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Sample records for echo acquisition mri

  1. Reference-free unwarping of single-shot spatiotemporally encoded MRI using asymmetric self-refocused echoes acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Song; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a phase evolution rewinding algorithm for correcting the geometric and intensity distortions in single-shot spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) MRI with acquisition of asymmetric self-refocused echo trains. Using the field map calculated from the phase distribution of the source image, the off-resonance induced phase errors are successfully rewound through deconvolution. The alias-free partial Fourier transform reconstruction helps improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the field maps and the output images. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was validated through 7 T MRI experiments on a lemon, a water phantom, and in vivo rat head. SPEN imaging was evaluated using rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing (RASER) which produces uniform T2 weighting. The results indicate that the new technique can more robustly deal with the cases in which the images obtained with conventional single-shot spin-echo EPI are difficult to be restored due to serious field variations.

  2. Comparing resting state fMRI de-noising approaches using multi- and single-echo acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Arjun; Laganà, Maria Marcella; Baglio, Francesca; Baselli, Giuseppe; Kundu, Prantik; Harrison, Neil A.; Cercignani, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Artifact removal in resting state fMRI (rfMRI) data remains a serious challenge, with even subtle head motion undermining reliability and reproducibility. Here we compared some of the most popular single-echo de-noising methods—regression of Motion parameters, White matter and Cerebrospinal fluid signals (MWC method), FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) and ICA-based Automatic Removal Of Motion Artifacts (ICA-AROMA)—with a multi-echo approach (ME-ICA) that exploits the linear dependency of BOLD on the echo time. Data were acquired using a clinical scanner and included 30 young, healthy participants (minimal head motion) and 30 Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder patients (greater head motion). De-noising effectiveness was assessed in terms of data quality after each cleanup procedure, ability to uncouple BOLD signal and motion and preservation of default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity. Most cleaning methods showed a positive impact on data quality. However, based on the investigated metrics, ME-ICA was the most robust. It minimized the impact of motion on FC even for high motion participants and preserved DMN functional connectivity structure. The high-quality results obtained using ME-ICA suggest that using a multi-echo EPI sequence, reliable rfMRI data can be obtained in a clinical setting. PMID:28323821

  3. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  4. MRI Scan Time Reduction through K-Space Data Sharing in Combo Acquisitions with a Spin Echo Sequence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    REFERENCES [1] P. Mansfield, A. A. Maudsley, and T. Baines, “Fast scan proton density imaging by NMR,” J . Phys. E: Scient . Instrum ., vol. 9, pp. 271...1976. [2] J . Listerud, S. Einstein, E. Outwater, and H. Y. Kressel, “First principles of fast spin echo,” Magnetic Resonance Quarterly, vol. 8, pp. 199...244, 1992. [3] P. van der Meulen, J . P. Groen, and J . J . Cuppen, “Very fast MR imaging by field echoes and small angle excitation,” Magnetic

  5. Elasticity reconstructive imaging by means of stimulated echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Skovoroda, A R; O'Donnell, M; Emelianov, S Y

    1998-03-01

    A method is introduced to measure internal mechanical displacement and strain by means of MRI. Such measurements are needed to reconstruct an image of the elastic Young's modulus. A stimulated echo acquisition sequence with additional gradient pulses encodes internal displacements in response to an externally applied differential deformation. The sequence provides an accurate measure of static displacement by limiting the mechanical transitions to the mixing period of the simulated echo. Elasticity reconstruction involves definition of a region of interest having uniform Young's modulus along its boundary and subsequent solution of the discretized elasticity equilibrium equations. Data acquisition and reconstruction were performed on a urethane rubber phantom of known elastic properties and an ex vivo canine kidney phantom using <2% differential deformation. Regional elastic properties are well represented on Young's modulus images. The long-term objective of this work is to provide a means for remote palpation and elasticity quantitation in deep tissues otherwise inaccessible to manual palpation.

  6. Functional MRI using regularized parallel imaging acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Belliveau, John W; Wald, Lawrence L; Kwong, Kenneth K

    2005-08-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions.

  7. Functional MRI Using Regularized Parallel Imaging Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Belliveau, John W.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Kwong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions. PMID:16032694

  8. Simultaneous Acquisition of Gradient Echo / Spin Echo BOLD and Perfusion with a Separate Labeling Coil

    PubMed Central

    Glielmi, C.B.; Xu, Q.; Craddock, R.C.; Hu, X.

    2010-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) based cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging complements blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging with a measure that is more quantitative and has better specificity to neuronal activation. Relative to gradient echo (GE) BOLD, spin echo (SE) BOLD has better spatial specificity because it is less biased to large draining veins. While there have been many studies comparing simultaneously acquired CBF data with GE BOLD data in fMRI, there have been few studies comparing CBF with SE BOLD and no study comparing all three. We present a pulse sequence that simultaneously acquires CBF data with a separate labeling coil, GE BOLD and SE BOLD images. Simultaneous acquisition avoids inter-scan variability, allowing more direct assessment and comparison of each contrast’s relative specificity and reproducibility. Furthermore, it facilitates studies that may benefit from multiple complementary measures. PMID:20648682

  9. Investigating the Group-Level Impact of Advanced Dual-Echo fMRI Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Kettinger, Ádám; Hill, Christopher; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán; Windischberger, Christian; Nagy, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Multi-echo fMRI data acquisition has been widely investigated and suggested to optimize sensitivity for detecting the BOLD signal. Several methods have also been proposed for the combination of data with different echo times. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these advanced echo combination methods provide advantages over the simple averaging of echoes when state-of-the-art group-level random-effect analyses are performed. Both resting-state and task-based dual-echo fMRI data were collected from 27 healthy adult individuals (14 male, mean age = 25.75 years) using standard echo-planar acquisition methods at 3T. Both resting-state and task-based data were subjected to a standard image pre-processing pipeline. Subsequently the two echoes were combined as a weighted average, using four different strategies for calculating the weights: (1) simple arithmetic averaging, (2) BOLD sensitivity weighting, (3) temporal-signal-to-noise ratio weighting and (4) temporal BOLD sensitivity weighting. Our results clearly show that the simple averaging of data with the different echoes is sufficient. Advanced echo combination methods may provide advantages on a single-subject level but when considering random-effects group level statistics they provide no benefit regarding sensitivity (i.e., group-level t-values) compared to the simple echo-averaging approach. One possible reason for the lack of clear advantages may be that apart from increasing the average BOLD sensitivity at the single-subject level, the advanced weighted averaging methods also inflate the inter-subject variance. As the echo combination methods provide very similar results, the recommendation is to choose between them depending on the availability of time for collecting additional resting-state data or whether subject-level or group-level analyses are planned. PMID:28018165

  10. Fast REDOR with CPMG multiple-echo acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo Double Resonance (REDOR) is a widely used experiment for distance measurements in solids. The conventional REDOR experiment measures the signal dephasing from hetero-nuclear recoupling under magic-angle spinning (MAS) in a point by point manner. A modified Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple-echo scheme is introduced for fast REDOR measurement. REDOR curves are measured from the CPMG echo amplitude modulation under dipolar recoupling. The real time CPMG-REDOR experiment can speed up the measurement by an order of magnitude. The effects from hetero-nuclear recoupling, the Bloch-Siegert shift and echo truncation to the signal acquisition are discussed and demonstrated.

  11. Progress in visualizing turbulent flow using single-echo acquisition imaging.

    PubMed

    Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston; Bosshard, John C

    2006-01-01

    MRI of flow remains a challenging problem despite significant improvements in imaging speeds. For periodic flow the acquisition can be gated, synchronizing data acquisition with the flow. However, this method fails to work if the flow is sufficiently fast that turbulence occurs, or when it is sufficiently fast that blurring occurs during the excitation of the spins or the acquisition of the signal. This paper describes recent progress in employing a very fast MR imaging technique, Single Echo Acquisition Imaging (SEA-MRI) and spin-tagging to visualize very rapid and turbulent flow patterns. Demonstrations are done on a separating channel phantom with input flow rates ranging from zero to over 100 cm/sec. Spin-tagging enables a "texture" to be placed on the spins, enabling clear visualization of the complex flow patterns, and in some cases measurement of the flow velocity.

  12. Communication: Phase incremented echo train acquisition in NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Walder, Brennan J.; Keeler, Eric G.; Kaseman, Derrick C.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved and general approach for implementing echo train acquisition (ETA) in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, particularly where the conventional approach of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) acquisition would produce numerous artifacts. Generally, adding ETA to any N-dimensional experiment creates an N + 1 dimensional experiment, with an additional dimension associated with the echo count, n, or an evolution time that is an integer multiple of the spacing between echo maxima. Here we present a modified approach, called phase incremented echo train acquisition (PIETA), where the phase of the mixing pulse and every other refocusing pulse, ϕP, is incremented as a single variable, creating an additional phase dimension in what becomes an N + 2 dimensional experiment. A Fourier transform with respect to the PIETA phase, ϕP, converts the ϕP dimension into a Δp dimension where desired signals can be easily separated from undesired coherence transfer pathway signals, thereby avoiding cumbersome or intractable phase cycling schemes where the receiver phase must follow a master equation. This simple modification eliminates numerous artifacts present in NMR experiments employing CPMG acquisition and allows "single-scan" measurements of transverse relaxation and J-couplings. Additionally, unlike CPMG, we show how PIETA can be appended to experiments with phase modulated signals after the mixing pulse.

  13. Ultrashort echo time imaging using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA).

    PubMed

    Grodzki, David M; Jakob, Peter M; Heismann, Bjoern

    2012-02-01

    Sequences with ultrashort echo times enable new applications of MRI, including bone, tendon, ligament, and dental imaging. In this article, a sequence is presented that achieves the shortest possible encoding time for each k-space point, limited by pulse length, hardware switching times, and gradient performance of the scanner. In pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), outer k-space is filled with radial half-projections, whereas the centre is measured single pointwise on a Cartesian trajectory. This hybrid sequence combines the features of single point imaging with radial projection imaging. No hardware changes are required. Using this method, 3D images with an isotropic resolution of 1 mm can be obtained in less than 3 minutes. The differences between PETRA and the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are evaluated by simulation and phantom measurements. Advantages of pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition are shown for tissue with a T(2) below 1 ms. The signal to noise ratio and Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) performance, as well as possible limitations of the approach, are investigated. In-vivo head, knee, ankle, and wrist examples are presented to prove the feasibility of the sequence. In summary, fast imaging with ultrashort echo time is enabled by PETRA and may help to establish new routine clinical applications of ultrashort echo time sequences.

  14. Matched-filter acquisition for BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lars; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Wilm, Bertram J; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Brunner, David O; Ruff, Christian C; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2014-10-15

    We introduce matched-filter fMRI, which improves BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) sensitivity by variable-density image acquisition tailored to subsequent image smoothing. Image smoothing is an established post-processing technique used in the vast majority of fMRI studies. Here we show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the resulting smoothed data can be substantially increased by acquisition weighting with a weighting function that matches the k-space filter imposed by the smoothing operation. We derive the theoretical SNR advantage of this strategy and propose a practical implementation of 2D echo-planar acquisition matched to common Gaussian smoothing. To reliably perform the involved variable-speed trajectories, concurrent magnetic field monitoring with NMR probes is used. Using this technique, phantom and in vivo measurements confirm reliable SNR improvement in the order of 30% in a "resting-state" condition and prove robust in different regimes of physiological noise. Furthermore, a preliminary task-based visual fMRI experiment equally suggests a consistent BOLD sensitivity increase in terms of statistical sensitivity (average t-value increase of about 35%). In summary, our study suggests that matched-filter acquisition is an effective means of improving BOLD SNR in studies that rely on image smoothing at the post-processing level.

  15. Comparison of Echo and MRI in the Imaging Evaluation of Intracardiac Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, G. Sharma, S.; Kothari, S.S.; Juneja, R.; Saxena, A.; Talwar, K.K.

    2004-09-15

    We compared the efficacy of echocardiography (ECHO) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating intracardiac masses. Over an 8-yr period, 28 patients, 21 males, 7 females, 16 days-60 years of age (mean 25 years) with a suspected intracardiac mass on ECHO (transthoracic in all; transesophageal in 9) underwent an MRI examination. Five patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI. ECHO and MRI were compared with respect to their technical adequacy, ability to detect and suggest the likely etiology of the mass, and provide additional information (masses not seen with the other technique, inflow or outflow obstruction, and intramural component of an intracavitary mass). With MRI, the image morphology (including signal intensity changes on the various sequences) and extracardiac manifestations were also evaluated. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology in 18, surgical inspection in 4, by follow- up imaging on conservative management in 5, and by typical extracardiac manifestations of the disease in 1 patient.Fifteen (54%) patients had tumors (benign 12, malignant 3), 5 had a thrombus or hematoma, and 4 each had infective or vascular lesions. Thirty-four masses (13 in ventricle, 11 septal, 7 atrial, 2 on valve and 1 in pulmonary artery) were seen on MRI, 28 of which were detected by ECHO. Transthoracic ECHO (TTE) and MRI were technically optimal in 82% and 100% of cases, respectively. Nine patients needed an additional transesophageal ECHO (TEE). Overall, MRI showed a mass in all patients, whereas ECHO missed it in 2 cases. In cases with a mass on both modalities, MRI detected 4 additional masses not seen on ECHO. MRI suggested the etiology in 21 (75%) cases, while the same was possible with ECHO (TTE and TEE) in 8 (29%) cases. Intramural component, extension into the inflow or outflow, outflow tract obstruction, and associated pericardial or extracardiac masses were better depicted on MRI. We conclude that MRI is advantageous over a combination of TTE and TEE for

  16. MRI: update on technology diffusion and acquisition.

    PubMed

    Hoppszallern, S; Hughes, C; Zimmerman, R A

    1991-04-01

    Over the past three years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become accepted as a valuable diagnostic tool, and its applications continue to expand. During this time, the number of units installed in the United States doubled. By 1990 about 2,000 MRI units were in place in the United States and nearly 20 percent of the MRI-installed base was mobile, according to a research study conducted by the Hadley Hart Group (Chicago) and Drew Consultants, Inc. (Concord, MA). With the introduction of the prospective payment system, many hospitals were hesitant to spend limited capital on new technology, such as MRI. At the same time, freestanding diagnostic imaging centers were on the rise. Some hospitals and entrepreneurs who foresaw the potential of MRI in health care pioneered its use in the clinical setting. Hospitals began to examine new partnership arrangements and alternative forms of financing, so that they too could offer MRI services. By the end of 1988, the majority of hospitals offering MRI services did not own their own unit and about 40 percent of the hospitals offering MRI services were in a mobile configuration according to the Hadley Hart Group. While the technology has been diffused into 100-bed hospitals via mobile service vendors in some parts of the country, many medium-sized and large hospitals also have entered the MRI services market in this fashion. In the larger hospitals, the patient demand or need for the service often would justify acquisition of MRI, but the expense of the technology, and in many areas restrictive state health planning policies, modified purchase of MRI systems by hospitals. Mobile service vendors offered hospitals a way to startup MRI services in a limited fashion without a major capital expenditure and its associated risk. As hospitals gain experience with mobile MRI and achieve or exceed their early utilization projections, administrators are reevaluating the need to expand services to a full-time fixed site. Early fixed

  17. Echo Planar Imaging before and after fMRI: A personal history

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark S.; Schmitt, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) plays a crucial role in functional MRI. Focusing especially on the period from 1988 to 1992, the authors offer personal recollections, on the development of practical means of deploying EPI, the people that participated, and its impact on MRI in general. PMID:22266173

  18. High-Speed Real-Time Resting-State fMRI Using Multi-Slab Echo-Volumar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Zhang, Tongsheng; Hummatov, Ruslan; Akhtari, Massoud; Chohan, Muhammad; Fisch, Bruce; Yonas, Howard

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that ultra-high-speed real-time fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (MEVI) significantly increases sensitivity for mapping task-related activation and resting-state networks (RSNs) compared to echo-planar imaging (Posse et al., 2012). In the present study we characterize the sensitivity of MEVI for mapping RSN connectivity dynamics, comparing independent component analysis (ICA) and a novel seed-based connectivity analysis (SBCA) that combines sliding-window correlation analysis with meta-statistics. This SBCA approach is shown to minimize the effects of confounds, such as movement, and CSF and white matter signal changes, and enables real-time monitoring of RSN dynamics at time scales of tens of seconds. We demonstrate highly sensitive mapping of eloquent cortex in the vicinity of brain tumors and arterio-venous malformations, and detection of abnormal resting-state connectivity in epilepsy. In patients with motor impairment, resting-state fMRI provided focal localization of sensorimotor cortex compared with more diffuse activation in task-based fMRI. The fast acquisition speed of MEVI enabled segregation of cardiac-related signal pulsation using ICA, which revealed distinct regional differences in pulsation amplitude and waveform, elevated signal pulsation in patients with arterio-venous malformations and a trend toward reduced pulsatility in gray matter of patients compared with healthy controls. Mapping cardiac pulsation in cortical gray matter may carry important functional information that distinguishes healthy from diseased tissue vasculature. This novel fMRI methodology is particularly promising for mapping eloquent cortex in patients with neurological disease, having variable degree of cooperation in task-based fMRI. In conclusion, ultra-high-real-time speed fMRI enhances the sensitivity of mapping the dynamics of resting-state connectivity and cerebro-vascular pulsatility for clinical and neuroscience research applications

  19. Comparison of dual-echo DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived contrast agent kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Quarles, C Chad; Gore, John C; Xu, Lei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-09-01

    The application of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess brain tumors is often confounded by the extravasation of contrast agent (CA). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier allows CA to leak out of the vasculature leading to additional T(1), T(2) and T(2) relaxation effects in the extravascular space, thereby affecting the signal intensity time course in a complex manner. The goal of this study was to validate a dual-echo DSC-MRI approach that separates and quantifies the T(1) and T(2) contributions to the acquired signal and enables the estimation of the volume transfer constant, K(trans), and the volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space, v(e). To test the validity of this approach, DSC-MRI- and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived K(trans) and v(e) estimates were spatially compared in both 9L and C6 rat brain tumor models. A high degree of correlation (concordance correlation coefficients >0.83, Pearson's r>0.84) and agreement was found between the DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived measurements. These results indicate that dual-echo DSC-MRI can be used to simultaneously extract reliable DCE-MRI kinetic parameters in brain tumors in addition to conventional blood volume and blood flow metrics.

  20. Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    'William J. O'Sullivan, the father of the Echo balloon, was also the father of five children. ... The NASA public affairs office distributed copies of this family portrait to the news media along with stories about O'Sullivan's ingenious invention of the Echo balloon.' 'O'Sullivan became one of NASA's most highly publicized scientists. In December 1960, the U.S. Post Office Department issued a commemorative 4-cent stamp in honor of his beloved Echo balloon. For his concept of the inflatable space vehicle, NASA would award him one of its distinguished service medals, in addition to $5000 cash. In 1962, O'Sullivan would appear as a guest on the popular TV game show 'What's My Line?'; all four of the celebrity panelists correctly picked him from the lineup as the father of the Echo satelloons.'

  1. Substitute CT generation from a single ultra short time echo MRI sequence: preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Dowling, Jason A.; Rai, Robba; Liney, Gary P.

    2017-04-01

    In MR guided radiation therapy planning both MR and CT images for a patient are acquired and co-registered to obtain a tissue specific HU map. Generation of the HU map directly from the MRI would eliminate the CT acquisition and may improve radiation therapy planning. In this preliminary study of substitute CT (sCT) generation, two porcine leg phantoms were scanned using a 3D ultrashort echo time (PETRA) sequence and co-registered to corresponding CT images to build tissue specific regression models. The model was created from one co-registered CT-PETRA pair to generate the sCT for the other PETRA image. An expectation maximization based clustering was performed on the co-registered PETRA image to identify the soft tissues, dense bone and air class membership probabilities. A tissue specific non linear regression model was built from one registered CT-PETRA pair dataset to predict the sCT of the second PETRA image in a two-fold cross validation schema. A complete substitute CT is generated in 3 min. The mean absolute HU error for air was 0.3 HU, bone was 95 HU, fat was 30 HU and for muscle it was 10 HU. The mean surface reconstruction error for the bone was 1.3 mm. The PETRA sequence enabled a low mean absolute surface distance for the bone and a low HU error for other classes. The sCT generated from a single PETRA sequence shows promise for the generation of fast sCT for MRI based radiation therapy planning.

  2. Dynamic diffusion tensor measurements in muscle tissue using Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Baete, Steven H.; Cho, Gene; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    When diffusion biomarkers display transient changes, i.e. in muscle following exercise, traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) methods lack temporal resolution to resolve the dynamics. This paper presents an MRI method for dynamic diffusion tensor acquisitions on a clinical 3T scanner. This method, SL-MEDITATE (Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique) achieves a high temporal resolution (4s) (1) by rapid diffusion encoding through the acquisition of multiple echoes with unique diffusion sensitization and (2) by limiting the readout to a single line volume. The method is demonstrated in a rotating anisotropic phantom, in a flow phantom with adjustable flow speed, and in in vivo skeletal calf muscle of healthy volunteers following a plantar flexion exercise. The rotating and flow-varying phantom experiments show that SL-MEDITATE correctly identifies the rotation of the first diffusion eigenvector and the changes in diffusion tensor parameter magnitudes, respectively. Immediately following exercise, the in vivo mean diffusivity (MD) time-courses show, before the well-known increase, an initial decrease which is not typically observed in traditional DTI. In conclusion, SL-MEDITATE can be used to capture transient changes in tissue anisotropy in a single line. Future progress might allow for dynamic DTI when combined with appropriate k-space trajectories and compressed sensing reconstruction. PMID:25900166

  3. Assessing temperature changes in cortical bone using variable flip-angle ultrashort echo-time MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Misung; Scott, Serena J.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonakar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Diederich, Chris J.; Rieke, Viola; Krug, Roland

    2017-03-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation is a promising, noninvasive method for treatment of bone tumors and palliation of pain. During thermal therapy, temperature mapping is necessary to ensure proper heat deposition in targeted tumors as well as to prevent unnecessary heating in surrounding tissues. Conventional MR thermometry exploits the proton resonant frequency shift of water protons, which normally requires a long echo time; therefore, this method is not appropriate for cortical bone due to its short T2* relaxation time. This work demonstrates that ultrashort echo-time MRI can characterize T1 changes in cortical bone caused by temperature changes. Ex vivo experiments were performed to heat diaphysis segments of bovine femurs with an interstitial ultrasound applicator. The T1 increase in the heated parts of cortical bone was observed. The temerature dependence of T1 in cortical born was also assessed by heating bovine bone samples in a temperature-controlled water bath. T1 mapping of cortical bone enabled by ultrashort echo-time MRI might allow for more accurate characterization of thermal dose during treatment of bone tumors.

  4. A framework for accurate determination of the T₂ distribution from multiple echo magnitude MRI images.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Koay, Cheng Guan; Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Basser, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of the T2 distribution in tissues provides biologically relevant information about normal and abnormal microstructure and organization. Typically, the T2 distribution is obtained by fitting the magnitude MR images acquired by a multi-echo MRI pulse sequence using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm. It is well known that the ideal magnitude MR signal follows a Rician distribution. Unfortunately, studies attempting to establish the validity and efficacy of the ILT algorithm assume that these input signals are Gaussian distributed. Violation of the normality (or Gaussian) assumption introduces unexpected artifacts, including spurious cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-like long T2 components; bias of the true geometric mean T2 values and in the relative fractions of various components; and blurring of nearby T2 peaks in the T2 distribution. Here we apply and extend our previously proposed magnitude signal transformation framework to map noisy Rician-distributed magnitude multi-echo MRI signals into Gaussian-distributed signals with high accuracy and precision. We then perform an ILT on the transformed data to obtain an accurate T2 distribution. Additionally, we demonstrate, by simulations and experiments, that this approach corrects the aforementioned artifacts in magnitude multi-echo MR images over a large range of signal-to-noise ratios.

  5. Comparison of Optimized Soft-Tissue Suppression Schemes for Ultra-short Echo Time (UTE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Magland, Jeremy F.; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh; Song, Hee Kwon; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-short echo time (UTE) imaging with soft-tissue suppression reveals short-T2 components (typically hundreds of microseconds to milliseconds) ordinarily not captured or obscured by long-T2 tissue signals on the order of tens of milliseconds or longer. The technique therefore enables visualization and quantification of short-T2 proton signals such as those in highly collagenated connective tissues. This work compares the performance of the three most commonly used long-T2 suppression UTE sequences, i.e. echo subtraction (dual-echo UTE), saturation via dual-band saturation pulses (dual-band UTE), and inversion by adiabatic inversion pulses (IR-UTE) at 3T, via Bloch simulations and experimentally in vivo in the lower extremities of test subjects. For unbiased performance comparison, the acquisition parameters are optimized individually for each sequence to maximize short-T2 SNR and CNR between short- and long-T2 components. Results show excellent short-T2 contrast is achieved with these optimized sequences. A combination of dual-band UTE with dual-echo UTE provides good short-T2 SNR and CNR with less sensitivity to B1 homogeneity. IR-UTE has the lowest short-T2 SNR efficiency but provides highly uniform short-T2 contrast and is well suited for imaging short-T2 species with relatively short T1 such as bone water. PMID:22161636

  6. Evaluation of a multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition with SENSE acceleration: applications for perfusion imaging in and outside the brain.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jack T; Robison, Ryan K; Elder, Christopher P; Newton, Allen T; Damon, Bruce M; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion-based changes in MR signal intensity can occur in response to the introduction of exogenous contrast agents and endogenous tissue properties (e.g. blood oxygenation). MR measurements aimed at capturing these changes often implement single-shot echo planar imaging (ssEPI). In recent years ssEPI readouts have been combined with parallel imaging (PI) to allow fast dynamic multi-slice imaging as well as the incorporation of multiple echoes. A multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition has recently been developed to allow measurement of transverse relaxation rate (R2 and R2(*)) changes in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI experiments in the brain. With SAGE EPI, the use of PI can influence image quality, temporal resolution, and achievable echo times. The effect of PI on dynamic SAGE measurements, however, has not been evaluated. In this work, a SAGE EPI acquisition utilizing SENSE PI and partial Fourier (PF) acceleration was developed and evaluated. Voxel-wise measures of R2 and R2(*) in healthy brain were compared using SAGE EPI and conventional non-EPI multiple echo acquisitions with varying SENSE and PF acceleration. A conservative SENSE factor of 2 with PF factor of 0.73 was found to provide accurate measures of R2 and R2(*) in white (WM) (rR2=[0.55-0.79], rR2*=[0.47-0.71]) and gray (GM) matter (rR2=[0.26-0.59], rR2*=[0.39-0.74]) across subjects. The combined use of SENSE and PF allowed the first dynamic SAGE EPI measurements in muscle, with a SENSE factor of 3 and PF factor of 0.6 providing reliable relaxation rate estimates when compared to multi-echo methods. Application of the optimized SAGE protocol in DSC-MRI of high-grade glioma patients provided T1 leakage-corrected estimates of CBV and CBF as well as mean vessel diameter (mVD) and simultaneous measures of DCE-MRI parameters K(trans) and ve. Likewise, application of SAGE in a muscle reperfusion model allowed dynamic measures of R2', a parameter that has been shown to correlate

  7. Tailored slice selection in solid-state MRI by DANTE under magic-echo line narrowing.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shigeru; Masumoto, Hidefumi; Hashimoto, Takeyuki

    2007-06-01

    We propose a method of slice selection in solid-state MRI by combining DANTE selective excitation with magic-echo (ME) line narrowing. The DANTE RF pulses applied at the ME peaks practically do not interfere with the ME line narrowing in the combined ME DANTE sequence. This allows straightforward tailoring of the slice profile simply by introducing an appropriate modulation, such as a sinc modulation, into the flip angles of the applied DANTE RF pulses. The utility of the method has been demonstrated by preliminary experiments performed on a test sample of adamantane.

  8. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Shemesh, Noam

    2017-04-01

    White Matter (WM) microstructures, such as axonal density and average diameter, are crucial to the normal function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) as they are closely related with axonal conduction velocities. Conversely, disruptions of these microstructural features may result in severe neurological deficits, suggesting that their noninvasive mapping could be an important step towards diagnosing and following pathophysiology. Whereas diffusion based MRI methods have been proposed to map these features, they typically entail the application of powerful gradients, which are rarely available in the clinic, or extremely long acquisition schemes to extract information from parameter-intensive models. In this study, we suggest that simple and time-efficient multi-gradient-echo (MGE) MRI can be used to extract the axon density from susceptibility-driven non-monotonic decay in the time-dependent signal. We show, both theoretically and with simulations, that a non-monotonic signal decay will occur for multi-compartmental microstructures - such as axons and extra-axonal spaces, which were here used as a simple model for the microstructure - and that, for axons parallel to the main magnetic field, the axonal density can be extracted. We then experimentally demonstrate in ex-vivo rat spinal cords that its different tracts - characterized by different microstructures - can be clearly contrasted using the MGE-derived maps. When the quantitative results are compared against ground-truth histology, they reflect the axonal fraction (though with a bias, as evident from Bland-Altman analysis). As well, the extra-axonal fraction can be estimated. The results suggest that our model is oversimplified, yet at the same time evidencing a potential and usefulness of the approach to map underlying microstructures using a simple and time-efficient MRI sequence. We further show that a simple general-linear-model can predict the average axonal diameters from the four model parameters, and

  9. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  10. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Eric S; Prah, Douglas E; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma.

  11. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Eric S.; Prah, Douglas E.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:28090589

  12. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Luo, Jie; Lancia, Samantha; Hildebolt, Charles; Cross, Anne H

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gray matter (GM) damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS). The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2(*)) in 10 each relapsing-remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2(*) values from healthy controls (HCs) of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2(*) values - age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2(*) values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT) and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT) neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2(*) values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2(*) values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05) correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests) showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2(*) values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  13. Efficient imaging of midbrain nuclei using inverse double-echo steady-state acquisition a)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Long; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging of midbrain nuclei using T2- or T2*-weighted MRI often entails long echo time, leading to long scan time. In this study, an inverse double-echo steady-state (iDESS) technique is proposed for efficiently depicting midbrain nuclei. Methods: Thirteen healthy subjects participated in this study. iDESS was performed along with two sets of T2*-weighted spoiled gradient-echo images (SPGR1, with scan time identical to iDESS and SPGR2, using clinical scanning parameters as a reference standard) for comparison. Generation of iDESS composite images combining two echo signals was optimized for maximal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the red nuclei and surrounding tissues. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated from the occipital lobe. Comparison was also made using phase-enhanced images as in standard susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Results: The iDESS images present significantly higher SNR efficiency (171.3) than SPGR1 (158.7, p = 0.013) and SPGR2 (95.5, p < 10−8). iDESS CNR efficiency (19.2) is also significantly greater than SPGR1 (6.9, p < 10−6) and SPGR2 (14.3, p = 0.0016). Compared with DESS, iDESS provides further advantage on enhanced phase information and hence improved contrast on SWI-processed images. Conclusions: iDESS efficiently depicts midbrain nuclei with improved CNR efficiency, increased SNR efficiency, and reduced scan time and is less prone to susceptibility signal loss from air-tissue interfaces. PMID:26133633

  14. Assessing tumor cytoarchitecture using multi-echo DSC-MRI derived measures of the Transverse Relaxivity at Tracer Equilibrium (TRATE)

    PubMed Central

    Semmineh, Natenael B; Xu, Junzhong; Skinner, Jack T; Xie, Jingping; Li, Hua; Ayers, Gregory; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain tumor dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI studies, multi-echo acquisition methods are used to quantify the dynamic changes in T1 and T2* that occur when contrast agent (CA) extravasates. Such methods also enable the estimation of the effective tissue CA transverse relaxivity. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the Transverse Relaxivity at Tracer Equilibrium (TRATE) to tumor cytoarchitecture. Theory and Methods Computational and in vitro studies were used to evaluate the biophysical basis of TRATE. In 9L, C6 and human brain tumors, TRATE, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), the CA transfer constant (Ktrans), the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) and histological data were compared. Results Simulations and in vitro results indicate that TRATE is highly sensitive to variations in cellular properties such as cell size and density. The histologic cell density and TRATE values were significantly higher in 9L tumors as compared to C6 tumors. In animal and human tumors, a voxel-wise comparison of TRATE with ADC, ve, and Ktrans maps showed low spatial correlation. Conclusion The assessment of TRATE is clinically feasible and its sensitivity to tissue cytoarchitectural features not present in other imaging methods indicate that it could potentially serve as a unique structural signature or “trait” of cancer. PMID:25227668

  15. Bayesian algorithm using spatial priors for multiexponential T₂ relaxometry from multiecho spin echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dushyant; Nguyen, Thanh D; Gauthier, Susan A; Raj, Ashish

    2012-11-01

    Multiexponential T₂ relaxometry is a powerful research tool for detecting brain structural changes due to demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, because of unusually high signal-to-noise ratio requirement compared with other MR modalities and ill-posedness of the underlying inverse problem, the T₂ distributions obtained with conventional approaches are frequently prone to noise effects. In this article, a novel multivoxel Bayesian algorithm using spatial prior information is proposed. This prior takes into account the expectation that volume fractions and T₂ relaxation times of tissue compartments change smoothly within coherent brain regions. Three-dimensional multiecho spin echo MRI data were collected from five healthy volunteers at 1.5 T and myelin water fraction maps were obtained using the conventional and proposed algorithms. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method provides myelin water fraction maps with improved depiction of brain structures and significantly lower coefficients of variance in white matter.

  16. Assessment of a combined spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) DSC-MRI method for preclinical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Ashley M; Skinner, Jack T; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to optimize and validate a combined spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) sequence for dynamic susceptibility-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to obtain hemodynamic parameters in a preclinical setting. The SAGE EPI sequence was applied in phantoms and in vivo rat brain (normal, tumor, and stroke tissue). Partial and full Fourier encoding schemes were implemented and characterized. Maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), vessel size index (VSI), volume transfer constant (K(trans)), and volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space (ve) were obtained. Partial Fourier encoding provided shortened echo times with acceptable signal-to-noise ratio and temporal stability, thus enabling reliable characterization of T2, T2(*) and T1 in both phantoms and rat brain. The hemodynamic parameters CBV, CBF, and MTT for gradient-echo and spin-echo contrast were determined in tumor and stroke; VSI, K(trans), and ve were also computed in tumor tissue. The SAGE EPI sequence allows the acquisition of multiple gradient- and spin-echoes, from which measures of perfusion, permeability, and vessel size can be obtained in a preclinical setting. Partial Fourier encoding can be used to minimize SAGE echo times and reliably quantify dynamic T2 and T2(*) changes. This acquisition provides a more comprehensive assessment of hemodynamic status in brain tissue with vascular and perfusion abnormalities.

  17. Spin echo MRI in the evaluation of hearts with a double outlet right ventricle: usefulness and limitations.

    PubMed

    Beekmana, R P; Roest, A A; Helbing, W A; Hazekamp, M G; Schoof, P H; Bartelings, M M; Sobotka, M A; de Roos, A; Ottenkamp, J

    2000-04-01

    The surgical approach to a double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is dependent on the spatial relationship of the semilunar valves, outflow tracts and ventricular septal defect (VSD). The purpose of the study was to assess the value of MRI for the evaluation of cardiovascular anatomy in patients before and after surgery for DORV. Spin echo MRI was performed in 12 patients with DORV (eight preoperative and four postoperative patients). Thin-section MRI was performed in three orthogonal planes and selected angulated views were obtained. Conventional imaging by color Doppler echocardiography and cine-angiocardiography and surgical findings, when present, served as the reference standards. The results found that the spatial relationship between semilunar valves and VSD was accurately assessed by MRI in eight out of eight preoperative patients. In the four postoperative cases MRI depicted the morphology of both outflow tracts and provided adequate information on their patency. Of the eight preoperative patients, five have undergone corrective surgery and the MRI findings were confirmed. MRI provided additional information to conventional imaging preoperatively in three cases in which the VSD opened into the outlet portion of the DORV, without there being a direct relation to a semilunar valve. In two preoperative cases in which the VSD was directly committed to the aorta, conventional imaging was conclusive. MRI was unable to depict aberrant chordae tendineae in four out of four cases. We conclude that MRI provides accurate additional anatomic information in patients with DORV, which is helpful in presurgical planning as well as during follow-up. Spin echo MRI does not visualize aberrant chordae tendineae.

  18. Improving effect size estimation and statistical power with multi-echo fMRI and its impact on understanding the neural systems supporting mentalizing.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Michael V; Auyeung, Bonnie; Holt, Rosemary J; Waldman, Jack; Ruigrok, Amber N V; Mooney, Natasha; Bullmore, Edward T; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Kundu, Prantik

    2016-11-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research is routinely criticized for being statistically underpowered due to characteristically small sample sizes and much larger sample sizes are being increasingly recommended. Additionally, various sources of artifact inherent in fMRI data can have detrimental impact on effect size estimates and statistical power. Here we show how specific removal of non-BOLD artifacts can improve effect size estimation and statistical power in task-fMRI contexts, with particular application to the social-cognitive domain of mentalizing/theory of mind. Non-BOLD variability identification and removal is achieved in a biophysical and statistically principled manner by combining multi-echo fMRI acquisition and independent components analysis (ME-ICA). Without smoothing, group-level effect size estimates on two different mentalizing tasks were enhanced by ME-ICA at a median rate of 24% in regions canonically associated with mentalizing, while much more substantial boosts (40-149%) were observed in non-canonical cerebellar areas. Effect size boosting occurs via reduction of non-BOLD noise at the subject-level and consequent reductions in between-subject variance at the group-level. Smoothing can attenuate ME-ICA-related effect size improvements in certain circumstances. Power simulations demonstrate that ME-ICA-related effect size enhancements enable much higher-powered studies at traditional sample sizes. Cerebellar effects observed after applying ME-ICA may be unobservable with conventional imaging at traditional sample sizes. Thus, ME-ICA allows for principled design-agnostic non-BOLD artifact removal that can substantially improve effect size estimates and statistical power in task-fMRI contexts. ME-ICA could mitigate some issues regarding statistical power in fMRI studies and enable novel discovery of aspects of brain organization that are currently under-appreciated and not well understood.

  19. Phase incremented echo train acquisition applied to magnetic resonance pore imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, S. A.; Galvosas, P.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient phase cycling schemes remain a challenge for NMR techniques if the pulse sequences involve a large number of rf-pulses. Especially complex is the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence where the number of rf-pulses can range from hundreds to several thousands. Our recent implementation of Magnetic Resonance Pore Imaging (MRPI) is based on a CPMG rf-pulse sequence in order to refocus the effect of internal gradients inherent in porous media. While the spin dynamics for spin- 1 / 2 systems in CPMG like experiments are well understood it is still not straight forward to separate the desired pathway from the spectrum of unwanted coherence pathways. In this contribution we apply Phase Incremented Echo Train Acquisition (PIETA) to MRPI. We show how PIETA offers a convenient way to implement a working phase cycling scheme and how it allows one to gain deeper insights into the amplitudes of undesired pathways.

  20. Quantifying Temperature-Dependent T1 Changes in Cortical Bone Using Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Scott, Serena J; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Jones, Peter D; Larson, Peder E Z; Diederich, Chris J; Krug, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time (UTE) MRI to quantify T1 changes in cortical bone due to heating. Methods Variable flip-angle T1 mapping combined with 3D UTE imaging was used to measure T1 in cortical bone. A calibration experiment was performed to detect T1 changes with temperature in ex vivo cortical bone samples from a bovine femur. Ultrasound heating experiments were performed using an interstitial applicator in ex vivo bovine femur specimens, and heat-induced T1 changes were quantified. Results The calibration experiment demonstrated that T1 increases with temperature in cortical bone. We observed a linear relationship between temperature and T1 with a linear coefficient of 0.67–0.84 ms/°C over a range of 25–70°C. The ultrasound heating experiments showed increased T1 changes in the heated regions, and the relationship between the temperature changes and T1 changes was similar to that of the calibration. Conclusion We demonstrated a temperature dependence of T1 in ex vivo cortical bone using a variable flip-angle UTE T1 mapping method. PMID:26390357

  1. Gaussian phase distribution approximations for oscillating gradient spin echo diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianuş, Andrada; Siow, Bernard; Drobnjak, Ivana; Zhang, Hui; Alexander, Daniel C.

    2013-02-01

    Oscillating gradients provide an optimal probe of small pore sizes in diffusion MRI. While sinusoidal oscillations have been popular for some time, recent work suggests additional benefits of square or trapezoidal oscillating waveforms. This paper presents analytical expressions of the free and restricted diffusion signal for trapezoidal and square oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) sequences using the Gaussian phase distribution (GPD) approximation and generalises existing similar expressions for sinusoidal OGSE. Accurate analytical models are necessary for exploitation of these pulse sequences in imaging studies, as they allow model fitting and parameter estimation in reasonable computation times. We evaluate the accuracy of the approximation against synthesised data from the Monte Carlo (MC) diffusion simulator in Camino and Callaghan's matrix method and we show that the accuracy of the approximation is within a few percent of the signal, while providing several orders of magnitude faster computation. Moreover, since the expressions for trapezoidal wave are complex, we test sine and square wave approximations to the trapezoidal OGSE signal. The best approximations depend on the gradient amplitude and the oscillation frequency and are accurate to within a few percent. Finally, we explore broader applications of trapezoidal OGSE, in particular for non-model based applications, such as apparent diffusion coefficient estimation, where only sinusoidal waveforms have been considered previously. We show that with the right apodisation, trapezoidal waves also have benefits by virtue of the higher diffusion weighting they provide compared to sinusoidal gradients.

  2. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M.; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (23Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (23Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a 23Na resonator was constructed for whole body 23Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B1-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body 23Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm3 and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the 23Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, 23Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  3. Simultaneous Quantitative MRI Mapping of T1, T2* and Magnetic Susceptibility with Multi-Echo MP2RAGE

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Tobias; Möller, Harald E.; Schäfer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of relaxation times is essential for understanding the biophysical mechanisms underlying contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative experiments, while offering major advantages in terms of reproducibility, may benefit from simultaneous acquisitions. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of simultaneously recording relaxation-time and susceptibility maps with a prototype Multi-Echo (ME) Magnetization-Prepared 2 RApid Gradient Echoes (MP2RAGE) sequence. T1 maps can be obtained using the MP2RAGE sequence, which is relatively insensitive to inhomogeneities of the radio-frequency transmit field, B1+. As an extension, multiple gradient echoes can be acquired in each of the MP2RAGE readout blocks, which permits the calculation of T2* and susceptibility maps. We used computer simulations to explore the effects of the parameters on the precision and accuracy of the mapping. In vivo parameter maps up to 0.6 mm nominal resolution were acquired at 7 T in 19 healthy volunteers. Voxel-by-voxel correlations and the test-retest reproducibility were used to assess the reliability of the results. When using optimized paramenters, T1 maps obtained with ME-MP2RAGE and standard MP2RAGE showed excellent agreement for the whole range of values found in brain tissues. Simultaneously obtained T2* and susceptibility maps were of comparable quality as Fast Low-Angle SHot (FLASH) results. The acquisition times were more favorable for the ME-MP2RAGE (≈ 19 min) sequence as opposed to the sum of MP2RAGE (≈ 12 min) and FLASH (≈ 10 min) acquisitions. Without relevant sacrifice in accuracy, precision or flexibility, the multi-echo version may yield advantages in terms of reduced acquisition time and intrinsic co-registration, provided that an appropriate optimization of the acquisition parameters is performed. PMID:28081157

  4. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI.

  5. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI. PMID:26413518

  6. Thin film MRI-high resolution depth imaging with a local surface coil and spin echo SPI.

    PubMed

    Ouriadov, Alexei V; MacGregor, Rodney P; Balcom, Bruce J

    2004-07-01

    A multiple echo, single point imaging technique, employing a local surface coil probe, is presented for examination of thin film samples. Depth images with a nominal resolution of 5 microm were acquired with acquisition times on the order of 10 min. The method may be used to observe dynamic phenomenon such as polymerization, wetting, and drying in thin film samples. It is readily adapted to spatially resolved diffusion coefficient and T2 relaxation time mapping.

  7. Single-shot T1 mapping using simultaneous acquisitions of spin- and stimulated-echo-planar imaging (2D ss-SESTEPI).

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianfeng; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2010-09-01

    The conventional stimulated-echo NMR sequence only measures the longitudinal component while discarding the transverse component, after tipping up the prepared magnetization. This transverse magnetization can be used to measure a spin echo, in addition to the stimulated echo. Two-dimensional single-shot spin- and stimulated-echo-planar imaging (ss-SESTEPI) is an echo-planar-imaging-based single-shot imaging technique that simultaneously acquires a spin-echo-planar image and a stimulated-echo-planar image after a single radiofrequency excitation. The magnitudes of the spin-echo-planar image and stimulated-echo-planar image differ by T(1) decay and diffusion weighting for perfect 90 degrees radiofrequency and thus can be used to rapidly measure T(1). However, the spatial variation of amplitude of radiofrequency field induces uneven splitting of the transverse magnetization for the spin-echo-planar image and stimulated-echo-planar image within the imaging field of view. Correction for amplitude of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity is therefore critical for two-dimensional ss-SESTEPI to be used for T(1) measurement. We developed a method for amplitude of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity correction by acquiring an additional stimulated-echo-planar image with minimal mixing time, calculating the difference between the spin echo and the stimulated echo and multiplying the stimulated-echo-planar image by the inverse functional map. Diffusion-induced decay is corrected by measuring the average diffusivity during the prescanning. Rapid single-shot T(1) mapping may be useful for various applications, such as dynamic T(1) mapping for real-time estimation of the concentration of contrast agent in dynamic contrast enhancement MRI.

  8. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Subashi, Ergys; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO{sub 4} phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K{sup trans} with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1{sub 0}). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model

  9. T2-weighted MRI of the uterus: fast spin echo vs. breath-hold fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Ascher, S M; O'Malley, J; Semelka, R C; Patt, R H; Rajan, S; Thomasson, D

    1999-03-01

    This study compared one routine T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2FSE) sequence with a breath-hold T2FSE (BH T2FSE) sequence of the female pelvis for image quality, uterine anatomy, lesion detection, and signal intensity measurements. Thirty-two consecutive women (mean age 41.7 years) were imaged at 1.5 T with one high-resolution routine T2FSE sequence and one BH T2FSE sequence in the sagittal plane as part of comprehensive pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. The different image sets were rated separately for imaging characteristics (overall image quality, uterine anatomy definition, lesion detection, and free fluid conspicuity) and then compared side by side. The image sets were also compared for artifacts (ghosting, blurring, pulsatility, and chemical shift misregistration). Signal-to-noise (S/N) and signal difference-to-noise (SD/N) ratios were calculated for the different uterine zones, uterine abnormalities, free fluid, rectus abdominis muscle, and bladder. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for uterine abnormalities. Twenty-eight uterine abnormalities were detected in 20 patients and included leiomyomata (13 patients), adenomyosis (7 patients), benign endometrial polyps (6 patients), endometrial carcinoma (1 patient), and pregnancy (1 patient). BH T2FSE was superior or equivalent to T2FSE for overall image quality in 23/32 patients (71.8%), uterine anatomy definition in 19/32 patients (59.3%), and lesion detection in 13/20 patients (65%). BH T2FSE performed less well than T2FSE for free fluid conspicuity in 5/5 (100%) patients. BH T2FSE was equivalent to or less affected than T2FSE for ghosting artifact in 24/32 patients (75%) and blurring artifact in 29/32 patients (90.6%). Pulsatility and chemical shift artifacts were not problematic for either image set. S/N and SD/N were higher for all BH T2FSE determinations compared with T2FSE. For the endometrium, junctional zone, myometrium, and bladder, these differences were statistically significant. There

  10. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the prostate: an apparent diffusion coefficient comparison of half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo and echo planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Cowin, Gary J; Wang, Deming

    2012-02-01

    Prostate cancer detection using diffusion-weighted imaging is highly affected by the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in an image. Echo planar imaging (EPI) is a fast sequence commonly used for diffusion imaging but has inherent magnetic susceptibility and chemical shift artefacts associated. A diffusion sequence that is less affected by these artefacts is therefore advantageous. The half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence was chosen. The diffusion sequences were compared in image quality, repeatability of the ADC value and the effect on the ADC value with varied b values. Eight volunteers underwent three scans of each sequence, on a 1.5-T Siemens system, using b values of 0, 150, 300, 450, 600, 750, 900 and 1000 s/mm(2). ADC maps were created to address the reproducibility of the ADC value when using two b values compared to eight b values. The ADC value using all b values with the HASTE sequence gave the best performance in all tested categories. Both sequences gave significantly different ADC mean values for two b values compared to when using eight b values (P<.05) suggesting larger error is present when using two b values. HASTE was shown to be an improvement over EPI in terms of repeatability, signal variation within a region of interest and standard deviation over the volunteer set. The improved accuracy of the ADC value in the HASTE sequence makes it potentially a more sensitive tumor detection technique.

  11. A voxel-based investigation for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain using ultra short echo times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Kjer, Hans M.; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.; Andersen, Jon AL; Andreasen, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, so-called MRI-only RT, would remove the systematic registration error between MR and computed tomography (CT), and provide co-registered MRI for assessment of treatment response and adaptive RT. Electron densities, however, need to be assigned to the MRI images for dose calculation and patient setup based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Here, we investigate the geometric and dosimetric performance for a number of popular voxel-based methods to generate a so-called pseudo CT (pCT). Five patients receiving cranial irradiation, each containing a co-registered MRI and CT scan, were included. An ultra short echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization was used. Six methods were investigated for three popular types of voxel-based approaches; (1) threshold-based segmentation, (2) Bayesian segmentation and (3) statistical regression. Each approach contained two methods. Approach 1 used bulk density assignment of MRI voxels into air, soft tissue and bone based on logical masks and the transverse relaxation time T2 of the bone. Approach 2 used similar bulk density assignments with Bayesian statistics including or excluding additional spatial information. Approach 3 used a statistical regression correlating MRI voxels with their corresponding CT voxels. A similar photon and proton treatment plan was generated for a target positioned between the nasal cavity and the brainstem for all patients. The CT agreement with the pCT of each method was quantified and compared with the other methods geometrically and dosimetrically using both a number of reported metrics and introducing some novel metrics. The best geometrical agreement with CT was obtained with the statistical regression methods which performed significantly better than the threshold and Bayesian segmentation methods (excluding spatial information). All methods agreed significantly better with CT than a reference water MRI

  12. Three-dimensional accurate detection of lung emphysema in rats using ultra-short and zero echo time MRI.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a life-threatening pathology that causes irreversible destruction of alveolar walls. In vivo imaging techniques play a fundamental role in the early non-invasive pre-clinical and clinical detection and longitudinal follow-up of this pathology. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using high resolution radial three-dimensional (3D) zero echo time (ZTE) and 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) MRI to accurately detect lung pathomorphological changes in a rodent model of emphysema.Porcine pancreas elastase (PPE) was intratracheally administered to the rats to produce the emphysematous changes. 3D ZTE MRI, low and high definition 3D UTE MRI and micro-computed tomography images were acquired 4 weeks after the PPE challenge. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in PPE-treated and control rats. T2* values were computed from low definition 3D UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements were made after euthanizing the animals. Both ZTE and UTE MR images showed a significant decrease in the SNR measured in PPE-treated lungs compared with controls, due to the pathomorphological changes taking place in the challenged lungs. A significant decrease in T2* values in PPE-challenged animals compared with controls was measured using UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements showed a significant increase in the mean linear intercept in PPE-treated lungs. UTE yielded significantly higher SNR compared with ZTE (14% and 30% higher in PPE-treated and non-PPE-treated lungs, respectively).This study showed that optimized 3D radial UTE and ZTE MRI can provide lung images of excellent quality, with high isotropic spatial resolution (400 µm) and SNR in parenchymal tissue (>25) and negligible motion artifacts in freely breathing animals. These techniques were shown to be useful non-invasive instruments to accurately and reliably detect the pathomorphological alterations taking place in emphysematous lungs, without incurring the risks of cumulative radiation

  13. Rapid brain MRI acquisition techniques at ultra-high fields

    PubMed Central

    Setsompop, Kawin; Feinberg, David A.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI provides large increases in signal-to-noise ratio as well as enhancement of several contrast mechanisms in both structural and functional imaging. Combined, these gains result in a substantial boost in contrast-to-noise ratio that can be exploited for higher spatial resolution imaging to extract finer-scale information about the brain. With increased spatial resolution, however, is a concurrent increased image encoding burden that can cause unacceptably long scan times for structural imaging and slow temporal sampling of the hemodynamic response in functional MRI—particularly when whole-brain imaging is desired. To address this issue, new directions of imaging technology development—such as the move from conventional 2D slice-by-slice imaging to more efficient Simultaneous MultiSlice (SMS) or MultiBand imaging (which can be viewed as “pseudo-3D” encoding) as well as full 3D imaging—have provided dramatic improvements in acquisition speed. Such imaging paradigms provide higher SNR efficiency as well as improved encoding efficiency. Moreover, SMS and 3D imaging can make better use of coil sensitivity information in multi-channel receiver arrays used for parallel imaging acquisitions through controlled aliasing in multiple spatial directions. This has enabled unprecedented acceleration factors of an order of magnitude or higher in these imaging acquisition schemes, with low image artifact levels and high SNR. Here we review the latest developments of SMS and 3D imaging methods and related technologies at ultra-high field for rapid high-resolution functional and structural imaging of the brain. PMID:26835884

  14. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer.

