transverse axial computed tomography (CT) has been combined with CT digital phlebography to study nine patients with superior vena cava syndrome. Six were due to malignancy, two were secondary to benign disease, and one was a paraneoplastic manifestation. This combined CT approach successfully identified the abnormal morphology of the superior vena cava, demonstrating external compression, encasement, or intraluminal thrombus in all patients and the collateral venous channels in eight. This technique is a rapid, informative, and cost-effective method for the workup of superior vena cava syndrome. The CT digital phlebogram, however, is not successful in regularly and optimally opacifying the normal superior vena cava because of the limited amount of contrast material, dilution effect of the nonopacified incoming flow from the jugular and azygos veins, and the lack of image enhancement from the CT digital scanograms.

  2. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  3. Whole-Chest 64-MDCT of Emergency Department Patients with Nonspecific Chest Pain: Radiation Dose and Coronary Artery Image Quality with Prospective ECG Triggering Versus Retrospective ECG Gating

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, William P.; Branch, Kelley R.; May, Janet M.; Mitsumori, Lee M.; Strote, Jared N.; Warren, Bill H.; Dubinsky, Theodore J.; Lockhart, David W.; Caldwell, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the patient radiation dose and coronary artery image quality of long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT performed with retrospective ECG gating with those of CT performed with prospective ECG triggering in the evaluation of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain. Subjects and Methods Consecutively registered emergency department patients with nonspecific low-to-moderate-risk chest pain underwent whole-chest CT with retrospective gating (n = 41) or prospective triggering (n = 31). Effective patient radiation doses were estimated and compared by use of unpaired Student's t tests. Two reviewers independently scored the quality of images of the coronary arteries, and the scores were compared by use of ordinal logistic regression. Results Age, heart rate, body mass index, and z-axis coverage were not statistically different between the two groups. For retrospective gating, the mean effective radiation dose was 31.8 ± 5.1 mSv; for prospective triggering, the mean effective radiation dose was 9.2 ± 2.2 mSv (prospective triggering 71% lower, p < 0.001). Two of 512 segments imaged with retrospective gating were nonevaluable (0.4%), and two of 394 segments imaged with prospective triggering were nonevaluable (0.5%). Prospectively triggered images were 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1–4.5) times as likely as retrospectively gated images to receive a high image quality score for each segment after adjustment for segment differences (p < 0.05). Conclusion For long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain, use of prospective ECG triggering may result in substantially lower patient radiation doses and better coronary artery image quality than is achieved with retrospective ECG gating. PMID:19457832

  4. Whole-chest 64-MDCT of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain: Radiation dose and coronary artery image quality with prospective ECG triggering versus retrospective ECG gating.

    PubMed

    Shuman, William P; Branch, Kelley R; May, Janet M; Mitsumori, Lee M; Strote, Jared N; Warren, Bill H; Dubinsky, Theodore J; Lockhart, David W; Caldwell, James H

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the patient radiation dose and coronary artery image quality of long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT performed with retrospective ECG gating with those of CT performed with prospective ECG triggering in the evaluation of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain. Consecutively registered emergency department patients with nonspecific low-to-moderate-risk chest pain underwent whole-chest CT with retrospective gating (n = 41) or prospective triggering (n = 31). Effective patient radiation doses were estimated and compared by use of unpaired Student's t tests. Two reviewers independently scored the quality of images of the coronary arteries, and the scores were compared by use of ordinal logistic regression. Age, heart rate, body mass index, and z-axis coverage were not statistically different between the two groups. For retrospective gating, the mean effective radiation dose was 31.8 +/- 5.1 mSv; for prospective triggering, the mean effective radiation dose was 9.2 +/- 2.2 mSv (prospective triggering 71% lower, p < 0.001). Two of 512 segments imaged with retrospective gating were nonevaluable (0.4%), and two of 394 segments imaged with prospective triggering were nonevaluable (0.5%). Prospectively triggered images were 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1-4.5) times as likely as retrospectively gated images to receive a high image quality score for each segment after adjustment for segment differences (p < 0.05). For long-z-axis whole-chest 64-MDCT of emergency department patients with nonspecific chest pain, use of prospective ECG triggering may result in substantially lower patient radiation doses and better coronary artery image quality than is achieved with retrospective ECG gating.

  5. Comparing the diagnostic utility of sacroiliac spectral CT and MRI in axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Yu, Kai Hu; Guo, Rui Min; Ran, Jun; Liu, Yao; Morelli, John; Runge, Val A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical value of sacroiliac spectral CT and MRI in diagnosing axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Methods: 137 patients with low back pain and suspected axial SpA were recruited. 76 patients were diagnosed with axial SpA, and 49 patients were diagnosed with non-specific low back pain (nLBP). Each patient underwent spectral CT and MRI examinations of the sacroiliac joints. Water- and calcium-based material decomposition images were reconstructed for quantitative analysis. The marrow-to-muscle ratios of water and calcium concentrations and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) signal intensity, as well as Hounsfield units in the ilium and sacrum were compared between nLBP and patients with axial SpA. Results: Spectral CT is comparable with MRI for the detection of bone marrow oedema, and it is superior to MRI for detection of osseous sclerosis and erosions. MRI is superior to spectral CT in detecting enthesitis and synovitis. There were statistically significant differences in STIR signal intensity, water concentration and calcium concentration ratios as well as CT values between nLBP and patients with axial SpA (p < 0.05) in the ilium. There was a statistically significant but weak correlation between ratios of water concentration and STIR signal intensity in both the ilium and sacrum (p < 0.05). Overall, the iliac water concentration was most sensitive for detection of patients with SpA. The positive likelihood ratio of the STIR signal intensity ratio was the highest. The diagnostic odds ratio of the calcium concentration ratio was the highest, and its negative likelihood ratio was the lowest. Conclusion: Spectral CT not only depicts findings of chronic sacroiliitis (i.e. bone erosion and sclerosis), but also can detect and quantify the extent of marrow oedema in patients with SpA with activity sacroiliitis. The sensitivity of MRI for diagnosis of early synovitis and enthesitis remains superior. The combination of spectral CT and MRI may

  6. Can nontriggered thoracic CT be used for coronary artery calcium scoring? A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xueqian; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Groen, Jaap M.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Jong, Pim A. de; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Coronary artery calcium score, traditionally based on electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered computed tomography (CT), predicts cardiovascular risk. However, nontriggered CT is extensively utilized. The study-purpose is to evaluate the in vitro agreement in coronary calcium score between nontriggered thoracic CT and ECG-triggered cardiac CT.Methods: Three artificial coronary arteries containing calcifications of different densities (high, medium, and low), and sizes (large, medium, and small), were studied in a moving cardiac phantom. Two 64-detector CT systems were used. The phantom moved at 0–90 mm/s in nontriggered low-dose CT as index test, and at 0–30 mm/s in ECG-triggered CT as reference. Differences in calcium scores between nontriggered and ECG-triggered CT were analyzed by t-test and 95% confidence interval. The sensitivity to detect calcification was calculated as the percentage of positive calcium scores.Results: Overall, calcium scores in nontriggered CT were not significantly different to those in ECG-triggered CT (p > 0.05). Calcium scores in nontriggered CT were within the 95% confidence interval of calcium scores in ECG-triggered CT, except predominantly at higher velocities (≥50 mm/s) for the high-density and large-size calcifications. The sensitivity for a nonzero calcium score was 100% for large calcifications, but 46%± 11% for small calcifications in nontriggered CT.Conclusions: When performing multiple measurements, good agreement in positive calcium scores is found between nontriggered thoracic and ECG-triggered cardiac CT. Agreement decreases with increasing coronary velocity. From this phantom study, it can be concluded that a high calcium score can be detected by nontriggered CT, and thus, that nontriggered CT likely can identify individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, a zero calcium score in nontriggered CT does not reliably exclude coronary calcification.

  7. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal: an approach for perfusion imaging on the beating calf heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Karin; Karlsson, Daniel M.; Loenn, Urban; Traff, Stefan; Casimir-Ahn, Henrik

    2001-06-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) has successfully been used to map the myocardial perfusion on patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery on the arrested heart. The need for intra-operative evaluation of graft function is obvious in routine surgery but even more imperative when adapting new surgical techniques where the procedure is performed on the beating heart. When using LDPI on the beating heart, artifacts originating from the movement of the heart are superimposed on the Doppler signal. We have investigated a method to reduce these artifacts by controlling the sampling sequence with ECG-triggering. The method has been assessed in an animal model on the beating calf heart. After sternotomy, an area covering 1 cm2 was imaged at the anterior wall of the left ventricle. In this area, six perfusion images were captured each of them recorded at fixed, but different time intervals in the cardiac cycle. In addition continuous measurements at one spot was done during 1 - 2 minutes. The signal recorded during pumping action was high compared to measurements performed in the same muscle area during infusion of blood with a syringe pump. Repeated measurements captured at a fixed delay time from the R-peak in the same areas at the same heart frequency showed reproducibility. ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler signal is the first step in our attempts to adapt LDPI to enabling assessment of myocardial perfusion on the beating heart. Further technical achievements and in-vivo investigations are, however, needed and will be performed by our research team in future studies.

  8. Diagnostic value of CT-localizer and axial low-dose computed tomography for the detection of drug body packing.

    PubMed

    Aissa, Joel; Kohlmeier, Antonia; Rubbert, Christian; Hohn, Ulrich; Blondin, Dirk; Schleich, Christoph; Kröpil, Patric; Boos, Johannes; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of CT-localizers in the detection of intracorporal containers. This study was approved by the research ethics committee of our clinic. From March 2012 to March 2013, 108 subjects were referred to our institute with suspected body packing. The CT-localizer and the axial CT-images were compared by two blinded observers retrospectively. Presence of body packs was assessed in consensus. Sensitivity and specificity, PPV and NPV of the CT-localizer were calculated. Packets were detected in the CT-localizer of 19 suspects. In 28 of 108 cases packs were detected in axial CT-images. Sensitivity of CT-localizer for detection of packs was 0.68, and specificity was 1.00. There were no cases rated as false positive. The PPV was 1.0 and the NPV was 0.89. The omission of the axial CT-images would have led to a mean radiation dose reduction of 1.94 ± 0.5 mSv. The value of CT-localizers lies in their high PPV. Localizers are limited by low sensitivity, compared to axial CT-images in screening of potential body packers. However, in positive cases their high PPV may possibly allow to omit the complete axial abdominal CT to achieve even lower radiation exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Computed tomography coronary angiography with a consistent dose below 2 mSv using double prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition in patients with atrial fibrillation: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qin, Jing; He, Bai; Zhou, Yin; Yang, Jun-jie; Hou, Xiao-ling; Yang, Xiao-bo; Chen, Jiu-hong; Chen, Yun-dai

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and imaging quality of double prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition mode (double flash mode) for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTCA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). 47 patients (11 women, 36 men; mean age 64.5 ± 12.1 years) were enrolled for CTCA examinations using a dual-source CT with 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm collimation, 0.28 s rotation time and a pitch of 3.4. Double flash mode was prospectively triggered first at 60 % and later at 30 % of the R-R interval within two cardiac cycles. Image quality was evaluated using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 4 = non-assessable). From 672 coronary artery segments, 77.5 % (521/672) was rated as score of 1, 20.8 % (140/672) as score of 2, 1.2 % (8/672) as score of 3 and 0.4 % (3/672) was rated as 'non-assessable'. The average image quality score was 1.25 ± 0.38 on a per segment basis. Mean dose-length product for CTCA was 92.6 ± 28.2 mGy cm, the effective dose was 1.30 ± 0.39 mSv (0.64-1.97 mSv). In patients with AF, double prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition mode could be a feasible and valuable scan mode for CTCA with a consistent dose below 2 mSv as well as diagnostic imaging quality.

  10. "Inline" Axial Reconstructed CT Scans Provide a Significantly Larger Assessment of C2 Pedicle Diameter for Screw Placement Compared With "Standard" Axial Scans: Implications for Surgical Planning.

    PubMed

    Vizurraga, David E; Rhee, John M; Borden, Timothy C; Mansour, Ashton S

    2016-06-27

    Radiologic analysis. The objective was to compare C2 pedicle diameter and screw feasibility on reconstructed axial computed tomography (CT) cuts created "Inline" (IL) with the intended pedicle screw tract versus unaltered "Standard" (STD) axial cuts. Axial CT cuts through the C2 pedicle are commonly evaluated when planning pedicle screw fixation as medial aberrancies of the vertebral artery can significantly narrow pedicle diameter. STD axial CT cuts provided by radiology departments are typically formatted orthogonal to the long axis of the neck or the vertical plumb, which is often not IL with the axis of the intended C2 pedicle screw tract. A total of 89 cervical spine CT scans obtained by a single radiology department over 2 years (35 male, 54 female; mean age 64.9 y) were reviewed. STD axial cuts were not manipulated but were assessed as provided. IL axial cuts were created along the intended C2 pedicle screw tract using free, open-source DICOM viewer software. Inner and outer pedicle diameters were measured on axial cuts most closely approximating the isthmus of the intended tract. On STD cuts, the mean outer and inner pedicle diameters were 5.05±1.45 and 2.01±1.31 mm, respectively. By contrast, IL measurements yielded significantly larger outer and inner diameters: 5.85±1.78 and 2.68±1.47 mm (P<0.01). IL measurement predicted a higher number of pedicles amenable to insertion of a 3.5 mm screw with safety margins of 1 to 3 mm. Reformatted IL axial cuts through the intended path of C2 pedicle screws provide significantly larger assessments of C2 pedicle diameter than those obtained on STD cuts. IL measurements predict C2 screw insertion feasibility in a substantially higher number of pedicles. As assessment of IL cuts may alter surgical decision-making at no added cost or radiation exposure, we suggest that they be obtained whenever considering C2 pedicle screw placement.

  11. Locating the reference point of symphysis pubis in axial CT images.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jiyong; Jung, Dae Chul; Choi, Chong-Ho

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present an effective method to determine the reference point of symphysis pubis (SP) in an axial stack of CT images to facilitate image registration for pelvic cancer treatment. In order to reduce the computational time, the proposed method consists of two detection parts, the coarse detector, and the fine detector. The detectors check each image patch whether it contains the characteristic structure of SP. The coarse detector roughly determines the location of the reference point of SP using three types of information, which are the location and intensity of an image patch, the SP appearance, and the geometrical structure of SP. The fine detector examines around the location found by the coarse detection to refine the location of the reference point of SP. In the experiment, the average location error of the propose method was 2.23 mm, which was about the side length of two pixels. Considering that the average location error by a radiologist is 0.77 mm, the proposed method finds the reference point quite accurately. Since it takes about 10 s to locate the reference point from a stack of CT images, it is fast enough to use in real time to facilitate image registration of CT images for pelvic cancer treatment.

  12. Reformatted images improve the detection rate of acute traumatic subdural hematomas on brain CT compared with axial images alone.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, Timothy J; Mostertz, William; Matheus, Maria Gisele; Maass-Bolles, Genevieve; Sharma, Komal; Collins, Heather R; Kranz, Peter G

    2017-02-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDHs) comprise a significant percentage of missed intracranial hemorrhage on axial brain CT. SDH detection rates could be improved with the addition of reformatted images. Though performed at some centers, the potential additional diagnostic sensitivity of reformatted images has not yet been investigated. The purpose of our study is to determine if the addition of coronal and sagittal reformatted images to an axial brain CT increases the sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute traumatic SDH. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive brain CTs acquired for acute trauma that contained new SDHs. An equivalent number of normal brain CTs served as control. Paired sets of images were created for each case: (1) axial images only ("axial only") and (2) axial, coronal, sagittal images ("reformat added"). Three readers interpreted both the axial only and companion reformat added for each case, separated by 1 month. Reading times and SDH detection rates were compared. One hundred SDH and 100 negative examinations were collected. Sensitivity and specificity for the axial-only scans were 75.7 and 94.3 %, respectively, compared with 88.3 and 98.3 % for reformat added. There was a 24.3 % false negative (missed SDH) rate with axial-only scans versus 11.7 % with reformat added (p = <0.001). Median reader interpretation times were longer with the addition of reformatted images (125 versus 89 s), but this difference was not significant (p = 0.23). The addition of coronal and sagittal images in trauma brain CT resulted in improved sensitivity and specificity as well as a reduction in SDH false negatives by greater than 50 %. Reformatted images substantially reduce the number of missed SDHs compared with axial images alone.

  13. A framework for automated coronary artery tracking of low axial resolution multi slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Ferns, Gordon; Giles, John; Lewis, Emma

    2011-03-01

    Low axial resolution data such as multi-slice CT(MSCT) used for coronary artery disease screening must balance the potential loss in image clarity, detail and partial volume effects with the benefits to the patient such as faster acquisition time leading to lower dose exposure. In addition, tracking of the coronary arteries can aid the location of objects contained within, thus helping to differentiate them from similar in appearance, difficult to discern neighbouring regions. A fully automated system has been developed to segment and track the main coronary arteries and visualize the results. Automated heart isolation is carried out for each slice of an MSCT image using active contour methods. Ascending aorta and artery root segmentation is performed using a combination of active contours, morphological operators and geometric analysis of coronary anatomy to identify a starting point for vessel tracking. Artery tracking and backtracking employs analysis of vessel position combined with segmented region shape analysis to obtain artery paths. Robust, accurate threshold parameters are calculated for segmentation utilizing Gaussian Mixture Model fitting and analysis. The low axial resolution of our MSCT data sets, in combination with poor image clarity and noise presented the greatest challenge. Classification techniques such as shape analysis have been utilized to good effect and our results to date have shown that such deficiencies in the data can be overcome, further promoting the positive benefits to patients.

  14. The evaluation and comparison of kidney length obtained from axial cuts in spiral CT scan with its true length

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mehdi; Rahimi, Farshad; Tajadini, Mohammadhasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased size of kidney is the main symptom of pyelonephritis and renal ischemia in children. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan methods are the imaging methods for evaluating the urogenital system. The aim of this study is to compare the kidney length obtained from spiral CT scan with the true length obtained from multi-slice CT. Materials and Methods: From 100 patients 200 kidneys were examined in Alzahra Hospital in 2012. Multi-slice CT was used to obtain coronal and sagittal cuts to find the length of kidneys. Results: The mean values of true size of axial sections of the right and left kidneys were 108.37 ± 12.3 mm and 109.74 ± 13.6 mm, respectively. The mean difference of axial sections’ lengths in the right and left kidneys was 1.37 ± 1.22 mm. The mean values of length in the spiral CT scan of the right and left kidneys were 98.61 ± 15.8 mm and 103.11 ± 15.9 mm, respectively. The difference in the estimated size by multi-slice CT scan in oblique and axial images was significant (9.77 ± 1.19 mm and 6.63 ± 0.8 mm for the right and left kidneys, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The average size of both kidneys determined in axial images was smaller than the actual size. The estimation of kidney size in axial images is not reliable, and to obtain the actual size, it is required to have the coronal and sagittal cuts with proper quality, which could be achieved by multi-slice method. PMID:25709984

  15. Axial segmentation of lungs CT scan images using canny method and morphological operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noviana, Rina; Febriani, Rasal, Isram; Lubis, Eva Utari Cintamurni

    2017-08-01

    Segmentation is a very important topic in digital image process. It is found simply in varied fields of image analysis, particularly within the medical imaging field. Axial segmentation of lungs CT scan is beneficial in designation of abnormalities and surgery planning. It will do to ascertain every section within the lungs. The results of the segmentation are accustomed discover the presence of nodules. The method which utilized in this analysis are image cropping, image binarization, Canny edge detection and morphological operation. Image cropping is done so as to separate the lungs areas, that is the region of interest. Binarization method generates a binary image that has 2 values with grey level, that is black and white (ROI), from another space of lungs CT scan image. Canny method used for the edge detection. Morphological operation is applied to smoothing the lungs edge. The segmentation methodology shows an honest result. It obtains an awfully smooth edge. Moreover, the image background can also be removed in order to get the main focus, the lungs.

  16. Detection of Renal Stones on Portal Venous Phase CT: Comparison of Thin Axial and Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Michael T; Lee, Justin S; Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-12-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the sensitivity of thin axial and coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) images for the detection of renal stones on contrast-enhanced CT performed in the portal venous phase. This retrospective study included 72 patients, 59 of whom had at least one renal stone, who underwent unenhanced CT immediately followed by contrast-enhanced CT in the portal venous phase. Two abdominal imaging fellowship-trained radiologists independently recorded the number of stones on both thin (1-1.50 mm) axial and 5-mm coronal MIP images in the portal venous phase. The reference standard was determined by consensus review of the thin axial unenhanced images. Reviewer sensitivity was calculated and categorized by stone diameter. One hundred forty-eight stones were present; the mean number of stones per patient was 2.5 (SD, 2.7). The mean stone size was 2.5 mm (SD, 2.7). The sensitivity of thin axial images was 89.9%, 99.0%, and 100.0% for reviewer 1 and 83.1%, 98.0%, and 100.0% for reviewer 2 for all stones, stones ≥ 2 mm, and stones ≥ 3 mm, respectively. The sensitivity of coronal MIP images was 86.5%, 96.2%, and 100.0% for reviewer 1 and 79.0%, 91.4%, and 96.6% for reviewer 2 for all stones, stones ≥ 2 mm, and stones ≥ 3 mm, respectively. Thin axial images are highly sensitive for the detection of renal stones ≥ 2 mm on portal venous phase CT. Coronal MIP images do not improve renal stone detection over thin axial images.

  17. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (<1 years old) with CHD undergoing 128-slice CT prospective ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to cardiac MRI for the detection of cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, David J; Lavelle, Lisa P; Gibney, Brian; O'Donohoe, Rory L; Rémy-Jardin, Martine; Dodd, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial chest CT compared with cardiac MRI for cardiomyopathies. The standard axial 64-slice chest CTs of 49 patients with cardiomyopathies and 27 controls were blindly assessed for the presence of a cardiomyopathy by two independent readers. Qualitative and quantitative analysis included assessment of: (i) interatrial septal thickness, (ii) left atrial diameter, (iii) myocardial hypertrophy, thinning or fat, (iv) myocardial and papillary muscle calcification, (v) papillary muscle thickness, (vi) calcified coronary artery segments, (vii) left ventricular (LV) diameter, (viii) interventricular septal thickness and (ix) right ventricular diameters. Cardiac MRI was the gold standard. There were 21 (42.9%) dilated, 16 (32.7%) hypertrophic, 8 (16.3%) ischaemic and 4 other (8.2%) (LV non-compaction × 2, amyloid, idiopathic restrictive) patients with cardiomyopathies. An LV diameter of 47 mm, interventricular septal thickness of 14 mm and coronary artery/papillary muscle calcification on axial chest CT best distinguished dilated, hypertrophic and ischaemic cardiomyopathies from controls, respectively; kappa = 0.45 (moderate interobserver agreement). The sensitivity (95% confidence interval), specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values (95% confidence interval) and diagnostic accuracy of chest CT in diagnosing cardiomyopathies were 68% (52-83), 100%, 100%, 66% (55-85) and 80%, respectively. Cardiomyopathies may be detected on standard chest CT with good sensitivity and high specificity. It is useful to assess for an underlying cardiomyopathy on standard chest CT, especially in a patient with unexplained dyspnoea.

  19. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to cardiac MRI for the detection of cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Gibney, Brian; O'Donohoe, Rory L; Rémy-Jardin, Martine; Dodd, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial chest CT compared with cardiac MRI for cardiomyopathies. Methods: The standard axial 64-slice chest CTs of 49 patients with cardiomyopathies and 27 controls were blindly assessed for the presence of a cardiomyopathy by two independent readers. Qualitative and quantitative analysis included assessment of: (i) interatrial septal thickness, (ii) left atrial diameter, (iii) myocardial hypertrophy, thinning or fat, (iv) myocardial and papillary muscle calcification, (v) papillary muscle thickness, (vi) calcified coronary artery segments, (vii) left ventricular (LV) diameter, (viii) interventricular septal thickness and (ix) right ventricular diameters. Cardiac MRI was the gold standard. Results: There were 21 (42.9%) dilated, 16 (32.7%) hypertrophic, 8 (16.3%) ischaemic and 4 other (8.2%) (LV non-compaction × 2, amyloid, idiopathic restrictive) patients with cardiomyopathies. An LV diameter of 47 mm, interventricular septal thickness of 14 mm and coronary artery/papillary muscle calcification on axial chest CT best distinguished dilated, hypertrophic and ischaemic cardiomyopathies from controls, respectively; kappa = 0.45 (moderate interobserver agreement). The sensitivity (95% confidence interval), specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values (95% confidence interval) and diagnostic accuracy of chest CT in diagnosing cardiomyopathies were 68% (52–83), 100%, 100%, 66% (55–85) and 80%, respectively. Conclusion: Cardiomyopathies may be detected on standard chest CT with good sensitivity and high specificity. Advances in knowledge: It is useful to assess for an underlying cardiomyopathy on standard chest CT, especially in a patient with unexplained dyspnoea. PMID:26670156

  1. Combined Electrocardiography- and Respiratory-Triggered CT of the Lung to Reduce Respiratory Misregistration Artifacts between Imaging Slabs in Free-Breathing Children: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. Materials and Methods In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Conclusion Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children. PMID:28860904

  2. Combined Electrocardiography- and Respiratory-Triggered CT of the Lung to Reduce Respiratory Misregistration Artifacts between Imaging Slabs in Free-Breathing Children: Initial Experience.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months-8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children.

  3. Prevalence of CT features of axial spondyloarthritis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    De Kock, Isabelle; Hindryckx, Pieter; De Vos, Martine; Delrue, Louke; Verstraete, Koenraad; Jans, Lennart

    2017-05-01

    Background The sacroiliac joint and spine are seen on abdominal computed tomography (CT) and may show structural lesions as part of spondyloarthritis. Purpose To determine the prevalence of CT features of spondyloarthritis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Material and Methods A retrospective study of structural lesions of spondyloarthritis on abdominal CT was performed. The sacroiliac joints and spine of 120 patients were studied: study group I consisted of 40 patients with known CD and inflammatory back pain, group II involved 40 patients with CD without inflammatory back pain, and group III consisted of 40 patients without known joint or inflammatory bowel disease. Recorded CT features included sclerosis, erosions or ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, enthesopathy, spinal syndesmophytes, and costovertebral joint lesions. Results CT showed structural lesions of the sacroiliac joints in 19/40 (48%) patients with CD and inflammatory back pain (sclerosis [n = 14; 35%], erosions [n = 14; 35%], ankylosis [n = 3; 8%]), in 8/40 (8%) patients with CD without inflammatory back pain (sclerosis [n = 3; 8%], erosions [n = 4; 10%], ankylosis [n = 3; 8%]), and in 3/40 (8%) patients without known joint or bowel disease (sclerosis [n = 2; 5%], ankylosis [n = 1; 3%]). Syndesmophytes were exclusively seen in group I (n = 6; 15%). Conclusion CT of the abdomen in patients with CD and inflammatory back pain shows structural lesions of the sacroiliac joint, entheses, or spine in almost half of the patients. Awareness and knowledge of these findings may guide the referring clinician to further clinical evaluation, imaging, and biomarker evaluation of the disease.

  4. Atlas of axial, sagittal and coronal anatomy with CT and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Christoforidis, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book correlates CT scans and nuclear magnetic resonance images with cross sections of all parts of the body-head and neck, thorax, abdomen, male and female pelvis and extremities. Cross sections are fixed, and images are made from the sections to provide exact section-to-scan correlation. Shows all three cross-sectional axes. Includes selected pathologic cases to demonstrate technique.

  5. ECG-triggered non-enhanced MR angiography of peripheral arteries in comparison to DSA in patients with peripheral artery occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Partovi, Sasan; Rasmus, Matthias; Schulte, Anja-Carina; Rengier, Fabian; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Aschwanden, Markus; Karmonik, Christof; Bongartz, Geog; Bilecen, Deniz

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate peripheral non-enhanced-MRA (NE-MRA) acquired with a 3D Turbo Spin Echo sequence with electrocardiographt (ECG) triggering in comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) as the gold standard in symptomatic peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) patients. This IRB approved prospective study included 23 PAOD patients from whom three patients had to be excluded. The remaining 20 subjects were included in the analysis (15 male; mean age 62.4 ± 15.3 years). The patients first underwent DSA followed by NE-MRA on a 1.5-T whole body scanner within 24 h after the DSA study. A NATIVE (Non-contrast Angiography of the Arteries and Veins) SPACE (Sampling Perfection with Application Optimized Contrast by using different flip angle Evolution) sequence at four levels (pelvis, upper leg, knee region and lower leg) was acquired. For evaluation purposes, subtracted standardized MIP (maximum intensity projection) images were generated from the NE-MRA data sets. Qualitative assessment of NE-MRA images in reference to the corresponding DSA images, as well as blinded stenosis grading of preselected segments in NE-MRA images were performed by two experienced readers. Image quality in 95 corresponding arterial segments was rated from 1 (good) to 4 (inadequate) directly comparing the NE-MRA with the corresponding DSA segment as the gold standard. Blinded stenosis grading consisted of 66 preselected stenoses rated from 1 (<10 %) to 4 (>90 %) in NE-MRA which were compared to the grade in the corresponding DSA. The mean image quality of NE-MRA in comparison to DSA was 2.7 ± 1.1 (reader 1) and 3.0 ± 1.0 (reader 2). The kappa value indicating interobserver agreement was 0.34; readers 1 and 2 rated the image quality as good in 21 % and 3 %, sufficient in 19 % and 41 %, limited in 29 % and 14 % and inadequate in 31 % and 42 %, respectively. Stenosis graduation revealed significantly higher grades in NE-MRA (reader 1: 3.0

  6. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) Findings in an Unusual Case of Multiple Myeloma Presenting with a Large Extra-Axial Intracranial Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Sevin; Ayaz, Ümit Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background We aimed to present unusual cranial FDG PET/CT findings of a 56-year-old female with multiple myeloma (MM). Case Report Plain CT images revealed a lytic lesion in the right parietal bone, filled with an oval-shaped, large, extra-axial, extradural, intracranial mass which measured 75×75×40 mm and had smooth borders. The right parietal lobe was compressed by the mass. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the mass lesion was 8.94 on FDG PET/CT images. Multiple lytic lesions with an increased uptake were also detected in other calvarial bones, in several vertebras and in the proximal left femur. After seven months, a control FDG PET/CT following radiotherapy and chemotherapy revealed almost complete regression of the right parietal extra-axial mass lesion. The number, size and metabolism of lytic lesions in other bones also decreased. Conclusions FDG PET/CT was useful for an initial evaluation of MM lesions and was effective in monitoring the response of these lesions to therapy. PMID:28058074

  7. First performance evaluation of software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine at CT.

    PubMed

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Wichmann, Julian L; Kaup, Moritz; Fischer, Sebastian; Kerl, J Matthias; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J; Bauer, Ralf W

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine on CT in terms of accuracy, potential for time savings and workflow improvement. 77 patients (28 women, 49 men, mean age 65.3±14.4 years) with known or suspected spinal disorders (degenerative spine disease n=32; disc herniation n=36; traumatic vertebral fractures n=9) underwent 64-slice MDCT with thin-slab reconstruction. Time for automatic labeling of the thoracolumbar spine and reconstruction of double-angulated axial images of the pathological vertebrae was compared with manually performed reconstruction of anatomical aligned axial images. Reformatted images of both reconstruction methods were assessed by two observers regarding accuracy of symmetric depiction of anatomical structures. In 33 cases double-angulated axial images were created in 1 vertebra, in 28 cases in 2 vertebrae and in 16 cases in 3 vertebrae. Correct automatic labeling was achieved in 72 of 77 patients (93.5%). Errors could be manually corrected in 4 cases. Automatic labeling required 1min in average. In cases where anatomical aligned axial images of 1 vertebra were created, reconstructions made by hand were significantly faster (p<0.05). Automatic reconstruction was time-saving in cases of 2 and more vertebrae (p<0.05). Both reconstruction methods revealed good image quality with excellent inter-observer agreement. The evaluated software for automatic labeling and anatomically aligned, double-angulated axial image reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine on CT is time-saving when reconstructions of 2 and more vertebrae are performed. Checking results of automatic labeling is necessary to prevent errors in labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improved detection of bone metastases from lung cancer in the thoracic cage using 5- and 1-mm axial images versus a new CT software generating rib unfolding images: comparison with standard ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Homann, Georg; Mustafa, Deedar F; Ditt, Hendrik; Spengler, Werner; Kopp, Hans-Georg; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the performance of a dedicated computed tomography (CT) software called "bone reading" generating rib unfolded images for improved detection of rib metastases in patients with lung cancer in comparison to readings of 5- and 1-mm axial CT images and (18)F-Fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). Ninety consecutive patients who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and chest CT scanning between 2012 and 2014 at our institution were analyzed retrospectively. Chest CT scans with 5- and 1-mm slice thickness were interpreted blindly and separately focused on the detection of rib metastases (location, number, cortical vs. medullary, and osteoblastic vs. sclerotic). Subsequent image analysis of unfolded 1 mm-based CT rib images was performed. For all three data sets the reading time was registered. Finally, results were compared to those of FDG-PET. Validation was based on FDG-PET positivity for osteolytic and mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic focal rib lesions and follow-up for sclerotic PET-negative lesions. A total of 47 metastatic rib lesions were found on FDG-PET/CT plus another 30 detected by CT bone reading and confirmed by follow-up CT. Twenty-nine lesions were osteolytic, 14 were mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic, and 34 were sclerotic. On a patient-based analysis, CT (5 mm), CT (1 mm), and CT (1-mm bone reading) yielded a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 76.5/97.3/93, 81.3/97.3/94, and 88.2/95.9/92, respectively. On segment-based (unfolded rib) analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the three evaluations were 47.7/95.7/67, 59.5/95.8/77, and 94.8/88.2/92, respectively. Reading time for 5 mm/1 mm axial images and unfolded images was 40.5/50.7/21.56 seconds, respectively. The use of unfolded rib images in patients with lung cancer improves sensitivity and specificity of rib metastasis detection in comparison to 5- and 1-mm CT slice reading. Moreover, it may reduce the reading time. Copyright © 2015 AUR

  9. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  10. SU-D-9A-04: Brain PET/CT Imaging On a Scanner with a Large Axial Field-Of-View

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Gerbaudo, V; Hamberg, L; Seaver, K; Kijewski, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large axial field-of-view (FOV) PET/CT scanners are valued for high sensitivity. Brain PET image quality may depend on the head position within the FOV. We investigated the precision of activity estimation for brain PET imaging when the brain was positioned at the end (END) and in the middle (CEN) of the FOV. The additional CT dose for the CEN position was recorded. Methods: An image quality (Jaszczak) phantom and a striatal phantom were filled with F-18 and positioned in END and CEN locations. For each phantom and each location, we acquired a ∼1-hr listmode PET, rebinned the data into 10 frames with equal number of coincidence events, and reconstructed each frame using an iterative algorithm. For the striatal phantom, END and CEN were compared by drawing on each image three regions of interest (ROI) in axially separated uniform areas. The standard deviation of the activity estimation within each ROI was averaged over the 10 images. The coefficient of variation (CV) for activity estimation was calculated at each position. Image quality was assessed by inspecting the resolution bar pattern in the Jaszczak phantom at two different head positions. Results: The CV was the lowest for ROIs near the center of the FOV. For slices near the end, not only was the CV highest, but also the resolution pattern was degraded. CTDIvol summarized in the dose report indicated that the CT dose was ∼ 10% higher for CEN as compared to END position. Conclusion: Positioning the brain in the middle of the FOV in a large FOV PET/CT scanner allows more precise measurement of tracer uptake and better image quality at the cost of increased CT dose. For the end location longer scan times may minimize image quality degradation without any additional CT dose.

  11. Left Atrial Area and Right Ventricle Dimensions in Non-gated Axial Chest CT can Differentiate Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease from Other Causes.

    PubMed

    Katikireddy, Chandra K; Singh, Manmeet; Muhyieddeen, Kamil; Acharya, Tushar; Ambrose, John A; Samim, Arang

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether axial non-gated CT can distinguish World Health Organization Group 2 pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease) from non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. The study was performed to identity imaging parameters in non-gated chest CT that differentiate Group 2 from non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. Among 158 patients who underwent right heart catheterization for evaluation of pulmonary hypertension, 112 had sufficient data and chest CT for review. Invasive hemodynamic data and numerous variables obtained from axial CT images (maximum diameters of main, right, left pulmonary arteries, ascending aorta, main pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio, right atrial diameter, left atrial area and right ventricular size) were collected. CT variables were validated against hemodynamic data to identify parameters that would allow to differentiate pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (Group 2) from non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. Based on right heart catheterization data, we identified 53 patients with Group 2 pulmonary hypertension, 50 patients with non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension, and 9 subjects with no pulmonary hypertension. In patients with a dilated pulmonary artery (n = 84), the ROC curve for left atrial area (area under the ROC curve 0.76 ± 0.06) independently distinguished patients with Group 2 pulmonary hypertension (n = 42) from patients with non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension (n = 42). A dilated left atrium (>20 mm(2)) in combination with a normal right ventriuclar size had a sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 94% for Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. In patients with a dilated pulmonary artery on chest CT, left atrial area and right ventricular dimensions may aid to diagnose pulmonary hypertension and to distinguish underlying cardiac disease from other causes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children using axial volumetric 320-detector row CT compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16- detector row CT acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Kroft, Lucia J M; Roelofs, Joost J H; Geleijns, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Recently a 320-detector-row CT (MDCT) scanner has become available that allows axial volumetric scanning of a 16-cm-long range (50 cm field of view) in a single 0.35-s rotation. For imaging neonates and small children, volume scanning is potentially of great advantage as the entire scan range can be acquired in 0.35 s, which can reduce motion artefacts and may reduce the need for sedation in clinical CT imaging. Also, because there is no over-ranging associated with axial volumetric scanning, this may reduce patient radiation dose. To evaluate, by means of a phantom study, scan time and patient dose for thoracic imaging in neonates and small children by using axial cone-beam and helical fan-beam MDCT acquisitions. Paediatric imaging protocols were assessed for a 320-MDCT volumetric scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba, Otawara, Japan). The 320-MDCT scanner allows for cone-beam acquisitions with coverage up to 160 mm, but it also allows for helical fan-beam acquisitions in 64-, 32-, or 16-MDCT modes. The acquisition configurations that were evaluated were 320 x 0.5 mm, 240 x 0.5 mm, and 160 x 0.5 mm for axial volumetric scanning, and 64 x 0.5 mm, 32 x 0.5 mm, and 16 x 0.5 mm for helical scanning. Dose assessment was performed for clinically relevant paediatric angiographic or chest/mediastinum acquisition protocols with tube voltages of 80 or 100 kVp and tube currents between 40 and 80 mA. Scan time was 0.35 s for 320-MDCT acquisitions, scan times varied between 1.9 s and 8.3 s for helical acquisitions. Dose savings varying between 18% and 40% were achieved with axial volumetric scanning as compared to helical scanning (for 320- versus 64-MDCT at 160 mm and 80 kVp, and for 320- versus 16-MDCT at 80 mm and 100 kVp, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in radiation dose was found for axial 320-MDCT volumetric scanning compared to helical 64-, 32-, and 16-MDCT scanning. Axial thoracic CT of neonates and small children with volumetric 320-MDCT can be performed

  13. Evaluation of reperfused myocardial infarction by low-dose multidetector computed tomography using prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-triggering: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gweon, Hye Mi; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Min; Hong, Yoo Jin; Rim, Se-Joong; Hong, Bum Ki; Min, Phil Ki; Yoon, Young Won; Kwon, Hyuck Moon

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the potential of prospective electrocardiography (ECG)- gated 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for evaluation of myocardial enhancement, infarct size, and stent patency after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting in patients with myocardial infarction. Seventeen patients who were admitted with acute myocardial infarction were examined with prospective ECG-gated 64-slice cardiac MDCT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after reperfusion using PCI with stenting. Cardiac MDCT was performed with two different phases: arterial and delayed phases. We evaluated the stent patency on the arterial phase, and nonviable myocardium on the delayed phase of computed tomography (CT) image, and they were compared with the results from the delayed MR images. Total mean radiation dose was 7.7 +/- 0.5 mSv on the two phases of CT images. All patients except one showed good patency of the stent at the culprit lesion on the arterial phase CT images. All patients had hyperenhanced area on the delayed phase CT images, which correlated well with those on the delayed phase MR images, with a mean difference of 1.6% (20 +/- 10% vs. 22 +/- 10%, r = 0.935, p = 0.10). Delayed MR images had a better contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than delayed CT images (27.1 +/- 17.8% vs. 4.3 +/- 2.1%, p < 0.001). Prospective ECG-gated 64-slice MDCT provides the potential to evaluate myocardial viability on delayed phase as well as for stent patency on arterial phase with an acceptable radiation dose after PCI with stenting in patients with myocardial infarction.

  14. 18F-NaF PET/CT in Extensive Melorheostosis of the Axial and Appendicular Skeleton With Soft-Tissue Involvement.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Jha, Smita; Bhattacharyya, Timothy; Millo, Corina; Tu, Tsang-Wei; Bagci, Ulas; Marias, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-03-17

    Melorheostosis is a rare, nonhereditary, benign, sclerotic bone dysplasia with no sex predilection, typically occurring in late childhood or early adulthood, which can lead to substantial functional morbidity, depending on the sites of involvement. We report on a patient with extensive melorheostosis in the axial and appendicular skeleton, as well as in the soft tissues, who was evaluated with whole-body F-NaF PET/CT scan. All melorheostotic lesions of the skeleton and of the ossified soft-tissue masses demonstrated intensely increased F-NaF activity, suggesting the application of this modality in assessing and monitoring the disease activity.

  15. SU-E-I-15: Quantitative Evaluation of Dose Distributions From Axial, Helical and Cone-Beam CT Imaging by Measurement Using a Two-Dimensional Diode-Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, M; Aldoohan, S; Sonnad, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate quantitatively dose distributions from helical, axial and cone-beam CT clinical imaging techniques by measurement using a two-dimensional (2D) diode-array detector. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from selected clinical protocols used for axial, helical and cone-beam CT imaging were measured using a diode-array detector (MapCheck2). The MapCheck2 is composed from solid state diode detectors that are arranged in horizontal and vertical lines with a spacing of 10 mm. A GE-Light-Speed CT-simulator was used to acquire axial and helical CT images and a kV on-board-imager integrated with a Varian TrueBeam-STx machine was used to acquire cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Results: The dose distributions from axial, helical and cone-beam CT were non-uniform over the region-of-interest with strong spatial and angular dependence. In axial CT, a large dose gradient was measured that decreased from lateral sides to the middle of the phantom due to large superficial dose at the side of the phantom in comparison with larger beam attenuation at the center. The dose decreased at the superior and inferior regions in comparison to the center of the phantom in axial CT. An asymmetry was found between the right-left or superior-inferior sides of the phantom which possibly to angular dependence in the dose distributions. The dose level and distribution varied from one imaging technique into another. For the pelvis technique, axial CT deposited a mean dose of 3.67 cGy, helical CT deposited a mean dose of 1.59 cGy, and CBCT deposited a mean dose of 1.62 cGy. Conclusions: MapCheck2 provides a robust tool to measure directly 2D-dose distributions for CT imaging with high spatial resolution detectors in comparison with ionization chamber that provides a single point measurement or an average dose to the phantom. The dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 consider medium heterogeneity and can represent specific patient dose.

  16. Coronary Artery Axial Plaque Stress and its Relationship With Lesion Geometry: Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics to Coronary CT Angiography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gilwoo; Lee, Joo Myung; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jun-Bean; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Otake, Hiromasa; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Nam, Chang-Wook; Shin, Eun-Seok; Taylor, Charles A; Koo, Bon-Kwon

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the hemodynamic force acting on plaque and to investigate its relationship with lesion geometry. Coronary plaque rupture occurs when plaque stress exceeds plaque strength. Computational fluid dynamics was applied to 114 lesions (81 patients) from coronary computed tomography angiography. The axial plaque stress (APS) was computed by extracting the axial component of hemodynamic stress acting on stenotic lesions, and the axial lesion asymmetry was assessed by the luminal radius change over length (radius gradient [RG]). Lesions were divided into upstream-dominant (upstream RG > downstream RG) and downstream-dominant lesions (upstream RG < downstream RG) according to the RG. Thirty-three lesions (28.9%) showed net retrograde axial plaque force. Upstream APS linearly increased as lesion severity increased, whereas downstream APS exhibited a concave function for lesion severity. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.274, p = 0.003) between APS and lesion length. The pressure gradient, computed tomography-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT), and wall shear stress were consistently higher in upstream segments, regardless of the lesion asymmetry. However, APS was higher in the upstream segment of upstream-dominant lesions (11,371.96 ± 5,575.14 dyne/cm(2) vs. 6,878.14 ± 4,319.51 dyne/cm(2), p < 0.001), and in the downstream segment of downstream-dominant lesions (7,681.12 ± 4,556.99 dyne/cm(2) vs. 11,990.55 ± 5,556.64 dyne/cm(2), p < 0.001). Although there were no differences in FFRCT, % diameter stenosis, and wall shear stress pattern, the distribution of APS was different between upstream- and downstream-dominant lesions. APS uniquely characterizes the stenotic segment and has a strong relationship with lesion geometry. Clinical application of these hemodynamic and geometric indices may be helpful to assess the future risk of plaque rupture and to determine treatment strategy for patients with coronary artery

  17. The impact of x-ray tube stabilization on localized radiation dose in axial CT scans: initial results in CTDI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2016-10-01

    Rise, fall, and stabilization of the x-ray tube output occur immediately before and after data acquisition on some computed tomography (CT) scanners and are believed to contribute additional dose to anatomy facing the x-ray tube when it powers on or off. In this study, we characterized the dose penalty caused by additional radiation exposure during the rise, stabilization, and/or fall time (referred to as overscanning). A 32 cm CT dose-index (CTDI) phantom was scanned on three CT scanners: GE Healthcare LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare Discovery CT750 HD, and Siemens Somatom Definition Flash. Radiation exposure was detected for various x-ray tube start acquisition angles using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed in the peripheral chamber hole at the phantom’s 12 o’clock position. Scan rotation time, ionization chamber location, phantom diameter, and phantom centering were varied to quantify their effects on the dose penalty caused by overscanning. For 1 s single, axial rotations, CTDI at the 12 o’clock chamber position (CTDI100, 12:00) was 6.1%, 4.0%, and 4.4% higher when the start angle of the x-ray tube was aligned at the top of the gantry (12 o’clock) versus when the start angle was aligned at 9 o’clock for the Siemens Flash, GE CT750 HD, and GE VCT scanner, respectively. For the scanners’ fastest rotation times (0.285 s for the Siemens and 0.4 s for both GE scanners), the dose penalties increased to 22.3%, 10.7%, and 10.5%, respectively, suggesting a trade-off between rotation speed and the dose penalty from overscanning. In general, overscanning was shown to have a greater radiation dose impact for larger diameter phantoms, shorter rotation times, and to peripheral phantom locations. Future research is necessary to determine an appropriate method for incorporating the localized dose penalty from overscanning into standard dose metrics, as well as to assess the impact on organ dose.