    PubMed

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-07-21

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (²³Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (²³Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a ²³Na resonator was constructed for whole body ²³Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B₁-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body ²³Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm³ and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the ²³Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, ²³Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  15. Comparative accuracy of CT, dual-echo MRI and MR spectroscopy for preoperative liver fat quantification in living related liver donors

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Gupta, Subhash; Garg, Bhavya; Vohra, Sandeep; Wadhawan, Manav; Rastogi, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is of significant importance to assess the extent of hepatic steatosis in living donor liver transplant (LDLT) surgery to ensure optimum graft regeneration as well as donor safety. Aim: To establish the accuracy of non-invasive imaging methods including computed tomography (CT), dual-echo in- and opposed-phase magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) for quantification of liver fat content (FC) in prospective LDLT donors with histopathology as reference standard. Settings and Design: This retrospective study was conducted at our institution on LDLT donors being assessed for biliary and vascular anatomy depiction by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and CT scan, respectively, between July 2013 and October 2014. Materials and Methods: Liver FC was measured in 73 donors by dual-echoT1 MRI and MRS. Of these, CT liver attenuation index (LAI) values were available in 62 patients. Statistical Analysis: CT and MRI FC were correlated with histopathological reference standard using Spearman correlation coefficient. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predicative value, and positive and negative likelihood ratios with 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Results: CT LAI, dual-echo MRI, and MRS correlated well with the histopathology results (r = 0.713, 0.871, and 0.882, respectively). An accuracy of 95% and 96% was obtained for dual-echo MRI and MRS in FC estimation with their sensitivity being 97% and 94%, respectively. False-positive rate, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predicative value (NPV) were 0.08, 0.92, and 0.97, respectively, for dual-echo MRI and 0.03, 0.97, and 0.95, respectively, for MRS. CT LAI method of fat estimation has a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 73%, 77.7%, 70.4%, and 80%, respectively. Conclusion: Dual-echo MRI, MRS, and CT LAI are accurate measures to quantify the degree of hepatic steatosis in LDLT donors, thus reducing the need for invasive

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Zero-Echo-Time Attenuation Correction for Brain 18F-FDG PET/MRI: Comparison with Atlas Attenuation Correction.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Tetsuro; Ter Voert, Edwin E G W; Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Huellner, Martin; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2016-12-01

    Accurate attenuation correction (AC) on PET/MR is still challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of AC based on fast zero-echo-time (ZTE) MRI by comparing it with the default atlas-based AC on a clinical PET/MR scanner.

  17. Multi-echo fMRI replication sample of autobiographical memory, prospection and theory of mind reasoning tasks

    PubMed Central

    DuPre, Elizabeth; Luh, Wen-Ming; Spreng, R. Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The default network is involved in self-generated thought, a class of cognition that includes autobiographical memory, prospection, and reasoning about the mental states of others. We collected a replication sample of Spreng and Grady (J Cogn. Neurosci. 22, 1112–1123, 2010), confirming that the default network differentially supports each of these forms of self-generated thought. Here we describe this dataset of multi-echo fMRI data in 31 young adults during autobiographical remembering, imagining, and mentalizing; we also provide an additional resting-state scan for each subject. In this new sample, the findings from the original report are successfully replicated using the same analysis. Physiological measures were additionally collected and allow for interrogation of the impact of multi-echo independent components preprocessing both in task and rest. Future work on this dataset may provide insight into evoked brain response for cued self-generated thought, International Affective Picture System viewing, resting state dynamics, preprocessing procedures, and more. The dataset is accompanied by experimental code for independent behavioral data collection. PMID:27996964

  18. Multi-echo fMRI replication sample of autobiographical memory, prospection and theory of mind reasoning tasks.

    PubMed

    DuPre, Elizabeth; Luh, Wen-Ming; Spreng, R Nathan

    2016-12-20

    The default network is involved in self-generated thought, a class of cognition that includes autobiographical memory, prospection, and reasoning about the mental states of others. We collected a replication sample of Spreng and Grady (J Cogn. Neurosci. 22, 1112-1123, 2010), confirming that the default network differentially supports each of these forms of self-generated thought. Here we describe this dataset of multi-echo fMRI data in 31 young adults during autobiographical remembering, imagining, and mentalizing; we also provide an additional resting-state scan for each subject. In this new sample, the findings from the original report are successfully replicated using the same analysis. Physiological measures were additionally collected and allow for interrogation of the impact of multi-echo independent components preprocessing both in task and rest. Future work on this dataset may provide insight into evoked brain response for cued self-generated thought, International Affective Picture System viewing, resting state dynamics, preprocessing procedures, and more. The dataset is accompanied by experimental code for independent behavioral data collection.

  19. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  20. Differentiating BOLD and non-BOLD signals in fMRI time series using multi-echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Prantik; Inati, Souheil J; Evans, Jennifer W; Luh, Wen-Ming; Bandettini, Peter A

    2012-04-15

    A central challenge in the fMRI based study of functional connectivity is distinguishing neuronally related signal fluctuations from the effects of motion, physiology, and other nuisance sources. Conventional techniques for removing nuisance effects include modeling of noise time courses based on external measurements followed by temporal filtering. These techniques have limited effectiveness. Previous studies have shown using multi-echo fMRI that neuronally related fluctuations are Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signals that can be characterized in terms of changes in R(2)* and initial signal intensity (S(0)) based on the analysis of echo-time (TE) dependence. We hypothesized that if TE-dependence could be used to differentiate BOLD and non-BOLD signals, non-BOLD signal could be removed to denoise data without conventional noise modeling. To test this hypothesis, whole brain multi-echo data were acquired at 3 TEs and decomposed with Independent Components Analysis (ICA) after spatially concatenating data across space and TE. Components were analyzed for the degree to which their signal changes fit models for R(2)* and S(0) change, and summary scores were developed to characterize each component as BOLD-like or not BOLD-like. These scores clearly differentiated BOLD-like "functional network" components from non BOLD-like components related to motion, pulsatility, and other nuisance effects. Using non BOLD-like component time courses as noise regressors dramatically improved seed-based correlation mapping by reducing the effects of high and low frequency non-BOLD fluctuations. A comparison with seed-based correlation mapping using conventional noise regressors demonstrated the superiority of the proposed technique for both individual and group level seed-based connectivity analysis, especially in mapping subcortical-cortical connectivity. The differentiation of BOLD and non-BOLD components based on TE-dependence was highly robust, which allowed for the

  1. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI.

  2. Quantification of Left Ventricular Volumes, Mass and Ejection Fraction using Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; Kramer, Sage P.; Skrinjar, Oskar; Binkley, Cassi M.; Powell, David K.; Mattingly, Andrea C.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that magnitude images from cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI can accurately quantify left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction. Materials and Methods Thirteen mice (C57BL/6J) were imaged using a 7T ClinScan MRI. A short-axis stack of cine T2-weighted black blood (BB) images was acquired for calculation of left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) using the gold standard sum-of-slices methodology. DENSE images were acquired during the same imaging session in three short-axis (basal, mid, apical) and two long-axis orientations. A custom surface fitting algorithm was applied to epicardial and endocardial borders from the DENSE magnitude images to calculate volumes, mass, and EF. Agreement between the DENSE-derived measures and BB-derived measures was assessed via coefficient of variation (CoV). Results 3D surface reconstruction was completed on the order of seconds from segmented images, and required fewer slices to be segmented. Volumes, mass, and EF from DENSE-derived surfaces matched well with BB data (CoVs ≤11%). Conclusion LV mass, volumes, and ejection fraction in mice can be quantified through sparse (5 slices) sampling with DENSE. This consolidation significantly reduces the time required to assess both mass/volume-based measures of cardiac function and advanced cardiac mechanics. PMID:24923710

  3. T2 selective π Echo-Planar Imaging for porous media MRI.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2017-02-08

    The π Echo Planar Imaging (PEPI) method has recently been modified to permit proton density imaging of fluids in porous media with moderate T2 and short T2(∗) signal components. In many applications, it is desirable to discriminate multiple T2 components within each image voxel. T2 selective imaging is explored in this paper through adiabatic inversion as a magnetization preparation with PEPI readout. When prior information of the sample relaxation times is known, responses of different species to broadband adiabatic inversion pulses can be predicted by Bloch equation simulation. Different relaxation components can be acquired by combining the images with and without inversion preparation pulses. T2 weighting can be easily introduced in the PEPI sequence by shifting the spatial encoding gradients based on its spin echo nature. T2 decay curves can be extracted for each image voxel from a series of T2 weighted images and spatially resolved T2 distributions can be generated. This method is reliable but slow. The two methods were implemented to image porous media samples with PEPI the common basis of spatial resolution. The results of both methods agree remarkably well.

  4. T2 selective π Echo-Planar Imaging for porous media MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2017-04-01

    The π Echo Planar Imaging (PEPI) method has recently been modified to permit proton density imaging of fluids in porous media with moderate T2 and short T2∗ signal components. In many applications, it is desirable to discriminate multiple T2 components within each image voxel. T2 selective imaging is explored in this paper through adiabatic inversion as a magnetization preparation with PEPI readout. When prior information of the sample relaxation times is known, responses of different species to broadband adiabatic inversion pulses can be predicted by Bloch equation simulation. Different relaxation components can be acquired by combining the images with and without inversion preparation pulses. T2 weighting can be easily introduced in the PEPI sequence by shifting the spatial encoding gradients based on its spin echo nature. T2 decay curves can be extracted for each image voxel from a series of T2 weighted images and spatially resolved T2 distributions can be generated. This method is reliable but slow. The two methods were implemented to image porous media samples with PEPI the common basis of spatial resolution. The results of both methods agree remarkably well.

  5. Fast radio-frequency enforced steady state (FRESS) spin echo MRI for quantitative T2 mapping: minimizing the apparent repetition time (TR) dependence for fast T2 measurement

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jerry S.; Wang, Enfeng; Zhang, XiaoAn; Mandeville, Emiri; Lo, Eng H.; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Transverse relaxation time (T2) is a basic but very informative MRI parameter, widely used in imaging to examine a host of diseases, including multiple sclerosis, stroke, and tumor. However, short repetition time (TR) is often used to minimize scan time, which may introduce non-negligible errors in T2 measurement. Specifically, due to the use of refocusing pulse, the steady state magnetization depends not only on TR but also on the TE. Hence, if the TE dependence is not properly accounted for, it may be mistaken as T2-induced signal attenuation, leading to non-negligible T2 underestimation. Our study proposed a fast radio-frequency enforced steady state (FRESS) spin echo (SE) MRI sequence, which saturates the magnetization after the echo and ensures a TE-independent steady state. The proposed FRESS-SE MRI was evaluated with numerical simulation, implemented with echo planar imaging readout, and validated by both phantom and in vivo experiments. In summary, FRESS-SE T2 MRI technique was developed for fast and accurate T2 imaging, suitable for in vivo applications. PMID:21755552

  6. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and R2* values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher R2* and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in R2* and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2–8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies. PMID:26661253

  7. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Klohs, Jan; Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and [Formula: see text] values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher [Formula: see text] and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in [Formula: see text] and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2-8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies.

  8. Fast T2 Mapping With Improved Accuracy Using Undersampled Spin-Echo MRI and Model-Based Reconstructions With a Generating Function

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Andreas; Uecker, Martin; Knoll, Florian; Frahm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A model-based reconstruction technique for accelerated T2 mapping with improved accuracy is proposed using under-sampled Cartesian spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The technique employs an advanced signal model for T2 relaxation that accounts for contributions from indirect echoes in a train of multiple spin echoes. An iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse reconstruction problem directly estimates spin-density and T2 maps from undersampled raw data. The algorithm is validated for simulated data as well as phantom and human brain MRI at 3T. The performance of the advanced model is compared to conventional pixel-based fitting of echo-time images from fully sampled data. The proposed method yields more accurate T2 values than the mono-exponential model and allows for retrospective under-sampling factors of at least 6. Although limitations are observed for very long T2 relaxation times, respective reconstruction problems may be overcome by a gradient dampening approach. The analytical gradient of the utilized cost function is included as Appendix. The source code is made available to the community. PMID:24988592

  9. Assessment of EchoMRI-AH versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry by iDXA to measure human body composition

    PubMed Central

    Marlatt, Kara L.; Greenway, Frank; Ravussin, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Background Comparison of percent fat mass across different body composition analysis devices is important given variation in technology accuracy and precision, as well as the growing need for cross-validation of devices often applied across longitudinal studies. Subjects/Methods We compared EchoMRI-AH and Lunar iDXA quantification of percent body fat (PBF) in 84 adults (43M, 41F) with mean age 39.7±15.9 y and BMI 26.2±5.3 kg/m2. Results PBF correlated strongly between devices (r>0.95, p<0.0001). A prediction equation was derived in half of the subjects, and the other half were used to cross-validate the proposed equation (EchoMRI-AH PBF=[0.94*iDXA PBF]+[0.14*Age]+[3.3*Female]−8.83). Mean PBF difference (predicted–measured) in the validation group was not different from 0 (diff=0.27%, 95%CI: −0.42–0.96, p=0.430). Bland-Altman plots showed a bias with higher measured PBF on EchoMRI-AH versus iDXA in all 84 subjects (β=0.13, p<0.0001). Conclusions The proposed prediction equation was valid in our cross-validation sample, and has the potential to be applied across multicenter studies. PMID:27901030

  10. Isolated sixth cranial nerve aplasia visualized with Fast Imaging Employing Steady-State Acquisition (FIESTA) MRI.

    PubMed

    Pilyugina, Svetlana A; Fischbein, Nancy J; Liao, Y Joyce; McCulley, Timothy J

    2007-06-01

    An otherwise healthy 12-month-old girl presented for evaluation of reduced abduction of the left eye detected at 6 months of age. The remainder of the examination was unremarkable. A special MRI sequence-fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA)-visualized the right but not the left sixth nerve cisternal segment. This is the first reported use of the MRI FIESTA sequence to diagnose aplasia of the sixth cranial nerve.

  11. Postoperative arachnoiditis diagnosed by high resolution fast spin-echo MRI of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Fitt, G J; Stevens, J M

    1995-02-01

    Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis is cited as an important cause of recurrent pain and disability after extradural lumbar disc surgery. Myelography using oil-based or ionic water-soluble contrast media was a major contributing factor, and it was not possible to distinguish the prevalence of arachnoiditis probably due to surgery alone. Today it should be possible to make this distinction, which was the purpose of this study. Using high-resolution MRI in 129 patients symptomatic at least 1 year after surgery, a prevalence of arachnoiditis of 20% was found, which dropped to 3% when patients who had undergone oil-based myelography were excluded. Arachnoiditis was diffuse in 88% and focal in 12%. When oil-based media were involved it was focal in 13%, and when not, in one of three cases. It was concluded that arachnoiditis does occur after extradural lumbar disc surgery independently of the use of some myelographic contrast media, and that it may be diffuse or confined only to the operated level. Its prevalence was estimated at 4.6%, four cases focal and two cases diffuse. The causes and clinical significance can only be the subject of speculation.

  12. Associations between Dietary Nutrient Intakes and Hepatic Lipid Contents in NAFLD Patients Quantified by 1H-MRS and Dual-Echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yipeng; Zhang, Kewei; Chen, Yang; Li, Yanchuan; Li, Yuzheng; Fu, Kuang; Feng, Rennan

    2016-01-01

    Dietary habits are crucial in the progression of hepatic lipid accumulation and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, there are limited studies using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and dual-echo in-phase and out-phase magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (dual-echo MRI) to assess the effects of dietary nutrient intakes on hepatic lipid contents. In the present study, we recruited 36 female adults (NAFLD:control = 19:17) to receive questionnaires and medical examinations, including dietary intakes, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, and 1H-MRS and dual-echo MRI examinations. NAFLD patients were found to consume diets higher in energy, protein, fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Total energy intake was positively associated with hepatic fat fraction (HFF) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) after adjustment for age and body-mass index (BMI) (HFF: β = 0.24, p = 0.02; IHL: β = 0.38, p = 0.02). Total fat intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustment for age, BMI and total energy intake (HFF: β = 0.36, p = 0.03; IHL: β = 0.42, p = 0.01). SFA intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustments (HFF: β = 0.45, p = 0.003; IHL: β = 1.16, p = 0.03). In conclusion, hepatic fat content was associated with high energy, high fat and high SFA intakes, quantified by 1H-MRS and dual-echo MRI in our population. Our findings are useful to provide dietary targets to prevent the hepatic lipid accumulation and NAFLD. PMID:27618908

  13. Associations between Dietary Nutrient Intakes and Hepatic Lipid Contents in NAFLD Patients Quantified by ¹H-MRS and Dual-Echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yipeng; Zhang, Kewei; Chen, Yang; Li, Yanchuan; Li, Yuzheng; Fu, Kuang; Feng, Rennan

    2016-08-27

    Dietary habits are crucial in the progression of hepatic lipid accumulation and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, there are limited studies using ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) and dual-echo in-phase and out-phase magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (dual-echo MRI) to assess the effects of dietary nutrient intakes on hepatic lipid contents. In the present study, we recruited 36 female adults (NAFLD:control = 19:17) to receive questionnaires and medical examinations, including dietary intakes, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, and ¹H-MRS and dual-echo MRI examinations. NAFLD patients were found to consume diets higher in energy, protein, fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Total energy intake was positively associated with hepatic fat fraction (HFF) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) after adjustment for age and body-mass index (BMI) (HFF: β = 0.24, p = 0.02; IHL: β = 0.38, p = 0.02). Total fat intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustment for age, BMI and total energy intake (HFF: β = 0.36, p = 0.03; IHL: β = 0.42, p = 0.01). SFA intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustments (HFF: β = 0.45, p = 0.003; IHL: β = 1.16, p = 0.03). In conclusion, hepatic fat content was associated with high energy, high fat and high SFA intakes, quantified by ¹H-MRS and dual-echo MRI in our population. Our findings are useful to provide dietary targets to prevent the hepatic lipid accumulation and NAFLD.

  14. Fast and accurate simulations of diffusion-weighted MRI signals for the evaluation of acquisition sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensonnet, Gaëtan; Jacobs, Damien; Macq, Benoît.; Taquet, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is a powerful tool to probe the diffusion of water through tissues. Through the application of magnetic gradients of appropriate direction, intensity and duration constituting the acquisition parameters, information can be retrieved about the underlying microstructural organization of the brain. In this context, an important and open question is to determine an optimal sequence of such acquisition parameters for a specific purpose. The use of simulated DW-MRI data for a given microstructural configuration provides a convenient and efficient way to address this problem. We first present a novel hybrid method for the synthetic simulation of DW-MRI signals that combines analytic expressions in simple geometries such as spheres and cylinders and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations elsewhere. Our hybrid method remains valid for any acquisition parameters and provides identical levels of accuracy with a computational time that is 90% shorter than that required by MC simulations for commonly-encountered microstructural configurations. We apply our novel simulation technique to estimate the radius of axons under various noise levels with different acquisition protocols commonly used in the literature. The results of our comparison suggest that protocols favoring a large number of gradient intensities such as a Cube and Sphere (CUSP) imaging provide more accurate radius estimation than conventional single-shell HARDI acquisitions for an identical acquisition time.

  15. [Effect of motion correction associated with echo train length and number of blades in propeller MRI-computer simulation].

    PubMed

    Muro, Isao; Horie, Tomohiko; Kimura, Eri; Matsuo, Taichi; Ogihara, Yoshisada; Hanaki, Akira

    2004-02-01

    The PROPELLER (periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction) MRI method is available with a technique for motion correction. We studied changes in correction according to differences in echo train length (ETL) and number of blades, and measured correction accuracy according to linear translation and rotation, using computer simulation. A T(2)-weighted axial image of the head taken by FSE was utilized as the basic MR image. We reconstructed other images with differences in quantity of motion, ETL, and number of blades, also using computer simulation. After motion correction was performed, we measured correction accuracy with cross-correlation to the basic image. The method of motion correction was performed by the conversion of k-space data for each blade step using 2D Fourier-transform. After motion correction of the obtained image had been carried out, the image was converted to k-space data using reverse Fourier-transform. For data of 30 pixels with horizontal translation, cross-correlation coefficients for the stationary image were 0.6 for FSE without motion correction, 0.74 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image without motion correction, and 0.99 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image with motion correction. For data of 24 degrees with rotation, cross-correlation coefficients were 0.38 for FSE without motion correction, 0.53 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image without motion correction, and 0.93 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image with motion correction. The cross-correlation coefficient of liner translation is higher than its rotation. Correction accuracy was better with larger numbers of ETL than without motion correction. The spatial resolution of the image was decreased in the corrected image more by rotation than linear translation. This study indicated that the PR method was able to inspect the imaging technique with little influence on movement.

  16. Towards MRI-Based Autonomous Robotic US Acquisitions: A First Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Hennersperger, Christoph; Fuerst, Bernhard; Virga, Salvatore; Zettinig, Oliver; Frisch, Benjamin; Neff, Thomas; Navab, Nassir

    2016-10-24

    Robotic ultrasound has the potential to assist and guide physicians during interventions. In this work, we present a set of methods and a workflow to enable autonomous MRI-guided ultrasound acquisitions. Our approach uses a structured-light 3D scanner for patient-to-robot and image-to-patient calibration, which in turn is used to plan 3D ultrasound trajectories. These MRI-based trajectories are followed autonomously by the robot and are further refined online using automatic MRI/US registration. Despite the low spatial resolution of structured light scanners, the initial planned acquisition path can be followed with an accuracy of 2.46±0.96 mm. This leads to a good initialization of the MRI/US registration: the 3D-scan-based alignment for planning and acquisition shows an accuracy (distance between planned ultrasound and MRI) of 4.47 mm, and 0.97 mm after an online-update of the calibration based on a closed loop registration.

  17. MRI-derived measurements of human subcortical, ventricular and intracranial brain volumes: Reliability effects of scan sessions, acquisition sequences, data analyses, scanner upgrade, scanner vendors and field strengths.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, Jorge; Czanner, Silvester; Han, Xiao; Salat, David; van der Kouwe, Andre; Quinn, Brian; Pacheco, Jenni; Albert, Marilyn; Killiany, Ronald; Blacker, Deborah; Maguire, Paul; Rosas, Diana; Makris, Nikos; Gollub, Randy; Dale, Anders; Dickerson, Bradford C; Fischl, Bruce

    2009-05-15

    Automated MRI-derived measurements of in-vivo human brain volumes provide novel insights into normal and abnormal neuroanatomy, but little is known about measurement reliability. Here we assess the impact of image acquisition variables (scan session, MRI sequence, scanner upgrade, vendor and field strengths), FreeSurfer segmentation pre-processing variables (image averaging, B1 field inhomogeneity correction) and segmentation analysis variables (probabilistic atlas) on resultant image segmentation volumes from older (n=15, mean age 69.5) and younger (both n=5, mean ages 34 and 36.5) healthy subjects. The variability between hippocampal, thalamic, caudate, putamen, lateral ventricular and total intracranial volume measures across sessions on the same scanner on different days is less than 4.3% for the older group and less than 2.3% for the younger group. Within-scanner measurements are remarkably reliable across scan sessions, being minimally affected by averaging of multiple acquisitions, B1 correction, acquisition sequence (MPRAGE vs. multi-echo-FLASH), major scanner upgrades (Sonata-Avanto, Trio-TrioTIM), and segmentation atlas (MPRAGE or multi-echo-FLASH). Volume measurements across platforms (Siemens Sonata vs. GE Signa) and field strengths (1.5 T vs. 3 T) result in a volume difference bias but with a comparable variance as that measured within-scanner, implying that multi-site studies may not necessarily require a much larger sample to detect a specific effect. These results suggest that volumes derived from automated segmentation of T1-weighted structural images are reliable measures within the same scanner platform, even after upgrades; however, combining data across platform and across field-strength introduces a bias that should be considered in the design of multi-site studies, such as clinical drug trials. The results derived from the young groups (scanner upgrade effects and B1 inhomogeneity correction effects) should be considered as preliminary and in

  18. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method.

  19. Inter- and intra-rater reliability of patellofemoral kinematic and contact area quantification by fast spin echo MRI and correlation with cartilage health by quantitative T1ρ MRI☆

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Brian C.; Thuillier, Daniel U.; Pedoia, Valentina; Chen, Ellison Y.; Zhang, Zhihong; Feeley, Brian T.; Souza, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patellar maltracking is a leading cause of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The aim of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of a semi-automated program for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based patellofemoral kinematics. Methods Sixteen subjects (10 with PFPS [mean age 32.3; SD 5.2; eight females] and six controls without PFPS 19 [mean age 28.6; SD 2.8; three females]) participated in the study. One set of T2-weighted, fat-saturated fast spin-echo (FSE) MRIs were acquired from each subject in full extension and 30° of knee flexion. MRI including axial T1ρ relaxation time mapping sequences was also performed on each knee. Following image acquisitions, regions of interest for kinematic MRI, and patellar and trochlear cartilage were segmented and quantified with in-house designed spline- based MATLAB semi-automated software. Results Intraclass Correlations Coefficients (ICC) of calculated kinematic parameters were good to excellent, ICC > 0.8 in patellar flexion, rotation, tilt, and translation (anterior -posterior, medial -lateral, and superior -inferior), and contact area translation. Only patellar tilt in the flexed position and motion from extended to flexed state was significantly different between PFPS and control patients (p = 0.002 and p = 0.006, respectively). No significant correlations were identified between patellofemoral kinematics and contact area with T1ρ relaxation times. Conclusions A semi-automated, spline-based kinematic MRI technique for patellofemoral kinematic and contact area quantification is highly reproducible with the potential to help better understand the role of patellofemoral maltracking in PFPS and other knee disorders. PMID:26746045

  20. Simultaneous and interleaved acquisition of NMR signals from different nuclei with a clinical MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Arthur W.; Kuehne, Andre; Gruetter, Rolf; Moser, Ewald; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Modification of a clinical MRI scanner to enable simultaneous or rapid interleaved acquisition of signals from two different nuclei. Methods A device was developed to modify the local oscillator signal fed to the receive channel(s) of an MRI console. This enables external modification of the frequency at which the receiver is sensitive and rapid switching between different frequencies. Use of the device was demonstrated with interleaved and simultaneous 31P and 1H spectroscopic acquisitions, and with interleaved 31P and 1H imaging. Results Signal amplitudes and signal‐to‐noise ratios were found to be unchanged for the modified system, compared with data acquired with the MRI system in the standard configuration. Conclusion Interleaved and simultaneous 1H and 31P signal acquisition was successfully demonstrated with a clinical MRI scanner, with only minor modification of the RF architecture. While demonstrated with 31P, the modification is applicable to any detectable nucleus without further modification, enabling a wide range of simultaneous and interleaved experiments to be performed within a clinical setting. Magn Reson Med 76:1636–1641, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26608834

  1. Articular cartilage grading of the knee: diagnostic performance of fat-suppressed 3D volume isotropic turbo spin-echo acquisition (VISTA) compared with 3D T1 high-resolution isovolumetric examination (THRIVE).

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Han; Hahn, Seok; Lim, Daekeon; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-02-01

    Background Conventionally, two-dimensional (2D) fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences have been widely used for clinical cartilage imaging as well as gradient (GRE) sequences. Recently, three-dimensional (3D) volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced with one 3D volumetric scan, and this is replacing slice-by-slice 2D MR scans. Purpose To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic performance of two 3D sequences for abnormalities of knee cartilage: fat-suppressed (FS) FSE-based 3D volume isotropic turbo spin-echo acquisition (VISTA) and GRE-based 3D T1 high-resolution isovolumetric examination (THRIVE). Material and Methods The institutional review board approved the protocol of this retrospective review. This study enrolled 40 patients (41 knees) with arthroscopically confirmed abnormalities of cartilage. All patients underwent isovoxel 3D-VISTA and 3D-THRIVE MR sequences on 3T MRI. We assessed the cartilage grade on the two 3D sequences using arthroscopy as a gold standard. Inter-observer agreement for each technique was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Differences in the area under the curve (AUC) were compared between the 3D-THRIVE and 3D-VISTA. Results Although inter-observer agreement for both sequences was excellent, the inter-observer agreement for 3D-VISTA was higher than for 3D-THRIVE for cartilage grading in all regions of the knee. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic performance ( P > 0.05) between the two sequences for detecting cartilage grade. Conclusion FSE-based 3D-VISTA images had good diagnostic performance that was comparable to GRE-based 3D-THRIVE images in the evaluation of knee cartilage, and can be used in routine knee MR protocols for the evaluation of cartilage.

  2. A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom for the quantitative evaluation of prostate DCE-MRI acquisition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Silvin P.; Browne, Jacinta E.; Meaney, James F.; Smith, David S.; Fagan, Andrew J.

    2016-10-01

    A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom device has been developed, which can be used for quantitatively assessing the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to accurately measure signal/concentration time-intensity curves (CTCs) associated with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Modelling of the complex pharmacokinetics of contrast agents as they perfuse through the tumour capillary network has shown great promise for cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring. However, clinical adoption has been hindered by methodological problems, resulting in a lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate acquisition and modelling methodology to use and a consequent wide discrepancy in published data. A heretofore overlooked source of such discrepancy may arise from measurement errors of tumour CTCs deriving from the imaging pulse sequence itself, while the effects on the fidelity of CTC measurement of using rapidly-accelerated sequences such as parallel imaging and compressed sensing remain unknown. The present work aimed to investigate these features by developing a test device in which ‘ground truth’ CTCs were generated and presented to the MRI scanner for measurement, thereby allowing for an assessment of the DCE-MRI protocol to accurately measure this curve shape. The device comprised a four-pump flow system wherein CTCs derived from prior patient prostate data were produced in measurement chambers placed within the imaged volume. The ground truth was determined as the mean of repeat measurements using an MRI-independent, custom-built optical imaging system. In DCE-MRI experiments, significant discrepancies between the ground truth and measured CTCs were found for both tumorous and healthy tissue-mimicking curve shapes. Pharmacokinetic modelling revealed errors in measured K trans, v e and k ep values of up to 42%, 31%, and 50% respectively, following a simple variation of the parallel imaging factor and number of signal averages in the acquisition

  3. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  4. Slice Accelerated Gradient-Echo Spin-Echo Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Imaging with Blipped CAIPI for Increased Slice Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Cornelius; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Cauley, Stephen; Bhat, Himanshu; Polaskova, Pavlina; Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Rapalino, Otto; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L.; Stufflebeam, Steven; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve slice coverage of gradient echo spin echo (GESE) sequences for dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using a simultaneous-multiple-slice (SMS) method. Methods Data were acquired on 3 Tesla (T) MR scanners with a 32-channel head coil. To evaluate use of SMS for DSC, an SMS GESE sequence with two-fold slice coverage and same temporal sampling was compared with a standard GESE sequence, both with 2× in-plane acceleration. A signal to noise ratio (SNR) comparison was performed on one healthy subject. Additionally, data with Gadolinium injection were collected on three patients with glioblastoma using both sequences, and perfusion analysis was performed on healthy tissues as well as on tumor. Results Retained SNR of SMS DSC is 90% for a gradient echo (GE) and 99% for a spin echo (SE) acquisition, compared with a standard acquisition without slice acceleration. Comparing cerebral blood volume maps, it was observed that the results of standard and SMS acquisitions are comparable for both GE and SE images. Conclusion Two-fold slice accelerated DSC MRI achieves similar SNR and perfusion metrics as a standard acquisition, while allowing a significant increase in slice coverage of the brain. The results also point to a possibility to improve temporal sampling rate, while retaining the same slice coverage. PMID:24285593

  5. Reducing Contrast Contamination in Radial Turbo-Spin-Echo Acquisitions by Combining a Narrow-Band KWIC Filter With Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Daniel; Breuer, Felix A.; Völker, Michael; Brandt, Tobias; Griswold, Mark A.; Jakob, Peter M.; Blaimer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cartesian turbo spin-echo (TSE) and radial TSE images are usually reconstructed by assembling data containing different contrast information into a single k-space. This approach results in mixed contrast contributions in the images, which may reduce their diagnostic value. The goal of this work is to improve the image contrast from radial TSE acquisitions by reducing the contribution of signals with undesired contrast information. Methods Radial TSE acquisitions allow the reconstruction of multiple images with different T2 contrasts using the k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) filter. In this work, the image contrast is improved by reducing the band-width of the KWIC filter. Data for the reconstruction of a single image are selected from within a small temporal range around the desired echo time. The resulting data set is undersampled and therefore an iterative parallel imaging algorithm is applied to remove aliasing artifacts. Results Radial TSE images of the human brain reconstructed with the proposed method show an improved contrast when compared to Cartesian TSE images or radial TSE images with conventional KWIC reconstructions. Conclusion The proposed method provides multi-contrast images from radial TSE data with contrasts similar to multi spin-echo images. Contaminations from unwanted contrast weightings are strongly reduced. PMID:24436227

  6. MRI Compatible Ultrasound Transducers for Simultaneous Acquisition of Coregistered Ultrasound to MRI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speicher, Daniel; Bartscherer, T.; Becker, F. J.; Jenne, J. W.; Mrosk, K.; Degel, C.; Günther, M.; Tretbar, S.

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become an important part of radiological diagnostics as it shows high resolution volumes of human tissue without any radiation exposure. Beside the high costs for MR imaging the greatest disadvantage of this technology is that it is not real-time capable which leads to possible motion artifacts. Whereas Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool in radiology as it is real-time capable and cost effective. Therefore a combination of both modalities is obvious, not only to reduce motion artifacts in MR imaging but to save costs by reducing time in the MR scanner through coregistering ultrasound and MR images for deformation analysis. This work presents the manufacturing and measurement results of MR compatible ultrasound transducers for motion compensation and deformation analyses for clinical interventions under MRI conditions, based on ultrasound volumes acquired by a full MR compatible 180° rotating 8 MHz phased array.

  7. Functional connectivity analysis in resting state fMRI with echo-state networks and non-metric clustering for network structure recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; DSouza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2015-03-01

    Echo state networks (ESN) are recurrent neural networks where the hidden layer is replaced with a fixed reservoir of neurons. Unlike feed-forward networks, neuron training in ESN is restricted to the output neurons alone thereby providing a computational advantage. We demonstrate the use of such ESNs in our mutual connectivity analysis (MCA) framework for recovering the primary motor cortex network associated with hand movement from resting state functional MRI (fMRI) data. Such a framework consists of two steps - (1) defining a pair-wise affinity matrix between different pixel time series within the brain to characterize network activity and (2) recovering network components from the affinity matrix with non-metric clustering. Here, ESNs are used to evaluate pair-wise cross-estimation performance between pixel time series to create the affinity matrix, which is subsequently subject to non-metric clustering with the Louvain method. For comparison, the ground truth of the motor cortex network structure is established with a task-based fMRI sequence. Overlap between the primary motor cortex network recovered with our model free MCA approach and the ground truth was measured with the Dice coefficient. Our results show that network recovery with our proposed MCA approach is in close agreement with the ground truth. Such network recovery is achieved without requiring low-pass filtering of the time series ensembles prior to analysis, an fMRI preprocessing step that has courted controversy in recent years. Thus, we conclude our MCA framework can allow recovery and visualization of the underlying functionally connected networks in the brain on resting state fMRI.

  8. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  9. SNR enhancement of highly-accelerated real-time cardiac MRI acquisitions based on non-local means algorithm.

    PubMed

    Naegel, Benoît; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Tognolini, Maurizio; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2009-08-01

    Real-time cardiac MRI appears as a promising technique to evaluate the mechanical function of the heart. However, ultra-fast MRI acquisitions come with an important signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty, which drastically reduces the image quality. Hence, a real-time denoising approach would be desirable for SNR amelioration. In the clinical context of cardiac dysfunction assessment, long acquisitions are required and for most patients the acquisition takes place with free breathing. Hence, it is necessary to compensate respiratory motion in real-time. In this article, a real-time and interactive method for sequential registration and denoising of real-time MR cardiac images is presented. The method has been experimented on 60 fast MRI acquisitions in five healthy volunteers and five patients. These experiments assessed the feasibility of the method in a real-time context.

  10. PBPK model of methotrexate in cerebrospinal fluid ventricles using a combined microdialysis and MRI acquisition.

    PubMed

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Noury, Fanny; Bruyère, Arnaud; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Le Corre, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the distribution of methotrexate (MTX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lateral ventricles and in cisterna magna after 3rd intraventricular CSF administration in a rabbit model. MTX or gadolinium chelate (Gd-DOTA) was administered in the 3rd ventricle with a local microdialysis to study the pharmacokinetics at the site of administration and with a simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition in the 3rd ventricle, the lateral ventricles and in the cisterna magna. A specific CSF Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was then extrapolated for MTX from Gd-DOTA data. The relative contribution of elimination and distribution processes to the overall disposition of MTX and Gd-DOTA in the 3rd ventricle was similar (i.e., around 60% for CLE and 40% for CLI) suggesting that Gd-DOTA was a suitable surrogate marker for MTX disposition in ventricular CSF. The PBPK predictions for MTX both in CSF of the 3rd ventricle and in plasma were in accordance with the in vivo results. The present study showed that the combination of local CSF microdialysis with MRI acquisition of the brain ventricles and a PBPK model could be a useful methodology to estimate the drug diffusion within CSF ventricles after direct brain CSF administration. Such a methodology would be of interest to clinicians for a rationale determination and optimization of drug dosing parameters in the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases.

  11. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Edna; Frigau, Luca; Voyvodic-Casabo, Clara; Voyvodic, James; Wright, John

    2013-01-01

    BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1) already proficient in at least two languages; or (2) are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1) longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2) statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition. PMID:24961428

  12. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Edna; Frigau, Luca; Voyvodic-Casabo, Clara; Voyvodic, James; Wright, John

    2013-05-28

    BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1) already proficient in at least two languages; or (2) are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1) longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2) statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition.

  13. Efficient Correction of Inhomogeneous Static Magnetic Field-Induced Distortion in Echo Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Dominic; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Dale, Anders M.

    2009-01-01

    Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B0 field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct ‘real-time’ implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images. PMID:19944768

  14. Efficient correction of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-induced distortion in Echo Planar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Holland, Dominic; Kuperman, Joshua M; Dale, Anders M

    2010-03-01

    Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B(0) field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct "real-time" implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images.

  15. A study of quantification of aortic compliance in mice using radial acquisition phase contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuandong

    Spatiotemporal changes in blood flow velocity measured using Phase contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to quantify Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) and Wall Shear Stress (WSS), well known indices of vessel compliance. A study was conducted to measure the PWV in the aortic arch in young healthy children using conventional phase contrast MRI and a post processing algorithm that automatically track the peak velocity in phase contrast images. It is shown that the PWV calculated using peak velocity-time data has less variability compared to that using mean velocity and flow. Conventional MR data acquisition techniques lack both the spatial and temporal resolution needed to accurately calculate PWV and WSS in in vivo studies using transgenic animal models of arterial diseases. Radial k-space acquisition can improve both spatial and temporal resolution. A major part of this thesis was devoted to developing technology for Radial Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance (RPCMR) cine imaging on a 7 Tesla Animal scanner. A pulse sequence with asymmetric radial k-space acquisition was designed and implemented. Software developed to reconstruct the RPCMR images include gridding, density compensation and centering of k-Space that corrects the image ghosting introduced by hardware response time. Image processing software was developed to automatically segment the vessel lumen and correct for phase offset due to eddy currents. Finally, in vivo and ex vivo aortic compliance measurements were conducted in a well-established mouse model for atherosclerosis: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO). Using RPCMR technique, a significantly higher PWV value as well as a higher average WSS was detected among 9 months old ApoE-KO mice compare to in wild type mice. A follow up ex-vivo test of tissue elasticity confirmed the impaired distensibility of aortic arteries among ApoE-KO mice.

  16. ECHO virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that lead to ...

  17. Phantom-based investigation of nonrigid registration constraints in mapping fMRI to anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studholme, Colin; Constable, R. Todd; Duncan, James S.

    2000-06-01

    In previous work we have introduced an approach to improving the registration of EPI fMRI data with anatomical MRI by accounting for differences in magnetic field induced geometric distortion in the two types of MRI acquisition. In particular we began to explore the use of imaging physics based constraints in a non-rigid multi-modality registration algorithm. In this paper we present phantom based experimental work examining the behavior of different non-rigid registration constraints compared to a field map acquisition of the MRI distortion. This acquisition provides a pixel by pixel 'ground truth' estimate of the displacement field within the EPI data. In our registration based approach we employ a B-spline based estimate of the relative geometric distortion with a multi-grid optimization scheme. We maximize the normalized mutual information between the two types of MRI scans to estimate the B-Spline parameters. Using the field map estimates as a gold standard, registration estimates using no additional geometric constraints are compared to those using the spin echo based signal conservation. We also examine the use of logarithmic EPI values in the criteria to provide additional sensitivity in areas of low signal. Results indicate that registration of EPI to conventional MRI incorporating a spin echo distortion model can provide comparable estimates of geometric distortion to those from field mapping data without the need for significant additional acquisitions during each fMRI sequence.

  18. Quantifying cortical bone water in vivo by three-dimensional ultra-short echo-time MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh; Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Magland, Jeremy F.; Ong, Henry; Li, Cheng; Song, Hee Kwon; Love, James; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-01-01

    Bone contains a significant fraction of water that is not detectable with ordinary Cartesian imaging sequences. The advent of ultra-short echo-time (UTE) methods has allowed the recovery of this submillisecond T2*water. In this work, we have developed a new three-dimensional hybrid-radial ultra-short echo-time (3D HRUTE) imaging technique based on slab selection by means of half-sinc pulses, variable-TE slice encoding and algorithms for quantification. The protocol consists of collecting two datasets differing in TR, from which T1 is extracted, which is needed for quantification. Unlike T2*, which has been found to vary within a narrow range and does not require individual correction, T1 is critically subject dependent (range, 100–350 ms). No soft-tissue suppression was used to preserve the signal-to-noise ratio of the short-T2 bone water protons or to minimize the loss of relatively mobile water in large pores. Critical for quantification is correction for spatial variations in reception field and selection of the endosteal boundary for inclusion of pixels in the bone water calculation, because of the ruffled boundary stemming from trabecularization of the endosteal surface. The reproducibility, evaluated in 10 subjects covering the age range 30–80 years, yielded an average coefficient of variation of 4.2% and an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95, suggesting that a treatment effect on the order of 5% could be detected in as few as 10 subjects. Lastly, experiments in specimens by means of graded deuterium exchange showed that approximately 90% of the detected signal arises from water protons, whose relaxation rates (1/T1 and 1/T2*) scale linearly with the isotopic volume fraction of light water after stepwise exchange with heavy water. The data thus show conclusively that the method quantifies water even though, in vivo, no distinction can be made between various fractions, such as collagen-bound vs pore-resident water. PMID:21274960

  19. The PRESTO technique for fMRI

    PubMed Central

    van Gelderen, P.; Duyn, J.H.; Ramsey, N.F.; Liu, G.; Moonen, C.T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In the early days of BOLD fMRI, the acquisition of T2* weighted data was greatly facilitated by rapid scan techniques such as EPI. The latter, however, was only available on a few MRI systems that were equipped with specialized hardware that allowed rapid switching of the imaging gradients. For this reason, soon after the invention of fMRI, the scan technique PRESTO was developed to make rapid T2* weighted scanning available on standard clinical scanning. This method combined echo shifting, which allows for echo times longer than the sequence repetition time, with acquisition of multiple k-space lines per excitation. These two concepts were combined in order to achieve a method fast enough for fMRI, while maintaining a sufficiently long echo time for optimal contrast. PRESTO has been primarily used for 3D scanning, which minimized the contribution of large vessels due to inflow effects. Although PRESTO is still being used today, its appeal has lessened somewhat due to increased gradient performance of modern MRI scanners. Compared to 2D EPI, PRESTO may have somewhat reduced temporal stability, which is a disadvantage for fMRI that may not outweigh the advantage of reduced inflow effects provided by 3D scanning. In this overview, the history of the development of the PRESTO is presented, followed by a qualitative comparison with EPI. PMID:22245350

  20. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  1. Optimizing hippocampal segmentation in infants utilizing MRI post-acquisition processing.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Deanne K; Ahmadzai, Zohra M; Wood, Stephen J; Inder, Terrie E; Warfield, Simon K; Doyle, Lex W; Egan, Gary F

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to determine the most reliable method for infant hippocampal segmentation by comparing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging post-acquisition processing techniques: contrast to noise ratio (CNR) enhancement, or reformatting to standard orientation. MR scans were performed with a 1.5 T GE scanner to obtain dual echo T2 and proton density (PD) images at term equivalent (38-42 weeks' gestational age). 15 hippocampi were manually traced four times on ten infant images by 2 independent raters on the original T2 image, as well as images processed by: a) combining T2 and PD images (T2-PD) to enhance CNR; then b) reformatting T2-PD images perpendicular to the long axis of the left hippocampus. CNRs and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. T2-PD images had 17% higher CNR (15.2) than T2 images (12.6). Original T2 volumes' ICC was 0.87 for rater 1 and 0.84 for rater 2, whereas T2-PD images' ICC was 0.95 for rater 1 and 0.87 for rater 2. Reliability of hippocampal segmentation on T2-PD images was not improved by reformatting images (rater 1 ICC = 0.88, rater 2 ICC = 0.66). Post-acquisition processing can improve CNR and hence reliability of hippocampal segmentation in neonate MR scans when tissue contrast is poor. These findings may be applied to enhance boundary definition in infant segmentation for various brain structures or in any volumetric study where image contrast is sub-optimal, enabling hippocampal structure-function relationships to be explored.

  2. Ultrashort-TE stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) improves the quantification of lipids and fatty acid chain unsaturation in the human liver at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Gajdošík, Martin; Chadzynski, Grzegorz L; Hangel, Gilbert; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Chmelík, Marek; Valkovič, Ladislav; Bogner, Wolfgang; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Ultrahigh-field, whole-body MR systems increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and improve the spectral resolution. Sequences with a short TE allow fast signal acquisition with low signal loss as a result of spin-spin relaxation. This is of particular importance in the liver for the precise quantification of the hepatocellular content of lipids (HCL). In this study, we introduce a spoiler Gradient-switching Ultrashort STimulated Echo AcqUisition (GUSTEAU) sequence, which is a modified version of a stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequence, with a minimum TE of 6 ms. With the high spectral resolution at 7 T, the efficient elimination of water sidebands and the post-processing suppression of the water signal, we estimated the composition of fatty acids (FAs) via the detection of the olefinic lipid resonance and calculated the unsaturation index (UI) of hepatic FAs. The performance of the GUSTEAU sequence for the assessment of UI was validated against oil samples and provided excellent results in agreement with the data reported in the literature. When measuring HCL with GUSTEAU in 10 healthy volunteers, there was a high correlation between the results obtained at 7 and 3 T (R(2) = 0.961). The test-retest measurements yielded low coefficients of variation for HCL (4 ± 3%) and UI (11 ± 8%) when measured with the GUSTEAU sequence at 7 T. A negative correlation was found between UI and HCL (n = 10; p < 0.033). The ultrashort TE MRS sequence (GUSTEAU; TE = 6 ms) provided high repeatability for the assessment of HCL. The improved spectral resolution at 7 T with the elimination of water sidebands and the offline water subtraction also enabled an assessment of the unsaturation of FAs. This all highlights the potential use of this MRS acquisition scheme for studies of hepatic lipid composition in vivo.

  3. The Role of Age of Acquisition on Past Tense Generation in Spanish-English Bilinguals: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Eric J.; Hernandez, Arturo E.

    2013-01-01

    At its most basic sense, the sensorimotor/emergentist (S/E) model suggests that early second language (L2) learning is preferentially reliant upon sensory and motor processes, while later L2 learning is accomplished by greater reliance on executive abilities. To investigate the S/E model using fMRI, neural correlates of L2 age of acquisition were…

  4. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  5. Single-shot echo-planar imaging with Nyquist ghost compensation: interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) echo-planar imaging (EPI).

    PubMed

    Poser, Benedikt A; Barth, Markus; Goa, Pål-Erik; Deng, Weiran; Stenger, V Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) is most commonly used for blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI, owing to its sensitivity and acquisition speed. A major problem with EPI is Nyquist (N/2) ghosting, most notably at high field. EPI data are acquired under an oscillating readout gradient and hence vulnerable to gradient imperfections such as eddy current delays and off-resonance effects, as these cause inconsistencies between odd and even k-space lines after time reversal. We propose a straightforward and pragmatic method herein termed "interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) EPI": two k-spaces (echoes) are acquired under the positive and negative readout lobes, respectively, by performing phase encoding blips only before alternate readout gradients. From these two k-spaces, two almost entirely ghost free images per shot can be constructed, without need for phase correction. The doubled echo train length can be compensated by parallel imaging and/or partial Fourier acquisition. The two k-spaces can either be complex averaged during reconstruction, which results in near-perfect cancellation of residual phase errors, or reconstructed into separate images. We demonstrate the efficacy of IDEA EPI and show phantom and in vivo images at both 3 T and 7 T.

  6. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  7. Exploring the acquisition and production of grammatical constructions through human-robot interaction with echo state networks

    PubMed Central

    Hinaut, Xavier; Petit, Maxime; Pointeau, Gregoire; Dominey, Peter Ford

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal functions of human language is to allow people to coordinate joint action. This includes the description of events, requests for action, and their organization in time. A crucial component of language acquisition is learning the grammatical structures that allow the expression of such complex meaning related to physical events. The current research investigates the learning of grammatical constructions and their temporal organization in the context of human-robot physical interaction with the embodied sensorimotor humanoid platform, the iCub. We demonstrate three noteworthy phenomena. First, a recurrent network model is used in conjunction with this robotic platform to learn the mappings between grammatical forms and predicate-argument representations of meanings related to events, and the robot's execution of these events in time. Second, this learning mechanism functions in the inverse sense, i.e., in a language production mode, where rather than executing commanded actions, the robot will describe the results of human generated actions. Finally, we collect data from naïve subjects who interact with the robot via spoken language, and demonstrate significant learning and generalization results. This allows us to conclude that such a neural language learning system not only helps to characterize and understand some aspects of human language acquisition, but also that it can be useful in adaptive human-robot interaction. PMID:24834050

  8. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  9. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  10. Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Loveless, Mary E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). PMID:23105959

  11. The time window of MRI of murine atherosclerotic plaques after administration of CB2 receptor targeted micelles: inter-scan variability and relation between plaque signal intensity increase and gadolinium content of inversion recovery prepared versus non-prepared fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    te Boekhorst, B C M; Bovens, S M; van de Kolk, C W A; Cramer, M J M; Doevendans, P A F M; ten Hove, M; van der Weerd, L; Poelmann, R; Strijkers, G J; Pasterkamp, G; van Echteld, C J A

    2010-10-01

    Single fast spin echo scans covering limited time frames are mostly used for contrast-enhanced MRI of atherosclerotic plaque biomarkers. Knowledge on inter-scan variability of the normalized enhancement ratio of plaque (NER(plaque)) and relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium content for inversion-recovery fast spin echo is limited. Study aims were: evaluation of (1) timing of MRI after intravenous injection of cannabinoid-2 receptor (CB2-R) (expressed by human and mouse plaque macrophages) targeted micelles; (2) inter-scan variability of inversion-recovery fast spin echo and fast spin echo; (3) relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium content for inversion-recovery fast spin echo and fast spin echo. Inversion-recovery fast spin echo/fast spin echo imaging was performed before and every 15 min up to 48 h after injection of CB2-R targeted or control micelles using several groups of mice measured in an interleaved fashion. NER(plaque) (determined on inversion-recovery fast spin echo images) remained high (∼2) until 48 h after injection of CB2-R targeted micelles, whereas NER(plaque) decreased after 36 h in the control group. The inter-scan variability and relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium (assessed with inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry) were compared between inversion-recovery fast spin echo and fast spin echo. Inter-scan variability was higher for inversion-recovery fast spin echo than for fast spin echo. Although gadolinium and NER(plaque) correlated well for both techniques, the NER of plaque was higher for inversion-recovery fast spin echo than for fast spin echo. In mice injected with CB2-R targeted micelles, NER(plaque) can be best evaluated at 36-48 h post-injection. Because NER(plaque) was higher for inversion-recovery fast spin echo than for fast spin echo, but with high inter-scan variability, repeated inversion-recovery fast spin echo imaging and averaging of the obtained NER(plaque) values is recommended.

  12. Optimization of saturation-recovery dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI acquisition protocol: monte carlo simulation approach demonstrated with gadolinium MR renography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Conlin, Chris C.; Carlston, Kristi; Xie, Luke; Kim, Daniel; Morrell, Glen; Morton, Kathryn; Lee, Vivian S.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI is widely used for the measurement of tissue perfusion and to assess organ function. MR renography, which is acquired using a DCE sequence, can measure renal perfusion, filtration and concentrating ability. Optimization of the DCE acquisition protocol is important for the minimization of the error propagation from the acquired signals to the estimated parameters, thus improving the precision of the parameters. Critical to the optimization of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted protocols is the balance of the T1-shortening effect across the range of gadolinium (Gd) contrast concentration in the tissue of interest. In this study, we demonstrate a Monte Carlo simulation approach for the optimization of DCE MRI, in which a saturation-recovery T1-weighted gradient echo sequence is simulated and the impact of injected dose (D) and time delay (TD, for saturation recovery) is tested. The results show that high D and/or high TD cause saturation of the peak arterial signals and lead to an overestimation of renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, the use of low TD (e.g. 100 ms) and low D leads to similar errors in RPF and GFR, because of the Rician bias in the pre-contrast arterial signals. Our patient study including 22 human subjects compared TD values of 100 and 300 ms after the injection of 4 mL of Gd contrast for MR renography. At TD = 100 ms, we computed an RPF value of 157.2 ± 51.7 mL/min and a GFR of 33.3 ± 11.6 mL/min. These results were all significantly higher than the parameter estimates at TD = 300 ms: RPF = 143.4 ± 48.8 mL/min (p = 0.0006) and GFR = 30.2 ± 11.5 mL/min (p = 0.0015). In conclusion, appropriate optimization of the DCE MRI protocol using simulation can effectively improve the precision and, potentially, the accuracy of the measured parameters. PMID:27200499

  13. Skeletal muscle diffusion tensor-MRI fiber tracking: rationale, data acquisition and analysis methods, applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Froeling, Martijn; Buck, Amanda K W; Oudeman, Jos; Ding, Zhaohua; Nederveen, Aart J; Bush, Emily C; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical functions of muscles involve the generation of force and the actuation of movement by shortening or lengthening under load. These functions are influenced, in part, by the internal arrangement of muscle fibers with respect to the muscle's mechanical line of action. This property is known as muscle architecture. In this review, we describe the use of diffusion tensor (DT)-MRI muscle fiber tracking for the study of muscle architecture. In the first section, the importance of skeletal muscle architecture to function is discussed. In addition, traditional and complementary methods for the assessment of muscle architecture (brightness-mode ultrasound imaging and cadaver analysis) are presented. Next, DT-MRI is introduced and the structural basis for the reduced and anisotropic diffusion of water in muscle is discussed. The third section discusses issues related to the acquisition of skeletal muscle DT-MRI data and presents recommendations for optimal strategies. The fourth section discusses methods for the pre-processing of DT-MRI data, the available approaches for the calculation of the diffusion tensor and the seeding and propagating of fiber tracts, and the analysis of the tracking results to measure structural properties pertinent to muscle biomechanics. Lastly, examples are presented of how DT-MRI fiber tracking has been used to provide new insights into how muscles function, and important future research directions are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Accuracy of respiratory motion measurement of 4D-MRI: A comparison between cine and sequential acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Rhee, DongJoo; Cai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have recently developed a cine-mode T2*/T1-weighted 4D-MRI technique and a sequential-mode T2-weighted 4D-MRI technique for imaging respiratory motion. This study aims at investigating which 4D-MRI image acquisition mode, cine or sequential, provides more accurate measurement of organ motion during respiration. Methods: A 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom with a hypothesized tumor was used to simulate the image acquisition and the 4D-MRI reconstruction. The respiratory motion was controlled by the given breathing signal profiles. The tumor was manipulated to move continuously with the surrounding tissue. The motion trajectories were measured from both sequential- and cine-mode 4D-MRI images. The measured trajectories were compared with the average trajectory calculated from the input profiles, which was used as references. The error in 4D-MRI tumor motion trajectory (E) was determined. In addition, the corresponding respiratory motion amplitudes of all the selected 2D images for 4D reconstruction were recorded. Each of the amplitude was compared with the amplitude of its associated bin on the average breathing curve. The mean differences from the average breathing curve across all slice positions (D) were calculated. A total of 500 simulated respiratory profiles with a wide range of irregularity (Ir) were used to investigate the relationship between D and Ir. Furthermore, statistical analysis of E and D using XCAT controlled by 20 cancer patients’ breathing profiles was conducted. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was conducted to compare two modes. Results: D increased faster for cine-mode (D = 1.17 × Ir + 0.23) than sequential-mode (D = 0.47 × Ir + 0.23) as irregularity increased. For the XCAT study using 20 cancer patients’ breathing profiles, the median E values were significantly different: 0.12 and 0.10 cm for cine- and sequential-modes, respectively, with a p-value of 0.02. The median D values were significantly

  15. From EEG to BOLD: brain mapping and estimating transfer functions in simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Sato, João R; Rondinoni, Carlo; Sturzbecher, Marcio; de Araujo, Draulio B; Amaro, Edson

    2010-05-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) aims to disentangle the description of brain processes by exploiting the advantages of each technique. Most studies in this field focus on exploring the relationships between fMRI signals and the power spectrum at some specific frequency bands (alpha, beta, etc.). On the other hand, brain mapping of EEG signals (e.g., interictal spikes in epileptic patients) usually assumes an haemodynamic response function for a parametric analysis applying the GLM, as a rough approximation. The integration of the information provided by the high spatial resolution of MR images and the high temporal resolution of EEG may be improved by referencing them by transfer functions, which allows the identification of neural driven areas without strong assumptions about haemodynamic response shapes or brain haemodynamic's homogeneity. The difference on sampling rate is the first obstacle for a full integration of EEG and fMRI information. Moreover, a parametric specification of a function representing the commonalities of both signals is not established. In this study, we introduce a new data-driven method for estimating the transfer function from EEG signal to fMRI signal at EEG sampling rate. This approach avoids EEG subsampling to fMRI time resolution and naturally provides a test for EEG predictive power over BOLD signal fluctuations, in a well-established statistical framework. We illustrate this concept in resting state (eyes closed) and visual simultaneous fMRI-EEG experiments. The results point out that it is possible to predict the BOLD fluctuations in occipital cortex by using EEG measurements.

  16. Echo's Legacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Echo 1 Satellite is simply a very large balloon, the diameter of a 10 story building. Metallized Products, Inc. developed a special material for NASA used for the balloons's skin. For "bouncing signals," material had to be reflective, lightweight, and thin enough to be folded into a beach ball size canister for delivery into orbit, where it would automatically inflate. Material selected was mylar polyester, with a reflective layer of tiny aluminum particles so fine that Echo's skin had a thickness half that of cellophane on a cigarette package.

  17. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: Distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Amy Metcalfe, Peter; Liney, Gary; Holloway, Lois; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. Methods: A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. Results: MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%–70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through

  18. New Clinically-Feasible 3-T MRI Protocol to Discriminate Internal Brain Stem Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Michael J.; Chung, Sohae; Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Bruno, Mary T.; Fatterpekar, Girish M.; Shepherd, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Two new 3-T MRI contrast methods, track density imaging and echo modulation curve T2 mapping were combined with simultaneous multislice acquisition to reveal exquisite anatomical detail at 7 canonical levels of the brainstem. Compared to conventional MRI contrasts, many individual brainstem tracts and nuclear groups were directly visualized for the first time at 3-T. This new approach is clinically practical and feasible (total scan time = 20 min) allowing better brainstem anatomical localization and characterization. PMID:26869471

  19. Multiband multi-echo imaging of simultaneous oxygenation and flow timeseries for resting state connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alexander D.; Nencka, Andrew S.; Lebel, R. Marc; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    A novel sequence has been introduced that combines multiband imaging with a multi-echo acquisition for simultaneous high spatial resolution pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) echo-planar imaging (MBME ASL/BOLD). Resting-state connectivity in healthy adult subjects was assessed using this sequence. Four echoes were acquired with a multiband acceleration of four, in order to increase spatial resolution, shorten repetition time, and reduce slice-timing effects on the ASL signal. In addition, by acquiring four echoes, advanced multi-echo independent component analysis (ME-ICA) denoising could be employed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and BOLD sensitivity. Seed-based and dual-regression approaches were utilized to analyze functional connectivity. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and BOLD coupling was also evaluated by correlating the perfusion-weighted timeseries with the BOLD timeseries. These metrics were compared between single echo (E2), multi-echo combined (MEC), multi-echo combined and denoised (MECDN), and perfusion-weighted (PW) timeseries. Temporal SNR increased for the MECDN data compared to the MEC and E2 data. Connectivity also increased, in terms of correlation strength and network size, for the MECDN compared to the MEC and E2 datasets. CBF and BOLD coupling was increased in major resting-state networks, and that correlation was strongest for the MECDN datasets. These results indicate our novel MBME ASL/BOLD sequence, which collects simultaneous high-resolution ASL/BOLD data, could be a powerful tool for detecting functional connectivity and dynamic neurovascular coupling during the resting state. The collection of more than two echoes facilitates the use of ME-ICA denoising to greatly improve the quality of resting state functional connectivity MRI. PMID:28253268

  20. Multiband multi-echo imaging of simultaneous oxygenation and flow timeseries for resting state connectivity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander D; Nencka, Andrew S; Lebel, R Marc; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    A novel sequence has been introduced that combines multiband imaging with a multi-echo acquisition for simultaneous high spatial resolution pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) echo-planar imaging (MBME ASL/BOLD). Resting-state connectivity in healthy adult subjects was assessed using this sequence. Four echoes were acquired with a multiband acceleration of four, in order to increase spatial resolution, shorten repetition time, and reduce slice-timing effects on the ASL signal. In addition, by acquiring four echoes, advanced multi-echo independent component analysis (ME-ICA) denoising could be employed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and BOLD sensitivity. Seed-based and dual-regression approaches were utilized to analyze functional connectivity. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and BOLD coupling was also evaluated by correlating the perfusion-weighted timeseries with the BOLD timeseries. These metrics were compared between single echo (E2), multi-echo combined (MEC), multi-echo combined and denoised (MECDN), and perfusion-weighted (PW) timeseries. Temporal SNR increased for the MECDN data compared to the MEC and E2 data. Connectivity also increased, in terms of correlation strength and network size, for the MECDN compared to the MEC and E2 datasets. CBF and BOLD coupling was increased in major resting-state networks, and that correlation was strongest for the MECDN datasets. These results indicate our novel MBME ASL/BOLD sequence, which collects simultaneous high-resolution ASL/BOLD data, could be a powerful tool for detecting functional connectivity and dynamic neurovascular coupling during the resting state. The collection of more than two echoes facilitates the use of ME-ICA denoising to greatly improve the quality of resting state functional connectivity MRI.

  1. Spatio-temporal registration in multiplane MRI acquisitions for 3D colon motiliy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Berkovich, Marina; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing and visualizing dynamic peristaltic motion of the colon in 3D from two series of differently oriented 2D MRI images. To this end, we have defined an MRI examination protocol, and introduced methods for spatio-temporal alignment of the two MRI image series into a common reference. This represents the main contribution of this paper, which enables the 3D analysis of peristaltic motion. The objective is to provide a detailed insight into this complex motion, aiding in the diagnosis and characterization of colon motion disorders. We have applied the proposed spatio-temporal method on Cine MRI data sets of healthy volunteers. The results have been inspected and validated by an expert radiologist. Segmentation and cylindrical approximation of the colon results in a 4D visualization of the peristaltic motion.

  2. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements.

  3. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Wyrwicz, A. M.; Li, L.; Kao, C.-M.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 T small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2×8 LYSO scintillators (5.0×5.0×10.0 mm3 with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner.

  4. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Chen, C-T; Eclov, N; Ronzhin, A; Murat, P; Ramberg, E; Los, S; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Li, Limin; Kao, C-M

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2 × 8 LYSO scintillators (5.0 × 5.0 × 10.0 mm(3) with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner.

  5. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Li, Limin; Kao, C.-M.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2 × 8 LYSO scintillators (5.0 × 5.0 × 10.0 mm3 with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner. PMID:25937685

  6. Quantitative 3D Ultrashort Time-to-Echo (UTE) MRI and Micro-CT (μCT) Evaluation of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Condylar Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Daniel; Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Du, Jiang; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Temporomandibular dysfunction involves osteoarthritis of the TMJ, including degeneration and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle. Purpose of this study was to determine accuracy of novel 3D-UTE MRI versus micro-CT (μCT) for quantitative evaluation of mandibular condyle morphology. Material & Methods Nine TMJ condyle specimens were harvested from cadavers (2M, 3F; Age 85 ± 10 yrs., mean±SD). 3D-UTE MRI (TR=50ms, TE=0.05 ms, 104 μm isotropic-voxel) was performed using a 3-T MR scanner and μCT (18 μm isotropic-voxel) was performed. MR datasets were spatially-registered with μCT dataset. Two observers segmented bony contours of the condyles. Fibrocartilage was segmented on MR dataset. Using a custom program, bone and fibrocartilage surface coordinates, Gaussian curvature, volume of segmented regions and fibrocartilage thickness were determined for quantitative evaluation of joint morphology. Agreement between techniques (MRI vs. μCT) and observers (MRI vs. MRI) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature and segmented volume of the bone were determined using intraclass correlation correlation (ICC) analyses. Results Between MRI and μCT, the average deviation of surface coordinates was 0.19±0.15 mm, slightly higher than spatial resolution of MRI. Average deviation of the Gaussian curvature and volume of segmented regions, from MRI to μCT, was 5.7±6.5% and 6.6±6.2%, respectively. ICC coefficients (MRI vs. μCT) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature and segmented volumes were respectively 0.892, 0.893 and 0.972. Between observers (MRI vs. MRI), the ICC coefficients were 0.998, 0.999 and 0.997 respectively. Fibrocartilage thickness was 0.55±0.11 mm, as previously described in literature for grossly normal TMJ samples. Conclusion 3D-UTE MR quantitative evaluation of TMJ condyle morphology ex-vivo, including surface, curvature and segmented volume, shows high correlation against μCT and between observers. In addition, UTE MRI allows

  7. Automated approaches for analysis of multimodal MRI acquisitions in a study of cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Hodneland, Erlend; Ystad, Martin; Haasz, Judit; Munthe-Kaas, Antonella; Lundervold, Arvid

    2012-06-01

    In this work we describe an integrated and automated workflow for a comprehensive and robust analysis of multimodal MR images from a cohort of more than hundred subjects. Image examinations are done three years apart and consist of 3D high-resolution anatomical images, low resolution tensor-valued DTI recordings and 4D resting state fMRI time series. The integrated analysis of the data requires robust tools for segmentation, registration and fiber tracking, which we combine in an automated manner. Our automated workflow is strongly desired due to the large number of subjects. Especially, we introduce the use of histogram segmentation to processed fMRI data to obtain functionally important seed and target regions for fiber tracking between them. This enables analysis of individually important resting state networks. We also discuss various approaches for the assessment of white matter integrity parameters along tracts, and in particular we introduce the use of functional data analysis (FDA) for this task.

  8. Three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition MRI and its diagnostic value for lumbar foraminal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Osamu; Fujikawa, Akira; Tachibana, Atsuko

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) in the diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS). Fifteen patients with LFS and 10 healthy volunteers were studied. All patients met the following criteria: (1) single L5 radiculopathy without compressive lesion in the spinal canal, (2) pain reproduction during provocative radiculography, and (3) improvement of symptoms after surgery. We retrospectively compared the symptomatic nerve roots to the asymptomatic nerve roots on fast spin-echo (FSE) T1 sagittal, FSE T2 axial and reconstituted 3D FIESTA images. The κ values for interobserver agreement in determining the presence of LFS were 0.525 for FSE T1 sagittal images, 0.735 for FSE T2 axial images, 0.750 for 3D FIESTA sagittal, 0.733 for axial images, and 0.953 for coronal images. The sensitivities and specificities were 60 and 86 % for FSE T1 sagittal images, 27 and 91 % for FSE T2 axial images, 60 and 97 % for 3D FIESTA sagittal images, 60 and 94 % for 3D FIESTA axial images, and 100 and 97 % for 3D FIESTA coronal images, respectively. 3D FIESTA can provide more reliable and additional information for the running course of lumbar nerve root, compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Particularly, use of 3D FIESTA coronal images enables accurate diagnosis for LFS.

  9. Fast and Tissue-Optimized Mapping of Magnetic Susceptibility and T2* with Multi-Echo and Multi-Shot Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Li, Wei; Avram, Alexandru Vlad; Gho, Sung-Min; Liu, Chunlei

    2011-01-01

    Gradient-echo MRI of resonance-frequency shift and T2* values exhibits unique tissue contrast and offers relevant physiological information. However, acquiring 3D-phase images and T2* maps [A1] with the standard spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) sequence is lengthy for routine imaging at high-spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage. In addition, with the standard SPGR sequence, optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) cannot be achieved for every tissue type given their distributed resonance frequency and T2* value. To address these two issues, a SNR optimized multi-echo sequence with a stack-of-spiral acquisition is proposed and implemented for achieving fast and simultaneous acquisition of image phase and T2* maps. The analytical behavior of the phase SNR is derived as a function of resonance frequency, T2* and echo time. This relationship is utilized to achieve tissue optimized SNR by combining phase images with different echo times. Simulations and in vivo experiments were designed to verify the theoretical predictions. Using the multi-echo spiral acquisition, whole-brain coverage with 1 mm isotropic resolution can be achieved within 2.5 minutes, shortening the scan time by a factor of 8. The resulting multi-echo phase map shows similar SNR to that of the standard SPGR. The acquisition can be further accelerated with non-Cartesian parallel imaging. The technique can be readily extended to other multi-shot readout trajectories besides spiral. It may provide a practical acquisition strategy for high resolution and simultaneous 3D mapping of magnetic susceptibility and T2*. PMID:21784162

  10. 19F-lanthanide complexes with increased sensitivity for 19F-MRI: optimization of the MR acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Kenwright, Alan M; Parker, David; Blamire, Andrew M

    2011-10-01

    Fluorine-19 magnetic resonance methods offer advantages for molecular or cellular imaging in vivo due to the absence of radioactivity, lack of naturally occurring background signal, and the ability to easily combine measurements with anatomical MRI. Previous studies have shown that (19) F-MRI sensitivity is limited to millimolar concentrations by slow longitudinal relaxation. In this study, a new class of macrocyclic fluorinated lanthanide complexes is investigated where relaxation rates are significantly shortened by proximity of the fluorine group to a paramagnetic lanthanide ion located within the same molecule. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates are field dependent and in the range 50-150 s(-1) and 70-200 s(-1), respectively, at 7 T. Relaxation rates in these complexes are a function of the molecular structure and are independent of concentration at biologically relevant levels, so can be used as criteria to optimize imaging acquisition. Phantom experiments at 7 T indicate a lower limit for detection by imaging of 20 μM.

  11. Optimal diffusion MRI acquisition for fiber orientation density estimation: an analytic approach.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan S; Dale, Anders M

    2009-11-01

    An important challenge in the design of diffusion MRI experiments is how to optimize statistical efficiency, i.e., the accuracy with which parameters can be estimated from the diffusion data in a given amount of imaging time. In model-based spherical deconvolution analysis, the quantity of interest is the fiber orientation density (FOD). Here, we demonstrate how the spherical harmonics (SH) can be used to form an explicit analytic expression for the efficiency of the minimum variance (maximally efficient) linear unbiased estimator of the FOD. Using this expression, we calculate optimal b-values for maximum FOD estimation efficiency with SH expansion orders of L = 2, 4, 6, and 8 to be approximately b = 1,500, 3,000, 4,600, and 6,200 s/mm(2), respectively. However, the arrangement of diffusion directions and scanner-specific hardware limitations also play a role in determining the realizable efficiency of the FOD estimator that can be achieved in practice. We show how some commonly used methods for selecting diffusion directions are sometimes inefficient, and propose a new method for selecting diffusion directions in MRI based on maximizing the statistical efficiency. We further demonstrate how scanner-specific hardware limitations generally lead to optimal b-values that are slightly lower than the ideal b-values. In summary, the analytic expression for the statistical efficiency of the unbiased FOD estimator provides important insight into the fundamental tradeoff between angular resolution, b-value, and FOD estimation accuracy.

  12. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  13. Optimization of Acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-Ligand PET/MRI in Patients with Local and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lütje, Susanne; Blex, Sebastian; Gomez, Benedikt; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M.; Umutlu, Lale; Forsting, Michael; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Wetter, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this optimization study was to minimize the acquisition time of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) in patients with local and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) to obtain a sufficient image quality and quantification accuracy without any appreciable loss. Methods Twenty patients with PCa were administered intravenously with the 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA ligand (mean activity 99 MBq/patient, range 76–148 MBq) and subsequently underwent PET/MRI at, on average, 168 min (range 77–320 min) after injection. PET and MR imaging data were acquired simultaneously. PET acquisition was performed in list mode and PET images were reconstructed at different time intervals (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min). Data were analyzed regarding radiotracer uptake in tumors and muscle tissue and PET image quality. Tumor uptake was quantified in terms of the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean) within a spherical volume of interest (VOI). Reference VOIs were drawn in the gluteus maximus muscle on the right side. PET image quality was evaluated by experienced nuclear physicians/radiologists using a five-point ordinal scale from 5–1 (excellent—insufficient). Results Lesion detectability linearly increased with increasing acquisition times, reaching its maximum at PET acquisition times of 4 min. At this image acquisition time, tumor lesions in 19/20 (95%) patients were detected. PET image quality showed a positive correlation with increasing acquisition time, reaching a plateau at 4–6 min image acquisition. Both SUVmax and SUVmean correlated inversely with acquisition time and reached a plateau at acquisition times after 4 min. Conclusion In the applied image acquisition settings, the optimal acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/MRI in patients with local and metastatic PCa was identified to be 4 min per bed position. At this acquisition time, PET image quality and lesion detectability reach a maximum

  14. Magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging signal and texture features for the prediction of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Early diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) would confer many benefits. Several biomarkers have been proposed to achieve such a task, where features extracted from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have played an important role. However, studies have focused exclusively on morphological characteristics. This study aims to determine whether features relating to the signal and texture of the image could predict mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD progression. Clinical, biological, and positron emission tomography information and MRI images of 62 subjects from the AD neuroimaging initiative were used in this study, extracting 4150 features from each MRI. Within this multimodal database, a feature selection algorithm was used to obtain an accurate and small logistic regression model, generated by a methodology that yielded a mean blind test accuracy of 0.79. This model included six features, five of them obtained from the MRI images, and one obtained from genotyping. A risk analysis divided the subjects into low-risk and high-risk groups according to a prognostic index. The groups were statistically different (p-value=2.04e−11). These results demonstrated that MRI features related to both signal and texture add MCI to AD predictive power, and supported the ongoing notion that multimodal biomarkers outperform single-modality ones. PMID:26158047

  15. High-speed 3T MR spectroscopic imaging of prostate with flyback echo-planar encoding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Xu, Duan; Hurd, Ralph E; Kelley, Douglas A C; Pauly, John M; Kurhanewicz, John; Nelson, Sarah J; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2007-06-01

    Prostate MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) at 3T may provide two-fold higher spatial resolution over 1.5T, but this can result in longer acquisition times to cover the entire gland using conventional phase-encoding. In this study, flyback echo-planar readout trajectories were incorporated into a Malcolm Levitt's composite-pulse decoupling sequence (MLEV)-point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) to accelerate the acquisition of large array (16 x 16 x 8), high spatial (0.154 cm(3)) resolution MRSI data by eight-fold to just 8.5 minutes. Artifact free, high-quality MRSI data was obtained in nine prostate cancer patients. Easy data reconstruction and the robustness of the flyback echo-planar encoding make this technique particularly suitable for the clinical setting. The short acquisition time provided by this method reduces the 3T prostate MRI/MRSI exam time, allows longer repetition times, and/or allows the acquisition of additional MR acquisitions within the same exam.

  16. Age of second language acquisition affects nonverbal conflict processing in children: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Struys, Esli; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background In their daily communication, bilinguals switch between two languages, a process that involves the selection of a target language and minimization of interference from a nontarget language. Previous studies have uncovered the neural structure in bilinguals and the activation patterns associated with performing verbal conflict tasks. One question that remains, however is whether this extra verbal switching affects brain function during nonverbal conflict tasks. Methods In this study, we have used fMRI to investigate the impact of bilingualism in children performing two nonverbal tasks involving stimulus–stimulus and stimulus–response conflicts. Three groups of 8–11-year-old children – bilinguals from birth (2L1), second language learners (L2L), and a control group of monolinguals (1L1) – were scanned while performing a color Simon and a numerical Stroop task. Reaction times and accuracy were logged. Results Compared to monolingual controls, bilingual children showed higher behavioral congruency effect of these tasks, which is matched by the recruitment of brain regions that are generally used in general cognitive control, language processing or to solve language conflict situations in bilinguals (caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus, STG, precuneus). Further, the activation of these areas was found to be higher in 2L1 compared to L2L. Conclusion The coupling of longer reaction times to the recruitment of extra language-related brain areas supports the hypothesis that when dealing with language conflicts the specialization of bilinguals hampers the way they can process with nonverbal conflicts, at least at early stages in life. PMID:25328840

  17. The role of age of acquisition on past tense generation in Spanish-English bilinguals: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Eric J; Hernandez, Arturo E

    2013-04-01

    At its most basic sense, the sensorimotor/emergentist (S/E) model suggests that early second language (L2) learning is preferentially reliant upon sensory and motor processes, while later L2 learning is accomplished by greater reliance on executive abilities. To investigate the S/E model using fMRI, neural correlates of L2 age of acquisition were examined by employing a past-tense generation task on 22 L2 proficient bilinguals. Early bilinguals preferentially recruited left hemisphere sensorimotor regions involved in motoric control and articulation. In contrast, later learners, to a greater degree, engaged regions involved in executive cognitive control and lexical access. The data support the notion that early L2 learners devote neural resources to motor control during lexical retrieval. In contrast, later L2 learners recruit executive control mechanisms to generate the past tense. These data are consistent with the S/E model of bilingual language learning, and serve as an extension of cognitive control theories.

  18. Micro-MRI-based image acquisition and processing system for assessing the response to therapeutic intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilić, B.; Ladinsky, G. A.; Saha, P. K.; Wehrli, F. W.

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is the cause of over 1.5 million bone fractures annually. Most of these fractures occur in sites rich in trabecular bone, a complex network of bony struts and plates found throughout the skeleton. The three-dimensional structure of the trabecular bone network significantly determines mechanical strength and thus fracture resistance. Here we present a data acquisition and processing system that allows efficient noninvasive assessment of trabecular bone structure through a "virtual bone biopsy". High-resolution MR images are acquired from which the trabecular bone network is extracted by estimating the partial bone occupancy of each voxel. A heuristic voxel subdivision increases the effective resolution of the bone volume fraction map and serves a basis for subsequent analysis of topological and orientational parameters. Semi-automated registration and segmentation ensure selection of the same anatomical location in subjects imaged at different time points during treatment. It is shown with excerpts from an ongoing clinical study of early post-menopausal women, that significant reduction in network connectivity occurs in the control group while the structural integrity is maintained in the hormone replacement group. The system described should be suited for large-scale studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in subjects with metabolic bone disease.

  19. Comparison of Diffusion MRI Acquisition Protocols for the In Vivo Characterization of the Mouse Spinal Cord: Variability Analysis and Application to an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzo, Stefania; Bonanno, Silvia; Padelli, Francesco; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Zucca, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) has relevant applications in the microstructural characterization of the spinal cord, especially in neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have a pivotal role in the study of such diseases; however, in vivo spinal dMRI of small animals entails additional challenges that require a systematical investigation of acquisition parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare three acquisition protocols and identify the scanning parameters allowing a robust estimation of the main diffusion quantities and a good sensitivity to neurodegeneration in the mouse spinal cord. For all the protocols, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to noise ratios and the mean value and variability of Diffusion Tensor metrics were evaluated in healthy controls. For the estimation of fractional anisotropy less variability was provided by protocols with more diffusion directions, for the estimation of mean, axial and radial diffusivity by protocols with fewer diffusion directions and higher diffusion weighting. Intermediate features (12 directions, b = 1200 s/mm2) provided the overall minimum inter- and intra-subject variability in most cases. In order to test the diagnostic sensitivity of the protocols, 7 G93A-SOD1 mice (model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) at 10 and 17 weeks of age were scanned and the derived diffusion parameters compared with those estimated in age-matched healthy animals. The protocols with an intermediate or high number of diffusion directions provided the best differentiation between the two groups at week 17, whereas only few local significant differences were highlighted at week 10. According to our results, a dMRI protocol with an intermediate number of diffusion gradient directions and a relatively high diffusion weighting is optimal for spinal cord imaging. Further work is needed to confirm these results and for a finer tuning of acquisition parameters. Nevertheless, our findings could be important for the

  20. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  1. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging for Better Sensitivity to Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Holdsworth, S.J.; Yeom, K.W.; Antonucci, M.U.; Andre, J.B.; Rosenberg, J.; Aksoy, M.; Straka, M.; Fischbein, N.J.; Bammer, R.; Moseley, M.E.; Zaharchuk, G.; Skare, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Parallel imaging facilitates the acquisition of echo-planar images with a reduced TE, enabling the incorporation of an additional image at a later TE. Here we investigated the use of a parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo EPI sequence to improve lesion conspicuity in diffusion-weighted imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo DWI data were acquired in 50 consecutive patients suspected of stroke at 1.5T. The dual-echo acquisition included 2 EPI for 1 diffusion-preparation period (echo 1 [TE = 48 ms] and echo 2 [TE = 105 ms]). Three neuroradiologists independently reviewed the 2 echoes by using the routine DWI of our institution as a reference. Images were graded on lesion conspicuity, diagnostic confidence, and image quality. The apparent diffusion coefficient map from echo 1 was used to validate the presence of acute infarction. Relaxivity maps calculated from the 2 echoes were evaluated for potential complementary information. RESULTS Echo 1 and 2 DWIs were rated as better than the reference DWI. While echo 1 had better image quality overall, echo 2 was unanimously favored over both echo 1 and the reference DWI for its high sensitivity in detecting acute infarcts. CONCLUSIONS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo diffusion-weighted EPI is a useful method for evaluating lesions with reduced diffusivity. The long TE of echo 2 produced DWIs that exhibited superior lesion conspicuity compared with images acquired at a shorter TE. Echo 1 provided higher SNR ADC maps for specificity to acute infarction. The relaxivity maps may serve to complement information regarding blood products and mineralization. PMID:24763417

  2. Two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging with combined free induction decay and long-TE acquisition (FID echo spectroscopic imaging, FIDESI) for the detection of intramyocellular lipids in calf muscle at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Just Kukurova, Ivica; Valkovič, Ladislav; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdošík, Martin; Krššák, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Chmelík, Marek

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D CSI) sequence, with simultaneous acquisition of free induction decay (FID) and long TEs, for the detection and quantification of intramyocellular lipids (IMCLs) in the calf at 7 T. The feasibility of the new 2D CSI sequence, which acquires FID (acquisition delay, 1.3 ms) and an echo (long TE) in one measurement, was evaluated in phantoms and volunteers (n = 5): TR/TE*/TE = 800/1.3/156 ms; 48 × 48 matrix; field of view, 200 × 200 × 20 mm(3) ; Hamming filter; no water suppression; measurement time, 22 min 2 s. The IMCL concentration and subcutaneous lipid contamination were assessed. Spectra in the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SOL) muscles were analyzed. The water signal from the FID acquisition was used as an internal concentration reference. In the spectra from subcutaneous adipose tissue (SUB) and bone marrow (BM), an unsaturation index (UI) of the vinyl-H (5.3 ppm) to methyl-CH3 ratio, and a polyunsaturation index (pUI) of the diallylic-H (2.77 ppm) to -CH3 ratio, were calculated. Long-TE spectra from muscles showed a simplified spectral pattern with well-separated IMCL for several muscle groups in the same scan. The IMCL to water ratio was largest in SOL (0.66% ± 0.23%), and lower in GM (0.37% ± 0.14%) and TA (0.36% ± 0.12%). UI and pUI for SUB were 0.65 ± 0.06 and 0.18 ± 0.04, respectively, and for BM were 0.60 ± 0.16 and 0.18 ± 0.08, respectively. The new sequence, with the proposed name 'free induction decay echo spectroscopic imaging' (FIDESI), provides information on both specific lipid resonances and water signal from different tissues in the calf, with high spectral and spatial resolution, as well as minimal voxel bleeding and subcutaneous lipid contamination, in clinically acceptable measurement times.

  3. An Open-Source Hardware and Software System for Acquisition and Real-Time Processing of Electrophysiology during High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, Patrick L.; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (< 0.6 uV p-p input noise), electromagnetic compatibility for MRI (tested up to 7 Tesla), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7 Tesla examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3 Tesla fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level. PMID:18761038

  4. Physiological neuronal decline in healthy aging human brain - An in vivo study with MRI and short echo-time whole-brain (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Qi; Maudsley, Andrew A; Sabati, Mohammad; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Schmitz, Birte; Schütze, Martin; Bronzlik, Paul; Kahl, Kai G; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2016-08-15

    Knowledge of physiological aging in healthy human brain is increasingly important for neuroscientific research and clinical diagnosis. To investigate neuronal decline in normal aging brain eighty-one healthy subjects aged between 20 and 70years were studied with MRI and whole-brain (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging. Concentrations of brain metabolites N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), total creatine (tCr), myo-inositol (mI), and glutamine+glutamate (Glx) in ratios to internal water, and the fractional volumes of brain tissue were estimated simultaneously in eight cerebral lobes and in cerebellum. Results demonstrated that an age-related decrease in gray matter volume was the largest contribution to changes in brain volume. Both lobar NAA and the fractional volume of gray matter (FVGM) decreased with age in all cerebral lobes, indicating that the decreased NAA was predominantly associated with decreased gray matter volume and neuronal density or metabolic activity. In cerebral white matter Cho, tCr, and mI increased with age in association with increased fractional volume, showing altered cellular membrane turn-over, energy metabolism, and glial activity in human aging white matter. In cerebellum tCr increased while brain tissue volume decreased with age, showing difference to cerebral aging. The observed age-related metabolic and microstructural variations suggest that physiological neuronal decline in aging human brain is associated with a reduction of gray matter volume and neuronal density, in combination with cellular aging in white matter indicated by microstructural alterations and altered energy metabolism in the cerebellum.

  5. A Three-Dimensional Regional Strain Computation Method with Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) in Non-Ischemic, Non-Valvular Dilated Cardiomyopathy Patients and Healthy Subjects Validated by Tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Julia; Knutsen, Andrew K.; Cupps, Brian P.; Zhong, Xiaodong; Pasque, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Fast cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MR has higher spatial resolution and enables rapid post-processing. Thus we compared the accuracy of regional strains computation by DENSE with tagged MR in healthy and non-ischemic, non-valvular dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) subjects. Materials and Methods Validation of 3D regional strains computed with DENSE was conducted in reference to standard tagged MRI (TMRI) in healthy subjects and patients with DCM. Additional repeatability studies in healthy subjects were conducted to increase confidence in DENSE. A meshfree multiquadrics radial point interpolation method (RPIM) was used for computing Lagrange strains in sixteen left ventricular segments. Bland-Altman analysis and Student's t-tests were conducted to observe similarities in regional strains between sequences and in DENSE repeatability studies. Results Regional circumferential strains ranged from -0.21 ± 0.07 (Lateral-Apex) to -0.11 ± 0.05 (Posterorseptal-Base) in healthy subjects and -0.15 ± 0.04 (Anterior-Apex) to -0.02 ± 0.08 (Posterorseptal-Base) in DCM patients. Computed mean differences in regional circumferential strain from the DENSE-TMRI comparison study was 0.01 ± 0.03 (95% limits of agreement) in normal subjects, -0.01 ± 0.06 in DCM patients and 0.0 ± 0.02 in repeatability studies, with similar agreements in longitudinal and radial strains. Conclusion We found agreement between DENSE and tagged MR in patients and volunteers in terms of evaluation of regional strains. PMID:24753028

  6. UTE MRI of the Osteochondral Junction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Reni; Chen, Karen; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    The osteochondral junction is composed of numerous tissue components and serves important functions relating to structural stability and proper nutrition in joints such as the knee and spine. Conventional MR techniques have been inadequate at imaging the tissues of the osteochondral junction primarily because of the intrinsically short T2 nature of these tissues, rendering them “invisible” with the standard acquisitions. Ultrashort time to echo (UTE) MR techniques acquire sufficient MR signal of osteochondral tissues, thereby allowing direct evaluation. This article reviews the anatomy of the osteochondral junction of the knee and the spine, technical aspects of UTE MRI, and the application of UTE MRI for evaluation of the osteochondral junction. PMID:25061547

  7. MRI simulator: a teaching tool for radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, Debra A.; Kishore, Sheel; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    1990-08-01

    The increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a clinical modality has put an enormous burden on medical institutions to cost-effectively teach Mill scanning techniques to technologists and physicians. Since MRI scanner time is a scarce resource, it would be ideal if the teaching could be effectively performed off-line. In order to meet this goal, the Radiology Department has designed and developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Simulator. The Simulator in its current implementation mimics the General Electric Signa scanner's user-interface for image acquisition. The design is general enough to be applied to other MRI scanners. One unique feature of the simulator is its incorporation of an image-synthesis module which permits the user to derive images for any arbitrary combination of pulsing parameters for spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion recovery pulse sequences. These images are computed in five seconds. The development platform chosen is a standard Apple Macintosh-Il computer with no specialized hardware peripherals. The user-interface is implemented in HyperCard. All other software development including synthesis and display functions are implemented under the MPW 'C' environment. The scan parameters, demographics and images are tracked using an Oracle database. Images are currently stored on magnetic disk but could be stored on optical media with minimal effort.

  8. Are Nonlinguistic Functions in ''Broca's Area'' Prerequisites for Language Acquisition? fMRI Findings from an Ontogenetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ralph-Axel; Basho, Surina

    2004-01-01

    There is incomplete consensus on the anatomical demarcation of Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus and its functional characterization remains a matter of debate. Exclusive syntactic specialization has been proposed, but is overall inconsistent with the neuroimaging literature. We examined three functional MRI (fMRI) datasets on…

  9. Techniques for Fast Stereoscopic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Stereoscopic MRI can impart 3D perception with only two image acquisitions. This economy over standard multiplanar 3D volume renderings allows faster frame rates, which are needed for real-time imaging applications. Real-time 3D perception may enhance the appreciation of complex anatomical structures, and may improve hand-eye coordination while manipulating a medical device during an image-guided interventional procedure. To this goal, a system is being developed to acquire and display stereoscopic MR images in real-time. A clinically used, fast gradient-recalled echo-train sequence has been modified to produce stereo image pairs. Features have been added for depth cueing, view sharing, and bulk signal suppression. A workstation was attached to a clinical MR scanner for fast data extraction, image reconstruction and stereoscopic image display. PMID:11477636

  10. Sparse Reconstruction Challenge for diffusion MRI: Validation on a physical phantom to determine which acquisition scheme and analysis method to use?

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Laun, Frederik; Gur, Yaniv; DiBella, Edward V. R.; Deslauriers-Gauthier, Samuel; Megherbi, Thinhinane; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Zucchelli, Mauro; Menegaz, Gloria; Fick, Rutger; St-Jean, Samuel; Paquette, Michael; Aranda, Ramon; Descoteaux, Maxime; Deriche, Rachid; O’Donnell, Lauren; Rathi, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is the modality of choice for investigating in-vivo white matter connectivity and neural tissue architecture of the brain. The diffusion-weighted signal in dMRI reflects the diffusivity of water molecules in brain tissue and can be utilized to produce image-based biomarkers for clinical research. Due to the constraints on scanning time, a limited number of measurements can be acquired within a clinically feasible scan time. In order to reconstruct the dMRI signal from a discrete set of measurements, a large number of algorithms have been proposed in recent years in conjunction with varying sampling schemes, i.e., with varying b-values and gradient directions. Thus, it is imperative to compare the performance of these reconstruction methods on a single data set to provide appropriate guidelines to neuroscientists on making an informed decision while designing their acquisition protocols. For this purpose, the SParse Reconstruction Challenge (SPARC) was held along with the workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (at MICCAI 2014) to validate the performance of multiple reconstruction methods using data acquired from a physical phantom. A total of 16 reconstruction algorithms (9 teams) participated in this community challenge. The goal was to reconstruct single b-value and/or multiple b-value data from a sparse set of measurements. In particular, the aim was to determine an appropriate acquisition protocol (in terms of the number of measurements, b-values) and the analysis method to use for a neuroimaging study. The challenge did not delve on the accuracy of these methods in estimating model specific measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) or mean diffusivity, but on the accuracy of these methods to fit the data. This paper presents several quantitative results pertaining to each reconstruction algorithm. The conclusions in this paper provide a valuable guideline for choosing a suitable algorithm and the corresponding

  11. ECHO Site Map | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  12. ECHO Rest Services Documentation | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  13. Resources - ECHO Data | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  14. Contact Us about ECHO | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  15. ECHO Release Notes | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  16. Learn More About ECHO | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. ECHO Gov Login | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  18. T2-weighted fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging of extraocular muscles

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.; Dushyanth, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide unique information about extraocular muscle (EOM) structure and function. Prior high-resolution motility imaging studies employed T1 weighting, which provides intrinsic contrast of dark-appearing EOMs against bright orbital fat and is suitable for intravenous contrast. However, time-consuming T1 sequences are subject to motion artifacts. We evaluated an alternative T2-weighted fast spin-echo pulse sequence that emphasizes tissue-free fluid. Methods We prospectively used high resolution, surface coil technique for orbital MRI at 1.5T in 21 normal and 113 living strabismic subjects and 2 monkey cadavers using T2 fast spin-echo (T2FSE) weighting (long repetition time, short echo time). T2FSE was compared with T1 in 17 subjects, and with T1 in 506 different living subjects, and 12 cadavers. Results For 2 mm thick coronal MRIs of 312 μm resolution spanning the entire orbit, T1 acquisition required 218 seconds, whereas T2FSE required 150 seconds (31% faster). T2-defined the globe border better, and provided intrinsic contrast between EOMs and their pulleys. While both T1 and T2 demonstrated motor nerves to EOMs in living subjects, only T1 was satisfactory with injected contrast and in cadavers. Conclusions For motility imaging, T2FSE is faster than T1 MRI and demonstrates superior tissue details of EOMs and other orbital tissues. T2FSE of the orbits can be performed using widely available standard equipment. We suggest that T2FSE be the preferred method for clinical imaging of EOM structure, function, and innervation, although T1 may be more appropriate when intravenous contrast must be employed. PMID:21397801

  19. The role of age of acquisition and language usage in early, high-proficient bilinguals: an fMRI study during verbal fluency.

    PubMed

    Perani, Daniela; Abutalebi, Jubin; Paulesu, Eraldo; Brambati, Simona; Scifo, Paola; Cappa, Stefano F; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2003-07-01

    We assessed the effects of age of acquisition and language exposure on the cerebral correlates of lexical retrieval in high-proficient, early-acquisition bilinguals. Functional MRI was used to study Spanish-Catalan bilinguals who acquired either Spanish or Catalan as a first language in the first years of life. Subjects were exposed to the second language at 3 years of age, and have used both languages in daily life since then. Subjects had a comparable level of proficiency in the comprehension of both languages. Lexical retrieval with the verbal fluency task resulted in the well-established pattern of left hemispheric activation centered on the inferior frontal region. The effect of age of acquisition was assessed by dividing the subjects into two groups, on the basis of the language acquired first (Catalan-born or Spanish-born bilinguals). Functional comparisons indicated that less extensive brain activation was associated with lexical retrieval in the language acquired earlier in life. The two groups were also different in language usage/exposure, as assessed with a specific questionnaire; in particular, the exposure to the second language (Spanish) was less intensive in the case of Catalans. This was reflected in a significant interaction, indicating a more extensive activation in Catalans during production in Spanish. Overall, these results indicate that, during a production task, both age of acquisition and language exposure affect the pattern of brain activation in bilinguals, even if both languages are acquired early and with a comparable level of proficiency.

  20. Is High Temporal Resolution Achievable for Paediatric Cardiac Acquisitions during Several Heart Beats? Illustration with Cardiac Phase Contrast Cine-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonnemains, Laurent; Odille, Freddy; Meyer, Christophe; Hossu, Gabriella; Felblinger, Jacques; Vuissoz, Pierre-André

    2015-01-01

    Background During paediatric cardiac Cine-MRI, data acquired during cycles of different lengths must be combined. Most of the time, Feinstein’s model is used to project multiple cardiac cycles of variable lengths into a mean cycle. Objective To assess the effect of Feinstein projection on temporal resolution of Cine-MRI. Methods 1/The temporal errors during Feinstein’s projection were computed in 306 cardiac cycles fully characterized by tissue Doppler imaging with 6-phase analysis (from a population of 7 children and young adults). 2/The effects of these temporal errors on tissue velocities were assessed by simulating typical tissue phase mapping acquisitions and reconstructions. 3/Myocardial velocities curves, extracted from high-resolution phase-contrast cine images, were compared for the 6 volunteers with lowest and highest heart rate variability, within a population of 36 young adults. Results 1/The mean of temporal misalignments was 30 ms over the cardiac cycle but reached 60 ms during early diastole. 2/During phase contrast MRI simulation, early diastole velocity peaks were diminished by 6.1 cm/s leading to virtual disappearance of isovolumic relaxation peaks. 3/The smoothing and erasing of isovolumic relaxation peaks was confirmed on tissue phase mapping velocity curves, between subjects with low and high heart rate variability (p = 0.05). Conclusions Feinstein cardiac model creates temporal misalignments that impair high temporal resolution phase contrast cine imaging when beat-to-beat heart rate is changing. PMID:26599755

  1. Accurate alignment of functional EPI data to anatomical MRI using a physics-based distortion model.

    PubMed

    Studholme, C; Constable, R T; Duncan, J S

    2000-11-01

    Mapping of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to conventional anatomical MRI is a valuable step in the interpretation of fMRI activations. One of the main limits on the accuracy of this alignment arises from differences in the geometric distortion induced by magnetic field inhomogeneity. This paper describes an approach to the registration of echo planar image (EPI) data to conventional anatomical images which takes into account this difference in geometric distortion. We make use of an additional spin echo EPI image and use the known signal conservation in spin echo distortion to derive a specialized multimodality nonrigid registration algorithm. We also examine a plausible modification using log-intensity evaluation of the criterion to provide increased sensitivity in areas of low EPI signal. A phantom-based imaging experiment is used to evaluate the behavior of the different criteria, comparing nonrigid displacement estimates to those provided by a imagnetic field mapping acquisition. The algorithm is then applied to a range of nine brain imaging studies illustrating global and local improvement in the anatomical alignment and localization of fMRI activations.

  2. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  3. Gradient-Modulated PETRA MRI.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Goerke, Ute; Wang, Luning; Ellermann, Jutta; Metzger, Gregory J; Garwood, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T 2(*) signal decay is a common issue in radial ultrashort echo time MRI sequences. One solution is to use a higher readout bandwidth, but this may be impractical for some techniques like pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), which is a hybrid method of zero echo time and single point imaging techniques. Specifically, PETRA has severe specific absorption rate (SAR) and radiofrequency (RF) pulse peak power limitations when using higher bandwidths in human measurements. In this study, we introduce gradient modulation (GM) to PETRA to reduce image blurring artifacts while keeping SAR and RF peak power low. Tolerance of GM-PETRA to image blurring was evaluated in simulations and experiments by comparing with the conventional PETRA technique. We performed inner ear imaging of a healthy subject at 7T. GM-PETRA showed significantly less image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2(*) signal decay compared to PETRA. In in vivo imaging, GM-PETRA nicely captured complex structures of the inner ear such as the cochlea and semicircular canals. Gradient modulation can improve the PETRA image quality and mitigate SAR and RF peak power limitations without special hardware modification in clinical scanners.

  4. Retrospective correction of B0-field-induced geometric distortions in multislice echo planar images: a 3D solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, Roderick W.; Coburn, Edward A.

    2000-04-01

    A method has been developed to utilize a 3D B0 fieldmap, with a multi-volume-of-interest segmentation map, to quantify and correct geometric distortions in echo-planar images. The purpose is to provide accurate co-registration of anatomical MRI to functional MRI time course sequences. A data structure capable of extracting and reporting the necessary information forms a central part of the solution. Images were obtained from a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an experimental y-gradient insert coil. Two 3D-gradient echo sequences supply the data needed to calculate the B0 map across the volume. Segmentation of the volume into brain/background produces the data needed for the phase unwrapping and volume(s) of interest generation, from which the global B0 variation map is obtained. Subsequent EPI acquisition yields the fMRI time- course information. Tests were carried out on a phantom and a human volunteer engaged in a motor task (finger-tapping). Strong distortions were measured, and subsequently corrected, particularly near the petrous bone/mastoid air cells and in the frontal and maxillary sinuses. Additionally, a strong eddy current resulting from the unshielded y-gradient was detected. The method facilitates geometric distortion correction through an imaging volume, containing multiple regions of interest within a slice, starting from a single starting point.

  5. Generation of attenuation map for MR-based attenuation correction of PET data in the head area employing 3D short echo time MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khateri, Parisa; Salighe Rad, Hamidreza; Fathi, Anahita; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2013-02-01

    Attenuation correction is a crucial step to get accurate quantification of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data. An attenuation map to provide attenuation coefficients at 511 keV can be generated using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). One of the main steps involved in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) of PET data is to separate bone from air. Low signal intensity of bone in conventional MRI makes it difficult to separate bone from air in the head area, while their attenuation coefficients are very different. In literature, several groups proposed ultrashort echo-time (UTE) sequences to differentiate bone from air [4,5,7], because these sequences are capable of imaging tissues with short T2* relaxation time, such as cortical bone; however, they are difficult to use, expensive and time-consuming. Employing short echo-time (STE) MRI in combination with long echo-time (LTE) MRI, and along with high performance image processing algorithms is a good substitute for UTE-based PET attenuation correction; they are widely available, easy to use, inexpensive and much faster than UTE pulse sequences. In this work, we propose the use of STE sequences along with LTE ones, as well as a dedicated image processing method to differentiate bone from air cavities in the head area by creating contrast between the tissues. Attenuation coefficients at 511 kev, relying on literature [5], will then be assigned to the voxels. Acquisition was performed on a clinical 3T Tim Trio scanner (Siemens Medical Solution, Erlangen, Germany), employing a dual echo sequence. To achieve an optimized protocol with the best result for discrimination of bone and air, two types of acquisitions were performed, with and without fat suppression; the acquisition parameters were as follows: TE=1.21/5 ms, TR=5/17, FA=30, and TE=1.12/3.16 ms, TR=5/5, FA=12 for non-fat-suppressed and fat-suppressed protocol, respectively. Contrast enhancement and tissue segmentation were applied as processing steps, to

  6. Light echoes - Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1988-01-01

    The sudden brilliance of a nova eruption will be reflected on surrounding dust grains to create a phantom nebula. Previous searches for these light echoes have used relatively short exposures with photograhic detectors. This paper reports on a search around eight recent novae with long exposures using a CCD camera. Despite an increase of sensitivity by over an order of magnitude, no light echoes were detected. It is found that the average grain density must be less than about 10 to the -9th per cu cm for distances from 0.1 pc to 1000 pc from the novae. The light echo around Nova Persei 1901 was caused by reflection off clouds with grain densities of several times 10 to the -9th per cu cm which are at distances between 0.1 pc and 10 pc. Echoes from dust in a circumstellar shell or ejected during a previous eruption will be effectively unobservable.

  7. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, J. D.; Shams, E.; Stortz, G.; Schellenberg, G.; Bishop, D.; Khan, M. S.; Kozlowski, P.; Retière, F.; Sossi, V.; Thompson, C. J.; Goertzen, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  8. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, J D; Shams, E; Stortz, G; Schellenberg, G; Bishop, D; Khan, M S; Kozlowski, P; Retière, F; Sossi, V; Thompson, C J; Goertzen, A L

    2016-11-21

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  9. Resources | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  10. Light echoes from ancient supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Rest, Armin; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, R Chris; Welch, Douglas L; Becker, Andrew; Bergmann, Marcel; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Cook, Kem; Garg, Arti; Huber, Mark; Miknaitis, Gajus; Minniti, Dante; Nikolaev, Sergei; Stubbs, Christopher

    2005-12-22

    The light from historical supernovae could in principle still be visible as scattered-light echoes centuries after the explosion. The detection of light echoes could allow us to pinpoint the supernova event both in position and age and, most importantly, permit the acquisition of spectra to determine the 'type' of the supernova centuries after the direct light from the explosion first reached Earth. Although echoes have been discovered around some nearby extragalactic supernovae, targeted searches have not found any echoes in the regions of historical Galactic supernovae. Here we report three faint variable-surface-brightness complexes with high apparent proper motions pointing back to three of the six smallest (and probably youngest) previously catalogued supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which are believed to have been thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae. Using the distance and apparent proper motions of these echo arcs, we estimate ages of 610 and 410 years for two of them.