  18. Quantitative estimation of a ratio of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid volume to brain volume based on segmentation of CT images in patients with extra-axial hematoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Kurpad, Shekar; Mueller, Wade

    2017-02-01

    Background Diminishing volume of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with space-occupying masses have been attributed to unfavorable outcome associated with reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure and subsequent brain ischemia. Objective The objective of this article is to employ a ratio of CSF volume to brain volume for longitudinal assessment of space-volume relationships in patients with extra-axial hematoma and to determine variability of the ratio among patients with different types and stages of hematoma. Patients and methods In our retrospective study, we reviewed 113 patients with surgical extra-axial hematomas. We included 28 patients (age 61.7 +/- 17.7 years; 19 males, nine females) with an acute epidural hematoma (EDH) ( n = 5) and subacute/chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) ( n = 23). We excluded 85 patients, in order, due to acute SDH ( n = 76), concurrent intraparenchymal pathology ( n = 6), and bilateral pathology ( n = 3). Noncontrast CT images of the head were obtained using a CT scanner (2004 GE LightSpeed VCT CT system, tube voltage 140 kVp, tube current 310 mA, 5 mm section thickness) preoperatively, postoperatively (3.8 ± 5.8 hours from surgery), and at follow-up clinic visit (48.2 ± 27.7 days after surgery). Each CT scan was loaded into an OsiriX (Pixmeo, Switzerland) workstation to segment pixels based on radiodensity properties measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Based on HU values from -30 to 100, brain, CSF spaces, vascular structures, hematoma, and/or postsurgical fluid were segregated from bony structures, and subsequently hematoma and/or postsurgical fluid were manually selected and removed from the images. The remaining images represented overall brain volume-containing only CSF spaces, vascular structures, and brain parenchyma. Thereafter, the ratio between the total number of voxels representing CSF volume (based on values between 0 and 15 HU) to the total number of voxels

  19. Accuracy of finite element analyses of CT scans in predictions of vertebral failure patterns under axial compression and anterior flexion.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Timothy M; DelMonaco, Alex M; Morgan, Elise F

    2016-01-25

    Finite element (FE) models built from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans can provide patient-specific estimates of bone strength and fracture risk in the spine. While prior studies demonstrate accurate QCT-based FE predictions of vertebral stiffness and strength, the accuracy of the predicted failure patterns, i.e., the locations where failure occurs within the vertebra and the way in which the vertebra deforms as failure progresses, is less clear. This study used digital volume correlation (DVC) analyses of time-lapse micro-computed tomography (μCT) images acquired during mechanical testing (compression and anterior flexion) of thoracic spine segments (T7-T9, n=28) to measure displacements occurring throughout the T8 vertebral body at the ultimate point. These displacements were compared to those simulated by QCT-based FE analyses of T8. We hypothesized that the FE predictions would be more accurate when the boundary conditions are based on measurements of pressure distributions within intervertebral discs of similar level of disc degeneration vs. boundary conditions representing rigid platens. The FE simulations captured some of the general, qualitative features of the failure patterns; however, displacement errors ranged 12-279%. Contrary to our hypothesis, no differences in displacement errors were found when using boundary conditions representing measurements of disc pressure vs. rigid platens. The smallest displacement errors were obtained using boundary conditions that were measured directly by DVC at the T8 endplates. These findings indicate that further work is needed to develop methods of identifying physiological loading conditions for the vertebral body, for the purpose of achieving robust, patient-specific FE analyses of failure mechanisms.

  20. Accuracy of finite element analyses of CT scans in predictions of vertebral failure patterns under axial compression and anterior flexion

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Timothy M.; DelMonaco, Alex M.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2016-01-01

    Finite element (FE) models built from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans can provide patient-specific estimates of bone strength and fracture risk in the spine. While prior studies demonstrate accurate QCT-based FE predictions of vertebral stiffness and strength, the accuracy of the predicted failure patterns, i.e., the locations where failure occurs within the vertebra and the way in which the vertebra deforms as failure progresses, is less clear. This study used digital volume correlation (DVC) analyses of time-lapse micro-computed tomography (µCT) images acquired during mechanical testing (compression and anterior flexion) of thoracic spine segments (T7–T9, n = 28) to measure displacements occurring throughout the T8 vertebral body at the ultimate point. These displacements were compared to those simulated by QCT-based FE analyses of T8. We hypothesized that the FE predictions would be more accurate when the boundary conditions are based on measurements of pressure distributions within intervertebral discs of similar level of disc degeneration vs. boundary conditions representing rigid platens. The FE simulations captured some of the general, qualitative features of the failure patterns; however, displacement errors ranged 12–279%. Contrary to our hypothesis, no differences in displacement errors were found when using boundary conditions representing measurements of disc pressure vs. rigid platens. The smallest displacement errors were obtained using boundary conditions that were measured directly by DVC at the T8 endplates. These findings indicate that further work is needed to develop methods of identifying physiological loading conditions for the vertebral body, for the purpose of achieving robust, patient-specific FE analyses of failure mechanisms. PMID:26792288

  1. In vivo three-dimensional intervertebral kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine during seated axial rotation and lateral bending via a fluoroscopy-to-CT registration approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Wang, Ting-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Jung; Shih, Ting-Fang

    2014-10-17

    Accurate measurement of the coupled intervertebral motions is helpful for understanding the etiology and diagnosis of relevant diseases, and for assessing the subsequent treatment. No study has reported the in vivo, dynamic and three-dimensional (3D) intervertebral motion of the cervical spine during active axial rotation (AR) and lateral bending (LB) in the sitting position. The current study fills the gap by measuring the coupled intervertebral motions of the subaxial cervical spine in ten asymptomatic young adults in an upright sitting position during active head LB and AR using a volumetric model-based 2D-to-3D registration method via biplane fluoroscopy. Subject-specific models of the individual vertebrae were derived from each subject's CT data and were registered to the fluoroscopic images for determining the 3D poses of the subaxial vertebrae that were used to obtain the intervertebral kinematics. The averaged ranges of motion to one side (ROM) during AR at C3/C4, C4/C5, C5/C6, and C6/C7 were 4.2°, 4.6°, 3.0° and 1.3°, respectively. The corresponding values were 6.4°, 5.2°, 6.1° and 6.1° during LB. Intervertebral LB (ILB) played an important role in both AR and LB tasks of the cervical spine, experiencing greater ROM than intervertebral AR (IAR) (ratio of coupled motion (IAR/ILB): 0.23-0.75 in LB, 0.34-0.95 in AR). Compared to the AR task, the ranges of ILB during the LB task were significantly greater at C5/6 (p=0.008) and C6/7 (p=0.001) but the range of IAR was significantly smaller at C4/5 (p=0.02), leading to significantly smaller ratios of coupled motions at C4/5 (p=0.0013), C5/6 (p<0.001) and C6/7 (p=0.0037). The observed coupling characteristics of the intervertebral kinematics were different from those in previous studies under discrete static conditions in a supine position without weight-bearing, suggesting that the testing conditions likely affect the kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine. While C1 and C2 were not included owing to

  2. Rare and challenging extra-axial brain lesions: CT and MRI findings with clinico-radiological differential diagnosis and pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapıcıer, Özlem; Onat, Elif; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Urgun, Kamran; Kılıç, Türker

    2014-01-01

    There are many kinds of extra-axial brain tumors and tumor-like lesions, and definitive diagnosis is complicated in some cases. In this pictorial essay, we present rare and challenging extra-axial brain lesions including neuroenteric cyst, primary leptomeningeal melanomatosis, isolated dural neurosarcoidosis, intradiploic epidermoid cyst, ruptured dermoid cyst, intraventricular cavernoma, and cavernous hemangioma of the skull with imaging findings and clinico-radiological differential diagnosis, including the pathologic correlation. Familiarity with these entities may improve diagnostic accuracy and patient management. PMID:25010368

  3. Imaging anatomy of the head and spine. A photographic color atlas of MRI, CT, gross and microscopic anatomy in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzlein, H.N.; Murtagh, F.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a correlative display of horizontal, coronal, and sagittal sections of the head and spine with a wide array of MRI images, CT scans, and conventional radiographs. Superb full color illustrations of serial dissections emphasize such clinically important areas as the temporal bone, orbit, and cervical spine. The MRI images included are state of the art, and only the highest resolution CT scans appear.

  4. Non-invasive prediction of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses by contrast density difference in coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michaela M; Dey, Damini; Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan; Schmid, Jasmin; Schuhbaeck, Annika

    2015-08-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) allows the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease. However, its ability to predict the hemodynamic significance of stenoses is limited. We assessed differences in plaque characteristics and contrast density difference between hemodynamically significant and non-significant stenoses, as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). Lesion characteristics of 59 consecutive patients (72 lesions) in whom invasive FFR was performed in at least one coronary artery with moderate to high-grade stenoses in coronary CTA were evaluated by two experienced readers. Coronary CTA data sets were acquired on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner using retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition or prospectively ECG-triggered axial acquisition mode. Plaque volume and composition (non-calcified, calcified), remodeling index as well as contrast density difference (defined as the percentage decline in luminal CT attenuation/cross-sectional area over the lesion) were assessed using a semi-automatic software tool (Autoplaq). Additionally, the transluminal attenuation gradient (defined as the linear regression coefficient between intraluminal CT attenuation and length from the ostium) was determined. Differences in lesion characteristics between hemodynamically significant (invasively measured FFR ≤0.80) and non-significant lesions (FFR >0.80) were determined. Mean patient age was 64±11 years with 44 males (75%). 21 out of 72 coronary artery lesions (29%) were hemodynamically significant according to invasive FFR. Mean invasive FFR was 0.66±0.12 vs. 0.91±0.05 for hemodynamically significant versus non-significant lesions. Hemodynamically significant lesions showed a significantly greater percentage of non-calcified plaque compared to non-hemodynamically relevant lesions (51.3±15.3% vs. 43.6±16.5%, p=0.021). Contrast density difference was significantly increased in hemodynamically relevant lesions (26.0±20.2% vs

  5. Feasibility of low-dose contrast medium high pitch CT angiography for the combined evaluation of coronary, head and neck arteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yining; Xue, Huadan; Jin, Zhengyu; Kong, Lingyan; Cao, Jian; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of combined heart, head, and neck CT angiography (CTA) using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol, compared with single coronary CTA. 151 consecutive patients were prospectively included and randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 47) underwent combined heart, neck, and head CTA using prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral (Flash) scan protocol with a single-phase intravenous injection of iodinated contrast and saline flush; Group 2 (n = 51) underwent single coronary CTA with Flash scan protocol; and Group 3 (n = 53) underwent single coronary CTA with prospective sequence scan protocol. All patients were examined on a dual source CT (Definition FLASH). The image quality was determined for each CT study. Patients of scanning protocol Group 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant differences in age, sex, heart rates, and BMI. Evaluation of coronary artery image quality showed comparable results in the three scanning protocol groups on a per patient-based analysis. In group 1, image quality was found to be sufficient to be diagnostic in all arterial segments of carotid arteries. The mean dose-length product (DLP) for group 1 was 256.3±24.5 mGy×cm and was significantly higher in comparison with group 2 (93.4±19.9 mGy×cm; p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference of DLP between group 1 and group 3 (254.1±69.9 mGy×cm). The combined heart, neck, and head arteries scan using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol in 1 single examination resulted in an excellent opacification of the aorta, the carotid arteries, and the coronary arteries and provided a good image quality with low radiation dose.

  6. Myocardial ischemia detection with single-phase CT perfusion in symptomatic patients using high-pitch helical image acquisition technique.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Bernhard; Deseive, Simon; Rampp, Martin; Todica, Andrei; Wermke, Marc; Martinoff, Stefan; Massberg, Steffen; Reiser, Maximilian F; Becker, Hans-Christoph; Hausleiter, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) suffers from a reduced diagnostic accuracy in patients with heavily calcified coronary arteries or prior myocardial revascularisation due to artefacts caused by calcifications and stent material. CT myocardial perfusion imaging (CTMPI) yields high potential for the detection of myocardial ischemia and might help to overcome the above mentioned limitations. We analysed CT single-phase perfusion using high-pitch helical image acquisition technique in patients with prior myocardial revascularisation. Thirty-six patients with an indication for invasive coronary angiography (28 with coronary stents, 2 with coronary artery bypass grafts and 6 with both) were included in this prospective study at two study sites. All patients were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Stress CT images were obtained using a prospectively ECG-triggered single-phase high-pitch helical image acquisition technique. During stress the tracer for myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT imaging was administered. Rest CT images were acquired using prospectively ECG-triggered sequential CT. MP-SPECT imaging and invasive coronary angiography served as standard of reference. In this heavily diseased patient cohort CCTA alone showed a low overall diagnostic accuracy for detection of hemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenosis of only 31% on a per-patient base and 60% on a per-vessel base. Combining CCTA and CTMPI allowed for a significantly higher overall diagnostic accuracy of 78% on a per-patient base and 92% on a per-vessel base (p < 0.001). Mean radiation dose for stress CT scans was 0.9 mSv, mean radiation dose for rest CT scans was 5.0 mSv. In symptomatic patients with known coronary artery disease and prior myocardial revascularization combining CCTA and CTMPI showed significantly higher diagnostic accuracy in detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis when compared to CCTA alone.

  7. Axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sieper, Joachim; Braun, Jürgen; Dougados, Maxime; Baeten, Dominique

    2015-07-09

    The term axial spondyloarthritis covers both non-radiographic disease and radiographic disease (also known as ankylosing spondylitis). Some studies have been performed to investigate the prevalence of axial spondyloarthritis, although most are limited to patients with radiographic disease. A strong genetic association has been shown between axial spondyloarthritis and human leukocyte antigen-B27 (HLA-B27), but the pathogenetic role of HLA-B27 has not yet been clarified. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-17, IL-23 and downstream pathways also seem to be important - based on the good results of therapies directed against these molecules - but their exact role in the inflammatory process is also not yet clear. Elucidating the interaction between osteoproliferation and inflammation will be crucial for the prevention of long-term structural damage of the bone. The development of new criteria for classification, diagnosis and screening of patients with axial spondyloarthritis will enable earlier intervention for this chronic inflammatory disease. MRI has become an important tool for the early detection of axial spondyloarthritis. NSAIDs and TNF blockers are effective therapies, including in the early non-radiographic stage. Therapeutic blockade of IL-17 or IL-23 seems to be a promising new treatment option. Tools for measuring quality of life in axial spondyloarthritis have become relevant to assess the impact that the disease has on patients. These diagnostic and therapeutic advances will continue to change the management of axial spondyloarthritis, and new insights into the disease pathogenesis will hopefully accelerate this process. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/51b1af.

  8. Localization accuracy of AC-PC line and functional pallidal target using BRW stereotactic implementation system and axial CT scanning. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Rampini, P; Egidi, M; Zavanone, M; Orsi, M; Farabola, M; Sina, C

    1998-12-01

    Ventriculography is still considered an unavoidable step for functional target localization, even though this method is invasive and requires stereotactic rooms, orthogonal frames, and parallax-free X-ray equipment. In this experimental study, the authors investigated the feasibility of performing stereotactic lesions using a conventional, widely employed frame, such as the Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) apparatus, and computerized axial tomography (CAT) imaging. Five ex vivo models consisting of cadaveric brains enclose in a plastic shell were fixed in a BRW frame. A simple BRW implementation was used to ensure more symmetrical placement of the basal ring. Two-millimeter plastic balls were inserted at the level of the anterior (AC) and posterior commissures (PC) and at the target in the pallidus. Their final position was measured on the anatomical specimens and compared with Schaltenbrand Atlas maps. The error in estimating the length of the intercommissural line ranged from 0.5 mm to 2.0 mm, with a maximum backward angulation of four degrees in predicting the AC-PC plane. Upon dissection, in four out of five cases, the balls were found within the area of the pallidus defined by Laitinen for posteroventral pallidotomy. The authors conclude that anatomical identification of the AC-PC line and the pallidus target, using the BRW stereotactic system and CAT axial images alone offers sufficient accuracy. They suggest that functional neurosurgery for movement disorders could be safely and successfully carried out without ventriculography if neurophysiological monitoring is also employed.

  9. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... your provider should weigh this risk against the benefits of getting a correct diagnosis for a medical ...

  10. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  11. Axial superchargers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1944-01-01

    Improvements, however, have been attained which permit a shortening of the structure without any impairment of the efficiency. The axial supercharger has a better efficiency and a simpler design than the radial supercharger. The relatively narrow range in which it operates satisfactorily should not be a very disturbing factor for practical flight problems. The length of this type of supercharger may be reduced considerably if some impairment in the efficiency is permitted.

  12. Can Parameters Other than Minimal Axial Diameter in MRI and PET/CT Further Improve Diagnostic Accuracy for Equivocal Retropharyngeal Lymph Nodes in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Shun; Zhang, Guo-Yi; Chang, Chih-Han; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng; Yao, Wei-Jen; Chang, Yu-Kang; Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lin, Li-Ching; Lin, Keng-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Minimal axial diameter (MIAD) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recognized as the most useful parameter in diagnosing lateral retropharyngeal lymph (LRPL) nodes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This study aims to explore the additional nodal parameters in MRI and positron emission tomography–computed tomography for increasing the prediction accuracy. Materials and Methods A total of 663 LRPL nodes were retrospectively collected from 335 patients with NPC. The LRPL nodes ascertained on follow-up MRI were considered positive for metastases. First, the optimal cutoff value of each parameter was derived for each parameter. In addition, neural network (NN) nodal evaluation was tested for all combinations of three parameters, namely MIAD, maximal axial diameter (MAAD), and maximal coronal diameter (MACD). The optimal approach was determined through brute force attack, and the results of two methods were compared using a bootstrap sampling method. Second, the mean standard uptake value (NSUVmean) was added as the fourth parameter and tested in the same manner for 410 nodes in 219 patients. Results In first and second analysis, the accuracy rate (percentage) for the MIAD was 89.0% (590/663) and 89.0% (365/410), with the optimal cutoff values being 6.1 mm and 6.0 mm, respectively. With the combination of all three and four parameters, the accuracy rate of the NN was 89% (288/332) and 88.8% (182/205), respectively. In prediction, the optimal combinations of the three and four parameters resulted in correct identification of three (accuracy: 593/663, 89.4%) and six additional nodes (371/410, 90.5%), representing 4% (3/73) and 13.3% (6/45) decreases in incorrect prediction, respectively. Conclusion NPC LRPL nodes with an MIAD ≥ 6.1 mm are positive. Among nodes with an MIAD < 6.1 mm, if the NSUVmean ≥ 2.6 or MACD ≥ 25 mm and MAAD ≥ 8 mm, the nodes are positive; otherwise, they are negative. PMID:27736927

  13. Compressive axial mechanical properties of rat bone as functions of bone volume fraction, apparent density and micro-ct based mineral density.

    PubMed

    Cory, Esther; Nazarian, Ara; Entezari, Vahid; Vartanians, Vartan; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2010-03-22

    Mechanical testing has been regarded as the gold standard to investigate the effects of pathologies on the structure-function properties of the skeleton. With recent advances in computing power of personal computers, virtual alternatives to mechanical testing are gaining acceptance and use. We have previously introduced such a technique called structural rigidity analysis to assess mechanical strength of skeletal tissue with defects. The application of this technique is predicated upon the use of relationships defining the strength of bone as a function of its density for a given loading mode. We are to apply this technique in rat models to assess their compressive skeletal response subjected to a host of biological and pharmaceutical stimulations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to derive a relationship expressing axial compressive mechanical properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone as a function of equivalent bone mineral density, bone volume fraction or apparent density over a range of normal and pathologic bones. We used bones from normal, ovariectomized and partially nephrectomized animals. All specimens underwent micro-computed tomographic imaging to assess bone morphometric and densitometric indices and uniaxial compression to failure. We obtained univariate relationships describing 71-78% of the mechanical properties of rat cortical and cancellous bone based on equivalent mineral density, bone volume fraction or apparent density over a wide range of density and common skeletal pathologies. The relationships reported in this study can be used in the structural rigidity analysis introduced by the authors to provide a non-invasive method to assess the compressive strength of bones affected by pathology and/or treatment options.

  14. Application of the Low-dose One-stop-shop Cardiac CT Protocol with Third-generation Dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Wang, Yining; Yi, Yan; Cao, Jian; Kong, Lingyan; Qian, Hao; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wu, Wei; Wang, Yun; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-02-20

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a low-dose one-stop-shop cardiac CT imaging protocol with third-generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Methods Totally 23 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients were prospectively enrolled between March to September in 2016. All patients underwent an ATP stress dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) (data acquired prospectively ECG-triggered during end systole by table shuttle mode in 32 seconds) at 70 kV combined with prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary artery angiography (CCTA) on a third-generation DSCT system. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified and compared between perfusion normal and abnormal myocardial segments based on AHA-17-segment model. CCTA images were evaluated qualitatively based on SCCT-18-segment model and the effective dose(ED) was calculated. In patients with subsequent catheter coronary angiography (CCA) as reference,the diagnosis performance of MPI (for per-vessel ≥50% and ≥70% stenosis) and CCTA (for≥50% stenosis) were assessed. Results Of 23 patients who had completed the examination of ATP stress MPI plus CCTA,12 patients received follow-up CCA. At ATP stress MPI,77 segments (19.7%) in 13 patients (56.5%) had perfusion abnormalities. The MBF values of hypo-perfused myocardial segments decreased significantly compared with normal segments [(93±22)ml/(100 ml·min) vs. (147±27)ml/(100 ml·min);t=15.978,P=0.000]. At CCTA,93.9% (308/328) of the coronary segments had diagnostic image quality. With CCA as the reference standard,the per-vessel and per-segment sensitivity,specificity,and accuracy of CCTA for stenosis≥50% were 94.1%,93.5%,and 93.7% and 90.9%,97.8%,and 96.8%,and the per-vessel sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of ATP stress MPI for stenosis≥50% and ≥70% were 68.7%,100%,and 89.5% and 91.7%,100%,and 97.9%. The total ED of MPI and CCTA was (3.9±1.3) mSv [MPI:(3.5±1.2) mSv,CCTA:(0.3±0.1) mSv]. Conclusion The third-generation DSCT stress dynamic MPI at 70 k

  15. Coronary calcium screening with dual-source CT: reliability of ungated, high-pitch chest CT in comparison with dedicated calcium-scoring CT.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Antoine; Duhamel, Alain; Deken, Valérie; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Molinari, Francesco; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the reliability of ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening. One hundred and eighty-five smokers underwent a dual-source CT examination with acquisition of two sets of images during the same session: (a) ungated, high-pitch and high-temporal resolution acquisition over the entire thorax (i.e., chest CT); (b) prospectively ECG-triggered acquisition over the cardiac cavities (i.e., cardiac CT). Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT for detecting positive CAC scores were 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. There was excellent inter-technique agreement for determining the quantitative CAC score (ICC = 0.986). The mean difference between the two techniques was 11.27, representing 1.81 % of the average of the two techniques. The inter-technique agreement for categorizing patients into the four ranks of severity was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.95; 95 % CI 0.93-0.98). The inter-technique differences for quantitative CAC scores did not correlate with BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.575) or heart rate (r = -0.06, p = 0.95); 87.2 % of them were explained by differences at the level of the right coronary artery (RCA: 0.8718; LAD: 0.1008; LCx: 0.0139; LM: 0.0136). Ungated, high-pitch dual-source CT is a reliable imaging mode for CAC screening in the conditions of routine chest CT examinations. • CAC is an independent risk factor for major cardiac events. • ECG-gated techniques are the reference standard for calcium scoring. • Great interest is directed toward calcium scoring on non-gated chest CT examinations. • Reliable calcium scoring can be obtained with dual-source CT in a high-pitch mode.

  16. Variability of repeated coronary artery calcium scoring and radiation Dose on 64- and 16-slice computed tomography by prospective electrocardiographically-triggered axial and retrospective electrocardiographically-gated spiral computed tomography: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Jun; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Arie, Ryuichi; Shen, Yun; Sunasaka, Kenichi; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Hideya; Ito, Katsuhide

    2008-08-01

    We sought to compare coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores, the variability and radiation doses on 64- and 16-slice computed tomography (CT) scanners by both prospective electrocardiographically (ECG)-triggered and retrospective ECG-gated scans. Coronary artery models (n = 3) with different plaque CT densities (approximately 240 Hounsfield units [HU], approximately 600 HU, and approximately 1000 HU) of four sizes (1, 3, 5, and 10 mm in length) on a cardiac phantom were scanned three times in five heart rate sequences. The tube current-time products were set to almost the same on all four protocols (32.7 mAs for 64-slice prospective and retrospective scans, 33.3 mAs for 16-slice prospective and retrospective scans). Slice thickness was set to 2.5 mm to keep the radiation dose low. Overlapping reconstruction with a 1.25-mm increment was applied on the retrospective ECG-gated scan. The CAC scores were not different between the four protocols (one-factor analysis of variance: Agatston, P = .32; volume, P = .19; and mass, P = .09). Two-factor factorial analysis of variance test revealed that the interscan variability was different between protocols (P < .01) and scoring algorithms (P < .01). The average variability of Agatston/volume/mass scoring and effective doses were as follows: 64-slice prospective scan: 16%/15%/11% and 0.5 mSv; 64-slice retrospective scan: 11%/11%/8% and 3.7 mSv; 16-slice prospective scan: 20%/18%/13% and 0.6 mSv; and 16-slice retrospective scan: 16%/15%/11% and 2.9 to 3.5 mSv (depending on the pitch). Retrospective ECG-gated 64-slice CT showed the lowest variability. Prospective ECG-triggered 64-slice CT, with low radiation dose, shows low variability on CAC scoring comparable to retrospective ECG-gated 16-slice CT.

  17. Subdural empyema: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.D.; Leeds, N.E.; Danziger, A.

    1984-02-01

    CT scans in 49 patients with surgically proven subdural empyema were evaluated. The empyemas were crescentic or lentiform extra-axial hypodense collections (density approximating that of cerebrospinal fluid) with prominent, sharply etched medial rim enhancement. Enhancement of the adjacent cerebral cortex was identified in many cases. Mass effect was always present and in 10 cases so extensive that it overshadowed a small extra-axial collection. CT allowed for precise localization of the lesion, including contiguous or isolated involvement of the interhemispheric subdural space. Mortality was 12% (6/49 cases), a marked improvement when compared with mortality figures obtained prior to the advent of CT (40%). CT findings indicative of involvement of the adjacent parenchyma via retrograde thrombophlebitis with resultant infarction and/or abscess formation were associated with poor prognosis. Improvement in prognosis since the advent of CT is the direct result of early accurate diagnosis and timely intervention.

  18. Computed tomography of axial skeletal osteoid osteomas

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, J.L.; Martinez, S.; Apple, J.; Harrelson, J.M.; Nunley, J.A.

    1984-04-01

    Five cases of axial skeletal osteoid osteomas were viewed with particular attention to the role of computed tomography (CT) as a key diagnostic tool in the evaluation of osteoid osteoma. The complex anatomy of the axial skeleton can make the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma extremely difficult on routine films or tomograms, and the lesion often is well delineated only on CT scans. As complete surgical excision of this benign bony tumor is curative, precise anatomic localization is essential to the surgeon. Conventional radiographs were normal in all patients. Bone scans were positive when obtained and were useful in localizing the lesion and directing CT to the appropriate level. In all five cases CT was of proven value in accurately demonstrating the location, nidus, and other characteristic diagnostic radiographic features of osteoid osteoma.

  19. CT of pituitary abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  20. Light axial vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kan; Pang, Cheng-Qun; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial-vector states, we study whether the observed axial-vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial-vector meson family. In this paper we carry out an analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial-vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial-vector mesons, which are valuable for further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial-vector mesons.

  1. CT evaluation prior to transapical aortic valve replacement: semi-automatic versus manual image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Foldyna, Borek; Jungert, Camelia; Luecke, Christian; von Aspern, Konstantin; Boehmer-Lasthaus, Sonja; Rueth, Eva Maria; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Gutberlet, Matthias; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Lehmkuhl, Lukas

    2015-08-01

    To compare the performance of semi-automatic versus manual segmentation for ECG-triggered cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) examinations prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), with focus on the speed and precision of experienced versus inexperienced observers. The preoperative ECG-triggered CT data of 30 consecutive patients who were scheduled for TAVR were included. All datasets were separately evaluated by two radiologists with 1 and 5 years of experience (novice and expert, respectively) in cardiovascular CT using an evaluation software program with or without a semi-automatic TAVR workflow. The time expended for data loading and all segmentation steps required for the implantation planning were assessed. Inter-software as well as inter-observer reliability analysis was performed. The CT datasets were successfully evaluated, with mean duration between 520.4 ± 117.6 s and 693.2 ± 159.5 s. The three most time-consuming steps were the 3D volume rendering, the measurement of aorta diameter and the sizing of the aortic annulus. Using semi-automatic segmentation, a novice could evaluate CT data approximately 12.3% faster than with manual segmentation, and an expert could evaluate CT data approximately 10.3% faster [mean differences of 85.4 ± 83.8 s (p < 0.001) and 59.8 ± 101 s (p < 0.001), respectively]. The inter-software reliability for a novice was slightly lower than for an expert; however, the reliability for a novice and expert was excellent (ICC 0.92, 95% CI 0.75-0.97/ICC 0.96, 95% CI 0.91-0.98). Automatic aortic annulus detection failed in two patients (6.7%). The study revealed excellent inter-software and inter-observer reliability, with a mean ICC of 0.95. TAVR evaluation can be accomplished significantly faster with semi-automatic rather than with manual segmentation, with comparable exactness, showing a benefit for experienced and inexperienced observers.

  2. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  3. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I.

  4. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  5. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  6. Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Ministry of’ Defence, Defence Research Information Centre, UK. Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) Report Secufty C"uMiauion tide Onadtiicadon (U. R, Cor S...DRIC T 8485 COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY ( CAT ) F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA, V. TRO1* ISS R 78/4.Rome, 1.5 Mlarch 1978 (from Italian) B Distribution(f...dello Radiazioni ISSN 0390--6477 F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA. V. TROI Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) March 15, 1978). This paper is a review of

  7. [Management of axial spondyloarthritis].

    PubMed

    Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2016-11-01

    The term spondyloarthritis (SpA) is now increasingly used to classify and diagnose patients who are characterized by inflammation in the axial skeleton and peripheral manifestations (arthritis and enthesitis). The management of SpA should be tailored according to the current manifestations of the disease, the disease activity and functional impairment. The current article focuses on diagnosis and therapy in patients with axial SpA. Diagnostic procedures are discussed in light of diagnostic utility and feasibility in daily routine care. Cornerstones of treatment in patients with axial SpA are a combination of regular exercise and pharmacological treatment options aiming at anti-inflammatory strategies.

  8. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  9. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  10. Performance of turbo high-pitch dual-source CT for coronary CT angiography: first ex vivo and patient experience.

    PubMed

    Morsbach, Fabian; Gordic, Sonja; Desbiolles, Lotus; Husarik, Daniela; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Wildermuth, Simon; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate image quality, maximal heart rate allowing for diagnostic imaging, and radiation dose of turbo high-pitch dual-source coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). First, a cardiac motion phantom simulating heart rates (HRs) from 60-90 bpm in 5-bpm steps was examined on a third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT (prospective ECG-triggering, pitch 3.2; rotation time, 250 ms). Subjective image quality regarding the presence of motion artefacts was interpreted by two readers on a four-point scale (1, excellent; 4, non-diagnostic). Objective image quality was assessed by calculating distortion vectors. Thereafter, 20 consecutive patients (median, 50 years) undergoing clinically indicated CCTA were included. In the phantom study, image quality was rated diagnostic up to the HR75 bpm, with object distortion being 1 mm or less. Distortion increased above 1 mm at HR of 80-90 bpm. Patients had a mean HR of 66 bpm (47-78 bpm). Coronary segments were of diagnostic image quality for all patients with HR up to 73 bpm. Average effective radiation dose in patients was 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv. Our combined phantom and patient study indicates that CCTA with turbo high-pitch third-generation dual-source 192-slice CT can be performed at HR up to 75 bpm while maintaining diagnostic image quality, being associated with an average radiation dose of 0.6 mSv. • CCTA is feasible with the turbo high-pitch mode. • Turbo high-pitch CCTA provides diagnostic image quality up to 73 bpm. • The radiation dose of high-pitch CCTA is 0.6 mSv on average.

  11. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  12. Altered Axial Skeletal Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The axial skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...

  13. Cine CT for Attenuation Correction in Cardiac PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Alessio, Adam M.; Kohlmyer, Steve; Branch, Kelley; Chen, Grace; Caldwell, James; Kinahan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In dual-modality PET/CT systems, the CT scan provides the attenuation map for PET attenuation correction. The current clinical practice of obtaining a single helical CT scan provides only a snapshot of the respiratory cycle, whereas PET occurs over multiple respiratory cycles. Misalignment of the attenuation map and emission image because of respiratory motion causes errors in the attenuation correction factors and artifacts in the attenuation-corrected PET image. To rectify this problem, we evaluated the use of cine CT, which acquires multiple low-dose CT images during a respiratory cycle. We evaluated the average and the intensity-maximum image of cine CT for cardiac PET attenuation correction. Methods Cine CT data and cardiac PET data were acquired from a cardiac phantom and from multiple patient studies. The conventional helical CT, cine CT, and PET data of an axially translating phantom were evaluated with and without respiratory motion. For the patient studies, we acquired 2 cine CT studies for each PET acquisition in a rest–stress 13N-ammonia protocol. Three readers visually evaluated the alignment of 74 attenuation image sets versus the corresponding emission image and determined whether the alignment provided acceptable or unacceptable attenuation-corrected PET images. Results In the phantom study, the attenuation correction from helical CT caused a major artifactual defect in the lateral wall on the PET image. The attenuation correction from the average and from the intensity-maximum cine CT images reduced the defect by 20% and 60%, respectively. In the patient studies, 77% of the cases using the average of the cine CT images had acceptable alignment and 88% of the cases using the intensity maximum of the cine CT images had acceptable alignment. Conclusion Cine CT offers an alternative to helical CT for compensating for respiratory motion in the attenuation correction of cardiac PET studies. Phantom studies suggest that the average and the intensity

  14. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  15. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  16. Analysis and calibration of stage axial vibration for synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation nanoscale computed tomography (SR nano-CT) is a powerful analysis tool and can be used to perform chemical identification, mapping, or speciation of carbon and other elements together with X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) imaging. In practical applications, there are often challenges for SR nano-CT due to the misaligned geometry caused by the sample stage axial vibration. It occurs quite frequently because of experimental constraints from the mechanical error of manufacturing and assembly and the thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. The axial vibration will lead to the structure overlap among neighboring layers and degrade imaging results by imposing artifacts into the nano-CT images. It becomes worse for samples with complicated axial structure. In this work, we analyze the influence of axial vibration on nano-CT image by partial derivative. Then, an axial vibration calibration method for SR nano-CT is developed and investigated. It is based on the cross correlation of plane integral curves of the sample at different view angles. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission X-ray microscope nano-CT setup at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results demonstrate that the presented method can handle the stage axial vibration. It can work for random axial vibration and needs neither calibration phantom nor additional calibration scanning. It will be helpful for the development and application of synchrotron radiation nano-CT systems.

  17. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  18. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  19. GEOS axial booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A booms and mechanisms subsystem was designed, developed, and qualified for the geostationary scientific satellite GEOS. Part of this subsystem consist of four axial booms consisting of one pair of 1 m booms and one pair of 2.5 m booms. Each of these booms is carrying one bird cage electric field sensor. Alignment accuracy requirements led to a telescopic type solution. Deployment is performed by pressurized nitrogen. At deployment in orbit two of these booms showed some anomalies and one of these two deployed only about 80%. Following this malfunction a detailed failure investigation was performed resulting in a design modification of some critical components as release mechanism, guide sleeves of the telescopic elements, and pressure system.

  20. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  1. Estimation of radiation exposure of retrospective gated and prospective triggered 128-slice triple-rule-out CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Fenchel, Michael; Thomas, Christoph; Buchgeister, Markus; Boehringer, Nadine; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Kaempf, Michael; Claussen, Claus D; Heuschmid, Martin

    2011-09-01

    CT has become an important role in the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain to exclude an aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary artery syndrome. However, the additional radiation exposure is a cause of concern and dose saving strategies should be applied, if possible. To estimate effective dose of retrospective gated and prospective ECG-triggered triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography (TRO-CTA). An Alderson-Rando-phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used for dose measurements. Exposure was performed on a 128-slice single source scanner. The following scan parameters were used (retrospective ECG-gated): 120 kV, 190 mAs/rot., collimation 128x0.6 mm, rotation time 0.3 s. Protocols with a simulated heart rate (HR) of 60 and 100 bpm were performed using the standard ECG-pulsing as well as MinDose. Additionally, a prospective triggered TRO-CTA was acquired (HR 60 bpm). The estimated effective dose of retrospective ECG-gated TRO-CTA ranged from 7.4-13.4 mSv and from 10.1-17.5 mSv for men and women, respectively. Due to radiosensitive breast tissue, women received a significant increased effective dose of up to 64.7% ± 0.03% (p = 0.028) compared to men. MinDose reduces radiation exposure of up to 33.0% ± 6.5% in comparison to standard ECG-pulsing (p < 0.001). The effective dose increased significantly with lower heart rates (p < 0.001). Prospective ECG-triggered TRO-CTA showed an effective dose of 5.9 mSv and 8.2 mSv for men and women, respectively. Compared to retrospective ECG-gated TRO-CTA a significant dose reduction was observed (p < 0.001). Due to the significant different dose exposure, scan protocols should be specifically adapted in a patient- and problem-oriented manner.

  2. Dual source CT (DSCT) imaging of obese patients: evaluation of CT number accuracy, uniformity, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz-Flannigan, A.; Schmidt, B.,; Apel, A.; Eusemann, C.; Yu, L.; McCollough, C. H.

    2009-02-01

    Obese patients present challenges in obtaining sufficient x-ray exposure over reasonable time periods for acceptable CT image quality. To overcome this limitation, the exposure can be divided between two x-ray sources using a dualsource (DS) CT system. However, cross-scatter issues in DS CT may also compromise image quality. We evaluated a DS CT system optimized for imaging obese patients, comparing the CT number accuracy and uniformity to the same images obtained with a single-source (SS) acquisition. The imaging modes were compared using both solid cylindrical PMMA phantoms and a semi-anthropomorphic thorax phantom fitted with extension rings to simulate different size patients. Clinical protocols were used and CTDIvol and kVp were held constant between SS and DS modes. Results demonstrated good agreement in CT number between SS and DS modes in CT number, with the DS mode showing better axial uniformity for the largest phantoms.

  3. Axial movements in ideomotor apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Poeck, K; Lehmkuhl, G; Willmes, K

    1982-01-01

    Non-symbolic axial movements were examined and compared to oral and limb movements in a group of 60 aphasic patients (15 of each major subgroup) with exclusively left-sided brain damage. The contention in the literature that axial movements are preserved in patients with ideomotor limb apraxia was not confirmed. PMID:6186771

  4. Axial disease in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna D

    2007-12-01

    The definition of axial disease in psoriatic arthritis has varied from isolated unilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis to criteria similar to those used for ankylosing spondylitis. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of axial disease varies from 25% to 70% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the prevalence, clinical and radiologic features, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of psoriatic spondylitis.

  5. Technical note: Electrocardiogram electrode repositioning for 320-row coronary CT angiography in patients with regular and recurrent premature ventricular contractions.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Groarke, John; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako K

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias can compromise image quality and increase radiation exposure during coronary CT angiography (CTA). However, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) can occur in a predictable recurrent and regular pattern (ie, bigeminy, trigeminy, quadrigeminy) with post-PVC compensatory pauses. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrode repositioning can achieve relative amplification of the R waves of PVCs compared with R waves of sinus beats. This technical note describes how simple ECG electrode repositioning, combined with an absolute-delay strategy, facilitated selective R waves of PVC ECG triggering of image acquisition in 6 patients with PVC bigeminy or quadrigeminy at the time of 320-row coronary CTA. All 6 studies were single heartbeat acquisition scans with excellent image quality and a median effective radiation dose of 2.9 mSv (interquartile range, 2.1-3.8 mSv). Standard ECG electrode positions used for 2 patients with PVC bigeminy undergoing coronary CTA were associated with an acquisition over 2 heartbeats and effective radiation doses of 6.8 and 10.3 mSv, respectively. In conclusion, ECG electrode repositioning combined with an absolute-delay strategy for regularly recurring PVCs, such as ventricular bigeminy, facilitates high image quality and lower radiation dose during coronary CTA. This simple and straightforward technique can be considered for all patients with regular and recurrent PVCs undergoing coronary CTA. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  7. Study of axial magnetic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Braguta, Victor; Chernodub, M. N.; Goy, V. A.; Landsteiner, K.; Ulybyshev, M.

    2016-01-22

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  8. Identification of an intra-cranial intra-axial porcupine quill foreign body with computed tomography in a canine patient.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Christopher P; Sereda, Nikki C; Sereda, Colin W

    2012-02-01

    An intra-cranial intra-axial foreign body was diagnosed in a golden retriever dog through the use of computed tomography (CT). Confirmed by necropsy, a porcupine quill had migrated to the patient's left cerebral hemisphere, likely through the oval foramen. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of CT in visualizing a quill in the canine brain.

  9. Application of low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT scans in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhimin; Song, Lei; Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qifeng; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yong; Peng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of using low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media in enhanced CT examinations in children with congenital heart disease. Ninety patients with congenital heart disease were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each who underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac scans on a Discovery CT750 HD scanner. Group A received 270 mg I/mL iodixanol, and group B received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol contrast media and was scanned with prospective ECG triggering mode. Group C received 320 mg I/mL iodixanol and was scanned with conventional retrospective ECG gating mode. The same weight-based contrast injection protocol was used for all three groups. Images were reconstructed using a 30% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm and a 50% ASIR in groups A and B and a 30% ASIR in group C. The subjective and objective image quality evaluations, diagnostic accuracies, radiation doses and amounts of contrast media in the three groups were measured and compared. All images in the three groups met the diagnostic requirements, with the same diagnostic accuracy and image quality scores greater than 3 in a 4-point scoring system. However, ventricular enhancement and the objective noise, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality scores in group C were better than those in groups A and B (all P<.001). The effective radiation dose in groups A and B was 84% lower than that in group C (P<.001); group A received the lowest contrast dose (14% lower than that of groups B and C). Enhanced CT scan images with low dose radiation and low concentration contrast media can meet the diagnostic requirements for examining children with congenital heart disease while reducing the potential risk of radiation damage and contrast-induced nephropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Deep convolutional neural networks for automatic coronary calcium scoring in a screening study with low-dose chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessmann, Nikolas; Išgum, Ivana; Setio, Arnaud A. A.; de Vos, Bob D.; Ciompi, Francesco; de Jong, Pim A.; Oudkerk, Matthjis; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Viergever, Max A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-03-01

    The amount of calcifications in the coronary arteries is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is used to identify subjects at high risk who might benefit from preventive treatment. Routine quantification of coronary calcium scores can complement screening programs using low-dose chest CT, such as lung cancer screening. We present a system for automatic coronary calcium scoring based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). The system uses three independently trained CNNs to estimate a bounding box around the heart. In this region of interest, connected components above 130 HU are considered candidates for coronary artery calcifications. To separate them from other high intensity lesions, classification of all extracted voxels is performed by feeding two-dimensional 50 mm × 50 mm patches from three orthogonal planes into three concurrent CNNs. The networks consist of three convolutional layers and one fully-connected layer with 256 neurons. In the experiments, 1028 non-contrast-enhanced and non-ECG-triggered low-dose chest CT scans were used. The network was trained on 797 scans. In the remaining 231 test scans, the method detected on average 194.3 mm3 of 199.8 mm3 coronary calcifications per scan (sensitivity 97.2 %) with an average false-positive volume of 10.3 mm3 . Subjects were assigned to one of five standard cardiovascular risk categories based on the Agatston score. Accuracy of risk category assignment was 84.4 % with a linearly weighted κ of 0.89. The proposed system can perform automatic coronary artery calcium scoring to identify subjects undergoing low-dose chest CT screening who are at risk of cardiovascular events with high accuracy.

  11. Appropriate management of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    LaSalle, Sean P; Deodhar, Atul A

    2007-10-01

    The management of axial spondyloarthritis includes a structured baseline assessment of the disease and follow-up of treatment efficacy using validated instruments. The treatment will depend on the severity and predominant manifestations of the disease. The cornerstone of management remains physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs such as sulfasalazine have shown efficacy only in treating peripheral arthritis, whereas thalidomide and pamidronate have shown some efficacy in treating axial inflammation. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents are an efficacious option for treating signs and symptoms of axial disease, peripheral arthritis, and enthesitis, and for improving functional outcomes. They have not shown efficacy in reducing radiographic progression in axial disease. Recent evidence suggests that the new bone formation in ankylosing spondylitis may be due to upregulation of Wnt signaling in the osteoblastic pathway secondary to low serum DKK-1 levels, which are further suppressed by tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.

  12. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

  13. Dissipative axial inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notari, Alessio; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2016-12-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term phi/fγ F ~F, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density ρR, which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta k smaller than the cutoff fγ, including the backreaction numerically. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if fγ is smaller than the field excursion phi0 by about a factor of at least Script O (20), there is a friction effect which turns on before the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of perturbations, scalars and tensors. Such oscillations have a period of 4-5 efolds and an amplitude which is typically less than a few percent and decreases linearly with fγ. We also stress that the curvature perturbation on uniform density slices should be sensitive to slow-roll parameters related to ρR rather than dot phi2/2 and we discuss the existence of friction terms acting on the perturbations, although we postpone a calculation of the power spectrum and of non-gaussianity to future work and we simply define and compute suitable slow roll parameters. Finally we stress that this scenario may be realized in the axion case, if the coupling 1/fγ to U(1) (photons) is much larger than the coupling 1/fG to non-abelian gauge fields (gluons), since the latter sets the range of the potential and therefore the maximal allowed phi0~ fG.

  14. Differential occupation of axial morphospace.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrea B; Mehta, Rita S

    2014-02-01

    The postcranial system is composed of the axial and appendicular skeletons. The axial skeleton, which consists of serially repeating segments commonly known as vertebrae, protects and provides leverage for movement of the body. Across the vertebral column, much numerical and morphological diversity can be observed, which is associated with axial regionalization. The present article discusses this basic diversity and the early developmental mechanisms that guide vertebral formation and regionalization. An examination of vertebral numbers across the major vertebrate clades finds that actinopterygian and chondrichthyan fishes tend to increase vertebral number in the caudal region whereas Sarcopterygii increase the number of vertebrae in the precaudal region, although exceptions to each trend exist. Given the different regions of axial morphospace that are occupied by these groups, differential developmental processes control the axial patterning of actinopterygian and sarcopterygian species. It is possible that, among a variety of factors, the differential selective regimes for aquatic versus terrestrial locomotion have led to the differential use of axial morphospace in vertebrates.

  15. CT enterography.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; Raptopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-04-01

    Conventional radiologic and endoscopic evaluations of the small bowel are often limited by the length, caliber, and motility of the small bowel loops. The development of new multidetector-row CT scanners, with faster scan times and isotropic spatial resolution, allows high-resolution multiphasic and multiplanar assessment of the bowel, bowel wall, and lumen. CT Enterography (CTE) is a variant of routine abdominal scanning, geared toward more sustained bowel filling with oral contrast material, and the use of multiplanar images, that can enhance gastrointestinal (GI) tract imaging. This article examines the techniques and clinical applications of CTE in comparison with CT enteroclysis, focusing on Crohn disease, obscure GI bleeding, GI tumors, acute abdominal pain, and bowel obstruction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy.

  17. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  18. Thermophoresis of Axially Symmetric Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Sweden Abstract. Thermophoresis of axially symmetric bodies is investigated to first order in the Knudsen-mimber, Kn. The study is made in the limit...derived. Asymptotic solutions are studied. INTRODUCTION Thermophoresis as a phenomenon has been known for a long time, and several authors have approached

  19. Axial pumps for propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppert, M. C.; Rothe, K.

    1974-01-01

    The development of axial flow hydrogen pumps is examined. The design features and the performance data obtained during the course of the development programs are discussed. The problems created by the pump characteristics are analyzed. Graphs of four stage pump performance for various turbine blade configurations are developed. The characteristics and performance of a variety of pumps are included.

  20. Axial structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner

    2002-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the axial nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.

  1. [Quantitative CT perfusion measurements in characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules: new insights and limitations].

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Guerrini, Susanna; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Rossi, Michele; Fonio, Paolo; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Volterrani, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) scans remain the basis of morphologic evaluation in the characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs), perfusion CT can represent an additional feasible technique offering reproducible measurements, at least in SPNs with a diameter >10 mm. In particular, CT perfusion could reduce the number of SPNs, diagnosed as undetermined at morphologic CT, avoiding long term follow-up CT, FDG-PET studies, biopsy or unnecessary surgery with a significant reduction in healthcare costs. In order to reduce the radiation dose, an optimization of the CT perfusion protocol could be obtained using axial mode acquisition, using shorter acquisition time and adaptative statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm.

  2. Breast CT.

    PubMed

    Glick, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious disease that accounts for approximately 40,000 deaths per year in the United States. Unfortunately, there is no known cause of breast cancer, and therefore the best way to prevent mortality is early detection. In the past 15 years, breast cancer mortality has been reduced significantly, which is in part due to screening with film-screen mammography. Nonetheless, conventional mammography lacks sensitivity, especially for certain subgroups of women such as those with dense breast tissue, those under 50 years old, and pre- or perimenopausal women. In addition, mammography has a very poor positive predictive value for biopsy, with 70%-90% of biopsies performed turning out negative. By improving visualization of breast tissue, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) of the breast can potentially provide improvements in diagnostic accuracy over conventional mammography. Owing to recent technological developments in digital detector technology, flat-panel CT imagers dedicated to imaging of the breast are now feasible. A number of academic groups are currently researching dedicated breast CT and prototype systems are currently being evaluated in the clinical setting.

  3. Axially grooved heat pipes - 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, P. J.; Kroliczek, E. J.; Jen, H.; Mcintosh, R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes the 'state-of-the-art' of axially grooved heat pipes. Applications are identified and the related heat pipe design and performance are defined. Recent developments in the analysis, design and fabrication of axially grooved hardware are also discussed. A mathematical model which predicts the hydrodynamic behavior and accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction and 1-g puddle flow is also presented. Performance data for various fluids in the 100-500 K range is compared to predictions from the Groove Analysis Program (GAP). Finally, a simplified closed form solution which accounts for gravity effects, self-priming and composite pumping by the grooves as well as all of the hydrodynamic losses is also discussed.

  4. Ultrasonic measurement of axial stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Chern, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of acoustic propagation in strained media is examined, with particular emphasis on rod (bolt) geometries. The continuous wave (CW) approach is the basis of the study, and the theory is developed from a frequency domain analysis standpoint in order to obtain an applied stress/normalized frequency shift relationship. CW measurements may be influenced by such factors as propagation effects, mode conversion, frequency, material properties, and geometry. After the first loading cycle, axial stress measurements for a preloading with an initial frequency of 4.995 36 MHz dropped to 4.989 19 MHz, indicating a 6.17 kHz change. CW and pseudo-CW ultrasonic techniques are found to be reliable for axial stress measurements, and acoustic attenuation measurements correlated to residual stress fields may possibly involve transducer phase cancellation. It is thus concluded that signal drop is an artifact of the transducer directivity, rather than an actual acoustic power decrease.

  5. [Axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Nordström, Dan; Kauppi, Markku

    2010-01-01

    Current classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis do not allow diagnosis before radiographic changes are visible in sacroiliacal joints. The the new axial spondyloarthropathy (SpA) criteria include axial SpA without radiographic changes as well as established ankylosing spondylitis, recognizing them as a continuum of the same disease. This is of major importance as the burden of early SpA is comparable to that of later stage disease. Diagnosis relies on inflammatory MRI findings which is the most significant change compared to earlier criteria. Emerging data on the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blocking therapies already in early but also in established disease have given new promising alternatives for treatment of this often very cumbersome disease, that rarely responds to classic DMARDs.

  6. Analysis of axial flow turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, V. K.

    A variety of steady and time-dependent, two and three dimensional numerical techniques for axial-flow turbulent design and analysis is reviewed. Meridional flow solutions are discussed, including the streamline curvature method, the matrix method, and finite element methods. Blade-to-blade flow solutions are considered, including singularity methods, field methods, and transonic blade-to-blade calculations. Three-dimensional flow solutions are briefly examined.

  7. Incremental Value of Adenosine-induced Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with Dual-Source CT at Cardiac CT Angiography1

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Filho, Jose A.; Blankstein, Ron; Shturman, Leonid D.; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Okada, David R.; Rogers, Ian S.; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Hoffmann, Udo; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Mamuya, Wilfred S.; Brady, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: First, to assess the feasibility of a protocol involving stress-induced perfusion evaluated at computed tomography (CT) combined with cardiac CT angiography in a single examination and second, to assess the incremental value of perfusion imaging over cardiac CT angiography in a dual-source technique for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in a high-risk population. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and informed patient consent were obtained before patient enrollment in the study. The study was HIPAA compliant. Thirty-five patients at high risk for CAD were prospectively enrolled for evaluation of the feasibility of CT perfusion imaging. All patients underwent retrospectively electrocardiographically gated (helical) adenosine stress CT perfusion imaging followed by prospectively electrocardiographically gated (axial) rest myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Analysis was performed in three steps: (a)Coronary arterial stenoses were scored for severity and reader confidence at cardiac CT angiography, (b)myocardial perfusion defects were identified and scored for severity and reversibility at CT perfusion imaging, and (c)coronary stenosis severity was reclassified according to perfusion findings at combined cardiac CT angiography and CT perfusion imaging. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV) of cardiac CT angiography before and after CT perfusion analysis were calculated. Results: With use of a reference standard of greater than 50% stenosis at invasive angiography, all parameters of diagnostic accuracy increased after CT perfusion analysis: Sensitivity increased from 83% to 91%; specificity, from 71% to 91%; PPV, from 66% to 86%; and NPV, from 87% to 93%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased significantly, from 0.77 to 0.90 (P < .005). Conclusion: A combination protocol involving adenosine perfusion CT imaging and cardiac

  8. Intramural gastric abscess--preoperative diagnosis with CT.

    PubMed

    Asrani, Ashwin; Novelline, Robert; Abujudeh, Hani; Lawrason, James; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2007-09-01

    Intramural gastric abscess is a rare condition representing a localized form of suppurative gastritis, which was described in the time of Galen. Cases are usually diagnosed either with a combination of imaging modalities such as upper gastrointestinal series, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and endoscopic ultrasound or in conjunction with endoscopy and laparotomy. The authors describe a case of intramural gastric abscess in which the diagnosis was made preoperatively using axial, coronal, and sagittal reformations obtained with multidetector CT.

  9. Golimumab for treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis

    2016-02-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis comprises two forms: nonradiographic (nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis) and radiographic (better known as ankylosing spondylitis), which are often considered as two stages of one disease. Historically, all currently available TNF-α inhibitors were first investigated in ankylosing spondylitis and later on in nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis. This year, EMA has granted golimumab approval for the treatment of active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis based on the recently published data from the GO-AHEAD study. This article summarizes recent data on efficacy and safety of golimumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

  10. Time delay study of a CT simulator in respiratory gated CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Huaiqun

    2006-04-15

    In respiratory-gated radiotherapy (RGRT), if the time delay in a computed tomography (CT) simulator and that in a linear accelerator (Linac) are different, the simulation and the treatment cannot be synchronized. In this study, we presented a technique to measure the time delay of the AcQSim CT simulator (Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH) using Varian's Real-Time Positioning Management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). A respiratory gating platform (REF 91150, Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, MI) was first set at the position of amplitude maximum (phase 0). Then a ball of 1.3 cm diameter was put on the platform and set at the CT laser. A single axial scan was acquired across the center of the ball without motion. Then the motion was turned on and single axial scans gated at different phases were acquired with a very narrow gating window. The time between the phase giving a good estimate of the ball and phase 0 is the overall delay time. We found that for AcQSim CT, the overall delay for a single axial scan (with 1 s scan time) is 1.75 s. For multiple axial scans, the overall delay is 1.75 s for the first scan and 0.75 s for the subsequent ones. This demonstrated that the CT mechanical startup delay is 1 s. After the first axial scan, the overall delay per scan is less because CT gantry continuously spins and no mechanical delay exists. We call the overall delay without mechanical part the scanning delay, which basically equals half the scan time (0.5 s for 1 s scan time) plus the gating pulse triggering delay (250 ms). The delays were also verified using metal balls of 1.5 mm diameter set at the amplitude minimum (phase 180, initially). We note that it is the scanning delay rather than the triggering delay that should be compensated when doing motion-synchronized radiotherapy. The current interface between the RPM system and the AcQSim CT does not compensate for this scanning delay.

  11. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases.

  12. Intercostal Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Demonstration of a Tumor Feeder by C-arm CT and Multidetector Row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, In Joon; An, Sangbu; Seong, Nak Jong; Son, Kyu Ri; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    This study was designed to describe tumor feeders from the intercostal artery supplying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT. From March 2008 to May 2009, C-arm CT of the intercostal artery was prospectively performed in 24 HCC patients. Two interventional radiologists, who performed C-arm CT, evaluated tumor feeders on C-arm CT and multidetector row CT scans by consensus. In total, 35 intercostal arteries were examined by C-arm CT. All tumor feeders except one showed a sharp upward turn at or near the costochondral junction. On axial C-arm CT images, all tumor feeders were observed as an enhancing dot in the upper intercostal space along the diaphragm. On multidetector CT scans, 17 tumor feeders were observed and 18 were not. Tumor feeders from the intercostal artery are observed as an enhancing dot along the diaphragm on C-arm CT and can be seen on multidetector row CT in approximately half of patients.

  13. Twin-Axial Wire Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Twin-Axial Wire Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L, Bldg 102T...A An antenna includes a polymer coating having a VLF/LF element and an HF/VHF element embedded therein. A blocking choke is interposed between the...VLF/LF element and the antenna feed t block HF/VHF signals. Small chokes are regularly positioned on the VLF/LF element to eliminate resonances caused

  14. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  15. Axial Globe Length in Congenital Ptosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Kang, Hyera; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    To compare axial globe length between affected and unaffected sides in patients with unilateral congenital ptosis. This prospective observational study included 37 patients (age range: 7 months to 58 years). The axial globe length, margin reflex distance-1 (MRD-1), and refractive power were measured. The axial globe length difference was calculated by subtracting the axial globe length on the unaffected side from that of the affected side. The relationships among axial globe length differences, MRD-1 on the affected sides, and patient ages were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. No significant differences were found in the axial globe length between sides (P = .677). The axial globe length difference was 0.17 ± 0.30 mm (mean ± standard deviation), and two patients (5.4%), aged 32 to 57 years, showed axial globe length more than 0.67 mm longer (corresponding to a refractive power of 2 diopters) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side. The multiple regression model between axial globe length difference, patient age, and MRD-1 on the affected sides was less appropriate (YAGL = 0.003XAGE-0.048XMRD-1 +0.112; r = 0.338; adjusted r2 = 0.062; P = .127). The cylindrical power was greater on the affected side (P = .046), although the spherical power was not different between sides (P = .657). No significant difference was identified in the axial globe length between sides, and only 5% of non-pediatric patients showed an axial globe length more than 0.67 mm longer on the affected side. Congenital ptosis may have little effect on axial globe length elongation, and the risk of axial myopia-induced anisometropic amblyopia may be low in patients with unilateral congenital ptosis. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Classification of CT-brain slices based on local histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Tymkovych, Maksym Y.; Pavlov, Sergii V.; Timchik, Sergii V.; Kisała, Piotr; Orakbaev, Yerbol

    2015-12-01

    Neurosurgical intervention is a very complicated process. Modern operating procedures based on data such as CT, MRI, etc. Automated analysis of these data is an important task for researchers. Some modern methods of brain-slice segmentation use additional data to process these images. Classification can be used to obtain this information. To classify the CT images of the brain, we suggest using local histogram and features extracted from them. The paper shows the process of feature extraction and classification CT-slices of the brain. The process of feature extraction is specialized for axial cross-section of the brain. The work can be applied to medical neurosurgical systems.

  17. CT appearance of the normal inferior pulmonary ligament

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Moss, A.A.; Buy, J.N.; Stark, D.D.

    1983-08-01

    The inferior pulmonary ligament, a double layer of pleura that tethers the lower lobe of the lung to the mediastinum, is rarely appreciated on plain radiographs but may be involved in pathologic processes. A linear structure on axial computer tomographic (CT) images of the lung bases corresponds to the inferior pulmonary ligament on cadaver sections. Review of 100 CT studies identified at least one inferior pulmonary ligament in 42%. Its presence and configuration did not correlate with patient age or gender. The anatomy and CT appearance of the ligament are discussed.

  18. Cervical neural foramina: Correlation of microtomy and CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Pech, P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the cervical neural foramina and contents is described in detail. Nineteen cervical spine specimens were studied with CT and corresponding cryomicrotomy in direct axial, sagittal, coronal, and oblique planes. Both ventra and dorsal nerve roots can be identified in the foramen's lower portion at or below the disk level. The dorsal nerve roots and ganglion contact the superior facet. The ventral nerve roots contact the uncinate process and bottom of the neural foramen. The ventral nerve roots, dorsal nerve roots and ganglion, and vertebral artery are resolved with current high-resolution CT.

  19. Extra-Axial Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Imad; Jallu, Ashraf; Alwatban, Jehad; Patay, Zoltan; Hessler, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Two patients with extra-axial cavernous hemangioma who presented with headache and oculovisual disturbances were investigated with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions masqueraded as basal meningioma, but this diagnosis was not supported by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in one patient. Cerebral angiography with embolization was indicated in one patient, but embolization was not justified in the other. Both patients underwent a pterional craniotomy. The lesions were extradural and highly vascular, necessitating excessive transfusion in one patient in whom gross total resection was achieved, and precluding satisfactory removal in the other. There was no mortality. Transient ophthalmoplegia, the only complication in one patient, was due to surgical manipulation of the cavernous sinus; it resolved progressively over 3 months. Extra-axial skull base cavernous hemangiomas are distinct entities with clinical and radiological characteristics that differ from those of intraparenchymal cavernous malformations. They can mimic meningiomas or pituitary tumors. In some cases, magnetic resonance spectroscopy may narrow the differential diagnoses. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice, facilitated by preoperative embolization to reduce intraoperative bleeding and by the application of the principles of skull base surgery. Fractionated radiotherapy is an alternative in partial or difficult resections and in high-risk and elderly patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17167631

  20. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  1. Axial vector Z‧ and anomaly cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Keung, Wai-Yee; Tsao, Kuo-Hsing; Unwin, James

    2017-05-01

    Whilst the prospect of new Z‧ gauge bosons with only axial couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions is widely discussed, examples of anomaly-free renormalisable models are lacking in the literature. We look to remedy this by constructing several motivated examples. Specifically, we consider axial vectors which couple universally to all SM fermions, as well as those which are generation-specific, leptophilic, and leptophobic. Anomaly cancellation typically requires the presence of new coloured and charged chiral fermions, and we argue that in a large class of models masses of these new states are expected to be comparable to that of the axial vector. Finally, an axial vector mediator could provide a portal between SM and hidden sector states, and we also consider the possibility that the axial vector couples to dark matter. If the dark matter relic density is set due to freeze-out via the axial vector, this strongly constrains the parameter space.

  2. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  3. Resolution of axial shear strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Righetti, Raffaella; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    The technique of mapping the local axial component of the shear strain due to quasi-static axial compression is defined as axial shear strain elastography. In this paper, the spatial resolution of axial shear strain elastography is investigated through simulations, using an elastically stiff cylindrical lesion embedded in a homogeneously softer background. Resolution was defined as the smallest size of the inclusion for which the strain value at the inclusion/background interface was greater than the average of the axial shear strain values at the interface and inside the inclusion. The resolution was measured from the axial shear strain profile oriented at 45° to the axis of beam propagation, due to the absence of axial shear strain along the normal directions. The effects of the ultrasound system parameters such as bandwidth, beamwidth and transducer element pitch along with signal processing parameters such as correlation window length (W) and axial shift (ΔW) on the estimated resolution were investigated. The results show that the resolution (at 45° orientation) is determined by the bandwidth and the beamwidth. However, the upper bound on the resolution is limited by the larger of the beamwidth and the window length, which is scaled inversely to the bandwidth. The results also show that the resolution is proportional to the pitch and not significantly affected by the axial window shift.

  4. Fast CT-CT fluoroscopy registration with respiratory motion compensation for image-guided lung intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Po; Xue, Zhong; Lu, Kongkuo; Yang, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.

    2012-02-01

    CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) is an efficient imaging method for guiding percutaneous lung interventions such as biopsy. During CTF-guided biopsy procedure, four to ten axial sectional images are captured in a very short time period to provide nearly real-time feedback to physicians, so that they can adjust the needle as it is advanced toward the target lesion. Although popularly used in clinics, this traditional CTF-guided intervention procedure may require frequent scans and cause unnecessary radiation exposure to clinicians and patients. In addition, CTF only generates limited slices of images and provides limited anatomical information. It also has limited response to respiratory movements and has narrow local anatomical dynamics. To better utilize CTF guidance, we propose a fast CT-CTF registration algorithm with respiratory motion estimation for image-guided lung intervention using electromagnetic (EM) guidance. With the pre-procedural exhale and inhale CT scans, it would be possible to estimate a series of CT images of the same patient at different respiratory phases. Then, once a CTF image is captured during the intervention, our algorithm can pick the best respiratory phase-matched 3D CT image and performs a fast deformable registration to warp the 3D CT toward the CTF. The new 3D CT image can be used to guide the intervention by superimposing the EM-guided needle location on it. Compared to the traditional repetitive CTF guidance, the registered CT integrates both 3D volumetric patient data and nearly real-time local anatomy for more effective and efficient guidance. In this new system, CTF is used as a nearly real-time sensor to overcome the discrepancies between static pre-procedural CT and the patient's anatomy, so as to provide global guidance that may be supplemented with electromagnetic (EM) tracking and to reduce the number of CTF scans needed. In the experiments, the comparative results showed that our fast CT-CTF algorithm can achieve better registration

  5. Axial cylinder internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-03-10

    This patent describes improvement in a barrel type internal combustion engine including an engine block having axial-positioned cylinders with reciprocating pistons arranged in a circular pattern: a drive shaft concentrically positioned within the cylinder block having an offset portion extending outside the cylinder block; a wobble spider rotatably journaled to the offset portion; connecting rods for each cylinder connecting each piston to the wobble spider. The improvement comprising: a first sleeve bearing means supporting the drive shaft in the engine block in a cantilevered manner for radial loads; a second sleeve bearing means rotatably supporting the wobble spider on the offset portion of the drive shaft for radial loads; a first roller bearing means positioned between the offset portion of the drive shaft and the wobble spider carrying thrust loadings only; a second roller bearing means carrying thrust loads only reacting to the first roller bearing located on the opposite end of the driveshaft between the shaft and the engine block.

  6. Axially grooved heat pipe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A technology evaluation study on axially grooved heat pipes is presented. The state-of-the-art is reviewed and present and future requirements are identified. Analytical models, the Groove Analysis Program (GAP) and a closed form solution, were developed to facilitate parametric performance evaluations. GAP provides a numerical solution of the differential equations which govern the hydrodynamic flow. The model accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction, puddle flow as well as laminar and turbulent vapor flow conditions. The closed form solution was developed to reduce computation time and complexity in parametric evaluations. It is applicable to laminar and ideal charge conditions, liquid/vapor shear interaction, and an empirical liquid flow factor which accounts for groove geometry and liquid recession effects. The validity of the closed form solution is verified by comparison with GAP predictions and measured data.

  7. Unsteady Flows in Axial Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marble, F. E.; Rannie, W. D.

    1957-01-01

    Of the various unsteady flows that occur in axial turbomachines certain asymmetric disturbances, of wave length large in comparison with blade spacing, have become understood to a certain extent. These disturbances divide themselves into two categories: self-induced oscillations and force disturbances. A special type of propagating stall appears as a self-induced disturbance; an asymmetric velocity profile introduced at the compressor inlet constitutes a forced disturbance. Both phenomena have been treated from a unified theoretical point of view in which the asymmetric disturbances are linearized and the blade characteristics are assumed quasi-steady. Experimental results are in essential agreement with this theory wherever the limitations of the theory are satisfied. For the self-induced disturbances and the more interesting examples of the forced disturbances, the dominant blade characteristic is the dependence of total pressure loss, rather than the turning angle, upon the local blade inlet angle.

  8. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  9. Liquid rocket engine axial-flow turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheer, D. D.; Huppert, M. C.; Viteri, F.; Farquhar, J.; Keller, R. B., Jr. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The axial pump is considered in terms of the total turbopump assembly. Stage hydrodynamic design, pump rotor assembly, pump materials for liquid hydrogen applications, and safety factors as utilized in state of the art pumps are among the topics discussed. Axial pump applications are included.

  10. Bone microstructure and elastic tissue properties are reflected in QUS axial transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Raum, Kay; Leguerney, Ingrid; Chandelier, Florent; Bossy, Emmanuel; Talmant, Maryline; Saïed, Amena; Peyrin, Françoise; Laugier, Pascal

    2005-09-01

    Accurate clinical interpretation of the sound velocity derived from axial transmission devices requires a detailed understanding of the propagation phenomena involved and of the bone factors that have an impact on measurements. In the low megahertz range, ultrasonic propagation in cortical bone depends on anisotropic elastic tissue properties, porosity and the cortical geometry (e.g., thickness). We investigated 10 human radius samples from a previous biaxial transmission study using a 50-MHz scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) and synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography. The relationships between low-frequency axial transmission sound speed at 1 and 2 MHz, structural properties (cortical width Ct.Wi, porosity, Haversian canal density and material properties (acoustic impedance, mineral density) on site-matched cross-sections were investigated. Significant linear multivariate regression models (1 MHz: R(2) = 0.84, p < 10(-4), root-mean-square error (RMSE) = 38 m/s, 2 MHz: R(2) = 0.65, p < 10(-4), RMSE = 48 m/s) were found for the combination of Ct.Wi with porosity and impedance. A new model was derived that accounts for the nonlinear dispersion relation with Ct.Wi and predicts axial transmission velocities measured at different ultrasonic frequencies (R(2) = 0.69, p < 10(-4), RMSE = 52 m/s).

  11. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  12. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  13. Novel Integration Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth; Brown, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics; separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and magnetic field modeling results will be presented.

  14. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  15. Application of flash dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in triple-rule-out (tro) examination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Liang; Chen, Tian-Wu; Qiu, Li-Hua; Diao, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical imaging capacity of FLASH dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in thoracic aorta, pulmonary artery & vein and coronary artery. One hundred and eight patients of thoracalgia were randomly divided into two groups; 60 cases (group A) received dual-source CT scan in flash model at 100 KV and contrast medium dose of 74 ml combined with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) examination; 48 cases (group B) received retrospectively. ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition at 120 KV and contrast medium dose of 101 ml. Several image reconstruction techniques were adopted for coronary artery, pulmonary artery and aorta. The imaging quality and the diagnostic value of this technique were evaluated. Coronary artery stenosis of group A was compared against the results of DSA examination. The scan time in group A was obviously shorter than that of group B, i.e., t=0.7±0.1 s in group A and t=7.7±1.7 s in group A. The image reconstruction phase of coronary artery was 70.4±15.6% in group A, and the systolic phase accounted for 13.3% of the optimal reconstruction phase. Compared with group B, the radiation dose of group A decreased obviously, i.e. ED=2.7±0.7 mSv for group A and ED=21.6±6.0 mSv for group B. Moreover, less contrast agent was consumed in group A than in group B, which was 74 ml in group A and 101 ml in group B. The image quality of aorta and pulmonary artery & vein was grade 1 for all cases in group A, which was the same as with group B. The coronary artery images of group A had better quality, with score of 2.9±0.1. Of 780 segments, only 2 segments could be effectively diagnosed, showing no statistically significant differences from group B (P>0.05). The coronary artery stenosis revealed by dual-source CT for group A was not significantly different from that by DSA (P>0.05). FLASH dual-source CT scan at reduced radiation dose and reduced contrast medium dose used for triple-rule-out (TRO) examination

  16. Application of flash dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in triple-rule-out (tro) examination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Liang; Chen, Tian-Wu; Qiu, Li-Hua; Diao, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical imaging capacity of FLASH dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in thoracic aorta, pulmonary artery & vein and coronary artery. Method: One hundred and eight patients of thoracalgia were randomly divided into two groups; 60 cases (group A) received dual-source CT scan in flash model at 100 KV and contrast medium dose of 74 ml combined with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) examination; 48 cases (group B) received retrospectively. ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition at 120 KV and contrast medium dose of 101 ml. Several image reconstruction techniques were adopted for coronary artery, pulmonary artery and aorta. The imaging quality and the diagnostic value of this technique were evaluated. Coronary artery stenosis of group A was compared against the results of DSA examination. Results: The scan time in group A was obviously shorter than that of group B, i.e., t=0.7±0.1 s in group A and t=7.7±1.7 s in group A. The image reconstruction phase of coronary artery was 70.4±15.6% in group A, and the systolic phase accounted for 13.3% of the optimal reconstruction phase. Compared with group B, the radiation dose of group A decreased obviously, i.e. ED=2.7±0.7 mSv for group A and ED=21.6±6.0 mSv for group B. Moreover, less contrast agent was consumed in group A than in group B, which was 74 ml in group A and 101 ml in group B. The image quality of aorta and pulmonary artery & vein was grade 1 for all cases in group A, which was the same as with group B. The coronary artery images of group A had better quality, with score of 2.9±0.1. Of 780 segments, only 2 segments could be effectively diagnosed, showing no statistically significant differences from group B (P>0.05). The coronary artery stenosis revealed by dual-source CT for group A was not significantly different from that by DSA (P>0.05). Conclusion: FLASH dual-source CT scan at reduced radiation dose and reduced contrast medium dose used for

  17. Non-Radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Eshed, Iris

    2015-12-01

    The term non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nrAxSpA) was coined for patients who have a clinical picture of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but do not exhibit radiographic sacroiliitis. The ASAS classification criteria for nrAxSpA, ensuring the recruitment of homogenous study cohorts, were accepted in 2009, although the respective diagnostic criteria for daily clinical practice have not yet been developed. The clinical diagnosis should be based on the composite of clinical symptoms and signs of the disease, HLA B27 status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of sacroiliac joints. Notably, a negative MRI or HLA B27 does not exclude the diagnosis in patients with a high clinical suspicion for nrAxSpA. The prevalence of nrAxSpA is similar to that of AS, but the former has a higher female preponderance. The rate of progression of nrAxSpA to the radiographic stage of disease (AS) ranges from 10% to 20% over 2 years. Current treatment strategies for nrAxSpA are the same as for AS and include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. While this review summarizes the current achievements in the field of nrAxSpA, further understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and, particularly, mechanisms of inflammation and subsequent new bone formation is essential for the development of new treatment strategies for nrAxSpA patients.

  18. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.; LaBelle, James

    2000-02-22

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  19. Axial Flow Conditioning Device for Mitigating Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet (Inventor); Birkbeck, Roger M. (Inventor); Hosangadi, Ashvin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A flow conditioning device for incrementally stepping down pressure within a piping system is presented. The invention includes an outer annular housing, a center element, and at least one intermediate annular element. The outer annular housing includes an inlet end attachable to an inlet pipe and an outlet end attachable to an outlet pipe. The outer annular housing and the intermediate annular element(s) are concentrically disposed about the center element. The intermediate annular element(s) separates an axial flow within the outer annular housing into at least two axial flow paths. Each axial flow path includes at least two annular extensions that alternately and locally direct the axial flow radially outward and inward or radially inward and outward thereby inducing a pressure loss or a pressure gradient within the axial flow. The pressure within the axial flow paths is lower than the pressure at the inlet end and greater than the vapor pressure for the axial flow. The invention minimizes fluidic instabilities, pressure pulses, vortex formation and shedding, and/or cavitation during pressure step down to yield a stabilized flow within a piping system.

  20. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  1. A Novel Three-Dimensional Vector Analysis of Axial Globe Position in Thyroid Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Yuan, Yifei; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Wenhu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To define a three-dimensional (3D) vector method to describe the axial globe position in thyroid eye disease (TED). Methods. CT data from 59 patients with TED were collected and 3D images were reconstructed. A reference coordinate system was established, and the coordinates of the corneal apex and the eyeball center were calculated to obtain the globe vector EC→. The measurement reliability was evaluated. The parameters of EC→ were analyzed and compared with the results of two-dimensional (2D) CT measurement, Hertel exophthalmometry, and strabismus tests. Results. The reliability of EC→ measurement was excellent. The difference between EC→ and 2D CT measurement was significant (p = 0.003), and EC→ was more consistent with Hertel exophthalmometry than with 2D CT measurement (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between EC→ and Hirschberg test, and a strong correlation was found between EC→ and synoptophore test. When one eye had a larger deviation angle than its fellow, its corneal apex shifted in the corresponding direction, but the shift of the eyeball center was not significant. The parameters of EC→ were almost perfectly consistent with the geometrical equation. Conclusions. The establishment of a 3D globe vector is feasible and reliable, and it could provide more information in the axial globe position. PMID:28491471

  2. A Novel Three-Dimensional Vector Analysis of Axial Globe Position in Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Qian, Jiang; Yuan, Yifei; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Wenhu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To define a three-dimensional (3D) vector method to describe the axial globe position in thyroid eye disease (TED). Methods. CT data from 59 patients with TED were collected and 3D images were reconstructed. A reference coordinate system was established, and the coordinates of the corneal apex and the eyeball center were calculated to obtain the globe vector [Formula: see text]. The measurement reliability was evaluated. The parameters of [Formula: see text] were analyzed and compared with the results of two-dimensional (2D) CT measurement, Hertel exophthalmometry, and strabismus tests. Results. The reliability of [Formula: see text] measurement was excellent. The difference between [Formula: see text] and 2D CT measurement was significant (p = 0.003), and [Formula: see text] was more consistent with Hertel exophthalmometry than with 2D CT measurement (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between [Formula: see text] and Hirschberg test, and a strong correlation was found between [Formula: see text] and synoptophore test. When one eye had a larger deviation angle than its fellow, its corneal apex shifted in the corresponding direction, but the shift of the eyeball center was not significant. The parameters of [Formula: see text] were almost perfectly consistent with the geometrical equation. Conclusions. The establishment of a 3D globe vector is feasible and reliable, and it could provide more information in the axial globe position.

  3. High-pitch dual-source CT coronary angiography: analysis of the impact on image quality of altered electrocardiography waves during data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Fang, Jiliang; Tong, Haibin; Zhao, Qing; Song, Qingqiao; Luo, Ping; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Min; Yang, Shuhua; Wang, Qun; Wang, Ping; Shi, Fengxiang; Xu, Lei; Rong, Peijing

    2012-06-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) "altered waves" sometimes occur during data acquisition when computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) is performed with the prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch (Flash spiral) mode using a second-generation dual-source CT. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the ECG altered waves on image quality. Seventy-three consecutive patients with stable sinus rhythm ≤ 65 beats per minute were retrospectively enrolled in this study. CTCA was performed using the Flash spiral mode in which the data acquisition was prospectively triggered at 60 % of the R-R interval and completed within one cardiac cycle. The ECG waves before and during data acquisition were analyzed for grouping purposes. Image quality was evaluated using a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = unevaluatable). Thirty patients (group 1) were found to have ECG altered waves during data acquisition, while 43 patients (group 2) had ECG "stable waves." The altered waves were seen as the baseline drifting; the broad, erected, or inverted P wave or QRS complexes; and a new wave. However, the length of the R-R interval did not change during the data acquisition. There were no significant differences in image quality scores between the two groups on the per-patient (2 ± 0.87 vs. 2.2 ± 0.74, P = 0.273) or per-segment (1.27 ± 0.54 vs. 1.32 ± 0.55, P = 0.577) basis. There were no significant differences in coronary evaluatability as well (per-patient; 93.3 vs. 95.3 %, P = 0.352; per-segment; 99.4 vs. 99.6 %, P = 1.0). CTCA image quality is not affected by ECG altered waves during data acquisition using the Flash spiral mode in low and stable heart rate patients. Thus, the ECG altered waves are considered artifacts.

  4. Multidetector CT (MD-CT) in the diagnosis of uncertain open globe injuries.

    PubMed

    Hoffstetter, P; Schreyer, A G; Schreyer, C I; Jung, E M; Heiss, P; Zorger, N; Framme, C

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the significance of multislice CT for the diagnosis of uncertain penetrating globe injuries. Based on a retrospective chart review between 2002 and 2007, we identified 59 patients presenting with severe ocular trauma with uncertain rupture of the globe due to massive subconjunctival and/or anterior chamber hemorrhage. The IOP (intraocular pressure) was within normal range in all patients. High resolution multidetector CT (MD-CT) scans (16 slice scans) with axial and coronar reconstructions were performed in all patients. The affected eye was examined for signs of penetrating injury such as abnormal eye shape, scleral irregularities, lens dislocation or intravitreal hemorrhages. Four experienced radiologists read the CT scans independently. Beside the diagnosis, the relevant morphological criteria and the optimal plane orientation (axial or coronar) were specified. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive value were calculated. Additionally the interobserver variability was determined by applying the Cohen's kappa test. Surgical sclera inspections were performed in all cases as a standard of reference. The evaluations of the CT examination were compared with the surgery reports. 59 patients were evaluated (42 men, 17 women). The mean age was 29 years (range 7 - 91). In 17 patients a rupture of the globe was diagnosed during surgery. 12 of these 17 penetrating injuries (70.6 %) were classified correctly by MDCT, 5 of the 17 (29.4 %) were not detectable. 42 patients did not have an open globe injury. 41 of these patients were diagnosed correctly negative by MDCT, and one patient was classified false positive. This results in a sensitivity of 70 % with a specificity of 98 %. There was high inter-rater agreement with kappa values between 0.89 - 0.96. Most discrepancies were caused by wrong negative findings. The most frequent morphologic criteria for open globe injury were the deformation (n = 10) and the volume reduction (n = 7) of

  5. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  6. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  7. Evaluations of multiplanar reconstruction in CT recognition of lumbar disk disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, D.I.; Stauffer, A.E.; Davis, K.R.; Ganott, M.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-07-01

    Axial computed tomographic (CT) images were compared with sagittal and coronal reformations and myelograms in 60 patients to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of multiplanar reconstructions for the recognition of lumbar disk disease. The axial CT scans were most sensitive and specific. The sagittal scans were helpful in evaluating the neural foramina, the size of the disk bulge into the spinal canal, especially at L5-S1, and patients with spondylolisthesis. The coronal images were the least informative, although they contributed to the evaluation of lumbar nerve roots. The myelograms and the sagittal images were equally useful in the detection of herniated disk, but axial scans were superior to either. It was concluded that reformatted sagittal and coronal images are not required if all axial images are normal.

  8. Modeling axial compression fatigue in fiber ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Hearle, J.W.S.; Hobbs, R.E.; Overington, M.S.; Banfield, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The modeling of long-term fatigue performance of twisted ropes has been extended to cover axial compression fatigue. This mode of failure has been observed in use and testing of ropes. It is characterized by sharp cooperative kinking of yarns, which leads to flex fatigue breakage of fibers. A model of pipeline buckling was modified to allow for plasticity in bending. An axial and lateral restraints, which influence the buckling, were derived from the existing rope mechanics model. Axial compression was introduced into the total computational model, in order to predict the form of buckling and the consequent fiber failure. An alternative use of the program is simply to detect conditions in which axial compression occurs as an indication of the occurrence of fatigue.

  9. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  10. High temperature co-axial winding transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Novotny, Donald W.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis and design of co-axial winding transformers is presented. The design equations are derived and the different design approaches are discussed. One of the most important features of co-axial winding transformers is the fact that the leakage inductance is well controlled and can be made low. This is not the case in conventional winding transformers. In addition, the power density of co-axial winding transformers is higher than conventional ones. Hence, using co-axial winding transformers in a certain converter topology improves the power density of the converter. The design methodology used in meeting the proposed specifications of the co-axial winding transformer specifications are presented and discussed. The final transformer design was constructed in the lab. Co-axial winding transformers proved to be a good choice for high power density and high frequency applications. They have a more predictable performance compared with conventional transformers. In addition, the leakage inductance of the transformer can be controlled easily to suit a specific application. For space applications, one major concern is the extraction of heat from power apparatus to prevent excessive heating and hence damaging of these units. Because of the vacuum environment, the only way to extract heat is by using a cold plate. One advantage of co-axial winding transformers is that the surface area available to extract heat from is very large compared to conventional transformers. This stems from the unique structure of the co-axial transformer where the whole core surface area is exposed and can be utilized for cooling effectively. This is a crucial issue here since most of the losses are core losses.

  11. The Slotted Blade Axial-Flow Blower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-09-01

    YORK 18, NEW YORK w is|’ .THE SLOTTED BLADE AXIAL-FLOW BLOVER AUG 0 1 13941J F Dr. H. E. Sheets, Member ASME Chief Research and Development Engineer ... blades of an axial flow blower. The subject of boundary-layer control has attracted considerable attention in respect to the isolated airfoil (1)1 but... blades . Flow through airfoils displays a region of laminar flow beginning at the leading edge. Further downstream, at approximately the location of the

  12. Axial forces in centrifugal compressor couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanov, N. M.; Yun, V. K.

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the results of the theoretical and experimental investigation of axial forces arising in the toothed and plate couplings of centrifugal compressor shaft lines. Additional loads on the thrust bearing are considered that can develop in the toothed couplings as a result of coupled rotors misalignment. Design relationships to evaluate the level of axial forces and recommendations for their reduction in the operating conditions are given.

  13. Planned Axial Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study axial reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned axial reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are modelled using computational fluid dynamics. These models show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.

  14. Declining radiation dose of coronary computed tomography angiography: German cardiac CT registry experience 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Schmermund, Axel; Marwan, Mohamed; Hausleiter, Jörg; Barth, Sebastian; Bruder, Oliver; Kerber, Sebastian; Korosoglou, Grigorius; Leber, Alexander; Moshage, Werner; Schröder, Stephen; Schneider, Steffen; Senges, Jochen; Achenbach, Stephan

    2017-07-19

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is increasingly used as a test to rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with a low to intermediate pre-test probability of the disease. We used the database of the German CT registry, collected between 2009 and 2014 in a broad patient population, to analyze contemporary radiation dose associated with coronary CTA in clinical practice. The prospective observational registry included a total of 7061 patients ≥18 years, referred to 12 participating centers for a clinically indicated cardiac CT examination. All centers were cardiology units well experienced in CTA and used multi-slice CT scanners with at least 64 rows. Coronary CTA was performed in a subset of 5001 patients, 59.6 ± 11.8 years, body mass index (BMI) 26.9 ± 4.5 kg/m(2), 38% females. Three time periods with approximately equal numbers of patients were created (01/09-03/10, 04/10-03/11, 04/11-07/14). The dose-length product of all examinations and derived effective dose in mSv (conversion factor k = 0.014) as well as the influence of patient characteristics on dose were compared for the three time periods. BMI and proportion of female patients remained stable over time, and mean heart rate decreased from 60.3 ± 9.0 to 58.5 ± 9.3 bpm from the first to the last time period (p < 0.001). Overall, the mean effective dose of coronary CTA was 3.6 mSv (Q1 1.8 mSv, Q3 7.4 mSv). Within the three time periods, it declined from 5.6 (2.7, 8.6) mSv during the first to 4.8 (2.1, 8.2) mSv during the second and 2.5 (1.3, 4.6) mSv during the last time period (p < 0.001). Paralleling the decline in radiation dose over time, the proportion of prospectively ECG-triggered examinations increased (68, 79, 83%; p < 0.001), and the proportion of examinations with retrospective gating and no tube current modulation decreased (5.3, 4.0, 1.6%; p < 0.001). Tube current (mAs) and voltage (kV) both decreased over time. In multivariable analysis

  15. Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOEpatents

    Walrath, David E.; Lindberg, William R.; Burgess, Robert K.

    2000-08-29

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane.

  16. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and axial motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the axially moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers. This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus, for such structures, by frequency band-gaps it is proposed to understand frequency ranges in which the primary component of the compound wave attenuates. Such frequency band-gaps can be present for a moving periodic string, but only if its axial velocity is lower than the transverse wave speed, and, the higher the axial velocity, the narrower the frequency band-gaps. The revealed effects could be of potential importance for applications, e.g. they indicate that due to spatial inhomogeneity, oscillations of axially moving periodic chains always involve a multitude of frequencies.

  17. Helical mode lung 4D-CT reconstruction using Bayesian model.

    PubMed

    He, Tiancheng; Xue, Zhong; Nitsch, Paige L; Teh, Bin S; Wong, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    4D computed tomography (CT) has been widely used for treatment planning of thoracic and abdominal cancer radiotherapy. Current 4D-CT lung image reconstruction methods rely on respiratory gating to rearrange the large number of axial images into different phases, which may be subject to external surrogate errors due to poor reproducibility of breathing cycles. New image-matching-based reconstruction works better for the cine mode of 4D-CT acquisition than the helical mode because the table position of each axial image is different in helical mode and image matching might suffer from bigger errors. In helical mode, not only the phases but also the un-uniform table positions of images need to be considered. We propose a Bayesian method for automated 4D-CT lung image reconstruction in helical mode 4D scans. Each axial image is assigned to a respiratory phase based on the Bayesian framework that ensures spatial and temporal smoothness of surfaces of anatomical structures. Iterative optimization is used to reconstruct a series of 3D-CT images for subjects undergoing 4D scans. In experiments, we compared visually and quantitatively the results of the proposed Bayesian 4D-CT reconstruction algorithm with the respiratory surrogate and the image matching-based method. The results showed that the proposed algorithm yielded better 4D-CT for helical scans.

  18. ECG-triggered 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging of the rat heart is dramatically enhanced by acipimox.

    PubMed

    Poussier, Sylvain; Maskali, Fatiha; Tran, Nguyen; Person, Christophe; Maureira, Pablo; Boutley, Henri; Karcher, Gilles; Lacolley, Patrick; Régnault, Véronique; Fay, Renaud; Marie, Pierre Yves

    2010-08-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging, provided by current positron emission tomography (PET) systems dedicated to small animals,might provide a precise functional assessment of the left ventricle (LV) in rats, although conventional metabolic conditioning by hyperinsulinaemic glucose clamping is not well adapted to this setting. This study was aimed at assessing cardiac FDG PET in rats premedicated with acipimox, a potent nicotinic acid derivative yielding comparable image quality to clamping in man. Metabolic conditioning was compared in Wistar rats between a conventional oral glucose loading (1.5 mg/kg) and acipimox, which was given at high but well tolerated doses subcutaneously (25 mg/kg) or orally (50 mg/kg). Myocardial to blood (M/B) activity ratio and myocardial signal to noise (S/N) ratio were analysed on gated FDG PET images. The S/N ratio of the gated cardiac images evolved in parallel with the M/B activity ratio and these two ratios were independently enhanced by glucose loading and acipimox. However, these enhancements were: (1) dramatic for acipimox, especially for the high oral dose of 50 mg/kg (from 2.85 +/- 0.57 to 10.73 +/- 0.54 for the M/B ratio of rats with or without glucose loading; p<0.0001) and (2) much more limited for glucose loading (from 6.61 +/- 0.49 to 7.89 +/- 0.41 for the M/B ratio of rats with or without acipimox administration; p=0.049). With the high oral dose of acipimox, the gated cardiac FDG PET images had very high S/N ratios, at least equivalent to those currently documented in man. Metabolic conditioning by oral doses of acipimox is highly efficient for experimental studies planned with cardiac FDG PET in rats.

  19. Segmental anatomy of the liver: poor correlation with CT.

    PubMed

    Fasel, J H; Selle, D; Evertsz, C J; Terrier, F; Peitgen, H O; Gailloud, P

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the current procedures for radiologic delineation of the segmental and subsegmental anatomy of the liver. Vascular casts of 10 livers were examined with helical computed tomography (CT). Liver segmental and subsegmental anatomy were determined on the CT scans according to customary radiologic practice guidelines. CT anatomic findings were compared with authentic anatomic territories seen at anatomic examination. The differences were assessed quantitatively in five of the 10 livers. For the marginal (cranial and caudal) portions of the liver, an average (+/- 1 standard deviation) of 17.3% +/- 6.5 of the hepatic area visualized on axial CT scans was attributed to an incorrect subsegment. For the central zones (those adjacent to the right and left branches of the portal vein), this error amounted to 51.6% +/- 19.9. Expressed in absolute numbers, the error amounted to 40 mm on axial CT scans. The radiologic determination of portal venous territories within the liver must be revised. The indirect landmarks currently used are not reliable for proper delineation. Only procedures that account for the portal venous distribution pattern, including peripheral branches, will result in correct depiction of the complex and variable anatomic reality.

  20. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  1. CT angiography ofthe carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Prokop, M; Waaijer, A; Kreuzer, S

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of multislice scanning has made CT angiography (CTA) a serious competitor to MR angiography (MRA) as a second line method for the evaluation of the carotid arteries. For optimum display of the morphology of stenoses, it is necessary to apply the thinnest possible section collimation (ideally [symbol: see text] 1.25mm). While the scan range is limited for single slice CTA, it is possible to cover the whole supraaortic circulation from the aortic arch to the intracranial vessels using multislice scanning. Timing of contrast injection is important, however, the injection technique for carotid CTA is more forgiving than for other body regions. Image evaluation is mainly based on axial sections and curved planar reformations (CPR). Other techniques only serve as an adjunct to better be able to demonstrate the findings. Most potential pitfalls can be avoided by using the appropriate technique. CTA has been shown to have a pooled sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 98% for the detection of >70% stenoses, even if only older single-slice techniques are used. Differentiation between lipid, fibrous and calcified plaques may be possible, especially with multislice scanning. Multislice CTA can in addition detect tandem stenoses in the region of the carotid origin from the aorta, the carotid siphon, and the intracranial portion of the carotids. CT is able to provide a comprehensive evaluation of patients with acute stroke by using a combined approach of pre-contrast CT to detect hemorrhage and manifest infarction, CT brain perfusion measurements to differentiate between penumbra and infarct and CTA to detect the occluded vessel as well as potential concomitant carotid abnormalities. In summary, carotid CTA has come of age and can be used to quantify stenoses more precisely than ultrasound, to detect tandem stenoses and for the workup of acute stroke patients. The learning objectives include learning how to chose acquisition parameters for carotid CTA, how to

  2. Hyperquenched hyaloclastites from Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezin, D.; Helo, C.; Richard, D.; Clague, D. A.; Dingwell, D. B.; Stix, J.