  11. In vivo Quantitative evaluation of brain tissue damage in Multiple Sclerosis using Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Sati, Pascal; Cross, Anne H.; Luo, Jie; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional MRI based on weighted spin-echo (SE) images aids in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, MRI markers derived from SE sequences provide limited information about lesion severity and correlate poorly with patient disability assessed with clinical tests. In this study, we introduced a novel method [based on quantitative R2* (1/T2*) histograms] for estimating the severity of brain tissue damage in MS lesions. We applied at 1.5 T an advanced, multi-gradient-echo MRI technique [gradient echo plural contrast imaging (GEPCI)] to obtain images of the brains of healthy control subjects and subjects with MS. GEPCI is a simple yet robust technique allowing simultaneous acquisition of inherently co-registered quantitative T2* and FLAIR-like maps, along with T1-weighted images within a clinically acceptable time frame. Images obtained with GEPCI appear highly similar to standard scans; hence, they can be used in a reliable and conventional way for a clinical evaluation of the disease. Yet, the main advantage of GEPCI approach is its quantitative nature. Analysis of R2* histograms of white matter revealed a difference in the distribution between healthy subjects and subjects with MS. Based on this difference, we developed a new method for grading the severity of tissue damage [tissue-damage score (TDS)] in MS lesions. This method also provides a tissue damage load (TDL) assessing both lesion load and lesion severity, and a mean tissue damage score (MTDS) estimating the average MS lesion damage. We found promising correlations between the results derived from this method and the standard measure of clinical disability. PMID:20338247

  12. Echoes in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang; Lu, Peifen; Ma, Junyang; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Zhang, Wenbin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian; Karras, Gabriel; Siour, Guillaume; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Faucher, Olivier; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-10-01

    Echo in mountains is a well-known phenomenon, where an acoustic pulse is mirrored by the rocks, often with reverberating recurrences. For spin echoes in magnetic resonance and photon echoes in atomic and molecular systems, the role of the mirror is played by a second, time-delayed pulse that is able to reverse the flow of time and recreate the original impulsive event. Recently, alignment and orientation echoes were discussed in terms of rotational-phase-space filamentation, and they were optically observed in laser-excited molecular gases. Here, we observe hitherto unreported fractional echoes of high order, spatially rotated echoes, and the counterintuitive imaginary echoes at negative times. Coincidence Coulomb explosion imaging is used for a direct spatiotemporal analysis of various molecular alignment echoes, and the implications to echo phenomena in other fields of physics are discussed.

  13. A new production method of elastic silicone carotid phantom based on MRI acquisition using rapid prototyping technique.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Duhamel, Yvan; Olympe, Guillaume; Ramond, Bruno; Langevin, Francois

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experimental simulations of blood fluid in carotid artery require ideal phantoms that are as precise as possible. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a method for carotid phantom fabrication by rapid prototyping technique (RP). By using 3D reconstructed projection of the 3D time-of-flight (TOF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequence, a 12.5 cm multi-dimensional spatial structure of a carotid artery has been set up. Y-shaped and patient specific models have been generated respectively using silicone elastomer, which has a high resilience and a good tensile strength. The final patient specific model has internal carotid artery (ICA) with a highly spiraling siphon and an external carotid artery (ECA). Elastic properties of carotid walls have also been evaluated by Young's elastic modulus test and dynamic behaviors in optical and echography simulation experiments.

  14. High-Resolution DCE-MRI of the Pituitary Gland Using Radial k-Space Acquisition with Compressed Sensing Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Espagnet, M.C.; Bangiyev, L.; Haber, M.; Block, K.T.; Babb, J.; Ruggiero, V.; Boada, F.; Gonen, O.; Fatterpekar, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDANDPURPOSE The pituitary gland is located outside of the blood-brain barrier. Dynamic T1 weighted contrast enhanced sequence is considered to be the gold standard to evaluate this region. However, it does not allow assessment of intrinsic permeability properties of the gland. Our aim was to demonstrate the utility of radial volumetric interpolated brain examination with the golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique to evaluate permeability characteristics of the individual components (anterior and posterior gland and the median eminence) of the pituitary gland and areas of differential enhancement and to optimize the study acquisition time. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed in 52 patients (group 1, 25 patients with normal pituitary glands; and group 2, 27 patients with a known diagnosis of microadenoma). Radial volumetric interpolated brain examination sequences with golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique were evaluated with an ROI-based method to obtain signal-time curves and permeability measures of individual normal structures within the pituitary gland and areas of differential enhancement. Statistical analyses were performed to assess differences in the permeability parameters of these individual regions and optimize the study acquisition time. RESULTS Signal-time curves from the posterior pituitary gland and median eminence demonstrated a faster wash-in and time of maximum enhancement with a lower peak of enhancement compared with the anterior pituitary gland (P < .005). Time-optimization analysis demonstrated that 120 seconds is ideal for dynamic pituitary gland evaluation. In the absence of a clinical history, differences in the signal-time curves allow easy distinction between a simple cyst and a microadenoma. CONCLUSIONS This retrospective study confirms the ability of the golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique to evaluate the permeability characteristics of the pituitary gland and establishes 120

  15. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Reese, Timothy G.; Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  16. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers.

  17. ECHO Status for International Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Beth; Lubelczyk, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The EOS Clearinghouse (ECHO) is a clearinghouse of spatial and temporal metadata, inclusive of NASA's Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) data holdings, that enables the science community to more easily exchange NASA data and information. Currently, ECHO has metadata descriptors for over 55 million individual data granules and 13 million browse images. The majority of ECHO's holdings come directly from data held in the NASA DAACs. The science disciplines and domains represented in ECHO are diverse and include metadata for all of NASA's Science Focus Area data. As middleware for a service-oriented enterprise, ECHO offers access to its capabilities through a set of publicly available Application Program Interfaces (APIs). More information about ECHO is available at http://eos.nasa.gov.echo. The presentation will discuss the status of the ECHO Partners, holdings, and activities, including the transition from the EOS Data Gateway to the Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST)

  18. Rotary echo nutation NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R.; Tijink, G. A. H.; Veeman, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment which combines rotary echoes and nutation NMR is investigated and used to study different sodium sites in zeolite NaA. It is shown that with this technique sodium ions with different relaxation rates in the rotating frame can be distinguished.

  19. Echo Boom Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordai, Phillipe; Rizzo, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Like their baby-boomer parents, the echo-boom generation is reshaping the college and university landscape. At 80 million strong, this group of children and young adults born between 1980 and 1995 now is flooding the college and university system, spurring a college building boom. According to Campus Space Crunch, a Hillier Architecture survey of…

  20. Resting-state fMRI in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen M; Andersson, Jesper; Auerbach, Edward J.; Beckmann, Christian F; Bijsterbosch, Janine; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Duff, Eugene; Feinberg, David A; Griffanti, Ludovica; Harms, Michael P; Kelly, Michael; Laumann, Timothy; Miller, Karla L; Moeller, Steen; Petersen, Steve; Power, Jonathan; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Snyder, Abraham Z; Vu, An; Woolrich, Mark W; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Van Essen, David; Glasser, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) allows one to study functional connectivity in the brain by acquiring fMRI data while subjects lie inactive in the MRI scanner, and taking advantage of the fact that functionally related brain regions spontaneously co-activate. rfMRI is one of the two primary data modalities being acquired for the Human Connectome Project (the other being diffusion MRI). A key objective is to generate a detailed in vivo mapping of functional connectivity in a large cohort of healthy adults (over 1,000 subjects), and to make these datasets freely available for use by the neuroimaging community. In each subject we acquire a total of one hour of whole-brain rfMRI data at 3 Tesla, with a spatial resolution of 2×2×2mm and a temporal resolution of 0.7s, capitalizing on recent developments in slice-accelerated echo-planar imaging. We will also scan a subset of the cohort at higher field strength and resolution. In this paper we outline the work behind, and rationale for, decisions taken regarding the rfMRI data acquisition protocol and pre-processing pipelines, and present some initial results showing data quality and example functional connectivity analyses. PMID:23702415

  1. A high resolution and high contrast MRI for differentiation of subcortical structures for DBS targeting: the Fast Gray Matter Acquisition T1 Inversion Recovery (FGATIR).

    PubMed

    Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Haq, Ihtsham U; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S; Bova, Frank J

    2009-08-01

    DBS depends on precise placement of the stimulating electrode into an appropriate target region. Image-based (direct) targeting has been limited by the ability of current technology to visualize DBS targets. We have recently developed and employed a Fast Gray Matter Acquisition T1 Inversion Recovery (FGATIR) 3T MRI sequence to more reliably visualize these structures. The FGATIR provides significantly better high resolution thin (1 mm) slice visualization of DBS targets than does either standard 3T T1 or T2-weighted imaging. The T1 subcortical image revealed relatively poor contrast among the targets for DBS, though the sequence did allow localization of striatum and thalamus. T2 FLAIR scans demonstrated better contrast between the STN, SNr, red nucleus (RN), and pallidum (GPe/GPi). The FGATIR scans allowed for localization of the thalamus, striatum, GPe/GPi, RN, and SNr and displayed sharper delineation of these structures. The FGATIR also revealed features not visible on other scan types: the internal lamina of the GPi, fiber bundles from the internal capsule piercing the striatum, and the boundaries of the STN. We hope that use of the FGATIR to aid initial targeting will translate in future studies to faster and more accurate procedures with consequent improvements in clinical outcomes.

  2. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  3. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  4. Noncontrast Peripheral MRA with Spiral Echo Train Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fielden, Samuel W.; Mugler, John P.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Norton, Patrick T.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Meyer, Craig H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a spin echo train sequence with spiral readout gradients with improved artery–vein contrast for noncontrast angiography. Theory Venous T2 becomes shorter as the echo spacing is increased in echo train sequences, improving contrast. Spiral acquisitions, due to their data collection efficiency, facilitate long echo spacings without increasing scan times. Methods Bloch equation simulations were performed to determine optimal sequence parameters, and the sequence was applied in five volunteers. In two volunteers, the sequence was performed with a range of echo times and echo spacings to compare with the theoretical contrast behavior. A Cartesian version of the sequence was used to compare contrast appearance with the spiral sequence. Additionally, spiral parallel imaging was optionally used to improve image resolution. Results In vivo, artery–vein contrast properties followed the general shape predicted by simulations, and good results were obtained in all stations. Compared with a Cartesian implementation, the spiral sequence had superior artery–vein contrast, better spatial resolution (1.2 mm2 versus 1.5 mm2), and was acquired in less time (1.4 min versus 7.5 min). Conclusion The spiral spin echo train sequence can be used for flow-independent angiography to generate threedimensional angiograms of the periphery quickly and without the use of contrast agents. PMID:24753164

  5. Quantitative characterizations of ultrashort echo (UTE) images for supporting air-bone separation in the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina; Feng, Mary; Grodzki, David M.; Balter, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate separation of air and bone is critical for creating synthetic CT from MRI to support Radiation Oncology workflow. This study compares two different ultrashort echo-time sequences in the separation of air from bone, and evaluates post-processing methods that correct intensity nonuniformity of images and account for intensity gradients at tissue boundaries to improve this discriminatory power. CT and MRI scans were acquired on 12 patients under an institution review board-approved prospective protocol. The two MRI sequences tested were ultra-short TE imaging using 3D radial acquisition (UTE), and using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA). Gradient nonlinearity correction was applied to both MR image volumes after acquisition. MRI intensity nonuniformity was corrected by vendor-provided normalization methods, and then further corrected using the N4itk algorithm. To overcome the intensity-gradient at air-tissue boundaries, spatial dilations, from 0 to 4 mm, were applied to threshold-defined air regions from MR images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, by comparing predicted (defined by MR images) versus ‘true’ regions of air and bone (defined by CT images), were performed with and without residual bias field correction and local spatial expansion. The post-processing corrections increased the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) from 0.944 ± 0.012 to 0.976 ± 0.003 for UTE images, and from 0.850 ± 0.022 to 0.887 ± 0.012 for PETRA images, compared to without corrections. When expanding the threshold-defined air volumes, as expected, sensitivity of air identification decreased with an increase in specificity of bone discrimination, but in a non-linear fashion. A 1 mm air mask expansion yielded AUC increases of 1 and 4% for UTE and PETRA images, respectively. UTE images had significantly greater discriminatory power in separating air from bone than PETRA images. Post-processing strategies improved the

  6. Fundamental Study of Three-dimensional Fast Spin-echo Imaging with Spoiled Equilibrium Pulse.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Masashi; Kaji, Naoto; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional fast spin-echo (3D FSE) imaging with variable refocusing flip angle has been recently applied to pre- or post-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. To reduce the acquisition time, this sequence requires higher echo train length (ETL), which potentially causes decreased T1 contrast. Spoiled equilibrium (SpE) pulse consists of a resonant +90° radiofrequency (RF) pulse and is applied at the end of the echo train. This +90° RF pulse brings residual transverse magnetization to the negative longitudinal axis, which makes it possible to increase T1 contrast. The purpose of our present study was to examine factors that influence the effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse and the relationship between T1 contrast improvement and imaging parameters and to understand the characteristics of spoiled equilibrium pulse. Phantom studies were conducted using an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom made of polyvinyl alcohol gel. To evaluate the effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse with changes in repetition time (TR), ETL, and refocusing flip angle, we measured the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse was evaluated by calculating the enhancement rate of CNR. The factors that influence the effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse are TR, ETL, and relaxation time of tissues. Spoiled equilibrium pulse is effective with increasing TR and decreasing ETL. The shorter the T1 value, the better the spoiled equilibrium pulse functions. However, for tissues in which the T1 value is long (>600 ms), at a TR of 600 ms, improvement in T1 contrast by applying spoiled equilibrium pulse cannot be expected.

  7. Project Echo: Receiving System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, E. A.

    1961-01-01

    A tracking horn-reflector antenna, a maser preamplifier (and standby parametric preamplifier), and a special FM demodulator were combined to form a low-noise receiving system which made possible the establishment of a high-quality voice circuit via the Echo I passive satellite. This paper describes the 2390-Mc receiving system located at the Bell Telephone Laboratories facility in Holmdel, New Jersey.

  8. Echo: skin stress test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Skin Stress Test of the 12-foot satellite built as a prototype of the full-scale Echo satellite. The 12-foot diameter of the sphere was chosen because that was the ceiling height in the Langley model shop. The proposal to build the 12-foot satellite was made in November 1957. - Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, pp. 170-171.

  9. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  10. Spin echo in synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.

    2007-01-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency Δνspin of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time τ between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference-overlap effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference-overlap effect occurs when Δνspin is too small, or when τ is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings overlap each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive interference patterns depending on the exact value of τ. Typically, the beam’s energy spread is large and this interference-overlap effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time τ after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when τ is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an analysis

  11. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an

  12. Imaging tooth enamel using zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Kevin M.; Zhu, Gang; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Nemani, Venkata K.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Flood, Ann B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-03-01

    In an event where many thousands of people may have been exposed to levels of radiation that are sufficient to cause the acute radiation syndrome, we need technology that can estimate the absorbed dose on an individual basis for triage and meaningful medical decision making. Such dose estimates may be achieved using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth biodosimetry, which measures the number of persistent free radicals that are generated in tooth enamel following irradiation. However, the accuracy of dose estimates may be impacted by individual variations in teeth, especially the amount and distribution of enamel in the inhomogeneous sensitive volume of the resonator used to detect the radicals. In order to study the relationship between interpersonal variations in enamel and EPR-based dose estimates, it is desirable to estimate these parameters nondestructively and without adding radiation to the teeth. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is capable of acquiring structural and biochemical information without imparting additional radiation, which may be beneficial for many EPR dosimetry studies. However, the extremely short T2 relaxation time in tooth structures precludes tooth imaging using conventional MRI methods. Therefore, we used zero echo time (ZTE) MRI to image teeth ex vivo to assess enamel volumes and spatial distributions. Using these data in combination with the data on the distribution of the transverse radio frequency magnetic field from electromagnetic simulations, we then can identify possible sources of variations in radiation-induced signals detectable by EPR. Unlike conventional MRI, ZTE applies spatial encoding gradients during the RF excitation pulse, thereby facilitating signal acquisition almost immediately after excitation, minimizing signal loss from short T2 relaxation times. ZTE successfully provided volumetric measures of tooth enamel that may be related to variations that impact EPR dosimetry and facilitate the development

  13. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  14. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  15. 'Snap-shot' velocity vector mapping using echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Alexander B; Sederman, Andrew J; Newling, Benedict; Mantle, Mick D; Gladden, Lynn F

    2010-06-01

    A 'snap-shot' ultra-fast MRI velocimetry technique based upon the echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence is presented. The new technique is an extension of the GERVAIS pulse sequence previously developed by Sederman et al. (2004) and is capable of acquiring both reference and velocity encoded phase maps following a single excitation for generation of three-component velocity vectors in under 125 ms. This approach allows velocity images of systems with a dynamic, non-periodic geometry to be obtained by MRI. The technique proved to be accurate within 5% error by comparison with Poiseuille flow in a pipe and for the transverse plane flow field in a Couette cell. It was further applied to obtain the velocity field around an impeller in a stirred vessel; an unsteady yet periodic system which otherwise could only be studied by triggered acquisitions. Good agreement was evident between the present technique and triggered conventional velocity encoded pulse sequences. Finally, new experimental data attainable only by the new sequence is demonstrated as the flow field within a mobile droplet of oil is captured as it rises through a column of water. The technique promises to be highly useful in velocimetric measurements of dynamic, non-periodic systems, and in particular for the characterisation of multiphase flow systems.

  16. Light Echoes of Historic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Sinnott, B.; Welch, D. L.; Prieto, J. L.; Bianco, F.

    2014-01-01

    Light echoes, light from a variable source scattered off dust, have been observed for over a century. The recent discovery of light echoes around centuries-old supernovae in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud have allowed the spectroscopic characterization of these events, even without contemporaneous photometry and spectroscopy using modern instrumentation. Here we review the recent scientific advances using light echoes of ancient and historic transients, and focus on our latest work on SN 1987A's and Eta Carinae's light echoes.

  17. Neutron Speed Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, A.

    Neutron speed echo (NSPE) technique is in a way a generalization of the neutron spin echo (NSE) technique. Similar to NSE spectrometers, the resolution of such NSPE spectrometer is extremely high and is not connected with the monochromatization of the incoming beam. However, in contrast to NSE spectrometers, the operation of proposed spectrometer does not necessarily require a polarized neutron beam. Such decoupling the polarization and the resolution is in clear contrast to NSE technique. Because the resolution of a NSPE spectrometer can be a few orders higher than the resolution of NSE spectrometers, one can achieve the energy resolution of about 10-14 eV by the use of ultra cold neutrons; a fact that can be used in some fundamental physics experiments. Though the scattering on the sample impose limitations on the resolution of a NSPE spectrometer, the use of the proposed technique in a low-resolution mode can be useful in the combination with triple-axis spectrometers and allow for the significant improvement of their energy resolution, however, without the use of polarized neutrons. This fact opens new possibilities for the study of magnetic phenomena in solids, where the NSE method is principally not applicable because of the neutron precession in the sample, especially by combining polarization analysis with high-resolution spectroscopy. The proposed technique also allows for an easy implementation of the principle of the NSE focusing, when the resolution ellipse is aligned along a dispersion curve.

  18. Dissecting a Light Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for audio animation

    This animation illustrates how a light echo works, and how an optical illusion of material moving outward is created.

    A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one.

    The animation starts by showing the explosion of a star, which results in a flash of light that moves outward in all directions. The direction of our line of sight from Earth is indicated by the blue arrow.

    When the light flash reaches surrounding dust, shown here as three dark clouds, the dust is heated up, creating infrared light that begins to travel toward Earth (indicated by the red arrows). Dust closest to the explosion lights up first, while the explosion's shock wave takes longer to reach more distant material. This results in light from different parts of the cloud reaching Earth at different times, creating the illusion of motion over time.

    As the animation shows, the inclination of the cloud toward our line of sight can result in the material seeming to move both away from and toward the central star.

  19. Echo 1 container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Echo 1 container: The design of this container was one of the most difficult technical tasks. Hansen writes: 'After several weeks of examining potential solutions to this problem, the Langley engineers narrowed the field of ideas to five. They then built working models of these five container designs, and 12-foot-diameter models of the satellite for simulation studies. With help from Langley's Engineering Service and Mechanical Service divisions, the Echo group built a special 41-foot-diameter spherical vacuum chamber equipped with pressure-proof windows. There the dynamics of opening the container and inflating the satelloon could be studies as the satelloon fell to the bottom of the tank.' 'The container-opening mechanism that eventually resulted from these vacuum tests was surely one of the oddest explosive devices ever contrived. The container was a sphere that opened at its equator into top and bottom hemispheres. the top half fit on the bottom half much like a lid fits snugly atop a kitchen pot. The joint between the two hemispheres, therefore, formed a sliding valve. The halves had to move apart an inch or two before the canister was actually open. It was in this joint between the hemispheres that the charge was placed.' The whole whole system was laced together with fishing line which resulted in many disdainful comments from visiting scientists and engineers but the system worked. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 180.

  20. Non-water-suppressed short-echo-time magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using a concentric ring k-space trajectory.

    PubMed

    Emir, Uzay E; Burns, Brian; Chiew, Mark; Jezzard, Peter; Thomas, M Albert

    2017-03-08

    Water-suppressed MRS acquisition techniques have been the standard MRS approach used in research and for clinical scanning to date. The acquisition of a non-water-suppressed MRS spectrum is used for artefact correction, reconstruction of phased-array coil data and metabolite quantification. Here, a two-scan metabolite-cycling magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) scheme that does not use water suppression is demonstrated and evaluated. Specifically, the feasibility of acquiring and quantifying short-echo (TE  = 14 ms), two-dimensional stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) MRSI spectra in the motor cortex is demonstrated on a 3 T MRI system. The increase in measurement time from the metabolite-cycling is counterbalanced by a time-efficient concentric ring k-space trajectory. To validate the technique, water-suppressed MRSI acquisitions were also performed for comparison. The proposed non-water-suppressed metabolite-cycling MRSI technique was tested for detection and correction of resonance frequency drifts due to subject motion and/or hardware instability, and the feasibility of high-resolution metabolic mapping over a whole brain slice was assessed. Our results show that the metabolite spectra and estimated concentrations are in agreement between non-water-suppressed and water-suppressed techniques. The achieved spectral quality, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 20 and linewidth <7 Hz allowed reliable metabolic mapping of five major brain metabolites in the motor cortex with an in-plane resolution of 10 × 10 mm(2) in 8 min and with a Cramér-Rao lower bound of less than 20% using LCModel analysis. In addition, the high SNR of the water peak of the non-water-suppressed technique enabled voxel-wise single-scan frequency, phase and eddy current correction. These findings demonstrate that our non-water-suppressed metabolite-cycling MRSI technique can perform robustly on 3 T MRI systems and within a clinically feasible acquisition time.

  1. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana L.; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D.; Smart, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. Materials and Methods An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10–100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50–100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse’s temperature approached the set target. Conclusion The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality. PMID:27806062

  2. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  3. Dual Inversion Recovery Ultrashort Echo Time (DIR-UTE) Imaging and Quantification of the Zone of Calcified Cartilage (ZCC)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Carl, Michael; Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Chang, Eric; Bydder, Graeme M; Chung, Christine B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to image the zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC), and quantify its T2*, T1 and T1ρ. DESIGN In this feasibility study a dual inversion recovery ultrashort echo time (DIR-UTE) sequence was developed for high contrast imaging of the ZCC. T2* of the ZCC was measured with DIR-UTE acquisitions at progressively increasing TEs. T1 of the ZCC was measured with saturation recovery UTE acquisitions at progressively increasing saturation recovery times. T1ρ of the ZCC was measured with spin-locking prepared DIR-UTE acquisitions at progressively increasing spin-locking times. RESULTS The feasibility of the qualitative and quantitative DIR-UTE techniques was demonstrated on phantoms and in six cadaveric patellae using a clinical 3T scanner. On average the ZCC has a short T2* ranging from 1.0 to 3.3 ms (mean ± standard deviation = 2.0 ± 1.2 ms), a short T1 ranging from 256 to 389 ms (mean ± standard deviation = 305 ± 45 ms), and a short T1ρ ranging from 2.2 to 4.6 ms (mean ± standard deviation = 3.6 ± 1.2 ms). CONCLUSION UTE MR based techniques have been developed for high resolution imaging of the ZCC and quantitative evaluation of its T2*, T1 and T1ρ relaxation times, providing noninvasive assessment of collagen orientation and proteoglycan content at the zone of calcified cartilage and the bone cartilage interface. These measurements may be useful for non-invasive assessment of the ZCC, including understanding the involvement of this tissue component in osteoarthritis. PMID:23025927

  4. Characterization of signal properties in atherosclerotic plaque components by intravascular MRI.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W J; Prichard, J W; Hu, Y L; Olson, P R; Benckart, D H; Kramer, C M; Vido, D A; Reichek, N

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of distinguishing between atherosclerotic plaque components solely on the basis of biochemical differences. However, to date, the majority of plaque characterization has been performed by using high-field strength units or special coils, which are not clinically applicable. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate MRI properties in histologically verified plaque components in excised human carotid endarterectomy specimens with the use of a 5F catheter-based imaging coil, standard acquisition software, and a clinical scanner operating at 0.5 T. Human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 17 patients were imaged at 37 degrees C by use of an opposed solenoid intravascular radiofrequency coil integrated into a 5F double-lumen catheter interfaced to a 0.5-T General Electric interventional scanner. Cross-sectional intravascular MRI (156x250 microm in-plane resolution) that used different imaging parameters permitted the calculation of absolute T1and T2, the magnetization transfer contrast ratio, the magnitude of regional signal loss associated with an inversion recovery sequence (inversion ratio), and regional signal loss in gradient echo (gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio) in plaque components. Histological staining included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, Kossa, oil red O, and Gomori's iron stain. X-ray micrographs were also used to identify regions of calcium. Seven plaque components were evaluated: fibrous cap, smooth muscle cells, organizing thrombus, fresh thrombus, lipid, edema, and calcium. The magnetization transfer contrast ratio was significantly less in the fibrous cap (0.62+/-13) than in all other components (P<0.05) The inversion ratio was greater in lipid (0.91+/-0.09) than all other components (P<0.05). Calcium was best distinguished by using the gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio, which was lower in calcium (0.36+/-0.2) than in all plaque components, except for the organizing thrombus (P<0

  5. A new application of compressive sensing in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lenti, Flavia; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Image formation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the procedure which allows the generation of the image starting from data acquired in the so called k-space. At the present, many image formation techniques have been presented, working with different k-space filling strategies. Recently, Compressive Sampling (CS) has been successfully used for image formation from non fully sampled k-space acquisitions, due to its interesting property of reconstructing signal from highly undetermined linear systems. The main advantage consists in greatly reducing the acquisition time. Within this manuscript, a novel application of CS to MRI field is presented, named Intra Voxel Analysis (IVA). The idea is to achieve the so-called super resolution, i.e. the possibility of distinguish anatomical structures smaller than the spatial resolution of the image. For this aim, multiple Spin Echo images acquired with different Echo Times are required. The output of the algorithm is the estimation of the number of contributions present in the same pixel, i.e. the number of tissues inside the same voxel, and their spin-spin relaxation times. This allows us not only to identify the number of involved tissues, but also to discriminate them. At the present, simulated case studies have been considered, obtaining interesting and promising results. In particular, a study on the required number of images, on the estimation noise and on the regularization parameter of different CS algorithms has been conducted. As future work, the method will be applied to real clinical datasets, in order to validate the estimations.

  6. Retrospective estimation of the susceptibility driven field map for distortion correction in echo planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kim, Boklye

    2013-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence used for acquiring functional MRI (fMRI) time series data provides the advantage of high temporal resolution, but also is highly sensitive to the magnetic field inhomogeneity resulting in geometric distortions. A static field-inhomogeneity map measured before or after the fMRI scan to correct for such distortions does not account for magnetic field changes due to the head motion during the time series acquisition. In practice, the field map dynamically changes with head motion during the scan and leads to variations in the geometric distortion. We model in this work the field inhomogeneity with the object and the scanner dependent terms. The object-specific term varies with the object's magnetic susceptibility and orientation, i.e., head position with respect to B0. Thus, the simple transformation of the acquired field may not yield an accurate field map. We assume that the scanner-specific field remains unchanged and independent of the head motion. Our approach in this study is to retrospectively estimate the object's magnetic susceptibility (chi) map from an observed high-resolution static field map using an estimator derived from a probability density function of non-uniform noise. This approach is capable of finding the susceptibility map regardless of the wrapping effect. A dynamic field map at each head position can be estimated by applying a rigid body transformation to the estimated chi-map and the 3-D susceptibility voxel convolution (SVC) which is a physics-based discrete convolution model for computing chi-induced field inhomogeneity.

  7. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  8. Improving the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance inverse imaging via the blipped-CAIPI acquisition scheme.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Tang; Setsompop, Kawin; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Witzel, Thomas; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous acquisition from multiple channels of a radio-frequency (RF) coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) achieves functional MRI acquisitions at a rate of 100ms per whole-brain volume. InI accelerates the scan by leaving out partition encoding steps and reconstructs images by solving under-determined inverse problems using RF coil sensitivity information. Hence, the correlated spatial information available in the coil array causes spatial blurring in the InI reconstruction. Here, we propose a method that employs gradient blips in the partition encoding direction during the acquisition to provide extra spatial encoding in order to better differentiate signals from different partitions. According to our simulations, this blipped-InI (bInI) method can increase the average spatial resolution by 15.1% (1.3mm) across the whole brain and from 32.6% (4.2mm) in subcortical regions, as compared to the InI method. In a visual fMRI experiment, we demonstrate that, compared to InI, the spatial distribution of bInI BOLD response is more consistent with that of a conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI) at the level of individual subjects. With the improved spatial resolution, especially in subcortical regions, bInI can be a useful fMRI tool for obtaining high spatiotemporal information for clinical and cognitive neuroscience studies.

  9. Improving the spatial resolution of Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging via the blipped-CAIPI acquisition scheme

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Tang; Setsompop, Kawin; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W.; Witzel, Thomas; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Using simultaneous acquisition from multiple channels of a radio-frequency (RF) coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) achieves functional MRI acquisitions at a rate of 100 ms per whole-brain volume. InI accelerates the scan by leaving out partition encoding steps and reconstructs images by solving under-determined inverse problems using RF coil sensitivity information. Hence, the correlated spatial information available in the coil array causes spatial blurring in the InI reconstruction. Here, we propose a method that employs gradient blips in the partition encoding direction during the acquisition to provide extra spatial encoding in order to better differentiate signals from different partitions. According to our simulations, this blipped-InI (bInI) method can increase the average spatial resolution by 15.1% (1.3 mm) across the whole brain and from 32.6% (4.2 mm) in subcortical regions, as compared to the InI method. In a visual fMRI experiment, we demonstrate that, compared to InI, the spatial distribution of bInI BOLD response is more consistent with that of a conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI) at the level of individual subjects. With the improved spatial resolution, especially in subcortical regions, bInI can be a useful fMRI tool for obtaining high spatiotemporal information for clinical and cognitive neuroscience studies. PMID:24374076

  10. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming for Echo-Planar Imaging of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Nixon, Terence W.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (Juchem et al., J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13 Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8 mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3 mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large

  11. Guide to Regulated Facilities in ECHO | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There are multiple ways ECHO can be used to search compliance data. By default, ECHO searches focus on larger, more regulated facilities. Each search page allows users to search a more comprehensive group of facilities by electing to search for minor or smaller facilities. Information is presented that explains the types and approximate numbers of facilities that are included in searches when the default and custom options are used.

  12. A new method for joint susceptibility artefact correction and super-resolution for dMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthotto, Lars; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has become increasingly relevant in clinical research and neuroscience. It is commonly carried out using the ultra-fast MRI acquisition technique Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI). While offering crucial reduction of acquisition times, two limitations of EPI are distortions due to varying magnetic susceptibilities of the object being imaged and its limited spatial resolution. In the recent years progress has been made both for susceptibility artefact correction and increasing of spatial resolution using image processing and reconstruction methods. However, so far, the interplay between both problems has not been studied and super-resolution techniques could only be applied along one axis, the slice-select direction, limiting the potential gain in spatial resolution. In this work we describe a new method for joint susceptibility artefact correction and super-resolution in EPI-MRI that can be used to increase resolution in all three spatial dimensions and in particular increase in-plane resolutions. The key idea is to reconstruct a distortion-free, high-resolution image from a number of low-resolution EPI data that are deformed in different directions. Numerical results on dMRI data of a human brain indicate that this technique has the potential to provide for the first time in-vivo dMRI at mesoscopic spatial resolution (i.e. 500μm) a spatial resolution that could bridge the gap between white-matter information from ex-vivo histology (≍1μm) and in-vivo dMRI (≍2000μm).

  13. Effluent Charts | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  14. Enforcement Cases | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  15. Data Downloads | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide for searching and downloading. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  16. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  17. Measurement of Intramuscular Fat by Muscle Echo Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hui-Ju; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Zhao, Qun; McCully, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare ultrasound echo intensity (EI) to high-resolution T1-weighted MRI and to establish calibration equations to estimate percent intramuscular fat from EI. Methods Thirty-one participants underwent both ultrasound and MRI testing of 4 muscles: rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG). Results Strong correlations were found between MRI percent fat and muscle EI after correcting for subcutaneous fat thickness (r = 0.91 in RF, r = 0.80 in BF, r = 0.80 in TA, r = 0.76 in MG). Three types of calibration equations were established. Conclusion Muscle ultrasound is a practical and reproducible method that can be used as an imaging technique for examination of percent intramuscular fat. Future ultrasound studies are needed to establish equations for other muscle groups to enhance its use in both research and clinical settings. PMID:25787260

  18. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  19. SU-D-18C-01: A Novel 4D-MRI Technology Based On K-Space Retrospective Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Current 4D-MRI techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of an entirely new framework of 4D-MRI based on k-space retrospective sorting. Methods: An important challenge of the proposed technique is to determine the number of repeated scans(NR) required to obtain sufficient k-space data for 4D-MRI. To do that, simulations using 29 cancer patients' respiratory profiles were performed to derive the relationship between data acquisition completeness(Cp) and NR, also relationship between NR(Cp=95%) and the following factors: total slice(NS), respiratory phase bin length(Lb), frame rate(fr), resolution(R) and image acquisition starting-phase(P0). To evaluate our technique, a computer simulation study on a 4D digital human phantom (XCAT) were conducted with regular breathing (fr=0.5Hz; R=256×256). A 2D echo planer imaging(EPI) MRI sequence were assumed to acquire raw k-space data, with respiratory signal and acquisition time for each k-space data line recorded simultaneously. K-space data was re-sorted based on respiratory phases. To evaluate 4D-MRI image quality, tumor trajectories were measured and compared with the input signal. Mean relative amplitude difference(D) and cross-correlation coefficient(CC) are calculated. Finally, phase-sharing sliding window technique was applied to investigate the feasibility of generating ultra-fast 4D-MRI. Result: Cp increased with NR(Cp=100*[1-exp(-0.19*NR)], when NS=30, Lb=100%/6). NR(Cp=95%) was inversely-proportional to Lb (r=0.97), but independent of other factors. 4D-MRI on XCAT demonstrated highly accurate motion information (D=0.67%, CC=0.996) with much less artifacts than those on image-based sorting 4D-MRI. Ultra-fast 4D-MRI with an apparent temporal resolution of 10 frames/second was reconstructed using the phase-sharing sliding window technique. Conclusions: A novel 4D-MRI

  20. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification.

  1. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-12-27

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  2. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lorenzato, Mário Müller; Salim, Rodrigo; Kfuri-Junior, Maurício; Crema, Michel Daoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE) protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively) and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively). For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively) and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively). In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively) and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively). There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition. PMID:27141127

  3. Lung volume quantified by MRI reflects extracellular-matrix deposition and altered pulmonary function in bleomycin models of fibrosis: effects of SOM230.

    PubMed

    Egger, Christine; Gérard, Christelle; Vidotto, Nella; Accart, Nathalie; Cannet, Catherine; Dunbar, Andrew; Tigani, Bruno; Piaia, Alessandro; Jarai, Gabor; Jarman, Elizabeth; Schmid, Herbert A; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2014-06-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal disease, characterized by loss of lung elasticity and alveolar surface area, secondary to alveolar epithelial cell injury, reactive inflammation, proliferation of fibroblasts, and deposition of extracellular matrix. The effects of oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice, as well as of intratracheal administration of ovalbumin to actively sensitized Brown Norway rats on total lung volume as assessed noninvasively by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated here. Lung injury and volume were quantified by using nongated or respiratory-gated MRI acquisitions [ultrashort echo time (UTE) or gradient-echo techniques]. Lung function of bleomycin-challenged rats was examined additionally using a flexiVent system. Postmortem analyses included histology of collagen and hydroxyproline assays. Bleomycin induced an increase of MRI-assessed total lung volume, lung dry and wet weights, and hydroxyproline content as well as collagen amount. In bleomycin-treated rats, gated MRI showed an increased volume of the lung in the inspiratory and expiratory phases of the respiratory cycle and a temporary decrease of tidal volume. Decreased dynamic lung compliance was found in bleomycin-challenged rats. Bleomycin-induced increase of MRI-detected lung volume was consistent with tissue deposition during fibrotic processes resulting in decreased lung elasticity, whereas influences by edema or emphysema could be excluded. In ovalbumin-challenged rats, total lung volume quantified by MRI remained unchanged. The somatostatin analog, SOM230, was shown to have therapeutic effects on established bleomycin-induced fibrosis in rats. This work suggests MRI-detected total lung volume as readout for tissue-deposition in small rodent bleomycin models of pulmonary fibrosis.

  4. Sub-millimeter T2 weighted fMRI at 7 T: comparison of 3D-GRASE and 2D SE-EPI.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Valentin G; De Martino, Federico; Vu, An T; Poser, Benedikt A; Feinberg, David A; Goebel, Rainer; Yacoub, Essa

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows studying human brain function non-invasively up to the spatial resolution of cortical columns and layers. Most fMRI acquisitions rely on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast employing T(*) 2 weighted 2D multi-slice echo-planar imaging (EPI). At ultra-high magnetic field (i.e., 7 T and above), it has been shown experimentally and by simulation, that T2 weighted acquisitions yield a signal that is spatially more specific to the site of neuronal activity at the cost of functional sensitivity. This study compared two T2 weighted imaging sequences, inner-volume 3D Gradient-and-Spin-Echo (3D-GRASE) and 2D Spin-Echo EPI (SE-EPI), with evaluation of their imaging point-spread function (PSF), functional specificity, and functional sensitivity at sub-millimeter resolution. Simulations and measurements of the imaging PSF revealed that the strongest anisotropic blurring in 3D-GRASE (along the second phase-encoding direction) was about 60% higher than the strongest anisotropic blurring in 2D SE-EPI (along the phase-encoding direction). In a visual paradigm, the BOLD sensitivity of 3D-GRASE was found to be superior due to its higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR). High resolution cortical depth profiles suggested that the contrast mechanisms are similar between the two sequences, however, 2D SE-EPI had a higher surface bias owing to the higher T(*) 2 contribution of the longer in-plane EPI echo-train for full field of view compared to the reduced field of view of zoomed 3D-GRASE.

  5. Short T2 contrast with three-dimensional ultrashort echo time imaging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Bydder, Mark; Takahashi, Atsushi M.; Carl, Michael; Chung, Christine B.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in imaging short T2 species which show little or no signal with conventional magnetic resonance (MR) pulse sequences. In this paper, we describe the use of three-dimensional ultrashort echo time (3D UTE) sequences with TEs down to 8 μs for imaging of these species. Image contrast was generated with acquisitions using dual echo 3D UTE with echo subtraction, dual echo 3D UTE with rescaled subtraction, long T2 saturation 3D UTE, long T2 saturation dual echo 3D UTE with echo subtraction, single adiabatic inversion recovery 3D UTE, single adiabatic inversion recovery dual echo 3D UTE with echo subtraction and dual adiabatic inversion recovery 3D UTE. The feasibility of using these approaches was demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo imaging of calcified cartilage, aponeuroses, menisci, tendons, ligaments and cortical bone with a 3-T clinical MR scanner. Signal-to-noise ratios and contrast-to-noise ratios were used to compare the techniques. PMID:21440400

  6. Stellar Echo Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Chris; Lerch, Kieran; Lucente, Mark; Meza-Galvan, Jesus; Mitchell, Dan; Ruedin, Josh; Williams, Spencer; Zollars, Byron

    2016-01-01

    All stars exhibit intensity fluctuations over several timescales, from nanoseconds to years. These intensity fluctuations echo off bodies and structures in the star system. We posit that it is possible to take advantage of these echoes to detect, and possibly image, Earth-scale exoplanets. Unlike direct imaging techniques, temporal measurements do not require fringe tracking, maintaining an optically-perfect baseline, or utilizing ultra-contrast coronagraphs. Unlike transit or radial velocity techniques, stellar echo detection is not constrained to any specific orbital inclination. Current results suggest that existing and emerging technology can already enable stellar echo techniques at flare stars, such as Proxima Centauri, including detection, spectroscopic interrogation, and possibly even continent-level imaging of exoplanets in a variety of orbits. Detection of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars appears to be extremely challenging, but cannot be fully quantified without additional data on micro- and millisecond-scale intensity fluctuations of the Sun. We consider survey missions in the mold of Kepler and place preliminary constraints on the feasibility of producing 3D tomographic maps of other structures in star systems, such as accretion disks. In this report we discuss the theory, limitations, models, and future opportunities for stellar echo imaging.

  7. TU-EF-BRA-03: Free Induction Decay (without the Decay) and Spin-Echo Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.

    2015-06-15

    ), which involves a brief introduction to the Fourier transform and k-space. This leads to conventional Spin-Echo (S-E) reconstruction techniques for creating clinical images from raw data, and sets the stage for: Part IV. Spin-Echo; S-E / Spin Warp in a 2D Slice (Price) discusses application of the S- E sequence of radiofrequency pulses and gradient magnetic fields to the 1D patient. T2 is introduced but not explained. This Part also considers how to manipulate the image acquisition parameters so as to generate clinical pictures with contrast dominated by spatial variations in PD, T1, or T2. We conclude by demonstrating the spin-warp approach to imaging in 2D with a simple 2×2, 4-voxel example. Much of this material is presented in more detail in the chapter “MRI of the One-dimensional Patient, Part I”, in Advances in Medical Physics, Vol 5 (2014). Copies are on display at the Medical Physics Publishing booth. Learning Objectives: The participant will learn about the processes of NMR and T1 spin relaxation in a tissue voxel in a uniform magnetic field. The participant will learn about combining spin-up/spin-down NMR and T1 processes with a linear gradient to effect frequency-encoding of voxel spatial position. This approach can be used to create proton density and T1 MRI maps, respectively, of the contents of multi-voxel 1D phantoms. The participant will learn about how the ‘classical’ model of NMR it can generate Free Induction Decay (FID) images of 1D phantoms, which involves the use of the Fourier transform in k-space. This can lead simply into standard Spin-Echo images. The participant will learn about extending Spin-Echo imaging into 2 and more dimensions.

  8. Commissioning the Echo-Seeding Experiment Echo-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.a E.Colby; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Woodley, M.; Xiang, D.; Pernet, P-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2011-06-02

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment is intended to test the EEHG principle at low electron beam energy, 120 MeV, and determine the sensitivities and limitations to understand the expected performance at the higher energy scales and harmonic numbers required for x-ray FELs. In this paper we present the experimental results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  9. Automated shimming at 1.5 T using echo-planar image frequency maps.

    PubMed

    Reese, T G; Davis, T L; Weisskoff, R M

    1995-01-01

    Using echo-planar imaging, we developed an automated image-based procedure to shim the static (B0) field. Our method uses the rapid acquisition capability of echo-planar imaging to collect the required frequency data rapidly, rendering the shim data acquisition time negligible in comparison with the total study time. We address image distortion issues involved in echo-planar imaging acquisition of the data and formulate analytic methods for arriving at an optimal shim for the NMR imaging experiment in a single iteration. We investigated the use of cost functions other than least-squares (Chebychev, high-order numeric) and found that choice between the cost functions we tested was irrelevant to resultant image quality, at least when used in conjunction with low-order shims. With appropriate integration, the method has become routine practice for investigators at our laboratory.

  10. Generalized INverse imaging (GIN): ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correction.

    PubMed

    Boyacioğlu, Rasim; Barth, Markus

    2013-10-01

    An ultrafast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, called generalized inverse imaging (GIN), is proposed, which combines inverse imaging with a phase constraint-leading to a less underdetermined reconstruction-and physiological noise correction. A single 3D echo planar imaging (EPI) prescan is sufficient to obtain the necessary coil sensitivity information and reference images that are used to reconstruct standard images, so that standard analysis methods are applicable. A moving dots stimulus paradigm was chosen to assess the performance of GIN. We find that the spatial localization of activation for GIN is comparable to an EPI protocol and that maximum z-scores increase significantly. The high temporal resolution of GIN (50 ms) and the acquisition of the phase information enable unaliased sampling and regression of physiological signals. Using the phase time courses obtained from the 32 channels of the receiver coils as nuisance regressors in a general linear model results in significant improvement of the functional activation, rendering the acquisition of external physiological signals unnecessary. The proposed physiological noise correction can in principle be used for other fMRI protocols, such as simultaneous multislice acquisitions, which acquire the phase information sufficiently fast and sample physiological signals unaliased.

  11. Towards real-time thermometry using simultaneous multislice MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, P. T. S.; Bos, C.; de Boorder, T.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Moonen, C. T. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2016-09-01

    MR-guided thermal therapies, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) and laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) are increasingly being applied in oncology and neurology. MRI is used for guidance since it can measure temperature noninvasively based on the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS). For therapy guidance using PRFS thermometry, high temporal resolution and large spatial coverage are desirable. We propose to use the parallel imaging technique simultaneous multislice (SMS) in combination with controlled aliasing (CAIPIRINHA) to accelerate the acquisition. We compare this with the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acceleration technique. Two experiments were performed to validate that SMS can be used to increase the spatial coverage or the temporal resolution. The first was performed in agar gel using LITT heating and a gradient-echo sequence with echo-planar imaging (EPI), and the second was performed in bovine muscle using HIFU heating and a gradient-echo sequence without EPI. In both experiments temperature curves from an unaccelerated scan and from SMS, SENSE, and SENSE/SMS accelerated scans were compared. The precision was quantified by a standard deviation analysis of scans without heating. Both experiments showed a good agreement between the temperature curves obtained from the unaccelerated, and SMS accelerated scans, confirming that accuracy was maintained during SMS acceleration. The standard deviations of the temperature measurements obtained with SMS were significantly smaller than when SENSE was used, implying that SMS allows for higher acceleration. In the LITT and HIFU experiments SMS factors up to 4 and 3 were reached, respectively, with a loss of precision of less than a factor of 3. Based on these results we conclude that SMS acceleration of PRFS thermometry is a valuable addition to SENSE, because it allows for a higher temporal resolution or bigger spatial coverage, with a higher precision.

  12. Fluid echoes in a pure electron plasma.

    PubMed

    Yu, J H; O'Neil, T M; Driscoll, C F

    2005-01-21

    Experimental observations of diocotron wave echoes on a magnetized electron column are reported, representing Kelvin wave echoes on a rotating near-ideal fluid. The echoes occur by reversal of an inviscid wave damping process, and the phase-space mixing and unmixing are directly imaged. The basic echo characteristics agree with a simple nonlinear ballistic theory. At late times, the echo is degraded, and the maximal observed echo times agree with a theory of electron-electron collisions acting on separately evolving velocity classes.

  13. SU-F-303-02: Achieving 4D MRI in Regular Breathing Cycle with Extended Acquisition Time of Dynamic MR Images

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C; Beddar, S; Wen, Z; Stemkens, B; Tijssen, R; Berg, C van den

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to obtain four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images that are more representative of a patient’s typical breathing cycle by utilizing an extended acquisition time while minimizing the image artifacts. Methods: The 4D MR data were acquired with the balanced steady state free precession in two-dimensional sagittal plane of view. Each slice was acquired repeatedly for about 15 s, thereby obtaining multiple images at each of the 10 phases in the respiratory cycle. This improves the probability that at least one of the images were acquired at the desired phase during a regular breathing cycle. To create optimal 4D MR images, an iterative approach was used to identify the set of images that yielded the highest slice-to-slice similarity. To assess the effectiveness of the approach, the data set was truncated into periods of 7 s (50 time points), 11 s (75 time points) and the full 15 s (100 time points). The 4D MR images were then sorted with data of the three different acquisition periods for comparison. Results: In general, the 4D MR images sorted using data from longer acquisition periods showed less mismatched artifacts. In addition, the normalized cross correlation (NCC) between slices of a 4D volume increases with increased acquisition period. The average NCC was 0.791 from the 7 s period, 0.794 from the 11 s period and 0.796 from the 15 s period. Conclusion: Our preliminary study showed that extending the acquisition time with the proposed sorting technique can improve image quality and reduce artifact presence in the 4D MR images. Data acquisition over two breathing cycles is a good trade-off between artifact reduction and scan time. This research was partially funded by the the Center for Radiation Oncology Research from UT MD Anderson Cancer Center.

  14. Simultaneous imaging of locus coeruleus and substantia nigra with a quantitative neuromelanin MRI approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangchuan; Huddleston, Daniel E; Langley, Jason; Ahn, Sinyeob; Barnum, Christopher J; Factor, Stewart A; Levey, Allan I; Hu, Xiaoping

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative MRI of neuromelanin (NM) containing structures (referred to as NM-MRI) in the brainstem, namely the locus coeruleus (LC) and substantia nigra (SN), may assist with the early detection of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as differential diagnosis in the early disease stages. In this study, two gradient echo (GRE) sequences with magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) preparation pulses were developed to simultaneously image the LC and SN. This has been a challenge with NM-MRI techniques used in previous studies due to the relatively high specific absorption rate (SAR) induced by these techniques. In addition, a semi-automated quantitative analysis scheme was applied to estimate volumes and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the LC and SN based on segmentation of both structures. Compared to a T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence typically used for simultaneous imaging of the LC and SN, the two GRE-MTC sequences exhibited improved performance in terms of higher sensitivity (in CNR) in imaging the SN and lower SAR during the scans. A multiple-measurement protocol was adopted as well so that motion degraded measurements could be removed and artifacts associated with motion could be corrected. The present approach has demonstrated advantages in image acquisition (lower SAR and higher sensitivity), image pre-processing (with motion correction) and quantitative image analysis (segmentation-based estimation of volume and CNR) when compared with existing NM-MRI approaches. This approach has potential for detection and monitoring of neurodegeneration in LC and SN in disease states including AD and PD.