    2009-12-01

    We determined apparent cooling rates for basaltic hyaloclastites from Axial caldera, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Samples originate from different stratigraphic layers within the unconsolidated volcaniclastic sequences, on flanks of the volcanic edifice. Water depth is ~1400 m below sea level. The hyaloclastite glass fragments comprise two principal morphologies: (1) angular fragments, and (2) thin glassy melt films interpreted as bubble walls, called deep-sea limu o Pele. A natural cooling rate was estimated for each sample of ~50 carefully selected glass shards. The heat capacity was first measured with a differential scanning calorimeter in two heating scans with heating rates of 20 K/min, and a matching cooling rate between those scans. The fictive temperatures Tf were then determined from both heating cycles, and the natural cooling rate derived by the non-Arrhenian relationship between Tf and cooling rate. All samples display hyperquenched states, manifested in a strong exothermic energy release during the initial heating cycle before reaching the glass transition. Cooling rates range from 10 6.73 K/s to 10 3.94 K/s for the limu, and 10 4.92 K/s to 10 2.34 K/s for the angular fragments. Almost all samples of limu shards show elevated cooling rates compared to their angular counterparts of comparable grain mass. In addition, the exothermic part of the enthalpy curves reveal two superimposed relaxation domains, the main broad exothermal peak, ranging from ~350 K to the onset of the glass transition, and a small subordinate peak/shoulder occurring between 550 K and 700 K. The magnitude of the latter varies from clearly identifiable to nearly absent, and tends to be more pronounced in curves obtained from angular fragments. The main exothermal peak is related to the frozen-in structure of the glass and consequently to its thermal history when passing through the glass transition. The subordinate peak may represent strain rate-induced and tensile stress accumulation

  3. Analytical cone-beam reconstruction using a multi-source inverse geometry CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhye; De Man, Bruno; Pack, Jed

    2007-03-01

    In a 3rd generation CT system, a single source projects the entire field of view (FOV) onto a large detector opposite the source. In multi-source CT imaging, a multitude of sources sequentially project a part of the FOV on a much smaller detector. These sources may be distributed in both the trans-axial and axial directions in order to jointly cover the entire FOV. Scan data from multiple sources in the axial direction provide complementary information, which is not available in a conventional single-source CT system. In this work, an analytical 3D cone-beam reconstruction algorithm for multi-source CT is proposed. This approach has three distinctive features. First, multi-source data are re-binned transaxially to multiple offset third-generation datasets. Second, data points in sinograms from multiple source sets are either accepted or rejected for contribution to the backprojection of a given voxel. Third, instead of using a ramp filter, a Hilbert transform is combined with a parallel derivative to form the filtering mechanism. Phantom simulations are performed using a multi-source CT geometry and compared to conventional 3rd generation CT geometry. We show that multi-source CT can extend the axial scan coverage to 120mm without cone-beam artifacts, while a third-generation geometry results in compromised image quality at 60mm of axial coverage. Moreover, given that the cone-angle in the proposed geometry is limited to 7 degrees, there are no degrading effects such as the Heel effect and scattered radiation, unlike in a third-generation geometry with comparable coverage. An additional benefit is the uniform flux profile resulting in uniform image noise throughout the FOV and a uniform dose absorption profile.

  4. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Sixteenth quarterly report, 14 May--13 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-10-10

    The axial flow reversal was studied using tracer injection and results correlation with x-ray CT and flotation. Effects of dimensionless area ratio and flow rate ratio, percent solids in feed, and inlet pressure on location of surface of zero axial velocity in the ASH were studied. 4 figs.

  5. [Computerized transverse axial tomography in intracerebral, intracerebellar and intraventricular hemorrhage (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Imanaga, H; Jimbo, M; Kitamura, K

    1977-04-01

    Computerized transverse axial tomography (CT) of the brain is a recently developed method which allows non-invasive roentgenologic evaluation of intracranial diseases. The advent of CT represents a great advance in the diagnosis of a very wide variety of intracranial lesions, including cerebrovascular diseases. Especially, CT was found to be extremely informative in evaluating intracerebral, intracerebellar and intraventricular hemorrhage. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of CT in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. From the seven hundreds cases of various intracranial diseases hitherto examined by the EMI-scanner (160 X 160 matrix), twenty-three cases of nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage were selected for the present study. Fifteen cases of fresh hemorrhage consisted of hypertensive cerebrovascular disease, arterio-venous malformation, aneurysm and unknown etiology, number of cases being six, three, four and two, respectively. All cases were examined within fifteen days after the ictus and the positive findings were obtained in all cases. The characteristic feature of the hematoma is the circumscribed and increased density area surrounded by the decreased density zone probably representing the accompanied brain edema. The sequential CT studies revealed that the hematoma area was gradually decreased in its density and finally transformed into the rather low density one in four weeks or so after the ictus. The smallest hematoma detected by CT was the cerebellar hematoma about five grams in weight, which was failed to be recognized by the angiography. In cases of the old hemorrhage, besides the decreased density area of the hematoma, such findings were obtained as cerebral atrophy, ventricular dilatation and porencephalic change. It would be concluded that CT study is the most useful aid at present available in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. The precise anatomic extent of the hematoma, associated brain edema

  6. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  7. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  8. Axial eye length after retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Vukojević, Nenad; Sikić, Jakov; Curković, Tihomir; Juratovac, Zlatko; Katusić, Damir; Sarić, Borna; Jukić, Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the eye axial diameter were studied to assess the eye globe impact of conventional operation for retinal detachment. The study included 69 eyes in 69 patients operated on for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. There were 46.4% of men and 53.6% of women, mean age 52.7 (+/- 15.21) years. Results of preoperative and postoperative ultrasonographic measurement of axial diameter are presented. The mean preoperative and postoperative eye axial diameter was 23.69 (+/- 1.84) mm and 24.43 (+/- 1.91) mm, respectively. Postoperative results showed the axial eye length to increase by a mean of 0.74 (+/- 0.44) mm, yielding a statistically significant difference from the preoperative measurement (p < 0.001). The mean myopia induced by this eyeball elongation was 1.77 D. The encircling band with and without segmental buckling used in surgical repair of retinal detachment creates circular and segmental indentation of the eyeball, thus increasing its axial length. The myopia induced by elongation of the eyeball results in considerable myopia, which requires appropriate correction in the early postoperative period to achieve favorable vision rehabilitation.

  9. Axial flow gas turbine engine combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Shekleton, J.R.; Sawyer, K.W.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine. It comprises: radial compressor means for compressing air entering through a compressor inlet opening; axial turbine means in axially spaced relation to the radial compressor means; the radial compressor means being operatively associated with the axial turbine means; radial combustor means intermediate the radial compressor means and axial turbine means; turbine nozzle means proximate the axial turbine means for directing gases of combustion thereto; the radial combustor means defining a radial combustion space in communication with both the radial compressor means and the turbine nozzle means. The radial combustor means including means for introducing compressed air generally tangentially into the radial combustion space upstream of the turbine nozzle means and at a point radially outwardly of the turbine nozzle means and the turbine nozzle means being disposed radially inwardly of the radial combustion space to define a generally radial flow path therebetween. The radial combustor means generating the gases of combustion by combusting fuel from a source and air from the radial compressor means; and fuel injection means operatively associated with the radial combustor means radially outwardly of the turbine nozzle means for injecting a fuel/air mixture generally tangentially into the radial combustion space; whereby a tangential swirl flow is established within the radial combustion space.

  10. Are axial and radial flow chromatography different?

    PubMed

    Besselink, Tamara; van der Padt, Albert; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2013-01-04

    Radial flow chromatography can be a solution for scaling up a packed bed chromatographic process to larger processing volumes. In this study we compared axial and radial flow affinity chromatography both experimentally and theoretically. We used an axial flow column and a miniaturized radial flow column with a ratio of 1.8 between outer and inner surface area, both with a bed height of 5 cm. The columns were packed with affinity resin to adsorb BSA. The average velocity in the columns was set equal. No difference in performance between the two columns could be observed. To gain more insight into the design of a radial flow column, the velocity profile and resin distribution in the radial flow column were calculated. Using mathematical models we found that the breakthrough performance of radial flow chromatography is very similar to axial flow when the ratio between outer and inner radius of the radial flow column is around 2. When this ratio is increased, differences become more apparent, but remain small. However, the ratio does have a significant influence on the velocity profile inside the resin bed, which directly influences the pressure drop and potentially resin compression, especially at higher values for this ratio. The choice between axial and radial flow will be based on cost price, footprint and packing characteristics. For small-scale processes, axial flow chromatography is probably the best choice, for resin volumes of at least several tens of litres, radial flow chromatography may be preferable.

  11. Axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography.

    PubMed

    Pendharker, Sarang; Shende, Swapnali; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a three-dimensional (3D) nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope beyond surface imaging and achieve a tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of 3D fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by one-dimensional (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axial resolution of ∼130  nm. Our method does not require any additional optical components or sample preparation. The proposed method can be combined with focal plane super-resolution techniques like stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy and can also be adapted for THz and microwave near-field tomography.

  12. Animated axial surface mapping: The multimedia companion

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, S.C.; Shaw, J.H.; Suppe, J.

    1995-09-01

    This newly expanded version of AAPG`s first DataShare Disk brings to life the concepts and applications of a new method of structural trend analysis. Through the dynamic use of color, sound, animation, and humor, this multimedia companion to the May 1994 article on Axial Surface Mapping introduces the reader (or viewer) to the concepts of rigid-block translation, fault-bend folding, and axial surface mapping. Animated models of growing fault-bend folds allow the viewer to see in four dimensions. The axial surface map shows the horizontal plane; the folding lines show depth planes; and the animations show the structure and its two-dimensional map changing with time and increasing slip. The animations create theoretical map patterns under varying, but controlled conditions that can be compared to axial surface maps from real data. The model patterns are then used to interpret seismic data and axial surface maps from a producing gas field in offshore California and from an exploration play in Pennsylvania.

  13. Axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendharker, Sarang; Shende, Swapnali; Newman, Ward; Ogg, Stephen; Nazemifard, Neda; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-12-01

    Optical tomographic reconstruction of a 3D nanoscale specimen is hindered by the axial diffraction limit, which is 2-3 times worse than the focal plane resolution. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an axial super-resolution evanescent wave tomography (AxSET) method that enables the use of regular evanescent wave microscopes like Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRF) beyond surface imaging, and achieve tomographic reconstruction with axial super-resolution. Our proposed method based on Fourier reconstruction achieves axial super-resolution by extracting information from multiple sets of three-dimensional fluorescence images when the sample is illuminated by an evanescent wave. We propose a procedure to extract super-resolution features from the incremental penetration of an evanescent wave and support our theory by 1D (along the optical axis) and 3D simulations. We validate our claims by experimentally demonstrating tomographic reconstruction of microtubules in HeLa cells with an axial resolution of $\\sim$130 nm. Our method does not require any additional optical components or sample preparation. The proposed method can be combined with focal plane super-resolution techniques like STORM and can also be adapted for THz and microwave near-field tomography.

  14. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  15. Axial resolution enhancement of third harmonic generation microscopy by harmonic focal point axial modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozdoor Dashtabi, Mahdi; Arabanian, Atoosa Sadat; Massudi, Reza

    2017-02-01

    Harmonic focal point axial modulation (h-FPAM) in nonlinear optical microscopy is introduced and used to enhance the axial resolution and the signal to background ratio by modulating the focal point of a beam of femtosecond pulses train along the axial direction and phase sensitively filtering the resulting signals using a lock-in amplifier. Axial resolution enhancement factor of 2.05 is acquired in 2f detection mode for the third harmonic generation microscopy of glass-oil interfaces. This technique also resolves the image interpretation problem of the fundamental harmonic FPAM technique. Moreover, the potential of this technique for axial sectioning is demonstrated by acquiring images from a red blood cell.

  16. [Multiplane postmortem cerebral computed angiotomography--Part I. Normal anatomy of cerebral vessels on the axial plane (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Satoh, T; Asari, S; Sadamoto, K

    1982-04-01

    Cranial computed tomography has been mainly used for detection of the parenchymal space-occupying lesion, and has had the limitation of detection of the cerebrovascular lesion itself because of low CT resolution. However, high resolution CT scanners have recently brought us the possibility of definition of fine cerebral vessels on CT images using an appropriate injection method of contrast agents (cerebral computed angiotomography). This paper concerns the normal anatomy of the cerebral vasculature on CT images using 9 fresh cadavers with normal intracranial structures. They received the postmortem injection of contrast agents through bilateral common carotid and vertebral arteries, and were undertaken the multiplane CT scanning with the axial, modified coronal, Towne (half-axial) and the semisagittal projections using GE-CT/T 8800 (9.6 sec scanning time, 320 x 320 matrices). The normal anatomy of cerebral vessels on the axial plane, obtained at the levels 10 to 90 mm above the canthomeatal line, is presented in this paper. Main visualized vessels in the posterior fossa were the basilar artery, the cranial loop of the PICA, the AICA from the origin to the hemispheric branches including the meatal loop in the cerebellopontine angle cistern, and the SCA from the ambient and quadrigeminal segments to the lateral marginal and superior hemispheric branches. The circle of Willis and other main cerebral arteries were clearly visualized with their small branches, for example, the posterior communicating, the anterior choroidal and the lenticulostriate arteries. Deep cerebral veins were also visualized at the levels of the midbrain, the middle and the roof of third ventricle, and the body of lateral ventricle. Postmortem cerebral computed angiotomography provided us not only the precise anatomy of the cerebral vasculatures, but also their anatomic relations with the surrounding structures such as cerebral parenchyma, ventricles, cisterns and other subarachnoid spaces. On

  17. Axial flow reversal and its significance in air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Das, A.; Yin, D.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the potential of air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation for fine coal cleaning has been demonstrated both in pilot plant testing and in a plant-site demonstration program. Further improvements in the ASH technology will depend, to some extent, on improved understanding of the complex multiphase fluid flow. Froth transport plays a very important role in determining the efficiency of fine coal cleaning by ASH flotation. It should be noted that the surface of zero axial velocity is of particular significance in froth transport because the location of this surface actually accounts for the amount of froth being transported to the overflow. In this regard, the axial flow reversal has been examined based on specially designed tracer experiments. On the basis of these experimental results, modeling efforts were made to characterize the flow pattern in the ASH. The theoretical predictions based on turbulent fluid dynamic considerations were found to describe experimental observations regarding the surface of zero axial velocity. These results that define the surface of zero axial velocity together with froth phase features established from X-ray CT measurements provide an excellent description of the flow characteristics in ASH flotation and explain the effect of various process variables, such as dimensionless area (A*), dimensionless flowrate (Q*), inlet pressure, percent solids, etc., on flotation recovery. On this basis it is expected that further advances in the design and operation of the ASH system can be made, leading to more efficient use of the ASH technology for fine coal cleaning.

  18. Donkey dental anatomy. Part 1: Gross and computed axial tomography examinations.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, N; Kempson, S A; Dixon, P M

    2008-06-01

    Post-mortem examination of 19 donkey skulls showed that donkeys have a greater degree of anisognathia (27% width difference between upper and lower jaws) compared to horses (23%). Teeth (n=108) were collected from 14 skulls and examined grossly and by computed axial tomography (CAT). A greater degree of peripheral enamel infolding was found in mandibular cheek teeth (CT) compared to maxillary CT (P<0.001). A significant increase in peripheral cementum from the apical region to the clinical crown was demonstrated in all CT (P<0.0001). All donkey CT had at least five pulp cavities with six pulp cavities present in the 06s and 11s. A new endodontic numbering system for equid CT has been proposed. A greater occlusal depth of secondary dentine (mm) was present in older donkeys (>16 years) than in the younger (<15 years) donkeys studied. Based on gross and CAT examinations, donkey dental anatomy was shown to be largely similar to that described in horses.

  19. Anomalous transport and generalized axial charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilin, Vladimir P.; Sadofyev, Andrey V.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we continue studying the modification of the axial charge in chiral media by macroscopic helicities. Recently it was shown that magnetic reconnections result in a persistent current of zero mode along flux tubes. Here we argue that in general a change in the helical part of the generalized axial charge results in the same phenomenon. Thus one may say that there is a novel realization of chiral effects requiring no initial chiral asymmetry. The transfer of flow helicity to zero modes is analyzed in a toy model based on a vortex reconnection in a chiral superfluid. Then, we discuss the balance between the two competing processes effect of reconnections and the chiral instability on the example of magnetic helicity. We argue that in the general case there is a possibility for the distribution of the axial charge between the magnetic and fermionic forms at the end of the instability.

  20. Organocatalytic atroposelective synthesis of axially chiral styrenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Sheng-Cai; Wu, San; Zhou, Qinghai; Chung, Lung Wa; Ye, Liu; Tan, Bin

    2017-05-01

    Axially chiral compounds are widespread in biologically active compounds and are useful chiral ligands or organocatalysts in asymmetric catalysis. It is well-known that styrenes are one of the most abundant and principal feedstocks and thus represent excellent prospective building blocks for chemical synthesis. Driven by the development of atroposelective synthesis of axially chiral styrene derivatives, we discovered herein the asymmetric organocatalytic approach via direct Michael addition reaction of substituted diones/ketone esters/malononitrile to alkynals. The axially chiral styrene compounds were produced with good chemical yields, enantioselectivities and almost complete E/Z-selectivities through a secondary amine-catalysed iminium activation strategy under mild conditions. Such structural motifs are important precursors for further transformations into biologically active compounds and synthetic useful intermediates and may have potential applications in asymmetric synthesis as olefin ligands or organocatalysts.

  1. Axial flow positive displacement worm gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement engine has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes and the third twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. A combustor section extends axially downstream through at least a portion of the second section.

  2. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  3. Imaging of posterior element axial pain generators: facet joints, pedicles, spinous processes, sacroiliac joints, and transitional segments.

    PubMed

    Kotsenas, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    The role of the posterior elements in generating axial back and neck pain is well established; the imaging detection of posterior element pain generators remains problematic. Morphologic imaging findings have proved to be nonspecific and are frequently present in asymptomatic patients. Edema, inflammation, and hypervascularity are more specific for sites of pain generation, but are often overlooked by imagers if physiologic imaging techniques such as fat-suppressed T2 or contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide bone scanning with single-photon emission computed tomography (CT), or (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with CT are not used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Axial pico turbine - construction and experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peczkis, G.; Goryca, Z.; Korczak, A.

    2017-08-01

    The paper concerns axial water turbine of power equal to 1 kW. The example of axial water turbine constructional calculations was provided, as well as turbine rotor construction with NACA profile blades. The laboratory test rig designed and built to perform measurements on pico turbine was described. The turbine drove three-phase electrical generator. On the basis of highest efficiency parameters, pico turbine basic characteristics were elaborated. The experimental research results indicated that pico turbine can achieve maximum efficiency close to the values of larger water turbines.

  5. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of lubricating plugs are disposed in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are disposed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  6. A Mixed Finite Analysis of Axial Foreshortening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzicka, Gene; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, a mixed finite element was derived and shown to be effective in facilitating accurate modal reduction of rotor blades. This study builds upon that earlier work through the development of algorithms that allow the element's Lagrangian axial displacement degrees of freedom to be eliminated in favor of the axial force degrees of freedom. This reduction process, which had been demonstrated previously for the case of a single mixed finite element, may be viewed as a generalization of the UMARC blade analysis methodology to arbitrary topologies. A unique strength of the method. developed here is that the model may consist of two dimensional or even three dimensional elements.

  7. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of lubricating plugs is located in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are placed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  8. Theoretical Determination of Axial Fan Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struve, E.

    1943-01-01

    The report presents a method for the computation of axial fan characteristics. The method is based on the assumption that the law of constancy of the circulation along the blade holds, approximately, for all fan conditions for which the blade elements operate at normal angles of attack (up to the stalling angles). Pressure head coefficient K(sub a) and power coefficient K(sub u) for the force components in the axial and tangential directions, respectively, and analogous to the lift and drag coefficients C(sub y) and C(sub x) are conveniently introduced.

  9. CT of Castleman disease

    SciTech Connect

    Onik, G.; Goodman, P.C.

    1983-04-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in distinguishing among mediastinal fatty tumors, vascular abnormalities, and fluid-filled cystic masses is well established. However, little has been written about the use of CT to identify mediastinal masses with soft-tissue characteristics nor of the ability of CT to assess the degree of enhancement of these lesions after contrast material administration. We report a case of Castleman disease which presented as a densely enhancing, soft-tissue lesion on dynamic CT scanning and suggest that enhancement characteristics may be helpful in limiting the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses.

  10. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  11. The usefulness of combined axial and coronal computed tomography for the evaluation of metastatic supraclavicular lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Na Hee; Kim, Jun Ho; Hyun, In Young; Ryu, Jeong-Seon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose is to assess the value of adding coronal images for the identification of metastatic supraclavicular lymph nodes (LNs). Two radiologists reviewed axial images and combined axial and coronal images using thoracic computed tomography (CT) of 386 patients whose maximum standardized uptake value measured in a supraclavicular LN was ≥2.0 on a positron emission tomography. We compared sensitivity and agreement between readers before and after the addition of coronal images. For combined images, agreement was almost perfect (κ=0.982), and sensitivity was significantly higher (90.4%, P<.001). Interpreting both axial and coronal images improves the diagnostic accuracy for supraclavicular metastasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Co-axial, high energy gamma generator

    DOEpatents

    Reijonen, Jani Petteri; Gicquel, Frederic

    2011-08-16

    A gamma ray generator includes an ion source in a first chamber. A second chamber is configured co-axially around the first chamber at a lower second pressure. Co-axially arranged plasma apertures separate the two chambers and provide for restricted passage of ions and gas from the first to the second chamber. The second chamber is formed by a puller electrode having at least one long channel aperture to draw ions from the first chamber when the puller electrode is subject to an appropriate applied potential. A plurality of electrodes rings in the third chamber in third pressure co-axially surround the puller electrode and have at least one channel corresponding to the at least one puller electrode aperture and plasma aperture. The electrode rings increase the energy of the ions to a selected energy in stages in passing between successive pairs of the electrodes by application of an accelerating voltage to the successive pairs of accelerator electrodes. A target disposed co-axially around the plurality of electrodes receives the beam of accelerated ions, producing gamma rays.

  13. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  14. Computerized axial tomography: the normal EMI scan.

    PubMed Central

    Gawler, J; Bull, J D; Du Boulay, G H; Marshall, J

    1975-01-01

    Computerized axial tomography using the EMI scanner as a new method of using x-rays in diagnosis. The technique displays intracranial and orbital structures in the transverse plane. The appearances of normal EMI Scans are described and correlated with cerebral and orbital anatomy seen in transverse section. Images PMID:1081587

  15. Investigations on Experimental Impellers for Axial Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Encke, W.

    1947-01-01

    A selection of measurements obtained on experimental impellers for axial blowers will be reported. In addition to characteristic curves plotted for low and for high peripheral velocities, proportions and blade sections for six different blower models and remarks on the design of blowers will be presented.

  16. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: AXIAL RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Confocal Microscopy System Performance: Axial resolution.
    Robert M. Zucker, PhD

    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  17. Computer programs for axial flow compressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, R. H.; Creveling, H. F.

    1969-01-01

    Four computer programs examine effects of design parameters and indicate areas for research of multistage axial flow compressors. The programs provide information on velocity diagrams and stage-by-stage performance calculation, radial equilibrium of flow, radial distribution of total pressure, and off-design performance calculation.

  18. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  19. Excitation modes in non-axial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Ginnochio, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    Excitation modes of non-axial quadrupole shapes are investigated in the framework of interacting boson models. Both {gamma}-unstable and {gamma}-rigid nuclear shapes are considered for systems with one type of boson as well as with proton-neutron bosons. 6 refs.

  20. Active axial stress in mouse aorta.

    PubMed

    Agianniotis, A; Rachev, A; Stergiopulos, N

    2012-07-26

    The study verifies the development of active axial stress in the wall of mouse aorta over a range of physiological loads when the smooth muscle cells are stimulated to contract. The results obtained show that the active axial stress is virtually independent of the magnitude of pressure, but depends predominately on the longitudinal stretch ratio. The dependence is non-monotonic and is similar to the active stress-stretch dependence in the circumferential direction reported in the literature. The expression for the active axial stress fitted to the experimental data shows that the maximum active stress is developed at longitudinal stretch ratio 1.81, and 1.56 is the longitudinal stretch ratio below which the stimulation does not generate active stress. The study shows that the magnitude of active axial stress is smaller than the active circumferential stress. There is need for more experimental investigations on the active response of different types of arteries from different species and pathological conditions. The results of these studies can promote building of refined constrictive models in vascular rheology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Axial spondyloarthritis: the heart of the matter.

    PubMed

    Gensler, Lianne S

    2015-06-01

    A variety of cardiovascular clinical manifestations have been described in patients with spondyloarthritis, especially in well-established ankylosing spondylitis. These include both structural heart disease, conduction defects and ischemic heart disease. The true prevalence of cardiovascular involvement in patients with axial spondyloarthritis, including non-radiographic disease needs to be further defined.

  2. Lenses axial space ray tracing measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiqian; Sun, Ruoduan; Qiu, Lirong; Shi, Libo; Sha, Dingguo

    2010-02-15

    In order to achieve the precise measurement of the lenses axial space, a new lenses axial space ray tracing measurement (ASRTM) is proposed based on the geometrical theory of optical image. For an assembled lenses with the given radius of curvature r(n) and refractive index nn of every lens, ASRTM uses the annular laser differential confocal chromatography focusing technique (ADCFT) to achieve the precise focusing at the vertex position P(n) of its inner-and-outer spherical surface Sn and obtain the coordinate z(n) corresponding to the axial movement position of ASRTM objective, and then, uses the ray tracing facet iterative algorithm to precisely determine the vertex position P(n) of every spherical surface by these coordinates z(n), refractive index n(n) and spherical radius r(n), and thereby obtaining the lenses inner axial space d(n). The preliminary experimental results indicate that ASRTM has a relative measurement error of less than 0.02%.

  3. Stability of structural members under axial load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E

    1937-01-01

    The principles of the cross method of moment distribution are used to check the stability of structural members under axial load. A brief theoretical treatment of the subject, together with an illustrative problem, is included as well as a discussion of the reduced modulus at high stresses and a set of tables to aid in the solution of practical problems.

  4. Supersonic axial-flow fan flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, John K.

    1988-01-01

    Lane's (1957) analytical formulation of the unsteady pressure distribution on an oscillating two-dimensional flat plate cascade in supersonic axial flow has been developed into a computer code. This unsteady aerodynamic code has shown good agreement with other published data. This code has also been incorporated into an existing aeroelastic code to analyze the NASA Lewis supersonic through-flow fan design.

  5. CT Scans - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tomography) Scan - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section CT ( ... Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section CT ( ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  7. CT of lumbar spine disk herniation: correlation with surgical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Benjamin, V.; Kricheff, I.I.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.

    1984-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine was performed with selectively positioned 5-mm-thick axial cross sections to examine each disk level from the top of the neural foramen to the pedicle of the next caudad vertebra. One hundred consecutive patients with 116 surgical disk explorations were reviewed. There was agreement between the CT and surgical findings in 89 patients (104 explorations) in determination of presence or absence of a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP). Discrepancy occurred in 12 instances (11 patients): two because of incorrect interpretations, five in previously operated patients, three in spondylolisthesis, and two in spinal stenosis. There were 97 true-positives, eight false-negatives, seven true-negatives, and four false-positives. If nine previously operated patients are excluded from the study, then CT was accurate in detection of presence or absence of an HNP in 93% of the disk explorations.

  8. [Micro-CT imaging of guinea pig cochlear].

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng-cheng; Jiang, Zi-dong; Zhang, Kai

    2012-12-25

    To employ micro-CT equipment for nondestructive three-dimensional (3D) imaging of internal ear. The guinea pigs were anesthetized by napental and bilateral cochleas harvested. Cochlea was fixed in glutaraldehyde before scanning of micro-CT. Two-dimensional (2D) images were acquired for a 3D model of reconstruction. The 2D images was distinct enough to visualize vestibular gallery, scala media, scala tympani, Reissner's membrane, velum, organ of Corti and spiral ganglion, etc. The 3D structure model was excellent for viewing and free to revolve in any axial direction. Micro-CT may allow nondestructive three-dimensional imaging of internal ear. As compared with the traditional method of morphology, this approach is able to save samples, easy to operate and has a high resolution. And it is more easily popularized than the synchrotron radiation approach.

  9. A combined PET/CT scanner for clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Beyer, T; Townsend, D W; Brun, T; Kinahan, P E; Charron, M; Roddy, R; Jerin, J; Young, J; Byars, L; Nutt, R

    2000-08-01

    The availability of accurately aligned, whole-body anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images could have a significant impact on diagnosing and staging malignant disease and on identifying and localizing metastases. Computer algorithms to align CT and PET images acquired on different scanners are generally successful for the brain, whereas image alignment in other regions of the body is more problematic. A combined PET/CT tomograph with the unique capability of acquiring accurately aligned functional and anatomical images for any part of the human body has been designed and built. The PET/CT scanner was developed as a combination of a Siemens Somatom AR.SP spiral CT and a partial-ring, rotating ECAT ART PET scanner. All components are mounted on a common rotational support within a single gantry. The PET and CT components can be operated either separately, or in combined mode. In combined mode, the CT images are used to correct the PET data for scatter and attenuation. Fully quantitative whole-body images are obtained for an axial extent of 100 cm in an imaging time of less than 1 h. When operated in PET mode alone, transmission scans are acquired with dual 137Cs sources. The scanner is fully operational and the combined device has been operated successfully in a clinical environment. Over 110 patients have been imaged, covering a range of different cancers, including lung, esophageal, head and neck, melanoma, lymphoma, pancreas, and renal cell. The aligned PET and CT images are used both for diagnosing and staging disease and for evaluating response to therapy. We report the first performance measurements from the scanner and present some illustrative clinical studies acquired in cancer patients. A combined PET and CT scanner is a practical and effective approach to acquiring co-registered anatomical and functional images in a single scanning session.

  10. Pain precedes computer axial tomography and scintigraphic findings in an osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Daniel B; Lee, Paul C; Fish, David E

    2008-10-01

    To report a case in which pain preceded computer axial tomography (CT) and scintigraphic findings in an osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture. Report of a patient presenting to a physical medicine/pain medicine outpatient clinic. Eighty-seven-year-old female with history of osteoporosis and previous vertebral compression fracture with new onset, atraumatic, axial thoracic pain. Thoracic spine CT, bone scintigraphy, kyphoplasty (Kyphon-Medtronic, Sunnyvale, CA). Not applicable. History and physical exam were suggestive of thoracic compression fracture. CT and bone scintigraphy were negative for vertebral compression fracture. A CT of the pulmonary arteries during an unrelated hospital admission less than two weeks after initial presentation revealed a compression fracture at T7. Pain report was unchanged except for an increase in intensity. Follow-up X-ray and CT revealed a compression fracture at T7 with loss of 80% of vertebral height. Pain was successfully treated with kyphoplasty. CT and bone scintigraphy performed early after pain onset did not reveal a vertebral compression fracture. Within 2 weeks, fracture was evident on further imaging. The pain resolved following an intervention directed at the fracture. The patient's pain preceded CT and scintigraphic evidence of the osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture. It is possible that pain is an early sign of impending osteoporotic compression fracture, or microtrabecular fracture, prior to anatomic and physiologic changes. Magnetic resonance imaging may be the imaging study of choice rather than bone scintigraphy in identification of noncollapsed osteoporotic compression fracture. Earlier identification and treatment of vertebral compression fractures may reduce kyphosis and associated sequelae.

  11. Axial type self-bearing motor for axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yohji; Masuzawa, Toru; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Ohmori, Kunihiro; Yamane, Takashi; Konishi, Yoshiaki; Fukahori, Shinya; Ueno, Satoshi; Kim, Seung-Jong

    2003-10-01

    An axial self-bearing motor is proposed which can drive an axial blood pump without physical contact. It is a functional combination of the bi-directional disc motor and the axial active magnetic bearing, where it actively controls single degree-of-freedom motion, while other motions such as lateral vibration are passively stable. For application to a blood pump, the proposed self-bearing motor has the advantages of simple structure and small size. Through the finite element method (FEM) analysis and the experimental test, its good feasibility is verified. Finally, the axial flow pump is fabricated using the developed magnetically suspended motor. The pump test is carried out and the results are discussed in detail.

  12. Volumetric applications for spiral CT in the thorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy; Leung, Ann N.

    1994-05-01

    Spiral computed tomography (CT) is a new technique for rapidly acquiring volumetric data within the body. By combining a continuous gantry rotation and table feed, it is possible to image the entire thorax within a single breath-hold. This eliminates the ventilatory misregistration seen with conventional thoracic CT, which can result in small pulmonary lesions being undetected. An additional advantage of a continuous data set is that axial sections can be reconstructed at arbitrary intervals along the spiral path, resulting in the generation of overlapping sections which diminish partial volume effects resulting from lesions that straddle adjacent sections. The rapid acquisition of spiral CT enables up to a 50% reduction in the total iodinated contrast dose required for routine thoracic CT scanning. This can be very important for imaging patients with cardiac and renal diseases and could reduce the cost of thoracic CT scanning. Alternatively, by combining a high flow peripheral intravenous iodinated contrast injection with a spiral CT acquisition, it is possible to obtain images of the vasculature, which demonstrate pulmonary arterial thrombi, aortic aneurysms and dissections, and congenital vascular anomalies in detail previously unattainable without direct arterial access.

  13. Normative segment-specific axial and coronal angulation corridors of subaxial cervical column in axial rotation.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A; Baisden, Jamie L; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    In contrast to clinical studies wherein loading magnitudes are indeterminate, experiments permit controlled and quantifiable moment applications, record kinematics in multiple planes, and allow derivation of moment-angulation corridors. Axial and coronal moment-angulation corridors were determined at every level of the subaxial cervical spine, expressed as logarithmic functions, and level-specificity of range of motion and neutral zones were evaluated. segmental primary axial and coupled coronal motions do not vary by level. Although it is known that cervical spine responses are coupled, segment-specific corridors of axial and coronal kinematics under axial twisting moments from healthy normal spines are not reported. Ten human cadaver columns (23-44 years, mean: 34 +/- 6.8) were fixed at the ends and targets were inserted to each vertebra to obtain kinematics in axial and coronal planes. The columns were subjected to pure axial twisting moments. Range of motion and neutral zone for primary-axial and coupled-coronal rotation components were determined at each spinal level. Data were analyzed using factorial analysis of variance. Moment-rotation angulations were expressed using logarithmic functions, and mean +/-1 standard deviation corridors were derived at each level for both components. Moment-angulations responses were nonlinear. Each segmental curve for both components was well represented by a logarithmic function (r2 > 0.95). Factorial analysis of variance indicated that the biomechanical metrics are spinal level-specific (P < 0.05). Axial and coronal angulations of cervical spinal columns show statistically different level-specific responses. The presentation of moment-angulation corridors for both metrics forms a dataset for the normal population. These segment-specific nonlinear corridors may help clinicians assess dysfunction or instability. These data will assist mathematical models of the spine in improved validation and lead to efficacious design of

  14. Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly R; Galloway, Jack D

    2012-04-20

    For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the

  15. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  16. SU-F-I-31: Reproducibility of An Automatic Exposure Control Technique in the Low-Dose CT Scan of Cardiac PET/CT Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Rosica, D; Agarwal, V; Di Carli, M; Dorbala, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Two separate low-dose CT scans are usually performed for attenuation correction of rest and stress N-13 ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (PET/CT). We utilize an automatic exposure control (AEC) technique to reduce CT radiation dose while maintaining perfusion image quality. Our goal is to assess the reproducibility of displayed CT dose index (CTDI) on same-day repeat CT scans (CT1 and CT2). Methods: Retrospectively, we reviewed CT images of PET/CT studies performed on the same day. Low-dose CT utilized AEC technique based on tube current modulation called Smart-mA. The scan parameters were 64 × 0.625mm collimation, 5mm slice thickness, 0.984 pitch, 1-sec rotation time, 120 kVp, and noise index 50 with a range of 10–200 mA. The scan length matched with PET field of view (FOV) with the heart near the middle of axial FOV. We identified the reference slice number (RS) for an anatomical landmark (carina) and used it to estimate axial shift between two CTs. For patient size, we measured an effective diameter on the reference slice. The effect of patient positioning to CTDI was evaluated using the table height. We calculated the absolute percent difference of the CTDI (%diff) for estimation of the reproducibility. Results: The study included 168 adults with an average body-mass index of 31.72 ± 9.10 (kg/m{sup 2}) and effective diameter was 32.72 ± 4.60 cm. The average CTDI was 1.95 ± 1.40 mGy for CT1 and 1.97 ± 1.42mGy for CT2. The mean %diff was 7.8 ± 6.8%. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the table height and %diff CTDI. (r=0.82, p<0.001) Conclusion: We have shown for the first time in human subjects, using two same-day CT images, that the AEC technique in low-dose CT is reproducible within 10% and significantly depends on the patient centering.

  17. Influence of model based iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality of multiplanar reformations in reduced dose chest CT

    PubMed Central

    Dunet, Vincent; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Grimm, Jochen; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reduces image noise and improves image quality (IQ) but its influence on post-processing tools including maximal intensity projection (MIP) and minimal intensity projection (mIP) remains unknown. Purpose To evaluate the influence on IQ of MBIR on native, mIP, MIP axial and coronal reformats of reduced dose computed tomography (RD-CT) chest acquisition. Material and Methods Raw data of 50 patients, who underwent a standard dose CT (SD-CT) and a follow-up RD-CT with a CT dose index (CTDI) of 2–3 mGy, were reconstructed by MBIR and FBP. Native slices, 4-mm-thick MIP, and 3-mm-thick mIP axial and coronal reformats were generated. The relative IQ, subjective IQ, image noise, and number of artifacts were determined in order to compare different reconstructions of RD-CT with reference SD-CT. Results The lowest noise was observed with MBIR. RD-CT reconstructed by MBIR exhibited the best relative and subjective IQ on coronal view regardless of the post-processing tool. MBIR generated the lowest rate of artefacts on coronal mIP/MIP reformats and the highest one on axial reformats, mainly represented by distortions and stairsteps artifacts. Conclusion The MBIR algorithm reduces image noise but generates more artifacts than FBP on axial mIP and MIP reformats of RD-CT. Conversely, it significantly improves IQ on coronal views, without increasing artifacts, regardless of the post-processing technique. PMID:27635253

  18. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

    1994-12-06

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

  19. Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.; Treanor, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    A pipe inspection instrument carriage for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure.

  20. Axial flow positive displacement worm compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An axial flow positive displacement compressor has an inlet axially spaced apart and upstream from an outlet. Inner and outer bodies have offset inner and outer axes extend from the inlet to the outlet through first and second sections of a compressor assembly in serial downstream flow relationship. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes respectively. The inner and outer helical blades extend radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first and second twist slopes in the first and second sections respectively. The first twist slopes are less than the second twist slopes. An engine including the compressor has in downstream serial flow relationship from the compressor a combustor and a high pressure turbine drivingly connected to the compressor by a high pressure shaft.

  1. Buckling of axially compressed conical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C.-H.; Katz, L.

    1980-01-01

    The buckling of a truncated elastic conical shell subjected to an axial compression is a classical problem in shell structures. The paper reinvestigates the buckling of an axially compressed truncated conical shell with rigid bulkheads. Two improvements are achieved. First, the condition that the total horizontal displacement must vanish due to rigid bulkhead and axisymmetry is treated as a constraint. This constraint is incorporated into the system through the use of the Lagrange multiplier; then the variational method is used to derive a complete set of boundary conditions for conical shells. Second, the stability is evaluated in the deformed state using the asymptotic solutions of the pair of Donnell-type equations for axisymmetric configuration. The results indicate that the buckling strength of conical shells depends mainly on the condition of the smaller end. In addition to the vertex angle, the distance ratio plays, at least, an equally important role.

  2. Tri-axial tactile sensing element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Ramos, Julián.; Navas-González, Rafael; Vidal-Verdú, F.

    2013-05-01

    A 13 x 13 square millimetre tri-axial taxel is presented which is suitable for some medical applications, for instance in assistive robotics that involves contact with humans or in prosthetics. Finite Element Analysis is carried out to determine what structure is the best to obtain a uniform distribution of pressure on the sensing areas underneath the structure. This structure has been fabricated in plastic with a 3D printer and a commercial tactile sensor has been used to implement the sensing areas. A three axis linear motorized translation stage with a tri-axial precision force sensor is used to find the parameters of the linear regression model and characterize the proposed taxel. The results are analysed to see to what extent the goal has been reached in this specific implementation.

  3. Micrometer axial resolution OCT for corneal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rahul; Lee, Kye-Sung; Rolland, Jannick P.; Zavislan, James M.; Aquavella, James V.; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2011-01-01

    An optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high axial resolution corneal imaging is presented. The system uses 375 nm bandwidth (625 to 1000 nm) from a broadband supercontinuum light source. The system was developed in free space to minimize image quality degradation due to dispersion. A custom-designed spectrometer based on a Czerny Turner configuration was implemented to achieve an imaging depth of 1 mm. Experimentally measured axial resolution was 1.1 μm in corneal tissue and had a good agreement with the theoretically calculated resolution from the envelope of the spectral interference fringes. In vivo imaging was carried out and thin corneal layers such as the tear film and the Bowman’s layer were quantified in normal, keratoconus, and contact lens wearing eyes, indicating the system’s suitability for several ophthalmic applications. PMID:22076265

  4. The closed co-axial analgesia system.

    PubMed

    Waaben, J; Jørgensen, S; Oxhøj, H; Arnsbo, P

    1980-10-01

    A twin-tube system for nitrous oxide analgesia in dental surgeries is described. The system is a non-polluting modification of the Mapleson A system, employing the principle of co-axial tubing introduced by Bain & Spoerel (1972). Active, continuous and calibrated gas removal takes place via the co-axial tubing by means of an ejector flowmeter. Investigation of the dynamic pressure excursions occurring at the nose-piece are fully compatible with normal breathing. Gas contamination of the dental environment can be reduced by at least 90%. The system described is safe and easy to handle. It is made of light-weight material and is adaptable to the equipment available. No rebreathing takes place when using a fresh gas inflow of 150 ml/kg body weight/min.

  5. Axial length changes after retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Burton, T C; Herron, B E; Ossoinig, K C

    1977-01-01

    A-scan echography was an accurate method for detecting changes in the depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, and length of the vitreous cavity after retinal detachment surgery in 30 eyes. Approximately 60% of the eyes had significant alterations in axial lengths exceeding+/-0.36 mm in aphakic eyes and +/-0.54 mm in phakic eyes. However, the operation of scleral bucklingg with large segments of hard silicone rubber implants or explants supported by an encircling band failed to result in a significant predictable shift of axial change in phakic or aphakic eyes. A-scan echography showed significant shallowing of the anterior chamber, and scleral buckling significantly increases lens thickness for at least six weeks. This induced a minor myopic refractive change that may explain some of the difference in postoperative refracitons between phakic and aphakic eyes.

  6. Microwave axial dielectric properties of carbon fiber

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng; Li, Zhuan

    2015-01-01

    Randomly distributed carbon fibers (CFs) reinforced epoxy resin composites are prepared by the pouring method, the dielectric properties of CF composites with different fiber content and length have been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of the composite increases with the fiber length, which is attributed to the decrease of depolarization field, and increases with the volume fraction, which is attributed to the increase of polarization. A formula, based on the theory of Reynolds-Hugh, is proposed to calculate the effective permittivity of CF composites, and validated by the experiments. The proposed formula is further applied to derive the axial permittivity of CF and analyze the effect of fiber length on the axial permittivity. PMID:26477579

  7. Modular organization of axial microcircuits in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bagnall, Martha W.; McLean, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Locomotion requires precise control of spinal networks. In tetrapods and bipeds, dynamic regulation of locomotion is simplified by the modular organization of spinal limb circuits, but it is not known whether their predecessors, fish axial circuits, are similarly organized. Here, we demonstrate that the larval zebrafish spinal cord contains distinct, parallel microcircuits for independent control of dorsal and ventral musculature on each side of the body. During normal swimming, dorsal and ventral microcircuits are equally active; but during postural correction, fish differentially engage these microcircuits to generate torque for self-righting. These findings reveal greater complexity in the axial spinal networks responsible for swimming than previously recognized and suggest an early template of modular organization for more complex locomotor circuits in later vertebrates. PMID:24408436

  8. Measurement of axial forces via natural frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Samer H.; Reynolds, Don; EnChen, Shen; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents results from testing several suspender ropes of the Delaware Memorial Bridge using vibration measurements and a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) instrument called the Axial Load Monitor (ALM). The testing consisted of measuring the frequencies of suspender ropes and determining their tension levels. Results were compared to theoretical predictions. This paper presents the results of the testing and discusses the problems associated with vibration measurements on actual bridges.

  9. Atlanto-axial subluxation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Thurlow, Robert D

    1988-01-01

    One of the causes of death in rheumatoid patients is cord compression following atlanto-axial subluxation. Dislocations in the cervical spine are common with patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. Anterior subluxation occurs in up to 35%, followed by vertical subluxation in 22.2%, lateral subluxation in 20.6% and rarely posterior subluxation. A case report is presented to illustrate such a complication. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  10. Compressive strength of axially loaded composite cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollar, Laszlo P.; Springer, George C.; Spingarn, Jay; McColskey, J. D.

    1993-10-01

    Tests were performed to measure the failure loads of axially compressed glass-fiber-reinforced and graphite-fiber-reinforced composite cylinders. The data were compared with the results of a previous model, which was based on a three-dimensional stress analysis and the Tsai-Wu quadratic first-ply failure criterion. This model predicted the failure loads for glass-fiber-reinforced composites with good accuracy, but less accurately for failure loads of graphite-epoxy composites.

  11. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    PubMed Central

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern. PMID:26046671

  12. Wetting on axially-patterned heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ruiz-Cabello, F J Montes; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, M A

    2008-05-19

    Contact angle variability, leading to errors in interpretation, arises from various sources. Contact angle hysteresis (history-dependent wetting) and contact angle multiplicity (corrugation of three-phase contact line) are irrespectively the most frequent causes of this uncertainty. Secondary effects also derived from the distribution of chemical defects on solid surfaces, and so due to the existence of boundaries, are the known "stick/jump-slip" phenomena. Currently, the underlying mechanisms in contact angle hysteresis and their connection to "stick/jump-slip" effects and the prediction of thermodynamic contact angle are not fully understood. In this study, axial models of smooth heterogeneous surface were chosen in order to mitigate contact angle multiplicity. For each axial pattern, advancing, receding and equilibrium contact angles were predicted from the local minima location of the system free energy. A heuristic model, based on the local Young equation for spherical drops on patch-wise axial patterns, was fruitfully tested from the results of free-energy minimization. Despite the very simplistic surface model chosen in this study, it allowed clarifying concepts usually misleading in wetting phenomena.

  13. Direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, N.; Mayet, C.; Dupuis, G.; Barroca, T.; Bon, P.; Lécart, S.; Fort, E.; Lévêque-Fort, S.

    2015-09-01

    Evanescent light excitation is widely used in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to confine light and reduce background noise. Here, we propose a method of exploiting evanescent light in the context of emission. When a fluorophore is located in close proximity to a medium with a higher refractive index, its near-field component is converted into light that propagates beyond the critical angle. This so-called supercritical-angle fluorescence can be captured using a high-numerical-aperture objective and used to determine the axial position of the fluorophore with nanometre precision. We introduce a new technique for three-dimensional nanoscopy that combines direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with dedicated detection of supercritical-angle fluorescence emission. We demonstrate that our approach of direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection (DONALD) typically yields an isotropic three-dimensional localization precision of 20 nm within an axial range of ∼150 nm above the coverslip.

  14. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples.

    PubMed

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-05

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.

  15. Bessel beam CARS of axially structured samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for axial profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of axially structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are modeled by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an axially layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.

  16. Axial gravity, massless fermions and trace anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Cvitan, M.; Prester, P. Dominis; Pereira, A. Duarte; Giaccari, S.; Štemberga, T.

    2017-08-01

    This article deals with two main topics. One is odd parity trace anomalies in Weyl fermion theories in a 4d curved background, the second is the introduction of axial gravity. The motivation for reconsidering the former is to clarify the theoretical background underlying the approach and complete the calculation of the anomaly. The reference is in particular to the difference between Weyl and massless Majorana fermions and to the possible contributions from tadpole and seagull terms in the Feynman diagram approach. A first, basic, result of this paper is that a more thorough treatment, taking account of such additional terms and using dimensional regularization, confirms the earlier result. The introduction of an axial symmetric tensor besides the usual gravitational metric is instrumental to a different derivation of the same result using Dirac fermions, which are coupled not only to the usual metric but also to the additional axial tensor. The action of Majorana and Weyl fermions can be obtained in two different limits of such a general configuration. The results obtained in this way confirm the previously obtained ones.

  17. Vibration of axially loaded circular arches

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work in the present paper is devoted to the determination of the buckling loads and natural frequencies of axially loaded arch structures. The finite element method is employed using a strain based arch element. The element is based on the conventional Euler curved beam type of strain displacement relationship and satisfies the exact representation of rigid body modes. The sub-space iteration technique is used to determine the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of the governing transcendental equation. The buckling of a pinned arch subjected to a uniform lateral pressure is first considered. The work is then extended to produce a comprehensive set of results for the vibration of axially loaded arches which are either pinned or fixed at both ends. The first symmetric and anti symmetric modes of vibration are determined and the effect of the axial load on these frequencies is investigated. The practical problem of an arch with a backfill is then considered and the effect of the elastic packing due to this backfill on the natural frequencies is determined.

  18. Golimumab for the treatment of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gelfer, Gita; Perry, Lisa; Deodhar, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the axial skeleton that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA). Patients with AS experience chronic pain due to sacroiliac joint and spinal inflammation, and may develop spinal ankylosing with syndesmophyte formation. Tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (TNFi) have shown promise in the management of AS and axSpA by targeting the underlying inflammatory process, and providing symptomatic relief. Whether they alter the progression of the disease is uncertain. Golimumab is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets and downregulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The use of golimumab has been shown to reduce the signs and symptoms of axSpA as well as improve patient function and quality reported outcomes. This review focuses on the biological rationale and the results of clinical trials with golimumab for the treatment of axSpA.

  19. Turbulence Effects of Axial Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Axial flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical modeling experiments using a 1:10 scale axial flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating axial flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.

  20. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

  1. Cardiac CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate. Before the test, a contrast dye, often iodine, may be injected into a vein in your ... should not receive more CT scans than the number that clinical guidelines recommend. Another risk is that ...

  2. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  3. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  4. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... reveal the following conditions or diseases: Cyst Herniated disk Infection Cancer that has spread to the spine ... M. Editorial team. CT Scans Read more Herniated Disk Read more Osteoarthritis Read more A.D.A. ...

  5. CHOROIDAL THICKNESS AND VOLUME IN A HEALTHY PEDIATRIC POPULATION AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH AGE, AXIAL LENGTH, AMETROPIA, AND SEX.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Laura; Perez-Navarro, Itziar; Sanchez-Cano, Ana; Perez-Garcia, Diana; Remon, Leon; Almenara, Cristina; Caramello, Constanza; Cristóbal, José A; Pinilla, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate choroidal thickness (CT) and volume in healthy pediatric individuals using enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), as well as its association with age, sex, axial length (AL), and refractive error. Ninety-three eyes from 93 healthy pediatric individuals were examined. An Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study grid was applied to analyze CT and volume map in each of its nine sectors. The mean subfoveal CT and volume were 314.22 ± 55.48 μm and 0.25 ± 0.04 mm, respectively. The nasal CT and volume of both the inner and the outer rings were significantly lower than the temporal area of the same ring and lower than the subfoveal choroidal thickness. A significant negative correlation between the subfoveal CT and AL (r = -0.250, P = 0.015) and a significant positive correlation between the subfoveal CT and refractive error (r = 0.238, P = 0.006) were found. The estimation of the variation in the subfoveal CT in relationship to the AL was -13.55 μm per millimeter. The variation in the subfoveal CT with refractive error was 7.52 μm per diopter. The estimation of the variation in the total choroidal volume related to the AL and ametropia was, respectively, -0.2354 mm per millimeter and 0.1412 mm per diopter. Healthy pediatric subjects exhibit choroidal differences in refractive error and AL. In the study population, CT and volume show an increase with age after adjusting for AL.

  6. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  7. Might axial myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. Axial myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine model of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated

  8. Confined anterior cerebral artery infarction manifesting as isolated unilateral axial weakness.

    PubMed

    Honig, Asaf; Eliahou, Ruth; Auriel, Eitan

    2017-02-15

    We describe isolated unilateral axial weakness in three patients eventually diagnosed with anterior cerebral artery infarction (ACAI), a new clinical observation. Files of three ACAI patients (2 females, 1 male, ages 55-80) were retrospectively reviewed. All three presented to the ED with sudden unsteadiness. On initial neurological examination, all three patients manifested unilateral truncal deviation to the side contralateral to the weakness, even while seated. There was significant unilateral hypotonia due to substantial paravertebral weakness. None had pyramidal signs or increased limb tone. Speech, language, and cognitive performance were intact during admission examination. In all three patients, initial diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI showed small confined regions of restriction involving the posterolateral border of ACA territory; CT angiography was normal in one patient with a newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation but showed atherosclerotic vasculature with severe narrowing of the A3 segment of the ACA in two. Awareness of ACAI presenting as unilateral axial weakness is warranted. We suggest that optimal diagnostic management should include examination of axial tone. Ischemic involvement of distal ACA branches may herald a more extensive ACAI. Prompt diagnosis may enable thrombolysis or endovascular treatment, and blood pressure maintenance may allow adequate perfusion to damaged tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Deformation and failure mechanisms of 18650 battery cells under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Juner; Zhang, Xiaowei; Sahraei, Elham; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    An important deformation mode during ground impacts of battery packs made of cylindrical battery cells is axial compression. This type of loading subjects the cell to a complex deformation pattern and failure mechanism. The design of endcaps plays an important role in such deformations. To explore the sequence of deformation and the underlying failure mechanisms, a combined experimental/numerical study was carried out. Tests were conducted on 18650 cells, and the deformation of each component was carefully investigated and documented. There are four different stages in the force-displacement curve, corresponding with deformation of various components in the endcap assembly. A short circuit happens at a displacement of 4 mm. To clarify these observations, a detailed Finite Element model was set up, covering the geometry and the mechanical property of almost all the components of the cell. Using the simulation results, the sequence of the axial compression was revealed, which was subsequently validated by Micro CT scans as well as analytical solutions. Based on the precise analysis of the mechanical behavior, the cause of the short circuit during axial loading was clarified. Two failure mechanisms in the separator at the top section of the cell explain the possible causes of short circuit.

  10. PlexinD1 deficiency induces defects in axial skeletal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Tomoatsu; Yoshida, Yutaka; Izu, Yayoi; Nifuji, Akira; Ezura, Yoichi; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Noda, Masaki

    2007-08-15

    Axial patterning in embryonic skeletogenesis associates with coordinated programming of somitogenesis and angiogenesis. As seen in endochondral bone formation, skeletogenesis is closely related to angiogenesis during development. PlexinD1 is a member of plexin family, is expressed in central nervous system and endothelium, and plays a role in blood vessel patterning and endothelium positioning during embryonic development. Here, we examined the effects of PlexinD1 deficiency on skeletogenesis. Three-dimensional micro CT examination revealed that PlexinD1 deficiency resulted in axial skeletal patterning defects including malformation in vertebral body and rib bone shape. Histological examination of the vertebral bodies and long bones showed that PlexinD1 deficiency altered the development of cartilage. PlexinD1 deficiency did not affect the levels of von Willebrand factor staining in relatively large vessels not attached but close to the vertebral body of mice. However, PlexinD1 deficiency reduced the von Willebrand factor (vWf) staining in most of the microvasculatures attached to the vertebral bone. PlexinD1 was expressed in osteoblastic cells and bone tissues of newborn and adult mice. As most of the homozygous knockout mice did not survive, we examined the role of PlexinD1 in bone formation in heterozygous adult mice subjected to bone marrow ablation. However, PlexinD1 heterozygous knockout did not reveal defects in new bone formation. In conclusion, PlexinD1 is involved in the patterning of axial skeletogenesis.

  11. Helical CT of abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Bell, T

    1999-05-01

    CT has revolutionized the diagnostic work-up of trauma patients with suspected abdominal injuries. A wide range of intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal organ injuries can be quickly and accurately diagnosed with CT. Today, helical CT technology permits even faster examinations, with improved intravenous contrast opacification of parenchymal organs and vascular structures and reduced CT artifacts caused by patient motion, respiration, and arterial pulsation. Severely injured and potentially unstable patients, who might not have been able to tolerate the long CT examinations of the past, may be quickly evaluated today with helical CT. Accurate diagnosis requires high quality CT examinations that are performed with optimum CT protocols. This article reviews the currently recommended helical CT protocols for evaluating patients with suspected abdominal injuries, and the CT findings when injuries are present.

  12. Dual-energy computed tomography of the head: a phantom study assessing axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Kosuke; Kawashima, Hiroki; Hamaguchi, Takashi; Takata, Tadanori; Kobayashi, Masanao; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Koshida, Kichiro

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a calibration method for small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses during dual- source dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and to compare the axial dose distribution, eye lens dose, and image noise level between DE and standard, single-energy (SE) head CT angiography. Three DE (100/Sn140 kVp 80/Sn140 kVp, and 140/80 kVp) and one SE (120 kVp) acquisitions were performed using a second-generation dual-source CT device and a female head phantom, with an equivalent volumetric CT dose index. The axial absorbed dose distribution at the orbital level and the absorbed doses for the eye lens were measured using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. CT attenuation numbers were obtained in the DE composite images and the SE images of the phantom at the orbital level. The doses absorbed at the orbital level and in the eye lens were lower and standard deviations for the CT attenuation numbers were slightly higher in the DE acquisitions than those in the SE acquisition. The anterior surface dose was especially higher in the SE acquisition than that in the DE acquisitions. Thus, DE head CT angiography can be performed with a radiation dose lower than that required for a standard SE head CT angiography, with a slight increase in the image noise level. The 100/Sn140 kVp acquisition revealed the most balanced axial dose distribution. In addition, our proposed method was effective for calibrating small dosimeters to measure absorbed doses in DECT.

  13. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  14. Co-axial multicusp source for low axial energy spread ion beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R. A.; Leung, K. N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M. D.; Zahir, N.

    1999-09-01

    A co-axial multicusp ion source has been designed and tested. This source uses a new magnetic filter configuration. This magnetic filter is efficient in modifying the plasma potential distribution which can reduce the axial energy spread of the extracted ion beam. Energy spreads as low as 0.6 eV have been obtained. The electron temperature in this source has also been found to be about 0.1 eV. Furthermore, the new source configuration is capable of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution which can improve the transverse ion energy, which results in a low beam emittance. The co-axial source can be used for a number of different applications such as ion projection lithography and radioactive ion beam projets.

  15. Urachal remnant diseases: spectrum of CT and US findings.

    PubMed

    Yu, J S; Kim, K W; Lee, H J; Lee, Y J; Yoon, C S; Kim, M J

    2001-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) are ideally suited for demonstrating urachal remnant diseases. A patent urachus is demonstrated at longitudinal US and occasionally at CT as a tubular connection between the anterosuperior aspect of the bladder and the umbilicus. An umbilical-urachal sinus manifests at US as a thickened tubular structure along the midline below the umbilicus. A vesicourachal diverticulum is usually discovered incidentally at axial CT, appearing as a midline cystic lesion just above the anterosuperior aspect of the bladder. At US, it manifests as an extraluminally protruding, fluid-filled sac that does not communicate with the umbilicus. Urachal cysts manifest at both modalities as a noncommunicating, fluid-filled cavity in the midline lower abdominal wall located just beneath the umbilicus or above the bladder. Both infected urachal cysts and urachal carcinomas commonly display increased echogenicity at US and thick-walled cystic or mixed attenuation at CT, making it difficult to differentiate between them. Percutaneous needle biopsy or fluid aspiration is usually needed for diagnosis and therapeutic planning. Nevertheless, CT and US can help identify most disease entities originating from the urachal remnant in the anterior abdominal wall. Understanding the anatomy and the imaging features of urachal remnant diseases is essential for correct diagnosis and proper management.

  16. Drop size selection in axially heated co-axial fiber capillary instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlavi, Saviz; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Gallaire, Francois

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the sphere size selection mechanism in silicon-in-silica sphere formation through the application of an external axial thermal gradient to a co-axial silicon-in-silica fiber (Gumennik et al., Nature Com., 2013). We first apply a convective/absolute stability analysis to the in-fibre capillary instability governing the sphere formation and demonstrate that the resulting wavelength selection predicts a finite but still too large wavelength. A global stability analysis is then pursued, which accounts for the spatial inhomogeneity of the base flow. F.G. acknowledges funding from ERC SimCoMiCs 280117.

  17. Designing and updating the flow part of axial and radial-axial turbines through mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, Andrey; Rusanov, Roman; Lampart, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes an algorithm for the design of axial and radial-axial type turbines. The algorithm is based on using mathematical models of various levels of complexity - from 1D to 3D. Flow path geometry is described by means of analytical methods of profiling using a limited number of parameters. 3D turbulent flow model is realised in the program complex IPMFlow, developed based on the earlier codes FlowER and FlowER-U. Examples of developed or modernized turbines for differentpurpose power machines are presented. They are: an expansion turbine, ORC turbine and cogeneration mediumpressure turbine.

  18. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  19. Digital enhancement of computerized axial tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic evaluation has been conducted of certain digital image enhancement techniques performed in image space. Three types of images have been used, computer generated phantoms, tomograms of a synthetic phantom, and axial tomograms of human anatomy containing images of lesions, artificially introduced into the tomograms. Several types of smoothing, sharpening, and histogram modification have been explored. It has been concluded that the most useful enhancement techniques are a selective smoothing of singular picture elements, combined with contrast manipulation. The most useful tool in applying these techniques is the gray-scale histogram.

  20. Digital enhancement of computerized axial tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic evaluation was conducted of certain digital image enhancement techniques performed in image space. Three types of images were used, computer generated phantoms, tomograms of a synthetic phantom, and axial tomograms of human anatomy containing images of lesions, artificially introduced into the tomograms. Several types of smoothing, sharpening, and histogram modification were explored. It was concluded that the most useful enhancement techniques are a selective smoothing of singular picture elements, combined with contrast manipulation. The most useful tool in applying these techniques is the gray-scale histogram.

  1. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  2. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  3. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  4. Scalar resonances in axially symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F.; Vucetich, Héctor

    2015-03-01

    We study properties of resonant solutions to the scalar wave equation in several axially symmetric spacetimes. We prove that nonaxial resonant modes do not exist neither in the Lanczos dust cylinder, the extreme (2 + 1) dimensional Bañados-Taitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) spacetime nor in a class of simple rotating wormhole solutions. Moreover, we find unstable solutions to the wave equation in the Lanczos dust cylinder and in the r2 < 0 region of the extreme (2 + 1) dimensional BTZ spacetime, two solutions that possess closed timelike curves. Similarities with previous results obtained for the Kerr spacetime are explored.

  5. Water ingestion into jet engine axial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1982-01-01

    An axial flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A model for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.

  6. Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  7. Accuracy assessment of the axial images obtained from cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Panzarella, FK; Junqueira, JLC; Oliveira, LB; de Araújo, NS; Costa, C

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate accuracy of linear measurements assessed from axial tomograms and the influence of the use of different protocols in two cone beam CT (CBCT) units. Methods A cylinder object consisting of Nylon® (Day Brazil, Sao Paulo, Brazil) with radiopaque markers was radiographically examined applying different protocols from NewTom 3GTM (Quantitative Radiology s.r.l, Verona, Veneto, Italy) and i-CATTM (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA) units. Horizontal (A–B) and vertical (C–D) distances were assessed from axial tomograms and measured using a digital calliper that provided the gold standard for actual values. Results There were differences when considering acquisition protocols to each CBCT unit. Concerning all analysed protocols from i-CATTM and Newtom 3GTM, both A–B and C–D distances presented underestimated values. Measurements of the axial images obtained from NewTom 3GTM (6 inch 0.16 mm and 9 inch 0.25 mm) were similar to the ones obtained from i-CATTM (13 cm 20 s 0.3 mm, 13 cm 20 s 0.4 mm and 13 cm 40 s 0.25 mm). Conclusion The use of different protocols from CBCT machines influences linear measurements assessed from axial images. Linear distances were underestimated in both equipments. Our findings suggest that the best protocol for the i-CATTM is 13 cm 20 s 0.3 mm and for the NewTom 3GTM, the use of 6 inch or 9 inch is recommended. PMID:21831977

  8. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  9. Interobserver reproducibility of cervical lymph node measurements at CT in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, M S; Cheng, K L; Choi, Y J; Roh, J L; Lee, Y S; Lee, S S; Lee, J H; Baek, J H

    2016-12-01

    To determine the interobserver reproducibility of measuring cervical lymph nodes at computed tomography (CT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and to investigate the influence of finding extracapsular spread (ECS) at CT on measurement reliability. The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and informed consent was obtained. A total of 146 patients with 224 suspicious lymph nodes underwent CT before treatment. Two observers independently measured the diameters (minimal axial, maximum axial, and maximum longitudinal diameter) and assessed the ECS using CT. The greatest diameter was defined as the largest among the three measured diameters. Interobserver variability was determined by the within-subject coefficient of variation, and interobserver agreement was determined by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The within-subject coefficients of variation were 7.8%, 7.6%, and 11.4% for the minimal axial, maximum axial, and greatest diameters, respectively. The ICC values for interobserver agreement were excellent for all diameter measurements (i.e., ICC >0.9). Minimum and maximum axial diameter measurements were statistically more reliable than the greatest diameter measurement (p=0.008 and p=0.0001, respectively). The presence of ECS on CT does not significantly affect the reliability of lymph node diameter measurements (p>0.05). Lymph node diameter measurement on CT is a highly reproducible and robust method. Additionally, imaging features of ECS do not affect reliability. Therefore, the measurement of lymph node diameter can be confidently performed in daily clinical practice or clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multi-frequency Axial Transmission Bone Ultrasonometer

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Egorov, Vladimir; Sarvazyan, Noune; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen a surge in the development of axial transmission QUS (Quantitative UltraSound) technologies for the assessment of long bones using various modes of acoustic waves. The condition of cortical bones and the development of osteoporosis are determined by numerous mechanical, micro-structural, and geometrical or macro-structural bone properties like hardness, porosity and cortical thickness. Such complex manifestations of osteoporosis require the evaluation of multiple parameters with different sensitivities to the various properties of bone that are affected by the disease. This objective may be achieved by using a multi-frequency ultrasonic examination The ratio of the acoustic wavelength to the cortical thickness can be changed by varying the frequency of the ultrasonic pulse propagating through the long bone that results in the change in composition of the induced wave comprised of a set of numerous modes of guided, longitudinal, and surface acoustic waves. The multi-frequency axial transmission QUS method developed at Artann Laboratories (Trenton, NJ) is implemented in the Bone Ultrasonic Scanner (BUSS). In the current version of the BUSS, a train of ultrasonic pulses with 60, 100, 400, 800, and 1200 kHz frequencies is used. The developed technology was tested on a variety of bone phantoms simulating normal, osteopenic, and osteoporotic bones. The results of this study confirm the feasibility of the multi-frequency approach for the assessment of the processes leading to osteoporosis. PMID:24206675

  11. Multi-frequency axial transmission bone ultrasonometer.

    PubMed

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Egorov, Vladimir; Sarvazyan, Noune; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2014-07-01

    The last decade has seen a surge in the development of axial transmission QUS (Quantitative UltraSound) technologies for the assessment of long bones using various modes of acoustic waves. The condition of cortical bones and the development of osteoporosis are determined by numerous mechanical, micro-structural, and geometrical or macro-structural bone properties like hardness, porosity and cortical thickness. Such complex manifestations of osteoporosis require the evaluation of multiple parameters with different sensitivities to the various properties of bone that are affected by the disease. This objective may be achieved by using a multi-frequency ultrasonic examination The ratio of the acoustic wavelength to the cortical thickness can be changed by varying the frequency of the ultrasonic pulse propagating through the long bone that results in the change in composition of the induced wave comprised of a set of numerous modes of guided, longitudinal, and surface acoustic waves. The multi-frequency axial transmission QUS method developed at Artann Laboratories (Trenton, NJ) is implemented in the Bone Ultrasonic Scanner (BUSS). In the current version of the BUSS, a train of ultrasonic pulses with 60, 100, 400, 800, and 1200 kHz frequencies is used. The developed technology was tested on a variety of bone phantoms simulating normal, osteopenic, and osteoporotic bones. The results of this study confirm the feasibility of the multi-frequency approach for the assessment of the processes leading to osteoporosis.

  12. Microbubbling by co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization.

    PubMed

    Farook, U; Stride, E; Edirisinghe, M J; Moaleji, R

    2007-08-01

    The preparation of microbubble suspensions is an important feature of medical engineering research. Recently, co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization was used in our laboratory for the first time to prepare microbubble suspensions. In this paper, using a model glycerol-air system, we investigate in detail the characteristics of this microbubbling process. Modes of microbubbling are elucidated with respect to applied voltage and liquid and air flow rates. Thus, a parametric plot is constructed to identify a liquid and gas flow rate regime, which allows continuous microbubbling. This map provides a basis for the selection of a suitable combination of liquid and gas flow rates particularly in relation to yield and bubble size. The mechanism of microbubbling in microfluidic systems is compared with that of microbubbling by co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization to identify the advantages and the limiting factors of the latter. Stability of microbubbles prepared by this method in terms of variation of diameter as a function of time is compared with previous literature on the dissolution of microbubbles with an air core and suggests the need for further work to stabilize the bubbles.

  13. Modeling of an axial injection torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Álvarez, R.; Marques, L.; Rubio, S. J.; Rodero, A.; Quintero, M. C.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents simulation results for a microwave (2.45GHz) plasma reactor, operated by an axial injection torch (AIT). The study gives a two-dimensional description of the AIT-reactor system, based on an electromagnetic model (that solves Maxwell's equations adopting a time-harmonic description, yielding the distribution of the electromagnetic fields and the average power absorbed by the plasma), and a hydrodynamic model (that solves the Navier-Stokes' equations for the flowing neutral gas, yielding the distribution of mass density, pressure, temperature, and velocities). Comparison between model results and experimental measurements reveal common variation trends, with changes in the reactor height, for the power reflected by the system, and yield a qualitative agreement for the axial profile of the gas rotational temperature. Model results, such as the power transmission coefficient and the gas temperature, are particularly dependent on the reactor dimensions, the electron density and temperature, and the gas input flow, which indicates that simulations can be used to provide general guidelines for device optimization.

  14. Axial vessel widening in arborescent monocots.

    PubMed

    Petit, Giai; DeClerck, Fabrice A J; Carrer, Marco; Anfodillo, Tommaso

    2014-02-01

    Dicotyledons have evolved a strategy to compensate for the increase in hydraulic resistance to water transport with height growth by widening xylem conduits downwards. In monocots, the accumulation of hydraulic resistance with height should be similar, but the absence of secondary growth represents a strong limitation for the maintenance of xylem hydraulic efficiency during ontogeny. The hydraulic architecture of monocots has been studied but it is unclear how monocots arrange their axial vascular structure during ontogeny to compensate for increases in height. We measured the vessel lumina and estimated the hydraulic diameter (Dh) at different heights along the stem of two arborescent monocots, Bactris gasipaes (Kunth) and Guadua angustifolia (Kunth). For the former, we also estimated the variation in Dh along the leaf rachis. Hydraulic diameter increased basally from the stem apex to the base with a scaling exponent (b) in the range of those reported for dicot trees (b = 0.22 in B. gasipaes; b = 0.31 and 0.23 in G. angustifolia). In B. gasipaes, vessels decrease in Dh from the stem's centre towards the periphery, an opposite pattern compared with dicot trees. Along the leaf rachis, a pattern of increasing Dh basally was also found (b = 0.13). The hydraulic design of the monocots studied revealed an axial pattern of xylem conduits similar to those evolved by dicots to compensate and minimize the negative effect of root-to-leaf length on hydrodynamic resistance to water flow.

  15. Pulsed Detonation Operation of an Axial Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, David; St. George, Andrew; Driscoll, Robert; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gas Dynamics and Propulsion Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    A detonation is by its nature a more thermodynamically efficient combustion mode than deflagration. Several attempts are underway to integrate detonating combustion into turbomachines in order to realize the increased efficiency available, save resources and reduce emissions. One approach to this challenge is to employ pulsed detonations as from pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) and use the pulsed outflow to drive a turbine. The difficulty with this approach is that turbines, especially the more efficient axial turbines suffer in efficiency when their inflow is pulsed. At present there is not even a commonly acknowledged turbine efficiency measure which works reasonably for a pulsed input. The present work investigates the efficiency of an axial turbine with pulsed flow. Initial tests are performed with non-combusting flow in order to study the influence of pulsation on the turbine performance. This cold flow will admit a broader range of instrumentation which can be inserted within the turbine. This allows time-resolved measure of the flow angles which have a pronounced effect on the turbine performance. Later tests with detonating inflow yield global measures and these are compared to the non-combusting results. Work sponsored by Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc.

  16. 3D iterative full and half scan reconstruction in CT architectures with distributed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatrou, M.; De Man, B.; Beque, D.; Yin, Z.; Khare, K.; Benson, T. M.

    2008-03-01

    In 3 rd generation CT systems projection data, generated by X-rays emitted from a single source and passing through the imaged object, are acquired by a single detector covering the entire field of view (FOV). Novel CT system architectures employing distributed sources [1,2] could extend the axial coverage, while removing cone-beam artifacts and improving spatial resolution and dose. The sources can be distributed in plane and/or in the longitudinal direction. We investigate statistical iterative reconstruction of multi-axial data, acquired with simulated CT systems with multiple sources distributed along the in-plane and longitudinal directions. The current study explores the feasibility of 3D iterative Full and Half Scan reconstruction methods for CT systems with two different architectures. In the first architecture the sources are distributed in the longitudinal direction, and in the second architecture the sources are distributed both longitudinally and trans-axially. We used Penalized Weighted Least Squares Transmission Reconstruction (PWLSTR) and incorporated a projector-backprojector model matching the simulated architectures. The proposed approaches minimize artifacts related to the proposed geometries. The reconstructed images show that the investigated architectures can achieve good image quality for very large coverage without severe cone-beam artifacts.

  17. Fundamental relationship between the noise properties of grating-based differential phase contrast CT and absorption CT: Theoretical framework using a cascaded system model and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using a grating interferometer, a conventional x-ray cone beam computed tomography (CT) data acquisition system can be used to simultaneously generate both conventional absorption CT (ACT) and differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) images from a single data acquisition. Since the two CT images were extracted from the same set of x-ray projections, it is expected that intrinsic relationships exist between the noise properties of the two contrast mechanisms. The purpose of this paper is to investigate these relationships. Methods: First, a theoretical framework was developed using a cascaded system model analysis to investigate the relationship between the noise power spectra (NPS) of DPC-CT and ACT. Based on the derived analytical expressions of the NPS, the relationship between the spatial-frequency-dependent noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) of DPC-CT and ACT was derived. From these fundamental relationships, the NPS and NEQ of the DPC-CT system can be derived from the corresponding ACT system or vice versa. To validate these theoretical relationships, a benchtop cone beam DPC-CT/ACT system was used to experimentally measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) and NPS of both DPC-CT and ACT. The measured three-dimensional (3D) MTF and NPS were then combined to generate the corresponding 3D NEQ. Results: Two fundamental relationships have been theoretically derived and experimentally validated for the NPS and NEQ of DPC-CT and ACT: (1) the 3D NPS of DPC-CT is quantitatively related to the corresponding 3D NPS of ACT by an inplane-only spatial-frequency-dependent factor 1/f 2, the ratio of window functions applied to DPC-CT and ACT, and a numerical factor Cg determined by the geometry and efficiency of the grating interferometer. Note that the frequency-dependent factor is independent of the frequency component fz perpendicular to the axial plane. (2) The 3D NEQ of DPC-CT is related to the corresponding 3D NEQ of ACT by an f 2 scaling factor and

  18. Determination of CT-to-density conversion relationship for image-based treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Saw, Cheng B; Loper, Alphonse; Komanduri, Krishna; Combine, Tony; Huq, Saiful; Scicutella, Carol

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of tissue inhomogeneity correction in image-based treatment planning will improve the accuracy of radiation dose calculations for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy. Before the tissue inhomogeneity correction can be applied, the relationship between the computed tomography (CT) value and density must be established. This tissue characterization relationship allows the conversion of CT value in each voxel of the CT images into density for use in the dose calculations. This paper describes the proper procedure of establishing the CT value to density conversion relationship. A tissue characterization phantom with 17 inserts made of different materials was scanned using a GE Lightspeed Plus CT scanner (120 kVp). These images were then downloaded into the Eclipse and Pinnacle treatment planning systems. At the treatment planning workstation, the axial images were retrieved to determine the CT value of the inserts. A region of interest was drawn on the central portion of the insert and the mean CT value and its standard deviation were determined. The mean CT value was plotted against the density of the tissue inserts and fitted with bilinear equations. A new set of CT values vs. densities was generated from the bilinear equations and then entered into the treatment planning systems. The need to obtain CT values through the treatment planning system is very clear. The 2 treatment planning systems use different CT value ranges, one from -1024 to 3071 and the other from 0 to 4096. If the range is correct, it would result in inappropriate use of the conversion curve. In addition to the difference in the range of CT values, one treatment planning system uses physical density, while the other uses relative electron density.

  19. Elastic Buckling of Orthotropic Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, Ashraf; Hu, Hurang; Diallo, Abdouramane

    1997-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular orthotropic plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  20. A technique to determine a desired preparation axial inclination.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Harry; Ivanhoe, John R; Blalock, John S; Frazier, Kevin B; Plummer, Kevin D

    2003-10-01

    The guidelines recommended in the literature for the convergence angle of a crown preparation vary from 3 to 24 degrees. There is a lack of guidelines on techniques to achieve a specific axial inclination. The purpose of this article was to present a practical technique, with a diamond rotary cutting instrument of known axial inclination, to determine the diamond rotary cutting instrument angulations required to achieve the desired axial inclination of a preparation.

  1. U(1) axial charge in the chiral limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangdong

    1990-07-01

    The U(1) axial-vector form factor is studied using an unsubtracted dispersion relation. The associated axial charge is shown to be analytic in quark masses in the chiral limit although individual terms in the Cheng-Li separation exhibit large isospin and flavor-SU(3) symmetry breaking. A new separation of the U(1) axial charge is proposed, based on the wave functions of the physical states entering in the spectral density.

  2. Dedicated breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, John

    2009-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) systems were designed and fabricated in our laboratory, and patient scanning commenced in November 2004. The breast CT scanner was designed utilizing several off-the-shelf components, including the x-ray system, the flat-panel detector, and a position encoder - bearing - motor system. These components were integrated into a custom designed scanner frame and gantry. The breast CT scanners utilize a 17 second acquisition during patient breath-hold, and during this time 500 projection images are acquired over 360 degrees around the breast. The radiation levels are adjusted such that the mean glandular dose is equal to that of two-view mammography for each woman. As of November 2008, over 180 patients have been scanned. Of these, about 40 were imaged with and without contrast agent injection. We have also imaged 4 patients using an integrated PET system. Initial evaluation indicates that high-quality tomographic images of the breast can be achieved at dose levels comparable to two view mammography. The ultimate utility of breast CT may include breast cancer screening, diagnostic imaging, robotically controlled biopsy, and other interventional procedures.

  3. Intraorbital glass foreign body missed on CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Edwin C; Francis, Ian C; Wilcsek, Geoffrey A

    2007-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with a 7-week history of foreign body sensation in the superior right orbit after orbital trauma sustained during an accidental face-down fall onto a broken drinking glass. CT identified a 10.35 x 3.91-mm radiopaque foreign body in the right orbit superolateral to the globe. Orbital exploration superficial to the levator palpebrae superioris aponeurosis in close proximity to the site occupied by the CT-identified foreign body revealed an additional glass intraorbital foreign body, 4.0 x 2.5 x 0.25 mm in dimension. The second glass foreign body was entirely missed on the preoperative, 1-mm axial scans combined with sagittal and coronal reconstructed images and plain radiography.

  4. Modular functional organisation of the axial locomotor system in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Charrier, Vanessa; Mathou, Alexia

    2014-02-01

    Most investigations on tetrapod locomotion have been concerned with limb movements. However, there is compelling evidence that the axial musculoskeletal system contributes to important functions during locomotion. Adult salamanders offer a remarkable opportunity to examine these functions because these amphibians use axial undulations to propel themselves in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. In this article, we review the currently available biological data on axial functions during various locomotor modes in salamanders. We also present data showing the modular organisation of the neural networks that generate axial synergies during locomotion. The functional implication of this modular organisation is discussed.

  5. Motion and emotion: anxiety-axial connections in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Šumec, Rastislav; Rektorová, Irena; Jech, Robert; Menšíková, Kateřina; Roth, Jan; Růžička, Evžen; Sochorová, Dana; Dušek, Ladislav; Kaňovský, Petr; Rektor, Ivan; Pavlík, Tomáš; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety is a serious and frequent complication in Parkinson's disease (PD) that significantly affects the quality of life of patients. Multiple neuroanatomical, experimental, and clinical studies suggest its close association with axial disturbances. However, whether this relation applies for PD patients (commonly suffering from axial difficulties, such as balance and gait disturbance) has not been properly tested yet. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PD patients suffering from axial symptoms have higher levels of anxiety than others and to identify other factors associated with anxiety-axial connections. In this questionnaire study, 212 patients with PD were assessed by standardized scales, such as Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, examining their mood and cognitive status. These data were correlated to dominant motor symptoms of these patients, such as tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and axial symptoms. Unlike other motor symptoms, only axial symptoms showed to be significantly related to higher levels of anxiety. The patients suffering from anxiety and axial problems have also shown significantly higher depression levels. Axial disturbances are related to higher anxiety levels in PD patients. It is crucial to pay high attention to symptoms of anxiety in patients having postural instability or gait disorder. Further clinical studies are desirable to investigate new, practical implications of anxiety-axial connection to provide complex management options of these serious symptoms.

  6. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; Schiavilla, Rocco; Viviani, Michele

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power counting is constructed.

  7. Nuclear axial currents in chiral effective field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Pastore, Saori; ...

    2016-01-11

    Two-nucleon axial charge and current operators are derived in chiral effective field theory up to one loop. The derivation is based on time-ordered perturbation theory and accounts for cancellations between the contributions of irreducible diagrams and the contributions owing to nonstatic corrections from energy denominators of reducible diagrams. Ultraviolet divergencies associated with the loop corrections are isolated in dimensional regularization. The resulting axial current is finite and conserved in the chiral limit, while the axial charge requires renormalization. As a result, a complete set of contact terms for the axial charge up to the relevant order in the power countingmore » is constructed.« less

  8. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  9. Technical aspects of CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Kuszyk, B S; Fishman, E K

    1998-10-01

    The basic tasks of spiral CT acquisition, image processing, and image display are the foundations underlying CT angiography regardless of the anatomic region of interest. Volume rendering is a rapidly emerging image processing technique for creating three-dimensional (3D) images from CT datasets, which has important advantages over other 3D rendering techniques including maximum intensity projection and surface rendering. This articles reviews the techniques that are commonly used in CT angiography and key considerations for optimization.

  10. Comparison of computed tomography scout based reference point localization to conventional film and axial computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C H

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  11. Value of 3-D CT in classifying acetabular fractures during orthopedic residency training.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Jeffrey; Halvorson, Jason; Carroll, Eben; Webb, Lawrence X

    2012-05-01

    The complex anatomy of the pelvis and acetabulum have historically made classification and interpretation of acetabular fractures difficult for orthopedic trainees. The addition of 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) scan has gained popularity in preoperative planning, identification, and education of acetabular fractures given their complexity. Therefore, the authors examined the value of 3-D CT compared with conventional radiography in classifying acetabular fractures at different levels of orthopedic training. Their hypothesis was that 3-D CT would improve correct identification of acetabular fractures compared with conventional radiography.The classic Letournel fracture pattern classification system was presented in quiz format to 57 orthopedic residents and 20 fellowship-trained orthopedic traumatologists. A case consisted of (1) plain radiographs and 2-dimensional axial CT scans or (2) 3-D CT scans. All levels of training showed significant improvement in classifying acetabular fractures with 3-D vs 2-D CT, with the greatest benefit from 3-D CT found in junior residents (postgraduate years 1-3).Three-dimensional CT scans can be an effective educational tool for understanding the complex spatial anatomy of the pelvis, learning acetabular fracture patterns, and correctly applying a widely accepted fracture classification system.

  12. Validity of MicroCT for in vitro detection of proximal carious lesions in primary molars.

    PubMed

    Soviero, V M; Leal, S C; Silva, R C; Azevedo, R B

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the MicroCT for detection of proximal carious lesions in primary molars, using histology as the gold standard. Forty-eight proximal surfaces of primary molars were examined. Two calibrated examiners conducted the examinations independently. Proximal surfaces were visually scored, using ICDAS. Bitewing radiographs, Micro-CT and histological analyses used caries scores: 0=sound; 1=outer enamel; 2=inner enamel; 3=not spread dentine; 4=outer dentine; 5=inner dentine. Axial and sagital images were used for Micro-CT analysis, whilst for histology, tooth sections (400μm) were analyzed stereomicroscopically (×15). Inter-examiner agreement ranged from 0.87 to 0.93 kappa coefficient (k). Histological analysis revealed a frequency of sound tooth surfaces (18.8%) enamel carious lesions (E1) (48%) and dentine carious lesions (D1) (33.3%). MicroCT showed high correlation with histology (r(s)0.88). At both diagnostic thresholds (E1 and D1), sensitivity and accuracy were higher for MicroCT. Inter-device agreement between MicroCT and histology was k=0.81. No difference was found between MicroCT and histology as gold standards for detecting carious lesions using ICDAS. MicroCT can be used as a gold standard for detecting carious lesions in proximal surfaces in primary molars. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Axially symmetric shapes with minimum wave drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Fuller, Franklyn B

    1956-01-01

    The external wave drag of bodies of revolution moving at supersonic speeds can be expressed either in terms of the geometry of the body, or in terms of the body-simulating axial source distribution. For purposes of deriving optimum bodies under various given conditions, it is found that the second of the methods mentioned is the more tractable. By use of a quasi-cylindrical theory, that is, the boundary conditions are applied on the surface of a cylinder rather than on the body itself, the variational problems of the optimum bodies having prescribed volume or caliber are solved. The streamline variations of cross-sectional area and drags of the bodies are exhibited, and some numerical results are given.

  14. Axial flux machine, stator and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Ralph James

    2004-03-16

    An axial flux machine comprises: a soft magnetic composite stator extension positioned in parallel with a rotor disk and having slots; soft magnetic composite pole pieces attached to the stator extension and facing a permanent magnet on the rotor disk, each comprising a protrusion situated within a respective one of the slots, each protrusion shaped so as to facilitate orientation of the respective pole piece with respect to the stator extension; electrical coils, each wrapped around a respective one of the pole pieces. In another embodiment the soft magnetic composite pole pieces each comprise a base portion around with the electrical coils are wound and a trapezoidal shield portion a plurality of heights with a first height in a first region being longer than a second height in a second region, the second region being closer to a pole-to-pole gap than the first region.

  15. Temperature gradient formation while axial gas compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A spinning gas in equilibrium has a rotation-dependent heat capacity. However, as equilibrium is approached, such as after sudden heating, significant variations in temperature appear. Surprisingly, when fast axial compression or instantaneous gas heating occurs, the temperature does not grow homogeneously in radial direction, but instead has a gradient towards to the maximum of potential energy of external or self potential. The gradient monotonically grows with compression rate and the amplitude of the potential. The gradient builds up due to change of equilibrium density distribution, yet, not due to acoustic waves created by the compression. This result was checked in numerical simulations for particles in an external constant gravitational potential and also for rotating gas in the cylinder with perfect slip boundary conditions on the walls. This work was supported by the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and by the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG52-08NA28553.

  16. Axially symmetric static sources of gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Pastora, J. L.; Herrera, L.; Martin, J.

    2016-12-01

    A general procedure to find static and axially symmetric, interior solutions to the Einstein equations is presented. All the so obtained solutions, verify the energy conditions for a wide range of values of the parameters, and match smoothly to some exterior solution of the Weyl family, thereby representing globally regular models describing non-spherical sources of gravitational field. In the spherically symmetric limit, all our models converge to the well known incompressible perfect fluid solution. The key stone of our approach is based on an ansatz allowing to define the interior metric in terms of the exterior metric functions evaluated at the boundary source. Some particular sources are obtained, and the physical variables of the energy-momentum tensor are calculated explicitly, as well as the geometry of the source in terms of the relativistic multipole moments. The total mass of different configurations is also calculated, it is shown to be equal to the monopole of the exterior solution.

  17. Prismatic effect in axially symmetric spectacle lenses.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose Ramon

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare different approximate formulas to compute the prismatic effect in axially symmetric spectacle lenses. Gaussian formulas to calculate the prismatic effect are derived, for thick and thin lenses, and for near and far vision. The results from these formulas, as well as other taken from the literature, are compared with the exact results. None of the studied approximations provides the most accurate results in all circumstances. The Gaussian formula for thick lenses could be considered globally the most accurate, both in near vision and far vision. However, it is notably more difficult to use than the traditional Prentice rule, because it is mathematically more complex, and needs several additional lens parameters.

  18. Hierarchical tapered bar elements undergoing axial deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.; Thampi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described to model the dynamics of tapered axial bars of various cross sections based on the well-known Craig/Bampton component mode synthesis technique. This element is formed in terms of the static constraint modes and interface restrained normal modes. This is in contrast with the finite elements as implemented in NASTRAN where the interface restrained normal modes are neglected. These normal modes are in terms of Bessel functions. Restoration of a few of these modes leads to higher accuracy with fewer generalized coordinates. The proposed models are hierarchical so that all lower order element matrices are embedded in higher order element matrices. The advantages of this formulation compared to standard NASTRAN truss element formulation are demonstrated through simple numerical examples.

  19. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  20. Dark energy and collapsing axial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Manzoor, Rubab

    This paper investigates the effects of dark source term on the dissipative axially symmetric collapse by taking self-interacting Brans-Dicke (SBD) gravity as a dark energy (DE) candidate. We discuss physically feasible energy source of the model and formulate all the dynamical variables as well as structure scalars. It is found that the dark source term is one of the source of anisotropy and dissipation in the system. Further, we obtain structure scalars in this background. In order to discuss factors describing dissipative collapse, we develop equations related to the evolution of dynamical variables, heat transport equation as well as super-Poynting vector. We conclude that the thermodynamics of the collapse, evolution of kinematical terms (like expansion scalar, shear and vorticity) and inhomogeneity are affected by dark source term. Finally, we study the existence of radiation having repulsive gravitational nature in this collapse scenario.

  1. Buckling of cylindrical panels under axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, L. H.; Weller, T.; Agarwal, B. L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of boundary conditions and panel width on the axially compressive buckling behavior of unstiffened, isotropic, circular cylindrical panels. Numerical results are presented for eight different sets of boundary conditions along the straight edges of the panels. For all sets of boundary conditions except one (SS1), the results show that the panel buckling loads monotonically approach the complete cylinder buckling load from above as the panel width is increased. Low buckling loads, sometimes less than half the complete cylinder buckling load, are found for simply supported panels with free in-plane edge displacements (SS1). It is observed that the prevention of circumferential edge displacement is the most important in-plane boundary condition from the point of view of increasing the buckling load; and that the prevention of edge rotation in the circumferential direction also significantly increases the buckling load.

  2. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  3. Axially evoked postural reflexes: influence of task.

    PubMed

    Govender, Sendhil; Dennis, Danielle L; Colebatch, James G

    2015-01-01

    Postural reflexes were recorded in healthy subjects (n = 17) using brief axial accelerations and tap stimuli applied at the vertebra prominens (C7) and manubrium sterni. Short latency (SL) responses were recorded from the soleus, hamstrings and tibialis anterior muscles and expressed as a percentage of the background EMG prior to stimulus onset. In the majority of postural conditions tested, subjects were recorded standing erect and leaning forward with their feet together. The SL response was larger for soleus than for the hamstrings during standing (soleus vs hamstrings; 70.4 vs 28.1%), whereas the opposite occurred during kneeling (25.3 vs 127.3%). Concordant head and trunk accelerations produced larger SL responses than discordant accelerations for soleus and hamstrings, but the evoked excitatory response was independent of head direction and as expected for the direction of truncal acceleration. Postural reflexes for soleus and tibialis anterior were strongly affected by conditions that posed a significant threat to postural stability; stimulation at C7 was associated with significant SL enhancement for soleus during anterior lean while sternal stimulation showed SL enhancement for tibialis anterior during posterior lean. Cutaneous anaesthesia applied over the C7 stimulation site had no significant effect on EMG responses, nor did vision or surface type (rigid or compliant). This study provides further evidence that postural reflexes produced by brief axial accelerations are independent of cutaneous receptors, vestibular afferents and ankle proprioceptors, and demonstrates that postural tasks and truncal orientation significantly affect the evoked response, consistent with a role in stabilising posture.