  15. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  16. Multi-Vendor Implementation and Comparison of Volumetric Whole-Brain Echo-Planar MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sabati, Mohammad; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Gu, Meng; Wei, Juan; Zhu, Henry; Barker, Peter B.; Spielman, Daniel M.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Maudsley, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess volumetric proton MR spectroscopic imaging of the human brain on multi-vendor MRI instruments. Methods Echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) was developed on instruments from three manufacturers, with matched specifications and acquisition protocols that accounted for differences in sampling performance, RF power, and data formats. Inter-site reproducibility was evaluated for signal-normalized maps of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Creatine (Cre) and Choline using phantom and human subject measurements. Comparative analyses included metrics for spectral quality, spatial coverage, and mean values in atlas-registered brain regions. Results Inter-site differences for phantom measurements were under 1.7% for individual metabolites and 0.2% for ratio measurements. Spatial uniformity ranged from 79% to 91%. The human studies found differences of mean values in the temporal lobe, but good agreement in other white-matter regions, with maximum differences relative to their mean of under 3.2%. For NAA/Cre, the maximum difference was 1.8%. In grey-matter a significant difference was observed for frontal lobe NAA. Primary causes of inter-site differences were attributed to shim quality, B0 drift, and accuracy of RF excitation. Correlation coefficients for measurements at each site were over 0.60, indicating good reliability. Conclusion A volumetric intensity-normalized MRSI acquisition can be implemented in a comparable manner across multi-vendor MR instruments. PMID:25354190

  17. Rapid Isotropic 3D-Sodium MRI of the Knee Joint In-vivo at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligong; Wu, Yan; Chang, Gregory; Oesingmann, Niels; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring high resolution, isotropic 3D-sodium MR images of the whole knee joint in vivo at ultra high field strength (7.0T) via a 3D-radial acquisition with ultra short echo times and clinically acceptable acquisition times. Materials and Methods Five healthy controls (4 males, 1 female; mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 28.7 ± 4.8 years) and five patients with osteoarthritis (OA) (3 males, 2 females; mean ± SD age 52.4 ± 5.6 years) underwent 23Na–MRI on a 7T, multi-nuclei equipped whole body scanner. A quadrature 23Na knee coil and a 3D-gradient echo (GRE) imaging sequence with a radial acquisition were utilized. Cartilage sodium concentration was measured and compared between the healthy controls and OA patients. Results The average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for different spatial resolutions (1.2 mm – 4 mm) varied from ∼14 – 120, respectively. The mean sodium concentration of healthy subjects ranged from ∼240 ± 28 mM/L – 280 ± 22 mM/L. However, in OA patients the sodium concentrations were reduced, significantly by ∼30 – 60%, depending upon the degree of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion The preliminary results suggest that sodium imaging at 7T may be a feasible potential alternative for physiologic OA imaging and clinical diagnosis. PMID:19711406

  18. A new paramagnetically shifted imaging probe for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, P. Kanthi; Rogers, Nicola J.; Finney, Katie‐Louise N.A.; Harvey, Peter; Funk, Alexander M.; Wilson, J. Ian; O'Hogain, Dara; Maxwell, Ross; Parker, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop and characterize a new paramagnetic contrast agent for molecular imaging by MRI. Methods A contrast agent was developed for direct MRI detection through the paramagnetically shifted proton magnetic resonances of two chemically equivalent tert‐butyl reporter groups within a dysprosium(III) complex. The complex was characterized in phantoms and imaged in physiologically intact mice at 7 Tesla (T) using three‐dimensional (3D) gradient echo and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequences to measure spatial distribution and signal frequency. Results The reporter protons reside ∼6.5 Å from the paramagnetic center, resulting in fast T 1 relaxation (T 1 = 8 ms) and a large paramagnetic frequency shift exceeding 60 ppm. Fast relaxation allowed short scan repetition times with high excitation flip angle, resulting in high sensitivity. The large dipolar shift allowed direct frequency selective excitation and acquisition of the dysprosium(III) complex, independent of the tissue water signal. The biokinetics of the complex were followed in vivo with a temporal resolution of 62 s following a single, low‐dose intravenous injection. The lower concentration limit for detection was ∼23 μM. Through MRSI, the temperature dependence of the paramagnetic shift (0.28 ppm.K−1) was exploited to examine tissue temperature variation. Conclusions These data demonstrate a new MRI agent with the potential for physiological monitoring by MRI. Magn Reson Med 77:1307–1317, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26922918

  19. Facility Search Criteria Help | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides powerful search capabilities offering more than 100 search criteria to target your results. Use the ECHO to search compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide.

  20. Accelerated Fast Spin-Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart Using a Self-Calibrated Split-Echo Approach

    PubMed Central

    Klix, Sabrina; Hezel, Fabian; Fuchs, Katharina; Ruff, Jan; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Design, validation and application of an accelerated fast spin-echo (FSE) variant that uses a split-echo approach for self-calibrated parallel imaging. Methods For self-calibrated, split-echo FSE (SCSE-FSE), extra displacement gradients were incorporated into FSE to decompose odd and even echo groups which were independently phase encoded to derive coil sensitivity maps, and to generate undersampled data (reduction factor up to R = 3). Reference and undersampled data were acquired simultaneously. SENSE reconstruction was employed. Results The feasibility of SCSE-FSE was demonstrated in phantom studies. Point spread function performance of SCSE-FSE was found to be competitive with traditional FSE variants. The immunity of SCSE-FSE for motion induced mis-registration between reference and undersampled data was shown using a dynamic left ventricular model and cardiac imaging. The applicability of black blood prepared SCSE-FSE for cardiac imaging was demonstrated in healthy volunteers including accelerated multi-slice per breath-hold imaging and accelerated high spatial resolution imaging. Conclusion SCSE-FSE obviates the need of external reference scans for SENSE reconstructed parallel imaging with FSE. SCSE-FSE reduces the risk for mis-registration between reference scans and accelerated acquisitions. SCSE-FSE is feasible for imaging of the heart and of large cardiac vessels but also meets the needs of brain, abdominal and liver imaging. PMID:24728341

  1. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  2. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (vts) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the vts derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  3. MSE-MRI sequence optimisation for measurement of bi- and tri-exponential T2 relaxation in a phantom and fruit.

    PubMed

    Adriaensen, Hans; Musse, Maja; Quellec, Stéphane; Vignaud, Alexandre; Cambert, Mireille; Mariette, François

    2013-12-01

    The transverse relaxation signal from vegetal cells can be described by multi-exponential behaviour, reflecting different water compartments. This multi-exponential relaxation is rarely measured by conventional MRI imaging protocols; mono-exponential relaxation times are measured instead, thus limiting information about of the microstructure and water status in vegetal cells. In this study, an optimised multiple spin echo (MSE) MRI sequence was evaluated for assessment of multi-exponential transverse relaxation in fruit tissues. The sequence was designed for the acquisition of a maximum of 512 echoes. Non-selective refocusing RF pulses were used in combination with balanced crusher gradients for elimination of spurious echoes. The study was performed on a bi-compartmental phantom with known T2 values and on apple and tomato fruit. T2 decays measured in the phantom and fruit were analysed using bi- and tri-exponential fits, respectively. The MRI results were compared with low field non-spatially resolved NMR measurements performed on the same samples. The results demonstrated that the MSE-MRI sequence can be used for up to tri-exponential T2 quantification allowing for estimation of relaxation times from a few tens of milliseconds to over a second. The effects of the crusher moment and the TE value on T2 measurements were studied both on the bi-compartmental phantom and on the fruit tissues. It was demonstrated that the sequence should be optimised with regard to the characteristics of the tissue to be examined by considering the effects of water molecular diffusion in the presence of both imaging gradients and gradients produced by susceptibility inhomogeneities.

  4. A real-time data acquisition and control of gradient coil noise for fMRI identification of hearing disorder in children with history of ear infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeseung; Holte, James; Ritenour, E Russell

    2013-02-01

    Early ear infection and trauma, from birth to age 12 are known to have a significant effect on sensory and cognitive development. This effect can be demonstrated through the fMRI study of children who have a history of ear infection compared to a control group. A second research question is the extent to which brain plasticity at an early age can reduce the impact of infection on hearing and cognitive development. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) provides a mapping of brain activity in cognitive and sensory regions by recording the oxygenation state of the local cerebral blood flow. The gradient coils of fMRI scanners generate intense acoustic noise (GCN) - to which the subject is in close proximity - in the range of 90 to 140 db SPL during the imaging process. Clearly this noise will impress its signature on low level brain response patterns. An Active Noise Canceller (ANC) system can suppress the effect of GCN on the subject's perception of a phonetic stimulus at the phoneme, word or phrase level. Due to a superimposition of the frequency and time domain components of the test signal and GCN for MR test, the ANC filtering system performs its function in real time - we must capture the brain's response to the test signal AFTER the noise has been removed. This goal is achieved through the application of field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology of NI LabVIEW. The presentation (in the noisy fMRI environment) of test words and phrases to hearing impaired children can identify sources of distortion to their perceptual processes associated with GCN. Once this distortion has been identified, learning strategies may be introduced to replace the hearing function distorted by early infection as well as the short term effect of GCN. The study of speech cognition without the confounding effect of GCN and with the varying level of GCN for a repeated test signal at later age can be allowed to a measure of recovery through brain plasticity.

  5. A real-time data acquisition and control of gradient coil noise for fMRI identification of hearing disorder in children with history of ear infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeseung; Holte, James

    2013-01-01

    Early ear infection and trauma, from birth to age 12 are known to have a significant effect on sensory and cognitive development. This effect can be demonstrated through the fMRI study of children who have a history of ear infection compared to a control group. A second research question is the extent to which brain plasticity at an early age can reduce the impact of infection on hearing and cognitive development. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) provides a mapping of brain activity in cognitive and sensory regions by recording the oxygenation state of the local cerebral blood flow. The gradient coils of fMRI scanners generate intense acoustic noise (GCN) - to which the subject is in close proximity - in the range of 90 to 140 db SPL during the imaging process. Clearly this noise will impress its signature on low level brain response patterns. An Active Noise Canceller (ANC) system can suppress the effect of GCN on the subject’s perception of a phonetic stimulus at the phoneme, word or phrase level. Due to a superimposition of the frequency and time domain components of the test signal and GCN for MR test, the ANC filtering system performs its function in real time - we must capture the brain’s response to the test signal AFTER the noise has been removed. This goal is achieved through the application of field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology of NI LabVIEW. The presentation (in the noisy fMRI environment) of test words and phrases to hearing impaired children can identify sources of distortion to their perceptual processes associated with GCN. Once this distortion has been identified, learning strategies may be introduced to replace the hearing function distorted by early infection as well as the short term effect of GCN. The study of speech cognition without the confounding effect of GCN and with the varying level of GCN for a repeated test signal at later age can be allowed to a measure of recovery through brain plasticity. PMID:23482910

  6. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  7. Application of accelerated acquisition and highly constrained reconstruction methods to MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang

    2011-12-01

    There are many Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications that require rapid data acquisition. In conventional proton MRI, representative applications include real-time dynamic imaging, whole-chest pulmonary perfusion imaging, high resolution coronary imaging, MR T1 or T2 mapping, etc. The requirement for fast acquisition and novel reconstruction methods is either due to clinical demand for high temporal resolution, high spatial resolution, or both. Another important category in which fast MRI methods are highly desirable is imaging with hyperpolarized (HP) contrast media, such as HP 3He imaging for evaluation of pulmonary function, and imaging of HP 13C-labeled substrates for the study of in vivo metabolic processes. To address these needs, numerous MR undersampling methods have been developed and combined with novel image reconstruction techniques. This thesis aims to develop novel data acquisition and image reconstruction techniques for the following applications. (I) Ultrashort echo time spectroscopic imaging (UTESI). The need for acquiring many echo images in spectroscopic imaging with high spatial resolution usually results in extended scan times, and thus requires k-space undersampling and novel imaging reconstruction methods to overcome the artifacts related to the undersampling. (2) Dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic imaging. HP 13C compounds exhibit non-equilibrium T1 decay and rapidly evolving spectral dynamics, and therefore it is vital to utilize the polarized signal wisely and efficiently to observe the entire temporal dynamic of the injected "C compounds as well as the corresponding downstream metabolites. (3) Time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography. The diagnosis of vascular diseases often requires large coverage of human body anatomies with high spatial resolution and sufficient temporal resolution for the separation of arterial phases from venous phases. The goal of simultaneously achieving high spatial and temporal resolution has

  8. Three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the accurate, extensive quantification of microvascular permeability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Lobatto, Mark E; Dyvorne, Hadrien; Robson, Philip M; Millon, Antoine; Senders, Max L; Lairez, Olivier; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Coolen, Bram F; Black, Alexandra; Mulder, Willem J M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques that cause stroke and myocardial infarction are characterized by increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has been proposed as a method to quantify vessel wall microvascular permeability in vivo. Until now, most DCE-MRI studies of atherosclerosis have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice imaging. Although providing the high spatial resolution required to image the arterial vessel wall, these approaches do not allow the quantification of plaque permeability with extensive anatomical coverage, an essential feature when imaging heterogeneous diseases, such as atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, we present the first systematic evaluation of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, DCE-MRI for the extensive quantification of plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed, with validation in atherosclerotic rabbits. We compare two acquisitions: 3D turbo field echo (TFE) with motion-sensitized-driven equilibrium (MSDE) preparation and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE). We find 3D TFE DCE-MRI to be superior to 3D TSE DCE-MRI in terms of temporal stability metrics. Both sequences show good intra- and inter-observer reliability, and significant correlation with ex vivo permeability measurements by Evans Blue near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, we explore the feasibility of using compressed sensing to accelerate 3D DCE-MRI of atherosclerosis, to improve its temporal resolution and therefore the accuracy of permeability quantification. Using retrospective under-sampling and reconstructions, we show that compressed sensing alone may allow the acceleration of 3D DCE-MRI by up to four-fold. We anticipate that the development of high-spatial-resolution 3D DCE-MRI with prospective compressed sensing acceleration may allow for the more accurate and extensive quantification of atherosclerotic plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed. We foresee that this approach may allow for

  9. Sensitivity and specificity considerations for fMRI encoding, decoding, and mapping of auditory cortex at ultra-high field.

    PubMed

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Kemper, Valentin G; Schmitter, Sebastian; Vu, An T; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Formisano, Elia; Yacoub, Essa

    2017-03-31

    Following rapid technological advances, ultra-high field functional MRI (fMRI) enables exploring correlates of neuronal population activity at an increasing spatial resolution. However, as the fMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is a vascular signal, the spatial specificity of fMRI data is ultimately determined by the characteristics of the underlying vasculature. At 7T, fMRI measurement parameters determine the relative contribution of the macro- and microvasculature to the acquired signal. Here we investigate how these parameters affect relevant high-end fMRI analyses such as encoding, decoding, and submillimeter mapping of voxel preferences in the human auditory cortex. Specifically, we compare a T2* weighted fMRI dataset, obtained with 2D gradient echo (GE) EPI, to a predominantly T2 weighted dataset obtained with 3D GRASE. We first investigated the decoding accuracy based on two encoding models that represented different hypotheses about auditory cortical processing. This encoding/decoding analysis profited from the large spatial coverage and sensitivity of the T2* weighted acquisitions, as evidenced by a significantly higher prediction accuracy in the GE-EPI dataset compared to the 3D GRASE dataset for both encoding models. The main disadvantage of the T2* weighted GE-EPI dataset for encoding/decoding analyses was that the prediction accuracy exhibited cortical depth dependent vascular biases. However, we propose that the comparison of prediction accuracy across the different encoding models may be used as a post processing technique to salvage the spatial interpretability of the GE-EPI cortical depth-dependent prediction accuracy. Second, we explored the mapping of voxel preferences. Large-scale maps of frequency preference (i.e., tonotopy) were similar across datasets, yet the GE-EPI dataset was preferable due to its larger spatial coverage and sensitivity. However, submillimeter tonotopy maps revealed biases in assigned frequency

  10. SU-D-9A-03: STAMP: Simulator for Texture Analysis in MRI/PET

    SciTech Connect

    Laberge, S; Vallieres, M; Levesque, I R.; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a convenient simulation platform to facilitate PET/MR image analysis with the prospect of gaining a better understanding of the influence of acquisition parameters on PET/MRI textural features. The simulation platform is demonstrated by showing textural variations of a representative case study using different image acquisition parameters. Methods: The simulation platform is composed of MRI simulators JEMRIS and SIMRI to achieve simulations of customized MRI sequences on sample tumor models. The PET simulator GATE is used to get 2D and 3D Monte Carlo acquisitions of voxelized PET sources using a phantom geometry and a customized scanner architecture. The platform incorporates a series of graphical user interfaces written in Matlab. Two GUIs are used to facilitate communication with the simulation executables installed on a computer cluster. A third GUI is used to collect and display the clinical and simulated images, as well as fused PET/MRI images, and perform computation of textural features.To illustrate the capabilities of this platform, one FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) digitized tumor models were generated from clinical images of a soft-tissue sarcoma patient. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using 3 different echo times (TE) and 5 different repetition times (TR). PET 2D images were simulated using an OSEM algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. Results: STAMP was successfully used to produce numerically simulated FDG-PET and MRI images, and to calculate their corresponding textures. Three typical textures (GLCM-Contrast, GLSZM-ZSV and NGTDM-Coarseness) were found to vary by a range of 45% on average compared to reference scanning conditions in the case of FDG-PET, and by a range of 40% in the case of T1w MRI. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a Matlab-based simulation platform to facilitate PET/MRI texture image analysis for outcome prediction.

  11. Nuclear quadrupole resonance echoes from hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Ota, Go; Itozaki, Hideo

    2006-10-01

    We investigated the echo phenomenon of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) from hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). We detected the pure NQR echo signal of HMT with a short pulse interval. The intensity of the echo signal increased as the pulse interval time was decreased. We observed that a clean echo signal was generated even when the pulse interval was shorter than the decay time constant T(2)(*). Since the short interval time gives a strong echo, our result insists that shorter interval time is preferred for the NQR detection.

  12. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  13. [Importance of rapid gradient echo sequences for nuclear magnetic tomographic diagnosis of joint diseases].

    PubMed

    König, H; Deimling, M

    1986-09-01

    The possibilities and limitations of rapid echo acquisition methods in various posttraumatic, degenerative and inflammatory diseases of the joints are demonstrated and discussed on the basis of a pilot study. It is evident that specific information important for clarifying effusions and meniscopathies is supplied especially by "water"-like images. Limitations of spatial resolution are at present still a limiting factor.

  14. Zero and first order phase shift correction for field map estimation with dual-echo GRE using bipolar gradients

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Desmond T. B.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Boklye

    2007-01-01

    A simple phase error correction technique used for field map estimation with a generally available dual-echo GRE sequence is presented. Magnetic field inhomogeneity maps estimated using two separate GRE volume acquisitions at different echo times are prone to dynamic motion errors between acquisitions. By using the dual-echo sequence the data are collected during two back-to-back readout gradients in opposite polarity after a single RF pulse, and inter-echo motion artifacts and alignment errors in field map estimation can be factored out. Residual phase error from the asymmetric readout pulses is modeled as an affine term in the readout direction. Results from phantom and human data suggest that the first order phase correction term stays constant over time and, hence, can be applied to different data acquired with the same protocol over time. The zero order phase correction term may change with time and is estimated empirically for different scans. PMID:17442524

  15. The future of acquisition speed, coverage, sensitivity, and resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    Two decades of technology development has continually improved the image quality, spatial-temporal resolution, and sensitivity of the fMRI acquisition. In this article, I assess our current acquisition needs, briefly examine the technological breakthroughs that have benefited fMRI in the past, and look at some promising technologies that are currently under development to try to envision what the fMRI acquisition protocol of the future might look like. PMID:22421052

  16. Dance of the Light Echoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This composite image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the remnant of a star that exploded, called Cassiopeia A (center) and its surrounding 'light echoes' -- dances of light through dusty clouds, created when stars blast apart. The light echoes are colored and the surrounding clouds of dust are gray.

    In figure 1, dramatic changes are highlighted in phenomena referred to as light echoes (colored areas) around the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (center). Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died.

    A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. In figure 1, this apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 11,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    This composite consists of six processed images taken over a time span of three years. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Bluer colors represent an earlier time and redder ones, a later time. The progression of the light echo through the dust can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps.

    This

  17. Reducing respiratory effect in motion correction for EPI images with sequential slice acquisition order.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Puce, Aina

    2014-04-30

    Motion correction is critical for data analysis of fMRI time series. Most motion correction algorithms treat the head as a rigid body. Respiration of the subject, however, can alter the static magnetic field in the head and result in motion-like slice shifts for echo planar imaging (EPI). The delay of acquisition between slices causes a phase difference in respiration so that the shifts vary with slice positions. To characterize the effect of respiration on motion correction, we acquired fast sampled fMRI data using multi-band EPI and then simulated different acquisition schemes. Our results indicated that respiration introduces additional noise after motion correction. The signal variation between volumes after motion correction increases when the effective TR increases from 675ms to 2025ms. This problem can be corrected if slices are acquired sequentially. For EPI with a sequential acquisition scheme, we propose to divide the image volumes into several segments so that slices within each segment are acquired close in time and then perform motion correction on these segments separately. We demonstrated that the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR) was increased when the motion correction was performed on the segments separately rather than on the whole image. This enhancement of TSNR was not evenly distributed across the segments and was not observed for interleaved acquisition. The level of increase was higher for superior slices. On superior slices the percentage of TSNR gain was comparable to that using image based retrospective correction for respiratory noise. Our results suggest that separate motion correction on segments is highly recommended for sequential acquisition schemes, at least for slices distal to the chest.

  18. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Moodie, D.S.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Sterba, R.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied 11 adult patients (pts) with atrial septal defect (ASD) and 4 adult pts with ventricular septal defect (VSD) using cine magnetic resonance. All studies were performed using a .6T superconducting magnet with ECG gating and electronic axial rotation when appropriate. Repeated multislice image with no change in physiologic delay of the spin echo pulse sequence, but varying the time by offsetting one slice at each imaging stage allowed for an N x N collection of data where N is the number of slices in one collection set and is equal to the number of sets collected. Algebraic manipulation of the T1 weighted images (TE=30mSec TRMRI. Using this technique, the authors have identified both atrial and ventricular septal defects in all pts preoperatively and have noted an intact atrial septum following surgery. Standard MRI produced 4 false positive studies postoperatively because only 1 phase of the cardiac cycle was reviewed. Cine MRI allows better identification of septal defects than standard static acquisitions. The cine technique also provides better definition and delineation of right sided abnormalities which are maximized when viewed in a cardiac major axis obtained by electronic axial rotation.

  19. A pilot validation of multi-echo based echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging in human calf muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Jon K; Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Roberts, Christian K; Lee, Cathy C; Hahn, Theodore J; Thomas, M Albert

    2014-10-01

    A current limitation of MR spectroscopic imaging of multiple skeletal muscles is prolonged scan duration. A significant reduction in the total scan duration using the echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) sequence was accomplished using two bipolar readout trains with different phase-encoded echoes for one of two spatial dimensions within a single repetition time (TR). The second bipolar readout was used for spatially encoding the outer k-space, whereas the first readout was used for the central k-space only. The performance of this novel sequence, called multi-echo based echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (ME-EPCOSI), was demonstrated by localizing specific key features in calf muscles and bone marrow of 11 healthy volunteers and five subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A 3 T MRI-MRS scanner equipped with a transmit-receive extremity coil was used. Localization of the ME-EPCOSI sequence was in good agreement with the earlier single-readout based EP-COSI sequence and the required scan time was reduced by a factor of two. In agreement with an earlier report using single-voxel based 2D MRS, significantly increased unsaturated pools of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipid (EMCL) and decreased IMCL and EMCL unsaturation indices (UIs) were observed in the soleus and tibialis anterior muscle regions of subjects with T2D compared with healthy controls. In addition, significantly decreased choline content was observed in the soleus of T2D subjects compared with healthy controls. Multi-voxel characterization of IMCL and EMCL ratios and UI in the calf muscle may be useful for the non-invasive assessment of altered lipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of T2D.

  20. MRI and Histopathologic Study of a Novel Cholesterol-Fed Rabbit Model of Xanthogranuloma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanxin; Hamilton, Amanda M.; Parkins, Katie M.; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Rogers, Kem A.; Zeineh, Michael M.; Rutt, Brian K.; Ronald, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a rabbit model of xanthogranuloma based on supplementation of dietary cholesterol. The aim of this study was to analyze the xanthogranulomatous lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological examination. Materials and Methods Rabbits were fed a low-level cholesterol (CH) diet (n = 10) or normal chow (n = 5) for 24 months. In vivo brain imaging was performed on a 3T MR system using fast imaging employing steady state acquisition, susceptibility-weighted imaging, spoiled gradient recalled, T1-weighted inversion recovery imaging and T1 relaxometry, PD-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo imaging and T2 relaxometry, iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation, ultrashort TE MRI (UTE-MRI), and T2∗ relaxometry. MR images were evaluated using a Likert scale for lesion presence and quantitative analysis of lesion size, ventricular volume, and T1, T2, and T2∗ values of lesions was performed. After imaging, brain specimens were examined using histological methods. Results In vivo MRI revealed that 6 of 10 CH-fed rabbits developed lesions in the choroid plexus. Region-of-interest analysis showed that for CH-fed rabbits the mean lesion volume was 8.5 ± 2.6mm3 and the volume of the lateral ventricle was significantly increased compared to controls (P < 0.01). The lesions showed significantly shorter mean T2 values (35 ± 12 msec, P < 0.001), longer mean T1 values (1581 ± 146 msec, P < 0.05), and shorter T2∗ values (22 ± 13 msec, P < 0.001) compared to adjacent brain structures. The ultrashort T2∗ components were visible using UTE-MRI. Histopathologic evaluation of lesions demonstrated features of human xanthogranuloma. Conclusion Rabbits fed a low-level CH diet develop sizable intraventricular masses that have similar histopathological features as human xanthogranuloma. Multiparametric MRI techniques were able to provide information about the complex composition of these lesions. PMID

  1. MRI virtual biopsies: analysis of an explanted endovascular device and perspectives for the future.

    PubMed

    Guidoin, R; Zhang, Z; Douville, Y; Bonny, J M; Renou, J P; Baslé, M-F; Zarins, C K; Legrand, A P; Guzman, R

    2006-01-01

    Information that can be obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of explanted endovascular devices must be validated as this method is non-destructive. Histology of such a device together with its encroached tissues can be elegantly performed after polymethymethacrylate (PMMA) embedding, but this approach requires destruction of the specimen. The issue is therefore to determine if the MRI is sufficient to fully validate an explanted device based upon the characterization of an explanted specimen. An AneuRx device deployed percutaneously 25 months earlier in a 75-year-old patient was removed en bloc at autopsy together with the surrounding aneurysmal sac and segments of the upstream and downstream arteries. Macroscopic pictures were taken and a slice of the cross-section was processed for histology after polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) embedding. For the magnetic resonance imaging investigation, the device was inserted in a Biospec 4.7 T MRI system with a 20 mm diameter birdcage resonator used for both emission and reception. A Spin-Echo (SE) was used to acquire both T1 proton density (PD) and T2 weighted images. A gradient-echo (GE) sampling of a free induction decay (GESFID) was used to generate multiple GE images using a single excitation pulse so that four images at different TE were obtained in the same acquisition. The selected explanted device was outstandingly well-healed compared to most devices harvested from humans. No inflammatory process was observed in contact or at distance of the materials. In MRI T1 images display no specific contrast and were homogeneous in the different tissues. The contrast was improved on proton density weighed images. On the T2 weighed images, the different areas were well identified. The diffusion images displayed in the surrounding B region had the greatest diffusion coefficient and the greatest anisotropy. The MRI analysis of the explanted AneuRx device illustrates the possibilities of this technique to characterize the

  2. A radar-echo model for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Moore, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers developed a radar-echo model for Mars based on 12.6 cm continuous wave radio transmissions backscattered from the planet. The model broadly matches the variations in depolarized and polarized total radar cross sections with longitude observed by Goldstone in 1986 along 7 degrees S. and yields echo spectra that are generally similiar to the observed spectra. Radar map units in the model include an extensive cratered uplands unit with weak depolarized echo cross sections, average thermal inertias, moderate normal refelectivities, and moderate rms slopes; the volcanic units of Tharsis, Elysium, and Amazonis regions with strong depolarized echo cross sections, low thermal inertia, low normal reflectivities, and large rms slopes; and the northern planes units with moderate to strong depolarized echo cross sections, moderate to very high thermal inertias, moderate to large normal reflectivities, and moderate rms slopes. The relevance of the model to the interpretation of radar echoes from Mars is discussed.

  3. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  4. Is Echo a complex adaptive system?

    PubMed

    Smith, R M; Bedau, M A

    2000-01-01

    We evaluate whether John Holland's Echo model exemplifies his theory of complex adaptive systems. After reviewing Holland's theory of complex adaptive systems and describing his Escho model, we describe and explain the characteristic evolutionary behavior observed in a series of Echo model runs. We conclude that Echo lacks the diversity of hierarchically organized aggregates that typify complex adaptive systems, and we explore possible explanations for this failure.

  5. The Echoes of Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) acquires, archives, and manages data from all of NASA s Earth science satellites, for the benefit of the Space Agency and for the benefit of others, including local governments, first responders, the commercial remote sensing industry, teachers, museums, and the general public. EOSDIS is currently handling an extraordinary amount of NASA scientific data. To give an idea of the volume of information it receives, NASA s Terra Earth-observing satellite, just one of many NASA satellites sending down data, sends it hundreds of gigabytes a day, almost as much data as the Hubble Space Telescope acquires in an entire year, or about equal to the amount of information that could be found in hundreds of pickup trucks filled with books. To make EOSDIS data completely accessible to the Earth science community, NASA teamed up with private industry in 2000 to develop an Earth science "marketplace" registry that lets public users quickly drill down to the exact information they need. It also enables them to publish their research and resources alongside of NASA s research and resources. This registry is known as the Earth Observing System ClearingHOuse, or ECHO. The charter for this project focused on having an infrastructure completely independent from EOSDIS that would allow for more contributors and open up additional data access options. Accordingly, it is only fitting that the term ECHO is more than just an acronym; it represents the functionality of the system in that it can echo out and create interoperability among other systems, all while maturing with time as industry technologies and standards change and improve.

  6. Project Echo: Antenna Steering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klahn, R.; Norton, J. A.; Githens, J. A.

    1961-01-01

    The Project Echo communications experiment employed large, steerable,transmitting and receiving antennas at the ground terminals. It was necessary that these highly directional antennas be continuously and accurately pointed at the passing satellite. This paper describes a new type of special purpose data converter for directing narrow-beam communication antennas on the basis of predicted information. The system is capable of converting digital input data into real-time analog voltage commands with a dynamic accuracy of +/- 0.05 degree, which meets the requirements of the present antennas.

  7. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  8. How restful is it with all that noise? Comparison of Interleaved silent steady state (ISSS) and conventional imaging in resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Andoh, J; Ferreira, M; Leppert, I R; Matsushita, R; Pike, B; Zatorre, R J

    2017-02-15

    Resting-state fMRI studies have become very important in cognitive neuroscience because they are able to identify BOLD fluctuations in brain circuits involved in motor, cognitive, or perceptual processes without the use of an explicit task. Such approaches have been fruitful when applied to various disordered populations, or to children or the elderly. However, insufficient attention has been paid to the consequences of the loud acoustic scanner noise associated with conventional fMRI acquisition, which could be an important confounding factor affecting auditory and/or cognitive networks in resting-state fMRI. Several approaches have been developed to mitigate the effects of acoustic noise on fMRI signals, including sparse sampling protocols and interleaved silent steady state (ISSS) acquisition methods, the latter being used only for task-based fMRI. Here, we developed an ISSS protocol for resting-state fMRI (rs-ISSS) consisting of rapid acquisition of a set of echo planar imaging volumes following each silent period, during which the steady state longitudinal magnetization was maintained with a train of relatively silent slice-selective excitation pulses. We evaluated the test-retest reliability of intensity and spatial extent of connectivity networks of fMRI BOLD signal across three different days for rs-ISSS and compared it with a standard resting-state fMRI (rs-STD). We also compared the strength and distribution of connectivity networks between rs-ISSS and rs-STD. We found that both rs-ISSS and rs-STD showed high reproducibility of fMRI signal across days. In addition, rs-ISSS showed a more robust pattern of functional connectivity within the somatosensory and motor networks, as well as an auditory network compared with rs-STD. An increased connectivity between the default mode network and the language network and with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) network was also found for rs-ISSS compared with rs-STD. Finally, region of interest analysis showed

  9. Light echoes - Type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1987-01-01

    Type II supernovae (SNs) light curves show a remarkable range of shapes. Data have been collected for the 12 Type II SNs that have light curve information for more than four months past maximum. Contrary to previous reports, it is found that (1) the decay rate after 100 days past maximum varies by almost an order of magnitude and (2) the light curve shapes are not bimodally distributed, but actually form a continuum. In addition, it is found that the extinctions to the SNs are related to the light curve shapes. This implies that the absorbing dust is local to the SNs. The dust is likely to be part of a circumstellar shell emitted by the SN progenitor that Dwek (1983) has used to explain infrared echoes. The optical depth of the shell can get quite large. In such cases, it is found that the photons scattered and delayed by reflection off dust grains will dominate the light curve several months after peak brightness. This 'light echo' offers a straightforward explanation of the diversity of Type II SN light curves.

  10. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  11. Cine-MRI versus two-dimensional echocardiography to measure in vivo left ventricular function in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Daniel J; Carr, Carolyn A; Tyler, Damian J; Clarke, Kieran

    2008-08-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography is the most commonly used non-invasive method for measuring in vivo cardiac function in experimental animals. In humans, measurements of cardiac function made using cine-MRI compare favourably with those made using echocardiography. However, no rigorous comparison has been made in small animals. Here, standard short-axis two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography (2D-echo) and cine-MRI measurements were made in the same rats, both control and after chronic myocardial infarction. Correlations between the two techniques were found for end diastolic area, stroke area and ejection fraction, but cine-MRI measurements of ejection fraction were 12+/-6% higher than those made using 2D-echo, because of the 1.8-fold higher temporal resolution of the MRI technique (4.6 ms vs 8.3 ms). Repeated measurements on the same group of rats over several days showed that the cine-MRI technique was more reproducible than 2D-echo, in that 2D-echo would require five times more animals to find a statistically significant difference. In summary, caution should be exercised when comparing functional results acquired using short-axis 2D-echo vs cine-MRI. The accuracy of cine-MRI allows identification of alterations in heart function that may be missed when using 2D-echo.

  12. Joint estimation and correction of geometric distortions for EPI functional MRI using harmonic retrieval.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien M; Sutton, Bradley P; Morrison, Robert L; Do, Minh N

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses applied spatial variations in the magnetic field to encode spatial position. Therefore, nonuniformities in the main magnetic field can cause image distortions. In order to correct the image distortions, it is desirable to simultaneously acquire data with a field map in registration. We propose a joint estimation (JE) framework with a fast, noniterative approach using harmonic retrieval (HR) methods, combined with a multi-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition. The connection with HR establishes an elegant framework to solve the JE problem through a sequence of 1-D HR problems in which efficient solutions are available. We also derive the condition on the smoothness of the field map in order for HR techniques to recover the image with high signal-to-noise ratio. Compared to other dynamic field mapping methods, this method is not constrained by the absolute level of the field inhomogeneity over the slice, but relies on a generous pixel-to-pixel smoothness. Moreover, this method can recover image, field map, and T2* map simultaneously.

  13. Simultaneous Imaging of Radiation-Induced Cerebral Microbleeds, Arteries and Veins, Using a Multiple Gradient Echo Sequence at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Banerjee, Suchandrima; Kelly, Douglas A.C.; Hess, Christopher P.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the utility of a multi-echo sequence at 7 Tesla (T) for simultaneous time-of-flight (TOF) MR-angiography (MRA) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) of radiation-induced cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), intracranial arteries, and veins. Methods A four-echo gradient-echo sequence was implemented on a 7T scanner. The first echo was used to create TOF-MRA images, while the remaining echoes were combined to visualize CMBs and veins on SWI images. The sequence was evaluated on eight brain tumor patients with known radiation-induced CMBs. Single-echo images were also acquired to visually and quantitatively compare the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of small- and intermediate-vessels between acquisitions. The number of CMBs detected with each acquisition was also quantified. Statistical significance was determined using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results Compared with the single-echo sequences, the CNR of small and intermediate arteries increased 7.6% (P < 0.03) and 9.5% (P = 0.06), respectively, while the CNR of small and intermediate veins were not statistically different between sequences (P = 0.95 and P = 0.46, respectively). However, these differences were not discernible by visual inspection. Also the multi-echo sequence detected 18.3% more CMBs (P < 0.008) due to higher slice resolution. Conclusion The proposed 7T multi-echo sequence depicts arteries, veins, and CMBs on a single image to facilitate quantitative evaluation of radiation-induced vascular injury. PMID:25471321

  14. A robust multi-shot scan strategy for high-resolution diffusion weighted MRI enabled by multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE).

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-Kuei; Guidon, Arnaud; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Song, Allen W

    2013-05-15

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) data have been mostly acquired with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) to minimize motion induced artifacts. The spatial resolution, however, is inherently limited in single-shot EPI, even when the parallel imaging (usually at an acceleration factor of 2) is incorporated. Multi-shot acquisition strategies could potentially achieve higher spatial resolution and fidelity, but they are generally susceptible to motion-induced phase errors among excitations that are exacerbated by diffusion sensitizing gradients, rendering the reconstructed images unusable. It has been shown that shot-to-shot phase variations may be corrected using navigator echoes, but at the cost of imaging throughput. To address these challenges, a novel and robust multi-shot DWI technique, termed multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), is developed here to reliably and inherently correct nonlinear shot-to-shot phase variations without the use of navigator echoes. The performance of the MUSE technique is confirmed experimentally in healthy adult volunteers on 3Tesla MRI systems. This newly developed technique should prove highly valuable for mapping brain structures and connectivities at high spatial resolution for neuroscience studies.

  15. A robust multi-shot scan strategy for high-resolution diffusion weighted MRI enabled by multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-kuei; Guidon, Arnaud; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Song, Allen W.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) data have been mostly acquired with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) to minimize motion induced artifacts. The spatial resolution, however, is inherently limited in single-shot EPI, even when the parallel imaging (usually at an acceleration factor of 2) is incorporated. Multi-shot acquisition strategies could potentially achieve higher spatial resolution and fidelity, but they are generally susceptible to motion-induced phase errors among excitations that are exacerbated by diffusion sensitizing gradients, rendering the reconstructed images unusable. It has been shown that shot-to-shot phase variations may be corrected using navigator echoes, but at the cost of imaging throughput. To address these challenges, a novel and robust multi-shot DWI technique, termed multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), is developed here to reliably and inherently correct nonlinear shot-to-shot phase variations without the use of navigator echoes. The performance of the MUSE technique is confirmed experimentally in healthy adult volunteers on 3 Tesla MRI systems. This newly developed technique should prove highly valuable for mapping brain structures and connectivities at high spatial resolution for neuroscience studies. PMID:23370063

  16. Solar Sail Model Validation from Echo Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Brickerhoff, Adam T.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion program has been engaged in a project to increase the technology readiness of solar sails. Recently, these efforts came to fruition in the form of several software tools to model solar sail guidance, navigation and control. Furthermore, solar sails are one of five technologies competing for the New Millennium Program Space Technology 9 flight demonstration mission. The historic Echo 1 and Echo 2 balloons were comprised of aluminized Mylar, which is the near-term material of choice for solar sails. Both spacecraft, but particularly Echo 2, were in low Earth orbits with characteristics similar to the proposed Space Technology 9 orbit. Therefore, the Echo balloons are excellent test cases for solar sail model validation. We present the results of studies of Echo trajectories that validate solar sail models of optics, solar radiation pressure, shape and low-thrust orbital dynamics.

  17. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocket-borne instrumentation confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes were observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Of these, 102 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2, 4 or 8 keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher energy electrons led the lower energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. The injection process is discussed as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection.

  18. Hematite Abundance Map at Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the hematite abundance map for a portion of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop near where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landed. It was acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument from a spot called 'Echo.' Portions of the inner crater wall in this region appear rich in hematite (red). The sharp boundary from hematite-rich to hematite-poor (yellow and green) surfaces corresponds to a change in the surface texture and color. The hematite-rich surfaces have ripple-like forms suggesting wind transported hematite to these surfaces. The bounce marks produced during landing at the base of the slope on the left are low in hematite (blue). The hematite grains that originally covered the surface were pushed below the surface by the lander, exposing a soil that has less hematite.

  19. Rapid and Accurate T2 Mapping from Multi Spin Echo Data Using Bloch-Simulation-Based Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Sodickson, Daniel K; Block, Tobias Kai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative T2-relaxation-based contrast has the potential to provide valuable clinical information. Practical T2-mapping, however, is impaired either by prohibitively long acquisition times or by contamination of fast multi-echo protocols by stimulated and indirect echoes. This work presents a novel post-processing approach aiming to overcome the common penalties associated with multi-echo protocols, and enabling rapid and accurate mapping of T2 relaxation values. Methods Bloch simulations are used to estimate the actual echo modulation curve (EMC) in a multi spin-echo experiment. Simulations are repeated for a range of T2 values and transmit field scales, yielding a database of simulated EMCs, which is then used to identify the T2 value whose EMC most closely matches the experimentally measured data at each voxel. Results T2 maps of both phantom and in vivo scans were successfully reconstructed, closely matching maps produced from single spin-echo data. Results were consistent over the physiological range of T2 values and across different experimental settings. Conclusion The proposed technique allows accurate T2 mapping in clinically feasible scan times, free of user- and scanner-dependent variations, while providing a comprehensive framework that can be extended to model other parameters (e.g., T1, B1+, B0, diffusion) and support arbitrary acquisition schemes. PMID:24648387

  20. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space.

  1. Excitation of photon echo by noise pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruzdin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation of photon echo by noise pulses that are formed by modulation of the carrying frequency with Gauss noise is modeled. The modeling is based on optical Bloch equations the solution of which for noise pulse realizations is constructed by their stepwise approximation. In terms of the formalism of state transfer matrices, the two- and three-pulse excitation modes are analyzed. The complex envelopes of the primary and stimulated echo responses are determined. In the linear (low-level-signal) mode, the shape of the two-pulse echo corresponds to that of the time delayed and inverted noise pulse. The boundary of the linear mode, upon exceeding of which distortions of the shape of the noise pulse become noticeable, is determined. The shape of the stimulated (three-pulse) echo in the linear mode corresponds to that of the autocorrelation function of the noise pulse realization. Upon passage beyond the boundary of the linear mode, the shape of the three-pulse echo corresponds either to the cross-correlation function of distorted noise pulses (with different intensities) or to the autocorrelation function of distorted pulses (with the same intensities). The modeled photon echo excitation modes can be used in photon echo processors to process signals in the light range.

  2. MRI findings in Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Raval, Monali; Kumari, Rima; Dung, Aldrin Anthony Dung; Guglani, Bhuvnesh; Gupta, Nitij; Gupta, Rohit

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7), abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  3. Elastography: A New Ultrasound and MRI Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Theo Z.; Vieira, Silvio L.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.

    2008-08-11

    Elastography is an imaging technique whereby local tissue strains are estimated from small displacements of internal tissue structure. These displacements are generated from a weak, quasi-static or dynamic stress field. Displacement evaluation through ultrasound is based on time delay estimation between speckle patterns of echo maps acquired for different levels of tissue deformation. A classical model of deformation is applying a quasi-static compression on a sample during echoes acquisition. The elastogram map corresponds to the spatial derivation of the displacement map. By magnetic resonance, the displacement is evaluated from a map of phase acquired using a sequence gradient echo synchronized with a mechanical end sinusoidal excitation. The map of shear elastic modulus is obtained from the phase map.

  4. Elastography: A New Ultrasound and MRI Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, Theo Z.; Vieira, Sílvio L.; Carneiro, Antônio. A. O.

    2008-08-01

    Elastography is an imaging technique whereby local tissue strains are estimated from small displacements of internal tissue structure. These displacements are generated from a weak, quasi-static or dynamic stress field. Displacement evaluation through ultrasound is based on time delay estimation between speckle patterns of echo maps acquired for different levels of tissue deformation. A classical model of deformation is applying a quasi-static compression on a sample during echoes acquisition. The elastogram map corresponds to the spatial derivation of the displacement map. By magnetic resonance, the displacement is evaluated from a map of phase acquired using a sequence gradient echo synchronized with a mechanical end sinusoidal excitation. The map of shear elastic modulus is obtained from the phase map.

  5. WE-B-BRD-00: MRI for Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  6. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  7. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  8. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the shoulder uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  9. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  10. Correction of concomitant gradient artifacts in experimental microtesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Myers, Whittier R; Mössle, Michael; Clarke, John

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suffers from artifacts caused by concomitant gradients when the product of the magnetic field gradient and the dimension of the sample becomes comparable to the static magnetic field. To investigate and correct for these artifacts at very low magnetic fields, we have acquired MR images of a 165-mm phantom in a 66-microT field using gradients up to 350 microT/m. We prepolarize the protons in a field of about 100 mT, apply a spin-echo pulse sequence, and detect the precessing spins using a superconducting gradiometer coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Distortion and blurring are readily apparent at the edges of the images; by comparing the experimental images to computer simulations, we show that concomitant gradients cause these artifacts. We develop a non-perturbative, post-acquisition phase correction algorithm that eliminates the effects of concomitant gradients in both the simulated and the experimental images. This algorithm assumes that the switching time of the phase-encoding gradient is long compared to the spin precession period. In a second technique, we demonstrate that raising the precession field during phase encoding can also eliminate blurring caused by concomitant phase-encoding gradients; this technique enables one to correct concomitant gradient artifacts even when the detector has a restricted bandwidth that sets an upper limit on the precession frequency. In particular, the combination of phase correction and precession field cycling should allow one to add MRI capabilities to existing 300-channel SQUID systems used to detect neuronal currents in the brain because frequency encoding could be performed within the 1-2 kHz bandwidth of the readout system.

  11. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors. PMID:27193936

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  13. Geometric spin echo under zero field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Komura, Yusuke; Mishima, Shota; Tanaka, Touta; Niikura, Naeko; Kosaka, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Spin echo is a fundamental tool for quantum registers and biomedical imaging. It is believed that a strong magnetic field is needed for the spin echo to provide long memory and high resolution, since a degenerate spin cannot be controlled or addressed under a zero magnetic field. While a degenerate spin is never subject to dynamic control, it is still subject to geometric control. Here we show the spin echo of a degenerate spin subsystem, which is geometrically controlled via a mediating state split by the crystal field, in a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. The demonstration reveals that the degenerate spin is protected by inherent symmetry breaking called zero-field splitting. The geometric spin echo under zero field provides an ideal way to maintain the coherence without any dynamics, thus opening the way to pseudo-static quantum random access memory and non-invasive biosensors.

  14. Data processing of records of meteoric echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinský, P.

    2016-01-01

    The data obtained in the period from 4 November 2014 to 31 July 2014 by our receiving and recording system was statistically processed. The system records meteoric echoes from the TV transmitter Lviv 49.739583 MHz (N49.8480° E24.0369°, Ukraine) using a 4-element Yagi antenna with horizontal polarization (elevation of 0° and azimuth of 60°), receiver ICOM R-75 in the CW mode, and a computer with a recording using HROFFT v1.0.0f. The main goal was to identify weak showers in these data. Mayor or strong showers are visible without processing (referred at IMC2015, Mistelbach). To find or to identify weaker showers is more difficult. Not all echoes are meteoric echoes, but also ionospheric echoes or lightning disturbances are present.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE ECHOES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.; SATOGATA, T.; TOMAS. R.

    2005-05-16

    Beam echoes are a very sensitive method to measure diffusion, and longitudinal echo measurements were performed in a number of machines. In RHIC, for the first time, a transverse beam echo was observed after applying a dipole kick followed by a quadrupole .kick. After application of the dipole kick, the dipole moment decohered completely due to lattice nonlinearities. When a quadrupole kick is applied at time {tau} after the dipole kick, the beam re-cohered at time 2{tau} thus showing an echo response. We describe the experimental setup and measurement results. In the measurements the dipole and quadrupole kick amplitudes, amplitude dependent tune shift, and the time between dipole and quadrupole kick were varied. In addition, measurements were taken with gold bunches of different intensities. These should exhibit different transverse diffusion rates due to intra-beam scattering.

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  18. MRI renaissance.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S

    1997-12-01

    A few years ago, magnetic resonance imaging was healthcare's version of a foreign sports car-flashy, expensive and impractical. Now, after years in the doldrums, sales of MRI systems are roaring back. An aging fleet of MRI scanners due for replacement and a hearty increase in doctors' use of the versatile imaging tools are combining to fuel the surge in demand, vendors and customers say.

  19. Estimation of Characteristics of Echo Envelope Using RF Echo Signal from the Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Ikeda, Kazuki; Moriyasu, Norifumi

    2001-05-01

    To realize quantitative diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, we have been analyzing the probability density function (PDF) of echo amplitude using B-mode images. However, the B-mode image is affected by the various signal and image processing techniques used in the diagnosis equipment, so a detailed and quantitative analysis is very difficult. In this paper, we analyze the PDF of echo amplitude using RF echo signal and B-mode images of normal and cirrhotic livers, and compare both results to examine the validity of the RF echo signal.

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    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  16. Corporate Compliance Screener Help | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. Integrated strategy for improving functional connectivity mapping using multiecho fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Prantik; Brenowitz, Noah D.; Voon, Valerie; Worbe, Yulia; Vértes, Petra E.; Inati, Souheil J.; Saad, Ziad S.; Bandettini, Peter A.; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Functional connectivity analysis of resting state blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional MRI is widely used for noninvasively studying brain functional networks. Recent findings have indicated, however, that even small (≤1 mm) amounts of head movement during scanning can disproportionately bias connectivity estimates, despite various preprocessing efforts. Further complications for interregional connectivity estimation from time domain signals include the unaccounted reduction in BOLD degrees of freedom related to sensitivity losses from high subject motion. To address these issues, we describe an integrated strategy for data acquisition, denoising, and connectivity estimation. This strategy builds on our previously published technique combining data acquisition with multiecho (ME) echo planar imaging and analysis with spatial independent component analysis (ICA), called ME-ICA, which distinguishes BOLD (neuronal) and non-BOLD (artifactual) components based on linear echo-time dependence of signals—a characteristic property of BOLD signal changes. Here we show for 32 control subjects that this method provides a physically principled and nearly operator-independent way of removing complex artifacts such as motion from resting state data. We then describe a robust estimator of functional connectivity based on interregional correlation of BOLD-independent component coefficients. This estimator, called independent components regression, considerably simplifies statistical inference for functional connectivity because degrees of freedom equals the number of independent coefficients. Compared with traditional connectivity estimation methods, the proposed strategy results in fourfold improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, functional connectivity analysis with improved specificity, and valid statistical inference with nominal control of type 1 error in contrasts of connectivity between groups with different levels of subject motion. PMID:24038744

  18. Multiparametric Breast MRI of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Habib; Partridge, Savannah C.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Breast MRI has increased in popularity over the past two decades due to evidence for its high sensitivity for cancer detection. Current clinical MRI approaches rely on the use of a dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI) acquisition that facilitates morphologic and semi-quantitative kinetic assessments of breast lesions. The use of more functional and quantitative parameters, such as pharmacokinetic features from high temporal resolution DCE-MRI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) on diffusion weighted MRI, and choline concentrations on MR spectroscopy, hold promise to broaden the utility of MRI and improve its specificity. However, due to wide variations in approach among centers for measuring these parameters and the considerable technical challenges, robust multicenter data supporting their routine use is not yet available, limiting current applications of many of these tools to research purposes. PMID:26613883

  19. X-ray echo spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, was recently introduced [1] to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-meV and 0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power > 10^8) with broadband 5-13 meV dispersing systems will be presented featuring more than 1000-fold signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. [1.] Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, accepted (2016), arXiv:1511.01526.

  20. Regional Differences in End-Diastolic Volumes between 3D Echo and CMR in HLHS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Alberto; Oktay, Ozan; Rueckert, Daniel; Penney, Graeme P.; Schnabel, Julia A.; Simpson, John M.; Pushparajah, Kuberan

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is commonly thought to underestimate ventricular volumes compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although the reason for this and the spatial distribution of the volume difference is not well understood. In this paper, we use landmark-based image registration to spatially align MRI and ultrasound images from patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and carry out a qualitative and quantitative spatial comparison of manual segmentations of the ventricular volume obtained from the respective modalities. In our experiments, we have found a trend showing volumes estimated from ultrasound to be smaller than those obtained from MRI (by approximately up to 20 ml), and that important contributors to this difference are the presence of artifacts such as shadows in the echo images and the different criteria to include or exclude image features as part of the ventricular volume. PMID:28018895

  1. Recommendations for Real-Time Speech MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Sutton, Brad P.; Miquel, Marc E.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (RT-MRI) is being increasingly used for speech and vocal production research studies. Several imaging protocols have emerged based on advances in RT-MRI acquisition, reconstruction, and audio-processing methods. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art, discusses technical considerations, and provides specific guidance for new groups entering this field. We provide recommendations for performing RT-MRI of the upper airway. This is a consensus statement stemming from the ISMRM-endorsed Speech MRI summit held in Los Angeles, February 2014. A major unmet need identified at the summit was the need for consensus on protocols that can be easily adapted by researchers equipped with conventional MRI systems. To this end, we provide a discussion of tradeoffs in RT-MRI in terms of acquisition requirements, a priori assumptions, artifacts, computational load, and performance for different speech tasks. We provide four recommended protocols and identify appropriate acquisition and reconstruction tools. We list pointers to open-source software that facilitate implementation. We conclude by discussing current open challenges in the methodological aspects of RT-MRI of speech. PMID:26174802

  2. Evaluation of the WARP-turbo spin echo sequence for 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of stifle joints in dogs with stainless steel tibial plateau leveling osteotomy implants.

    PubMed

    Simpler, Renee E; Kerwin, Sharon C; Eichelberger, Bunita M; Wall, Corey R; Thompson, James A; Padua, Abraham; Purdy, David; Griffin, John F

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibility artifacts caused by ferromagnetic implants compromise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the canine stifle after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) procedures. The WARP-turbo spin echo sequence is being developed to mitigate artifacts and utilizes slice encoding for metal artifact reduction. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the WARP-turbo spin echo sequence for imaging post TPLO canine stifle joints. Proton density weighted images of 19 canine cadaver limbs were made post TPLO using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Susceptibility artifact sizes were recorded and compared for WARP vs. conventional turbo spin echo sequences. Three evaluators graded depiction quality for the tibial tuberosity, medial and lateral menisci, tibial osteotomy, and caudal cruciate ligament as sufficient or insufficient to make a diagnosis. Artifacts were subjectively smaller and local structures were better depicted in WARP-turbo spin echo images. Signal void area was also reduced by 75% (sagittal) and 49% (dorsal) in WARP vs. conventional turbo spin echo images. Evaluators were significantly more likely to grade local anatomy depiction as adequate for making a diagnosis in WARP-turbo spin echo images in the sagittal but not dorsal plane. The proportion of image sets with anatomic structure depiction graded adequate to make a diagnosis ranged from 28 to 68% in sagittal WARP-turbo spin echo images compared to 0-19% in turbo spin echo images. Findings indicated that the WARP-turbo spin echo sequence reduces the severity of susceptibility artifacts in canine stifle joints post TPLO. However, variable depiction of local anatomy warrants further refinement of the technique.

  3. MO-G-18C-05: Real-Time Prediction in Free-Breathing Perfusion MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H; Liu, W; Ruan, D; Jung, S; Gach, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to minimize frame-wise difference errors caused by respiratory motion and eliminate the need for breath-holds in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with long acquisitions and repeat times (TRs). The technique is being applied to perfusion MRI using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Methods: Respiratory motion prediction (RMP) using navigator echoes was implemented in ASL. A least-square method was used to extract the respiratory motion information from the 1D navigator. A generalized artificial neutral network (ANN) with three layers was developed to simultaneously predict 10 time points forward in time and correct for respiratory motion during MRI acquisition. During the training phase, the parameters of the ANN were optimized to minimize the aggregated prediction error based on acquired navigator data. During realtime prediction, the trained ANN was applied to the most recent estimated displacement trajectory to determine in real-time the amount of spatial Results: The respiratory motion information extracted from the least-square method can accurately represent the navigator profiles, with a normalized chi-square value of 0.037±0.015 across the training phase. During the 60-second training phase, the ANN successfully learned the respiratory motion pattern from the navigator training data. During real-time prediction, the ANN received displacement estimates and predicted the motion in the continuum of a 1.0 s prediction window. The ANN prediction was able to provide corrections for different respiratory states (i.e., inhalation/exhalation) during real-time scanning with a mean absolute error of < 1.8 mm. Conclusion: A new technique enabling free-breathing acquisition during MRI is being developed. A generalized ANN development has demonstrated its efficacy in predicting a continuum of motion profile for volumetric imaging based on navigator inputs. Future work will enhance the robustness of ANN and verify its effectiveness with human

  4. MRI acoustic noise: sound pressure and frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Counter, S A; Olofsson, A; Grahn, H F; Borg, E

    1997-01-01

    The large gradient coils used in MRI generate, simultaneously with the pulsed radiofrequency (RF) wave, acoustic noise of high intensity that has raised concern regarding hearing safety. The sound pressure levels (SPLs) and power spectra of MRI acoustic noise were measured at the position of the human head in the isocenter of five MRI systems and with 10 different pulse sequences used in clinical MR scanning. Each protocol, including magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE; 113 dB SPL linear), fast gradient echo turbo (114 dB SPL linear), and spin echo T1/2 mm (117 dB SPL linear), was found to have the high SPLs, rapid pulse rates, amplitude-modulated pulse envelopes, and multipeaked spectra. Since thickness and SPL were inversely related, the T1-weighted images generated more intense acoustic noise than the proton-dense T2-weighted measures. The unfiltered linear peak values provided more accurate measurements of the SPL and spectral content of the MRI acoustic noise than the commonly used dB A-weighted scale, which filters out the predominant low frequency components. Fourier analysis revealed predominantly low frequency energy peaks ranging from .05 to approximately 1 kHz, with a steep high frequency cutoff for each pulse sequence. Ear protectors of known attenuation ratings are recommended for all patients during MRI testing.

  5. Changes in T2-weighted MRI of supinator muscle, pronator teres muscle, and extensor indicis muscle with manual muscle testing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Akiyama, Sumikazu; Takamori, Masayoshi; Otsuka, D. Eng, Hiroshi; Seo, Yoshiteru

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] In order to detect muscle activity with manual muscle testing, T2-weighted magnetic resonance (T2w-MR) images were detected by a 0.2 T compact MRI system. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 3 adult males. Transverse T2-weighted multi-slice spin-echo images of the left forearm were measured by a 39 ms echo-time with a 2,000 ms repetition time, a 9.5 mm slice thickness, 1 accumulation and a total image acquisition time of 4 min 16 s. First, T2w-MR images in the resting condition were measured. Then, manipulative isometric contraction exercise (5 sec duration) to the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle or the extensor indicis muscle was performed using Borg’s rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale of 15–17. The T2w-MR images were measured immediately after the exercise. [Results] T2w-MR image intensities increased significantly in the supinator muscle, the pronator teres muscle and the extensor indicis muscle after the exercise. However, the image intensities in the rest of the muscle did not change. [Conclusion] Using T2w-MR images, we could detect muscle activity in a deep muscle, the supinator muscle, and a small muscle, the extensor indicis muscle. These results also support the reliability of the manual muscle testing method. PMID:28356621

  6. Anisotropic phantom to calibrate high-q diffusion MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlosh, M. E.; Benjamini, D.; Barnett, A. S.; Schram, V.; Horkay, F.; Avram, A. V.; Basser, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    A silicon oil-filled glass capillary array is proposed as an anisotropic diffusion MRI phantom. Together with a computational/theoretical pipeline these provide a gold standard for calibrating and validating high-q diffusion MRI experiments. The phantom was used to test high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) and double pulsed-field gradient (d-PFG) MRI acquisition schemes. MRI-based predictions of microcapillary diameter using both acquisition schemes were compared with results from optical microscopy. This phantom design can be used for quality control and quality assurance purposes and for testing and validating proposed microstructure imaging experiments and the processing pipelines used to analyze them.

  7. [Recent advances in newborn MRI].

    PubMed

    Morel, B; Hornoy, P; Husson, B; Bloch, I; Adamsbaum, C

    2014-07-01

    The accurate morphological exploration of the brain is a major challenge in neonatology that advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now provide. MRI is the gold standard if an hypoxic ischemic pathology is suspected in a full term neonate. In prematures, the specific role of MRI remains to be defined, secondary to US in any case. We present a state of the art of hardware and software technical developments in MRI. The increase in magnetic field strength (3 tesla) and the emergence of new MRI sequences provide access to new information. They both have positive and negative consequences on the daily clinical data acquisition use. The semiology of brain imaging in full term newborns and prematures is more extensive and complex and thereby more difficult to interpret. The segmentation of different brain structures in the newborn, even very premature, is now available. It is now possible to dissociate the cortex and basal ganglia from the cerebral white matter, to calculate the volume of anatomical structures, which improves the morphometric quantification and the understanding of the normal and abnormal brain development. MRI is a powerful tool to analyze the neonatal brain. The relevance of the diagnostic contribution requires an adaptation of the parameters of the sequences to acquire and of the image processing methods.

  8. TROMBONE: T1-Relaxation-Oblivious Mapping of Transmit Radio-Frequency Field (B1) for MRI at High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Fleysher, Roman; Fleysher, Lazar; Inglese, Matilde; Sodickson, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Fast, 3D radio-frequency transmit field (B1) mapping is important for parallel transmission, spatially-selective pulse design and quantitative MRI applications. It has been shown that AFI — two interleaved spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR) images acquired in steady state with two very short time delays (T R1, T R2) — is an attractive method of B1 mapping. Herein, we describe the TROMBONE method which efficiently integrates AFI with EPI imaging, alleviates very short T R requirement of AFI and through their synergy yields up to 16 times higher precision in B1 estimation in the same experimental time. High precision of TROMBONE can be traded for faster scans. The map of B1 reconstructed from the ratio of intensities of two images is insensitive to longitudinal relaxation time (T1) in the physiologically relevant range. A table of the optimal acquisition protocol parameters for various target experimental conditions is provided. PMID:21394765

  9. Noninvasive temperature mapping with MRI using chemical shift water-fat separation.

    PubMed

    Soher, Brian J; Wyatt, Cory; Reeder, Scott B; MacFall, James R

    2010-05-01

    Tissues containing both water and lipids, e.g., breast, confound standard MR proton reference frequency-shift methods for mapping temperatures due to the lack of temperature-induced frequency shift in lipid protons. Generalized Dixon chemical shift-based water-fat separation methods, such as GE's iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation method, can result in complex water and fat images. Once separated, the phase change over time of the water signal can be used to map temperature. Phase change of the lipid signal can be used to correct for non-temperature-dependent phase changes, such as amplitude of static field drift. In this work, an image acquisition and postprocessing method, called water and fat thermal MRI, is demonstrated in phantoms containing 30:70, 50:50, and 70:30 water-to-fat by volume. Noninvasive heating was applied in an Off1-On-Off2 pattern over 50 min, using a miniannular phased radiofrequency array. Temperature changes were referenced to the first image acquisition. Four fiber optic temperature probes were placed inside the phantoms for temperature comparison. Region of interest (ROI) temperature values colocated with the probes showed excellent agreement (global mean +/- standard deviation: -0.09 +/- 0.34 degrees C) despite significant amplitude of static field drift during the experiments.

  10. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  11. A novel segmentation approach for implementation of MRAC in head PET/MRI employing Short-TE MRI and 2-point Dixon method in a fuzzy C-means framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khateri, Parisa; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh; Jafari, Amir Homayoun; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative PET image reconstruction requires an accurate map of attenuation coefficients of the tissue under investigation at 511 keV (μ-map), and in order to correct the emission data for attenuation. The use of MRI-based attenuation correction (MRAC) has recently received lots of attention in the scientific literature. One of the major difficulties facing MRAC has been observed in the areas where bone and air collide, e.g. ethmoidal sinuses in the head area. Bone is intrinsically not detectable by conventional MRI, making it difficult to distinguish air from bone. Therefore, development of more versatile MR sequences to label the bone structure, e.g. ultra-short echo-time (UTE) sequences, certainly plays a significant role in novel methodological developments. However, long acquisition time and complexity of UTE sequences limit its clinical applications. To overcome this problem, we developed a novel combination of Short-TE (ShTE) pulse sequence to detect bone signal with a 2-point Dixon technique for water-fat discrimination, along with a robust image segmentation method based on fuzzy clustering C-means (FCM) to segment the head area into four classes of air, bone, soft tissue and adipose tissue. The imaging protocol was set on a clinical 3 T Tim Trio and also 1.5 T Avanto (Siemens Medical Solution, Erlangen, Germany) employing a triple echo time pulse sequence in the head area. The acquisition parameters were as follows: TE1/TE2/TE3=0.98/4.925/6.155 ms, TR=8 ms, FA=25 on the 3 T system, and TE1/TE2/TE3=1.1/2.38/4.76 ms, TR=16 ms, FA=18 for the 1.5 T system. The second and third echo-times belonged to the Dixon decomposition to distinguish soft and adipose tissues. To quantify accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the bone segmentation algorithm, resulting classes of MR-based segmented bone were compared with the manual segmented one by our expert neuro-radiologist. Results for both 3 T and 1.5 T systems show that bone segmentation applied in several

  12. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  13. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  14. Accelerated susceptibility-based positive contrast imaging of MR compatible metallic devices based on modified fast spin echo sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Caiyun; Xie, Guoxi; Zhang, Yongqin; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Min; Su, Shi; Dong, Ying; Liu, Xin; Ji, Jim

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to develop an accelerated susceptibility-based positive contrast MR imaging method for visualizing MR compatible metallic devices. A modified fast spin echo sequence is used to accelerate data acquisition. Each readout gradient in the modified fast spin echo is slightly shifted by a short distance T shift. Phase changes accumulated within T shift are then used to calculate the susceptibility map by using a kernel deconvolution algorithm with a regularized ℓ1 minimization. To evaluate the proposed fast spin echo method, three phantom experiments were conducted and compared to a spin echo based technique and the gold standard CT for visualizing biopsy needles and brachytherapy seeds. Compared to the spin echo based technique, the data sampling speed of the proposed method was faster by 2–4 times while still being able to accurately visualize and identify the location of the biopsy needle and brachytherapy seeds. These results were confirmed by CT images of the same devices. Results also demonstrated that the proposed fast spin echo method can achieve good visualization of the brachytherapy seeds in positive contrast and in different orientations. It is also capable of correctly differentiating brachytherapy seeds from other similar structures on conventional magnitude images.

  15. Photon echo studies of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Read, Elizabeth L; Lee, Hohjai; Fleming, Graham R

    2009-01-01

    The broad linewidths in absorption spectra of photosynthetic complexes obscure information related to their structure and function. Photon echo techniques represent a powerful class of time-resolved electronic spectroscopy that allow researchers to probe the interactions normally hidden under broad linewidths with sufficient time resolution to follow the fastest energy transfer events in light harvesting. Here, we outline the technical approach and applications of two types of photon echo experiments: the photon echo peak shift and two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform photon echo spectroscopy. We review several extensions of these techniques to photosynthetic complexes. Photon echo peak shift spectroscopy can be used to determine the strength of coupling between a pigment and its surrounding environment including neighboring pigments and to quantify timescales of energy transfer. Two-dimensional spectroscopy yields a frequency-resolved map of absorption and emission processes, allowing coupling interactions and energy transfer pathways to be viewed directly. Furthermore, 2D spectroscopy reveals structural information such as the relative orientations of coupled transitions. Both classes of experiments can be used to probe the quantum mechanical nature of photosynthetic light-harvesting: peak shift experiments allow quantification of correlated energetic fluctuations between pigments, while 2D techniques measure quantum beating directly, both of which indicate the extent of quantum coherence over multiple pigment sites in the protein complex. The mechanistic and structural information obtained by these techniques reveals valuable insights into the design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, and a multitude of variations on the methods outlined here.

  16. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocketborne instrumentation have confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes have been observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Out of this number, 95 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2-, 4-, or 8-keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher-energy electrons led the lower-energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. An alternative interpretation is briefly examined, and its relative merit in describing the observations is evaluated. The injection process is discussed in some detail as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection for both processes.

  17. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Matheson, Thomas; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Welch, Doug

    2013-02-01

    We propose to continue our search for the first light echoes (LEs) associated with historical Galactic supernovae and LBV outbursts: SN 1006, Kepler's SN, RCW 86, Crab Nebula, and P Cygni. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered light echoes of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of eta Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. We propose to continue our search for light echoes of the remaining historical events. With DECam, we have a 10-15 fold improvement in efficiency over the retired Mosaic camera, which allows us to cover the bigger search areas of most of the remaining targets. The study of scattered-light echoes from these Galactic supernovae and eruptions will give us the opportunity to directly compare the original outburst and its current remnant, and in favorable cases (like Eta Carinae), it provides a three-dimensional view of the event and/or a spectral time series.

  18. Classical Acoustic Echoes in Model Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Justin; Nagel, Sidney

    2013-03-01

    For the last 40 years, the low-temperature excitations in glasses have traditionally been explained in terms of a distribution of dilute, two-level quantum states that are created by clusters of particles tunneling between two nearly degenerate ground states. Strong evidence for this model has come from ultrasonic saturation effects and acoustic echoes observed in experiments. Recently, a classical analysis of vibrational modes in model glasses has shown that at low frequencies, the modes are quasi-localized and highly anharmonic. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that this anharmonicity can produce an acoustic echo due to the shift in the mode frequency with increasing amplitude. We observe this both in jammed packings of spherical particles with finite-range, Hertzian repulsions, and in model glasses interacting with a Lennard-Jones potential. In contrast to pulse echoes in two-level systems, a distinguishing feature of these ``anharmonic echoes'' is the appearance of multiple echoes after two excitation pulses, a feature also observed in experiments.

  19. Emerging MRI methods in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Camilo G; Mountz, James M; Mountz, John D

    2011-02-01

    New MRI techniques have been developed to assess not only the static anatomy of synovial hyperplasia, bone changes and cartilage degradation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but also the activity of the physiological events that cause these changes. This enables an estimation of the rate of change in the synovium, bone and cartilage as a result of disease activity or in response to therapy. Typical MRI signs of RA in the pre-erosive phase include synovitis, bone marrow edema and subchondral cyst formation. Synovitis can be assessed by T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI or diffusion tensor imaging. Bone marrow edema can be detected on fluid-sensitive sequences such as short-tau inversion recovery or T2-weighted fast-spin echo sequences. Detection of small bone erosions in the early erosive phase using T1-weighted MRI has sensitivity comparable to CT. Numerous MRI techniques have been developed for quantitative assessment of potentially pathologic changes in cartilage composition that occur before frank morphologic changes. In this Review, we summarize the advances and new directions in the field of MRI, with an emphasis on their current state of development and application in RA.

  20. Mapping of the cerebral response to acetazolamide using graded asymmetric spin echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bhashkar; Preece, Mark; Houston, Gavin C; Papadakis, Nikolas G; Carpenter, T Adrian; Hall, Laurance D; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral vascular reactivity in different regions of the rat brain was quantitatively characterized by spatial and temporal measurements of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-fMRI signals following intravenous administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide: this causes cerebral vasodilatation through a cerebral extracellular acidosis that spares neuronal metabolism and vascular smooth muscle function, thus separating vascular and cerebral metabolic events. An asymmetric spin echo-echo planar imaging (ASE-EPI) pulse sequence sensitised images selectively to oxygenation changes in the microvasculature; use of a surface coil receiver enhanced image signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Image SNRs and hardware integrity were verified by incorporating quality assurance procedures; cardiorespiratory stability in the physiological preparations were monitored and maintained through the duration of the experiments. These conditions made it possible to apply BOLD contrast fMRI to map regional changes in cerebral perfusion in response to acetazolamide administration. Thus, fMRI findings demonstrated cerebral responses to acetazolamide that directly paralleled the known physiological actions of acetazolamide and whose time courses were similar through all regions of interest, consistent with acetazolamide's initial distribution in brain plasma, where it affects cerebral haemodynamics by acting at cerebral capillary endothelial cells. However, marked variations in the magnitude of the responses suggested relative perfusion deficits in the hippocampus and white matter regions correlating well with their relatively low vascularity and the known vulnerability of the hippocampus to ischaemic damage.

  1. Breath-hold Multi-Echo Fast Spin-Echo Pulse Sequence for Accurate R2 Measurement in the Heart and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Jensen, Jens H.; Wu, Ed X.; Sheth, Sujit S.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) is a generally useful means for quantitative characterization of pathological changes in tissue with a variety of clinical applications. The most widely used R2 measurement method is the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence but its relatively long scan time requires respiratory gating for chest or body MRI, rendering this approach impractical for comprehensive assessment within a clinically acceptable examination time. The purpose of our study was to develop a breath-hold multi-echo fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence for accurate measurement of R2 in the liver and heart. Phantom experiments and studies of subjects in vivo were performed to compare the FSE data with the corresponding even-echo CPMG data. For pooled data, the R2 measurements were strongly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.99) and in excellent agreement (mean difference [CPMG-FSE] = 0.10 s−1; 95% limits of agreement were 1.98 and −1.78 s−1) between the two pulse sequences. PMID:19526516

  2. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Horne, K.

    2004-01-01

    Echo mapping makes use of the intrinsic variability of the continuum source in active galactic nuclei to map out the distribution and kinematics of line-emitting gas from its light travel time-delayed response to continuum changes. Echo mapping experiments have yielded sizes for the broad line-emitting region in about three dozen AGNs. The dynamics of the line-emitting gas seem to be dominated by the gravity of the central black hole, enabling measurement of the black-hole masses in AGNs. We discuss requirements for future echo-mapping experiments that will yield the high quality velocity-delay maps of the broad-line region that are needed to determine its physical nature.

  3. Transient Loschmidt echo in quenched Ising chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Carla; Schiró, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We study the response to sudden local perturbations of highly excited quantum Ising spin chains. The key quantity encoding this response is the overlap between time-dependent wave functions, which we write as a transient Loschmidt Echo. Its asymptotics at long time differences contain crucial information about the structure of the highly excited nonequilibrium environment induced by the quench. We compute the echo perturbatively for a weak local quench but for arbitrarily large global quench, using a cumulant expansion. Our perturbative results suggest that the echo decays exponentially, rather than power law as in the low-energy orthogonality catastrophe, a further example of quench-induced decoherence already found in the case of quenched Luttinger liquids. The emerging decoherence scale is set by the strength of the local potential and the bulk excitation energy.

  4. Pseudothrombosis with T2-weighted fast spin-echo MR images caused by static portal venous flow in severe cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Nishigaki, Youichi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Goshima, Satoshi; Maeda, Sunaho; Tomita, Eiichi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2002-02-01

    Unenhanced T2-weighted fast spin-echo images obtained in a 65-year-old woman with severe cirrhosis showed an area of high signal intensity occupying the left second-order portal vein branch, suggesting portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis. Doppler sonography, which revealed virtually no blood flow in the vessel, also supported the diagnosis. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI subsequently revealed the patency of the vessel. The extremely slow portal venous flow was considered to be the cause of false-positive findings with unenhanced MRI and sonography.

  5. Search Results Help - Water | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available. Search Results Help explains how to navigate the search results page and describes the data presented.

  6. Optimization of sparse phase encodings for variable repetition-delay turbo-spin echo (TSE) T1 measurements for preclinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, DongKyu; Han, Sohyun; Cho, HyungJoon

    2017-01-01

    A variable repetition-delay (TR) spin echo sequence with repeated refocusing pulses, i.e., a variable TR turbo-spin echo (TSE), provides an attractive means of acquiring an accurate T1 map information that is free from gradient echo based artifacts such as magnetic field inhomogeneities particularly for ultra-high field (at 7T and above) preclinical applications. However, the applicability of multi-slice TSE sequences is often limited by signal distortion from T2 relaxation due to echo-train acquisitions for short T2 tissues, inter-slice cross talks and magnetization transfer (MT) from repetitive slice-selective 180° pulse, and extended scan times with multiple TR excitations. These TSE shortcomings are difficult to remedy for preclinical applications, where small sizes of target organs usually limit the slice-gap control with restricted parallel imaging capabilities. In this study, compressed-sensing-assisted turbo-spin echo (CS-TSE) acquisitions for variable TR T1 measurements at 7T preclinical scanner were implemented to reduce the echo-trains by sparse phase encodings. Following the sparse signal simulation and sampling scheme optimization, the measured T1 values from CS-TSE and TSE were compared for phantoms, ex vivo, and in vivo subjects. The phantom T1 values from CS-TSE and TSE were identical to those from the inversion recovery spin echo. For both ex vivo and in vivo multi-slice T1 mapping, the shortened echo-trains of CS-TSE relieved the T2 relaxation, reduced the inter-slice interferences of multi-slice acquisition, and made room for additional slice encodings while maintaining a shorter scan time than the conventional TSE at the expense of local image smoothness from CS regularizations.

  7. Application of MRI phase-difference mapping to assessment of vascular concentrations of BMS agent in mice.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Emeline Julie; Thiaudière, Eric; Roulland, Richard; Brugières, Pierre; Rahmouni, Alain; Voisin, Pierre; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Miraux, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    Direct quantitation of contrast agent concentration can be performed using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. This method is based on phase imaging and administration of paramagnetic agents such as gadolinium-chelates. This technique has only been applied on humans or primates. However, numerous research models have been developed on small animals like mice. For this reason, the aim of this work was the application of this MRI technique, allowing the direct quantitation of the contrast agent concentrations in vivo, in the mouse vascular system at high field. For this purpose, Dy-DOTA has been preferred to Gd-DOTA due to a lower T(2)* effect. Dy-DOTA shifts in Larmor frequency were measured by phase difference mapping, using fast gradient-echo imaging at short echo times. Such an acquisition sequence allowed the limitation of susceptibility artifacts at high magnetic fields and phase wrapping. As demonstrated in a phantom oriented parallel to the static magnetic field, it is possible to measure contrast agent concentrations between 0 and 10 mm with an uncertainty of about 100 microm. Finally, the method was applied on living mice at 4.7 T. After the bolus injection, the evolution of contrast agent concentrations was assessed in brain blood vessels parallel to B(0). Long-term disappearance of contrast agent was monitored at high spatial resolution every 15 s. Alternatively, lower resolved images at 0.72 s time-resolution allowed preliminary assessment of arterial input functions. The feasibility of quantitative bolus-tracking in small rodents opens the way for comprehensive descriptions of flow and over time-dependent biological processes, especially in pathological murine models.

  8. Comparison of Maximum Signal Intensity of Contrast Agent on T1-Weighted Images Using Spin Echo, Fast Spin Echo and Inversion Recovery Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpoor, Mahmood; Poureisa, Masoud; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Background MRI is not able to directly measure the concentration of contrast agent. It is measured indirectly from the signal intensity (SI). It is very important to know how much contrast agent should be injected to receive a maximum SI in the region of interest (ROI). Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the maximum relationship between contrast concentration and signal intensity (SI) on T1-weighted images using spin echo (SE), fast spin echo (FSE) and inversion recovery (IR) sequences. Materials and Methods To assess the relationship between SI and concentration, a water-filled phantom containing vials of different concentrations of gadolinium DTPA (Gd-DTPA) (0 to 19.77 mmol/L) or a constant concentration (1.2 mmol/L) of contrast agent was used. The vials of constant concentration were used to measure coil nonuniformity. The mean SI was obtained in the ROI using T1-weighted images. All studies were carried out using a 0.3 T clinical MR scanner with a standard head coil. Results This study shows that maximum SI will appear at different ranges in different sequences. The maximum SI can be seen at concentrations of 5.95, 4.96 and 3.98mmol/L for SE, FSE and IR, respectively. Conclusion Using standard imaging parameters, each MRI sequence reaches its maximum SI in a specific contrast concentration, which is highest in SE and least in IR in a comparison between SE, FSE and IR sequences. PMID:23599710

  9. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A; Edmonson, H; Felmlee, J; Pooley, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  10. Connectivity alterations assessed by combining fMRI and MR-compatible hand robots in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Astrakas, Loukas G; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Konstas, Angelos A; Singhal, Aneesh; Moskowitz, Michael A; Rosen, Bruce R; Tzika, A Aria

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate functional reorganization of motor systems by probing connectivity between motor related areas in chronic stroke patients using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with a novel MR-compatible hand-induced, robotic device (MR_CHIROD). We evaluated data sets obtained from healthy volunteers and right-hand-dominant patients with first-ever left-sided stroke > or =6 months prior and mild to moderate hemiparesis affecting the right hand. We acquired T1-weighted echo planar and fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images and multi-level fMRI data using parallel imaging by means of the GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisitions (GRAPPA) algorithm on a 3 T MR system. Participants underwent fMRI while performing a motor task with the MR_CHIROD in the MR scanner. Changes in effective connectivity among a network of primary motor cortex (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA) and cerebellum (Ce) were assessed using dynamic causal modeling. Relative to healthy controls, stroke patients exhibited decreased intrinsic neural coupling between M1 and Ce, which was consistent with a dysfunctional M1 to Ce connection. Stroke patients also showed increased SMA to M1 and SMA to cerebellum coupling, suggesting that changes in SMA and Ce connectivity may occur to compensate for a dysfunctional M1. The results demonstrate for the first time that connectivity alterations between motor areas may help counterbalance a functionally abnormal M1 in chronic stroke patients. Assessing changes in connectivity by means of fMRI and MR_CHIROD might be used in the future to further elucidate the neural network plasticity that underlies functional recovery in chronic stroke patients.

  11. Self-refocused slice selection by magic echo DANTE with 270 degrees flipping Gaussian RF modulation.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Hidefumi; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Matsui, Shigeru

    2010-04-01

    The method of slice selection proposed for solid-state MRI by combining DANTE selective excitation with magic echo (ME) line narrowing requires a rephasing period ca. 0.6 times the DANTE excitation period. The added rephasing period results in a significant loss of sensitivity due to transverse relaxation. To solve the sensitivity problem, we make use of the self-refocusing effect of the 270 degrees Gaussian-shaped soft pulse by introducing a 270 degrees flipping Gaussian modulation to the ME DANTE method. This eliminates the rephasing period. The utility of the improved method is demonstrated by experiments performed on test samples of adamantane and polycarbonate.

  12. Relationship between tornadoes and hook echoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Radar observations of tornado families occurring on April 3, 1974 are discussed. Of the 93 tornadoes included in the sample, 81% were associated with hook-like echoes with appendages at least 40 deg to the south of the echo movement. At least one tornado was associated with 62% of the hook-like echoes observed. All of the tornadoes with intensities of F 4 and F 5 were produced by hook-like echoes; the mean intensity of all tornadoes associated with this type of echo was F 3, while the mean intensity of the remaining tornadoes was F1. The tornadic hook-like echoes moved to the right of the non-tornadic echoes forming a tornado line in advance of the squall line. Some tornadoes were associated with 'spiral' echoes.

  13. On the reliability of hook echoes as tornado indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    A study of radar echoes associated with the tornadoes of the 3 April 1974 outbreak was performed to evaluate the usefulness of echo shape as an indicator of tornadic thunderstorms. The hook shape was usually successful in characterizing an echo as tornadic, with a false alarm rate of 16%. Because hook echoes were relatively rare, however, a less restrictive shape called distinctive was more successful at detecting tornadic thunderstorms, identifying 65% of the tornadic echoes. An echo had a distinctive shape if it possessed a marked appendage on its right rear flank or was in the shape of a spiral, comma or line echo wave pattern (LEWP). Characteristics of the distinctive echo are given.

  14. Sodium-23 MRI of whole spine at 3 Tesla using a 5-channel receive-only phased-array and a whole-body transmit resonator.

    PubMed

    Malzacher, Matthias; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Konstandin, Simon; Haneder, Stefan; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-03-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging ((23)Na MRI) is a unique and non-invasive imaging technique which provides important information on cellular level about the tissue of the human body. Several applications for (23)Na MRI were investigated with regard to the examination of the tissue viability and functionality for example in the brain, the heart or the breast. The (23)Na MRI technique can also be integrated as a potential monitoring instrument after radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The main contribution in this work was the adaptation of (23)Na MRI for spine imaging, which can provide essential information on the integrity of the intervertebral disks with respect to the early detection of disk degeneration. In this work, a transmit-only receive-only dual resonator system was designed and developed to cover the whole human spine using (23)Na MRI and increase the receive sensitivity. The resonator system consisted of an already presented (23)Na whole-body resonator and a newly developed 5-channel receive-only phased-array. The resonator system was first validated using bench top and phantom measurements. A threefold SNR improvement at the depth of the spine (∼7cm) over the whole-body resonator was achieved using the spine array. (23)Na MR measurements of the human spine using the transmit-only receive-only resonator system were performed on a healthy volunteer within an acquisition time of 10minutes. A density adapted 3D radial sequence was chosen with 6mm isotropic resolution, 49ms repetition time and a short echo time of 540μs. Furthermore, it was possible to quantify the tissue sodium concentration in the intervertebral discs in the lumbar region (120ms repetition time) using this setup.

  15. Asymmetric radar echo patterns from insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radar echoes from insects, birds, and bats in the atmosphere exhibit both symmetry and asymmetry in polarimetric patterns. Symmetry refers to similar magnitudes of polarimetric variables at opposite azimuths, and asymmetry relegates to differences in these magnitudes. Asymmetry can be due to diffe...

  16. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Matheson, Thomas; Narayan, Gautham; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Suntzeff, Nick; Welch, Doug; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2014-02-01

    We propose to continue our search for the first light echoes (LEs) associated with historical Galactic supernovae and LBV outbursts: SN 1006, Kepler's SN, RCW 86, Crab Nebula, and P Cygni. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered LEs of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. We propose to continue our search for light echoes of the remaining historical events. With DECam, we have a 10-15 fold improvement in efficiency over the retired CTIO-Mosaic camera, which allows us to cover the bigger search areas of most of the remaining targets. With the KPNO 4-m, we will observe fields too far north for CTIO/DECam. The study of scattered-light echoes from these Galactic supernovae and eruptions will give us the opportunity to directly compare the original outburst and its current remnant, and in favorable cases (like Eta Carinae), it provides a three-dimensional view of the event and/or a spectral time series.

  17. Data Entry Requirements | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data in ECHO are provided by authorized state, tribal, and local governments, and EPA Regional offices. Information is presented to help users understand where data are more complete. Many states voluntarily enter additional data that are not required; therefore, data completeness may vary widely from state to state.

  18. Choroidal osteoma: acoustic shadowing and reduplication echoes.

    PubMed

    Abramson, D H; Servodidio, C A; Poole, T A; Budinger, K

    1996-12-01

    A 27-year-old woman had a curious choroidal mass of 12 years duration in her right eye. Interesting ultrasonic findings of a choroidal osteoma, including acoustic shadowing and reduplication echoes on A-scan and B-scan are presented. Ophthalmic nurses can assist in performing ophthalmic examinations and in reinforcing regular follow-up examinations for these patients.

  19. An Evaluation of HF Ionospheric Backscatter Echoes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    regulated bj the following claaaiTlcaUone In order t’i aaf^uard proprietär) mior- matk in: CLASS l: GENERAL INFORMATION .\\\\ ailable ti i an] one on...km and were gen - tiallv spread in range (diffuse). The occurrence of the sunset echoes was relatively inde- pendent of magnetic activity. The

  20. State Comparative Maps Help | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Comparative Maps in ECHO focus on environmental compliance and enforcement trends at a state and national level. Comparative maps provide a quick cross-country look at key environmental compliance and enforcement indicators. The maps link to dashboards that provide details by state/territory.

  1. AN ECHO OF SUPERNOVA 2008bk

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2013-08-01

    I have discovered a prominent light echo around the low-luminosity Type II-plateau supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, seen in archival images obtained with the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The echo is a partial ring, brighter to the north and east than to the south and west. The analysis of the echo I present suggests that it is due to the SN light pulse scattered by a sheet, or sheets, of dust located Almost-Equal-To 15 pc from the SN. The composition of the dust is assumed to be of standard Galactic diffuse interstellar grains. The visual extinction of the dust responsible for the echo is A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.05 mag in addition to the extinction due to the Galactic foreground toward the host galaxy. That the SN experienced much less overall extinction implies that it is seen through a less dense portion of the interstellar medium in its environment. The late-time HST photometry of SN 2008bk also clearly demonstrates that the progenitor star has vanished.

  2. The Transeurope Footrace Project: longitudinal data acquisition in a cluster randomized mobile MRI observational cohort study on 44 endurance runners at a 64-stage 4,486km transcontinental ultramarathon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The TransEurope FootRace 2009 (TEFR09) was one of the longest transcontinental ultramarathons with an extreme endurance physical load of running nearly 4,500 km in 64 days. The aim of this study was to assess the wide spectrum of adaptive responses in humans regarding the different tissues, organs and functional systems being exposed to such chronic physical endurance load with limited time for regeneration and resulting negative energy balance. A detailed description of the TEFR project and its implemented measuring methods in relation to the hypotheses are presented. Methods The most important research tool was a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner mounted on a mobile unit following the ultra runners from stage to stage each day. Forty-four study volunteers (67% of the participants) were cluster randomized into two groups for MRI measurements (22 subjects each) according to the project protocol with its different research modules: musculoskeletal system, brain and pain perception, cardiovascular system, body composition, and oxidative stress and inflammation. Complementary to the diverse daily mobile MR-measurements on different topics (muscle and joint MRI, T2*-mapping of cartilage, MR-spectroscopy of muscles, functional MRI of the brain, cardiac and vascular cine MRI, whole body MRI) other methods were also used: ice-water pain test, psychometric questionnaires, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), skinfold thickness and limb circumference measurements, daily urine samples, periodic blood samples and electrocardiograms (ECG). Results Thirty volunteers (68%) reached the finish line at North Cape. The mean total race speed was 8.35 km/hour. Finishers invested 552 hours in total. The completion rate for planned MRI investigations was more than 95%: 741 MR-examinations with 2,637 MRI sequences (more than 200,000 picture data), 5,720 urine samples, 244 blood samples, 205 ECG, 1,018 BIA, 539 anthropological measurements and 150

  3. Battlefield MRI

    DOE PAGES

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  4. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  5. Sodium MRI.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Sodium ((23)Na) imaging has a place somewhere between (1)H-MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Like MRS it potentially provides information on metabolic processes, but only one single resonance of ionic (23)Na is observed. Therefore pulse sequences do not need to code for a chemical shift dimension, allowing (23)Na images to be obtained at high resolutions as compared to MRS. In this chapter the biological significance of sodium in the brain will be discussed, as well as methods for observing it with (23)Na-MRI. Many vital cellular processes and interactions in excitable tissues depend on the maintenance of a low intracellular and high extracellular sodium concentration. Healthy cells maintain this concentration gradient at the cost of energy. Leaky cell membranes or an impaired energy metabolism immediately leads to an increase in cytosolic total tissue sodium. This makes sodium a biomarker for ischemia, cancer, excessive tissue activation, or tissue damage as might be caused by ablation therapy. Special techniques allow quantification of tissue sodium for the monitoring of disease or therapy in longitudinal studies or preferential observation of the intracellular component of the tissue sodium. New methods and high-field magnet technology provide new opportunities for (23)Na-MRI in clinical and biomedical research.

  6. Preliminary Results of the Echo-Seeding Experiment ECHO-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-06-15

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  7. Three-dimensional inversion recovery manganese-enhanced MRI of mouse brain using super-resolution reconstruction to visualize nuclei involved in higher brain function.

    PubMed

    Poole, Dana S; Plenge, Esben; Poot, Dirk H J; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Niessen, Wiro J; Meijering, Erik; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-07-01

    The visualization of activity in mouse brain using inversion recovery spin echo (IR-SE) manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides unique contrast, but suffers from poor resolution in the slice-encoding direction. Super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) is a resolution-enhancing post-processing technique in which multiple low-resolution slice stacks are combined into a single volume of high isotropic resolution using computational methods. In this study, we investigated, first, whether SRR can improve the three-dimensional resolution of IR-SE MEMRI in the slice selection direction, whilst maintaining or improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the two-dimensional slice stacks. Second, the contrast-to-noise ratio of SRR IR-SE MEMRI was compared with a conventional three-dimensional gradient echo (GE) acquisition. Quantitative experiments were performed on a phantom containing compartments of various manganese concentrations. The results showed that, with comparable scan times, the signal-to-noise ratio of three-dimensional GE acquisition is higher than that of SRR IR-SE MEMRI. However, the contrast-to-noise ratio between different compartments can be superior with SRR IR-SE MEMRI, depending on the chosen inversion time. In vivo experiments were performed in mice receiving manganese using an implanted osmotic pump. The results showed that SRR works well as a resolution-enhancing technique in IR-SE MEMRI experiments. In addition, the SRR image also shows a number of brain structures that are more clearly discernible from the surrounding tissues than in three-dimensional GE acquisition, including a number of nuclei with specific higher brain functions, such as memory, stress, anxiety and reward behavior.

  8. TH-A-BRF-10: Quantification of Subject-Specific Susceptibility-Related Geometric Distortion in Clinical Liver MRI for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, T; Matakos, A; Feng, M; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Subject-specific susceptibility-induced B0 inhomogeneity affects the geometric accuracy of MRI images, with potential impact on the accuracy of treatment planning and image guidance. This study quantifies individual distortions for patients with intrahepatic tumors. Methods: Liver MRI scans of 13 patients who were enrolled in an IRB approved study were acquired on a 3T scanner (Skyra, Siemens). Clinical contrast-enhanced images were acquired by a 3D Volume Interpolated Breath-Hold Examination (VIBE) sequence with TE/TR =1.65/4.3ms, voxel size = 2.5×2.5×3mm (axial sets) or 3.5×3.5×5mm (coronal sets), and frequency-encoding (FE) bandwidth of 440Hz/pixel. B0 inhomogeneity was evaluated by acquisition of dual gradient echoes (GRE) with TE1/TE2/TR =4.92/7.38/106ms, a voxel size of 3.5×3.5×3.75mm, a FE bandwidth of 290Hz/pixel and breath-hold. The phase difference maps from the two echoes were unwrapped using a quantitative MRI analysis software package (FSL, FMRIB, Oxford, UK). The resulting calculated B0 inhomogeneity maps (ΔB0 in Hz) were converted to voxel distortion maps in the FE direction (ΔX in mm) corresponding to the VIBE images. Results: Maximum susceptibility-induced distortions were observed in the liver dome near the diaphragm. Using results from coronal VIBE images in this study as examples, we observed clusters of voxels displaced close to or greater than ΔX=3.5mm (440 Hz in ΔB0) in the VIBE images of the liver in 3 patients, and greater than 2 mm but less than 3.5 mm in 12 patients. On average, approximately 14% of imaged liver voxels had distortions ΔX>±1mm (ΔB0>±125Hz) and 1% of the voxels had ΔX>±2mm (ΔB0>±250Hz). Conclusion: Although advanced MRI techniques, like VIBE, permit faster acquisitions allowing for breath-held examinations with limited motion-induced artifacts, this study suggests that localized distortions due to subject-specific susceptibility variations can occur and require additional advanced corrections

  9. Quantifying the effect of tissue deformation on diffusion-weighted MRI: a mathematical model and an efficient simulation framework applied to cardiac diffusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkaoui, Imen; Moulin, Kevin; Croisille, Pierre; Pousin, Jerome; Viallon, Magalie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac motion presents a major challenge in diffusion weighted MRI, often leading to large signal losses that necessitate repeated measurements. The diffusion process in the myocardium is difficult to investigate because of the unqualified sensitivity of diffusion measurements to cardiac motion. A rigorous mathematical formalism is introduced to quantify the effect of tissue motion in diffusion imaging. The presented mathematical model, based on the Bloch-Torrey equations, takes into account deformations according to the laws of continuum mechanics. Approximating this mathematical model by using finite elements method, numerical simulations can predict the sensitivity of the diffusion signal to cardiac motion. Different diffusion encoding schemes are considered and the diffusion weighted MR signals, computed numerically, are compared to available results in literature. Our numerical model can identify the existence of two time points in the cardiac cycle, at which the diffusion is unaffected by myocardial strain and cardiac motion. Of course, these time points depend on the type of diffusion encoding scheme. Our numerical results also show that the motion sensitivity of the diffusion sequence can be reduced by using either spin echo technique with acceleration motion compensation diffusion gradients or stimulated echo acquisition mode with unipolar and bipolar diffusion gradients.

  10. Quantifying the effect of tissue deformation on diffusion-weighted MRI: a mathematical model and an efficient simulation framework applied to cardiac diffusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Mekkaoui, Imen; Moulin, Kevin; Croisille, Pierre; Pousin, Jerome; Viallon, Magalie

    2016-08-07

    Cardiac motion presents a major challenge in diffusion weighted MRI, often leading to large signal losses that necessitate repeated measurements. The diffusion process in the myocardium is difficult to investigate because of the unqualified sensitivity of diffusion measurements to cardiac motion. A rigorous mathematical formalism is introduced to quantify the effect of tissue motion in diffusion imaging. The presented mathematical model, based on the Bloch-Torrey equations, takes into account deformations according to the laws of continuum mechanics. Approximating this mathematical model by using finite elements method, numerical simulations can predict the sensitivity of the diffusion signal to cardiac motion. Different diffusion encoding schemes are considered and the diffusion weighted MR signals, computed numerically, are compared to available results in literature. Our numerical model can identify the existence of two time points in the cardiac cycle, at which the diffusion is unaffected by myocardial strain and cardiac motion. Of course, these time points depend on the type of diffusion encoding scheme. Our numerical results also show that the motion sensitivity of the diffusion sequence can be reduced by using either spin echo technique with acceleration motion compensation diffusion gradients or stimulated echo acquisition mode with unipolar and bipolar diffusion gradients.

  11. Preliminary study of the EChO data sampling and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Focardi, M.; Pace, E.; Micela, G.; Galli, E.; Giusi, G.; Liu, S. J.; Pezzuto, S.

    2014-08-01

    The EChO Payload is an integrated spectrometer with six different channels covering the spectral range from the visible up to the thermal infrared. A common Instrument Control Unit (ICU) implements all the instrument control and health monitoring functionalities as well as all the onboard science data processing. To implement an efficient design of the ICU on board software, separate analysis of the unit requirements are needed for the commanding and housekeeping collection as well as for the data acquisition, sampling and compression. In this work we present the results of the analysis carried out to optimize the EChO data acquisition and processing chain. The HgCdTe detectors used for EChO mission allow for non-destructive readout modes, such that the charge may be read without removing it after reading out. These modes can reduce the equivalent readout noise and the gain in signal to noise ratio can be computed using well known relations based on fundamental principles. In particular, we considered a multiaccumulation approach based on non-destructive reading of detector samples taken at equal time intervals. All detectors are periodically reset after a certain number of samples have been acquired and the length of the reset interval, as well as the number of samples and the sampling rate can be adapted to the brightness of the considered source. The estimation of the best set of parameters for the signal to noise ratio optimization and of the best sampling technique has been done by taking into account also the needs of mitigating the expected radiation effects on the acquired data. Cosmic rays can indeed be one of the major sources of data loss for a space observatory, and the studies made for the JWST mission allowed us to evaluate the actual need of the implementation of a dedicated deglitching procedure on board EChO.

  12. Intensity-Corrected Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) for Improved Pediatric Brain Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Matus; Iv, Michael; Moseley, Michael E.; Barnes, Patrick D.; Skare, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Here we investigate the utility of a dual-echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) approach to improve lesion conspicuity in pediatric imaging. This method delivers two ‘echo images’ for one diffusion-preparation period. We also demonstrate how the echoes can be utilized to remove transmit/receive coil-induced and static magnetic field intensity modulations on both echo images, which often mimic pathology and thereby pose diagnostic challenges. DE-EPI DWI data were acquired in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal diffusion lesions, and 46 pediatric patient controls at 3T. Echo1 [TE = 45ms] and Echo2 [TE = 86ms] were corrected for signal intensity variation across the images by exploiting the images equivalent coil-sensitivity and susceptibility-induced modulations. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed Echo1 and Echo2 and their intensity-corrected variants (cEcho1 and cEcho2) on a 7-point Likert scale, with grading on lesion conspicuity diagnostic confidence. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map from Echo1 was used to validate presence of true pathology. Echo2 was unanimously favored over Echo1 for its sensitivity for detecting acute brain injury, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.7/4.4 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.1/4.3 (p = 0.025). cEcho2 was rated higher than cEcho1, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.5/4.3 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.4/4.4 (p < 0.005). cEcho2 was favored over all echoes for its diagnostic reliability, particularly in regions close to the head coil. This work concludes that DE-EPI DWI is a useful alternative to conventional single-echo EPI DWI, whereby Echo2 and cEcho2 allows for improved lesion detection and overall higher diagnostic confidence. PMID:26069959

  13. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  14. Investigating the dependence of the calibration parameter M on echo time

    PubMed Central

    Bulte, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The calculation of the calibration parameter M, which represents the maximum theoretically possible blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal increase, is an essential intermediate step in any calibrated fMRI experiment. To better compare M values obtained across different studies, it is common to scale M values from their original BOLD echo time (TE) to a different echo time according to the theory that M is directly proportional to TE. To the best of our knowledge, this relationship has never been directly tested. Theory and Methods A pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling sequence with five readouts (TE ranging from 20 to 78 ms) was implemented to test the relationship between M and TE, both with and without the application of flow crushing gradients. Results Both M and the BOLD signal were found to be linear functions of TE, but with a nonzero intercept. This intercept was reduced when crusher gradients were added, suggesting that the deviation from theory is a result of nonnegligible intravascular signal. Conclusion The linear scaling method introduces some error when comparing M values acquired with different BOLD echo times. However, this error is small compared with other considerations, and would generally not preclude the continued use of this scaling method. Magn Reson Med 75:556–561, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:25761759

  15. Echoes of the Brain within Default Mode, Association, and Heteromodal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Rodrigo M.; Sharp, David J.; Leeson, Clare; Wise, Richard J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), such as the default mode, frontoparietal control, and salience networks, provide a useful large-scale description of the functional architecture of the brain. Although ICNs are functionally specialized, the information that they process needs to be integrated for coherent cognition, perception, and behavior. A region capable of performing this integration might be expected to contain traces, or “echoes,” of the neural signals from multiple ICNs. Here, using fMRI in humans, we show the existence of specific “transmodal” regions containing echoes of multiple ICNs. These regions include core nodes of the default mode network, as well as multimodal association regions of the temporoparietal and temporo-occipito-parietal junction, right middle frontal gyrus, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In contrast, “unimodal” regions such as the primary sensory and motor cortices show a much more singular pattern of activity, containing traces of few or even single ICNs. The presence of ICN echoes might explain how transmodal regions are involved in multiple different cognitive states. Our results suggest that these transmodal regions have a particular local spatial organization containing topographic maps that relate to multiple ICNs. This makes transmodal regions uniquely placed to be able to mediate the cross talk between the brain's functional networks through local modulation of adjacent regions that communicate with different ICNs. PMID:23986239

  16. Echo planar correlated spectroscopic imaging: implementation and pilot evaluation in human calf in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lipnick, Scott; Verma, Gaurav; Ramadan, Saadallah; Furuyama, Jon; Thomas, M Albert

    2010-10-01

    Exploiting the speed benefits of echo-planar imaging (EPI), the echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence facilitates recording of one spectral and two to three spatial dimensions faster than the conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). A novel four dimensional (4D) echo-planar correlated spectroscopic imaging (EP-COSI) was implemented on a whole body 3 T MRI scanner combining two spectral with two spatial encodings. Similar to EPSI, the EP-COSI sequence used a bipolar spatial read-out train facilitating simultaneous spatial and spectral encoding, and the conventional phase and spectral encodings for the other spatial and indirect spectral dimensions, respectively. Multiple 2D correlated spectroscopy (COSY) spectra were recorded over the spatially resolved volume of interest (VOI) localized by a train of three slice-selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses (90°-180°-90°). After the initial optimization using phantom solutions, the EP-COSI data were recorded from the lower leg of eight healthy volunteers including one endurance trained volunteer. Pilot results showed acceptable spatial and spectral quality achievable using the EP-COSI sequence. There was a detectable separation of cross peaks arising from the skeletal muscle intramyocellular lipids (IMCLs) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCLs) saturated and unsaturated pools. Residual dipolar interaction between the N-methylene and N-methyl protons of creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr) was also observed in the tibialis anterior region.

  17. Diffusion MRI and its role in neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain’s white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition. PMID:26255305

  18. Diffusion MRI and its Role in Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain's white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition.

  19. Sodium MRI in human heart: a review.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Paul A

    2016-02-01

    This paper offers a critical review of the properties, methods and potential clinical application of sodium ((23)Na) MRI in human heart. Because the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in heart is about ~40 µmol/g wet weight, and the (23)Na gyromagnetic ratio and sensitivity are respectively about one-quarter and one-11th of that of hydrogen ((1)H), the signal-to-noise ratio of (23)Na MRI in the heart is about one-6000th of that of conventional cardiac (1)H MRI. In addition, as a quadrupolar nucleus, (23)Na exhibits ultra-short and multi-component relaxation behavior (T1 ~ 30 ms; T2 ~ 0.5-4 ms and 12-20 ms), which requires fast, specialized, ultra-short echo-time MRI sequences, especially for quantifying TSC. Cardiac (23)Na MRI studies from 1.5 to 7 T measure a volume-weighted sum of intra- and extra-cellular components present at cytosolic concentrations of 10-15 mM and 135-150 mM in healthy tissue, respectively, at a spatial resolution of about 0.1-1 ml in 10 min or so. Currently, intra- and extra-cellular sodium cannot be unambiguously resolved without the use of potentially toxic shift reagents. Nevertheless, increases in TSC attributable to an influx of intra-cellular sodium and/or increased extra-cellular volume have been demonstrated in human myocardial infarction consistent with prior animal studies, and arguably might also be seen in future studies of ischemia and cardiomyopathies--especially those involving defects in sodium transport. While technical implementation remains a hurdle, a central question for clinical use is whether cardiac (23)Na MRI can deliver useful information unobtainable by other more convenient methods, including (1)H MRI.

  20. Automatic cardiac MRI myocardium segmentation using graphcut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedenburg, Gunnar; Cocosco, Chris A.; Köthe, Ullrich; Niessen, Wiro J.; Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Viergever, Max A.

    2006-03-01

    Segmentation of the left myocardium in four-dimensional (space-time) cardiac MRI data sets is a prerequisite of many diagnostic tasks. We propose a fully automatic method based on global minimization of an energy functional by means of the graphcut algorithm. Starting from automatically obtained segmentations of the left and right ventricles and a cardiac region of interest, a spatial model is constructed using simple and plausible assumptions. This model is used to learn the appearance of different tissue types by non parametric robust estimation. Our method does not require previously trained shape or appearance models. Processing takes 30-40s on current hardware. We evaluated our method on 11 clinical cardiac MRI data sets acquired using cine balanced fast field echo. Linear regression of the automatically segmented myocardium volume against manual segmentations (performed by a radiologist) showed an RMS error of about 12ml.

  1. Ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Michael S.; Hsu, David K.; Thompson, Donald O.; Wormley, Samuel J.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument uses active switches and a timing and drive circuitry to control electrical energy to a transducer, the discharging of the transducer, and the opening of an electrical pathway to the receiving circuitry for the returning echoes. The active switches utilize MOSFET devices along with decoupling circuitry to insure the preservation of the unipolar nature of the pulses, insure fast transition times, and maintain broad band width and time resolution. A housing contains the various circuitry and switches and allows connection to a power supply and a movable ultrasonic transducer. The circuitry maintains low impedance input to the transducer during transmitting cycles, and high impedance between the transducer and the receiving circuit during receive cycles to maintain the unipolar pulse shape. A unipolar pulse is valuable for nondestructive evaluation, a prime use for the present instrument.

  2. Ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, M.J.; Hsu, D.K.; Thompson, D.O.; Wormley, S.J.

    1993-04-06

    An ultrasonic unipolar pulse/echo instrument uses active switches and a timing and drive circuitry to control electrical energy to a transducer, the discharging of the transducer, and the opening of an electrical pathway to the receiving circuitry for the returning echoes. The active switches utilize MOSFET devices along with decoupling circuitry to insure the preservation of the unipolar nature of the pulses, insure fast transition times, and maintain broad band width and time resolution. A housing contains the various circuitry and switches and allows connection to a power supply and a movable ultrasonic transducer. The circuitry maintains low impedance input to the transducer during transmitting cycles, and high impedance between the transducer and the receiving circuit during receive cycles to maintain the unipolar pulse shape. A unipolar pulse is valuable for nondestructive evaluation, a prime use for the present instrument.

  3. Loschmidt Echo Revivals: Critical and Noncritical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, R.; Johannesson, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    A quantum phase transition is generally thought to imprint distinctive characteristics on the nonequilibrium dynamics of a closed quantum system. Specifically, the Loschmidt echo after a sudden quench to a quantum critical point—measuring the time dependence of the overlap between initial and time-evolved states—is expected to exhibit an accelerated relaxation followed by periodic revivals. We here introduce a new exactly solvable model, the extended Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model, the Loschmidt echo of which provides a counterexample. A parallell analysis of the quench dynamics of the three-site spin-interacting X Y model allows us to pinpoint the conditions under which a periodic Loschmidt revival actually appears.

  4. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  5. Echo Ranging/Probe Alert Performance Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-04

    contract included technical analyses of acoustic communication equipment, system performance predictions, sea test design and data analysis, and...proposing functional system design alternatives. 2.0 SUMMARY OF WORK PERFORMED The JAYCOR effort focused on the analysis of the Echo Ranging/ Probe Alert...JAYCOR Document No. J640-020-82-2242, 16 August 1982, CONFIDENTIAL. 13. Probe Alert Design System Performance Estimates (U), J.L. Collins, JAYCOR Document

  6. Project Echo: Satellite-Tracking Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLange, O. E.

    1961-01-01

    The radar employed at the Bell Telephone Laboratories' Holmdel, New Jersey site for tracking the Echo I satellite was originally designed for the sole purpose of antenna pointing. Recently, however, it has also been employed to measure earth-balloon-earth path loss at regular intervals of time in order to ascertain the balloon's condition. The performance of the system and some of the data obtained are discussed.

  7. Facility Search Help | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search for compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  8. Eldor spin echoes and slow motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornak, Joseph P.; Freed, Jack H.

    1983-10-01

    It is shown how an ELDOR technique based upon spin echoes and rapid stepping of the magnetic field may be employed to measure rotational correlation times, τ R for very slow motions. Experiments on PD-Tempone in 85% glycerol/ D 2O at low temperatures led to τ R values of 10 -4 to 10 -5 s obtained with a simple analysis of the data.

  9. State Compliance Monitoring Expectations | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA sets national goals for how frequently facilities should be evaluated by the authorized enforcement agency for three programs included in ECHO (Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act). EPA develops Compliance Monitoring Strategies (CMSs) to ensure that the regulated facilities across the country are evaluated for compliance on a regular basis. Information on CMSs, evaluations (such as on-site inspections), and inspection frequency goals that are defined by each program is included.

  10. Assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis using T2*-weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bidar, Fatemeh; Faeghi, Fariborz; Ghorbani, Askar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the advantages of gradient echo (GRE) sequences in the detection and characterization of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis compared to conventional magnetic resonance sequences. Methods: A total of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) were evaluated using different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The MRI sequences included T1-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging, T*2-weighted turbo SE (TSE), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T*2-weighted conventional GRE, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). MR venography (MRV) images were obtained as the golden standard. Results: Venous sinus thrombosis was best detectable in T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences in all patients except in one case. Venous thrombosis was undetectable in DWI. T*2-weighted GRE sequences were superior to T*2-weighted TSE, T1-weighted SE, and FLAIR. Enhanced MRV was successful in displaying the location of thrombosis. Conclusion: T*2-weighted conventional GRE sequences are probably the best method for the assessment of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The mentioned method is non-invasive; therefore, it can be employed in the clinical evaluation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:27326365

  11. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Foley, Ryan; James, David; Matheson, Thomas; Narayan, Gautham; Olsen, Knut; Points, Sean; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Suntzeff, Nick; Welch, Doug; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    We propose to search for light echoes (LEs) from the historical brightening of the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) P Cygni using the KPNO 4m Mosaic 1.1 imager. We also propose to us DECam to continue our search for LEs from the the Crab supernova SN 1054. In addition, we continue to monitor the LEs from the Cas A and Tycho supernovae in order to identify suitable LE candidates for 3D-spectroscopy and spectral time series. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered light echoes of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. Our extension of LE techniques to LBV outbursts promises to extend our ability to record outburst activity hundreds of years into the past - a timescale which is likely a significant fraction of the brief final phases of these probable core- collapse supernova precursors.

  12. A multifilter approach to acoustic echo cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, John; Woszczyk, Wieslaw; Cooperstock, Jeremy

    2004-05-01

    Hands-free teleconferencing is increasingly frequent today. An important design consideration for any such communication tool that uses high-quality audio is the return echo caused by the acoustic coupling between the loudspeakers and microphones at each end of the conference. An echo-suppression filter (ESF) reduces the level of this return echo, increasing speech intelligibility. A new ESF has been designed based on a block frequency domain adaptive filter using the well-known least-mean-square (LMS) criteria. There are two important coefficients in LMS adaptive filters which affect how an ESF adapts to changing acoustic conditions at each end of the conference, such as double-talk conditions and moving electroacoustic transducers. Previous approaches to similar ESFs have used either a single or double pair of these coefficients, whereas the new model typically uses ten. The performance of single, double, and multifilter architectures was compared. Performance was evaluated using both empirical measurements and subjective listening tests. Speech and music were used as the stimuli for a two-way teleconferencing experiment. The new filter performed better than the single- and two-filter ESF designs, especially in conferencing conditions with frequent double talk, and the new ESF can be optimized to suit different acoustic situations.

  13. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Kunder, Andrea; Matheson, Thomas; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Chris; Smith, Nathan; Welch, Doug

    2013-08-01

    We propose to search for light echoes (LEs) from the historical brightening of the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) P Cygni using the KPNO 4m Mosaic 1.1 imager. We also propose to conclude our search - so far unsuccessful - for LEs from the the Crab supernova SN 1054 by surveying one remaining region of the LE ellipsoid behind the plane of the supernova remnant on the sky. In addition, we continue to monitor the LEs from the Cas A and Tycho supernovae in order to identify suitable LE candidates for 3D-spectroscopy and spectral time series. In previously granted NOAO time, we have discovered light echoes of three ancient SNe in the LMC as well as from the historic SN events of Cas A and Tycho [2, 3], which allowed their spectroscopic classification [6, 7, 10] and 3D spectroscopy [8, 9]. Most recently, we discovered light echoes of the mid-19th-century Great Eruption of η Carinae using CTIO 4m Mosaic images [11]. Subsequent spectroscopic follow-up of Eta Carinae revealed that its outburst spectral type was most similar to those of G-type supergiants, rather than reported LBV outburst spectral types of F-type (or earlier) [11]. Our extension of LE techniques to LBV outbursts promises to extend our ability to record outburst activity hundreds of years into the past - a timescale which is likely a significant fraction of the brief final phases of these probable core- collapse supernova precursors.

  14. WE-G-18C-07: Accelerated Water/fat Separation in MRI for Radiotherapy Planning Using Multi-Band Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crijns, S; Stemkens, B; Sbrizzi, A; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den; Andreychenko, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dixon sequences are used to characterize disease processes, obtain good fat or water separation in cases where fat suppression fails and to obtain pseudo-CT datasets. Dixon's method uses at least two images acquired with different echo times and thus requires prolonged acquisition times. To overcome associated problems (e.g., for DCE/cine-MRI), we propose to use a method for water/fat separation based on spectrally selective RF pulses. Methods: Two alternating RF pulses were used, that imposes a fat selective phase cycling over the phase encoding lines, which results in a spatial shift for fat in the reconstructed image, identical to that in CAIPIRINHA. Associated aliasing artefacts were resolved using the encoding power of a multi-element receiver array, analogous to SENSE. In vivo measurements were performed on a 1.5T clinical MR-scanner in a healthy volunteer's legs, using a four channel receiver coil. Gradient echo images were acquired with TE/TR = 2.3/4.7ms, flip angle 20°, FOV 45×22.5cm{sup 2}, matrix 480×216, slice thickness 5mm. Dixon images were acquired with TE,1/TE,2/TR=2.2/4.6/7ms. All image reconstructions were done in Matlab using the ReconFrame toolbox (Gyrotools, Zurich, CH). Results: RF pulse alternation yields a fat image offset from the water image. Hence the water and fat images fold over, which is resolved using in-plane SENSE reconstruction. Using the proposed technique, we achieved excellent water/fat separation comparable to Dixon images, while acquiring images at only one echo time. Conclusion: The proposed technique yields both inphase water and fat images at arbitrary echo times and requires only one measurement, thereby shortening the acquisition time by a factor 2. In future work the technique may be extended to a multi-band water/fat separation sequence that is able to achieve single point water/fat separation in multiple slices at once and hence yields higher speed-up factors.

  15. Kidney stone imaging with 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Pooley, Robert A; Bridges, Mellena D; Cernigliaro, Joseph G; Haley, William E

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the current gold standard for imaging kidney stones, albeit at the cost of radiation exposure. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are insensitive to detecting the stones because of their appearance as a signal void. With the development of 2D ultra-short echo-time (UTE) MRI sequences, it becomes possible to image kidney stones in vitro. In this work, we optimize and implement a modified 3D UTE MRI sequence for imaging kidney stones embedded in agarose phantoms mimicking the kidney tissue and in urine phantoms at 3.0T. The proposed technique is capable of imaging the stones with high spatial resolution in a short scan time.

  16. Data collection and analysis strategies for phMRI.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Joseph B; Liu, Christina H; Vanduffel, Wim; Marota, John J A; Jenkins, Bruce G

    2014-09-01

    Although functional MRI traditionally has been applied mainly to study changes in task-induced brain function, evolving acquisition methodologies and improved knowledge of signal mechanisms have increased the utility of this method for studying responses to pharmacological stimuli, a technique often dubbed "phMRI". The proliferation of higher magnetic field strengths and the use of exogenous contrast agent have boosted detection power, a critical factor for successful phMRI due to the restricted ability to average multiple stimuli within subjects. Receptor-based models of neurovascular coupling, including explicit pharmacological models incorporating receptor densities and affinities and data-driven models that incorporate weak biophysical constraints, have demonstrated compelling descriptions of phMRI signal induced by dopaminergic stimuli. This report describes phMRI acquisition and analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on data-driven analyses. As an example application, statistically efficient data-driven regressors were used to describe the biphasic response to the mu-opioid agonist remifentanil, and antagonism using dopaminergic and GABAergic ligands revealed modulation of the mesolimbic pathway. Results illustrate the power of phMRI as well as our incomplete understanding of mechanisms underlying the signal. Future directions are discussed for phMRI acquisitions in human studies, for evolving analysis methodologies, and for interpretative studies using the new generation of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'.

  17. Compressed sensing MRI: a review of the clinical literature

    PubMed Central

    Jaspan, Oren N; Fleysher, Roman

    2015-01-01

    MRI is one of the most dynamic and safe imaging techniques available in the clinic today. However, MRI acquisitions tend to be slow, limiting patient throughput and limiting potential indications for use while driving up costs. Compressed sensing (CS) is a method for accelerating MRI acquisition by acquiring less data through undersampling of k-space. This has the potential to mitigate the time-intensiveness of MRI. The limited body of research evaluating the effects of CS on MR images has been mostly positive with regards to its potential as a clinical tool. Studies have successfully accelerated MRI with this technology, with varying degrees of success. However, more must be performed before its diagnostic efficacy and benefits are clear. Studies involving a greater number radiologists and images must be completed, rating CS based on its diagnostic efficacy. Also, standardized methods for determining optimal imaging parameters must be developed. PMID:26402216

  18. The EChO science case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul; Hartogh, Paul; Isaak, Kate; Linder, Martin; Lovis, Christophe; Micela, Giusi; Ollivier, Marc; Puig, Ludovic; Ribas, Ignasi; Snellen, Ignas; Swinyard, Bruce; Allard, France; Barstow, Joanna; Cho, James; Coustenis, Athena; Cockell, Charles; Correia, Alexandre; Decin, Leen; de Kok, Remco; Deroo, Pieter; Encrenaz, Therese; Forget, Francois; Glasse, Alistair; Griffith, Caitlin; Guillot, Tristan; Koskinen, Tommi; Lammer, Helmut; Leconte, Jeremy; Maxted, Pierre; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Nelson, Richard; North, Chris; Pallé, Enric; Pagano, Isabella; Piccioni, Guseppe; Pinfield, David; Selsis, Franck; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Stixrude, Lars; Tennyson, Jonathan; Turrini, Diego; Zapatero-Osorio, Mariarosa; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Grodent, Denis; Guedel, Manuel; Luz, David; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Ray, Tom; Rickman, Hans; Selig, Avri; Swain, Mark; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Barlow, Mike; Bowles, Neil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; du Foresto, Vincent Coudé; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Gizon, Laurent; Hornstrup, Allan; Jarchow, Christopher; Kerschbaum, Franz; Kovacs, Géza; Lagage, Pierre-Olivier; Lim, Tanya; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Pace, Emanuele; Pascale, Enzo; Vandenbussche, Bart; Wright, Gillian; Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Adriani, Alberto; Azzollini, Ruymán; Balado, Ana; Bryson, Ian; Burston, Raymond; Colomé, Josep; Crook, Martin; Di Giorgio, Anna; Griffin, Matt; Hoogeveen, Ruud; Ottensamer, Roland; Irshad, Ranah; Middleton, Kevin; Morgante, Gianluca; Pinsard, Frederic; Rataj, Mirek; Reess, Jean-Michel; Savini, Giorgio; Schrader, Jan-Rutger; Stamper, Richard; Winter, Berend; Abe, L.; Abreu, M.; Achilleos, N.; Ade, P.; Adybekian, V.; Affer, L.; Agnor, C.; Agundez, M.; Alard, C.; Alcala, J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Alonso Floriano, F. J.; Altieri, F.; Alvarez Iglesias, C. A.; Amado, P.; Andersen, A.; Aylward, A.; Baffa, C.; Bakos, G.; Ballerini, P.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Barber, R. J.; Barrado, D.; Barton, E. J.; Batista, V.; Bellucci, G.; Belmonte Avilés, J. A.; Berry, D.; Bézard, B.; Biondi, D.; Błęcka, M.; Boisse, I.; Bonfond, B.; Bordé, P.; Börner, P.; Bouy, H.; Brown, L.; Buchhave, L.; Budaj, J.; Bulgarelli, A.; Burleigh, M.; Cabral, A.; Capria, M. T.; Cassan, A.; Cavarroc, C.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Cerulli, R.; Chadney, J.; Chamberlain, S.; Charnoz, S.; Christian Jessen, N.; Ciaravella, A.; Claret, A.; Claudi, R.; Coates, A.; Cole, R.; Collura, A.; Cordier, D.; Covino, E.; Danielski, C.; Damasso, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Del Vecchio, C.; Demangeon, O.; De Sio, A.; De Wit, J.; Dobrijévic, M.; Doel, P.; Dominic, C.; Dorfi, E.; Eales, S.; Eiroa, C.; Espinoza Contreras, M.; Esposito, M.; Eymet, V.; Fabrizio, N.; Fernández, M.; Femenía Castella, B.; Figueira, P.; Filacchione, G.; Fletcher, L.; Focardi, M.; Fossey, S.; Fouqué, P.; Frith, J.; Galand, M.; Gambicorti, L.; Gaulme, P.; García López, R. J.; Garcia-Piquer, A.; Gear, W.; Gerard, J.-C.; Gesa, L.; Giani, E.; Gianotti, F.; Gillon, M.; Giro, E.; Giuranna, M.; Gomez, H.; Gomez-Leal, I.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J.; González Merino, B.; Graczyk, R.; Grassi, D.; Guardia, J.; Guio, P.; Gustin, J.; Hargrave, P.; Haigh, J.; Hébrard, E.; Heiter, U.; Heredero, R. L.; Herrero, E.; Hersant, F.; Heyrovsky, D.; Hollis, M.; Hubert, B.; Hueso, R.; Israelian, G.; Iro, N.; Irwin, P.; Jacquemoud, S.; Jones, G.; Jones, H.; Justtanont, K.; Kehoe, T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Kerins, E.; Kervella, P.; Kipping, D.; Koskinen, T.; Krupp, N.; Lahav, O.; Laken, B.; Lanza, N.; Lellouch, E.; Leto, G.; Licandro Goldaracena, J.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Liu, S. J.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lodieu, N.; Lognonné, P.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lundgaard Rasmussen, I.; Luntzer, A.; Machado, P.; MacTavish, C.; Maggio, A.; Maillard, J.-P.; Magnes, W.; Maldonado, J.; Mall, U.; Marquette, J.-B.; Mauskopf, P.; Massi, F.; Maurin, A.-S.; Medvedev, A.; Michaut, C.; Miles-Paez, P.; Montalto, M.; Montañés Rodríguez, P.; Monteiro, M.; Montes, D.; Morais, H.; Morales, J. C.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Morello, G.; Moro Martín, A.; Moses, J.; Moya Bedon, A.; Murgas Alcaino, F.; Oliva, E.; Orton, G.; Palla, F.; Pancrazzi, M.; Pantin, E.; Parmentier, V.; Parviainen, H.; Peña Ramírez, K. Y.; Peralta, J.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Petrov, R.; Pezzuto, S.; Pietrzak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Piskunov, N.; Prinja, R.; Prisinzano, L.; Polichtchouk, I.; Poretti, E.; Radioti, A.; Ramos, A. A.; Rank-Lüftinger, T.; Read, P.; Readorn, K.; Rebolo López, R.; Rebordão, J.; Rengel, M.; Rezac, L.; Rocchetto, M.; Rodler, F.; Sánchez Béjar, V. J.; Sanchez Lavega, A.; Sanromá, E.; Santos, N.; Sanz Forcada, J.; Scandariato, G.; Schmider, F.-X.; Scholz, A.; Scuderi, S.; Sethenadh, J.; Shore, S.; Showman, A.; Sicardy, B.; Sitek, P.; Smith, A.; Soret, L.; Sousa, S.; Stiepen, A.; Stolarski, M.; Strazzulla, G.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tanga, P.; Tecsa, M.; Temple, J.; Terenzi, L.; Tessenyi, M.; Testi, L.; Thompson, S.; Thrastarson, H.; Tingley, B. W.; Trifoglio, M.; Martín Torres, J.; Tozzi, A.; Turrini, D.; Varley, R.; Vakili, F.; de Val-Borro, M.; Valdivieso, M. L.; Venot, O.; Villaver, E.; Vinatier, S.; Viti, S.; Waldmann, I.; Waltham, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Waters, R.; Watkins, C.; Watson, D.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszk, A.; White, G.; Widemann, T.; Winek, W.; Wiśniowski, T.; Yelle, R.; Yung, Y.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of almost two thousand exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. We see gas giants in few-day orbits, whole multi-planet systems within the orbit of Mercury, and new populations of planets with masses between that of the Earth and Neptune—all unknown in the Solar System. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general population of planets in our Milky Way. The key science questions that urgently need addressing are therefore: What are exoplanets made of? Why are planets as they are? How do planetary systems work and what causes the exceptional diversity observed as compared to the Solar System? The EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) space mission was conceived to take up the challenge to explain this diversity in terms of formation, evolution, internal structure and planet and atmospheric composition. This requires in-depth spectroscopic knowledge of the atmospheres of a large and well-defined planet sample for which precise physical, chemical and dynamical information can be obtained. In order to fulfil this ambitious scientific program, EChO was designed as a dedicated survey mission for transit and eclipse spectroscopy capable of observing a large, diverse and well-defined planet sample within its 4-year mission lifetime. The transit and eclipse spectroscopy method, whereby the signal from the star and planet are differentiated using knowledge of the planetary ephemerides, allows us to measure atmospheric signals from the planet at levels of at least 10-4 relative to the star. This can only be achieved in conjunction with a carefully designed stable payload and satellite platform. It is also necessary to provide broad instantaneous wavelength coverage to detect as many molecular species as possible, to probe the thermal structure of the planetary atmospheres and to correct for the contaminating effects of the stellar photosphere. This requires wavelength

  19. TU-EF-BRA-01: NMR and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbarst, A.

    2015-06-15

    ), which involves a brief introduction to the Fourier transform and k-space. This leads to conventional Spin-Echo (S-E) reconstruction techniques for creating clinical images from raw data, and sets the stage for: Part IV. Spin-Echo; S-E / Spin Warp in a 2D Slice (Price) discusses application of the S- E sequence of radiofrequency pulses and gradient magnetic fields to the 1D patient. T2 is introduced but not explained. This Part also considers how to manipulate the image acquisition parameters so as to generate clinical pictures with contrast dominated by spatial variations in PD, T1, or T2. We conclude by demonstrating the spin-warp approach to imaging in 2D with a simple 2×2, 4-voxel example. Much of this material is presented in more detail in the chapter “MRI of the One-dimensional Patient, Part I”, in Advances in Medical Physics, Vol 5 (2014). Copies are on display at the Medical Physics Publishing booth. Learning Objectives: The participant will learn about the processes of NMR and T1 spin relaxation in a tissue voxel in a uniform magnetic field. The participant will learn about combining spin-up/spin-down NMR and T1 processes with a linear gradient to effect frequency-encoding of voxel spatial position. This approach can be used to create proton density and T1 MRI maps, respectively, of the contents of multi-voxel 1D phantoms. The participant will learn about how the ‘classical’ model of NMR it can generate Free Induction Decay (FID) images of 1D phantoms, which involves the use of the Fourier transform in k-space. This can lead simply into standard Spin-Echo images. The participant will learn about extending Spin-Echo imaging into 2 and more dimensions.

  20. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    fMRI mappings of language, memory , and motor function, and performance on clinical neurocognitive examinations. Our research represents an...normative fMRI maps from the 40 healthy volunteers in order to form consensus fMRI activation maps for language, memory , and visual-motor tasks (months...volunteers for language, memory , and visual-motor processing. ii. Task 2. Acquisition and comparison of fMRI activation patterns in 30 POMS patients

  1. Low-frequency conductivity tensor of rat brain tissues inferred from diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Sekino, Masaki; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Iriguchi, Norio; Ueno, Shoogo

    2009-09-01

    Conductivity tensor maps of the rat brain were obtained using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Signal attenuations in the cortex and the corpus callosum were measured using the stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequence with b factors up to 6000 s/mm(2). Our previously published method was improved to infer 3 x 3 conductivity tensor at the low-frequency limit. The conductivity tensor of the tissue was inferred from the fast component of the diffusion tensor and a fraction of the fast component. The mean conductivity (MC) of the cortex and the corpus callosum was 0.52 and 0.62 S/m, respectively. Diffusion-weighted images were obtained with b factors up to 4500 s/mm(2). Conductivity tensor images were calculated from the fast diffusion tensor images. Tissues with highly anisotropic cellular structures, such as the corpus callosum, the internal capsule, and the trigeminal nerve, exhibited high anisotropy in conductivity. The resulting values corresponded to conductivities at the low-frequency limit because our method assumed electric currents flowing only through extracellular fluid.

  2. Positive Contrast MRI Techniques for Visualization of Iron-Loaded Hernia Mesh Implants in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ciritsis, Alexander; Truhn, Daniel; Hansen, Nienke L.; Otto, Jens; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Kraemer, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Object In MRI, implants and devices can be delineated via susceptibility artefacts. To discriminate susceptibility voids from proton-free structures, different positive contrast techniques were implemented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pulse sequence-based positive contrast technique (PCSI) and a post-processing susceptibility gradient mapping algorithm (SGM) for visualization of iron loaded mesh implants in patients. Material and Methods Five patients with iron-loaded MR-visible inguinal hernia mesh implants were examined at 1.5 Tesla. A gradient echo sequence (GRE; parameters: TR: 8.3ms; TE: 4.3ms; NSA:2; FA:20°; FOV:350mm²) and a PCSI sequence (parameters: TR: 25ms; TE: 4.6ms; NSA:4; FA:20°; FOV:350mm²) with on-resonant proton suppression were performed. SGM maps were calculated using two algorithms. Image quality and mesh delineation were independently evaluated by three radiologists. Results On GRE, the iron-loaded meshes generated distinct susceptibility-induced signal voids. PCSI exhibited susceptibility differences including the meshes as hyperintense signals. SGM exhibited susceptibility differences with positive contrast. Visually, the different algorithms presented no significant differences. Overall, the diagnostic value was rated best in GRE whereas PCSI and SGM were barely “sufficient”. Conclusion Both “positive contrast” techniques depicted implanted meshes with hyperintense signal. SGM comes without additional acquisition time and can therefore be utilized in every patient. PMID:27192201

  3. Brain cortical activation during guitar-induced hand dystonia studied by functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Pujol, J; Roset-Llobet, J; Rosinés-Cubells, D; Deus, J; Narberhaus, B; Valls-Solé, J; Capdevila, A; Pascual-Leone, A

    2000-09-01

    Focal hand dystonia in musicians is a strongly task-related movement disorder. Typically, symptoms become apparent only when players execute specific overpracticed skilled exercises on their instrument. We therefore examined five guitarists with functional MRI during dystonic symptom provocation by means of an adapted guitar inside the magnet. The activation patterns obtained in comparable nondystonic guitarists and in the study patients when performing normal-hand exercise served as references. A 1.5-T system equipped with echo-speed gradients and single-shot echoplanar imaging software was used. Data acquisition was centered on the cortical motor system encompassed in eight contiguous slices. Dystonic musicians compared with both control situations showed a significantly larger activation of the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex that contrasted with a conspicuous bilateral underactivation of premotor areas. Our results coincide with studies of other dystonia types in that they show an abnormal recruitment of cortical areas involved in the control of voluntary movement. However, they do suggest that the primary sensorimotor cortex, rather than being underactive in idiopathic dystonic patients, may be overactive when tested during full expression of the task-induced movement disorder.

  4. Evaluation of Field Map and Nonlinear Registration Methods for Correction of Susceptibility Artifacts in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sijia; Peterson, Daniel J.; Gatenby, J. C.; Li, Wenbin; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Madhyastha, Tara M.

    2017-01-01

    Correction of echo planar imaging (EPI)-induced distortions (called “unwarping”) improves anatomical fidelity for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional imaging investigations. Commonly used unwarping methods require the acquisition of supplementary images during the scanning session. Alternatively, distortions can be corrected by nonlinear registration to a non-EPI acquired structural image. In this study, we compared reliability using two methods of unwarping: (1) nonlinear registration to a structural image using symmetric normalization (SyN) implemented in Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs); and (2) unwarping using an acquired field map. We performed this comparison in two different test-retest data sets acquired at differing sites (N = 39 and N = 32). In both data sets, nonlinear registration provided higher test-retest reliability of the output fractional anisotropy (FA) maps than field map-based unwarping, even when accounting for the effect of interpolation on the smoothness of the images. In general, field map-based unwarping was preferable if and only if the field maps were acquired optimally. PMID:28270762

  5. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5–3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  6. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  7. Importance of timing of post-contrast MRI in rheumatoid arthritis: what happens during the first 60 minutes after IV gadolinium-DTPA?

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, M; Klarlund, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Volumes of inflamed synovial membrane determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are closely related to histopathological synovitis and may predict erosive progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, after IV injection, leakage of MRI contrast from the synovium gradually compromises the differentiation of synovium from joint fluid.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the time period after IV MRI contrast (gadolinium-DTPA (Gd)) injection in which synovial membrane volume determination is reliable.
METHODS—MRI of five RA knees with clinical synovitis was carried out, with axial, T1 weighted, spin echo images before IV Gd injection and every 1.75 minutes for 60 minutes post-Gd. By a semiautomated "signal enhancement threshold" method, including voxels with >35% or >45% relative post-Gd enhancement, synovial membrane volumes were estimated at each time point. At 4.25 minutes post-Gd, volumes were also determined by a more accurate but time consuming "manual method".
RESULTS—The initially observed synovium-effusion borderline remained clearly visible, and on the same location, within at least the initial 11 minutes post-Gd (that is, within the normal time frame of post-Gd imaging in RA) but started blurring and moving centripetally thereafter. Compared with volumes at all other time points, synovial membrane volumes at 0.75 and 2.50 minutes post-Gd were significantly lower (Wilcoxon-Pratt), suggesting that some synovial membrane areas had not yet exceeded the enhancement threshold. Thereafter, the measured volumes remained practically unchanged.
CONCLUSION—This study suggests that MR image acquisition in arthritic knee joints should be performed within the initial approximately 10 minutes after gadolinium contrast injection to achieve the most accurate distinction between synovium and joint fluid but that small time variations are not of major importance to the measured synovial membrane volumes.

 PMID:11602477

  8. Whole-body MRI using a rolling table platform for the detection of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Lauenstein, Thomas C; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Goehde, Susanne C; Ruehm, Stefan G; Goyen, Mathias; Bosk, Silke; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results of whole-body MRI using a recently developed rolling table platform with findings of nuclear scintigraphy in patients with bone metastases. Twenty-six patients with known or suspected bone metastases who had undergone radionuclide scintigraphy were examined by MRI. Patients were placed on a rolling table platform with integrated phased-array surface coils [BodySURF (system for unlimited field of view)] capable of pulling the patient through the isocenter of the magnet. Using a five-station approach three different image sets (T1-weighted gradient recalled echo, half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin echo, and short tau inversion recovery) were collected in the coronal plane. In addition, the spine was imaged in the sagittal plane. The MRI findings were compared with the results obtained by scintigraphy. The whole-body MR examination lasting merely 40 min was feasible in all 26 patients. The MRI revealed excellent correlation with scintigraphy regarding metastatic lesions. A total of 60 regions with metastatic lesions were identified on bone scintigraphy. Fifty-three regions were detected on identical locations by MRI. The regions missed by MRI were located mainly in ribs and skull. The MRI could identify additional bone metastases in spine, pelvis, and femur. The MRI screening for bone metastases correlated well with bone scintigraphy. Use of the rolling table platform permits rapid imaging based on three different contrast mechanisms of the entire skeletal system.

  9. Comparison of gradient echo with spin echo magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography in the evaluation of major aortopulmonary collateral arteries.

    PubMed

    Vick, G W; Wendt, R E; Rokey, R

    1994-05-01

    This study compared gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging, spin echo magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and echocardiography with x-ray cineangiography in the evaluation of major aortopulmonary collateral arteries. Twelve patients (ages 9 months to 35 years, mean 11 +/- 11 years) with known or suspected major aortopulmonary collateral arteries were studied. The aortic insertion and proximal course of 29 major aortopulmonary collateral arteries demonstrated by x-ray contrast angiography were shown in all 29 cases by gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging but in only 23 of the 29 cases by spin echo magnetic resonance imaging. Color Doppler-echocardiography detected aortopulmonary collateral arteries in four patients but did not define the proximal course or distal anatomy. Gradient echo images of distal aortopulmonary collateral anatomy were qualitatively superior to spin echo images. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the vessel lumen and adjacent lung was greater for gradient echo (6.06 +/- 2.91) than for spin echo (1.45 +/- 1.13)(p < 0.05). Gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging is a useful method for identification and characterization of aortopulmonary collateral arteries in patients of all ages and is superior to spin echo magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

  10. Rapid multichannel impact-echo scanning of concrete bridge decks from a continuously moving platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, Brian A.; Larsen, Jacob; McElderry, Joseph; Guthrie, W. Spencer

    2017-02-01

    Impact-echo testing is a non-destructive evaluation technique for determining the presence of defects in reinforced concrete bridge decks based on the acoustic response of the bridge deck when struck by an impactor. In this work, we build on our prior research with a single-channel impactor to demonstrate a seven-channel impact-echo scanning system with independent control of the impactors. This system is towed by a vehicle and integrated with distance measurement for registering the locations of the impacts along a bridge deck. The entire impact and recording system is computer-controlled. Because of a winch system and hinged frame construction of the apparatus, setup, measurement, and take-down of the apparatus can be achieved in a matter of minutes. Signal processing of the impact responses is performed on site and can produce a map of delaminations immediately after data acquisition. This map can then be used to guide other testing and/or can be referenced with the results of other testing techniques to facilitate comprehensive condition assessments of concrete bridge decks. This work demonstrates how impact-echo testing can be performed in a manner that makes complete bridge deck scanning for delaminations rapid and practical.

  11. Dynamic and Inherent B0 Correction for DTI Using Stimulated Echo Spiral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Avram, Alexandru V.; Guidon, Arnaud; Truong, Trong-Kha; Liu, Chunlei; Song, Allen W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel technique for high-resolution stimulated echo (STE) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with self-navigated interleaved spirals (SNAILS) readout trajectories that can inherently and dynamically correct for image artifacts due to spatial and temporal variations in the static magnetic field (B0) resulting from eddy currents, tissue susceptibilities, subject/physiological motion, and hardware instabilities. Methods The Hahn spin echo formed by the first two 90° radio-frequency pulses is balanced to consecutively acquire two additional images with different echo times (TE) and generate an inherent field map, while the diffusion-prepared STE signal remains unaffected. For every diffusion-encoding direction, an intrinsically registered field map is estimated dynamically and used to effectively and inherently correct for off-resonance artifacts in the reconstruction of the corresponding diffusion-weighted image (DWI). Results After correction with the dynamically acquired field maps, local blurring artifacts are specifically removed from individual STE DWIs and the estimated diffusion tensors have significantly improved spatial accuracy and larger fractional anisotropy. Conclusion Combined with the SNAILS acquisition scheme, our new method provides an integrated high-resolution short-TE DTI solution with inherent and dynamic correction for both motion-induced phase errors and off-resonance effects. PMID:23630029

  12. Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, N. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An echo tracker/range finder or altimeter is described. The pulse repetition frequency (PFR) of a predetermined plurality of transmitted pulses is adjusted so that echo pulses received from a reflecting object are positioned between transmitted pulses and divided their interpulse time interval into two time intervals having a predetermined ratio with respect to each other. The invention described provides a means whereby the arrival time of a plurality of echo pulses is defined as the time at which a composite echo pulse formed of a sum of the individual echo pulses has the highest amplitude. The invention is applicable to radar systems, sonar systems, or any other kind of system in which pulses are transmitted and echoes received therefrom.

  13. Project Echo: FM Demodulators with Negative Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthroff, Clyde L.

    1961-01-01

    The primary experimental objective of Project Echo was the transmission of radio communications between points on the earth by reflection from the balloon satellite. Owing to the large path losses from transmitter to receiver via the satellite, a wide-band frequency modulation technique was used in which bandwidth was traded for signal-to-noise ratio. This paper describes the FM receiving demodulators employed. Negative feedback applied to the local oscillator reduces the FM modulation index in the receiver IF amplifiers, resulting in threshold performance superior to that of conventional FM receivers.

  14. Decoherence and spin echo in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Berman, Gennady P

    2015-05-01

    The spin-echo approach is extended to include biocomplexes for which the interaction with dynamical noise, produced by the protein environment, is strong. Significant restoration of the free induction decay signal due to homogeneous (decoherence) and inhomogeneous (dephasing) broadening is demonstrated analytically and numerically for both an individual dimer of interacting chlorophylls and for an ensemble of dimers. Our approach does not require the use of small interaction constants between the electron states and the protein fluctuations. It is based on an exact and closed system of ordinary differential equations that can be easily solved for a wide range of parameters that are relevant for bioapplications.

  15. Extra echo spaces: ultrasonography and computerised tomography correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, T; Honda, M; Matsuyama, S

    1982-01-01

    Among the echocardiograms of 844 patients of the International Goodwill Hospital from January 1980 to April 1981, 700 showed clinically inexplicable extra echo spaces. Fifty of the 700 had computerised tomography of their hearts which showed the extra echo spaces to be caused either by anterior or posterior subepicardial fat. Six of the 50 cases had both fat and pericardial effusions, which are difficult to differentiate echocardiographically unless follow-up clinical observations are performed. Subepicardial fat deposits are reasonable explanations for the extra echo spaces frequently observed by echocardiography: they correlate well with clinical findings. Subepicardial fat should be recognised as the cause of such extra echo spaces. Images PMID:7073903

  16. Temporal signal processing of dolphin biosonar echoes from salmon prey.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui Helen

    2014-08-01

    Killer whales project short broadband biosonar clicks. The broadband nature of the clicks provides good temporal resolution of echo highlights and allows for the discriminations of salmon prey. The echoes contain many highlights as the signals reflect off different surfaces and parts of the fish body and swim bladder. The temporal characteristics of echoes from salmon are highly aspect dependent and six temporal parameters were used in a support vector machine to discriminate between species. Results suggest that killer whales can classify salmon based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification.

  17. Echoes of Historical Supernovae in the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Rest, Armin; Welch, Douglas; Stubbs, Christopher; Smith, R. Chris; Olsen, Knut; Bergmann, Marcel; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Minnite, Dante; Cook, Kem; Prieto, J. L.; Becker, Andy; Garg, Arti; Huber, Mark; Nikolaev, Sergei; Miknaitis, Gajus

    2006-08-01

    Our SuperMACHO collaboration has discovered echoes from four ancient supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The echoes were discovered using our SuperMACHO MOSAIC data difference images. The echo motions point to three supernova remnants which are listed as three of the six youngest SNRs in the LMC. These three remnants are also identified as Type Ia events, based on the X-ray spectral abundances. We have dated these echoes at 400-800 years. The echoes are easy to detect - they are as bright as 22 mag arcsec^-2, generally superluminal, a few arc- seconds wide, and tens of arc-seconds across. We are asking for NOAO time to get images of regions of significant dust concentration near the Galactic SNe Crab/1054, Tycho (4+3n KPNO 4m) and Kepler, Lupus/1006 (4n CTIO 4m). These supernovae are the youngest and/or brightest. By obtaining these images, we will be able to search for echoes in the second epoch images and have the first epoch images for a run next semester. Our group, which pioneered the discovery of echoes, will be at a great advantage for finding these echoes first if we can get these images this observing season. Finding echoes from historical supernovae and typeing them with spectra will be a major discovery for the NOAO 4m telescopes.

  18. Brain morphometry reproducibility in multi-center 3T MRI studies: a comparison of cross-sectional and longitudinal segmentations.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, Jorge; Marizzoni, Moira; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bosch, Beatriz; Bartrés-Faz, David; Arnold, Jennifer; Benninghoff, Jens; Wiltfang, Jens; Roccatagliata, Luca; Nobili, Flavio; Hensch, Tilman; Tränkner, Anja; Schönknecht, Peter; Leroy, Melanie; Lopes, Renaud; Bordet, Régis; Chanoine, Valérie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Didic, Mira; Gros-Dagnac, Hélène; Payoux, Pierre; Zoccatelli, Giada; Alessandrini, Franco; Beltramello, Alberto; Bargalló, Núria; Blin, Olivier; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale longitudinal multi-site MRI brain morphometry studies are becoming increasingly crucial to characterize both normal and clinical population groups using fully automated segmentation tools. The test-retest reproducibility of morphometry data acquired across multiple scanning sessions, and for different MR vendors, is an important reliability indicator since it defines the sensitivity of a protocol to detect longitudinal effects in a consortium. There is very limited knowledge about how across-session reliability of morphometry estimates might be affected by different 3T MRI systems. Moreover, there is a need for optimal acquisition and analysis protocols in order to reduce sample sizes. A recent study has shown that the longitudinal FreeSurfer segmentation offers improved within session test-retest reproducibility relative to the cross-sectional segmentation at one 3T site using a nonstandard multi-echo MPRAGE sequence. In this study we implement a multi-site 3T MRI morphometry protocol based on vendor provided T1 structural sequences from different vendors (3D MPRAGE on Siemens and Philips, 3D IR-SPGR on GE) implemented in 8 sites located in 4 European countries. The protocols used mild acceleration factors (1.5-2) when possible. We acquired across-session test-retest structural data of a group of healthy elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) and compared the across-session reproducibility of two full-brain automated segmentation methods based on either longitudinal or cross-sectional FreeSurfer processing. The segmentations include cortical thickness, intracranial, ventricle and subcortical volumes. Reproducibility is evaluated as absolute changes relative to the mean (%), Dice coefficient for volume overlap and intraclass correlation coefficients across two sessions. We found that this acquisition and analysis protocol gives comparable reproducibility results to previous studies that used longer acquisitions without acceleration. We also show that

  19. Value of a single-shot turbo spin-echo pulse sequence for assessing the architecture of the subarachnoid space and the constitutive nature of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Pease, Anthony; Sullivan, Stacey; Olby, Natasha; Galano, Heather; Cerda-Gonzalez, Sophia; Robertson, Ian D; Gavin, Patrick; Thrall, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Three case history reports are presented to illustrate the value of the single-shot turbo spin-echo pulse sequence for assessment of the subarachnoid space. The use of the single-shot turbo spin-echo pulse sequence, which is a heavily T2-weighted sequence, allows for a rapid, noninvasive evaluation of the subarachnoid space by using the high signal from cerebrospinal fluid. This sequence can be completed in seconds rather than the several minutes required for a T2-fast spin-echo sequence. Unlike the standard T2-fast spin-echo sequence, a single-shot turbo spin-echo pulse sequence also provides qualitative information about the protein and the cellular content of the cerebrospinal fluid, such as in patients with inflammatory debris or hemorrhage in the cerebrospinal fluid. Although the resolution of the single-shot turbo spin-echo pulse sequence images is relatively poor compared with more conventional sequences, the qualitative information about the subarachnoid space and cerebrospinal fluid and the rapid acquisition time, make it a useful sequence to include in standard protocols of spinal magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4T microMRI

    SciTech Connect

    Maramraju, S.H.; Schlyer, D.; Maramraju, S.H.; Smith, S.D.; Junnarkar, S.S.; Schulz, D.; Stoll, S.; Ravindranath, B.; Purschke, M.L.; Rescia, S.; Southekal, S.; Pratte, J.-F.; Vaska, P.; Woody, C.L.; Schlyer, D.J.

    2011-03-25

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 x 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 x 2.22 x 5 mm{sup 3}) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [{sup 11}C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  1. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4 T microMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha Maramraju, Sri; Smith, S. David; Junnarkar, Sachin S.; Schulz, Daniela; Stoll, Sean; Ravindranath, Bosky; Purschke, Martin L.; Rescia, Sergio; Southekal, Sudeepti; Pratte, Jean-François; Vaska, Paul; Woody, Craig L.; Schlyer, David J.

    2011-04-01

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 × 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 × 2.22 × 5 mm3) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [11C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  2. Data Collection and Analysis Strategies for phMRI

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Joseph B.; Liu, Christina H.; Vanduffel, Wim; Marota, John J.A.; Jenkins, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Although functional MRI traditionally has been applied mainly to study changes in task-induced brain function, evolving acquisition methodologies and improved knowledge of signal mechanisms have increased the utility of this method for studying responses to pharmacological stimuli, a technique often dubbed “phMRI”. The proliferation of higher magnetic field strengths and the use of exogenous contrast agent have boosted detection power, a critical factor for successful phMRI due to the restricted ability to average multiple stimuli within subjects. Receptor-based models of neurovascular coupling, including explicit pharmacological models incorporating receptor densities and affinities and data-driven models that incorporate weak biophysical constraints, have demonstrated compelling descriptions of phMRI signal induced by dopaminergic stimuli. This report describes phMRI acquisition and analysis methodologies, with an emphasis on data-driven analyses. As an example application, statistically efficient data-driven regressors were used to describe the biphasic response to the mu-opioid agonist remifentanil, and antagonism using dopaminergic and GABAergic ligands revealed modulation of the mesolimbic pathway. Results illustrate the power of phMRI as well as our incomplete understanding of mechanisms underlying the signal. Future directions are discussed for phMRI acquisitions in human studies, for evolving analysis methodologies, and for interpretative studies using the new generation of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners. PMID:24613447

  3. Biophysical mechanisms of MRI signal frequency contrast in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Luo, Jie; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; Iyer, Aditi; Cross, Anne H.

    2012-01-01

    Phase images obtained with gradient echo MRI provide image contrast distinct from T1- and T2-weighted images. It is commonly assumed that the local contribution to MRI signal phase directly relates to local bulk tissue magnetic susceptibility. Here, we use Maxwell’s equations and Monte Carlo simulations to provide theoretical background to the hypothesis that the local contribution to MRI signal phase does not depend on tissue bulk magnetic susceptibility but tissue magnetic architecture—distribution of magnetic susceptibility inclusions (lipids, proteins, iron, etc.) at the cellular and subcellular levels. Specifically, we show that the regular longitudinal structures forming cylindrical axons (myelin sheaths and neurofilaments) can be locally invisible in phase images. Contrary to an expectation that the phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions should always increase in degree along with worsening of lesion severity (which happens for all known MR magnitude-based contrast mechanisms), we show that phase contrast can actually disappear with extreme tissue destruction. We also show that the phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions could be altered without loss of nervous system tissue, which happens in mild injury to the myelin sheaths or axonal neurofilaments. Moreover, we predict that the sign of phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions indicates the predominant type of tissue injury—myelin damage (positive sign) vs. axonal neurofilament damage (negative sign). Therefore, our theoretical and experimental results shed light on understanding the relationship between gradient echo MRI signal phase and multiple sclerosis pathology. PMID:22891307

  4. Synthetic quantitative MRI through relaxometry modelling

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative MRI (qMRI) provides standardized measures of specific physical parameters that are sensitive to the underlying tissue microstructure and are a first step towards achieving maps of biologically relevant metrics through in vivo histology using MRI. Recently proposed models have described the interdependence of qMRI parameters. Combining such models with the concept of image synthesis points towards a novel approach to synthetic qMRI, in which maps of fundamentally different physical properties are constructed through the use of biophysical models. In this study, the utility of synthetic qMRI is investigated within the context of a recently proposed linear relaxometry model. Two neuroimaging applications are considered. In the first, artefact‐free quantitative maps are synthesized from motion‐corrupted data by exploiting the over‐determined nature of the relaxometry model and the fact that the artefact is inconsistent across the data. In the second application, a map of magnetization transfer (MT) saturation is synthesized without the need to acquire an MT‐weighted volume, which directly leads to a reduction in the specific absorption rate of the acquisition. This feature would be particularly important for ultra‐high field applications. The synthetic MT map is shown to provide improved segmentation of deep grey matter structures, relative to segmentation using T 1‐weighted images or R 1 maps. The proposed approach of synthetic qMRI shows promise for maximizing the extraction of high quality information related to tissue microstructure from qMRI protocols and furthering our understanding of the interrelation of these qMRI parameters. PMID:27753154

  5. Impact echo scanning of concrete and wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Dennis A.; Olson, Larry D.; Aouad, Marwan F.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of a new nondestructive testing (NDT) system that allows rapid nondestructive assessment of many types of structural materials. The new system is based on scanning impact echo (IE), using a rolling receiver, digitally controlled impact source, and a distance measurement wheel integrated into a system that is capable of performing over 3000 IE tests per hour. The system has been successfully used on both concrete and wood for condition assessment. Previously, impact echo testing has been limited to point-by-point testing at rates of typically 30 - 60 points per hour. The new system is usable on any flat, relatively smooth surface such as floor slabs, pavements, walls, columns, beams, etc. In addition to IE scanning, the new system has recently been expanded to allow the performance of spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) scanning on concrete and wood. The SASW method allows the measurement of material stiffness (modulus) versus depth, and therefore can give a profile of the material condition versus depth. Included in this paper are brief discussions of the IE and SASW methods, the scanner system hardware, and the software which was developed to enable efficient processing, analysis, and display of the test data and results. Also included are sample data plots and a case history presentation of the use of the system in the field, including one in which 23,000 IE tests were performed on an elevated floor slab in approximately 16 hours of testing time.

  6. Image domain propeller fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Skare, Stefan; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Lilja, Anders; Bammer, Roland

    2013-04-01

    A new pulse sequence for high-resolution T2-weighted (T2-w) imaging is proposed - image domain propeller fast spin echo (iProp-FSE). Similar to the T2-w PROPELLER sequence, iProp-FSE acquires data in a segmented fashion, as blades that are acquired in multiple TRs. However, the iProp-FSE blades are formed in the image domain instead of in the k-space domain. Each iProp-FSE blade resembles a single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequence with a very narrow phase-encoding field of view (FOV), after which N rotated blade replicas yield the final full circular FOV. Our method of combining the image domain blade data to a full FOV image is detailed, and optimal choices of phase-encoding FOVs and receiver bandwidths were evaluated on phantom and volunteers. The results suggest that a phase FOV of 15-20%, a receiver bandwidth of ±32-63 kHz and a subsequent readout time of about 300 ms provide a good tradeoff between signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency and T2 blurring. Comparisons between iProp-FSE, Cartesian FSE and PROPELLER were made on single-slice axial brain data, showing similar T2-w tissue contrast and SNR with great anatomical conspicuity at similar scan times - without colored noise or streaks from motion. A new slice interleaving order is also proposed to improve the multislice capabilities of iProp-FSE.

  7. Light Echoes of Transients and Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryTycho Brahe's observations of a supernova in 1572 challenged the contemporaneous European view of the cosmos that the celestial realm was unchanging. 439 years later we have once again seen the light that Tycho saw, as some of the light from the 1572 supernova is reflected off dust and is only now reaching Earth. These light echoes, as well as ones detected from other transients and variables, give us a very rare opportunity in astronomy: direct observation of the cause (the supernova explosion) and the effect (the supernova remnant) of the same astronomical event. Furthermore, in some cases we can compare light echoes at different angles around a supernova remnant, and thus investigate possible asymmetry in the supernova explosion. In addition, in cases where the scattering dust is favorably positioned, the geometric distance to the SN remnant can be determined using polarization measurements. These techniques have been successfully applied to various transients in the last decade, and the talk gave an overview of the scientific results and techniques, with a particular focus on the challenges we will face in the current and upcoming wide-field time-domain surveys.

  8. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  9. Mergers + acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2002-05-01

    The hospital sector in 2001 led the health care field in mergers and acquisitions. Most deals involved a network augmenting its presence within a specific region or in a market adjacent to its primary service area. Analysts expect M&A activity to increase in 2002.

  10. Acquisition strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, M.J.; Lynch, P.W. )

    1993-11-01

    Acquiring projects takes careful planning, research and consideration. Picking the right opportunities and avoiding the pitfalls will lead to a more valuable portfolio. This article describes the steps to take in evaluating an acquisition and what items need to be considered in an evaluation.

  11. The Future of ECHO: Evaluating Open Source Possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Gilman, J.; Baynes, K.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System ClearingHOuse (ECHO) is a format agnostic metadata repository supporting over 3000 collections and 100M science granules. ECHO exposes FTP and RESTful Data Ingest APIs in addition to both SOAP and RESTful search and order capabilities. Built on top of ECHO is a human facing search and order web application named Reverb. ECHO processes hundreds of orders, tens of thousands of searches, and 1-2M ingest actions each week. As ECHO's holdings, metadata format support, and visibility have increased, the ECHO team has received requests by non-NASA entities for copies of ECHO that can be run locally against their data holdings. ESDIS and the ECHO Team have begun investigations into various deployment and Open Sourcing models that can balance the real constraints faced by the ECHO project with the benefits of providing ECHO capabilities to a broader set of users and providers. This talk will discuss several release and Open Source models being investigated by the ECHO team along with the impacts those models are expected to have on the project. We discuss: - Addressing complex deployment or setup issues for potential users - Models of vetting code contributions - Balancing external (public) user requests versus our primary partners - Preparing project code for public release, including navigating licensing issues related to leveraged libraries - Dealing with non-free project dependencies such as commercial databases - Dealing with sensitive aspects of project code such as database passwords, authentication approaches, security through obscurity, etc. - Ongoing support for the released code including increased testing demands, bug fixes, security fixes, and new features.

  12. DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and MRS in Cancer: Challenges and Advantages of Implementing Qualitative and Quantitative Multi-parametric Imaging in the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Jessica M.; Payne, Geoffrey S.; Weller, Alex; deSouza, Nandita M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) offers a unique insight into tumor biology by combining functional MRI techniques that inform on cellularity (diffusion-weighted MRI), vascular properties (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), and metabolites (magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and has scope to provide valuable information for prognostication and response assessment. Challenges in the application of mpMRI in the clinic include the technical considerations in acquiring good quality functional MRI data, development of robust techniques for analysis, and clinical interpretation of the results. This article summarizes the technical challenges in acquisition and analysis of multi-parametric MRI data before reviewing the key applications of multi-parametric MRI in clinical research and practice. PMID:27748710

  13. MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry for validating plans with multiple matrices in Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Gopishankar, N; Watanabe, Yoichi; Subbiah, Vivekanandhan

    2011-01-31

    One of treatment planning techniques with Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) uses multiple matrices with multiple dose prescriptions. Computational complexity increases when shots are placed in multiple matrices with different grid sizes. Hence, the experimental validation of LGP calculated dose distributions is needed for those cases. For the current study, we used BANG3 polymer gel contained in a head-sized glass bottle to simulate the entire treatment process of GKSRS. A treatment plan with three 18 mm shots and one 8 mm shot in separate matrices was created with LGP. The prescribed maximum dose was 8 Gy to three shots and 16 Gy to one of the 18 mm shots. The 3D dose distribution recorded in the gel dosimeter was read using a Siemens 3T MRI scanner. The scanning parameters of a CPMG pulse sequence with 32 equidistant echoes were as follows: TR = 7 s, echo step = 13.6 ms, field-of-view = 256 mm × 256 mm, and pixel size = 1 mm × 1 mm. Interleaved acquisition mode was used to obtain 15 to 45 2-mm-thick slices. Using a calibration relationship between absorbed dose and the spin-spin relaxation rate (R2), we converted R2 images to dose images. MATLAB-based in-house programs were used for R2 estimation and dose comparison. Gamma-index analysis for the 3D data showed gamma values less than unity for 86% of the voxels. Through this study we accomplished the first application of polymer gel dosimetry for a true comparison between measured 3D dose distributions and LGP calculations for plans using multiple matrices for multiple targets.

  14. A New Strategy for Fast MRI-Based Quantification of the Myelin Water Fraction: Application to Brain Imaging in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Kulikova, Sofya; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    The volume fraction of water related to myelin (fmy) is a promising MRI index for in vivo assessment of brain myelination, that can be derived from multi-component analysis of T1 and T2 relaxometry signals. However, existing quantification methods require rather long acquisition and/or post-processing times, making implementation difficult both in research studies on healthy unsedated children and in clinical examinations. The goal of this work was to propose a novel strategy for fmy quantification within acceptable acquisition and post-processing times. Our approach is based on a 3-compartment model (myelin-related water, intra/extra-cellular water and unrestricted water), and uses calibrated values of inherent relaxation times (T1c and T2c) for each compartment c. Calibration was first performed on adult relaxometry datasets (N = 3) acquired with large numbers of inversion times (TI) and echo times (TE), using an original combination of a region contraction approach and a non-negative least-square (NNLS) algorithm. This strategy was compared with voxel-wise fitting, and showed robust estimation of T1c and T2c. The accuracy of fmy calculations depending on multiple factors was investigated using simulated data. In the testing stage, our strategy enabled fast fmy mapping, based on relaxometry datasets acquired with reduced TI and TE numbers (acquisition <6 min), and analyzed with NNLS algorithm (post-processing <5min). In adults (N = 13, mean age 22.4±1.6 years), fmy maps showed variability across white matter regions, in agreement with previous studies. In healthy infants (N = 18, aged 3 to 34 weeks), asynchronous changes in fmy values were demonstrated across bundles, confirming the well-known progression of myelination. PMID:27736872

  15. Objective assessment of sonographic: quality II acquisition information spectrum.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nghia Q; Abbey, Craig K; Insana, Michael F

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes a task-based, information-theoretic approach to the assessment of image quality in diagnostic sonography. We expand the Kullback-Leibler divergence metric J, which quantifies the diagnostic information contained within recorded radio-frequency echo signals, into a spatial-frequency integral comprised of two spectral components: one describes patient features for low-contrast diagnostic tasks and the other describes instrumentation properties. The latter quantity is the acquisition information spectrum (AIS), which measures the density of object information that an imaging system is able to transfer to the echo data at each spatial frequency. AIS is derived based on unique properties of acoustic scattering in tissues that generate object contrast. Predictions made by the J integral expression were validated through Monte Carlo studies using echo-signal data from simulated lesions. Our analysis predicts the diagnostic performance of any sonographic system at specific diagnostic tasks based on engineering properties of the instrument that constitute image quality.

  16. MRI-SPECT image registration using multiple MR pulse sequences to examine osteoarthritis of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, John A.; Peterfy, Charles G.; White, David L.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Genant, Harry K.

    1999-05-01

    We have examined whether automated image registration can be used to combine metabolic information from SPECT knee scans with anatomical information from MRI. Ten patients, at risk of developing OA due to meniscal surgery, were examined. 99mTc methyldiphosphonate SPECT, T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) MRI, and T1-weighted, 3D fat-suppressed gradient recalled echo (SPGR) MRI images were obtained. Registration was performed using normalized mutual information. For each patient, FSE data was registered to SPGR data, providing a composite MRI image with each voxel represented by two intensities (ISPGR, IFSE). Modifications to the registration algorithm were made to allow registration of SPECT data (one intensity per voxel) to composite MRI data (2 intensities per voxel). Registration sources was assessed by visual inspection of uptake localization over expected anatomical locations, and the absence of uptake over unlikely sites. Three patients were discarded from SPECT-MRI registration tests since they had metallic artifacts that prevented co-registration of MR data. Registration of SPECT to SPGR or FSE data alone proved unreliable, with less than 50% of attempts succeeding. The modified algorithm, treating co-registered SPGR and FSE data as a two-value-per-voxel image, proved most reliable, allowing registration of all patients with no metallic artifacts on MRI.

  17. Assessment of MRI Issues at 3 Tesla for a New Metallic Tissue Marker.

    PubMed

    Cronenweth, Charlotte M; Shellock, Frank G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the MRI issues at 3 Tesla for a metallic tissue marker used to localize removal areas of tissue abnormalities. Materials and Methods. A newly designed, metallic tissue marker (Achieve Marker, CareFusion, Vernon Hills, IL) used to mark biopsy sites, particularly in breasts, was assessed for MRI issues which included standardized tests to determine magnetic field interactions (i.e., translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts at 3 Tesla. Temperature changes were determined for the marker using a gelled-saline-filled phantom. MRI was performed at a relatively high specific absorption rate (whole body averaged SAR, 2.9-W/kg). MRI artifacts were evaluated using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results. The marker displayed minimal magnetic field interactions (2-degree deflection angle and no torque). MRI-related heating was only 0.1°C above background heating (i.e., the heating without the tissue marker present). Artifacts seen as localized signal loss were relatively small in relation to the size and shape of the marker. Conclusions. Based on the findings, the new metallic tissue marker is acceptable or "MR Conditional" (using current labeling terminology) for a patient undergoing an MRI procedure at 3 Tesla or less.

  18. Iterative Method for Predistortion of MRI Gradient Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, Kevin D.; Does, Mark D.; Grissom, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to correct for transient gradient waveform errors in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether from eddy currents, group delay, or gradient amplifier nonlinearities, which are known to affect image quality. An iterative method is proposed to minimize error between desired and measured gradient waveforms, whose success does not depend on accurate knowledge of the gradient system impulse response. The method was applied to half-pulse excitation for 2-D ultra-short echo time (UTE) imaging on a small animal MRI system and to spiral 2-D excitation on a human 7T MRI system. Predistorted gradient waveforms reduced temporal signal variation caused by excitation gradient trajectory errors in 2-D UTE, and improved the quality of excitation patterns produced by spiral excitation pulses. Iterative gradient predistortion is useful for minimizing transient gradient errors without requiring accurate characterization of the gradient system impulse response. PMID:24801945

  19. Acoustic noise reduction in a 4 T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Mechefske, Chris K; Geris, Ryan; Gati, Joseph S; Rutt, Brian K

    2002-01-01

    High-field, high-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can generate high levels of noise. There is ongoing concern in the medical and imaging research communities regarding the detrimental effects of high acoustic levels on auditory function, patient anxiety, verbal communication between patients and health care workers and ultimately MR image quality. In order to effectively suppress the noise levels inside MRI scanners, the sound field needs to be accurately measured and characterized. This paper presents the results of measurements of the sound radiation from a gradient coil cylinder within a 4 T MRI scanner under a variety of conditions. These measurement results show: (1) that noise levels can be significantly reduced through the use of an appropriately designed passive acoustic liner; and (2) the true noise levels that are experienced by patients during echo planar imaging.

  20. Application of k-space energy spectrum analysis to susceptibility field mapping and distortion correction in gradient-echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-kuei; Oshio, Koichi; Panych, Lawrence P

    2006-06-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) is widely used in functional MRI studies. It is well known that EPI quality is usually degraded by geometric distortions, when there exist susceptibility field inhomogeneities. EPI distortions may be corrected if the field maps are available. It is possible to estimate the susceptibility field gradients from the phase reconstruction of a single-TE EPI image, after a successful phase-unwrapping procedure. However, in regions affected by pronounced field gradients, the phase-unwrapping of a single-TE image may fail, and therefore the estimated field maps may be incorrect. It has been reported that the field inhomogeneity may be calculated more reliably from T2*-weighted images corresponding to multiple TEs. However, the multi-TE MRI field mapping increases the scan time. Furthermore, the measured field maps may be invalid if the subject's position changes during dynamic scans. To overcome the limitations in conventional field mapping approaches, a novel k-space energy spectrum analysis algorithm is developed, which quantifies the spatially dependent echo-shifting effect and the susceptibility field gradients directly from the k-space data of single-TE gradient-echo EPI. Using the k-space energy spectrum analysis, susceptibility field gradients can be reliably measured without phase-unwrapping, and EPI distortions can be corrected without extra field mapping scans or pulse sequence modification. The reported technique can be used to retrospectively improve the image quality of the previously acquired EPI and functional MRI data, provided that the complex-domain k-space data are still available.

  1. Joint 2D and 3D phase processing for quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to 2D echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Zhang, Yuyao; Gibbs, Eric; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) measures tissue magnetic susceptibility and typically relies on time-consuming three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) MRI. Recent studies have shown that two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GRE-EPI), which is commonly used in functional MRI (fMRI) and other dynamic imaging techniques, can also be used to produce data suitable for QSM with much shorter scan times. However, the production of high-quality QSM maps is difficult because data obtained by 2D multi-slice scans often have phase inconsistencies across adjacent slices and strong susceptibility field gradients near air-tissue interfaces. To address these challenges in 2D EPI-based QSM studies, we present a new data processing procedure that integrates 2D and 3D phase processing. First, 2D Laplacian-based phase unwrapping and 2D background phase removal are performed to reduce phase inconsistencies between slices and remove in-plane harmonic components of the background phase. This is followed by 3D background phase removal for the through-plane harmonic components. The proposed phase processing was evaluated with 2D EPI data obtained from healthy volunteers, and compared against conventional 3D phase processing using the same 2D EPI datasets. Our QSM results were also compared with QSM values from time-consuming 3D GRE data, which were taken as ground truth. The experimental results show that this new 2D EPI-based QSM technique can produce quantitative susceptibility measures that are comparable with those of 3D GRE-based QSM across different brain regions (e.g. subcortical iron-rich gray matter, cortical gray and white matter). This new 2D EPI QSM reconstruction method is implemented within STI Suite, which is a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Neural coding of echo-envelope disparities in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Borina, Frank; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2011-05-01

    The effective use of echolocation requires not only measuring the delay between the emitted call and returning echo to estimate the distance of an ensonified object. To locate an object in azimuth and elevation, the bat's auditory system must analyze the returning echoes in terms of their binaural properties, i.e., the echoes' interaural intensity and time differences (IIDs and ITDs). The effectiveness of IIDs for echolocation is undisputed, but when bats ensonify complex objects, the temporal structure of echoes may facilitate the analysis of the echo envelope in terms of envelope ITDs. Using extracellular recordings from the auditory midbrain of the bat, Phyllostomus discolor, we found a population of neurons that are sensitive to envelope ITDs of echoes of their sonar calls. Moreover, the envelope-ITD sensitivity improved with increasing temporal fluctuations in the echo envelopes, a sonar parameter related to the spatial statistics of complex natural reflectors like vegetation. The data show that in bats envelope ITDs may be used not only to locate external, prey-generated rustling sounds but also in the context of echolocation. Specifically, the temporal fluctuations in the echo envelope, which are created when the sonar emission is reflected from a complex natural target, support ITD-mediated echolocation.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560 Section 892.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1560 Ultrasonic pulsed echo...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560 Section 892.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1560 Ultrasonic pulsed echo...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560 Section 892.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1560 Ultrasonic pulsed echo...

  6. ECHOS: Early Childhood Hands-On Science Efficacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judy A.; Greenfield, Daryl B.; Bell, Elizabeth; Juárez, Cheryl Lani; Myers, Ted; Nayfeld, Irena

    2013-01-01

    "ECHOS: Early Childhood Hands-On Science" was developed at the Miami Science Museum as a comprehensive set of science lessons sequenced to lead children toward a deeper understanding of science content and the use of science process skills. The purpose of the research is to determine whether use of the "ECHOS" model will…

  7. Psychoacoustic influences of the echoing environments of prehistoric art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Steven J.

    2002-11-01

    Cave paintings and ancient petroglyphs around the world are typically found in echo rich locations such as caves, canyons, and rocky cliff faces. Analysis of field data shows that echo decibel levels at a large number of prehistoric art sites are higher than those at nondecorated locations. The selection of these echoing environments by the artists appears not to be a mere coincidence. This paper considers the perception of an echoed sound as a psychoacoustic event that would have been inexplicable to ancient humans. A variety of ancient legends from cultures on several continents attribute the phenomenon of echoes to supernatural beings. These legends, together with the quantitative data, strongly implicate echoing as relevant to the artists of the past. The notion that the echoes were caused by spirits within the rock would explain not only the unusual locations of prehistoric art, but also the perplexing subject matter. For example, the common theme of hoofed animal imagery could have been inspired by echoes of percussion noises perceived as hoof beats. Further systematic acoustical studies of prehistoric art sites is warranted. Conservation of the natural acoustic properties of rock art environments--a previously unrecognized need--is urged.

  8. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560 Section 892.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1560 - Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system. 892.1560 Section 892.1560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed echo imaging system is a device intended to project...

  10. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselwander, Christopher J.; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5 Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately 2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500 kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  11. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios.

    PubMed

    Hasselwander, Christopher J; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately $2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  12. Echoes from Ancient supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, A; Suntzeff, N B; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Smith, R C; Welch, D L; Becker, A; Bergmann, M; Clocchiatti, A; Cook, K; Garg, A; Huber, M; Miknaitis, G; Minniti, D; Nikolaev, S; Stubbs, C

    2005-06-15

    In principle, historical supernovae could still be visible as scattered-light echoes even centuries later [1, 2]. Searches for surface brightness variations using photographic plates have not recovered any echoes in the regions of historical Galactic supernovae [3]. Using differenced images, our SuperMACHO collaboration has discovered three faint new variable surface brightness complexes with high apparent proper motion pointing back to well-defined positions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These correspond to three of the six smallest (and likely youngest) supernova remnants believed to be due to thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae [4]. A lower limit to the age of these remnants and echoes is 200 years given the lack of any reported LMC supernovae until 1987. The discovery of historical supernova echoes in the LMC suggests that similar echoes for Galactic supernovae such as Tycho, Kepler, Cas A, or SN1006 could be visible using standard image differencing techniques.

  13. Diurnal variation of overdense meteor echo duration and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simek, Milos

    1992-01-01

    The diurnal variation of the median duration of overdense sporadic radar meteor echoes is examined. The meteors recorded in August, December, and January by the Ondrejov meteor radar during the period 1958-1990 were used for the analysis. A maximum median echo duration 1-3 hours after the time of local sunrise in the meteor region confirms the already known sunrise effect. Minimum echo duration occurring at the time of sunset seems to be the most important point of diurnal variation of the echo duration, when ozone is no longer dissociated by solar UV radiation. The effect of diurnal changes of the echo duration should be considered when the mass distribution of meteor showers is analyzed.

  14. Enhanced sensitivity to echo cues in blind subjects.

    PubMed

    Dufour, André; Després, Olivier; Candas, Victor

    2005-09-01

    Many studies have reported that blind people compensate for their visual deficit by sharpening auditory processes. Here we compare the sensitivity to echo cues between blind and sighted subjects. In the first experiment, the blind subjects were more accurate than the sighted subjects in localizing an object on the basis of echo cues. To ensure that enhanced echolocalization abilities were not only due to the fact that blind individuals are more used to consciously paying attention to echo cues and are more familiar with this kind of tasks than sighted subjects, we tested both groups of subjects in a simple azimuthal localization task of auditory stimuli. In this second experiment, we evaluated the influence of irrelevant echo signals on auditory localization by placing the subjects and the sound sources at different positions in a sound reverberant room. Results revealed that blind subjects exhibit a higher sensitivity to echo signals than sighted subjects.

  15. Echo power analysis and simulation of low altitude radio fuze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolu; Chen, Biao; Xu, Tao; Xu, Suqin

    2013-01-01

    The echo power from the earth gound which was received by fuze plays an important role in aerial defense missile, especially when the fuze is working in the look down mode. It is necessary to analyze and even simulate the echo power signals to enhance the missile's anti-jamming ability. In this paper, the quantity of echo power from the earth ground of low altitude radio fuze was analyzed in detail. Three boundary equations of area irradiated by electromagnetic beams were presented, which include two equidistant curve equations and one equal-Doppler curve equation. The relationship between the working mode and the critical height was analyzed. The calculating formula of echo power waveform was derived. And based on the derived formula, the correlation between the maximal echo power and the incident height was given and simulated, which would be helpful for the further researches of low altitude radio fuze.

  16. A model-based reconstruction for undersampled radial spin echo DTI with variational penalties on the diffusion tensor

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Florian; Raya, José G; Halloran, Rafael O; Baete, Steven; Sigmund, Eric; Bammer, Roland; Block, Tobias; Otazo, Ricardo; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2015-01-01

    Radial spin echo diffusion imaging allows motion-robust imaging of tissues with very low T2 values like articular cartilage with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, in vivo measurements are challenging due to the significantly slower data acquisition speed of spin-echo sequences and the less efficient k-space coverage of radial sampling, which raises the demand for accelerated protocols by means of undersampling. This work introduces a new reconstruction approach for undersampled DTI. A model-based reconstruction implicitly exploits redundancies in the diffusion weighted images by reducing the number of unknowns in the optimization problem and compressed sensing is performed directly in the target quantitative domain by imposing a Total Variation (TV) constraint on the elements of the diffusion tensor. Experiments were performed for an anisotropic phantom and the knee and brain of healthy volunteers (3 and 2 volunteers, respectively). Evaluation of the new approach was conducted by comparing the results to reconstructions performed with gridding, combined parallel imaging and compressed sensing, and a recently proposed model-based approach. The experiments demonstrated improvement in terms of reduction of noise and streaking artifacts in the quantitative parameter maps as well as a reduction of angular dispersion of the primary eigenvector when using the proposed method, without introducing systematic errors into the maps. This may enable an essential reduction of the acquisition time in radial spin echo diffusion tensor imaging without degrading parameter quantification and/or SNR. PMID:25594167

  17. A model-based reconstruction for undersampled radial spin-echo DTI with variational penalties on the diffusion tensor.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Florian; Raya, José G; Halloran, Rafael O; Baete, Steven; Sigmund, Eric; Bammer, Roland; Block, Tobias; Otazo, Ricardo; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2015-03-01

    Radial spin-echo diffusion imaging allows motion-robust imaging of tissues with very low T2 values like articular cartilage with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, in vivo measurements are challenging, due to the significantly slower data acquisition speed of spin-echo sequences and the less efficient k-space coverage of radial sampling, which raises the demand for accelerated protocols by means of undersampling. This work introduces a new reconstruction approach for undersampled diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). A model-based reconstruction implicitly exploits redundancies in the diffusion-weighted images by reducing the number of unknowns in the optimization problem and compressed sensing is performed directly in the target quantitative domain by imposing a total variation (TV) constraint on the elements of the diffusion tensor. Experiments were performed for an anisotropic phantom and the knee and brain of healthy volunteers (three and two volunteers, respectively). Evaluation of the new approach was conducted by comparing the results with reconstructions performed with gridding, combined parallel imaging and compressed sensing and a recently proposed model-based approach. The experiments demonstrated improvements in terms of reduction of noise and streaking artifacts in the quantitative parameter maps, as well as a reduction of angular dispersion of the primary eigenvector when using the proposed method, without introducing systematic errors into the maps. This may enable an essential reduction of the acquisition time in radial spin-echo diffusion-tensor imaging without degrading parameter quantification and/or SNR.

  18. Acoustooptic pulse-echo transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. O.; Wade, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse-echo transducer system which uses an ultrasonic generating element and an optical detection technique is described. The transmitting transducer consists of a concentric ring electrode pattern deposited on a circular, X-cut quartz substrate with a circular hole in the center. The rings are independently pulsed with a sequence high voltage signals phased in such a way that the ultrasonic waves generated by the separate rings superimpose to produce a composite field which is focused at a controllable distance below the surface of the specimen. The amplitude of the field reflected from this focus position is determined by the local reflection coefficient of the medium at the effective focal point. By processing the signals received for a range of ultrasonic transducer array focal lengths, the system can be used to locate and size anomalies within solids and liquids. Applications in both nondestructive evaluation and biomedical scanning are suggested.

  19. Echo Mapping of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, K.

    Echo mapping exploits light travel time delays, revealed by multi-wavelength variability studies, to map the geometry, kinematics, and physical conditions of reprocessing sites in photo-ionized gas flows. In active galactic nuclei (AGN), the ultraviolet to near infrared light arises in part from reprocessing of EUV and X-ray light from a compact and erratically variable source in the nucleus. The observed time delays, 0.1-2 days for the continuum and 1-100 days for the broad emission lines, probe regions only micro-arcseconds from the nucleus. Emission-line delays reveal radially stratified ionization zones, identify the nature of the gas motions, and estimate the masses of the central black holes. Continuum time delays map the temperature-radius structure of AGN accretion discs, and provide distances that may be accurate enough to realize the potential of AGNs as cosmological probes.

  20. Dual-rail optical gradient echo memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, D. B.; Geng, J.; Campbell, G. T.; Hosseini, M.; Cao, M. T.; Sparkes, B. M.; Bernu, J.; Robins, N. P.; Lam, P. K.; Buchler, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a scheme for the parallel storage of frequency separated signals in an optical memory and demonstrate that this dual-rail storage is a suitable memory for high fidelity frequency qubits. The two signals are stored simultaneously in the Zeeman-split Raman absorption lines of a cold atom ensemble using gradient echo memory techniques. Analysis of the split-Zeeman storage shows that the memory can be configured to preserve the relative amplitude and phase of the frequency separated signals. In an experimental demonstration dual-frequency pulses are recalled with 35% efficiency, 82% interference fringe visibility, and 6 degrees phase stability. The fidelity of the frequency-qubit memory is limited by frequency-dependent polarisation rotation and ambient magnetic field fluctuations, our analysis describes how these can be addressed in an alternative configuration.

  1. Spin Echo and Interference in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2006-11-30

    Spin dynamics in crossing a single depolarization resonance is a well-studied subject. One well-known example is that of Froissart and Stora in 1960. More is needed to complete the understanding, particularly of the transient effects, when crossing a single resonance, but question arises what happens if we cross two resonances or cross a single resonance twice. When a resonance is crossed twice, the particle's spin dynamics encounters two additional phenomena. First, the two crossings will interfere with each other, leading to an interference effect. Second, there will be a spin echo effect. We discuss these two effects in this report. Two proposals to test these effects experimentally are made at the end.

  2. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  3. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  4. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20 to 40 minutes. top of page Contrast material For some MRI exams, a contrast material called gadolinium will need to be injected into a vein in the arm. While contrast material sometimes improves the MRI images, during pregnancy the ...

  5. Dynamic hysteresis between gradient echo and spin echo attenuations in dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Kiselev, Valerij G; Möller, Harald E; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2013-04-01

    Perfusion measurements using dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging provide additional information about the mean vessel size of microvasculature when supplemented with a dual gradient echo (GE) - spin echo (SE) contrast. Dynamic increase in the corresponding transverse relaxation rate constant changes, ΔR2GE and ΔR2SE , forms a loop on the (Δ R2SE3/2, ΔR2GE ) plane, rather than a reversible line. The shape of the loop and the direction of its passage differentiate between healthy brain and pathological tissue, such as tumour and ischemic tissue. By considering a tree model of microvasculature, the direction of the loop is found to be influenced mainly by the relative arterial and venous blood volume, as well as the tracer bolus dispersion. A parameter Λ is proposed to characterize the direction and shape of the loop, which might be considered as a novel imaging marker for describing the pathology of cerebrovascular network.

  6. Recent Results for the ECHo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassel, C.; Blaum, K.; Goodacre, T. Day; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enss, C.; Filianin, P.; Fäßler, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Goncharov, M.; Hengstler, D.; Jochum, J.; Johnston, K.; Keller, M.; Kempf, S.; Kieck, T.; Köster, U.; Krantz, M.; Marsh, B.; Mokry, C.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Ranitzsch, P. C. O.; Rothe, S.; Rischka, A.; Runke, J.; Saenz, A.; Schneider, F.; Scholl, S.; Schüssler, R. X.; Simkovic, F.; Stora, T.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Türler, A.; Veinhard, M.; Wegner, M.; Wendt, K.; Zuber, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Electron Capture in ^{163}Ho experiment, ECHo, is designed to investigate the electron neutrino mass in the sub-eV range by means of the analysis of the calorimetrically measured spectrum following the electron capture (EC) in ^{163}Ho. Arrays of low-temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), read-out by microwave SQUID multiplexing, will be used in this experiment. With a first MMC prototype having the ^{163}Ho source ion-implanted into the absorber, we performed the first high energy resolution measurement of the EC spectrum, which demonstrated the feasibility of such an experiment. In addition to the technological challenges for the development of MMC arrays, which preserve the single pixel performance in terms of energy resolution and bandwidth, the success of the experiment relies on the availability of large ultra-pure ^{163}Ho samples, on the precise description of the expected spectrum, and on the identification and reduction of background. We present preliminary results obtained with standard MMCs developed for soft X-ray spectroscopy, maXs-20, where the ^{163}Ho ion-implantation was performed using a high-purity ^{163}Ho source produced by advanced chemical and mass separation. With these measurements, we aim at determining an upper limit for the background level due to source contamination and provide a refined description of the calorimetrically measured spectrum. We discuss the plan for a medium scale experiment, ECHo-1k, in which about 1000 mathrm {Bq} of high-purity ^{163}Ho will be ion-implanted into detector arrays. With one year of measuring time, we will be able to achieve a sensitivity on the electron neutrino mass below 20 eV/c^2 (90 % C.L.), improving the present limit by more than one order of magnitude. This experiment will guide the necessary developments to reach the sub-eV sensitivity.

  7. Motion correction in MRI of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Godenschweger, F; Kägebein, U; Stucht, D; Yarach, U; Sciarra, A; Yakupov, R; Lüsebrink, F; Schulze, P; Speck, O

    2016-01-01

    Subject motion in MRI is a relevant problem in the daily clinical routine as well as in scientific studies. Since the beginning of clinical use of MRI, many research groups have developed methods to suppress or correct motion artefacts. This review focuses on rigid body motion correction of head and brain MRI and its application in diagnosis and research. It explains the sources and types of motion and related artefacts, classifies and describes existing techniques for motion detection, compensation and correction and lists established and experimental approaches. Retrospective motion correction modifies the MR image data during the reconstruction, while prospective motion correction performs an adaptive update of the data acquisition. Differences, benefits and drawbacks of different motion correction methods are discussed. PMID:26864183

  8. Motion correction in MRI of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godenschweger, F.; Kägebein, U.; Stucht, D.; Yarach, U.; Sciarra, A.; Yakupov, R.; Lüsebrink, F.; Schulze, P.; Speck, O.

    2016-03-01

    Subject motion in MRI is a relevant problem in the daily clinical routine as well as in scientific studies. Since the beginning of clinical use of MRI, many research groups have developed methods to suppress or correct motion artefacts. This review focuses on rigid body motion correction of head and brain MRI and its application in diagnosis and research. It explains the sources and types of motion and related artefacts, classifies and describes existing techniques for motion detection, compensation and correction and lists established and experimental approaches. Retrospective motion correction modifies the MR image data during the reconstruction, while prospective motion correction performs an adaptive update of the data acquisition. Differences, benefits and drawbacks of different motion correction methods are discussed.

  9. Minimum Field Strength Simulator for Proton Density Weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiyi; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a framework for simulating low-field proton-density weighted MRI acquisitions based on high-field acquisitions, which could be used to predict the minimum B0 field strength requirements for MRI techniques. This framework would be particularly useful in the evaluation of de-noising and constrained reconstruction techniques. Materials and Methods Given MRI raw data, lower field MRI acquisitions can be simulated based on the signal and noise scaling with field strength. Certain assumptions are imposed for the simulation and their validity is discussed. A validation experiment was performed using a standard resolution phantom imaged at 0.35 T, 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T. This framework was then applied to two sample proton-density weighted MRI applications that demonstrated estimation of minimum field strength requirements: real-time upper airway imaging and liver proton-density fat fraction measurement. Results The phantom experiment showed good agreement between simulated and measured images. The SNR difference between simulated and measured was ≤ 8% for the 1.5T, 3T, and 7T cases which utilized scanners with the same geometry and from the same vendor. The measured SNR at 0.35T was 1.8- to 2.5-fold less than predicted likely due to unaccounted differences in the RF receive chain. The predicted minimum field strength requirements for the two sample applications were 0.2 T and 0.3 T, respectively. Conclusions Under certain assumptions, low-field MRI acquisitions can be simulated from high-field MRI data. This enables prediction of the minimum field strength requirements for a broad range of MRI techniques. PMID:27136334

  10. Correlating MALDI and MRI Biomarkers of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    each of three time points. Acquisition of MALDI data for each mouse is currently underway. Coregistration of proteomic and MRI hind limb data will...invasive imaging techniques. 15. SUBJECT TERMS MRI, MALDI, breast cancer, metastases, proteins, correlation, mouse model, coregistration 16...underway. In contrast to coregistration techniques employed during the first award year using a rat model of brain cancer and featuring the skull as a non

  11. [Brain functional MRI: physiological, technical, and methodological bases, and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Hertz-Pannier, L; Lehéricy, S; Cordoliani, Y; Le Bihan, D; Marsault, C; Brunelle, F

    2000-06-01

    Brain functional MRI (fMRI) provides an indirect mapping of cerebral activity, based on the detection of the local blood flow and oxygenation changes following neuronal activity (BOLD contrast, Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent). fMRI allows us to study non invasively the normal and pathological aspects of cortical functional organization. Each fMRI study compares two different states of activity. Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI) is the technic of choice that makes it possible to study the whole brain at a rapid pace. Activation maps are calculated from a statistical analysis of the local signal changes. Functional MRI is now becoming an essential tool in the neurofunctional work-up of many neurosurgery patients, as well as the reference method to image normal or pathologic functional brain organization in adults and children.

  12. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-21

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  13. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  14. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  15. Multiscan MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongqing; Li, Bin; Huang, Wei; Liang, Zach

    2000-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) based virtual cystoscopy (VC) has been studied as a potential tool for screening bladder cancer. It is accurate in localizing tumor of size larger than 1 cm and less expensive, as compared to fiberoptic cystoscopy. However, it is invasive and difficult to perform due to using Foley catheter for bladder insufflating with air. In a previous work, we investigated a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based VC scheme with urine as a natural contrast solution, in which a MRI acquisition protocol and an adaptive segmentation method were utilized. Both bladder lumen and wall were successfully delineated. To suppress motion artifact and insight pathological change on the bladder wall images, a multi-scan MRI scheme was presented in this study. One transverse and another coronal acquisitions of T1-weighted that cover the whole bladder were obtained twice, at one time the bladder is full of urine and at another time it is near the empty. Four bladder volumes extracted from those 4 datasets were registered first using a flexible three- dimensional (3D) registration algorithm. Then, associated 4 lumen surfaces were viewed simultaneously with the help of an interactive 3D visualization system. This MRI-based VC was tested on volunteers and demonstrated the feasibility to mass screening for bladder cancer.

  16. Radar echo from a flat conducting plate, near and far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Over certain types of terrain, a radar fuze (or altimeter), by virtue of the horizontal component of its velocity, is likely to pass over various flat objects of limited size. The echo from such objects could have a duration less than that of one Doppler cycle, where the Doppler frequency is due to the vertical component of the velocity. If the terrain is principally made up of such objects, their echoes are in most cases entirely uncorrelated with each other. Hence, the total echo after mixing at the radar with the delayed transmitted wave would have a noise-like spectrum not at all confined to the Doppler-frequency band where the desired echo signal is expected. This would seriously degrade the performance of a radar that utilizes correlation. This work shows that the echo from a square flat plate will be of duration greater than the time it takes to pass over the plate if the height h above it satisfies h a squared lambda where a is the plate-edge dimension and lambda is the radar wavelength. The results presented here can be used to determine the spatial region wherein the echo exists, and the magnitude and phase of the echo from such a plate.

  17. Radar echo from a flat conducting plate - near and far

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Over certain types of terrain, a radar fuze (or altimeter), by virtue of the horizontal component of its velocity, is likely to pass over various flat objects of limited size. The echo from such objects could have a duration less than that of one Doppler cycle, where the Doppler frequency is due to the vertical component of the velocity. If the terrain is principally made up of such objects, their echoes are in most cases entirely uncorrelated with each other. Hence, the total echo after mixing at the radar with the delayed transmitted wave would have a noise-like spectrum not at all confined to the Doppler-frequency band where the desired echo signal is expected. This would seriously degrade the performance of a radar that utilizes correlation. This work shows that the echo from a square flat plate will be of duration greater than the time it takes to pass over the plate if the height h above it satisfies h > a/sup 2//lambda where a is the plate-edge dimension and lambda is the radar wavelength. The results presented here can be used to determine the spatial region wherein the echo exists, and the magnitude and phase of the echo from such a plate. I infer from these results that the case where the signal has a noise-like spectrum is not impossible but it is unlikely for the applications with which I am familiar.

  18. In vivo quantification of amygdala subnuclei using 4.7 T fast spin echo imaging.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadi-Sereshki, Arash; Huang, Yushan; Olsen, Fraser; Malykhin, Nikolai V

    2017-03-10

    The amygdala (AG) is an almond-shaped heterogeneous structure located in the medial temporal lobe. The majority of previous structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) volumetric methods for AG measurement have so far only been able to examine this region as a whole. In order to understand the role of the AG in different neuropsychiatric disorders, it is necessary to understand the functional role of its subnuclei. The main goal of the present study was to develop a reliable volumetric method to delineate major AG subnuclei groups using ultra-high resolution high field MRI. 38 healthy volunteers (15 males and 23 females, 21-60 years of age) without any history of medical or neuropsychiatric disorders were recruited for this study. Structural MRI datasets were acquired at 4.7T Varian Inova MRI system using a fast spin echo (FSE) sequence. The AG was manually segmented into its five major anatomical subdivisions: lateral (La), basal (B), accessory basal (AB) nuclei, and cortical (Co) and centromedial (CeM) groups. Inter-(intra-) rater reliability of our novel volumetric method was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Dice's Kappa. Our results suggest that reliable measurements of the AG subnuclei can be obtained by image analysts with experience in AG anatomy. We provided a step-by-step segmentation protocol and reported absolute and relative volumes for the AG subnuclei. Our results showed that the basolateral (BLA) complex occupies seventy-eight percent of the total AG volume, while CeM and Co groups occupy twenty-two percent of the total AG volume. Finally, we observed no hemispheric effects and no gender differences in the total AG volume and the volumes of its subnuclei. Future applications of this method will help to understand the selective vulnerability of the AG subnuclei in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  19. Segmentation of solid subregion of high grade gliomas in MRI images based on active contour model (ACM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, P.; Win, M. T.; Wong, J. H. D.; Abdullah, N. A.; Ramli, N.

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are tumours arising from the interstitial tissue of the brain which are heterogeneous, infiltrative and possess ill-defined borders. Tumour subregions (e.g. solid enhancing part, edema and necrosis) are often used for tumour characterisation. Tumour demarcation into substructures facilitates glioma staging and provides essential information. Manual segmentation had several drawbacks that include laborious, time consuming, subjected to intra and inter-rater variability and hindered by diversity in the appearance of tumour tissues. In this work, active contour model (ACM) was used to segment the solid enhancing subregion of the tumour. 2D brain image acquisition data using 3T MRI fast spoiled gradient echo sequence in post gadolinium of four histologically proven high-grade glioma patients were obtained. Preprocessing of the images which includes subtraction and skull stripping were performed and then followed by ACM segmentation. The results of the automatic segmentation method were compared against the manual delineation of the tumour by a trainee radiologist. Both results were further validated by an experienced neuroradiologist and a brief quantitative evaluations (pixel area and difference ratio) were performed. Preliminary results of the clinical data showed the potential of ACM model in the application of fast and large scale tumour segmentation in medical imaging.

  20. A MRI-COMPATIBLE SYSTEM FOR WHISKER STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Li, Limin; Weiss, Craig; Talk, Andrew C.; Disterhoft, John F.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a system for whisker stimulation designed for functional studies in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environments. This system, which incorporates real-time optical monitoring of the vibration stimulus, can generate well-controlled and reproducible whisker deflections with amplitudes up to 2 mm and frequencies up to 75 Hz, suitable for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of animals. Whiskers on either or both sides of the head can be stimulated selectively during fMRI experiments without removing the subject from the magnet. With a user-friendly graphical interface of a computer, a user can conveniently control both the whisker vibration and gating of the MR imager, and synchronize the stimulation with the fMRI acquisition to ensure precise timing of the stimulus presentation. This whisker stimulation system should facilitate a wide variety of fMRI investigations of the neural systems mediating sensory information from the whiskers. PMID:22322316

  1. Surface-based functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis of partial brain echo planar imaging data at 1.5 T.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hang Joon; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo; Kim, Sun I

    2009-06-01

    Surface-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis is more sensitive and accurate than volume-based analysis for detecting neural activation. However, these advantages are less important in practical fMRI experiments with commonly used 1.5-T magnetic resonance devices because of the resolution gap between the echo planar imaging data and the cortical surface models. We expected high-resolution segmented partial brain echo planar imaging (EPI) data to overcome this problem, and the activation patterns of the high-resolution data could be different from the low-resolution data. For the practical applications of surface-based fMRI analysis using segmented EPI techniques, the effects of some important factors (e.g., activation patterns, registration and local distortions) should be intensively evaluated because the results of surface-based fMRI analyses could be influenced by them. In this study, we demonstrated the difference between activations detected from low-resolution EPI data, which were covering whole brain, and high-resolution segmented EPI data covering partial brain by volume- and surface-based analysis methods. First, we compared the activation maps of low- and high-resolution EPI datasets detected by volume- and surface-based analyses, with the spatial patterns of activation clusters, and analyzed the distributions of activations in occipital lobes. We also analyzed the high-resolution EPI data covering motor areas and fusiform gyri of human brain, and presented the differences of activations detected by volume- and surface-based methods.

  2. First HF radar measurements of summer mesopause echoes at SURA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karashtin, A. N.; Shlyugaev, Y. V.; Abramov, V. I.; Belov, I. F.; Berezin, I. V.; Bychkov, V. V.; Eryshev, E. B.; Komrakov, G. P.

    1997-07-01

    HF sounding of the mesosphere was first carried out at SURA in summer 1994 at frequencies in the range 8-9 MHz using one of the sub-arrays of the SURA heating facility. The observations had a range resolution of 3 km. Almost all measurements indicated the presence of strong radar returns from altitudes between 83 and 90 km with features very similar to VHF measurements of mesopause summer echoes at mid-latitudes and polar mesopause summer echoes. In contrast to VHF observations, HF mesopause echoes are almost always present.

  3. Temperature echoes revisited to probe the vibrational behavior of dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Pedro M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Temperature quench echoes were induced in molecular dynamics simulations of dendrimers. This phenomenon was used to probe the vibrational behavior of these molecules by comparing simulation results with harmonic model predictions. The echo depth for short time intervals between temperature quenches is well described by the harmonic approximation and the fluctuations observed are related to the vibrational density of states. The echo depth for long time intervals decays progressively revealing dephasing due to anharmonic interactions. The density of states was calculated from the temperature fluctuations after the first quench and high-frequency modes were assigned by comparison with vibrational spectra of similar dendrimers.

  4. Temperature echoes revisited to probe the vibrational behavior of dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Pedro M R

    2010-03-21

    Temperature quench echoes were induced in molecular dynamics simulations of dendrimers. This phenomenon was used to probe the vibrational behavior of these molecules by comparing simulation results with harmonic model predictions. The echo depth for short time intervals between temperature quenches is well described by the harmonic approximation and the fluctuations observed are related to the vibrational density of states. The echo depth for long time intervals decays progressively revealing dephasing due to anharmonic interactions. The density of states was calculated from the temperature fluctuations after the first quench and high-frequency modes were assigned by comparison with vibrational spectra of similar dendrimers.

  5. Rapid ex vivo imaging of PAIII prostate to bone tumor with SWIFT-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Luhach, Ihor; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Lynch, Conor C.; Corum, Curt; Martinez, Gary V.; Garwood, Michael; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The limiting factor for MRI of skeletal/mineralized tissue is fast transverse relaxation. A recent advancement in MRI technology, SWIFT (Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transform), is emerging as a new approach to overcome this difficulty. Among other techniques like UTE, ZTE and WASPI, the application of SWIFT technology has the strong potential to impact preclinical and clinical imaging, particularly in the context of primary or metastatic bone cancers since it has the added advantage of imaging water in mineralized tissues of bone allowing MRI images to be obtained of tissues previously visible only with modalities such as CT. The goal of the current study is to examine the feasibility of SWIFT for the assessment of the prostate cancer induced changes in bone formation (osteogenesis) and destruction (osteolysis) in ex vivo specimens. Methods A luciferase expressing prostate cancer cell line (PAIII) or saline control was inoculated directly into the tibia of 6-week old immunocompromised male mice. Tumor growth was assessed weekly for three weeks prior to euthanasia and dissection of the tumor bearing and sham tibias. The ex vivo mouse tibia specimens were imaged with a 9.4T and 7T MRI systems. SWIFT images are compared with traditional gradient-echo and spin-echo MRI images as well as CT and histological sections. Results SWIFT images with nominal resolution of 78 μm are obtained with the tumor and different bone structures identified. Prostate cancer induced changes in the bone microstructure are visible in SWIFT images, which is supported by spin-echo, high resolution CT and histological analysis. Conclusions SWIFT MRI is capable of high-quality high-resolution ex vivo imaging of bone tumor and surrounding bone and soft tissues. Furthermore, SWIFT MRI shows promise for in vivo bone tumor imaging, with the added benefits of non-exposure to ionizing radiation, quietness and speed. PMID:24155275

  6. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Frohwein, Lynn J. Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  7. The use of high field strength and parallel imaging techniques for MRI-based gel dosimetry in stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seimenis, I.; Moutsatsos, A.; Petrokokkinos, L.; Kantemiris, I.; Benekos, O.; Efstathopoulos, E.; Papagiannis, P.; Spevacek, V.; Semnicka, J.; Dvorak, P.

    2009-07-01

    The poor clinical acceptance of polymer gel dosimetry for dose verification in stereotactic radio-surgery applications stems, inter alia, from the increased MRI acquisition times needed to meet the associated spatial resolution demands. To examine whether this could be partly alleviated by the employment of 3 Tesla imagers and parallel imaging techniques, a PolyAcrylamide Gel filled tube was irradiated in a Leksell Gamma Knife unit with two single irradiation shots (4 mm and 8 mm) and underwent four different scanning sessions using an optimised, volume selective, 32 echo CPMG pulse sequence: One performed on a 1.5 T imager with 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 in-plane spatial resolution and 0.75 mm slice thickness (scan A), while the rest three on a 3.0 T imager; one with the same spatial resolution as in scan A (scan B) and two with finer in-plane resolution (scans C and D). In scans B and C the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) parallel imaging technique was employed. Relative dose distributions derived by scan A were benchmarked against Monte Carlo and treatment planning system calculations, and then used as the reference for the comparison of 2D relative dose distributions derived by each scan in terms of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria (γ index tool). Findings suggest that careful MRI planning based on a figure of merit accounting for scanning time and precision for a given increase in spatial resolution, could facilitate the introduction of polymer gel dosimetry into the clinical setting as a practical quality assurance tool for complex radio-surgery techniques.

  8. The real-time fMRI neurofeedback based stratification of Default Network Regulation Neuroimaging data repository.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Amalia R; Muraskin, Jordan; Dam, Nicholas T Van; Froehlich, Caroline; Puccio, Benjamin; Pellman, John; Bauer, Clemens C C; Akeyson, Alexis; Breland, Melissa M; Calhoun, Vince D; Carter, Steven; Chang, Tiffany P; Gessner, Chelsea; Gianonne, Alyssa; Giavasis, Steven; Glass, Jamie; Homann, Steven; King, Margaret; Kramer, Melissa; Landis, Drew; Lieval, Alexis; Lisinski, Jonathan; Mackay-Brandt, Anna; Miller, Brittny; Panek, Laura; Reed, Hayley; Santiago, Christine; Schoell, Eszter; Sinnig, Richard; Sital, Melissa; Taverna, Elise; Tobe, Russell; Trautman, Kristin; Varghese, Betty; Walden, Lauren; Wang, Runtang; Waters, Abigail B; Wood, Dylan C; Castellanos, F Xavier; Leventhal, Bennett; Colcombe, Stanley J; LaConte, Stephen; Milham, Michael P; Craddock, R Cameron

    2017-02-01

    This data descriptor describes a repository of openly shared data from an experiment to assess inter-individual differences in default mode network (DMN) activity. This repository includes cross-sectional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from the Multi Source Interference Task, to assess DMN deactivation, the Moral Dilemma Task, to assess DMN activation, a resting state fMRI scan, and a DMN neurofeedback paradigm, to assess DMN modulation, along with accompanying behavioral and cognitive measures. We report technical validation from n=125 participants of the final targeted sample of 180 participants. Each session includes acquisition of one whole-brain anatomical scan and whole-brain echo-planar imaging (EPI) scans, acquired during the aforementioned tasks and resting state. The data includes several self-report measures related to perseverative thinking, emotion regulation, and imaginative processes, along with a behavioral measure of rapid visual information processing. Technical validation of the data confirms that the tasks deactivate and activate the DMN as expected. Group level analysis of the neurofeedback data indicates that the participants are able to modulate their DMN with considerable inter-subject variability. Preliminary analysis of behavioral responses and specifically self-reported sleep indicate that as many as 73 participants may need to be excluded from an analysis depending on the hypothesis being tested. The present data are linked to the enhanced Nathan Kline Institute, Rockland Sample and builds on the comprehensive neuroimaging and deep phenotyping available therein. As limited information is presently available about individual differences in the capacity to directly modulate the default mode network, these data provide a unique opportunity to examine DMN modulation ability in relation to numerous phenotypic characteristics.

  9. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  10. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  11. 7T Magnetization Transfer and Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI of Cortical Gray Matter: Can We Detect Neurochemical and Macromolecular Abnormalities?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    the same space for descriptive statistics on each cohort. 7. Implemented a set of fMRI experiments to assess working memory and resting-state...Brain • Cortical Gray Matter (cGM) • Multiple Sclerosis (MS) • Functional MRI ( fMRI ) • Pool Size Ratio (PSR) • Amide Proton Transfer (APT...SIR qMT – 10:11 • Bloch-Siegert B1 mapping – 1:42 • Dual-echo B0 mapping – :04 • T1w MPRAGE Anatomical – 2:12 • fMRI Resting State – 8:34

  12. First radar echoes from cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Charles A.; Miller, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    In attempting to use centimeter-wavelength radars to investigate the early stage of precipitation formation in clouds, 'mantle echoes' are rediscovered and shown to come mostly from scattering by small-scale variations in refractive index, a Bragg kind of scattering mechanism. This limits the usefulness of single-wavelength radar for studies of hydrometeor growth, according to data on summer cumulus clouds in North Dakota, Hawaii, and Florida, to values of reflectivity factor above about 10 dBZe with 10-cm radar, 0 dBZe with 5-cm radar, and -10 dBZe with 3-cm radar. These are limits at or above which the backscattered radar signal from the kinds of clouds observed can be assumed to be almost entirely from hydrometeors or (rarely) other particulate material such as insects. Dual-wavelength radar data can provide the desired information about hydrometeors at very low reflectivity levels if assumptions can be made about the inhomogeneities responsible for the Bragg scattering. The Bragg scattering signal itself probably will be a useful way to probe inhomogeneities one-half the radar wavelength in scale for studying cloud entrainment and mixing processes. However, this use is possible only before scattering from hydrometeors dominates the radar return.

  13. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Haemodynamic instability

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Nadia; Rendon, Alejandro; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    The use of echocardiography, whilst well established in cardiology, is a relatively new concept in critical care medicine. However, in recent years echocardiography's potential as both a diagnostic tool and a form of advanced monitoring in the critically ill patient has been increasingly recognised. In this series of Critical Care Echo Rounds, we explore the role of echocardiography in critical illness, beginning here with haemodynamic instability. We discuss the pathophysiology of the shock state, the techniques available to manage haemodynamic compromise, and the unique role which echocardiography plays in this complex process. Case A 69-year-old female presents to the emergency department with a fever, confusion and pain on urinating. Her blood pressure on arrival was 70/40, with heart rate of 117 bpm Despite 3 l of i.v. fluid she remained hypotensive. A central venous catheter was inserted and noradrenaline infusion commenced, and she was admitted to the intensive care unit for management of her shock state. At 6 h post admission, she was on high dose of noradrenaline (0.7 μg/kg per min) but blood pressure remained problematic. An echocardiogram was requested to better determine her haemodynamic state. PMID:26693291

  14. Factors Influencing Ultrasound Echoes From Arterial Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Jim; Maciel, Mario; Zalesky, Paul

    1988-04-01

    Significant progress in methods for the treatment of arterial disease has been made during the past several years. The trend towards least invasive therapies has led to an increasing need for instruments which quantify arterial disease status before, during, and after an intervention or treatment. Such instruments should provide safer and more effective disease treatment by providing the physician with a procedure guidance tool. The use of miniature ultrasound transducers, mounted at the distal end of a vascular catheter or probe, offers a promising method for producing images and quantitative measure-ment of arterial lumen and wall thickness. Several approaches have been suggested for placing the transducers in a probe configuration which is then mounted in a catheter and advanced to the vascular site of interest for image generation. The "best" probe configuration is defined by the specific questions of interest to the physician. It also depends upon transducer characteristics and how the sound beam "interacts" with the arterial wall. Imaging the small diameter coronary arteries, in particular, requires careful consideration of various transducer-tissue parameters. Transducer signal-to-noise ratio will likely be a critical parameter for systems designed to image healthy and diseased coronary arteries. The reported study shows how arterial wall echo amplitude changes as the angle between sound beam and wall varies. Changes are measured under carefully defined laboratory conditions.

  15. Light Echoes of Galactic Explosions and Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Bianco, Federica; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan; Huber, Mark E.; Matheson, Thomas; McDonald, Brittany; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Sinnott, Brendan; Smith, Nathan; Welch, Doug

    2012-08-01

    We propose to search for light echoes (LEs) from the historical brightening of the Luminous Blue Varia