  4. The treatment of refractory atlanto-axial rotatory fixation using a halo vest: results of a case series involving seven children.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, R; Imagama, S; Kanemura, T; Yoshihara, H; Sato, K; Deguchi, M; Kamiya, M; Ishiguro, N

    2011-08-01

    We reviewed seven children with torticollis due to refractory atlanto-axial rotatory fixation who were treated in a halo vest. Pre-operative three-dimensional CT and sagittal CT imaging showed deformity of the superior articular process of C2 in all patients. The mean duration of halo vest treatment was 67 days (46 to 91). The mean follow-up was 34 months (8 to 73); at the latest review six patients demonstrated remodelling of the deformed articular process. The other child, who had a more severe deformity, required C1-2 fusion. We suggest that patients with atlanto-axial rotatory fixation who do not respond to conservative treatment and who have deformity of the superior articular process of C2 should undergo manipulative reduction and halo-vest fixation for two to three months to induce remodelling of the deformed superior articular process before C1-2 fusion is considered.

  5. Leveraging Lexical Matching and Ontological Alignment to Map SNOMED CT Surgical Procedures to ICD-10-PCS

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Kin Wah; Xu, Julia; Ameye, Filip; Gutiérrez, Arturo Romero; D'Havé, Arabella

    2016-01-01

    In 2015 ICD-10-PCS replaced ICD-9-CM for coding medical procedures in the U.S. We explored two methods to automatically map SNOMED CT surgical procedures to ICD-10-PCS. First, we used MetaMap to lexically map ICD-10-PCS index terms to SNOMED CT. Second, we made use of the axial structure of ICD-10-PCS and aligned them to defining attributes in SNOMED CT. Lexical mapping produced 45% of correct maps and 44% of broader maps. Ontological mappings were 40% correct and 5% broader. Both correct and broader maps will be useful in assisting mappers to create the map. When the two mapping methods agreed, the accuracy increased to 93%. Reviewing the MetaMap generated body part mappings and using additional information in the SNOMED CT names and definitions can lead to better results for the ontological map. PMID:28269853

  6. New approach to a novel axially chiral ligand showing spontaneous enrichment of axial chirality.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomokuni; Omote, Masaaki; Sato, Kazuyuki; Ando, Akira; Kumadaki, Itsumaro

    2003-03-01

    We have synthesized novel axially chiral ligand with two chiral centers, (R)-(R)(2)- and (S)-(S)(2)-2,2'-bis(2,2,2-trifluoro-1-hydroxyethyl)biphenyl (1), which showed a high asymmetric induction when used as ligand. Here, another new approach to 1 by kinetic and thermodynamic resolution is presented which gave these ligands in a much shorter steps, in a higher yield, and in a higher enantiomeric excess.

  7. Quantification with a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Spencer L.; Ferrero, Andrea; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dedicated breast PET/CT is expected to have utility in local staging, surgical planning, monitoring of therapy response, and detection of residual disease for breast cancer. Quantitative metrics will be integral to several such applications. The authors present a validation of fully 3D data correction schemes for a custom built dedicated breast PET/CT (DbPET/CT) scanner via 18F-FDG phantom scans. Methods: A component-based normalization was implemented, live-time was estimated with a multicomponent model, and a variance reduced randoms estimate was computed from delayed coincidences. Attenuation factors were calculated by using a CT based segmentation scheme while scatter was computed using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. As no performance standard currently exists for breast PET systems, custom performance tests were created based on prior patient imaging results. Count-rate linearity for live-time and randoms corrections was measured with a decay experiment for a solid polyethylene cylinder phantom with an offset line source. A MC simulation was used to validate attenuation correction, a multicompartment phantom with asymmetric activity distribution provided an assessment of scatter correction, and image uniformity after geometric and detector normalization was measured from a high count scan of a uniform cylinder phantom. Raw data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) after Fourier rebinning. To quantify performance absolute activity concentrations, contrast recovery coefficients and image uniformity were calculated through region of interest analysis. Results: The most significant source of error was attributed to mispositioning of events due to pile-up, presenting in count-related axial and transaxial nonuniformities that were not corrected for with the normalization method used here. Within the range of singles counts observed during clinical trials residual error after applying all corrections was comparable to that of a

  8. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Paula; Faria-Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana-Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study. The total sample of 504 patients and their CT was included in this study. The patients were from a private dental clinic, specializing in oral surgery, where the first complaint was not directly related to sinus disease, but with dental pathology. For each patient, the etiological factors of maxillary sinusitis and the imaging CT findings were analyzed. All the axial, coronal and sagittal CT slices were evaluated and general data were registered. The latter was selected based on the maxillary sinus CT published literature. Results 32.40% of patients presented normal sinus (without any etiological factor associated), 29.00% showed presence of etiological and imaging findings in the maxillary sinus, 20.60% had only imaging changes in the maxillary sinus and 18.00% of patients presented only etiological factors and no change in the maxillary sinus. Conclusions Radiological imaging is an important tool for establishing the diagnosis of maxillary sinus pathology. These results indicate that the CT scan should be an excellent tool for complement the odontogenic sinusitis diagnosis. Key words: Maxillary sinusitis/etiology, odontogenic, computed tomography, maxillary sinus. PMID:25858084

  9. Performance evaluation of Biograph PET/CT system based on Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Gao, Fei; Liu, Hua-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Combined lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) Biograph PET/CT is developed by Siemens Company and has been introduced into medical practice. There is no septa between the scintillator rings, the acquisition mode is full 3D mode. The PET components incorporate three rings of 48 detector blocks which comprises a 13×13 matrix of 4×4×20mm3 elements. The patient aperture is 70cm, the transversal field of view (FOV) is 58.5cm, and the axial field of view is 16.2cm. The CT components adopt 16 slices spiral CT scanner. The physical performance of this PET/CT scanner has been evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation method according to latest NEMA NU 2-2007 standard and the results have been compared with real experiment results. For PET part, in the center FOV the average transversal resolution is 3.67mm, the average axial resolution is 3.94mm, and the 3D-reconstructed scatter fraction is 31.7%. The sensitivities of the PET scanner are 4.21kcps/MBq and 4.26kcps/MBq at 0cm and 10cm off the center of the transversal FOV. The peak NEC is 95.6kcps at a concentration of 39.2kBq/ml. The spatial resolution of CT part is up to 1.12mm at 10mm off the center. The errors between simulated and real results are permitted.

  10. Left-right axial rotation within C1-2 after implant removal.

    PubMed

    Pitzen, Tobias; Salman, Erbay; Ostrowski, Gregor; Welk, Thomas; Ruf, Michael; Drumm, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    Surgical treatment of atlantoaxial injuries may be performed by a variety of surgical procedures, with each of these having its own specific advantages and disadvantages. To preserve the range of motion within the atlantoaxial joint after surgical treatment, posterior atlantoaxial screw fixation according to the method of Goel and Harms could be beneficial. This technique is not considered to fix the joint permanently if the screws are removed. However, this must not necessarily be true, especially if one notices that cervical joints have a tendency for rapid fusion after surgery. The objective of this study was to analyze left-right axial rotation following implant removal, with the following research questions addressed: 1) is there a relevant rotational left-right mobility in C1-2; 2) is there a difference in mobility depending on sex; 3) is there a correlation of mobility to age; 4) is there a correlation of mobility to the "implant-in-body time"; and 5) is neck pain improved by this method of surgical treatment? This is a retrospective study in 10 patients who had received atlantoaxial fixation according to the Harms method following atlantoaxial injury. These patients had undergone implant removal after a mean time of 128 days, followed by functional atlantoaxial CT in left-right rotation. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software package; significance was assumed for p < 0.05. The following findings are reported. 1) Left-right axial rotation within the atlantoaxial joint was measured to be 17° (mean value) following implant removal. 2) There was no significant difference between men (20°) and women (14.8°) (p = 0.595). 3) Left-right axial rotation negatively correlated to the age of the patient (r = -0.646, p = 0.043). 4) "Implant-in-body time" did not influence left-right axial rotation (r = 0.04, p = 0.907) if the implants are removed within 90-180 days after surgery. 5) Neck pain as assessed by the patients themselves on the visual

  11. Surgical results in hidden lumbar spinal stenosis detected by axial loaded computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: an outcome study.

    PubMed

    Willén, Jan; Wessberg, Per J; Danielsson, Barbro

    2008-02-15

    An outcome study of patients with neurogenic claudication and/or sciatica with hidden stenosis, detected only by axial loading of the lumbar spine (ACE) but not at the traditional unloaded examination (psoas relaxed position) during computed tomography (CT) myelography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), followed up after surgery. To estimate the clinical effect of decompression with or without fusion in patients with hidden stenosis in the lumbar spine. A number of patients with neurogenic claudicatio with or without sciatica do not have corresponding imaging abnormalities. Axial loaded CT and MRI have disclosed hidden stenosis in certain cases. The surgical effect in patients with hidden stenosis has never been described. Axial loading of the lumbar spine during CT and MRI was performed in 250 patients with neurogenic claudication and sciatica. All fulfilled the inclusion criteria for ACE, i.e., suspected but not verified spinal stenosis in 1 to 3 levels. In 125 patients (50%), a significant narrowing of the spinal canal occurred. Out of these 125 patients, 101 had a clear stenosis besides the stenosis only detected at ACE. In 24 patients, a hidden stenosis was detected in 1 to 3 levels only at the ACE. These patients were observed for 1 to 6 years after decompression with or without fusion regarding subjective improvement of leg and back pains, walking capacity, satisfaction, and health related quality of life. At follow-up, 76% of the patients had leg pain less than 25/100 on a VAS scale and 62% had back pain less than 25/100. Ninety-six percent were improved or much improved regarding leg and back pains The ability to walk increased significantly after surgery. Walking capacity to more than 500 m increased from 4% to 87%. Twenty-two patients were subjectively satisfied with the surgical results. The ODI score, the SF-36 and the EQ-5D score corresponded well to the above mentioned improvements at follow-up. According to this study, the results of surgery in

  12. CT in aortic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    A diagnosis of aortic transection was made at computed tomography (CT) in four of 10 patients with acute multiple trauma suspected of having thoracic aortic injuries. There were no false-negative or false-positive examinations. The CT findings of an injured aorta were (1) false aneurysm, (2) linear lucency within the opacified aortic lumen caused by the torn edge of the aortic wall, (3) marginal irregularity of the opacified aortic lumen, (4) periaortic or intramural aortic hematoma, and (5) dissection. The extent of associated mediastinal hemorrhage and the amount of blood in the pleural space were not useful as indicators of aortic injury. Similarly, shift of the trachea and esophagus or absence thereof was found in patients with or without aortic tear.

  13. CT number definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. A.; Drage, N. A.; Richmond, S.

    2012-04-01

    The accuracy of CT number plots has been found lacking in several medical applications. This is of concern since the ability to compare and evaluate results on a reproducible and standard basis is essential to long term development. Apart from the technical limitations arising from the CT scanner and the data treatment, there are fundamental issues with the definition of the Hounsfield number, namely the absence of a standard photon energy and the need to specify the attenuation mechanism for standard measurements. This paper presents calculations to demonstrate the shortcomings of the present definition with a brief discussion. The remedy is straightforward, but probably of long duration as it would require an international agreement.

  14. Visualization of an actively bleeding cortical vessel into the subdural space by CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Dalfino, John C; Boulos, Alan S

    2010-10-01

    Spontaneous subdural hematomas of arterial origin are rare with only a few published case reports in the literature. In the CT era, vessel imaging of extra-axial hematomas is not commonly performed. In this case report we present a patient with a large, spontaneous acute subdural hematoma that demonstrated active contrast extravasation from a small cortical vessel on CT angiography. During surgical evacuation the vessel was confirmed to be a small cortical artery that was bulging through the arachnoid membrane and bleeding into the subdural space. The historical, radiographic, and clinical aspects of this unusual cause of subdural hematoma are discussed.

  15. An Axial-Torsional, Thermomechanical Fatigue Testing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for conducting strain-controlled, thermomechanical, axial-torsional fatigue tests on thin-walled tubular specimens was developed. Three waveforms of loading, namely, the axial strain waveform, the engineering shear strain waveform, and the temperature waveform were required in these tests. The phasing relationships between the mechanical strain waveforms and the temperature and axial strain waveforms were used to define a set of four axial-torsional, thermomechanical fatigue (AT-TMF) tests. Real-time test control (3 channels) and data acquisition (a minimum of 7 channels) were performed with a software program written in C language and executed on a personal computer. The AT-TMF testing technique was used to investigate the axial-torsional thermomechanical fatigue behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188. The maximum and minimum temperatures selected for the AT-TMF tests were 760 and 316 C, respectively. Details of the testing system, calibration of the dynamic temperature profile of the thin-walled tubular specimen, thermal strain compensation technique, and test control and data acquisition schemes, are reported. The isothermal, axial, torsional, and in- and out-of-phase axial-torsional fatigue behaviors of Haynes 188 at 316 and 760 C were characterized in previous investigations. The cyclic deformation and fatigue behaviors of Haynes 188 in AT-TMF tests are compared to the previously reported isothermal axial-torsional behavior of this superalloy at the maximum and minimum temperatures.

  16. Axial resolution of a chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon Reyes, Johnson; Meneses, J.; Plata, Arturo; Tribillon, Gilbert M.; Gharbi, Tijani

    2004-10-01

    An analysis of the axial resolution of a chromatic dispersion confocal microscopy is presented. The system is based on the principle of focus multiplexing by wavelength encoding due to a phase Fresnel lens. The axial resolution is related with the measure of the FWHM value of every spectral response.

  17. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-04-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  18. An Unbroken Axial-Vector Current Conservation Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an axial-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an axial-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed axial-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed axial-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor symmetrical axial-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an axial-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic axial-vector mass say in favor of an axial-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.

  19. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  20. A new approach to radial and axial gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Heribert; Heinz, Ulrich

    1992-03-01

    We develop a new path integral formulation of QCD in radial and axial gauges. This formalism yields free propagators which are free of gauge poles. We find that radial gauges are ghost free. In axial gauges ghosts cannot generally be excluded from the formalism due to the need to fix the residual gauge freedom.

  1. Measurement of time delay for a prospectively gated CT simulator

    PubMed Central

    Goharian, M.; Khan, R. F. H.

    2010-01-01

    For the management of mobile tumors, respiratory gating is the ideal option, both during imaging and during therapy. The major advantage of respiratory gating during imaging is that it is possible to create a single artifact-free CT data-set during a selected phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The purpose of the present work is to present a simple technique to measure the time delay during acquisition of a prospectively gated CT. The time delay of a Philips Brilliance BigBore™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) scanner attached to a Varian Real-Time Position Management™ (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was measured. Two methods were used to measure the CT time delay: using a motion phantom and using a recorded data file from the RPM system. In the first technique, a rotating wheel phantom was altered by placing two plastic balls on its axis and rim, respectively. For a desired gate, the relative positions of the balls were measured from the acquired CT data and converted into corresponding phases. Phase difference was calculated between the measured phases and the desired phases. Using period of motion, the phase difference was converted into time delay. The Varian RPM system provides an external breathing signal; it also records transistor-transistor logic (TTL) ‘X-Ray ON’ status signal from the CT scanner in a text file. The TTL ‘X-Ray ON’ indicates the start of CT image acquisition. Thus, knowledge of the start time of CT acquisition, combined with the real-time phase and amplitude data from the external respiratory signal, provides time-stamping of all images in an axial CT scan. The TTL signal with time-stamp was used to calculate when (during the breathing cycle) a slice was recorded. Using the two approaches, the time delay between the prospective gating signal and CT simulator has been determined to be 367 ± 40 ms. The delay requires corrections both at image acquisition and while setting gates for the treatment

  2. Cerebrovascular dysfunction following subfailure axial stretch.

    PubMed

    Bell, E David; Donato, Anthony J; Monson, Kenneth L

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood vessels are vital to maintaining the health of the brain. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly results in autoregulatory dysfunction and associated failure of cerebral vessels to maintain homeostasis in the brain. While post-injury changes to brain biochemistry are known to contribute to this dysfunction, tissue deformation may also directly alter vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) function. As a first step toward understanding stretch-induced dysfunction, this study investigates the effect of overstretch on the contractile behavior of SMCs in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). We hypothesized that vessel function is altered above a threshold of stretch and strain rate. Twenty-four MCAs from Sprague Dawley rats were tested. Following development of basal SMC tone, vessels were subjected to increasing levels of isosmotic extracellular potassium (K(+)). Samples were then subjected to an axial overstretch of either 1.2*λIV or 1.3*λIV at strain rates of 0.2 or 20s(-1). Following overstretch, SMC contractile behavior was measured again, both immediately and 60min after overstretch. Control vessels were subjected to the same protocol but without overstretch. SMC contractile behavior was characterized using both percent contraction (%C) relative to the fully dilated inner diameter and the K(+) dose required to evoke the half maximal contractile response (EC50). Control vessels exhibited increased sensitivity to K(+) in successive characterization tests, so all effects were quantified relative to the time-matched control response. Samples exhibited the typical biphasic response to extracellular K(+), dilating and contracting in response to small and large K(+) concentrations, respectively. As hypothesized, axial overstretch altered SMC contractile behavior, as seen in a decrease in %C for sub-maximal contractile K(+) doses (p<0.05) and an increase in EC50 (p<0.01), but only for the test group stretched rapidly to 1.3*λIV. While the change in %C was only

  3. Pedicled Transplantation of Axially Vascularized Bone Constructs in a Critical Size Femoral Defect.

    PubMed

    Arkudas, Andreas; Lipp, Amelie; Buehrer, Gregor; Arnold, Isabel; Dafinova, Diana; Brandl, Andreas; Beier, Justus Patrick; Koerner, Carolin; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Chistoph; Kneser, Ulrich; Horch, Raymund E

    2017-08-29

    Axial vascularization represents a mandatory requirement for clinically applied larger-scale vascularized bone grafts. The aim of this study was to combine the arteriovenous (AV) loop model in the rat with a critically sized femoral bone defect and to successfully transplant axially vascularized bone constructs into the defect. In Groups A and C, an AV loop together with a clinically approved HA/ß-TCP matrix, MSCs and rhBMP2, were implanted into a newly designed porous titanium chamber with an integrated osteosynthesis plate in the thighs of rats, whereas in Groups B and D, the same matrix composition without AV loop and, in Group E, only the HA/ß-TCP matrix were implanted. After 6 weeks, the constructs were transplanted into a 10 mm femoral defect created in the same leg, in Groups A and C under preservation of the AV loop pedicle. Group F served as a control group with an empty chamber. 10 days (Groups A and B) and 12 weeks (Groups C-F) after transplantation the femora together with the constructs were explanted and investigated using CT, micro-CT, X-ray, histology and RT-PCR. 10 days after transplantation, Group A showed a maintained vascular supply leading to increased vascularization, cell survival in the scaffold center and bone generation compared to Group B. After 12 weeks, there was no difference detectable among all groups regarding total vessel number, although Group C, using the AV loop, still showed increased vascularization of the construct center compared to Groups D and E. In Group C, there was still enhanced bone generation detectable compared to the other groups and increased bony fusion rate at the proximal femoral stump. This study shows the combination of the arteriovenous loop model in the rat with a critically sized femoral defect. By maintenance of the vascular supply, the constructs initially showed increased vascularization, leading to increased bone formation and bony fusion in the long term.

  4. 4D-Imaging of the Lung: Reproducibility of Lesion Size and Displacement on Helical CT, MRI, and Cone Beam CT in a Ventilated Ex Vivo System

    SciTech Connect

    Biederer, Juergen Dinkel, Julien; Remmert, Gregor; Jetter, Siri; Nill, Simeon; Moser, Torsten; Bendl, Rolf; Thierfelder, Carsten; Fabel, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe; Bock, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata; Hartmann, Guenter; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) imaging is a key to motion-adapted radiotherapy of lung tumors. We evaluated in a ventilated ex vivo system how size and displacement of artificial pulmonary nodules are reproduced with helical 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and linac-integrated cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Four porcine lungs with 18 agarose nodules (mean diameters 1.3-1.9 cm), were ventilated inside a chest phantom at 8/min and subject to 4D-CT (collimation 24 x 1.2 mm, pitch 0.1, slice/increment 24x10{sup 2}/1.5/0.8 mm, pitch 0.1, temporal resolution 0.5 s), 4D-MRI (echo-shared dynamic three-dimensional-flash; repetition/echo time 2.13/0.72 ms, voxel size 2.7 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, temporal resolution 1.4 s) and linac-integrated 4D-CBCT (720 projections, 3-min rotation, temporal resolution {approx}1 s). Static CT without respiration served as control. Three observers recorded lesion size (RECIST-diameters x/y/z) and axial displacement. Interobserver- and interphase-variation coefficients (IO/IP VC) of measurements indicated reproducibility. Results: Mean x/y/z lesion diameters in cm were equal on static and dynamic CT (1.88/1.87; 1.30/1.39; 1.71/1.73; p > 0.05), but appeared larger on MRI and CBCT (2.06/1.95 [p < 0.05 vs. CT]; 1.47/1.28 [MRI vs. CT/CBCT p < 0.05]; 1.86/1.83 [CT vs. CBCT p < 0.05]). Interobserver-VC for lesion sizes were 2.54-4.47% (CT), 2.29-4.48% (4D-CT); 5.44-6.22% (MRI) and 4.86-6.97% (CBCT). Interphase-VC for lesion sizes ranged from 2.28% (4D-CT) to 10.0% (CBCT). Mean displacement in cm decreased from static CT (1.65) to 4D-CT (1.40), CBCT (1.23) and MRI (1.16). Conclusions: Lesion sizes are exactly reproduced with 4D-CT but overestimated on 4D-MRI and CBCT with a larger variability due to limited temporal and spatial resolution. All 4D-modalities underestimate lesion displacement.

  5. 4D-Imaging of the lung: reproducibility of lesion size and displacement on helical CT, MRI, and cone beam CT in a ventilated ex vivo system.

    PubMed

    Biederer, Juergen; Dinkel, Julien; Remmert, Gregor; Jetter, Siri; Nill, Simeon; Moser, Torsten; Bendl, Rolf; Thierfelder, Carsten; Fabel, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe; Bock, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata; Hartmann, Günter; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Debus, Jürgen; Heller, Martin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) imaging is a key to motion-adapted radiotherapy of lung tumors. We evaluated in a ventilated ex vivo system how size and displacement of artificial pulmonary nodules are reproduced with helical 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and linac-integrated cone beam CT (CBCT). Four porcine lungs with 18 agarose nodules (mean diameters 1.3-1.9 cm), were ventilated inside a chest phantom at 8/min and subject to 4D-CT (collimation 24 x 1.2 mm, pitch 0.1, slice/increment 24 x 10(2)/1.5/0.8 mm, pitch 0.1, temporal resolution 0.5 s), 4D-MRI (echo-shared dynamic three-dimensional-flash; repetition/echo time 2.13/0.72 ms, voxel size 2.7 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, temporal resolution 1.4 s) and linac-integrated 4D-CBCT (720 projections, 3-min rotation, temporal resolution approximately 1 s). Static CT without respiration served as control. Three observers recorded lesion size (RECIST-diameters x/y/z) and axial displacement. Interobserver- and interphase-variation coefficients (IO/IP VC) of measurements indicated reproducibility. Mean x/y/z lesion diameters in cm were equal on static and dynamic CT (1.88/1.87; 1.30/1.39; 1.71/1.73; p > 0.05), but appeared larger on MRI and CBCT (2.06/1.95 [p < 0.05 vs. CT]; 1.47/1.28 [MRI vs. CT/CBCT p < 0.05]; 1.86/1.83 [CT vs. CBCT p < 0.05]). Interobserver-VC for lesion sizes were 2.54-4.47% (CT), 2.29-4.48% (4D-CT); 5.44-6.22% (MRI) and 4.86-6.97% (CBCT). Interphase-VC for lesion sizes ranged from 2.28% (4D-CT) to 10.0% (CBCT). Mean displacement in cm decreased from static CT (1.65) to 4D-CT (1.40), CBCT (1.23) and MRI (1.16). Lesion sizes are exactly reproduced with 4D-CT but overestimated on 4D-MRI and CBCT with a larger variability due to limited temporal and spatial resolution. All 4D-modalities underestimate lesion displacement.

  6. Melorheostosis involving the cervical and upper thoracic spine: radiographic, CT, and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Motimaya, A M; Meyers, S P

    2006-01-01

    Melorheostosis, an uncommon mesenchymal dysplasia, rarely affects the axial skeleton. We describe the imaging findings of melorheostosis involving the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Radiographs and CT showed unilateral well-marginated undulating zones of cortical hyperostosis involving multiple vertebrae that were contiguous with a coalescent ossified right paravertebral mass. MR imaging showed zones of signal intensity void on all pulse sequences without contrast enhancement. Conservative management was elected because of lack of interval clinical and imaging changes for 8 years.

  7. Axial Globe Position Measurement: A Prospective Multicenter Study by the International Thyroid Eye Disease Society.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Chad M; Sivak-Callcott, Jennifer A; Gurka, Matthew J; Nguyen, John; Hogg, Jeffery P; Feldon, Steve E; Fay, Aaron; Seah, Lay-Leng; Strianese, Diego; Durairaj, Vikram D; Uddin, Jimmy; Devoto, Martin H; Harris, Matheson; Saunders, Justin; Osaki, Tammy H; Looi, Audrey; Teo, Livia; Davies, Brett W; Elefante, Andrea; Shen, Sunny; Realini, Tony; Fischer, William; Kazim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identify a reproducible measure of axial globe position (AGP) for multicenter studies on patients with thyroid eye disease (TED). This is a prospective, international, multicenter, observational study in which 3 types of AGP evaluation were examined: radiologic, clinical, and photographic. In this study, CT was the modality to which all other methods were compared. CT AGP was measured from an orthogonal line between the anterior lateral orbital rims to the cornea. All CT measurements were made at a single institution by 3 individual clinicians. Clinical evaluation was performed with exophthalmometry. Three clinicians from each clinical site assessed AGP with 3 different exophthalmometers and horizontal palpebral width using a ruler. Each physician made 3 separate measurements with each type of exophthalmometer not in succession. All photographic measurements were made at a single institution. AGP was measured from lateral photographs in which a standard marker was placed at the anterior lateral orbital rim. Horizontal and vertical palpebral fissure were measured from frontal photographs. Three trained readers measured 3 separate times not in succession. Exophthalmometry and photography method validity was assessed by agreement with CT (mean differences calculation, intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs], Bland-Altman figures). Correlation between palpebral fissure and CT AGP was assessed with Pearson correlation. Intraclinician and interclinician reliability was evaluated using ICCs. Sixty-eight patients from 7 centers participated. CT mean AGP was 21.37 mm (15.96-28.90 mm) right and 21.22 mm (15.87-28.70 mm) left (ICC 0.996 and 0.995). Exophthalmometry AGP fell between 18 mm and 25 mm. Intraclinician agreement across exophthalmometers was ideal (ICC 0.948-0.983). Agreement between clinicians was greater than 0.85 for all upright exophthalmometry measurements. Photographic mean AGP was 20.47 mm (10.92-30.88 mm) right and 20.30 mm (8.61-28.72

  8. Engineering axially vascularized bone in the sheep arteriovenous-loop model.

    PubMed

    Boos, Anja M; Loew, Johanna S; Weigand, Annika; Deschler, Gloria; Klumpp, Dorothee; Arkudas, Andreas; Bleiziffer, Oliver; Gulle, Heinz; Kneser, Ulrich; Horch, Raymund E; Beier, Justus P

    2013-08-01

    Treatment of complex bone defects in which vascular supply is insufficient is still a challenge. To overcome the limitations from autologous grafts, a sheep model has been established recently, which is characterized by the development of an independent axial vascularization of a bioartificial construct, permitting microsurgical transplantation. To engineer independently axially vascularized bone tissue in the sheep arteriovenous (AV)-loop model, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), without and in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), were harvested and directly autotransplanted in combination with β-tricalcium phosphate-hydroxyapatite (β-TCP-HA) granules into sheep in this study. After explantation after 12 weeks, histological and immunohistochemical evaluation revealed newly formed bone in both groups. An increased amount of bone area was obtained using directly autotransplanted MSCs with rhBMP-2 stimulation. Osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells were detected adjacent to the newly formed bone, revealing an active bone remodelling process. Directly autotransplanted MSCs can be found close to the β-TCP-HA granules and are contributing to bone formation. Over time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging confirmed the dense vascularization arising from the AV-loop. This study shows de novo engineering of independently axially vascularized transplantable bone tissue in clinically significant amounts, using directly autotransplanted MSCs and rhBMP-2 stimulation in about 12 weeks in the sheep AV-loop model. This strategy of engineering vascularized transplantable bone tissue could be possibly transferred to the clinic in the future in order to augment current reconstructive strategies.

  9. New treatment targets for axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sieper, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) patients can be divided into those with structural damage in the SI joint visible on X-rays, termed radiographic axSpA or AS, and those in an earlier phase of the disease, without structural damage in the SI joint, termed non-radiographic axSpA. TNF-blockers have been shown to be highly effective in the treatment of active axSpA. Interestingly, conventional DMARDs and also non-TNF-blocker biologics targeting IL-1, IL-6 and T cells (abatacept) are not effective. Recent interest has focused on the cytokines IL-23 and IL-17 as potential treatment targets in axSpA. An open-label trial with ustekinumab showed a good efficacy in AS patients. Two placebo-controlled phase 3 trials with a mAb blocking IL-17, secukinumab, showed a good reduction in disease activity, similar to that shown for TNF blockers. Probably triggered by inflammation, new bone formation is another hallmark in AS and a potentially important treatment target. However, a previously reported inhibitory effect of NSAID treatment could not be confirmed in a recent NSAID trial.

  10. Axial compressor middle stage secondary flow study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. H.; Dring, R. P.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation of the secondary flow within and aft of an axial compressor model with thick endwall boundary layers. The objective of the study was to obtain detailed aerodynamic and trace gas concentration traverse data aft of a well documented isolated rotor for the ultimate purpose of improving the design phases of compressor development based on an improved physical understanding of secondary flow. It was determined from the flow visualization, aerodynamic, and trace gas concentration results that the relative unloading of the midspan region of the airfoil inhibitied a fullspan separation at high loading preventing the massive radial displacement of the hub corner stall to the tip. Radial distribution of high and low total pressure fluid influenced the magnitude of the spanwise distribution of loss, such that, there was a general decreases in loss near the hub to the extent that for the least loaded case a negative loss (increase in total pressure) was observed. The ability to determine the spanwise distribution of blockage was demonstrated. Large blockage was present in the endwall regions due to the corner stall and tip leakage with little blockage in the core flow region. Hub blockage was found to increase rapidly with loading.

  11. Vertebrate Axial Patterning: From Egg to Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Houston, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of the bilateral embryonic body axis from a symmetrical egg has been a long-standing question in developmental biology. Historical and modern experiments point to an initial symmetry-breaking event leading to localized Wnt and Nodal growth factor signaling and subsequent induction and formation of a self-regulating dorsal "organizer." This organizer forms at the site of notochord cell internalization and expresses primarily Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) growth factor antagonists that establish a spatiotemporal gradient of BMP signaling across the embryo, directing initial cell differentiation and morphogenesis. Although the basics of this model have been known for some time, many of the molecular and cellular details have only recently been elucidated and the extent that these events remain conserved throughout vertebrate evolution remains unclear. This chapter summarizes historical perspectives as well as recent molecular and genetic advances regarding: (1) the mechanisms that regulate symmetry-breaking in the vertebrate egg and early embryo, (2) the pathways that are activated by these events, in particular the Wnt pathway, and the role of these pathways in the formation and function of the organizer, and (3) how these pathways also mediate anteroposterior patterning and axial morphogenesis. Emphasis is placed on comparative aspects of the egg-to-embryo transition across vertebrates and their evolution. The future prospects for work regarding self-organization and gene regulatory networks in the context of early axis formation are also discussed.

  12. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  13. Small axial turbine stator technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, W.; Kozak, A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effects of surface finish, fillet radius, inlet boundary layer thickness, and free-stream inlet turbulence level on the aerodynamic performance of a small axial flow turbine stator. The principal objective of this program was to help understand why large turbine efficiency is not maintained when a large turbine is scaled to a smaller size. The stator used in this program as a one-sixth scale of a 762 mm (30 in.) diameter stator design with 50 vanes having a vane height of 17 mm (0.666 in.) and an aspect ratio of 1.77. A comprehensive overall test matrix was used to provide a complete engineering understanding of the effects of each variable over the full range of all the other variables. The range of each variable investigated was as follows: surface finish 0.1 micro (4 micro in.) to 2.4 micro (95 micro in.); boundary layer thickness 2 to 25 percent of channel height at each wall; fillet radius 0 mm (0 in.) to 1.0 mm (.040 in.) and turbulence 2 to 12 percent.

  14. Vector and Axial Vector Pion Form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitz, Michael; PEN Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Radiative pion decay π+ -->e+ νγ (RPD) provides critical input to chiral perturbation theory (χPT). Aside from the uninteresting ``inner bremsstrahlung'' contribution from QED, the RPD rate contains ``structure dependent'' terms given by FV and FA, the vector and axial-vector pion form factors, respectively. The two appear in the decay rate in combinations FV -FA and FV +FA , i.e., in the so-called SD- and SD+ terms, respectively. The latter has been measured to high precision by the PIBETA collaboration. We report on the analysis of new data, measured by the PEN collaboration in runs between 2008 and 2010 at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. We particularly focus on the possibility of improvement in the determination of the SD- term. Precise determinations of FV and FA test the validity of the CVC hypothesis, provide numerical input for the l9 +l10 terms in the χPT lagrangian, and constrain potential non-(V - A) terms, such as a possible tensor term FT. NSF grants PHY-0970013, 1307328, and others.

  15. Small axial compressor technology, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, F. F.; Kidwell, J. R.; Ware, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    A scaled single-stage, highly-loaded, axial-flow transonic compressor was tested at speeds from 70 to 110% design equivalent speed to evaluate the effects of scaling compromises and the individual and combined effects of rotor tip running clearance and rotor shroud casing treatment on the overall and blade element performance. At design speed and 1% tip clearance the stage demonstrated an efficiency of 83.2% at 96.4% design flow and a pressure ratio of 1.865. Casing treatment increased design speed surge margin 2.0 points to 12.8%. Overall performance was essentially unchanged. An increase in rotor running clearance to 2.2%, with smooth casing, reduced design speed peak efficiency 5.7 points, flow by 7.4%, pressure ratio to 1.740, and surge margin to 5.4%. Reinstalling casing treatment regained 3.5 points in design speed peak efficiency, 4.7% flow, increased pressure ratio to 1.800 and surge margin to 8.7%.

  16. Nitinol stent design - understanding axial buckling.

    PubMed

    McGrath, D J; O'Brien, B; Bruzzi, M; McHugh, P E

    2014-12-01

    Nitinol׳s superelastic properties permit self-expanding stents to be crimped without plastic deformation, but its nonlinear properties can contribute towards stent buckling. This study investigates the axial buckling of a prototype tracheobronchial nitinol stent design during crimping, with the objective of eliminating buckling from the design. To capture the stent buckling mechanism a computational model of a radial force test is simulated, where small geometric defects are introduced to remove symmetry and allow buckling to occur. With the buckling mechanism ascertained, a sensitivity study is carried out to examine the effect that the transitional plateau region of the nitinol loading curve has on stent stability. Results of this analysis are then used to redesign the stent and remove buckling. It is found that the transitional plateau region can have a significant effect on the stability of a stent during crimping, and by reducing the amount of transitional material within the stent hinges during loading the stability of a nitinol stent can be increased.

  17. Recent advances in transonic axial compressor aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biollo, Roberto; Benini, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Transonic axial flow compressors are fundamental components in aircraft engines as they make it possible to maximize pressure ratios per stage unit. This is achieved through a careful combination of both tangential flow deflections and, above all, by taking advantage of shock wave formation around the rotor blades. The resulting flow field is really complex as it features highly three-dimensional inviscid/viscous structures, strong shock-boundary layer interaction and intense tip clearance effects which negatively influence compressor efficiency. Complications are augmented at part load operation, where stall-related phenomena occur. Therefore, considerable research efforts are being spent, both numerically and experimentally, to improve efficiency and stall margin at peak efficiency and near stall operation. The present work aims at giving a complete review of the most recent advances in the field of aerodynamic design and operation of such machines. A great emphasis has been given to highlight the most relevant contribution in this field and to suggest the prospects for future developments.

  18. High Power Co-Axial SRF Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, R.A. Rimmer

    2009-05-01

    There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Two-thirds of these designs are coaxial couplers using disk or cylindrical ceramics in various combinations and configurations. While it is well known that dielectric losses go down by several orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, it not well known that the thermal conductivity also goes down, and it is the ratio of thermal conductivity to loss tangent (SRF ceramic Quality Factor) and ceramic volume which will determine the heat load of any given design. We describe a novel robust co-axial SRF coupler design which uses compressed window technology. This technology will allow the use of highly thermally conductive materials for cryogenic windows. The mechanical designs will fit into standard-sized ConFlat® flanges for ease of assembly. Two windows will be used in a coaxial line. The distance between the windows is adjusted to cancel their reflections so that the same window can be used in many different applications at various frequencies.

  19. Giant cell tumors of the axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors.

  20. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P.; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors. PMID:22448122

  1. Analytical equations for CT dose profiles derived using a scatter kernel of Monte Carlo parentage with broad applicability to CT dosimetry problems

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of the complete axial dose profile f(z), including its long scatter tails, provides the most complete (and flexible) description of the accumulated dose in CT scanning. The CTDI paradigm (including CTDI{sub vol}) requires shift-invariance along z (identical dose profiles spaced at equal intervals), and is therefore inapplicable to many of the new and complex shift-variant scan protocols, e.g., high dose perfusion studies using variable (or zero) pitch. In this work, a convolution-based beam model developed by Dixon et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 3712-3728, (2005)] updated with a scatter LSF kernel (or DSF) derived from a Monte Carlo simulation by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547-4554 (2009)] is used to create an analytical equation for the axial dose profile f(z) in a cylindrical phantom. Using f(z), equations are derived which provide the analytical description of conventional (axial and helical) dose, demonstrating its physical underpinnings; and likewise for the peak axial dose f(0) appropriate to stationary phantom cone beam CT, (SCBCT). The methodology can also be applied to dose calculations in shift-variant scan protocols. This paper is an extension of our recent work Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 37, 2703-2718 (2010)], which dealt only with the properties of the peak dose f(0), its relationship to CTDI, and its appropriateness to SCBCT. Methods: The experimental beam profile data f(z) of Mori et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 1061-1069 (2005)] from a 256 channel prototype cone beam scanner for beam widths (apertures) ranging from a = 28 to 138 mm are used to corroborate the theoretical axial profiles in a 32 cm PMMA body phantom. Results: The theoretical functions f(z) closely-matched the central axis experimental profile data{sup 11} for all apertures (a = 28 -138 mm). Integration of f(z) likewise yields analytical equations for all the (CTDI-based) dosimetric quantities of conventional CT (including CTDI{sub L} itself) in addition to the peak dose f(0) relevant to

  2. Dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations of adults with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-10-01

    Automatic tube current modulation (TCM) is used in modern CT devices. This is implemented in the numerical calculation of dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations. For four models of adults, the female and male reference models of ICRP and ICRU and a lighter and a heavier female model, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol (DCCCT) have been computed with a Monte Carlo transport code for CT scans with and without TCM. It could be shown for both cases that reliable values for spiral CT scans are obtained when combining the results from an appropriate set of axial scans. The largest organ DCCCT are presented for typical CT examinations for all four models. The impact of TCM is greatest for chest, pelvis and whole-trunk CT examinations, where with TCM the effective DCCCT can be 20-25% lower than without TCM. Typical organs with strong dependence on TCM are thyroid, urinary bladder, lungs and oesophagus. While the DCCCT of thyroid and urinary bladder are mainly sensitive to angular TCM, the DCCCT of lungs and oesophagus are influenced primarily by longitudinal TCM. The impact of the body stature on the effective DCCCT is of the same order as the effect of TCM. Thus, for CT scans in the trunk region, accurate dose values can only be obtained when different sets of DCCCT are employed that are appropriate for the patient's sex and stature and the actual TCM settings.

  3. Axial 3D region of interest reconstruction using weighted cone beam BPF/DBPF algorithm cascaded with adequately oriented orthogonal butterfly filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaojie; Tang, Xiangyang

    2016-03-01

    Axial cone beam (CB) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction is still the most desirable in clinical applications. As the potential candidates with analytic form for the task, the back projection-filtration (BPF) and the derivative backprojection filtered (DBPF) algorithms, in which Hilbert filtering is the common algorithmic feature, are originally derived for exact helical and axial reconstruction from CB and fan beam projection data, respectively. These two algorithms have been heuristically extended for axial CB reconstruction via adoption of virtual PI-line segments. Unfortunately, however, streak artifacts are induced along the Hilbert filtering direction, since these algorithms are no longer accurate on the virtual PI-line segments. We have proposed to cascade the extended BPF/DBPF algorithm with orthogonal butterfly filtering for image reconstruction (namely axial CB-BPP/DBPF cascaded with orthogonal butterfly filtering), in which the orientation-specific artifacts caused by post-BP Hilbert transform can be eliminated, at a possible expense of losing the BPF/DBPF's capability of dealing with projection data truncation. Our preliminary results have shown that this is not the case in practice. Hence, in this work, we carry out an algorithmic analysis and experimental study to investigate the performance of the axial CB-BPP/DBPF cascaded with adequately oriented orthogonal butterfly filtering for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction in region of interest (ROI).

  4. Phase-transfer-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis of axially chiral anilides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Wu, Xiangfei; Kan, S B Jennifer; Shirakawa, Seiji; Maruoka, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of axially chiral o-iodoanilides and o-tert-butylanilides as useful chiral building blocks was achieved by means of binaphthyl-modified chiral quaternary ammonium-salt-catalyzed N-alkylations under phase-transfer conditions. The synthetic utility of axially chiral products was demonstrated in various transformations. For example, axially chiral N-allyl-o-iodoanilide was transformed to 3-methylindoline by means of radical cyclization with high chirality transfer from axial chirality to C-centered chirality. Furthermore, stereochemical information on axial chirality in o-tert-butylanilides could be used as a template to control the stereochemistry of subsequent transformations. The transition-state structure of the present phase-transfer reaction was discussed on the basis of the X-ray crystal structure of ammonium anilide, which was prepared from binaphthyl-modified chiral ammonium bromide and o-iodoanilide. The chiral tetraalkylammonium bromide as a phase-transfer catalyst recognized the steric difference between the ortho substituents on anilide to obtain high enantioselectivity. The size and structural effects of the ortho substituents on anilide were investigated, and a wide variety of axially chiral anilides that possess various functional groups could be synthesized with high enantioselectivities. This method is the only general way to access a variety of axially chiral anilides in a highly enantioselective fashion reported to date. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Axial elongation following prolonged near work in myopes and emmetropes.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Emily C; Read, Scott A; Collins, Michael J; Hegarty, Katherine J; Priddle, Scott B; Smith, Josephine M; Perro, Judd V

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the influence of a period of sustained near work upon axial length in groups of emmetropes (EMM) and myopes. Forty young adult subjects (20 myopes and 20 emmetropes) were recruited for the study. Myopes were further classified as early onset (EOM), late onset (LOM), stable (SM) or progressing (PM) subgroups. Axial length was measured with the IOLMaster instrument before, immediately after and then again 10 min after a continuous 30 min near task of 5 D accommodation demand. Measures of distance objective refraction were also collected. Significant changes in axial length were observed immediately following the near task. EOM axial length elongated on average by 0.027±0.021 mm, LOM by 0.014±0.020 mm, EMM by 0.010±0.015 mm, PM by 0.031±0.022 mm and SM by 0.014±0.018 mm. At the conclusion of the 10 min regression period, axial length measures were not significantly different from baseline values. Axial elongation was observed following a prolonged near task. Both EOM and PM groups showed increases in axial length that were significantly greater than emmetropes.

  6. Quantification of AC electromagnetic tracking system accuracy in a CT scanner environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Eric; Shechter, Guy; Kruecker, Jochen; Stanton, Douglas

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of a computed tomography (CT) scanner environment on the positional accuracy of an AC electromagnetic tracking system, the second generation NDI Aurora. A three-axis positioning robot was used to move an electromagnetically tracked needle above the CT table throughout a 30cm by 30cm axial plane sampled in 2.5cm steps. The corresponding position data was captured from the Aurora and was registered to the positioning system data using a rigid body transformation minimizing the least squares L2-norm. Data was sampled at varying distances from the CT gantry (three feet, two feet, and one foot) and with the CT table in a nominal position and lowered by 10cm. A coordinate system was defined with the x axis normal to the CT table and the origin at the center of the CT table, and the z axis spanning the table in the lateral direction with the origin at the center of the CT table. In this coordinate system, the positional relationships of each sampled point, the CT table, and the Aurora field generator are clearly defined. This allows error maps to be displayed in accurate spatial relationship to the CT scanner as well as to a representative patient anatomy. By quantifying the distortions in relation to the position of CT scanner components and the Aurora field generator, the optimal working field of view and recommended guidelines for operation can be determined such that targeting inside human anatomy can be done with reasonable expectations of desired performance.

  7. Assessment of bilateral filter on 1/2-dose chest-pelvis CT views.

    PubMed

    Al-Hinnawi, Abdel Razzak; Daear, Mohammed; Huwaijah, Said

    2013-07-01

    A bilateral filter (BF) is a non-linear filter that has been proved to de-noise images without overrunning edges. Multi-slice computerized tomography (CT) may employ a BF to participate in dose reduction. This paper quantifies the role of the BF in achieving this objective on 1/2-dose CT. Two sets of CT images are acquired for the chest-pelvis at two different radiation doses. The BF was applied on the 1/2-dose CT images by use of various window sizes. Each time, a set of values of the BF range was fixed while the BF domain was modified. The goal was to observe the behavior of the BF on 1/2-dose CT images in comparison with full-dose CT images. The comparison was carried out by use of four co-occurrence matrix descriptors. Additionally, the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the mean square error (MSE) were reported. The study was applied to the sagittal, coronal, and axial CT views. The results showed that the impact of applying a BF varies among different CT views. The BF can retrieve only part of the signal being lost due to reduction of the radiation dose by one half. Yet, the BF improves the appearance of the 1/2-dose chest-pelvis CT examination. Thus, the BF can contribute to a 50% dose reduction. A procedure for employing the BF on CT machines is proposed. The results also showed that texture descriptors are similar to the PSNR and MSE in providing quantities for assessing medical image quality.

  8. Axial displacements in external and internal implant-abutment connection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Dae-Gon; Park, Chan-Jin; Cho, Lee-Ra

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the axial displacement of the abutments during clinical procedures by the tightening torque and cyclic loading. Two different implant-abutment connection systems were used (external butt joint connection [EXT]; internal tapered conical connection [INT]). The master casts with two implant replicas, angulated 10° from each other, were fabricated for each implant connection system. Four types of impression copings were assembled and tightened with the corresponding implants (hex transfer impression coping, non-hex transfer impression coping, hex pick-up impression coping, non-hex pick-up impression coping). Resin splinted abutments and final prosthesis were assembled. The axial displacement was measured from the length of each assembly, which was evaluated repeatedly, after 30 Ncm torque tightening. After 250 N cyclic loading of final prosthesis for 1,000,000 cycles, additional axial displacement was recorded. The mean axial displacement was statistically analyzed (repeated measured ANOVA). There was more axial displacement in the INT group than that of the EXT group in impression copings, resin splinted abutments, and final prosthesis. Less axial displacement was found at 1-piece non-hex transfer type impression coping than other type of impression copings in the INT group. There was more axial displacement at the final prosthesis than resin splinted abutments in the INT and the EXT groups. After 250 N cyclic loading of final prosthesis, the INT group showed more axial displacement than that of the EXT group. Internal tapered conical connection demonstrated a varying amount of axial displacement with tightening torque and cyclic loading. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Axial penile rigidity: determinants and relation to hemodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, I; Udelson, D

    1998-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction may be defined in terms of axial penile rigidity, the physical property that enables the erection to be utilized as a penetration tool during sexual activity. Erectile dysfunction occurs when inadequate axial penile rigidity results in buckling of the penile column when subjected to axial compressive loading situations during vaginal intromission. New multi-disciplinary engineering studies of penile hemodynamic and structural dynamic relationships are reviewed concerning the determinants of axial penile rigidity. Axial penile rigidity develops as a continuum during the increases in intracavernosal pressure and volume changes from the flaccid state and is influenced by intracavernosal pressure, penile tissue mechanical properties and penile geometry. Two penile tissue mechanical properties are especially relevant; cavernosal maximum volume at relatively low intracavernosal pressure, and tunical distensibility, the relative volume of the fully erect to completely flaccid pendulous penis. Two penile geometric properties are critical; the penile aspect ratio, defined as the diameter to length ratio of the pendulous penis, and the magnitude of the flaccid penile diameter. Clinically measured values of axial buckling forces in patients undergoing dynamic pharmacocavernosometry strongly correlated to theoretic-based analytic derived magnitudes of axial penile rigidity based on these above pressure, tissue and geometric determinants. Since axial penile rigidity is not exclusively dependent upon intracavernosal pressure, patients with normal erectile hemodynamics may be erroneously labelled as having psychogenic dysfunction where their true pathophysiology may be related to abnormal penile tissue properties and/or penile geometric factors. Similarly, some patients may claim sufficient rigidity for penetration, but have abnormal hemodynamic erectile function studies. They may have uniquely advantageous tissue mechanical and/or geometric properties. More

  10. Identifying Axial Spondyloarthritis in Electronic Medical Records of US Veterans.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jessica A; Shao, Yijun; Leng, Jianwei; He, Tao; Teng, Chia-Chen; Redd, Doug; Treitler Zeng, Qing; Burningham, Zachary; Clegg, Daniel O; Sauer, Brian C

    2017-09-01

    Large database research in axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) is limited by a lack of methods for identifying most types of axial SpA. Our objective was to develop methods for identifying axial SpA concepts in the free text of documents from electronic medical records. Veterans with documents in the national Veterans Health Administration Corporate Data Warehouse between January 1, 2005 and June 30, 2015 were included. Methods were developed for exploring, selecting, and extracting meaningful terms that were likely to represent axial SpA concepts. With annotation, clinical experts reviewed sections of text containing the meaningful terms (snippets) and classified the snippets according to whether or not they represented the intended axial SpA concept. With natural language processing (NLP) tools, computers were trained to replicate the clinical experts' snippet classifications. Three axial SpA concepts were selected by clinical experts, including sacroiliitis, terms including the prefix spond*, and HLA-B27 positivity (HLA-B27+). With supervised machine learning on annotated snippets, NLP models were developed with accuracies of 91.1% for sacroiliitis, 93.5% for spond*, and 97.2% for HLA-B27+. With independent validation, the accuracies were 92.0% for sacroiliitis, 91.0% for spond*, and 99.0% for HLA-B27+. We developed feasible and accurate methods for identifying axial SpA concepts in the free text of clinical notes. Additional research is required to determine combinations of concepts that will accurately identify axial SpA phenotypes. These novel methods will facilitate previously impractical observational research in axial SpA and may be applied to research with other diseases. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Historical variation of the geomagnetic axial dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher C.

    2008-09-01

    The geomagnetic axial dipole (hereinafter denoted g10) is the largest component of our planet's magnetic field. Its magnitude determines the morphology of solar-terrestrial electrical current systems and it is the most fundamental diagnostic property of the core-generated geodynamo. Elucidating past and future variations of g10(t) is consequently of central importance in geomagnetism. Previous historical geomagnetic field models, such as gufm1 of Jackson et al. [Jackson, A., Jonkers, A.R.T., Walker, M.R., 2000. Four centuries of geomagnetic secular variation from historical records. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A 358, 957-990], used direct observations to constrain g10(t) only after 1840 A.D.; before this time a crude linear extrapolation of the post-1840 A.D. rate of change (15 nT/year) was employed. In this contribution I construct historical field models with g10(t) instead constrained from 1590 A.D. to 1840 A.D. by an archaeointensity dataset compiled by Korte et al. [Korte, M., Genevey, A., Constable, C.G., Frank, U., Schnepp, E., 2005. Continuous geomagnetic field models for the past 7 millennia. 1. A new global data compilation. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 6, doi:10.1029/2004GC000800]. A range of possible linear models of the form g10(t)=g10(1840)+β(t-1840) are first explored; β=2.74±42.32 nT/year is found to explain the archaeointensity dataset with maximum likelihood, consistent with the recent findings of Gubbins et al. [Gubbins, D., Jones, A.L., Finlay, C.C., 2006. Fall in Earth's magnetic field is erratic. Science 312, 900-902]. Relaxing the linear constraint in an effort to find more physically plausible models, I find it is necessary to artificially increase the weight given to the archaeointensity data in order to obtain acceptable models. Despite satisfactorily explaining both the historical and archaeointensity data, and possessing reasonable spatial and temporal complexity, such free evolution models perform worse than the simpler linearly

  12. Nonmechanical axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter with directional discrimination.

    PubMed

    Maru, Koichi; Hata, Takahiro

    2012-07-10

    An axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with directional discrimination not requiring any moving mechanism in its probe is proposed. The proposed LDV utilizes frequency shift induced by acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) for discriminating the direction of velocity. The measurement position is axially scanned by changing the wavelength of the light input to the probe. The experimental result reveals that both the axial scan and the directional discrimination can be realized by using the proposed method without any moving element in the probe.

  13. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  14. Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-06-15

    We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

  15. Axial magnetic effect in two-color quenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V.; Chernodub, M. N.; Goy, V. A.; Landsteiner, K.; Molochkov, A. V.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2015-05-01

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T2 behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  16. Axial magnetic effect in two-color quenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V.; Chernodub, M. N.; Goy, V. A.; Landsteiner, K.; Molochkov, A. V.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T2 behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  17. Revealing atropisomer axial chirality in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    LaPlante, Steven R; Edwards, Paul J; Fader, Lee D; Jakalian, Araz; Hucke, Oliver

    2011-03-07

    An often overlooked source of chirality is atropisomerism, which results from slow rotation along a bond axis due to steric hindrance and/or electronic factors. If undetected or not managed properly, this time-dependent chirality has the potential to lead to serious consequences, because atropisomers can be present as distinct enantiomers or diastereoisomers with their attendant different properties. Herein we introduce a strategy to reveal and classify compounds that have atropisomeric chirality. Energy barriers to axial rotation were calculated using quantum mechanics, from which predicted high barriers could be experimentally validated. A calculated rotational energy barrier of 20 kcal mol(-1) was established as a suitable threshold to distinguish between atropisomers and non-atropisomers with a prediction accuracy of 86%. This methodology was applied to subsets of drug databases in the course of which atropisomeric drugs were identified. In addition, some drugs were exposed that were not yet known to have this chiral attribute. The most valuable utility of this tool will be to predict atropisomerism along the drug discovery pathway. When used in concert with our compound classification scheme, decisions can be made during early discovery stages such as "hit-to-lead" and "lead optimization," to foresee and validate the presence of atropisomers and to exercise options of removing, further stabilizing, or rendering the chiral axis of interest more freely rotatable via SAR design, thereby decreasing this potential liability within a compound series. The strategy can also improve drug development plans, such as determining whether a drug or series should be developed as a racemic mixture or as an isolated single compound. Moreover, the work described herein can be extended to other chemical fields that require the assessment of potential chiral axes.

  18. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2013-08-14

    A superconducting RF (SRF) power coupler capable of handling 500 kW CW RF power at 750 MHz is required for present and future storage rings and linacs. There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Coupler windows vary from cylinders to cones to disks and RF power couplers will always be limited by the ability of ceramic windows and their matching systems to withstand the stresses due to non-uniform heating from dielectric and wall losses, multipactor, and mechanical flexure. In the Phase II project, we built a double window coaxial system with materials that would not otherwise be useable due to individual VSWRs. Double window systems can be operated such that one is cold (LN2) and one is warm. They can have different materials and still have a good match without using matching elements that create problematic multipactor bands. The match of the two windows will always result from the cancellation of the two window’s reflections when they are located approximately a quarter wavelength apart or multiples of a quarter wavelength. The window assemblies were carefully constructed to put the window material and its braze joint in compression at all times. This was done using explosion bonding techniques which allow for inexpensive fabrication of the vacuum / compression ring out of stainless steel with copper plating applied to the inner surface. The EIA 3-1/8” double window assembly was then successfully baked out and tested to 12 kW in a 3-1/8” co-axial system. The thermal gradient across the window was measured to be 90 C which represents about 15 ksi tensile stress in an uncompressed window. In our design the compression was calculated to be about 25 ksi, so the net compressive force was 5 ksi at full power.

  19. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  20. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis with Novel CT-based Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Niedzielski, Joshua S.; Yang, Jinzhong; Stingo, Francesco; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel R.; Briere, Tina M.; Liao, Zhongxing; Court, Laurence E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with IMRT. Methods and Materials Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade0, 45 Grade2, and 16 Grade3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics’ performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of nineteen expansion metrics had ROC area under the curve (AUC) values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with AUCs of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian Value and 98.6mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced with anatomic correction methods. PMID:26675063

  1. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  2. Solving outside-axial-field-of-view scatter correction problem in PET via digital experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Zhu, Yang-Ming; Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Unaccounted scatter impact from unknown outside-axial-field-of-view (outside-AFOV) activity in PET is an important degrading factor for image quality and quantitation. Resource consuming and unpopular way to account for the outside- AFOV activity is to perform an additional PET/CT scan of adjacent regions. In this work we investigate a solution to the outside-AFOV scatter problem without performing a PET/CT scan of the adjacent regions. The main motivation for the proposed method is that the measured random corrected prompt (RCP) sinogram in the background region surrounding the measured object contains only scattered events, originating from both inside- and outside-AFOV activity. In this method, the scatter correction simulation searches through many randomly-chosen outside-AFOV activity estimates along with known inside-AFOV activity, generating a plethora of scatter distribution sinograms. This digital experimentation iterates until a decent match is found between a simulated scatter sinogram (that include supposed outside-AFOV activity) and the measured RCP sinogram in the background region. The combined scatter impact from inside- and outside-AFOV activity can then be used for scatter correction during final image reconstruction phase. Preliminary results using measured phantom data indicate successful phantom length estimate with the method, and, therefore, accurate outside-AFOV scatter estimate.

  3. Line-tied MHD modes: effect of plasma pressure, axial boundary condition and axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcudi, Francesco; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Finn, John M.

    2008-11-01

    Recent 3D nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of astrophysical jets [1] showed a narrow jet-like region with very tightly wound magnetic fields, very suggestive of jet observations. These results were unexpected because such tightly wound magnetic fields should be violently MHD unstable. In order to make direct contact with the simulations of Ref. [1], we present a linear stability study in resistive MHD in cylindrical geometry. In this work, stability is studied including axial flows and finite plasma pressure. We also changed the axial boundary conditions to model those typical of astrophysical jets and laboratory experiments, using line-tying at one end of the field lines and non-line-tied boundary conditions at the other end [2]. The numerical results show that pressure strongly shifts the marginal stability threshold relative to the Kruskal-Shafranov threshold and a monotonically increasing pressure profile stabilizes the plasma. On the other hand, non-line-tied boundary conditions have little effect on marginal stability for typical parameters. All the results are supported by analytical studies based on reduced ideal MHD. [1] H. Li, G. Lapenta, J. M. Finn, S. Li, and S. A. Colgate, Astrophys. J. 643, 92 (2006). [2] D. D. Ryutov, I. Furno, T. P. Intrator, S. Abbate, and T. Madziwa-Nussinov, Phys. Plasmas 13, 032105 (2006).

  4. The Nonradiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis, the Radiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis: The Tangled Skein of Rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Roopa; Agrawal, Neha; Patil, Nilesh S.

    2017-01-01

    Since 1984 the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has been based upon the modified New York (mNY) criteria with mandatory presence of radiographic sacroiliitis, without which the diagnosis is not tenable. However, it may take years or decades for radiographic sacroiliitis to develop delaying the diagnosis for long periods. It did not matter in the past because no effective treatment was available. However, with the availability of a highly effective treatment, namely, tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors (TNFi), the issue of early diagnosis of AS acquired an urgency. The Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) classification criteria published in 2009 was a significant step towards this goal. These criteria described an early stage of the disease where sacroiliitis was demonstrable only on MRI but not on standard radiograph. Therefore, this stage of the disease was labelled “nonradiographic axial SpA” (nr-axSpA). But questions have been raised if, in search of early diagnosis, specificity was compromised. The Federal Drug Administration (FDA, USA) withheld approval for the use of TNFi in patients with nr-axSpA because of issues related to the specificity of these criteria. This review attempts to clarify some of these aspects of the nr-axSpA-AS relationship and also tries to answer the question whether ASAS classifiable radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (r-axSpA) term can be interchangeably used with the term AS. PMID:28555158

  5. Investigation on viewing direction dependent detectability in a reconstructed 3D volume for a cone beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junhan; Lee, Changwoo; Baek, Jongduk

    2015-03-01

    In medical imaging systems, several factors (e.g., reconstruction algorithm, noise structures, target size, contrast, etc) affect the detection performance and need to be considered for object detection. In a cone beam CT system, FDK reconstruction produces different noise structures in axial and coronal slices, and thus we analyzed directional dependent detectability of objects using detection SNR of Channelized Hotelling observer. To calculate the detection SNR, difference-of-Gaussian channel model with 10 channels was implemented, and 20 sphere objects with different radius (i.e., 0.25 (mm) to 5 (mm) equally spaced by 0.25 (mm)), reconstructed by FDK algorithm, were used as object templates. Covariance matrix in axial and coronal direction was estimated from 3000 reconstructed noise volumes, and then the SNR ratio between axial and coronal direction was calculated. Corresponding 2D noise power spectrum was also calculated. The results show that as the object size increases, the SNR ratio decreases, especially lower than 1 when the object size is larger than 2.5 mm radius. The reason is because the axial (coronal) noise power is higher in high (low) frequency band, and therefore the detectability of a small (large) object is higher in coronal (axial) images. Our results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slices in order to improve the detectability of a small object in a cone beam CT system.

  6. Omental infarct: CT imaging features.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Gervais, D A; Lee, P; Westra, S; Hahn, P F; Novelline, R A; Mueller, P R

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) features of acute omental infarction and to study the evolutionary changes on follow-up CT imaging. Fifteen cases of omental infarction were evaluated for their initial CT imaging features. The imaging features evaluated included size of the fatty lesion, location, peripheral rim, and relation to colon. CT findings were correlated with etiology, clinical presentation, and leukocytosis. Follow-up CT images were available in eight patients and the imaging features were studied. Eight omental infarcts were of unknown etiology and seven were secondary to abdominal surgery. In 53% of patients (eight of 15), the location of the omental infarct was in the right lower, mid, or upper quadrants. These eight right-side infarcts occurred in six patients with primary omental infarcts. In 13 of 14 patients who underwent CT within 15 days of onset of omental infarct, the margin of the lesion was ill defined. Primary omental (n = 8) infarcts were seen in younger patients (p = 0.02) and were larger on CT (p = 0.02) compared with secondary omental infarcts. CT findings evolved from an ill-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion to a well-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion with a peripheral hyperdense rim in all six secondary omental infarctions for which acute stage and follow-up CT images were available for interpretation. There is a significant difference in the age distribution and CT findings in terms of size of the omental infarction between primary and secondary etiologies. On follow-up CT, secondary omental infarcts progressively shrank and developed a well-defined, hyperdense rim around a fatty core.

  7. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  8. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  9. Historic Image: view of Axial Cemetery Road and Sections 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Image: view of Axial Cemetery Road and Sections 1 and 2, from Receiving Vault looking to the entrance. Photograph 8 November 1937. NCA History Collection - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Jamaica Avenue Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  10. Axial field shaping under high-numerical-aperture focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Toufic G.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2007-03-01

    Kant reported [J. Mod. Optics47, 905 (2000)] a formulation for solving the inverse problem of vector diffraction, which accurately models high-NA focusing. Here, Kant's formulation is adapted to the method of generalized projections to obtain an algorithm for designing diffractive optical elements (DOEs) that reshape the axial point-spread function (PSF). The algorithm is applied to design a binary phase-only DOE that superresolves the axial PSF with controlled increase in axial sidelobes. An 11-zone DOE is identified that axially narrows the PSF central lobe by 29% while maintaining the sidelobe intensity at or below 52% of the peak intensity. This DOE could improve the resolution achievable in several applications without significantly complicating the optical system.

  11. 48. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open vistas to either side of the roadway and the wood guardrail. View is to the northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  12. Probing dense matter in neutron stars with axial w modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Debarati; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2009-07-15

    We study the problem of extracting information about composition and equation of state of dense matter in neutron star interior using axial w modes. We determine complex frequencies of axial w modes for a set of equations of state involving hyperons as well as Bose-Einstein condensates of antikaons adopting the continued fraction method. Hyperons and antikaon condensates result in softer equations of state leading to higher frequencies and lower damping times of first axial w modes than those of the nuclear matter case. The presence of condensates may lead to the appearance of a new stable branch of superdense stars beyond the neutron star branch called the third family. The existence of the same mass compact stars in both branches is known as neutron star twins. Further investigation of twins reveals that first axial w-mode frequencies of superdense stars in the third family are higher than those of the corresponding twins in the neutron star branch.

  13. Radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes subjected to axial pressure.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiao-Wen; Ni, Qing-Qing; Shi, Jin-Xing; Natsuki, Toshiaki

    2011-08-11

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the radial breathing mode (RBM) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subjected to axial pressure is presented based on an elastic continuum model. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are described as an individual elastic shell and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are considered to be two shells coupled through the van der Waals force. The effects of axial pressure, wave numbers and nanotube diameter on the RBM frequency are investigated in detail. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experiment, calculation and simulation. Our results show that the RBM frequency is linearly dependent on the axial pressure and is affected by the wave numbers. We concluded that RBM frequency can be used to characterize the axial pressure acting on both ends of a CNT.

  14. 22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Axial view along north cell corridor, cells at right; view to southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  15. A simplified sizing and mass model for axial flow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    An axial flow turbine mass model has been developed and used to study axial flow turbines for space power systems. Hydrogen, helium-xenon, hydrogen-water vapor, air, and potassium vapor working fluids have been investigated to date. The impact of construction material, inlet temperature, rotational speed, pressure ratio, and power level on turbine mass and volume has been analyzed. This paper presents the turbine model description and results of parametric studies showing general design trends characteristic of any axial flow machine. Also, a comparison of axial flow turbine designs using helium-xenon mixtures and potassium vapor working fluids, which are used in Brayton and Rankine space power systems, respectively, is presented. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. 8. VIEW OF AFTERCOOLER FOR ALLISCHALMER AXIAL AIR COMPRESSORS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF AFTERCOOLER FOR ALLIS-CHALMER AXIAL AIR COMPRESSORS IN THE LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING LOOKING WEST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  17. 9. VIEW OF AFTERCOOLER FOR ALLISCHALMER AXIAL AIR COMPRESSORS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF AFTERCOOLER FOR ALLIS-CHALMER AXIAL AIR COMPRESSORS IN THE LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING LOOKING WEST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  18. 2. AXIAL VIEW OF THE MAIN EQUIPMENT ROOM IN BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AXIAL VIEW OF THE MAIN EQUIPMENT ROOM IN BUILDING 408, LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Operations Building & Annex, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  19. Axial mesodermal dysplasia complex: a new case with parental consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Mota, C R; Azevedo, M; Rocha, G; Manuela, F; Coelho, R; Lima, M R

    2000-01-01

    A female is described with axial mesodermal dysplasia complex (AMDC) born to a consanguineous couple. This is thought to be the first description of a patient with AMDC born to consanguineous parents.

  20. 12. Axial view to north of south portal of truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Axial view to north of south portal of truss span. Repaired compression and sway brace members clearly visible. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  1. Hydrocephalus Caused by Fat Embolism: A Rare Complication of Atlanto-Axial Fixation for Odontoid Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-06-01

    Odontoid fracture is not uncommon and surgical treatment that uses posterior screw/rod fixation is an acceptable option. This is the first report of delayed hydrocephalus due to subarachnoid fat migration as a complication of posterior atlanto-axial (AA) fixation. A 27-year-old man underwent posterior C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw fixation for a recent Anderson-D'Alonzo type 2 odontoid fracture. Autologous bone graft was wired for onlay fusion. The surgery was smooth, except that there was an incidental durotomy intraoperatively. The patient had significant relief of his neck pain, although computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a medial breach of the left C1 screw postoperation; however, he gradually developed headache and dizziness after discharge. Five weeks after operation, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large pseudo-meningocele at the surgical site, which was managed conservatively. Nine weeks after the AA fixation, the patient was sent to the emergency department for altered consciousness. A brain CT demonstrated hydrocephalus and multiple fat emboli in the subarachnoid and intraventricular space. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted to manage the hydrocephalus and pseudo-meningocele. The patient recovered well and was followed up to 13 months after operation. To date, this was the first report of delayed hydrocephalus caused by fat embolism after AA fixation surgery. Incidental durotomy in posterior AA fixation may predispose the patient to a serious complication of fat-cerebrospinal fluid embolism and subsequent hydrocephalus. There should be a heightened awareness for such a complication. Both CT and magnetic resonance imaging are useful for the diagnosis of subarachnoid fat droplets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Update on the PWR axial burnup profile database

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciapouti, R.F.; Volkinburg, S.V.

    1995-12-01

    A pressurized water reactor database was developed to evaluate the axial burnup profiles of various reactor types. The data showed that the various types exhibit similar behavior, especially at the top and bottom of the assembly. From the existing data, bounding axial burnup profiles can be developed to envelope the various pressurized water reactor assembly deigns. The database encompasses most of the PWR fuel designs and contains sufficient data to provide reliable statistics.

  3. The research on flow pulsation characteristics of axial piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingchao; Wang, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    The flow pulsation is an important factor influencing the axial piston pump performance. In this paper we implement modeling and simulation of the axial piston pump with AMESim software to explore the flow pulsation characteristics under various factors . Theory analysis shows the loading pressure, angular speed, piston numbers and the accumulator impose evident influence on the flow pulsation characteristics. This simulation and analysis can be used for reducing the flow pulsation rate via properly setting the related factors.

  4. Axially astigmatic surfaces: different types and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1996-12-01

    Axially astigmatic surfaces have different curvatures in orthogonal diameters. Toroidal and spherocylindrical optical surfaces are two mathematically different special cases of axially astigmatic surfaces as noted by Menchaca and Malacara (1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The different between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. We study the general properties of astigmatic surfaces and some special interesting cases.

  5. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  6. CEnPiT: Helical cardiac CT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bontus, Claas; Koken, Peter; Koehler, Thomas; Grass, Michael

    2006-08-15

    Computer tomography (CT) scanners with an increasing number of detector rows offer the potential of shorter scanning times. Nevertheless, the reconstruction problem becomes more challenging, since cone beam artifacts are likely to enter. Here, we consider helical cardiac CT. We analyze how a relationship can be established between exact reconstruction algorithms and the demand to perform a cardiac gating. Utilizing the redundancies requires the consideration of all kinds of Radon planes. For the reconstruction algorithm proposed here, we separate the data into two parts. The first part contains contributions of Radon planes, which are measured with a large number of redundancies. The second part contains the remaining contributions. As it turns out, the second part contributes rather to the low-frequency contents of trans-axial slices. Therefore, we propose to perform a gated back-projection only for the first part, while the second part is back-projected in an ungated way. Data from the complete source trajectory are employed in the reconstruction process in contrary to conventional helical cardiac reconstruction methods. Moreover, all different types of Radon planes are taken into account in the reconstruction, though an ECG-dependent cardiac gating is applied. The reconstruction results, which we present for clinical and simulated data, demonstrate the high potential of CEnPiT for helical cardiac CT with large cone angle systems.

  7. X-ray snapshots for metalloporphyrin axial ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. X.; Zhang, X.; Wasinger, E. C.; Lockard, J. V.; Stickrath, A. B.; Mara, M. W.; Attenkofer, K.; Jennings, G.; Smolentsev, G.; Soldatov, A.

    2010-01-01

    Axial ligation mechanisms of a metalloporphyrin, nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), were investigated by static and transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy at Ni K-edge (8.333 keV). A surprisingly broad (i.e. {approx}1.4 eV) linewidth for the 1s {yields} 3d{sub x2-y2} transition in the ground state was attributed to strong geometry dependent 3d molecular orbital (MO) energies due to coexisting conformers in solution. The broad distribution of 3d MO energy levels enables transient degeneracy of the 3d{sub z2} and 3d{sub x2-y2} MOs to produce a temporary vacancy in the 3d{sub z2} MO which favors axial ligation. Photoexcitation also induces the vacancy in the 3d{sub z2} MO, leading to a more than two-fold enhancement in the axial ligated species. Therefore, a unified axial ligation mechanism for both the ground and excited state is proposed based on the elucidation of the excited state structural dynamics, which will have a broad impact in understanding and controlling axial ligation in enzymatic reactions and molecular catalysis involving transient axial ligation.

  8. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical.

  9. [Changes in axial length after scleral buckling surgery].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H; Hayashi, K; Nakao, F; Hayashi, F

    1996-04-01

    The eye lengthens after scleral buckling surgery for retinal detachment. We investigated the changes in axial length and refraction after scleral buckling. A total of 89 eyes from 88 patients which were all scheduled to undergo scleral buckling were included in this study. The eyes were classified into four groups based on the type of buckling procedures:1 local buckling, 2 encircling, 3 encircling with vitrectomy, and 4 encircling with local buckling. We examined the axial length of these eyes using ultrasonography, preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The refractive changes were also examined. Depending on the type of scleral buckling procedure employed, the eyes in Groups 2, 3, and 4 clearly lengthened, but those of Group 1 did not. The amount of axial lengthening in Groups 2, 3, and 4 was significantly greater than in Group 1 at 3 and 6 months after surgery. In the spherical equivalent, a myopic shift occurred in the eyes in Groups 2, 3, and 4, and this shift was significantly greater than in Group 1 In addition, the correlation between the extent of axial lengthening and myopic shift was significant. In conclusion, the axial length increases with a myopic shift due to encircling, whereas local buckling changed the axial length only slightly.

  10. Active axial spondyloarthritis: potential role of certolizumab pegol

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, Sriya; Miller, Anne V

    2014-01-01

    The axial spondyloarthropathies are a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that predominantly affect the axial joints. This group includes ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthropathy. While the pathogenesis of axial spondyloarthropathies is not clear, immunologically active tissues primarily include the entheses, ie, the areas where ligaments, tendons, and joint capsules attach to bone and to the annulus fibrosis at the vertebrae. One of the major mediators of the immune response in this group of diseases is tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). Blockade of TNFα results in reduced vascularity and inflammatory cell infiltration in the synovial tissues of affected joints. Certolizumab pegol (CZP) is an Fc-free, PEGylated anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody. CZP has unique properties that differ from other available TNFα inhibitors by virtue of its lack of an Fc region, which minimizes potential Fc-mediated effects, and its PEGylation, which improves drug pharmacokinetics and bioavailability. It has been shown in clinical trials that CZP improves patient outcomes and reduces inflammation in the sacroiliac joints and spine in both ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic axial spondyloarthropathies. These data support CZP as a treatment option for axial spondyloarthropathies. PMID:24611014

  11. Axial scanning in confocal microscopy employing adaptive lenses (CAL).

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Nektarios; Finkeldey, Markus; Stürmer, Moritz; Leithold, Christoph; Gerhardt, Nils C; Hofmann, Martin R; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Czarske, Jürgen W; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-03-10

    In this paper we analyze the capability of adaptive lenses to replace mechanical axial scanning in confocal microscopy. The adaptive approach promises to achieve high scan rates in a rather simple implementation. This may open up new applications in biomedical imaging or surface analysis in micro- and nanoelectronics, where currently the axial scan rates and the flexibility at the scan process are the limiting factors. The results show that fast and adaptive axial scanning is possible using electrically tunable lenses but the performance degrades during the scan. This is due to defocus and spherical aberrations introduced to the system by tuning of the adaptive lens. These detune the observation plane away from the best focus which strongly deteriorates the axial resolution by a factor of ~2.4. Introducing balancing aberrations allows addressing these influences. The presented approach is based on the employment of a second adaptive lens, located in the detection path. It enables shifting the observation plane back to the best focus position and thus creating axial scans with homogeneous axial resolution. We present simulated and experimental proof-of-principle results.

  12. Comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector CT using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection as reference standards.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Lee, D H; Ko, Y T

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare blinded with partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector (MD) CT by using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as reference standards. 44 patients with gastric cancer underwent MDCT with air as an oral contrast agent. Surgery was performed on 37 patients, ESD on six and surgery after ESD on one. To provide comparison cases of blinded evaluation, 38 MDCT examinations were added for cases where no focal gastric lesion was seen on endoscopy. Two radiologists, blinded to the presence, number and location of the tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus multiplanar reformation (MPR) images of 82 MDCT examinations with or without gastric cancer. For partially blinded evaluation, the same radiologists, blinded to the location and number of tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus MPR images of 44 MDCT examinations of gastric cancer. Differences in assessment were resolved by consensus. 45 gastric cancers were found in surgical and ESD specimens. Detection rates of gastric cancer from axial and axial plus MPR images during blinded evaluation and from axial and axial plus MPR images during partially blinded evaluation were 62% (28/45), 64% (29/45), 64% (29/45) and 71% (32/45), respectively. There was no statistical significance for the comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection rates of gastric cancer. The detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during blinded evaluation showed no specific difference compared with the detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during partially blinded evaluation.

  13. Mapping AUV Survey of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, H.; Caress, D.; Conlin, D.; Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Butterfield, D.; Chadwick, W.; Tucker, P.

    2006-12-01

    In late August and early September 2006, the MBARI Mapping Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed for 5 missions on Axial Seamount during a NOAA NeMO cruise on the R/V Thompson. The objective of the survey was to determine the geologic history of the summit of Axial Seamount using high resolution multibeam, sidescan, and sub-bottom profiler data. The Mapping AUV is a torpedo-shaped, 6000 m rated vehicle designed and constructed by MBARI. The vehicle is equipped with a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz and 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, and a 2-16 kHz sweep chirp sub-bottom profiler. The multibeam provides a 120-degree swath with 0.94 degree by 0.94 degree beam resolution. The endurance of the AUV is eight hours at 3 knots. Navigation derives from an inertial navigation system (INS) incorporating a ring laser gyro aided by GPS at the surface and by velocity-over- ground observations from a Doppler velocity log (DVL) when within 130 m of the seafloor. A navigational precision of 0.05 percent of distance traveled is achieved with continuous DVL bottom lock. An acoustic modem allows surface aiding of navigation during deep descents. The AUV ran two types of missions: those on the rim of the caldera were run at 90 m altitude with a line spacing of 250 m and those on the caldera floor were run at 50 m altitude with a line spacing of 150 or 175 m. The surveys covered most of 1998 lava flow on the south rim of the caldera and northern part of the south rift zone, the southern region of the caldera floor where hydrothermal vents are common, the northeast rim of the caldera where volcaniclastic deposits related to caldera collapse drape the surface, the north rift zone, and the northern portion of the caldera floor. The low-altitude maps have a resolution of 1 m, so large individual lava pillars and hydrothermal chimneys can be seen, fissures stand out clearly, and the regions of collapsed lobate flows and lava channels are prominent. Many of the flows, including the

  14. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  15. The effect of very low axial clearances on the performance of an axial-flow compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furber, S. B.

    1985-10-01

    The results of tests on an axial-flow compressor stage designed to allow operation at unusually low axial clearances are presented. The axial clearance was varied between 1 and 33 percent of the blade chord whilst the compressor was running, and the stage pressure rise showed a peak at a clearance around 4 percent of blade chord. The pressure rise was 8 percent higher at this clearance than at 33 percent of chord, with no significant change in the stage efficiency. In addition, reducing the clearance was found under some conditions to bring the stage from a stalled to a fully unstalled state. The sound output of the stage was measured at all clearances, and the results show a significant increase in the high harmonics of the blade-passing frequency at low axial clearances.

  16. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  17. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  18. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  19. Comparisons between co-axial and bi-axial optical systems for time-of-flight based laser scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Junhwan; Hwang, Sungui; Won, Bumsik; Park, Kyihwan

    2015-07-01

    In time-of-flight based laser scanners, measurable distance and accuracy are the most important parameters to determine performances. The optical system of the laser scanner should be optimally designed since a high intensity of measured signal increases the measurable distance and accuracy. Therefore, it is important to understand how the optical component layout affects the laser scanner performances. Optical component design for co-axial and bi-axial mechanisms are considered in the paper.

  20. Dynamic volume CT: the next revolution in clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, Kirsten; Mather, Rich

    2008-08-01

    The need for table motion in multi-detector CT causes image volumes acquired for whole organ motion and perfusion studies to lack temporal uniformity. The next revolution in clinical CT, dynamic volume CT, mitigates this limitation by providing the ability to acquire an entire organ with isotropic resolution in a single gantry rotation with no table movement. The first dynamic volume CT scanner has recently been introduced and comprises 320 detector rows of 0.5mm channel thickness, covering 16cm of anatomy in one rotation of 0.35sec. This scanner offers many advancements in terms of temporal uniformity, reconstruction, and radiation dose. This system significantly reduces motion artifact and eliminates contrast phase differences within the volume. Because this scanner does not require helical acquisition for volumetric imaging, it delivers significantly less dose for applications such as CT coronary angiography exams as well as reduced dose in most other applications. Furthermore, by eliminating table motion, the need for complex interpolation methods that can distort cardiac images is removed. Image quality is not sacrificed compared with standard 64-row CT scanners, as demonstrated via low contrast, resolution, and accuracy measurements presented in this work. By capturing the entire brain in one rotation, brain perfusion, bone subtraction, and quantitative perfusion analysis are now possible with a single low dose exam. Dynamic volume CT offers to change the way medicine approaches stroke patients, myocardial perfusion studies, and imaging of other moving body parts such as the lung and joints.

  1. Influence of the axial rotation angle on tool mark striations.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Derrel Louis; Pieterman, René; Baiker, Martin

    2017-10-01

    A tool's axial rotation influences the geometric properties of a tool mark. The larger the axial rotation angle, the larger the compression of structural details like striations. This complicates comparing tool marks at different axial rotations. Using chisels, tool marks were made from 0° to 75° axial rotation and compared using an automated approach Baiker et al. [10]. In addition, a 3D topographic surface of a chisel was obtained to generate virtual tool marks and to test whether the axial rotation angle of a mark could be predicted. After examination of the tool mark and chisel data-sets it was observed that marks lose information with increasing rotation due to the change in relative distance between geometrical details on the tool and the disappearance of smaller details. The similarity and repeatability were high for comparisons between marks with no difference in axial rotation, but decreasing with increased rotation angle from 0° to 75°. With an increasing difference in the rotation angles, the tool marks had to be corrected to account for the different compression factors between them. For compression up to 7.5%, this was obtained automatically by the tool mark alignment method. For larger compression, manually re-sizing the marks to the uncompressed widths at 0° rotation before the alignment was found suitable for successfully comparing even large differences in axial rotation. The similarity and repeatability were decreasing however, with increasing degree of re-sizing. The quality was assessed by determining the similarity at different detail levels within a tool mark. With an axial rotation up to 75°, tool marks were found to reliably represent structural details down to 100μm. The similarity of structural details below 100μm was dependent on the angle, with the highest similarity at small rotation angles and the lowest similarity at large rotation angles. Filtering to remove the details below 100μm lead to consistently higher similarity

  2. Multirigid registration of MR and CT images of the cervical spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.

    2004-05-01

    We present our work on fusion of MR and CT images of the cervical spine. To achieve the required registration accuracy of approximately 1mm, the spine is treated as a collection of rigid vertebrae, and a separate rigid body transformation applied to each (Hawkes). This in turn requires segmentation of the CT datasets into separate vertebral images, which is difficult because the narrow planes separating adjacent vertebrae are parallel to the axial plane of the CT scans. We solve this problem by evolving all the vertebral contours simultaneously using a level set method, and use contour competition to estimate the position of the vertebral edges when a clean separation between adjacent vertebrae is not seen. Contour competition is based in turn on the vertical scan principle: no part of a given vertebra is vertically below any part of an inferior vertebra. Once segmentation is complete, the individual rigid body transforms are then estimated using mutual information maximization, and the CT images of the vertebrae superimposed on the MR scans. The resultant fused images contain the bony detail of CT and the soft tissue discrimination of MR and appear to be diagnostically equivalent, or superior, to CT myelograms. A formal test of these conclusions is planned for the next phase of our work.

  3. Multidetector CT and postprocessing in planning and assisting in minimally invasive bronchoscopic airway interventions.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arjun; Godoy, Myrna C; Holden, Emma L; Madden, Brendan P; Chua, Felix; Ost, David E; Roos, Justus E; Naidich, David P; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    A widening spectrum of increasingly advanced bronchoscopic techniques is available for the diagnosis and treatment of various bronchopulmonary diseases. The evolution of computed tomography (CT)-multidetector CT in particular-has paralleled these advances. The resulting development of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) postprocessing techniques has complemented axial CT interpretation in providing more anatomically familiar information to the pulmonologist. Two-dimensional techniques such as multiplanar recontructions and 3D techniques such as virtual bronchoscopy can provide accurate guidance for increasing yield in transbronchial needle aspiration and transbronchial biopsy of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. Sampling of lesions located deeper within the lung periphery via bronchoscopic pathways determined at virtual bronchoscopy are also increasingly feasible. CT fluoroscopy for real-time image-guided sampling is now widely available; electromagnetic navigation guidance is being used in select centers but is currently more costly. Minimally invasive bronchoscopic techniques for restoring airway patency in obstruction caused by both benign and malignant conditions include mechanical strategies such as airway stent insertion and ablative techniques such as electrocauterization and cryotherapy. Multidetector CT postprocessing techniques provide valuable information for planning and surveillance of these treatment methods. In particular, they optimize the evaluation of dynamic obstructive conditions such as tracheobronchomalacia, especially with the greater craniocaudal coverage now provided by wide-area detectors. Multidetector CT also provides planning information for bronchoscopic treatment of bronchopleural fistulas and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction for carefully selected patients with refractory emphysema.

  4. On-the-fly generation of multiplanar reformation images independent of CT scanner type.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dong Kyun; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Bo Hyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Young Hoon; Bajpai, Vasundhara; Shin, Yeong Gil

    2008-09-01

    We propose a system that automatically generates multiplanar reformation (MPR) images on-the-fly, which is independent of computed tomography (CT) scanner type. Triggered by digital imaging communication in medicine (DICOM) Storage Commitment or in a time threshold manner, this system generates MPR images from received thin-section CT data sets with predefined reformation parameters and then sends MPR images to DICOM stations. Users can specify the reformation parameters and the destination of the resulting MPR images for each CT study description. A pilot system was tested for 3 months. From thin-section data sets received from two 16- and one 64-detector-row CT scanners, this system generated MPR images and sent them to the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) without failure or any additional human operation. For 143 test thin-section CT studies (172-4,761 images in each study), the time to store reformatted images (axial and coronal with 5-mm thicknesses and 4-mm intervals) in PACS after the completion of the CT scan ranged from 92 to 1,772 s (mean +/- SD, 555.1 +/- 509.4).

  5. Experimental benchmarking of a Monte Carlo dose simulation code for pediatric CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Yoshizumi, Terry; Colsher, James G.; Jones, Robert P.; Frush, Donald P.

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a desire to reduce CT radiation dose to children because of their susceptibility and prolonged risk for cancer induction. Concerns arise, however, as to the impact of dose reduction on image quality and thus potentially on diagnostic accuracy. To study the dose and image quality relationship, we are developing a simulation code to calculate organ dose in pediatric CT patients. To benchmark this code, a cylindrical phantom was built to represent a pediatric torso, which allows measurements of dose distributions from its center to its periphery. Dose distributions for axial CT scans were measured on a 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK). The same measurements were simulated using a Monte Carlo code (PENELOPE, Universitat de Barcelona) with the applicable CT geometry including bowtie filter. The deviations between simulated and measured dose values were generally within 5%. To our knowledge, this work is one of the first attempts to compare measured radial dose distributions on a cylindrical phantom with Monte Carlo simulated results. It provides a simple and effective method for benchmarking organ dose simulation codes and demonstrates the potential of Monte Carlo simulation for investigating the relationship between dose and image quality for pediatric CT patients.

  6. Opportunistic screening for osteoporosis by routine CT in Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Alacreu, Elena; Moratal, David; Arana, Estanislao

    2017-03-01

    Feasibility evaluation of early detection of osteoporosis in oncologic patients by bone mineral density (BMD) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans performed for other clinical indications, by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference. Abdominal CT images can identify patients with osteoporosis BMD without additional radiation exposure or cost. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of early detection of osteoporosis by bone mineral density (BMD) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans performed in oncologic patients, comparing calibrated and uncalibrated measurements by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference. We also performed an external validation of a threshold of 160 Hounsfield units (HU), proposed as highly sensitive. Cohort comprised CT-DXA pairs within a 6-month period performed for any indication on 326 consecutive adults, aged 62.4 ± 12.38 years (mean ± standard deviation). CT attenuation of trabecular bone in HU was measured at the axial cross sections of L1, L2, L3, and L4 vertebrae. Vertebral compression fractures were assessed by sagittal reconstruction view. Diagnostic performance measures and the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) for diagnosing osteoporosis were calculated. BMD values were statistical significantly lower at any vertebral level from L1 to L4 for patients with osteoporosis defined by DXA (p < 0.001). Calibrated and uncalibrated BMD values were significantly correlated (R (2) = 0.833, p < 0.01). An uncalibrated L1 CT attenuation threshold of 160 HU was more than 90 % sensitive, and a threshold of 73 HU was more than 90 % specific for distinguishing osteoporosis BMD. Fifty-nine percent of patients with vertebral compression fracture had non-osteoporotic DXA T-scores. Abdominal CT images obtained for other reasons can identify patients with osteoporosis BMD without additional radiation exposure or cost. Uncalibrated values at L1 can

  7. CT scanning of the breast using a conventional CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Doust, B D; Milbrath, J R; Doust, V L

    1981-09-01

    Using a conventional body CT scanner, computed tomography of the breast was performed on 32 patients known to have or suspected of having breast masses. Xeromammograms were available for comparison in all cases. All mass lesions were histologically proved. Seven patients were examined prone, 25 supine. The prone position yielded pictures that resembled craniocaudal mammograms. Breast asymmetry, skin thickening, stranding from a mass to the chest wall, calcification, and axillary lymphadenopathy could be demonstrated by means of CT. The portion of the breast adjacent to the chest wall was more readily examined by means of CT than by conventional mammography. Internal mammary nodes could not be demonstrated.

  8. [Diagnostic imaging--CT, dynamic CT, and others].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hajime

    2011-10-01

    Technical advances have raised computed tomography(CT) as a strong diagnostic tool of clinical imaging. Emphysematous changes can be quantitatively analyzed as low attenuation area which correlated with diffusion capacity, quality of life, and nutritional states, but not so much with forced expiratory volume in one second. With co-analyzing airway wall thickness, those are possibly useful to understand phenotypes. Dynamics of airway during breathing can be visualized by dynamic CT such as electron-beam CT. Dynamic airway narrowing is a representative feature in emphysematous lung.

  9. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Fourteenth quarterly report, 14 November 1993--13 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-08-10

    During this quarter of the DOE project, ``Characterization of Multiphase Fluid Flow During Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Flotation``, efforts were made to correlate the x-ray CT measurements with the flotation experiments reported in the last. quarterly report. In this regard the axial view of the flow regimes in the ASH during steady state operation were constructed from the radial density profiles as revealed by x-ray CT measurements. By studying the characteristics of the flow regimes from these axial views and relating them with flotation recovery data, a more detailed understanding of ASH flotation was possible. Construction of the axial view of the flow regimes and the effect of two operating variables, dimensionless area ratio (A* = overflow opening area/underflow opening area) and percent solids in the feed, are reported in this quarterly report.

  10. Characterization of multiphase fluid flow during air-sparged hydrocyclone flotation by x-ray CT. Fifteenth quarterly report, 14 February 1994--13 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1994-08-10

    During this quarter of the DOE project, ``Characterization of Multiphase Fluid Flow During Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Flotation``, the x-ray CT measurements were correlated with the results from the flotation experiments reported in the 13th quarterly report. In this regard the axial view of the flow regimes in the ASH during steady state operation were constructed from the radial density profiles as revealed by x-ray CT measurements. Construction of the axial view of the flow regimes was explained in the last quarterly report. By studying the characteristics of the flow regimes from these axial views and relating them with flotation recovery data, a phenomenological description of ASH flotation was possible. The effect of two operating variables, inlet pressure and dimensionless flow rate ratio (A* = air flow rate/slurry flow rate), are reported in this quarterly report.

  11. Investigation of the failure behaviour of vertebral trabecular architectures under uni-axial compression and wedge action loading conditions.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P; Harrison, N; McHugh, P E

    2010-07-01

    Vertebral wedge fractures are associated with combined compression and flexure loading and are the most common fracture type for human vertebrae. In this study, rapid prototype (RP) biomodels of human vertebral trabecular bone were mechanically tested under uni-axial compression loading and also under wedge action loading (combination of compression and flexure loading) to investigate the mode of failure and the ultimate loads that could be sustained under these different loading conditions. Two types of trabecular bone models were manufactured and tested: baseline models which were directly derived from microCT scans of human thoracic vertebrae, and osteoporotic models which were generated from the baseline models using a custom-developed bone loss algorithm. The ultimate load for each model under compression and wedge action loading was determined and a video was recorded of each test so that failure mechanisms could be evaluated. The results of the RP model mechanical tests showed that the ultimate loads that could be supported by vertebral trabecular architectures under wedge action loading were less than those that could be supported under uni-axial compression loading by up to 26%. Also, the percentage reduction in strength from the baseline value due to osteoporotic bone loss was slightly less for the wedge action loading compared to uni-axial compression loading. Analysis of the videos for each test revealed that failure occurred in localised regions of the trabecular structure due to bending and buckling of thin vertical struts. These results suggest that vertebral trabecular bone is more susceptible to failure from wedge action loading compared to uni-axial compression loading, although this effect is not exacerbated by osteoporotic bone loss.

  12. Axial Length Measurement: PalmScan Versus IOLMaster.

    PubMed

    Lipson, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    To compare axial length measurements taken on the handheld Micro Medical Devices (MMD) PalmScan with those taken with the Carl Zeiss Meditec IOLMaster. Sixty subjects had IOLMaster performed by a single operator to measure axial length in both eyes. Subjects then had axial length measurements taken by a different single operator with the MMD device. Each operator was masked to the other's results. Independent statistical analysis was performed to compare results. Sixty subjects had both eyes measured with each device for a total of 120 eyes. Subjects were categorized into 1 of 3 groups with 20 subjects each, 40 eyes in each group. Subjects in group A were wearers of overnight corneal reshaping, group B were soft lens wearers, and group C were noncontact lens wearers. Overall, the measures of axial length from IOLMaster and MMD were highly correlated (correlation = 0.93, P < 0.001, n = 120). Similarly, measures within each group between the 2 methods were highly correlated: group A (correlation = 0.94, P < 0.0001, n = 40), group B (correlation = 0.90, P < 0.0001, n = 40), and group C (correlation = 0.98, P < 0.001, n = 40). Results were highly correlated between the two devices. Data scatter plots and Bland-Altman plots were generated, showing that although there was good agreement between the methods, the MMD almost always measured the axial length smaller than the IOLMaster (median difference = 0.21 mm, mean difference ± SD = 0.26 ± 0.42 mm). The MMD is a convenient, reliable, and portable device to measure axial length. It can be used to monitor axial length in patients over time.

  13. Multivariate Analysis of Factors Associated With Axial Symptoms in Unilateral Expansive Open-Door Cervical Laminoplasty With Miniplate Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yuxiao; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Retrospective case–control study. Unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation is an efficient and increasing popular surgery for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Axial symptoms are the most frequent complaints after cervical laminoplasty. But the mechanisms have not been fully clarified yet. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiologic data between patients with or without axial symptoms and to investigate the factors associated with axial symptoms by multivariate analysis in cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation. A total of 129 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation were comprised from August 2009 to March 2014. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative axial symptoms (PA) or not (NA). The clinical data including gender, age, duration of symptoms, diagnosis type, medical comorbidity, operative level, blood loss, operative time, pre- and post-Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, JOA recovery rates, and other complications were recorded. The radiologic data including cervical canal diameter, C2–7 Cobb angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), cross-sectional area, open angle, hinge union, and facet joint destroyed would be measured according to X-ray plain and CT scan images. The univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed. There were 39 patients in PA group and 90 patients in NA group. Both groups gained significant JOA improvement postoperatively (P < 0.05). The preoperative neck pain (P = 0.048), negative change of cervical ROM (P = 0.018), and facet joints destroyed (P = 0.022) were significant different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences for other clinical and radiography parameters between the groups (P > 0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that the negative change of cervical ROM (OR = 1.062, P = 0.047) and

  14. Multivariate Analysis of Factors Associated With Axial Symptoms in Unilateral Expansive Open-Door Cervical Laminoplasty With Miniplate Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Liu, Hao; Deng, Yuxiao; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective case-control study.Unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation is an efficient and increasing popular surgery for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Axial symptoms are the most frequent complaints after cervical laminoplasty. But the mechanisms have not been fully clarified yet.The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiologic data between patients with or without axial symptoms and to investigate the factors associated with axial symptoms by multivariate analysis in cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation.A total of 129 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation were comprised from August 2009 to March 2014. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative axial symptoms (PA) or not (NA). The clinical data including gender, age, duration of symptoms, diagnosis type, medical comorbidity, operative level, blood loss, operative time, pre- and post-Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, JOA recovery rates, and other complications were recorded. The radiologic data including cervical canal diameter, C2-7 Cobb angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), cross-sectional area, open angle, hinge union, and facet joint destroyed would be measured according to X-ray plain and CT scan images. The univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed.There were 39 patients in PA group and 90 patients in NA group. Both groups gained significant JOA improvement postoperatively (P < 0.05). The preoperative neck pain (P = 0.048), negative change of cervical ROM (P = 0.018), and facet joints destroyed (P = 0.022) were significant different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences for other clinical and radiography parameters between the groups (P > 0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that the negative change of cervical ROM (OR = 1.062, P = 0.047) and facet joints

  15. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  16. Helical CT in emergency radiology.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Rao, P M; Stuk, J L

    1999-11-01

    Today, a wide range of traumatic and nontraumatic emergency conditions are quickly and accurately diagnosed with helical computed tomography (CT). Many traditional emergency imaging procedures have been replaced with newer helical CT techniques that can be performed in less time and with greater accuracy, less patient discomfort, and decreased cost. The speed of helical technology permits CT examination of seriously ill patients in the emergency department, as well as patients who might not have been taken to CT previously because of the length of the examinations of the past. Also, helical technology permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, a great advance for the multiple-trauma patient. Higher quality CT examinations result from decreased respiratory misregistration, enhanced intravenous contrast material opacification of vascular structures and parenchymal organs, greater flexibility in image reconstruction, and improved multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations. This report summarizes the role and recommended protocols for the helical CT diagnosis of thoracic aortic trauma; aortic dissection; pulmonary embolism; acute conditions of the neck soft tissues; abdominal trauma; urinary tract stones; appendicitis; diverticulitis; abdominal aortic aneurysm; fractures of the face, spine, and extremities; and acute stroke.

  17. Comparison of Image Quality, Diagnostic Accuracy and Radiation Dose Between Flash Model and Retrospective ECG-Triggered Protocols in Dual Source Computed Tomography (DSCT) in Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Xu, Xiang-Jiu; Huang, Gang; Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Ma, Ya-Qiong; Zuo, Xiao-na

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Dual source computed tomography (DSCT) plays an important role in the diagnosis of congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, the issue of radiation-related side effects constitutes a wide public concern. The aim of the study was to explore the differences in diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose and image quality between a prospectively ECG – triggered high – pitch spiral acquisition (flash model) and a retrospective ECG-gated protocol of DSCT used for the detection of CHD. Material/Methods The study included 58 patients with CHD who underwent a DSCT examination, including two groups of 29 patients in each protocol. Then, both subjective and objective image quality, diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose were compared between the two protocols. Results The image quality and the total as well as partial diagnostic accuracy did not differ significantly between the protocols. The radiation dose in the flash model was obviously lower than that in the retrospective model (P<0.05). Conclusions Compared to the retrospective protocol, the flash model can significantly reduce the dose of radiation, while maintaining both diagnostic accuracy and image quality. PMID:28344686

  18. [Analysis and discussion on the facet of the spinal column, spiral CT lock multiplanar reconstruction and 
3D reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhifeng; Wang, Shuhang; Si, Donglei

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the imaging appearances and diagnostic value of axial CT scanning, spiral CT multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction in vertebral facet joints locking.
 A total of 31 cases of vertebral facet joints locking, with injuries in different parts, were recruited to explore their CT features, and to evaluate their advantages in diagnosis against each other.
 Among the CT images of 31 cases with "Hamburger" sign in axial view, there were 21 cases of cervical spine and 10 cases of thoracolumbar segment; in vertical plane of MPR, "top to top" form was formed below the inferior and the superior articular process, accompanied by I° spondylolisthesis and inferior articular process tip fracture; 5 cases were unilateral locked cervical spine; none case for thoracolumbar segment. The inferior articular process was crossed with the superior articular process below and moved forward, formed "back to back" form, accompanied by II°-III° spondylolisthesis. 9 or 6 cases were bilateral or unilateral locking cervical spine, 10 cases were thoracolumbar segment, accompanied by teardrop fracture in the vertebral body below cervical spine. In coronal plane of MPR, inferior articular process showed ingression in different extent, and relied on the superior articular process below or locked in the articular fossa (21 cases for cervical spine); inferior articular process displayed upward displacement or appeared with the superior articular process at the same time, which meant joint structure disappearing thoracolumbar segment (10 cases). In 3D reconstruction, 31 cases displayed clearly in the spatial form of vertebral facet joints locking and the degree of spondylolisthesis of vertebral body.
 MPR and 3D image were more clear and intuitive in vertebral facet joints locking comparing to axial CT scan image. Spiral CT MPR and 3D reconstruction contributed to the diagnosis of vertebral facet joints locking and the reduction of misdiagnoses

  19. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  20. Two- and three-dimensional CT measurements of urinary calculi length and width: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Lidén, Mats; Thunberg, Per; Broxvall, Mathias; Geijer, Håkan

    2015-04-01

    The standard imaging procedure for a patient presenting with renal colic is unenhanced computed tomography (CT). The CT measured size has a close correlation to the estimated prognosis for spontaneous passage of a ureteral calculus. Size estimations of urinary calculi in CT images are still based on two-dimensional (2D) reformats. To develop and validate a calculus oriented three-dimensional (3D) method for measuring the length and width of urinary calculi and to compare the calculus oriented measurements of the length and width with corresponding 2D measurements obtained in axial and coronal reformats. Fifty unenhanced CT examinations demonstrating urinary calculi were included. A 3D symmetric segmentation algorithm was validated against reader size estimations. The calculus oriented size from the segmentation was then compared to the estimated size in axial and coronal 2D reformats. The validation showed 0.1 ± 0.7 mm agreement against reference measure. There was a 0.4 mm median bias for 3D estimated calculus length compared to 2D (P < 0.001), but no significant bias for 3D width compared to 2D. The length of a calculus in axial and coronal reformats becomes underestimated compared to 3D if its orientation is not aligned to the image planes. Future studies aiming to correlate calculus size with patient outcome should use a calculus oriented size estimation. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. CT anatomy of hilar lymphadenopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, S.; Higashihara, T.; Morimoto, S.; Ikezoe, J.; Arisawa, J.; Monden, Y.; Nahakara, K.

    1983-05-01

    The normal distributions of lymph nodes in the pulmonary hili is diagrammatically shown with a typical computed tomographic (CT) demonstration of hilar lymphadenopathy. On the basis of observations in anatomic cross sections of cadaver lungs, the lympth nodes in the right lung can be divided into four principal groups (right upper lobe, interlobar, middle lobe, and lower lobe) and in the left lung into three principal groups (left upper lobe, interlobar, and lower lobe). Most of the hilar lymph nodes are situated along the bronchi in close relation with the pulmonary vascular branches. Because of this close proximity, contrast-enhanced CT images are indispensable for precise CT interpretation of a hilar lymphadenopathy.

  2. Association between axial length and horizontal and vertical globe diameters.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Jost B; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Holbach, Leonard; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra

    2017-02-01

    To assess relationships between axial length and the horizontal and vertical globe diameters. The study consisted of enucleated human eyes. The horizontal, vertical, and sagittal diameters were measured. The study included 135 globes removed because of malignant uveal melanoma (111 globes) or end-stage painful glaucoma (n = 24 eyes). Mean axial, horizontal, and vertical diameters were 24.6 ± 2.6 mm (range: 20-35 mm), 23.7 ± 1.4 mm (range: 21-29 mm) and 23.7 ± 1.4 mm (range: 20-29 mm) respectively. The horizontal diameter and vertical diameter did not differ significantly (P = 0.92), while both were significantly (P < 0.001) shorter than the axial diameter. The horizontal diameter was significantly and linearly correlated with the vertical globe diameter (P < 0.001; regression line: vertical globe diameter = 0.84 × horizontal globe diameter + 3.69). The axial diameter was significantly (P < 0.001) associated with the horizontal diameter and vertical diameters in a bipartite manner. In eyes with an axial length ≤24 mm, horizontal and vertical diameters increased by 0.44 and 0.51 mm, respectively, for each mm increase in axial diameter, while in eyes with an axial length >24 mm, the horizontal and vertical globe diameter increased by a lower amount of 0.19 and 0.21 mm, respectively, for each mm increase in axial diameter. Myopic enlargement of the globe beyond an axial length of 24 mm takes place predominantly in the sagittal axis, leading to a change in the globe form from a sphere to an elongated form. It fits with the notion that myopic elongation may occur by an elongation of the eye walls in regions close to the globe's equator.

  3. Development and Testing of an Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic thrust bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help to reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical systems, computer memory systems, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  4. Trunk axial rotation in baseball pitching and batting.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Glenn S; Hsu, Wellington K; Fortenbaugh, Dave; Cordover, Andrew; Press, Joel M

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify trunk axial rotation and angular acceleration in pitching and batting of elite baseball players. Healthy professional baseball pitchers (n = 40) and batters (n = 40) were studied. Reflective markers attached to each athlete were tracked at 240 Hz with an eight-camera automated digitizing system. Trunk axial rotation was computed as the angle between the pelvis and the upper trunk in the transverse plane. Trunk angular acceleration was the second derivative of axial rotation. Maximum trunk axial rotation (55 +/- 6 degrees) and angular acceleration (11,600 +/- 3,100 degrees/s2) in pitching occurred before ball release, approximately at the instant the front foot landed. Maximum trunk axial rotation (46 +/- 9 degrees) and angular acceleration (7,200 +/- 2,800 degrees/s2) in batting occurred in the follow-through after ball contact. Thus, the most demanding instant for the trunk and spine was near front foot contact for pitching and after ball contact for batting.

  5. An Axial-Vector Photon in a Mirror World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.

    2016-03-01

    The unity of symmetry laws emphasizes, in the case of a mirror CP-even Dirac Lagrangian, the ideas of the left- and right-handed axial-vector photons referring to long- and short-lived bosons of true neutrality, respectively. Such a difference in lifetimes expresses the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of axial-vector photons of the different components. They define the unified field theory equation of C-odd particles with an integral spin. Together with a new equation of a theory of truly neutral particles with the half-integral spin, the latter reflects the availability in their nature of the second type of the local axial-vector gauge transformation responsible for origination in the Lagrangian of C-oddity of an interaction Newton component giving an axial-vector mass to all the interacting particles and fields. The mirror axial-vector mass, energy and momentum operators constitute a CP-invariant equation of quantum mechanics, confirming that each of them can individually influence on matter field. Thereby, findings suggest at the level of the mass-charge structure of gauge invariance a new equation for the C-noninvariant Lagrangian.

  6. Multi-axial mechanical properties of human trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Kohli, Liliana; Zysset, Philippe K

    2009-06-01

    In the context of osteoporosis, evaluation of bone fracture risk and improved design of epiphyseal bone implants rely on accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. A multi-axial loading chamber was designed, built and applied to explore the compressive multi-axial yield and strength properties of human trabecular bone from different anatomical locations. A thorough experimental protocol was elaborated for extraction of cylindrical bone samples, assessment of their morphology by micro-computed tomography and application of different mechanical tests: torsion, uni-axial traction, uni-axial compression and multi-axial compression. A total of 128 bone samples were processed through the protocol and subjected to one of the mechanical tests up to yield and failure. The elastic data were analyzed using a tensorial fabric-elasticity relationship, while the yield and strength data were analyzed with fabric-based, conewise generalized Hill criteria. For each loading mode and more importantly for the combined results, strong relationships were demonstrated between volume fraction, fabric and the elastic, yield and strength properties of human trabecular bone. Despite the reviewed limitations, the obtained results will help improve the simulation of the damage behavior of human bones and bone-implant systems using the finite element method.

  7. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π0 and 8Be∗ decay.

  8. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction

    DOEpatents

    Cowell, Gary K.; DiGuiseppe, Carl P.

    1985-01-01

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

  9. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-15

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  10. Lattice calculation of nucleon isovector axial charge with improved currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jian; Yang, Yi-Bo; Liu, Keh-Fei; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Sufian, Raza Sabbir; χ QCD Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    We employ dimension-4 operators to improve the local vector and axial-vector currents and calculate the nucleon isovector axial coupling gA3 with overlap valence on 2 +1 -flavor domain wall fermion (DWF) sea. Using the equality of gA3 from the spatial and temporal components of the axial-vector current as a normalization condition, we find that gA3 is increased by a few percent towards the experimental value. The excited-state contamination has been taken into account with three time separations between the source and sink. The improved axial charges gA3(24 I )=1.22 (4 )(3 ) and gA3(32 I )=1.21 (3 )(3 ) are obtained on a 2 43×64 lattice at pion mass of 330 MeV and a 3 23×64 lattice at pion mass 300 MeV and are increased by 3.4% and 1.7% from their unimproved values, respectively. We have also used clover fermions on the same DWF configurations and find the same behavior for the local axial charge as that with overlap fermions.

  11. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim P.

    2016-09-28

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in pi^0 and 8-Be* decay.

  12. Dynamics of intrinsic axial flows in unsheared, uniform magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for the generation and amplification of intrinsic axial flow in a linear device, controlled shear decorrelation experiment, is proposed. This model proposes and builds upon a novel dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism, using a simple theory of drift wave turbulence in the presence of axial flow shear. This mechanism does not require complex magnetic field structure, such as shear, and thus is also applicable to intrinsic rotation generation in tokamaks at weak or zero magnetic shear, as well as to linear devices. This mechanism is essentially the self-amplification of the mean axial flow profile, i.e., a modulational instability. Hence, the flow development is a form of negative viscosity phenomenon. Unlike conventional mechanisms where the residual stress produces an intrinsic torque, in this dynamical symmetry breaking scheme, the residual stress induces a negative increment to the ambient turbulent viscosity. The axial flow shear is then amplified by this negative viscosity increment. The resulting mean axial flow profile is calculated and discussed by analogy with the problem of turbulent pipe flow. For tokamaks, the negative viscosity is not needed to generate intrinsic rotation. However, toroidal rotation profile gradient is enhanced by the negative increment in turbulent viscosity.

  13. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    DOE PAGES

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; ...

    2017-05-01

    Here, we investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the e ects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a darkmore » photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, brie y commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π0 and 8Be* decay.« less

  14. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in [1] to 3D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in [1] with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT. PMID:25361500

  15. Regularization designs for uniform spatial resolution and noise properties in statistical image reconstruction for 3-D X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in to 3-D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3-D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT.

  16. Errors in CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Trilisky, Igor; Ward, Emily; Dachman, Abraham H

    2015-10-01

    CT colonography (CTC) is a colorectal cancer screening modality which is becoming more widely implemented and has shown polyp detection rates comparable to those of optical colonoscopy. CTC has the potential to improve population screening rates due to its minimal invasiveness, no sedation requirement, potential for reduced cathartic examination, faster patient throughput, and cost-effectiveness. Proper implementation of a CTC screening program requires careful attention to numerous factors, including patient preparation prior to the examination, the technical aspects of image acquisition, and post-processing of the acquired data. A CTC workstation with dedicated software is required with integrated CTC-specific display features. Many workstations include computer-aided detection software which is designed to decrease errors of detection by detecting and displaying polyp-candidates to the reader for evaluation. There are several pitfalls which may result in false-negative and false-positive reader interpretation. We present an overview of the potential errors in CTC and a systematic approach to avoid them.

  17. Detection of melorheostosis in a young lady with upper limb pain on Three Phase Bone Scintigram/SPECT-CT

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Aamna; Khalid, Madeeha; Khawar, Saquib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Melorheostosis is a benign, noninheritable bone dysplasia characterized by its classic radiographic features of dense, flowing hyperostosis. It frequently affects one limb, usually the lower extremity and rarely the axial skeleton. A 26-year-old lady with obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome and scalp dandruff presented with a long standing history of upper extremity pain and inability to adduct the arm completely. A Tc-99m MDP whole body and SPECT/CT scan performed for suspected fibrous dysplasia showed increased radiotracer uptake in densely sclerotic humeral and radial melorheostosis. This case highlighted the role of SPECT/CT imaging in this rare condition. PMID:27252746

  18. Detection of melorheostosis in a young lady with upper limb pain on Three Phase Bone Scintigram/SPECT-CT.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Aamna; Khalid, Madeeha; Khawar, Saquib

    2016-01-01

    Melorheostosis is a benign, noninheritable bone dysplasia characterized by its classic radiographic features of dense, flowing hyperostosis. It frequently affects one limb, usually the lower extremity and rarely the axial skeleton. A 26-year-old lady with obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome and scalp dandruff presented with a long standing history of upper extremity pain and inability to adduct the arm completely. A Tc-99m MDP whole body and SPECT/CT scan performed for suspected fibrous dysplasia showed increased radiotracer uptake in densely sclerotic humeral and radial melorheostosis. This case highlighted the role of SPECT/CT imaging in this rare condition.

  19. 68Ga PSMA PET/CT in a Rare Case of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma Prostate Presenting as Numb Chin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Gopal, Renuka; Thomas, Boben

    2017-03-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with right-side facial numbness. MRI showed an extra-axial mass infiltrating the right temporal bone. It was debulked surgically, and histopathology revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Ga PSMA PET/CT done in view of increased PSA levels and clinically suspicious hard lesion in prostate showed primary lesion in left side of prostate with metastases to the right temporal bone. Primary carcinoma of the prostate and metastases to the right temporal bone were proven histopathologically. Our case highlights the usefulness of Ga PSMA PET/CT in identifying the primary site in suspected prostate cancer and mapping the metastatic sites.

  20. Optical axial scanning in confocal microscopy using an electrically tunable lens.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Joey M; Malik, Bilal H; Olsovsky, Cory; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Wright, John M; Maitland, Kristen C

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the use and characterization of an electrically focus tunable lens to perform axial scanning in a confocal microscope. Lateral and axial resolution are characterized over a >250 µm axial scan range. Confocal microscopy using optical axial scanning is demonstrated in epithelial tissue and compared to traditional stage scanning. By enabling rapid axial scanning, minimizing motion artifacts, and reducing mechanical complexity, this technique has potential to enhance in vivo three-dimensional imaging in confocal endomicroscopy.

  1. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiman, J.S.; McLeod, R.A.; Kyle, R.A.; Beabout, J.W.

    1985-02-01

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs.

  2. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007677.htm CT angiography - head and neck To use the sharing features on this page, ... create pictures of the blood vessels in the head and neck. How the Test is Performed You will be ...

  3. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Greening America's Capitals - Hartford, CT

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Greening America's Capitals report gives Hartford, CT, a new vision for Capitol Avenue that highlights existing assets and fills in gaps along the mile-long area of focus and into the surrounding neighborhoods.

  5. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  6. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics are: CT of the Sacrum, The Postoperative Spine, Film Organizations and Case Reporting, Degeneration and Disc Disease of the Intervertebral Joint, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, and Cervical and Thoracic Spine.

  7. A tonsillolith seen on CT.

    PubMed

    Espe, B J; Newmark, H

    1992-01-01

    A case of a large tonsillolith visualized by computerized tomography is presented. Although otolaryngologists are well aware of this entity, few radiologists are. The importance of distinguishing tonsilloliths from other structures by CT scan is discussed.

  8. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  9. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... process. Nearly all CT scanners now have special computer programs that help to increase image quality at lower ...

  11. Liver echinococcus - CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This upper abdominal CT scan shows multiple cysts in the liver, caused by dog tapeworm (echinococcus). Note the large circular cyst (seen on the left side of the screen) and multiple smaller cysts throughout ...

  12. [Three-dimensional Representation of a Medical CT Image].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, MSCT acquisition of volume data becomes easier. For computer processing technology has advanced, was the performance of the workstation also be improved. Therefore, three-dimensional representation of the whole body is also made possible. Three-dimensional display, is usually doing the diagnosis in only axial image, it is useful to understand the structure that traveling to the cranio-caudal direction. When surgical care is necessary, an examination for CT is conducted for the purpose of a metastasis search. Use the data obtained this time, it becomes possible to provide surgical support image. I make what kind of image to use a clinical on the site three-dimensional image, and it is necessary to understand it what you want to know.

  13. 1975 Memorial Award Paper. Image generation and display techniques for CT scan data. Thin transverse and reconstructed coronal and sagittal planes.

    PubMed

    Glenn, W V; Johnston, R J; Morton, P E; Dwyer, S J

    1975-01-01

    The various limitations to computerized axial tomographic (CT) interpretation are due in part to the 8-13 mm standard tissue plane thickness and in part to the absence of alternative planes of view, such as coronal or sagittal images. This paper describes a method for gathering multiple overlapped 8 mm transverse sections, subjecting these data to a deconvolution process, and then displaying thin (1 mm) transverse as well as reconstructed coronal and sagittal CT images. Verification of the deconvolution technique with phantom experiments is described. Application of the phantom results to human post mortem CT scan data illustrates this method's faithful reconstruction of coronal and sagittal tissue densities when correlated with actual specimen photographs of a sectioned brain. A special CT procedure, limited basal overlap scanning, is proposed for use on current first generation CT scanners without hardware modification.

  14. Diagnosis of small posterior fossa stroke on brain CT: effect of iterative reconstruction designed for brain CT on detection performance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Taihei; Nakaura, Takeshi; Yoshida, Morikatsu; Yokoyama, Koichi; Hirata, Kenichiro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Harada, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether iterative model reconstruction designed for brain CT (IMR-neuro) would improve the accuracy of posterior fossa stroke diagnosis on brain CT. We enrolled 37 patients with ischaemic stroke in the posterior fossa and 37 patients without stroke (controls). Using axial images reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP) and IMR-neuro, we compared the CT numbers in infarcted areas, image noise in the pons, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of infarcted and non-infarcted areas on scans subjected to IMR-neuro and FBP. To analyse the performance of hypo-attenuation detection, we used receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve techniques. The image noise was significantly lower (2.2 ± 0.5 vs. 5.1 ± 0.9 Hounsfield units, p < 0.01) and the difference in CNR between the infarcted and non-infarcted areas was significantly higher with IMR-neuro than with FBP (2.2 ± 1.7 vs. 4.0 ± 3.6, p < 0.01). Furthermore, the average area under the ROC curve was significantly higher with IMR-neuro (0.90 vs. 0.86 for FBP, p = 0.04). IMR-neuro yielded better image quality and improved hypo-attenuation detection in patients with ischaemic stroke. • Iterative model reconstruction of brain CT data can facilitate the diagnosis of ischaemic stroke. • IMR improved the detectability of low-contrast lesions in the posterior fossa. • IMR-neuro yielded better image quality and improved observer performance.

  15. Age assessment in canine and premolar by cervical axial sections of cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nemsi, Hichem; Haj Salem, Nidhal; Bouanene, Ines; Ben Jomaa, Sami; Belhadj, Meriem; Mosrati, Mohamed Amin; Aissaoui, Abir; Ben Amor, Faten; Chadly, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Age estimation in adults is a challenge in both anthropological and forensic situations compared to sub-adults age estimation. The present study explored, for the first time, the cervical zone of single rooted teeth. The deposition of secondary dentin is responsible for a decrease in the volume of the dental pulp cavity with aging, and therefore is often used as an age indicator. The current study aimed at estimating the chronological age among adults by measuring the pulp/dentin area ratio (physiological ratio) by axial sections at cervical region of maxillary canine and mandibular second premolar. The sample consisted of 120 cone beam CT images of 120 Tunisians whose age ranged from 22 to 67, from the database of a private clinic of radiology. The first axial section of chosen teeth without enamel was selected. Linear regression models were derived for canine, premolar and for all variables to predict the age. They indicated that dentin deposition on canine and premolar have almost the same correlation with age (r=-0.838 and -0.837 respectively). The residual standard errors (RSE), when these regression equations applied for the entire sample, were ranged between 8.27, 8.29 and 7.06 for canine, premolar and for all variables respectively. Tested for younger ages (from 22 to 44years) the RSE decreased considerably and thus ranged between 4.32, 4.72 and 4.05. The outcomes of this study show that the physiological ratio is a useful variable for assessing age with a satisfying accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional bending, torsion and axial compression of the femoropopliteal artery during limb flexion.

    PubMed

    MacTaggart, Jason N; Phillips, Nicholas Y; Lomneth, Carol S; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Bowen, Robert; Baxter, B Timothy; Johanning, Jason; Longo, G Matthew; Desyatova, Anastasia S; Moulton, Michael J; Dzenis, Yuris A; Kamenskiy, Alexey V

    2014-07-18

    High failure rates of femoropopliteal artery reconstruction are commonly attributed to complex 3D arterial deformations that occur with limb movement. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for accurate assessment of these deformations. Custom-made stainless-steel markers were deployed into 5 in situ cadaveric femoropopliteal arteries using fluoroscopy. Thin-section CT images were acquired with each limb in the straight and acutely bent states. Image segmentation and 3D reconstruction allowed comparison of the relative locations of each intra-arterial marker position for determination of the artery's bending, torsion and axial compression. After imaging, each artery was excised for histological analysis using Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining. Femoropopliteal arteries deformed non-uniformly with highly localized deformations in the proximal superficial femoral artery, and between the adductor hiatus and distal popliteal artery. The largest bending (11±3-6±1 mm radius of curvature), twisting (28±9-77±27°/cm) and axial compression (19±10-30±8%) were registered at the adductor hiatus and the below knee popliteal artery. These deformations were 3.7, 19 and 2.5 fold more severe than values currently reported in the literature. Histology demonstrated a distinct sub-adventitial layer of longitudinally oriented elastin fibers with intimal thickening in the segments with the largest deformations. This endovascular intra-arterial marker technique can quantify the non-uniform 3D deformations of the femoropopliteal artery during knee flexion without disturbing surrounding structures. We demonstrate that 3D arterial bending, torsion and compression in the flexed lower limb are highly localized and are substantially more severe than previously reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Coolens, C; Breen, S; Purdie, T G; Owrangi, A; Publicover, J; Bartolac, S; Jaffray, D A

    2009-11-01

    Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as "volume" and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE160 mm=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for routine CT simulation within radiation oncology

  18. Implementation and characterization of a 320-slice volumetric CT scanner for simulation in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, C.; Breen, S.; Purdie, T. G.; Owrangi, A.; Publicover, J.; Bartolac, S.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Effective target definition and broad employment of treatment response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in radiation oncology requires increased speed and coverage for use within a single bolus injection. To this end, a novel volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Tochigi Pref., Japan) has been installed at the Princess Margaret Hospital for implementation into routine CT simulation. This technology offers great advantages for anatomical and functional imaging in both scan speed and coverage. The aim of this work is to investigate the system's imaging performance and quality as well as CT quantification accuracy which is important for radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods: The 320-slice CT scanner uses a 160 mm wide-area (2D) solid-state detector design which provides the possibility to acquire a volumetric axial length of 160 mm without moving the CT couch. This is referred to as ''volume'' and can be scanned with a rotation speed of 0.35-3 s. The scanner can also be used as a 64-slice CT scanner and perform conventional (axial) and helical acquisitions with collimation ranges of 1-32 and 16-32 mm, respectively. Commissioning was performed according to AAPM Reports TG 66 and 39 for both helical and volumetric imaging. Defrise and other cone-beam image analysis tests were performed. Results: Overall, the imaging spatial resolution and geometric efficiency (GE) were found to be very good (>10 lp/mm, <1 mm spatial integrity and GE{sub 160mm}=85%) and within the AAPM guidelines as well as IEC recommendations. Although there is evidence of some cone-beam artifacts when scanning the Defrise phantom, image quality was found to be good and sufficient for treatment planning (soft tissue noise <10 HU). Measurements of CT number stability and contrast-to-noise values across the volume indicate clinically acceptable scan accuracy even at the field edge. Conclusions: Initial experience with this exciting new technology confirms its accuracy for

  19. Some problems of sensitivity analysis of axially loaded piles

    SciTech Connect

    Budkowska, B.B.; Szymczak, C.

    1994-12-31

    The first variations of an axial displacement and an axial force at a specified cross-section of an axially loaded pile due to the changes of the design variables are derived. The parameters describing the pile material and the soil behavior as well as the pile cross-section dimensions are assumed to be the design variables. A simple one-dimensional idealization of the pile in conjunction with a nonlinear Winkler-type model of the soil is adopted. The considerations based on the virtual work theorems are valid for both linear and nonlinear ranges of the pile material and the soil behavior. Some presented numerical examples allow one to investigate the accuracy of approximation of changes of internal forces and displacements due to the increments of the design variables by means of their first order variations.

  20. Three-Dimensional Photon Counting Imaging with Axially Distributed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we review three-dimensional (3D) photon counting imaging with axially distributed sensing. Under severely photon-starved conditions, we have proposed various imaging and algorithmic approaches to reconstruct a scene in 3D, which are not possible by using conventional imaging system due to lack of sufficient number of photons. In this paper, we present an overview of optical sensing and imaging system along with dedicated algorithms for reconstructing 3D scenes by photon counting axially distributed sensing, which may be implemented by moving a single image sensor along its optical axis. To visualize the 3D image, statistical estimation methods and computational reconstruction of axially distributed sensing is applied.

  1. Investigation of Aluminum-Copper Tube Hydroforming with Axial Feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parto D., M.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.; Liaghat, Gh.; Naeini, H. Moslemi; Panahizadeh R., V.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroforming of a two-layered Aluminum-Copper tube is investigated numerically and experimentally. Pressure is applied through a nonlinear path along with symmetrical axial feeding. ABAQUS/Explicit commercial code is used for finite element simulation of the process. ASTM C11000 Copper alloy is used as inner layer and ASTM AA1050A Aluminum alloy is used as outer layer. The simulation results show that the part can be successfully formed under internal pressure of 40 MPa with 8 mm axial displacement. Stress distributions on both inner and outer tubes are compared and maximum thinning on their wall is also discussed. Different friction conditions are applied on the process using different coefficients of friction and their effects are investigated on thinning percentage of inner and outer tubes and also on axial feeding. It is observed that finite element results are in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Elastic Buckling of Laminated Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, A.; Hu, H.

    1998-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular composite plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. Numerical results are reported for three different cases: (1) orthotropic plates, (2) symmetrically laminated plates with multiple generally orthotropic layers exhibiting coupling between normal moments and twist, and twisting moment and normal curvatures, and (3) unsymmetrically laminated plates. Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to calculate the buckling load. An approximate solution using "reduced bending stiffness" is adopted for unsymmetrically laminated plates. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  3. Compressive Failure of Fiber Composites under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle beta produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  4. Compressive failure of fiber composites under multi-axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle β produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  5. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  6. Bistability between equatorial and axial dipoles during magnetic field reversals.

    PubMed

    Gissinger, Christophe; Petitdemange, Ludovic; Schrinner, Martin; Dormy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-08

    Numerical simulations of the geodynamo in the presence of heterogeneous heating are presented. We study the dynamics and the structure of the magnetic field when the equatorial symmetry of the flow is broken. If the symmetry breaking is sufficiently strong, the m=0 axial dipolar field is replaced by a hemispherical magnetic field, dominated by an oscillating m=1 magnetic field. Moreover, for moderate symmetry breaking, a bistability between the axial and the equatorial dipole is observed. In this bistable regime, the axial magnetic field exhibits chaotic switches of its polarity, involving the equatorial dipole during the transition period. This new scenario for magnetic field reversals is discussed within the framework of Earth's dynamo.

  7. Elastic Buckling of Laminated Plates Under Varying Axial Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badir, A.; Hu, H.

    1998-01-01

    The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular composite plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of axial stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of axial stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. Numerical results are reported for three different cases: (1) orthotropic plates, (2) symmetrically laminated plates with multiple generally orthotropic layers exhibiting coupling between normal moments and twist, and twisting moment and normal curvatures, and (3) unsymmetrically laminated plates. Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to calculate the buckling load. An approximate solution using "reduced bending stiffness" is adopted for unsymmetrically laminated plates. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform axial stresses.

  8. Removal of Axial Twist in RHIC Insertion Quadrupole Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzolino, J.; Anerella, M.; Jain, A.; Louie, W.; Muratore, P.

    1997-05-01

    The focusing triplets located on either side of the six interaction points of RHIC each consist of three 13cm aperture quadrupoles with magnetic lengths of 1.44m (Q1), 3.40m (Q2), and 2.10m (Q3). The field quality and alignment of these magnets are most critical to the performance of the accelerator. The maximum allowable axial twist of the cold mass, defined as the standard deviation in the quadrupole roll angle, is 0.5 mrad. This requirement has occasionally exceeded the capabilities of the assembly fixturing and the procedures used to complete the axial welding of the shell halves around the cold mass yoke. A corrective shell welding technique has been successfully employed to remove excessive axial twist of the 13cm quadrupoles. This ``custom straightening" method will be described along with the before and after mechanical inspection data. The magnetic results which confirm the untwisting procedure shall also be discussed.

  9. Compressive Failure of Fiber Composites under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle beta produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  10. Axial asymmetry in holographic and incoherent correlation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běhal, Jaromír.; Bouchal, Petr; Schovánek, Petr; Fordey, Tomáš; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2016-12-01

    In optical lens imaging, the main attention has traditionally been paid to the lateral resolution roughly estimated by a two-dimensional point spread function (PSF) describing sharp image of a point object. In three-dimensional (3D) imaging and methods based on depth information, an axial profile of the PSF becomes of particular importance. In studies on the 3D PSF, the axial image asymmetry and shift of the intensity maximum out of the focal plane were revealed for optical systems characterized by low Fresnel numbers. In this paper, the 3D PSF is examined in terms of digital imaging, where a point object is recorded optically and its image reconstructed numerically. The analysis includes methods of digital holography, in which the axial image asymmetry is examined in relation to different geometries of coherent recording waves. Attention is also devoted to the Fresnel incoherent correlation imaging that enables recording of 3D objects in spatially incoherent light.

  11. CT navigated lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L

    2013-10-01

    Lateral interbody fusion techniques are heavily reliant on fluoroscopy for retractor docking and graft placement, which expose both the patient and surgeon to high doses of radiation. Use of image-guided technologies with CT-based images, however, can eliminate this radiation exposure for the surgeon. We describe the surgical technique of performing lateral lumbar interbody fusion using CT navigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sinonasal Wegener's granulomatosis: CT characteristics.

    PubMed

    Benoudiba, F; Marsot-Dupuch, K; Rabia, M Hadj; Cabanne, J; Bobin, S; Lasjaunias, P

    2003-02-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a severe and potentially lethal granulomatosis. Even though no specific radiological criteria exist, CT may suggest the correct diagnosis at an early stage. Recent improvement in the prognosis is related to earlier diagnosis, allowing the initiation of efficient and specific treatment before any severe complications occur. We reviewed a series of WG cases in order to establish the CT diagnostic criteria.

  13. Diffuse Infiltrative Splenic Lymphoma: Diagnostic Efficacy of Arterial-Phase CT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Cho, June-Sik; Shin, Kyung Sook; Kim, Song Soo; You, Sun Kyoung; Park, Jae Woo; Shin, Hye Soo; Yoon, Yeo Chang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen (ONHES) on arterial phase (AP) computed tomography (CT) images in diffuse infiltrative splenic lymphoma (DISL). One hundred and thirty-six patients with lymphoma who had undergone two-phase (arterial and portal venous) abdominal CT were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of ONHES on AP CT in diagnosing DISL. Two observers evaluated ONHES on AP CT using the 5-point confidence level and assessed the presence or absence of subjective splenomegaly on axial CT images. Another two observers measured the splenic index as proposed by objective CT criteria. Statistical analysis included interobserver agreement and diagnostic performance of CT findings. Eleven of the 136 patients with lymphoma had DISL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of ONHES (0.948 for observer 1 and 0.922 for observer 2) was superior to that of the splenic index (0.872 for observer 3 and 0.877 for observer 4), but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The diagnostic performance of ONHES in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly showed higher diagnostic performance, as compared with subjective splenomegaly alone (accuracy: 100% and 85.3% for observer 1, 98.5% and 87.5% for observer 2; positive predictive value: 100% and 35.5% for observer 1, 90.9% and 39.3% for observer 2, respectively). Obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly can improve the diagnostic performance for DISL. Our results suggest that ONHES on AP CT images could be useful as an adjunctive diagnostic indicator of DISL in patients with lymphoma.

  14. Diffuse Infiltrative Splenic Lymphoma: Diagnostic Efficacy of Arterial-Phase CT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Kyung Sook; Kim, Song Soo; You, Sun Kyoung; Park, Jae Woo; Shin, Hye Soo; Yoon, Yeo Chang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen (ONHES) on arterial phase (AP) computed tomography (CT) images in diffuse infiltrative splenic lymphoma (DISL). Materials and Methods One hundred and thirty-six patients with lymphoma who had undergone two-phase (arterial and portal venous) abdominal CT were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of ONHES on AP CT in diagnosing DISL. Two observers evaluated ONHES on AP CT using the 5-point confidence level and assessed the presence or absence of subjective splenomegaly on axial CT images. Another two observers measured the splenic index as proposed by objective CT criteria. Statistical analysis included interobserver agreement and diagnostic performance of CT findings. Results Eleven of the 136 patients with lymphoma had DISL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of ONHES (0.948 for observer 1 and 0.922 for observer 2) was superior to that of the splenic index (0.872 for observer 3 and 0.877 for observer 4), but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The diagnostic performance of ONHES in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly showed higher diagnostic performance, as compared with subjective splenomegaly alone (accuracy: 100% and 85.3% for observer 1, 98.5% and 87.5% for observer 2; positive predictive value: 100% and 35.5% for observer 1, 90.9% and 39.3% for observer 2, respectively). Conclusion Obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly can improve the diagnostic performance for DISL. Our results suggest that ONHES on AP CT images could be useful as an adjunctive diagnostic indicator of DISL in patients with lymphoma. PMID:27587962

  15. Neural Control for Two-Axial Micro Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohka, Masahiro; Sawamoto, Yasuhiro; Matsukawa, Shiho; Miyaoka, Tetsu; Mitsuya, Yasunaga

    In the previous paper, we experimentally designed serial and parallel typed two-axial micro actuators, which were utilized for key parts of advanced tactile displays. The serial typed two-axial actuator comprises bimorph piezoelectric actuators connected in series. The parallel typed two-axial actuator was composed of two bimorph piezoelectric actuators and two small links connected by three joints. We formulated kinematics for the parallel typed two-axial actuator because the endpoint is controlled in the two-dimensional coordinate. Since relationship between applied voltage and displacement caused by the voltage shows a hysteresis loop in the bimorph piezoelectric actuator used as components of the two-axis actuators, we produce a control system for these two-axial actuators based on a multi-layered artificial neural network to compensate the hysteresis. The neural network is comprised of 4 neurons in the input layer, 10 neurons in the hidden layer and one neuron in the output layer. The output neuron emitts time derivative of voltage; two bits signal expressing loading or unloading condition is generated by two input neurons; one of the other two input neurons and the other calculate current values of voltage and displacement, respectively. The neural network is featured with a feedback loop including an integral unit to reduce number of neurons. In the learning process, the network learns the hysteresis including a minor loop. In the verification test, the endpoint of the two-axial actuator traces the desired circular trajectory in the two-dimensional coordinate system.

  16. Reducing gait speed affects axial coordination of walking turns.

    PubMed

    Forsell, Caroline; Conradsson, David; Paquette, Caroline; Franzén, Erika

    2017-05-01

    Turning is a common feature of daily life and dynamic coordination of the axial body segments is a cornerstone for safe and efficient turning. Although slow walking speed is a common trait of old age and neurological disorders, little is known about the effect of walking speed on axial coordination during walking turns. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of walking speed on axial coordination during walking turns in healthy elderly adults. Seventeen healthy elderly adults randomly performed 180° left and right turns while walking in their self-selected comfortable pace and in a slow pace speed. Turning velocity, spatiotemporal gait parameters (step length and step time), angular rotations and angular velocity of the head and pelvis, head-pelvis separation (i.e. the angular difference in degrees between the rotation of the head and pelvis) and head-pelvis velocity were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. During slow walking, turning velocity was 15% lower accompanied by shorter step length and longer step time compared to comfortable walking. Reducing walking speed also led to a decrease in the amplitude and velocity of the axial rotation of the head and pelvis as well as a reduced head-pelvis separation and angular velocity. This study demonstrates that axial coordination during turning is speed dependent as evidenced by a more 'en bloc' movement pattern (i.e. less separation between axial segments) at reduced speeds in healthy older adults. This emphasizes the need for matching speed when comparing groups with diverse walking speeds to differentiate changes due to speed from changes due to disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Posterior atlanto-axial arthrodesis for fixation of odontoid nonunions.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Vécsei, Vilmos; Thalhammer, Gerhild; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Schurz, Mark; Gaebler, Christian

    2008-03-15

    A retrospective case series. To determine the clinical and radiographic long-term results after posterior atlanto-axial arthrodesis of odontoid nonunions. Nonunion of odontoid fractures is a relatively common and dreaded complication after surgical and nonoperative treatment of these injuries. Although there might be a significant rate, which require surgical stabilization due to atlanto-axial instability, only few publications have covered this issue and presented reliable long-term results. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiographic records of 9 (4 women and 5 men) patients with an average age of 68 (42-78) years at the time of injury who had undergone posterior atlanto-axial arthrodesis for surgical treatment of odontoid nonunions between 1988 and 2004. For posterior atlanto-axial arthrodesis, we performed either C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation, or posterior wiring and bone grafting, or a combination of these 2 techniques. Eight patients achieved a satisfactory clinical outcome and returned to their preinjury activity level. The Smiley-Webster scale showed an overall functional outcome score of 2.2, which was 0.9 points superior to the outcome score before surgery. Neurologic deficits after operative treatment of the odontoid nonunion were evaluated in 2 patients. In all the other patients with primary neurologic deficits or delayed neurologic sequelae we saw a full recovery. Solid bony fusion of the cervical arthrodesis was achieved in all of the patients. Failures of reduction or fixation were noted in 2 patients, but no reoperations were necessary. In summary, we had a satisfactory outcome after surgical treatment of odontoid nonunions in patients with atlanto-axial instability and severe motion pain at the cervical spine. With a bony union rate of 100% and a noticeable improvement of clinical results and neurologic function, posterior atlanto-axial arthrodesis seems to be an appropriate option for nonunited odontoid fractures that require

  18. Primary lower extremity lymphedema: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, J.L.; Silverman, P.M.; Ling, D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-10-01

    The CT findings of two cases of primary lymphedema of the lower extremities are presented. CT showed a coarse, nonenhancing, reticular pattern in an enlarged subcutaneous compartment. CT excluded the diagnosis of secondary lymphedema from an obstructing mass by demonstrating a normal retroperitoneum and pelvis. The CT findings are correlated with pedal lymphangiograms.

  19. Primary epiploic appendagitis: CT diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Maglinte, Dean D; Rajesh, Arumugam; Akisik, Fatih M

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT signs of primary epiploic appendagitis. A retrospective search of the CT database over 12 months for this diagnosis revealed 11 cases. The clinical findings were recorded. Softcopy CT images were reviewed by two experienced abdominal radiologists (KS, DM) for location of lesion, size, shape, presence of central hyperdense focus, degree of bowel wall thickening, mass effect, and ancillary signs. Abdominal pain was the primary symptom in all patients. Preliminary diagnoses were appendicitis (n=2), diverticulitis (n=5), pancreatitis (n=1), ovarian lesion (n=1), or unknown (n=2). Abdominal examination and white blood cell count were uninformative. CT examination revealed a solitary (n=11), ovoid (n=9) fatty lesion with some soft tissue stranding adjacent to the left colon (n=6), transverse colon (n=3), or right colon (n=2). Central hyperdensity (n=5), mild bowel wall thickening (n=2), and parietal peritoneal thickening (n=4) were also seen. In 4 patients the lesions were not visible on follow-up CT examination performed 23-184 days later. Primary epiploic appendagitis can clinically mimic other, more serious inflammatory conditions. Knowledge of its findings on CT would help the radiologist make the diagnosis and allow a more conservative approach to patient care.

  20. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter