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Sample records for echo acquisition mri

  1. 3D hyperpolarized He-3 MRI of ventilation using a multi-echo projection acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, James H.; O’Halloran, Rafael L.; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Jung, Youngkyoo; Block, Walter F.; Fain, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented for high resolution 3D imaging of the whole lung using inhaled hyperpolarized (HP) He-3 MR with multiple half-echo radial trajectories that can accelerate imaging through undersampling. A multiple half-echo radial trajectory can be used to reduce the level of artifact for undersampled 3D projection reconstruction (PR) imaging by increasing the amount of data acquired per unit time for HP He-3 lung imaging. The point spread functions (PSFs) for breath-held He-3 MRI using multiple half-echo trajectories were evaluated using simulations to predict the effects of T2* and gas diffusion on image quality. Results from PSF simulations were consistent with imaging results in volunteer studies showing improved image quality with increasing number of echoes using up to 8 half-echoes. The 8 half-echo acquisition is shown to accommodate lost breath-holds as short as 6 s using a retrospective reconstruction at reduced resolution as well as to allow reduced breath-hold time compared to an equivalent Cartesian trajectory. Furthermore, preliminary results from a 3D dynamic inhalation-exhalation maneuver are demonstrated using the 8 half-echo trajectory. Results demonstrate the first high resolution 3D PR imaging of ventilation and respiratory dynamics in humans using HP He-3 MR. PMID:18429034

  2. MRI measurement of blood-brain barrier transport with a rapid acquisition refocused echo (RARE) method

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Jeffrey H; Ng, Kit Fai; Anderson, Steven E; Rutledge, John C

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI is increasingly being used to assess changes in capillary permeability. Most quantitative techniques used to measure capillary permeability are based on the Fick equation that requires measurement of signal reflecting both plasma and tissue concentrations of the solute being tested. To date, most Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods for acquiring appropriate data quickly rely on gradient recalled echo (GRE) type acquisitions, which work well in clinical low field settings. However, acquiring this type of data on high field small animal preclinical MRIs is problematic due to geometrical distortions from susceptibility mismatch. This problem can be exacerbated when using small animal models to measure blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, where precise sampling from the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) is commonly used to determine the plasma concentration of the contrast agent. Here we present results demonstrating that a standard saturation recovery rapid acquisition refocused echo (RARE) method is capable of acquiring T1 maps with good spatial and temporal resolution for Patlak analysis (Patlak, 1983) to assess changes in BBB Gd-DTPA permeability following middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion in the rat. This method limits known problems with magnetic susceptibility mismatch and may thus allow greater accuracy in BBB permeability measurement in small animals. PMID:25998382

  3. Reference-free unwarping of single-shot spatiotemporally encoded MRI using asymmetric self-refocused echoes acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Song; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a phase evolution rewinding algorithm for correcting the geometric and intensity distortions in single-shot spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) MRI with acquisition of asymmetric self-refocused echo trains. Using the field map calculated from the phase distribution of the source image, the off-resonance induced phase errors are successfully rewound through deconvolution. The alias-free partial Fourier transform reconstruction helps improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the field maps and the output images. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was validated through 7 T MRI experiments on a lemon, a water phantom, and in vivo rat head. SPEN imaging was evaluated using rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing (RASER) which produces uniform T2 weighting. The results indicate that the new technique can more robustly deal with the cases in which the images obtained with conventional single-shot spin-echo EPI are difficult to be restored due to serious field variations.

  4. High-resolution diffusion imaging with DIFRAD-FSE (diffusion-weighted radial acquisition with fast spin echo) MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilmann, Rebecca Jean

    2001-12-01

    A novel MRI method, DIFRAD-FSE (Diffusion with R_adial A_cquisition of D_ata with F_ast S_pin-E_cho) is presented that enables rapid, high-resolution, multi-shot diffusion-weighted MRI without significant artifacts due to motion. Following a diffusion-weighted spin-echo preparation, multiple radial lines of Fourier data are acquired using spin-echo refocusing. Data can be acquired in either 2D or 3D Fourier space. Motion correction is accomplished via one of four correction techniques: phase correction, shift correction, a combination of the phase and shift correction, or magnitude. Images from a radial data set are reconstructed with filtered back projection reconstruction. Results from human brain imaging will demonstrate the ability of DIFRAD-FSE to acquire high- resolution images without significant artifacts due to motion in both 2D and 3D. Results from liver and heart imaging demonstrate the versatility of the 2D DIFRAD-FSE.

  5. Single Echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous nonlinear gradient research has focused on trajectories that reconstruct images with a minimum number of echoes. Here we describe sequences where the nonlinear gradients vary in time to acquire the image in a single readout. The readout is designed to be very smooth so that it can be compressed to minimal time without violating peripheral nerve stimulation limits, yielding an image from a single 4 ms echo. Theory and Methods This sequence was inspired by considering the code of each voxel, i.e. the phase accumulation that a voxel follows through the readout, an approach connected to traditional encoding theory. We present simulations for the initial sequence, a low slew rate analog, and higher resolution reconstructions. Results Extremely fast acquisitions are achievable, though as one would expect, SNR is reduced relative to the slower Cartesian sampling schemes because of the high gradient strengths. Conclusions The prospect that nonlinear gradients can acquire images in a single <10 ms echo makes this a novel and interesting approach to image encoding. PMID:24465837

  6. Sinusoidal echo-planar imaging with parallel acquisition technique for reduced acoustic noise in auditory fMRI.

    PubMed

    Zapp, Jascha; Schmitter, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-09-01

    To extend the parameter restrictions of a silent echo-planar imaging (sEPI) sequence using sinusoidal readout (RO) gradients, in particular with increased spatial resolution. The sound pressure level (SPL) of the most feasible configurations is compared to conventional EPI having trapezoidal RO gradients. We enhanced the sEPI sequence by integrating a parallel acquisition technique (PAT) on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. The SPL was measured for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, without and with PAT (R = 2). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was examined for both sinusoidal and trapezoidal RO gradients. Compared to EPI PAT, the SPL could be reduced by up to 11.1 dB and 5.1 dB for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, respectively. The SNR of sinusoidal RO gradients is lower by a factor of 0.96 on average compared to trapezoidal RO gradients. The sEPI PAT sequence allows for 1) increased resolution, 2) expanded RO frequency range toward lower frequencies, which is in general beneficial for SPL, or 3) shortened TE, TR, and RO train length. At the same time, it generates lower SPL compared to conventional EPI for a wide range of RO frequencies while having the same imaging parameters. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Comparing resting state fMRI de-noising approaches using multi- and single-echo acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Arjun; Laganà, Maria Marcella; Baglio, Francesca; Baselli, Giuseppe; Kundu, Prantik; Harrison, Neil A.; Cercignani, Mara

    2017-01-01

    Artifact removal in resting state fMRI (rfMRI) data remains a serious challenge, with even subtle head motion undermining reliability and reproducibility. Here we compared some of the most popular single-echo de-noising methods—regression of Motion parameters, White matter and Cerebrospinal fluid signals (MWC method), FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) and ICA-based Automatic Removal Of Motion Artifacts (ICA-AROMA)—with a multi-echo approach (ME-ICA) that exploits the linear dependency of BOLD on the echo time. Data were acquired using a clinical scanner and included 30 young, healthy participants (minimal head motion) and 30 Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder patients (greater head motion). De-noising effectiveness was assessed in terms of data quality after each cleanup procedure, ability to uncouple BOLD signal and motion and preservation of default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity. Most cleaning methods showed a positive impact on data quality. However, based on the investigated metrics, ME-ICA was the most robust. It minimized the impact of motion on FC even for high motion participants and preserved DMN functional connectivity structure. The high-quality results obtained using ME-ICA suggest that using a multi-echo EPI sequence, reliable rfMRI data can be obtained in a clinical setting. PMID:28323821

  8. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  9. Free-breathing pediatric chest MRI: Performance of self-navigated golden-angle ordered conical ultrashort echo time acquisition.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Evan J; Cheng, Joseph Y; Haldipur, Anshul; Carl, Michael; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2017-06-01

    To assess the feasibility and performance of conical k-space trajectory free-breathing ultrashort echo time (UTE) chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus four-dimensional (4D) flow and effects of 50% data subsampling and soft-gated motion correction. Thirty-two consecutive children who underwent both 4D flow and UTE ferumoxytol-enhanced chest MR (mean age: 5.4 years, range: 6 days to 15.7 years) in one 3T exam were recruited. From UTE k-space data, three image sets were reconstructed: 1) one with all data, 2) one using the first 50% of data, and 3) a final set with soft-gating motion correction, leveraging the signal magnitude immediately after each excitation. Two radiologists in blinded fashion independently scored image quality of anatomical landmarks on a 5-point scale. Ratings were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum, Wilcoxon signed-ranks, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Interobserver agreement was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). For fully sampled UTE, mean scores for all structures were ≥4 (good-excellent). Full UTE surpassed 4D flow for lungs and airways (P < 0.001), with similar pulmonary artery (PA) quality (P = 0.62). 50% subsampling only slightly degraded all landmarks (P < 0.001), as did motion correction. Subsegmental PA visualization was possible in >93% scans for all techniques (P = 0.27). Interobserver agreement was excellent for combined scores (ICC = 0.83). High-quality free-breathing conical UTE chest MR is feasible, surpassing 4D flow for lungs and airways, with equivalent PA visualization. Data subsampling only mildly degraded images, favoring lesser scan times. Soft-gating motion correction overall did not improve image quality. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. MRI Scan Time Reduction through K-Space Data Sharing in Combo Acquisitions with a Spin Echo Sequence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    REFERENCES [1] P. Mansfield, A. A. Maudsley, and T. Baines, “Fast scan proton density imaging by NMR,” J . Phys. E: Scient . Instrum ., vol. 9, pp. 271...1976. [2] J . Listerud, S. Einstein, E. Outwater, and H. Y. Kressel, “First principles of fast spin echo,” Magnetic Resonance Quarterly, vol. 8, pp. 199...244, 1992. [3] P. van der Meulen, J . P. Groen, and J . J . Cuppen, “Very fast MR imaging by field echoes and small angle excitation,” Magnetic

  11. Reduced susceptibility effects in perfusion fMRI with single-shot spin-echo EPI acquisitions at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Li, Lin; Roc, Anne C; Alsop, David C; Tang, Kathy; Butler, Norman S; Schnall, Mitchell D; Detre, John A

    2004-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion contrast is not based on susceptibility effects and can therefore be used to study brain function in regions of high static inhomogeneity. As a proof of concept, single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition was carried out with a multislice continuous ASL (CASL) method at 1.5T. A bilateral finger tapping paradigm was used in the presence of an exogenously induced susceptibility artifact over left motor cortex. The spin-echo CASL technique was compared with a regular gradient-echo EPI sequence with the same slice thickness, as well as other imaging methods using thin slices and spin-echo acquisitions. The results demonstrate improved functional sensitivity and efficiency of the spin-echo CASL approach as compared with gradient-echo EPI techniques, and a trend of improved sensitivity as compared with spin-echo EPI approach in the brain regions affected by the susceptibility artifact. ASL images, either with or without subtraction of the control, provide a robust alternative to blood oxygenation level dependant (BOLD) methods for activation imaging in regions of high static field inhomogeneity.

  12. Elasticity reconstructive imaging by means of stimulated echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Chenevert, T L; Skovoroda, A R; O'Donnell, M; Emelianov, S Y

    1998-03-01

    A method is introduced to measure internal mechanical displacement and strain by means of MRI. Such measurements are needed to reconstruct an image of the elastic Young's modulus. A stimulated echo acquisition sequence with additional gradient pulses encodes internal displacements in response to an externally applied differential deformation. The sequence provides an accurate measure of static displacement by limiting the mechanical transitions to the mixing period of the simulated echo. Elasticity reconstruction involves definition of a region of interest having uniform Young's modulus along its boundary and subsequent solution of the discretized elasticity equilibrium equations. Data acquisition and reconstruction were performed on a urethane rubber phantom of known elastic properties and an ex vivo canine kidney phantom using <2% differential deformation. Regional elastic properties are well represented on Young's modulus images. The long-term objective of this work is to provide a means for remote palpation and elasticity quantitation in deep tissues otherwise inaccessible to manual palpation.

  13. Simultaneous Acquisition of Gradient Echo / Spin Echo BOLD and Perfusion with a Separate Labeling Coil

    PubMed Central

    Glielmi, C.B.; Xu, Q.; Craddock, R.C.; Hu, X.

    2010-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) based cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging complements blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging with a measure that is more quantitative and has better specificity to neuronal activation. Relative to gradient echo (GE) BOLD, spin echo (SE) BOLD has better spatial specificity because it is less biased to large draining veins. While there have been many studies comparing simultaneously acquired CBF data with GE BOLD data in fMRI, there have been few studies comparing CBF with SE BOLD and no study comparing all three. We present a pulse sequence that simultaneously acquires CBF data with a separate labeling coil, GE BOLD and SE BOLD images. Simultaneous acquisition avoids inter-scan variability, allowing more direct assessment and comparison of each contrast’s relative specificity and reproducibility. Furthermore, it facilitates studies that may benefit from multiple complementary measures. PMID:20648682

  14. Functional MRI using regularized parallel imaging acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Belliveau, John W; Wald, Lawrence L; Kwong, Kenneth K

    2005-08-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions.

  15. Functional MRI Using Regularized Parallel Imaging Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Huang, Teng-Yi; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Wang, Fu-Nien; Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Belliveau, John W.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Kwong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from undersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is degraded because of the reduced data samples and the spatially correlated nature of multiple RF receivers. Regularization has been proposed to mitigate the SNR loss originating due to the latter reason. Since it is necessary to utilize static prior to regularization, the dynamic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in parallel MRI will be affected. In this paper we investigate the CNR of regularized sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acquisitions. We propose to implement regularized parallel MRI acquisitions in functional MRI (fMRI) experiments by incorporating the prior from combined segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisition into SENSE reconstructions. We investigated the impact of regularization on the CNR by performing parametric simulations at various BOLD contrasts, acceleration rates, and sizes of the active brain areas. As quantified by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the simulations suggest that the detection power of SENSE fMRI can be improved by regularized reconstructions, compared to unregularized reconstructions. Human motor and visual fMRI data acquired at different field strengths and array coils also demonstrate that regularized SENSE improves the detection of functionally active brain regions. PMID:16032694

  16. Investigating the Group-Level Impact of Advanced Dual-Echo fMRI Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Kettinger, Ádám; Hill, Christopher; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán; Windischberger, Christian; Nagy, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Multi-echo fMRI data acquisition has been widely investigated and suggested to optimize sensitivity for detecting the BOLD signal. Several methods have also been proposed for the combination of data with different echo times. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these advanced echo combination methods provide advantages over the simple averaging of echoes when state-of-the-art group-level random-effect analyses are performed. Both resting-state and task-based dual-echo fMRI data were collected from 27 healthy adult individuals (14 male, mean age = 25.75 years) using standard echo-planar acquisition methods at 3T. Both resting-state and task-based data were subjected to a standard image pre-processing pipeline. Subsequently the two echoes were combined as a weighted average, using four different strategies for calculating the weights: (1) simple arithmetic averaging, (2) BOLD sensitivity weighting, (3) temporal-signal-to-noise ratio weighting and (4) temporal BOLD sensitivity weighting. Our results clearly show that the simple averaging of data with the different echoes is sufficient. Advanced echo combination methods may provide advantages on a single-subject level but when considering random-effects group level statistics they provide no benefit regarding sensitivity (i.e., group-level t-values) compared to the simple echo-averaging approach. One possible reason for the lack of clear advantages may be that apart from increasing the average BOLD sensitivity at the single-subject level, the advanced weighted averaging methods also inflate the inter-subject variance. As the echo combination methods provide very similar results, the recommendation is to choose between them depending on the availability of time for collecting additional resting-state data or whether subject-level or group-level analyses are planned. PMID:28018165

  17. Multi-echo fMRI: A review of applications in fMRI denoising and analysis of BOLD signals.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Prantik; Voon, Valerie; Balchandani, Priti; Lombardo, Michael V; Poser, Benedikt A; Bandettini, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    In recent years the field of fMRI research has enjoyed expanded technical abilities related to resolution, as well as use across many fields of brain research. At the same time, the field has also dealt with uncertainty related to many known and unknown effects of artifact in fMRI data. In this review we discuss an emerging fMRI technology, called multi-echo (ME)-fMRI, which focuses on improving the fidelity and interpretability of fMRI. Where the essential problem of standard single-echo fMRI is the indeterminacy of sources of signals, whether BOLD or artifact, this is not the case for ME-fMRI. By acquiring multiple echo images per slice, the ME approach allows T2* decay to be modeled at every voxel at every time point. Since BOLD signals arise by changes in T2* over time, an fMRI experiment sampling the T2* signal decay can be analyzed to distinguish BOLD from artifact signal constituents. While the ME approach has a long history of use in theoretical and validation studies, modern MRI systems enable whole-brain multi-echo fMRI at high resolution. This review covers recent multi-echo fMRI acquisition methods, and the analysis steps for this data to make fMRI at once more principled, straightforward, and powerful. After a brief overview of history and theory, T2* modeling and applications will be discussed. These applications include T2* mapping and combining echoes from ME data to increase BOLD contrast and mitigate dropout artifacts. Next, the modeling of fMRI signal changes to detect signal origins in BOLD-related T2* versus artifact-related S0 changes will be reviewed. A focus is on the use of ME-fMRI data to extract and classify components from spatial ICA, called multi-echo ICA (ME-ICA). After describing how ME-fMRI and ME-ICA lead to a general model for analysis of fMRI signals, applications in animal and human imaging will be discussed. Applications include removing motion artifacts in resting state data at subject and group level. New imaging methods such

  18. Echo train shifted multi-echo FLASH for functional MRI of the human brain at ultra-high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Voit, Dirk; Frahm, Jens

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique for functional MRI of the human brain at 0.135 microL resolution for a whole brain section. In comparison with conventional studies at 3 mm isotropic resolution or 27 microL voxel size, the method yields an improvement by a factor of 200. To achieve optimum image quality, the approach is based on a multi-echo fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence with unipolar traversals of k-space in the frequency-encoding dimension and echo train shifting to avoid amplitude discontinuities in the phase-encoding dimension. These strategies ensure a smooth point-spread function and eliminate image ghosting artifacts without the need for any phase correction or other post-processing. Signal-to-noise losses due to the considerably reduced voxel sizes are compensated for by single slice acquisitions, optimized bandwidths and an experimental four-channel shoulder coil matched to the posterior portion of the head. Multi-echo FLASH studies of the human brain (2.9 T, seven echoes, 200 Hz/pixel bandwidth, effective echo time 36 ms, acquisition time 6 s) at 300 microm resolution (no interpolation) and 1.5 mm slice thickness revealed robust activations in primary visual areas in response to binocular stimulation. The new method holds promise for refined studies of the columnar organization of specific brain systems and for functional assessments of the gray matter at laminar resolution.

  19. Fast REDOR with CPMG multiple-echo acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo Double Resonance (REDOR) is a widely used experiment for distance measurements in solids. The conventional REDOR experiment measures the signal dephasing from hetero-nuclear recoupling under magic-angle spinning (MAS) in a point by point manner. A modified Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple-echo scheme is introduced for fast REDOR measurement. REDOR curves are measured from the CPMG echo amplitude modulation under dipolar recoupling. The real time CPMG-REDOR experiment can speed up the measurement by an order of magnitude. The effects from hetero-nuclear recoupling, the Bloch-Siegert shift and echo truncation to the signal acquisition are discussed and demonstrated.

  20. Scalable multichannel MRI data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Bodurka, Jerzy; Ledden, Patrick J; van Gelderen, Peter; Chu, Renxin; de Zwart, Jacco A; Morris, Doug; Duyn, Jeff H

    2004-01-01

    A scalable multichannel digital MRI receiver system was designed to achieve high bandwidth echo-planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions for applications such as BOLD-fMRI. The modular system design allows for easy extension to an arbitrary number of channels. A 16-channel receiver was developed and integrated with a General Electric (GE) Signa 3T VH/3 clinical scanner. Receiver performance was evaluated on phantoms and human volunteers using a custom-built 16-element receive-only brain surface coil array. At an output bandwidth of 1 MHz, a 100% acquisition duty cycle was achieved. Overall system noise figure and dynamic range were better than 0.85 dB and 84 dB, respectively. During repetitive EPI scanning on phantoms, the relative temporal standard deviation of the image intensity time-course was below 0.2%. As compared to the product birdcage head coil, 16-channel reception with the custom array yielded a nearly 6-fold SNR gain in the cerebral cortex and a 1.8-fold SNR gain in the center of the brain. The excellent system stability combined with the increased sensitivity and SENSE capabilities of 16-channel coils are expected to significantly benefit and enhance fMRI applications. Published 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Boosting BOLD fMRI by K-Space Density Weighted Echo Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Mario; Müller, Alexander; Gutberlet, Marcel; Nichols, Thomas; Hahn, Dietbert; Köstler, Herbert; Bartsch, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful and influential method to non-invasively study neuronal brain activity. For this purpose, the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect is most widely used. T2* weighted echo planar imaging (EPI) is BOLD sensitive and the prevailing fMRI acquisition technique. Here, we present an alternative to its standard Cartesian recordings, i.e. k-space density weighted EPI, which is expected to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in fMRI data. Based on in vitro and in vivo pilot measurements, we show that fMRI by k-space density weighted EPI is feasible and that this new acquisition technique in fact boosted spatial and temporal SNR as well as the detection of local fMRI activations. Spatial resolution, spatial response function and echo time were identical for density weighted and conventional Cartesian EPI. The signal-to-noise ratio gain of density weighting can improve activation detection and has the potential to further increase the sensitivity of fMRI investigations. PMID:24040262

  2. Progress in visualizing turbulent flow using single-echo acquisition imaging.

    PubMed

    Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston; Bosshard, John C

    2006-01-01

    MRI of flow remains a challenging problem despite significant improvements in imaging speeds. For periodic flow the acquisition can be gated, synchronizing data acquisition with the flow. However, this method fails to work if the flow is sufficiently fast that turbulence occurs, or when it is sufficiently fast that blurring occurs during the excitation of the spins or the acquisition of the signal. This paper describes recent progress in employing a very fast MR imaging technique, Single Echo Acquisition Imaging (SEA-MRI) and spin-tagging to visualize very rapid and turbulent flow patterns. Demonstrations are done on a separating channel phantom with input flow rates ranging from zero to over 100 cm/sec. Spin-tagging enables a "texture" to be placed on the spins, enabling clear visualization of the complex flow patterns, and in some cases measurement of the flow velocity.

  3. Communication: Phase incremented echo train acquisition in NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Walder, Brennan J.; Keeler, Eric G.; Kaseman, Derrick C.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved and general approach for implementing echo train acquisition (ETA) in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, particularly where the conventional approach of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) acquisition would produce numerous artifacts. Generally, adding ETA to any N-dimensional experiment creates an N + 1 dimensional experiment, with an additional dimension associated with the echo count, n, or an evolution time that is an integer multiple of the spacing between echo maxima. Here we present a modified approach, called phase incremented echo train acquisition (PIETA), where the phase of the mixing pulse and every other refocusing pulse, ϕP, is incremented as a single variable, creating an additional phase dimension in what becomes an N + 2 dimensional experiment. A Fourier transform with respect to the PIETA phase, ϕP, converts the ϕP dimension into a Δp dimension where desired signals can be easily separated from undesired coherence transfer pathway signals, thereby avoiding cumbersome or intractable phase cycling schemes where the receiver phase must follow a master equation. This simple modification eliminates numerous artifacts present in NMR experiments employing CPMG acquisition and allows "single-scan" measurements of transverse relaxation and J-couplings. Additionally, unlike CPMG, we show how PIETA can be appended to experiments with phase modulated signals after the mixing pulse.

  4. Ultrashort echo time imaging using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA).

    PubMed

    Grodzki, David M; Jakob, Peter M; Heismann, Bjoern

    2012-02-01

    Sequences with ultrashort echo times enable new applications of MRI, including bone, tendon, ligament, and dental imaging. In this article, a sequence is presented that achieves the shortest possible encoding time for each k-space point, limited by pulse length, hardware switching times, and gradient performance of the scanner. In pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), outer k-space is filled with radial half-projections, whereas the centre is measured single pointwise on a Cartesian trajectory. This hybrid sequence combines the features of single point imaging with radial projection imaging. No hardware changes are required. Using this method, 3D images with an isotropic resolution of 1 mm can be obtained in less than 3 minutes. The differences between PETRA and the ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are evaluated by simulation and phantom measurements. Advantages of pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition are shown for tissue with a T(2) below 1 ms. The signal to noise ratio and Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) performance, as well as possible limitations of the approach, are investigated. In-vivo head, knee, ankle, and wrist examples are presented to prove the feasibility of the sequence. In summary, fast imaging with ultrashort echo time is enabled by PETRA and may help to establish new routine clinical applications of ultrashort echo time sequences.

  5. Matched-filter acquisition for BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Lars; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Wilm, Bertram J; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Brunner, David O; Ruff, Christian C; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2014-10-15

    We introduce matched-filter fMRI, which improves BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) sensitivity by variable-density image acquisition tailored to subsequent image smoothing. Image smoothing is an established post-processing technique used in the vast majority of fMRI studies. Here we show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the resulting smoothed data can be substantially increased by acquisition weighting with a weighting function that matches the k-space filter imposed by the smoothing operation. We derive the theoretical SNR advantage of this strategy and propose a practical implementation of 2D echo-planar acquisition matched to common Gaussian smoothing. To reliably perform the involved variable-speed trajectories, concurrent magnetic field monitoring with NMR probes is used. Using this technique, phantom and in vivo measurements confirm reliable SNR improvement in the order of 30% in a "resting-state" condition and prove robust in different regimes of physiological noise. Furthermore, a preliminary task-based visual fMRI experiment equally suggests a consistent BOLD sensitivity increase in terms of statistical sensitivity (average t-value increase of about 35%). In summary, our study suggests that matched-filter acquisition is an effective means of improving BOLD SNR in studies that rely on image smoothing at the post-processing level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The impact of spin coupling signal loss on fat content characterization in multi-echo acquisitions with different echo spacing.

    PubMed

    Nikiforaki, K; Manikis, G C; Boursianis, T; Marias, K; Karantanas, A; Maris, T G

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of echo spacing in transverse magnetization (T2) signal decay of gel and fat (oil) samples. Additionally, we assess the feasibility of using spin coupling as a determinant of fat content. Phantoms of known T2 values, as well as vegetable oil phantoms, were scanned at 1.5T scanner with a multi echo FSE sequence of variable echo spacing above and below the empirical threshold of 20ms for echo train signal modulation (6.7, 13.6, 26.8, and 40ms). T2 values were calculated from monoexponential fitting of the data. Relative signal loss between the four acquisitions of different echo spacing was calculated. Agreement in the T2 values of water gel phantom was observed in all acquisitions as opposed to fat phantom (oil) samples. Relative differences in signal intensity between two successive sequences of different echo spacing on composite fat/water regions of interest was found to be linearly correlated to fat fraction of the ROI. The sample specific degree of signal loss that was observed between different fat samples (vegetable oils) can be attributed to the composition of each sample in J coupled fat components. Hence, spin coupling may be used as a determinant of fat content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique (MEDITATE) on a 3T clinical scanner

    PubMed Central

    Baete, Steven H.; Cho, Gene; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the concepts and implementation of an MRI method, Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique (MEDITATE), which is capable of acquiring apparent diffusion tensor maps in two scans on a 3T clinical scanner. In each MEDITATE scan, a set of RF-pulses generates multiple echoes whose amplitudes are diffusion-weighted in both magnitude and direction by a pattern of diffusion gradients. As a result, two scans acquired with different diffusion weighting strengths suffice for accurate estimation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-parameters. The MEDITATE variation presented here expands previous MEDITATE approaches to adapt to the clinical scanner platform, such as exploiting longitudinal magnetization storage to reduce T2-weighting. Fully segmented multi-shot Cartesian encoding is used for image encoding. MEDITATE was tested on isotropic (agar gel), anisotropic diffusion phantoms (asparagus), and in vivo skeletal muscle in healthy volunteers with cardiac-gating. Comparisons of accuracy were performed with standard twice-refocused spin echo (TRSE) DTI in each case and good quantitative agreement was found between diffusion eigenvalues, mean diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy derived from TRSE-DTI and from the MEDITATE sequence. Orientation patterns were correctly reproduced in both isotropic and anisotropic phantoms, and approximately so for in vivo imaging. This illustrates that the MEDITATE method of compressed diffusion encoding is feasible on the clinical scanner platform. With future development and employment of appropriate view-sharing image encoding this technique may be used in clinical applications requiring time-sensitive acquisition of DTI parameters such as dynamical DTI in muscle. PMID:23828606

  8. Comparison of Echo and MRI in the Imaging Evaluation of Intracardiac Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, G. Sharma, S.; Kothari, S.S.; Juneja, R.; Saxena, A.; Talwar, K.K.

    2004-09-15

    We compared the efficacy of echocardiography (ECHO) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating intracardiac masses. Over an 8-yr period, 28 patients, 21 males, 7 females, 16 days-60 years of age (mean 25 years) with a suspected intracardiac mass on ECHO (transthoracic in all; transesophageal in 9) underwent an MRI examination. Five patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI. ECHO and MRI were compared with respect to their technical adequacy, ability to detect and suggest the likely etiology of the mass, and provide additional information (masses not seen with the other technique, inflow or outflow obstruction, and intramural component of an intracavitary mass). With MRI, the image morphology (including signal intensity changes on the various sequences) and extracardiac manifestations were also evaluated. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology in 18, surgical inspection in 4, by follow- up imaging on conservative management in 5, and by typical extracardiac manifestations of the disease in 1 patient.Fifteen (54%) patients had tumors (benign 12, malignant 3), 5 had a thrombus or hematoma, and 4 each had infective or vascular lesions. Thirty-four masses (13 in ventricle, 11 septal, 7 atrial, 2 on valve and 1 in pulmonary artery) were seen on MRI, 28 of which were detected by ECHO. Transthoracic ECHO (TTE) and MRI were technically optimal in 82% and 100% of cases, respectively. Nine patients needed an additional transesophageal ECHO (TEE). Overall, MRI showed a mass in all patients, whereas ECHO missed it in 2 cases. In cases with a mass on both modalities, MRI detected 4 additional masses not seen on ECHO. MRI suggested the etiology in 21 (75%) cases, while the same was possible with ECHO (TTE and TEE) in 8 (29%) cases. Intramural component, extension into the inflow or outflow, outflow tract obstruction, and associated pericardial or extracardiac masses were better depicted on MRI. We conclude that MRI is advantageous over a combination of TTE and TEE for

  9. MRI: update on technology diffusion and acquisition.

    PubMed

    Hoppszallern, S; Hughes, C; Zimmerman, R A

    1991-04-01

    Over the past three years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become accepted as a valuable diagnostic tool, and its applications continue to expand. During this time, the number of units installed in the United States doubled. By 1990 about 2,000 MRI units were in place in the United States and nearly 20 percent of the MRI-installed base was mobile, according to a research study conducted by the Hadley Hart Group (Chicago) and Drew Consultants, Inc. (Concord, MA). With the introduction of the prospective payment system, many hospitals were hesitant to spend limited capital on new technology, such as MRI. At the same time, freestanding diagnostic imaging centers were on the rise. Some hospitals and entrepreneurs who foresaw the potential of MRI in health care pioneered its use in the clinical setting. Hospitals began to examine new partnership arrangements and alternative forms of financing, so that they too could offer MRI services. By the end of 1988, the majority of hospitals offering MRI services did not own their own unit and about 40 percent of the hospitals offering MRI services were in a mobile configuration according to the Hadley Hart Group. While the technology has been diffused into 100-bed hospitals via mobile service vendors in some parts of the country, many medium-sized and large hospitals also have entered the MRI services market in this fashion. In the larger hospitals, the patient demand or need for the service often would justify acquisition of MRI, but the expense of the technology, and in many areas restrictive state health planning policies, modified purchase of MRI systems by hospitals. Mobile service vendors offered hospitals a way to startup MRI services in a limited fashion without a major capital expenditure and its associated risk. As hospitals gain experience with mobile MRI and achieve or exceed their early utilization projections, administrators are reevaluating the need to expand services to a full-time fixed site. Early fixed

  10. Multiple gradient echo propeller (MGREP) MRI: Technical development and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawalla, Aziz Hatim

    The PROPELLER (Periodically Rotated Overlapping Parallel Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique has inherent advantages over other fast imaging methods, including robust motion correction, reduced image distortion, and resistance to off-resonance effects. These features make PROPELLER highly desirable for T2*-sensitive imaging, high-resolution diffusion imaging, and many other applications. However, PROPELLER has been predominantly implemented as a fast spin-echo (FSE) technique, which is insensitive to T2* contrast, and requires time-inefficient signal averaging to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for many applications. These issues presently constrain the potential clinical utility of FSE-based PROPELLER. In this research, our aim was to extend and enhance the potential applications of PROPELLER MRI by developing a novel multiple gradient echo PROPELLER (MGREP) technique that can overcome the aforementioned limitations. The MGREP pulse sequence was designed to acquire multiple gradient-echo images simultaneously, without any increase in total scan time or RF energy deposition relative to FSE-based PROPELLER. A new parameter was also introduced for direct user-control over gradient echo spacing, to allow variable sensitivity to T2* contrast. In parallel to pulse sequence development, an improved algorithm for motion correction was also developed and evaluated against the established method through extensive simulations. The potential advantages of MGREP over FSE-based PROPELLER were illustrated via three specific applications: (1) quantitative T2* measurement, (2) time-efficient signal averaging, and (3) high-resolution diffusion imaging. Relative to the FSE-PROPELLER method, the MGREP sequence was found to yield quantitative T2* values, increase SNR by ˜40% without any increase in acquisition time or RF energy deposition, and noticeably improve image quality in high-resolution diffusion maps. In addition, the

  11. Differentiation of breast cancer from fibroadenoma with dual-echo dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Delproposto, Zachary; Wang, Haoyu; Ding, Xuewei; Ji, Conghua; Wang, Bei; Xu, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) of the breast is a routinely used imaging method which is highly sensitive for detecting breast malignancy. Specificity, though, remains suboptimal. Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI), an alternative dynamic contrast imaging technique, evaluates perfusion-related parameters unique from DCE MRI. Previous work has shown that the combination of DSC MRI with DCE MRI can improve diagnostic specificity, though an additional administration of intravenous contrast is required. Dual-echo MRI can measure both T1W DCE MRI and T2*W DSC MRI parameters with a single contrast bolus, but has not been previously implemented in breast imaging. We have developed a dual-echo gradient-echo sequence to perform such simultaneous measurements in the breast, and use it to calculate the semi-quantitative T1W and T2*W related parameters such as peak enhancement ratio, time of maximal enhancement, regional blood flow, and regional blood volume in 20 malignant lesions and 10 benign fibroadenomas in 38 patients. Imaging parameters were compared to surgical or biopsy obtained tissue samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curves were calculated for each parameter and combination of parameters. The time of maximal enhancement derived from DCE MRI had a 90% sensitivity and 69% specificity for predicting malignancy. When combined with DSC MRI derived regional blood flow and volume parameters, sensitivity remained unchanged at 90% but specificity increased to 80%. In conclusion, we show that dual-echo MRI with a single administration of contrast agent can simultaneously measure both T1W and T2*W related perfusion and kinetic parameters in the breast and the combination of DCE MRI and DSC MRI parameters improves the diagnostic performance of breast MRI to differentiate breast cancer from benign fibroadenomas.

  12. Echo Planar Imaging before and after fMRI: A personal history

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark S.; Schmitt, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) plays a crucial role in functional MRI. Focusing especially on the period from 1988 to 1992, the authors offer personal recollections, on the development of practical means of deploying EPI, the people that participated, and its impact on MRI in general. PMID:22266173

  13. Functional MRI using sensitivity-encoded echo planar imaging (SENSE-EPI).

    PubMed

    Preibisch, Christine; Pilatus, Ulrich; Bunke, Jürgen; Hoogenraad, Frank; Zanella, Friedhelm; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2003-06-01

    Parallel imaging methods become increasingly available on clinical MR scanners. To investigate the potential of sensitivity-encoded single-shot EPI (SENSE-EPI) for functional MRI, five imaging protocols at different SENSE reduction factors (R) and matrix sizes were compared with respect to their noise characteristics and their sensitivity toward functional activation in a motor task examination. At constant echo times, SENSE-EPI was either used to shorten the single volume acquisition times (TR(min)) at matrix size 128 x 100 (22 slices) from 3.9 s (no SENSE) to 2.0 s at R = 3, or to increase the matrix size to 192 x 153 (22 slices), resulting in TR(min) = 5.3 s for R = 2 or TR(min) = 3.4 s for R = 3. At the lower resolution, the bisection of echo train length (R = 2) substantially reduced distortions and blurring, while signal-to-noise and statistical power (measured by cluster size and maximum t value per unit time) were hardly reduced. At R = 3 the additional gain in speed and distortion reduction was quite small, while signal-to-noise and statistical power dropped significantly. With enhanced spatial resolution the time course signal-to-noise was better than expected from theory for purely thermal noise because of a reduced contribution of physiological noise, and statistical power almost reached that of the regular, low-resolution single-shot EPI, with a slight drop off toward R = 3. Thus, SENSE-EPI allows to substantially increase speed and spatial resolution in fMRI. At SENSE reduction factors up to R = 2, the potential drawbacks regarding signal-to-noise and statistical power are almost negligible.

  14. Separating slow BOLD from non-BOLD baseline drifts using multi-echo fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jennifer W.; Kundu, Prantik; Horovitz, Silvina G.; Bandettini, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) baseline is known to drift over the course of an experiment and is often attributed to hardware instability. These ultraslow fMRI fluctuations are inseparable from blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) changes in standard single echo fMRI and they are therefore typically removed before further analysis in both resting-state and task paradigms. However, some part of these fluctuations may be of neuronal origin, as neural activity can indeed fluctuate at the scale of several minutes or even longer, such as after the administration of drugs or during the ultradian rhythms. Here, we show that it is possible to separate the slow BOLD and non-BOLD drifts automatically using multi-echo fMRI and multi-echo independent components analysis (ME-ICA) denoising by demonstrating the detection of a visual signal evoked from a flickering checkerboard with slowly changing contrast. PMID:25449746

  15. Quantitative susceptibility mapping using principles of echo shifting with a train of observations sequence on 1.5T MRI.

    PubMed

    Kan, Hirohito; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kasai, Harumasa; Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of susceptibility estimated from the principles of echo shifting with a train of observations (PRESTO) sequence using a 1.5T MRI system, we conducted experiments on the human brain using the PRESTO sequence and compared our results with the susceptibility obtained from spoiled gradient-recalled echo (GRE) sequence with flow compensation using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) reconstruction. Experiments on the human brain were conducted on 12 healthy volunteers (27±4years) using PRESTO and spoiled GRE sequences on a 1.5T scanner. The PRESTO sequence is an echo-shifted gradient echo sequence that allows high susceptibility sensitivity and rapid acquisition because of TE>TR compared with the spoiled GRE sequence. QSM analysis was performed on the obtained phase images using the iLSQR method. Estimated susceptibility maps were used for region of interest analyses and estimation of line profiles through iron-rich tissue and major vessels. Our results demonstrated that susceptibility maps were accurately estimated, without error, by QSM analysis of PRESTO and spoiled GRE sequences. Acquisition time in the PRESTO sequence was reduced by 43% compared with that in the spoiled GRE sequence. Differences did exist between susceptibility maps in PRESTO and spoiled GRE sequences for visualization and quantitative values of major blood vessels and the areas around them CONCLUSION: The PRESTO sequence enables correct estimation of tissue susceptibility with rapid acquisition and may be useful for QSM analysis of clinical use of 1.5T scanners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-Speed Real-Time Resting-State fMRI Using Multi-Slab Echo-Volumar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Zhang, Tongsheng; Hummatov, Ruslan; Akhtari, Massoud; Chohan, Muhammad; Fisch, Bruce; Yonas, Howard

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that ultra-high-speed real-time fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (MEVI) significantly increases sensitivity for mapping task-related activation and resting-state networks (RSNs) compared to echo-planar imaging (Posse et al., 2012). In the present study we characterize the sensitivity of MEVI for mapping RSN connectivity dynamics, comparing independent component analysis (ICA) and a novel seed-based connectivity analysis (SBCA) that combines sliding-window correlation analysis with meta-statistics. This SBCA approach is shown to minimize the effects of confounds, such as movement, and CSF and white matter signal changes, and enables real-time monitoring of RSN dynamics at time scales of tens of seconds. We demonstrate highly sensitive mapping of eloquent cortex in the vicinity of brain tumors and arterio-venous malformations, and detection of abnormal resting-state connectivity in epilepsy. In patients with motor impairment, resting-state fMRI provided focal localization of sensorimotor cortex compared with more diffuse activation in task-based fMRI. The fast acquisition speed of MEVI enabled segregation of cardiac-related signal pulsation using ICA, which revealed distinct regional differences in pulsation amplitude and waveform, elevated signal pulsation in patients with arterio-venous malformations and a trend toward reduced pulsatility in gray matter of patients compared with healthy controls. Mapping cardiac pulsation in cortical gray matter may carry important functional information that distinguishes healthy from diseased tissue vasculature. This novel fMRI methodology is particularly promising for mapping eloquent cortex in patients with neurological disease, having variable degree of cooperation in task-based fMRI. In conclusion, ultra-high-real-time speed fMRI enhances the sensitivity of mapping the dynamics of resting-state connectivity and cerebro-vascular pulsatility for clinical and neuroscience research applications

  17. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI with radial ultra-short echo time and spatial-temporal constrained reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Johnson, Kevin M.; Bell, Laura C.; Velikina, Julia V.; Samsonov, Alexey A.; Nagle, Scott K.; Fain, Sean B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of spatial-temporal constrained reconstruction for accelerated regional lung perfusion using highly undersampled dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) 3D radial MRI with ultra-short echo time (UTE). Methods A combined strategy was used to accelerate DCE MRI for 3D pulmonary perfusion with whole lung coverage. A highly undersampled 3D radial UTE MRI acquisition was combined with an iterative constrained reconstruction exploiting principal component analysis and wavelet soft-thresholding for dimensionality reduction in space and time. The performance of the method was evaluated using a 3D fractal-based DCE digital lung phantom. Simulated perfusion maps and contrast enhancement curves were compared to ground truth using the structural similarity index (SSIM) to determine robust threshold and regularization levels. Feasibility studies were then performed in a canine and a human subject with 3D radial UTE (TE = 0.08 ms) acquisition to assess feasibility of mapping regional 3D perfusion. Results The method was able to accurately recover perfusion maps in the phantom with a nominal isotropic spatial resolution of 1.5 mm (SSIM of 0.949). The canine and human subject studies demonstrated feasibility for providing artifact-free perfusion maps in a simple 3D breath-held acquisition. Conclusion The proposed method is promising for fast and flexible 3D pulmonary perfusion imaging. PMID:24604452

  18. Comparison of dual-echo DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived contrast agent kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Quarles, C Chad; Gore, John C; Xu, Lei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-09-01

    The application of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess brain tumors is often confounded by the extravasation of contrast agent (CA). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier allows CA to leak out of the vasculature leading to additional T(1), T(2) and T(2) relaxation effects in the extravascular space, thereby affecting the signal intensity time course in a complex manner. The goal of this study was to validate a dual-echo DSC-MRI approach that separates and quantifies the T(1) and T(2) contributions to the acquired signal and enables the estimation of the volume transfer constant, K(trans), and the volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space, v(e). To test the validity of this approach, DSC-MRI- and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived K(trans) and v(e) estimates were spatially compared in both 9L and C6 rat brain tumor models. A high degree of correlation (concordance correlation coefficients >0.83, Pearson's r>0.84) and agreement was found between the DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived measurements. These results indicate that dual-echo DSC-MRI can be used to simultaneously extract reliable DCE-MRI kinetic parameters in brain tumors in addition to conventional blood volume and blood flow metrics.

  19. Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    'William J. O'Sullivan, the father of the Echo balloon, was also the father of five children. ... The NASA public affairs office distributed copies of this family portrait to the news media along with stories about O'Sullivan's ingenious invention of the Echo balloon.' 'O'Sullivan became one of NASA's most highly publicized scientists. In December 1960, the U.S. Post Office Department issued a commemorative 4-cent stamp in honor of his beloved Echo balloon. For his concept of the inflatable space vehicle, NASA would award him one of its distinguished service medals, in addition to $5000 cash. In 1962, O'Sullivan would appear as a guest on the popular TV game show 'What's My Line?'; all four of the celebrity panelists correctly picked him from the lineup as the father of the Echo satelloons.'

  20. Accuracy and Precision for EchoMRI-Infants™ Body Composition Analysis in Piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Body Composition Analysis is used to evaluate infant growth patterns, efficacy of nutritional and medical interventions, progression of chronic disease, and recovery from malnutrition. EchoMRI-Infants is a new Quantitative Magnetic Resonance (QMR) method to measure Total Body Fat, Lean Tissue Mass, ...

  1. Dynamic diffusion tensor measurements in muscle tissue using Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Baete, Steven H.; Cho, Gene; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    When diffusion biomarkers display transient changes, i.e. in muscle following exercise, traditional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) methods lack temporal resolution to resolve the dynamics. This paper presents an MRI method for dynamic diffusion tensor acquisitions on a clinical 3T scanner. This method, SL-MEDITATE (Single Line Multiple Echo Diffusion Tensor Acquisition Technique) achieves a high temporal resolution (4s) (1) by rapid diffusion encoding through the acquisition of multiple echoes with unique diffusion sensitization and (2) by limiting the readout to a single line volume. The method is demonstrated in a rotating anisotropic phantom, in a flow phantom with adjustable flow speed, and in in vivo skeletal calf muscle of healthy volunteers following a plantar flexion exercise. The rotating and flow-varying phantom experiments show that SL-MEDITATE correctly identifies the rotation of the first diffusion eigenvector and the changes in diffusion tensor parameter magnitudes, respectively. Immediately following exercise, the in vivo mean diffusivity (MD) time-courses show, before the well-known increase, an initial decrease which is not typically observed in traditional DTI. In conclusion, SL-MEDITATE can be used to capture transient changes in tissue anisotropy in a single line. Future progress might allow for dynamic DTI when combined with appropriate k-space trajectories and compressed sensing reconstruction. PMID:25900166

  2. Three Dimensional Imaging of Ventilation Dynamics in Asthmatics Using Multi-echo Projection Acquisition with Constrained Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, James H.; O’Halloran, Rafael L.; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Bley, Thorsten A.; Francois, Christopher J.; Velikina, Julia V.; Sorkness, Ronald L.; Busse, William W.; Fain, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to detect dynamic gas trapping in 3-dimensions during forced exhalation at isotropic high spatial resolution and high temporal resolution using hyperpolarized helium-3 (HPHe-3) MRI. Ten subjects underwent HPHe-3 MRI and MDCT. MRI was performed throughout inspiration, breath-hold, and forced expiration. A multi-echo 3D projection acquisition was used to improve data collection efficiency and an iterative constrained reconstruction (I-HYPR) was implemented to improve SNR and increase robustness to motion. Two radiologists evaluated the dynamic MRI and breath-held MDCT data for gas and air trapping respectively. Phantom studies showed the proposed technique significantly improved depiction of moving objects compared to view-sharing methods. Gas trapping was detected using MRI in 5 of the 6 asthmatic subjects who displayed air trapping with MDCT. Locations in disagreement were found to represent small to moderate regions of air trapping. The proposed technique provides whole lung 3D imaging of respiration dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution and compares well to the current standard, MDCT. While MDCT can provide information about static regional air trapping, it is unable to depict dynamics in a setting more comparable to a spirometry maneuver and explore the longitudinal time evolution of the trapped regions. PMID:19785015

  3. Substitute CT generation from a single ultra short time echo MRI sequence: preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Dowling, Jason A.; Rai, Robba; Liney, Gary P.

    2017-04-01

    In MR guided radiation therapy planning both MR and CT images for a patient are acquired and co-registered to obtain a tissue specific HU map. Generation of the HU map directly from the MRI would eliminate the CT acquisition and may improve radiation therapy planning. In this preliminary study of substitute CT (sCT) generation, two porcine leg phantoms were scanned using a 3D ultrashort echo time (PETRA) sequence and co-registered to corresponding CT images to build tissue specific regression models. The model was created from one co-registered CT-PETRA pair to generate the sCT for the other PETRA image. An expectation maximization based clustering was performed on the co-registered PETRA image to identify the soft tissues, dense bone and air class membership probabilities. A tissue specific non linear regression model was built from one registered CT-PETRA pair dataset to predict the sCT of the second PETRA image in a two-fold cross validation schema. A complete substitute CT is generated in 3 min. The mean absolute HU error for air was 0.3 HU, bone was 95 HU, fat was 30 HU and for muscle it was 10 HU. The mean surface reconstruction error for the bone was 1.3 mm. The PETRA sequence enabled a low mean absolute surface distance for the bone and a low HU error for other classes. The sCT generated from a single PETRA sequence shows promise for the generation of fast sCT for MRI based radiation therapy planning.

  4. Spherical navigator echoes for full 3D rigid body motion measurement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Edward B.; Manduca, Armando; Grimm, Roger; Ward, Heidi; Jack, Clifford R.

    2001-07-01

    We are developing a 3-D spherical navigator (SNAV) echo technique for MRI that can measure rigid body motion in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously, in a single echo, by sampling a spherical shell in k-space. MRI pulse sequences were developed to acquire varying amounts of data on such a shell. 3-D rotations of an imaged object simply rotate the data on this shell, and can be detected by registration of magnitude values. 3-D translations add phase shifts to the data on the shell, and can be detected with a weighted least squares fit to the phase differences at corresponding points. Data collected with a computer controlled motion phantom with known rotational and translational motions was used to evaluate the technique. The accuracy and precision of the technique depend on the sampling density, with roughly 1000 sample points necessary for accurate detection to within the error limits of the motion phantom. This number of samples can be captured in a single SNAV echo with a 3-D helical spiral trajectory. Motion detection in MRI with spherical navigator echoes is thus feasible and practical. Accurate motion measurements about all three axes, suitable for retrospective or prospective correction, can be obtained in a single pulse sequence.

  5. An Improved Susceptibility Weighted Imaging Method using Multi-Echo Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung Suk; Oh, Se-Hong; Nam, Yoonho; Han, Dongyeob; Stafford, Randall B.; Hwang, Jinyoung; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, HyunWook; Lee, Jongho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To introduce novel acquisition and post-processing approaches for susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to remove background field inhomogeneity artifacts in both magnitude and phase data. Method The proposed method acquires three echoes in a 3D gradient echo (GRE) sequence, with a field compensation gradient (z-shim gradient) applied to the third echo. The artifacts in the magnitude data are compensated by signal estimation from all three echoes. The artifacts in phase signals are removed by modeling the background phase distortions using Gaussians. The method was applied in vivo and compared with conventional SWI. Results The method successfully compensates for background field inhomogeneity artifacts in magnitude and phase images, and demonstrated improved SWI images. In particular, vessels in frontal lobe, which were not observed in conventional SWI, were identified in the proposed method. Conclusion The new method improves image quality in SWI by restoring signal in the frontal and temporal regions. PMID:24105838

  6. Less noise, more activation: Multiband acquisition schemes for auditory functional MRI.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Federico; Moerel, Michelle; Ugurbil, Kamil; Formisano, Elia; Yacoub, Essa

    2015-08-01

    To improve acquisition in fMRI studies of audition by using multiband (MB) gradient-echo echo planar imaging (GE-EPI). Data were acquired at 3T (Siemens Skyra) with a 32-channel head coil. Functional responses were obtained by presenting stimuli [tones and natural sounds (voices, speech, music, tools, animal cries)] in silent gaps between image acquisitions. Two-fold slice acceleration (MB2) was compared with a standard GE-EPI (MB1). Coverage and sampling rate (TR = 3 s) were kept constant across acquisition schemes. The longer gap in MB2 scans was used to present: (i) sounds of the same length as in conventional GE-EPI (type 1; 800 ms stimuli); (ii) sounds of double the length (type 2; 1600 ms stimuli). Functional responses to all sounds (i.e., main effect) were stronger when acquired with slice acceleration (i.e., shorter acquisition time). The difference between voice and nonvoice responses was greater in MB2 type 1 acquisitions (i.e., same length sounds as GE-EPI but presented in a longer silent gap) than in standard GE-EPI acquisitions (interaction effect). Reducing the length of the scanner noise results in stronger functional responses. Longer "silent" periods (i.e., keeping the sound length the same as in standard acquisitions) result in stronger response to voice compared with nonvoice stimuli. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Transperineal prostate biopsy with ECHO-MRI fusion. Biopsee system. Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Romero-Selas, E; Cuadros, V; Montáns, J; Sánchez, E; López-Alcorocho, J M; Gómez-Sancha, F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present our initial experience with the stereotactic echo-MRI fusion system for diagnosing prostate cancer. Between September 2014 and January 2015, we performed 50 prostate biopsies using the stereotactic echo-MRI fusion system. The 3-Tesla multiparameter MR images were superimposed using this image fusion system on 3D echo images obtained with the Biopsee system for the exact locating of areas suspected of prostate cancer. The lesions were classified using the Prostate Imaging Report and Date System. We assessed a total of 50 patients, with a mean age of 63 years (range, 45-79), a mean prostate-specific antigen level of 8 ng/mL (range, 1.9-20) and a mean prostate volume of 52mL (range, 12-118). Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 69% of the patients and intraepithelial neoplasia in 6%. The results of the biopsy were negative for 24% of the patients. The results of the biopsy and MRI were in agreement for 62% of the patients; however, 46% also had a tumour outside of the suspicious lesion. We diagnosed 46% anterior tumours and 33% apical tumours. One patient had a haematuria, another had a haematoma and a third had acute urine retention. Multiparametric prostatic MRI helps identify prostate lesions suggestive of cancer. The Biopsee echo-MRI fusion system provides for guided biopsy and increases the diagnostic performance, reducing the false negatives of classical biopsies and increasing the diagnosis of anterior tumours. Transperineal access minimises the risk of prostatic infection and sepsis. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Size Distribution Imaging by Non-Uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin Echo (NOGSE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Noam; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Objects making up complex porous systems in Nature usually span a range of sizes. These size distributions play fundamental roles in defining the physicochemical, biophysical and physiological properties of a wide variety of systems – ranging from advanced catalytic materials to Central Nervous System diseases. Accurate and noninvasive measurements of size distributions in opaque, three-dimensional objects, have thus remained long-standing and important challenges. Herein we describe how a recently introduced diffusion-based magnetic resonance methodology, Non-Uniform-Oscillating-Gradient-Spin-Echo (NOGSE), can determine such distributions noninvasively. The method relies on its ability to probe confining lengths with a (length)6 parametric sensitivity, in a constant-time, constant-number-of-gradients fashion; combined, these attributes provide sufficient sensitivity for characterizing the underlying distributions in μm-scaled cellular systems. Theoretical derivations and simulations are presented to verify NOGSE’s ability to faithfully reconstruct size distributions through suitable modeling of their distribution parameters. Experiments in yeast cell suspensions – where the ground truth can be determined from ancillary microscopy – corroborate these trends experimentally. Finally, by appending to the NOGSE protocol an imaging acquisition, novel MRI maps of cellular size distributions were collected from a mouse brain. The ensuing micro-architectural contrasts successfully delineated distinctive hallmark anatomical sub-structures, in both white matter and gray matter tissues, in a non-invasive manner. Such findings highlight NOGSE’s potential for characterizing aberrations in cellular size distributions upon disease, or during normal processes such as development. PMID:26197220

  9. [Scar or recurrence--comparison of MRI and color-coded ultrasound with echo signal amplifiers].

    PubMed

    Aichinger, U; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Krämer, S; Lell, M; Bautz, W

    2002-11-01

    MRI is the most reliable method to differentiate scar and recurrent carcinoma of the breast after surgical treatment. This study compares MRI and color-coded ultrasound with and without echo signal amplifier (ESA). Forty-two patients with suspected recurrent tumors were enrolled in this prospective study, with 38 patients after breast conserving therapy and 4 after mastectomy. All patients had a clinical examination, mammography (n = 38), real time ultrasound (US), color-coded ultrasound without and with ESA (Levovist(R), Schering, Berlin), and dynamic MRI. The criteria used for duplex ultrasound were tumor vascularisation and flow pattern. The results were compared with histologic findings or the results of follow-up examinations for at least 12 months. The detection of penetrating or central vessels proved to be an accurate sign of malignancy in duplex ultrasound. With the application of ESA, additional vessels were detected within the lesions, increasing the diagnostic accuracy (83 % with ESA versus 79 % without ESA). The sensitivity of color-coded ultrasound improved from 64 % to 86 % with echo signal amplifier. The specificity was 86 % without and 82 % with echo signal amplifier. MRI was found to have a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 82 %. The same 5 lesions were false positive on MRI and color-coded US after Levovist(R). No lesion without signs of vascularity within or in its vicinity was malignant. Color-coded ultrasound seems to be a promising method in the differentiation between scar and recurrence. Lesions with penetrating or central vessels have a high probability of being malignant, whereas lesions without any signs of vascularity inside or nearby have a high probability of being benign. Advantage of contrast-enhanced US is its ubiquitous availability.

  10. Optimization image of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 fast spin echo (FSE) with variation echo train length (ETL) on the rupture tendon achilles case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzamil, Akhmad; Haries Firmansyah, Achmad

    2017-05-01

    The research was done the optimization image of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T2 Fast Spin Echo (FSE) with variation Echo Train Length (ETL) on the Rupture Tendon Achilles case. This study aims to find the variations Echo Train Length (ETL) from the results of ankle’s MRI image and find out how the value of Echo Train Length (ETL) works on the MRI ankle to produce optimal image. In this research, the used ETL variations were 12 and 20 with the interval 2 on weighting T2 FSE sagittal. The study obtained the influence of Echo Train Length (ETL) on the quality of ankle MRI image sagittal using T2 FSE weighting and analyzed in 25 images of five patients. The data analysis has done quantitatively with the Region of Interest (ROI) directly on computer MRI image planes which conducted statistical tests Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR). The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) was the highest finding on fat tissue, while the Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR) on the Tendon-Fat tissue with ETL 12 found in two patients. The statistics test showed the significant SNR value of the 0.007 (p<0.05) of Tendon tissue, 0.364 (p>0.05) of the Fat, 0.912 (p>0.05) of the Fibula, and 0.436 (p>0.05) of the Heel Bone. For the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the Tendon-FAT tissue was about 0.041 (p>0.05). The results of the study showed that ETL variation with T2 FSE sagittal weighting had difference at Tendon tissue and Tendon-Fat tissue for MRI imaging quality. SNR and CNR were an important aspect on imaging optimization process to give the diagnose information.

  11. Spectroscopic Localization by Simultaneous Acquisition of the Double-Spin and Stimulated Echoes

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Assaf; Gonen, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design a proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS) localization sequence that combines the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) benefits of Point Resolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) with the high pulse bandwidths, low chemical shift displacements (CSD), low specific absorption rates (SAR), short echo times (TE) and superior radio-frequency transmit field (B1+) immunity of Stimulated Echo Acquisition Mode (STEAM), by simultaneously refocusing and acquiring both the double-spin and stimulated echo coherence pathways from the volume of interest. Methods We propose a family of 1H-MRS sequences comprising three orthogonal spatially-selective pulses with flip angles 90°<α, β, γ<128°. The stimulated and double-spin echo are refocused in-phase simultaneously by altering the pulses’ phases, flip angles and timing, as well as the inter-pulse gradient spoiling moments. The ≈90° nutations of α, β, γ provide STEAM-like advantages (lower SAR, in-plane CSD and TE; greater B1+ immunity), but with SNRs comparable with PRESS. Results Phantom and in vivo brain experiments show that 83–100% of the PRESS SNR (metabolite-dependent) is achieved at under 75% of the SAR and 66% lower in-plane CSD. Conclusion The advantages of STEAM can be augmented with the higher SNR of PRESS by combining the spin and stimulated echoes. Quantification, especially of J-coupled resonances and intermediate and long TEs, must be carefully considered. PMID:24664399

  12. Robust Super-resolution Volume Reconstruction from Slice Acquisitions: Application to Fetal Brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Ali; Estroff, Judy A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2013-01-01

    Fast magnetic resonance imaging slice acquisition techniques such as single shot fast spin echo are routinely used in the presence of uncontrollable motion. These techniques are widely used for fetal MRI and MRI of moving subjects and organs. Although high-quality slices are frequently acquired by these techniques, inter-slice motion leads to severe motion artifacts that are apparent in out-of-plane views. Slice sequential acquisitions do not enable 3D volume representation. In this study, we have developed a novel technique based on a slice acquisition model, which enables the reconstruction of a volumetric image from multiple-scan slice acquisitions. The super-resolution volume reconstruction is formulated as an inverse problem of finding the underlying structure generating the acquired slices. We have developed a robust M-estimation solution which minimizes a robust error norm function between the model-generated slices and the acquired slices. The accuracy and robustness of this novel technique has been quantitatively assessed through simulations with digital brain phantom images as well as high-resolution newborn images. We also report here successful application of our new technique for the reconstruction of volumetric fetal brain MRI from clinically acquired data. PMID:20529730

  13. Assessing temperature changes in cortical bone using variable flip-angle ultrashort echo-time MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Misung; Scott, Serena J.; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonakar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Diederich, Chris J.; Rieke, Viola; Krug, Roland

    2017-03-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation is a promising, noninvasive method for treatment of bone tumors and palliation of pain. During thermal therapy, temperature mapping is necessary to ensure proper heat deposition in targeted tumors as well as to prevent unnecessary heating in surrounding tissues. Conventional MR thermometry exploits the proton resonant frequency shift of water protons, which normally requires a long echo time; therefore, this method is not appropriate for cortical bone due to its short T2* relaxation time. This work demonstrates that ultrashort echo-time MRI can characterize T1 changes in cortical bone caused by temperature changes. Ex vivo experiments were performed to heat diaphysis segments of bovine femurs with an interstitial ultrasound applicator. The T1 increase in the heated parts of cortical bone was observed. The temerature dependence of T1 in cortical born was also assessed by heating bovine bone samples in a temperature-controlled water bath. T1 mapping of cortical bone enabled by ultrashort echo-time MRI might allow for more accurate characterization of thermal dose during treatment of bone tumors.

  14. A framework for accurate determination of the T₂ distribution from multiple echo magnitude MRI images.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Koay, Cheng Guan; Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Basser, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of the T2 distribution in tissues provides biologically relevant information about normal and abnormal microstructure and organization. Typically, the T2 distribution is obtained by fitting the magnitude MR images acquired by a multi-echo MRI pulse sequence using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm. It is well known that the ideal magnitude MR signal follows a Rician distribution. Unfortunately, studies attempting to establish the validity and efficacy of the ILT algorithm assume that these input signals are Gaussian distributed. Violation of the normality (or Gaussian) assumption introduces unexpected artifacts, including spurious cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-like long T2 components; bias of the true geometric mean T2 values and in the relative fractions of various components; and blurring of nearby T2 peaks in the T2 distribution. Here we apply and extend our previously proposed magnitude signal transformation framework to map noisy Rician-distributed magnitude multi-echo MRI signals into Gaussian-distributed signals with high accuracy and precision. We then perform an ILT on the transformed data to obtain an accurate T2 distribution. Additionally, we demonstrate, by simulations and experiments, that this approach corrects the aforementioned artifacts in magnitude multi-echo MR images over a large range of signal-to-noise ratios.

  15. A framework for accurate determination of the T2 distribution from multiple echo magnitude MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Koay, Cheng Guan; Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Basser, Peter J.

    2014-07-01

    Measurement of the T2 distribution in tissues provides biologically relevant information about normal and abnormal microstructure and organization. Typically, the T2 distribution is obtained by fitting the magnitude MR images acquired by a multi-echo MRI pulse sequence using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm. It is well known that the ideal magnitude MR signal follows a Rician distribution. Unfortunately, studies attempting to establish the validity and efficacy of the ILT algorithm assume that these input signals are Gaussian distributed. Violation of the normality (or Gaussian) assumption introduces unexpected artifacts, including spurious cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-like long T2 components; bias of the true geometric mean T2 values and in the relative fractions of various components; and blurring of nearby T2 peaks in the T2 distribution. Here we apply and extend our previously proposed magnitude signal transformation framework to map noisy Rician-distributed magnitude multi-echo MRI signals into Gaussian-distributed signals with high accuracy and precision. We then perform an ILT on the transformed data to obtain an accurate T2 distribution. Additionally, we demonstrate, by simulations and experiments, that this approach corrects the aforementioned artifacts in magnitude multi-echo MR images over a large range of signal-to-noise ratios.

  16. Evaluation of a multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition with SENSE acceleration: applications for perfusion imaging in and outside the brain.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jack T; Robison, Ryan K; Elder, Christopher P; Newton, Allen T; Damon, Bruce M; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    Perfusion-based changes in MR signal intensity can occur in response to the introduction of exogenous contrast agents and endogenous tissue properties (e.g. blood oxygenation). MR measurements aimed at capturing these changes often implement single-shot echo planar imaging (ssEPI). In recent years ssEPI readouts have been combined with parallel imaging (PI) to allow fast dynamic multi-slice imaging as well as the incorporation of multiple echoes. A multiple spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) EPI acquisition has recently been developed to allow measurement of transverse relaxation rate (R2 and R2(*)) changes in dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI experiments in the brain. With SAGE EPI, the use of PI can influence image quality, temporal resolution, and achievable echo times. The effect of PI on dynamic SAGE measurements, however, has not been evaluated. In this work, a SAGE EPI acquisition utilizing SENSE PI and partial Fourier (PF) acceleration was developed and evaluated. Voxel-wise measures of R2 and R2(*) in healthy brain were compared using SAGE EPI and conventional non-EPI multiple echo acquisitions with varying SENSE and PF acceleration. A conservative SENSE factor of 2 with PF factor of 0.73 was found to provide accurate measures of R2 and R2(*) in white (WM) (rR2=[0.55-0.79], rR2*=[0.47-0.71]) and gray (GM) matter (rR2=[0.26-0.59], rR2*=[0.39-0.74]) across subjects. The combined use of SENSE and PF allowed the first dynamic SAGE EPI measurements in muscle, with a SENSE factor of 3 and PF factor of 0.6 providing reliable relaxation rate estimates when compared to multi-echo methods. Application of the optimized SAGE protocol in DSC-MRI of high-grade glioma patients provided T1 leakage-corrected estimates of CBV and CBF as well as mean vessel diameter (mVD) and simultaneous measures of DCE-MRI parameters K(trans) and ve. Likewise, application of SAGE in a muscle reperfusion model allowed dynamic measures of R2', a parameter that has been shown to correlate

  17. Autoregressive moving average modeling for spectral parameter estimation from a multigradient echo chemical shift acquisition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian A; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigated the performance of the iterative Steiglitz-McBride (SM) algorithm on an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of signals from a fast, sparsely sampled, multiecho, chemical shift imaging (CSI) acquisition using simulation, phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments with a focus on its potential usage in magnetic resonance (MR)-guided interventions. The ARMA signal model facilitated a rapid calculation of the chemical shift, apparent spin-spin relaxation time (T2*), and complex amplitudes of a multipeak system from a limited number of echoes (< or equal 16). Numerical simulations of one- and two-peak systems were used to assess the accuracy and uncertainty in the calculated spectral parameters as a function of acquisition and tissue parameters. The measured uncertainties from simulation were compared to the theoretical Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the acquisition. Measurements made in phantoms were used to validate the T2* estimates and to validate uncertainty estimates made from the CRLB. We demonstrated application to real-time MR-guided interventions ex vivo by using the technique to monitor a percutaneous ethanol injection into a bovine liver and in vivo to monitor a laser-induced thermal therapy treatment in a canine brain. Simulation results showed that the chemical shift and amplitude uncertainties reached their respective CRLB at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > or =5 for echo train lengths (ETLs) > or =4 using a fixed echo spacing of 3.3 ms. T2* estimates from the signal model possessed higher uncertainties but reached the CRLB at larger SNRs and/or ETLs. Highly accurate estimates for the chemical shift (<0.01 ppm) and amplitude (<1.0%) were obtained with > or =4 echoes and for T2*(<1.0%) with > or =7 echoes. We conclude that, over a reasonable range of SNR, the SM algorithm is a robust estimator of spectral parameters from fast CSI acquisitions that acquire < or =16 echoes for one- and two-peak systems. Preliminary ex vivo

  18. Comparison of Optimized Soft-Tissue Suppression Schemes for Ultra-short Echo Time (UTE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Magland, Jeremy F.; Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh; Song, Hee Kwon; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-short echo time (UTE) imaging with soft-tissue suppression reveals short-T2 components (typically hundreds of microseconds to milliseconds) ordinarily not captured or obscured by long-T2 tissue signals on the order of tens of milliseconds or longer. The technique therefore enables visualization and quantification of short-T2 proton signals such as those in highly collagenated connective tissues. This work compares the performance of the three most commonly used long-T2 suppression UTE sequences, i.e. echo subtraction (dual-echo UTE), saturation via dual-band saturation pulses (dual-band UTE), and inversion by adiabatic inversion pulses (IR-UTE) at 3T, via Bloch simulations and experimentally in vivo in the lower extremities of test subjects. For unbiased performance comparison, the acquisition parameters are optimized individually for each sequence to maximize short-T2 SNR and CNR between short- and long-T2 components. Results show excellent short-T2 contrast is achieved with these optimized sequences. A combination of dual-band UTE with dual-echo UTE provides good short-T2 SNR and CNR with less sensitivity to B1 homogeneity. IR-UTE has the lowest short-T2 SNR efficiency but provides highly uniform short-T2 contrast and is well suited for imaging short-T2 species with relatively short T1 such as bone water. PMID:22161636

  19. Ultrashort Echo Time for Improved Positive-Contrast Manganese-Enhanced MRI of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nofiele, Joris Tchouala; Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Objective Manganese (Mn) is a positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent that has been used to obtain physiological, biochemical, and molecular biological information. There is great interest to broaden its applications, but a major challenge is to increase detection sensitivity. Another challenge is distinguishing regions of Mn-related signal enhancement from background tissue with inherently similar contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study investigates the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) and subtraction UTE (SubUTE) imaging for more sensitive and specific determination of Mn accumulation. Materials and Methods Simulations were performed to investigate the feasibility of UTE and SubUTE for Mn-enhanced MRI and to optimize imaging parameters. Phantoms containing aqueous Mn solutions were imaged on a MRI scanner to validate simulations predictions. Breast cancer cells that are very aggressive (MDA-MB-231 and a more aggressive variant LM2) and a less aggressive cell line (MCF7) were labeled with Mn and imaged on MRI. All imaging was performed on a 3 Tesla scanner and compared UTE and SubUTE against conventional T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) imaging. Results Simulations and phantom imaging demonstrated that UTE and SubUTE provided sustained and linearly increasing positive contrast over a wide range of Mn concentrations, whereas conventional SPGR displayed signal plateau and eventual decrease. Higher flip angles are optimal for imaging higher Mn concentrations. Breast cancer cell imaging demonstrated that UTE and SubUTE provided high sensitivity, with SubUTE providing background suppression for improved specificity and eliminating the need for a pre-contrast baseline image. The SubUTE sequence allowed the best distinction of aggressive breast cancer cells. Conclusions UTE and SubUTE allow more sensitive and specific positive-contrast detection of Mn enhancement. This imaging capability can potentially open many new doors for Mn

  20. The accuracy of ultrashort echo time MRI sequences for medical additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Hofman, Mark; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Wolff, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Additively manufactured bone models, implants and drill guides are becoming increasingly popular amongst maxillofacial surgeons and dentists. To date, such constructs are commonly manufactured using CT technology that induces ionizing radiation. Recently, ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI sequences have been developed that allow radiation-free imaging of facial bones. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of UTE MRI sequences for medical additive manufacturing (AM). Methods: Three morphologically different dry human mandibles were scanned using a CT and MRI scanner. Additionally, optical scans of all three mandibles were made to acquire a “gold standard”. All CT and MRI scans were converted into Standard Tessellation Language (STL) models and geometrically compared with the gold standard. To quantify the accuracy of the AM process, the CT, MRI and gold-standard STL models of one of the mandibles were additively manufactured, optically scanned and compared with the original gold-standard STL model. Results: Geometric differences between all three CT-derived STL models and the gold standard were <1.0 mm. All three MRI-derived STL models generally presented deviations <1.5 mm in the symphyseal and mandibular area. The AM process introduced minor deviations of <0.5 mm. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that MRI using UTE sequences is a feasible alternative to CT in generating STL models of the mandible and would therefore be suitable for surgical planning and AM. Further in vivo studies are necessary to assess the usability of UTE MRI sequences in clinical settings. PMID:26943179

  1. Tailored slice selection in solid-state MRI by DANTE under magic-echo line narrowing.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Shigeru; Masumoto, Hidefumi; Hashimoto, Takeyuki

    2007-06-01

    We propose a method of slice selection in solid-state MRI by combining DANTE selective excitation with magic-echo (ME) line narrowing. The DANTE RF pulses applied at the ME peaks practically do not interfere with the ME line narrowing in the combined ME DANTE sequence. This allows straightforward tailoring of the slice profile simply by introducing an appropriate modulation, such as a sinc modulation, into the flip angles of the applied DANTE RF pulses. The utility of the method has been demonstrated by preliminary experiments performed on a test sample of adamantane.

  2. Optimal echo time for functional MRI of the infant brain identified in response to noxious stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goksan, Sezgi; Hartley, Caroline; Hurley, Samuel A.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Duff, Eugene P.; Jenkinson, Mark; Rogers, Richard; Clare, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) brain activity, measured using functional MRI (fMRI), is dependent on the echo time (TE) and the reversible spin–spin relaxation time constant ( T2*) that describes the decay of transverse magnetization. Use of the optimal TE during fMRI experiments allows maximal sensitivity to BOLD to be achieved. Reports that T2* values are longer in infants (due to higher water concentrations and lower lipid content) have led to the use of longer TEs during infant fMRI experiments; however, the optimal TE has not been established. Methods In this study, acute experimental mildly noxious stimuli were applied to the heel in 12 term infants (mean gestational age = 40 weeks, mean postnatal age = 3 days); and the percentage change in BOLD activity was calculated across a range of TEs, from 30 to 70 ms, at 3 Tesla. In addition, T2* maps of the whole brain were collected in seven infants. Results The maximal change in BOLD occurred at a TE of 52 ms, and the average T2* across the whole brain was 99 ms. Conclusion A TE of approximately 50 ms is recommended for use in 3T fMRI investigations in term infants. Magn Reson Med 78:625–631, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. PMID:27654315

  3. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Shemesh, Noam

    2017-04-01

    White Matter (WM) microstructures, such as axonal density and average diameter, are crucial to the normal function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) as they are closely related with axonal conduction velocities. Conversely, disruptions of these microstructural features may result in severe neurological deficits, suggesting that their noninvasive mapping could be an important step towards diagnosing and following pathophysiology. Whereas diffusion based MRI methods have been proposed to map these features, they typically entail the application of powerful gradients, which are rarely available in the clinic, or extremely long acquisition schemes to extract information from parameter-intensive models. In this study, we suggest that simple and time-efficient multi-gradient-echo (MGE) MRI can be used to extract the axon density from susceptibility-driven non-monotonic decay in the time-dependent signal. We show, both theoretically and with simulations, that a non-monotonic signal decay will occur for multi-compartmental microstructures - such as axons and extra-axonal spaces, which were here used as a simple model for the microstructure - and that, for axons parallel to the main magnetic field, the axonal density can be extracted. We then experimentally demonstrate in ex-vivo rat spinal cords that its different tracts - characterized by different microstructures - can be clearly contrasted using the MGE-derived maps. When the quantitative results are compared against ground-truth histology, they reflect the axonal fraction (though with a bias, as evident from Bland-Altman analysis). As well, the extra-axonal fraction can be estimated. The results suggest that our model is oversimplified, yet at the same time evidencing a potential and usefulness of the approach to map underlying microstructures using a simple and time-efficient MRI sequence. We further show that a simple general-linear-model can predict the average axonal diameters from the four model parameters, and

  4. Rapid acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder using three-dimensional fast spin echo sequence with compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging with compressed sensing (CS) for the assessment of shoulder. Twenty-nine patients who underwent shoulder MRI including image sets of axial 3D-FSE sequence without CS and with CS, using an acceleration factor of 1.5, were included. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Two musculoskeletal radiologists compared image quality of 3D-FSE sequences without CS and with CS, and scored the qualitative agreement between sequences, using a five-point scale. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was evaluated. The acquisition time of 3D-FSE MRI was reduced using CS (3min 23s vs. 2min 22s). Quantitative evaluations showed a significant correlation between the two sequences (r=0.872-0.993, p<0.05) and SSIM was in an acceptable range (0.940-0.993; mean±standard deviation, 0.968±0.018). Qualitative image quality showed good to excellent agreement between 3D-FSE images without CS and with CS. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was very good (κ=0.915-1). The 3D-FSE sequence with CS is feasible in evaluating the shoulder joint with reduced scan time compared to 3D-FSE without CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prospective motion correction of 3D echo-planar imaging data for functional MRI using optical tracking.

    PubMed

    Todd, Nick; Josephs, Oliver; Callaghan, Martina F; Lutti, Antoine; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of an optical camera based prospective motion correction (PMC) system in improving the quality of 3D echo-planar imaging functional MRI data. An optical camera and external marker were used to dynamically track the head movement of subjects during fMRI scanning. PMC was performed by using the motion information to dynamically update the sequence's RF excitation and gradient waveforms such that the field-of-view was realigned to match the subject's head movement. Task-free fMRI experiments on five healthy volunteers followed a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design with the following factors: PMC on or off; 3.0mm or 1.5mm isotropic resolution; and no, slow, or fast head movements. Visual and motor fMRI experiments were additionally performed on one of the volunteers at 1.5mm resolution comparing PMC on vs PMC off for no and slow head movements. Metrics were developed to quantify the amount of motion as it occurred relative to k-space data acquisition. The motion quantification metric collapsed the very rich camera tracking data into one scalar value for each image volume that was strongly predictive of motion-induced artifacts. The PMC system did not introduce extraneous artifacts for the no motion conditions and improved the time series temporal signal-to-noise by 30% to 40% for all combinations of low/high resolution and slow/fast head movement relative to the standard acquisition with no prospective correction. The numbers of activated voxels (p<0.001, uncorrected) in both task-based experiments were comparable for the no motion cases and increased by 78% and 330%, respectively, for PMC on versus PMC off in the slow motion cases. The PMC system is a robust solution to decrease the motion sensitivity of multi-shot 3D EPI sequences and thereby overcome one of the main roadblocks to their widespread use in fMRI studies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of acquisition and analysis strategies on cortical depth-dependent fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sriranga; Ivanov, Dimo; Havlicek, Martin; Poser, Benedikt A; Uludağ, Kâmil

    2017-05-12

    Functional MRI at ultra-high magnetic fields (≥ 7T) provides the opportunity to probe columnar and laminar processing in the human brain in vivo at sub-millimeter spatial scales. However, fMRI data only indirectly reflects the neuronal laminar profile due to a bias to ascending and pial veins inherent in gradient- and spin-echo BOLD fMRI. In addition, accurate delineation of the cortical depths is difficult, due to the relatively large voxel sizes and lack of sufficient tissue contrast in the functional images. In conventional depth-dependent fMRI studies, anatomical and functional data are acquired with different image read-out modules, the fMRI data are distortion-corrected and vascular biases are accounted for by subtracting the depth-dependent activation profiles of different stimulus conditions. In this study, using high-resolution gradient-echo fMRI data (0.7 mm isotropic) of the human visual cortex, we propose instead, that depth-dependent functional information is best preserved if data analysis is performed in the original functional data space. To achieve this, we acquired anatomical images with high tissue contrast and similar distortion to the functional images using multiple inversion-recovery time EPI, thereby eliminating the need to un-distort the fMRI data. We demonstrate higher spatial accuracy for the cortical layer definitions of this approach as compared to the more conventional approach using MP2RAGE anatomy. In addition, we provide theoretical arguments and empirical evidence that vascular biases can be better accounted for using division instead of subtraction of the depth-dependent profiles. Finally, we show that the hemodynamic response of grey matter has relatively stronger post-stimulus undershoot than the pial vein voxels. In summary, we show that the choice of fMRI data acquisition and processing can impact observable differences in the cortical depth profiles and present evidence that cortical depth-dependent modulation of the BOLD

  7. Assessment of EchoMRI-AH versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure human body composition.

    PubMed

    Galgani, J E; Smith, S R; Ravussin, E

    2011-09-01

    The sensitivity to detect small changes in body composition (fat mass and fat-free mass) largely depends on the precision of the instrument. We compared EchoMRI-AH and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Hologic QDR-4500A) for estimating fat mass in 301 volunteers. Body composition was evaluated in 136 males and 165 females with a large range of body mass index (BMI) (19-49 kg m(-2)) and age (19-91 years old) using DXA and EchoMRI-AH. In a subsample of 13 lean (BMI=19-25 kg m(-2)) and 21 overweight/obese (BMI>25 kg m(-2)) individuals, within-subject precision was evaluated from repeated measurements taken within 1 h (n=3) and 1 week apart (mean of three measurements taken on each day). Using Bland-Altman analysis, we compared the mean of the fat mass measurements versus the difference in fat mass measured by both instruments. We found that EchoMRI-AH quantified larger amount of fat versus DXA in non-obese (BMI<30 kg m(-2) (1.1 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI(95)):-3.7 to 6.0)) and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg m(-2) (4.2 kg, CI(95):-1.4 to 9.8)) participants. Within-subject precision (coefficient of variation, %) in fat mass measured within 1 h was remarkably better when measured by EchoMRI-AH than DXA (<0.5 versus <1.5%, respectively; P<0.001). However, 1-week apart within-subject variability showed similar values for both instruments (<2.2%; P=0.15). EchoMRI-AH yielded greater fat mass values when compared with DXA (Hologic QDR-4500A), particularly in fatter subjects. EchoMRI-AH and DXA showed similar 1-week apart precision when fat mass was measured both in lean and overweight/obese individuals.

  8. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Eric S.; Prah, Douglas E.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:28090589

  9. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Eric S; Prah, Douglas E; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma.

  10. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jie; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Luo, Jie; Lancia, Samantha; Hildebolt, Charles; Cross, Anne H

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gray matter (GM) damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS). The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2(*)) in 10 each relapsing-remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2(*) values from healthy controls (HCs) of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2(*) values - age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2(*) values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT) and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT) neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2(*) values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2(*) values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05) correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests) showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2(*) values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  11. Placental function assessed visually using half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Yuki; Kido, Aki; Mogami, Haruta; Moribata, Yusaku; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Shitano, Fuki; Kiguchi, Kayo; Kurata, Yasuhisa; Konishi, Ikuo; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-03-01

    To investigate a simple visual assessment method of placental function using half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The institutional review board approved this retrospective study of fetal MRI in 48 singleton pregnant women for whom placentas had undergone clinical pathological examinations. Two readers independently assessed the placentas using the HASTE scoring system, particularly emphasizing the visualization of the regular two-tone pattern inside and signal intensity (SI) of placental parenchyma referring to SI of the fetal kidney and liver. After categorization using the HASTE scoring system, the associations between the scores and the presence of pathologically proven placental insufficiency or of low birth weight less than the tenth percentile were examined using chi-square tests. The associations between the HASTE scores and the MRI findings previously reported to suggest placental insufficiency, such as placental thickness and placenta to amniotic fluid SI ratio, were also examined using Student t-tests. The HASTE scores were associated significantly with the presence of pathologically proven placental insufficiency (P = .003 for reader 1; P = .04 reader 2) and birth weight less than the tenth percentile (P = .005 for reader 1; P = .003 for reader 2). The HASTE scores were associated significantly with the placenta thickness (P < .0001 for both readers) and the placenta to the amniotic fluid SI ratio (P < .0001 for both readers). The HASTE scoring system is feasible for use in clinical assessment of placental function and for diagnosing placental insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficient imaging of midbrain nuclei using inverse double-echo steady-state acquisition a)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Long; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging of midbrain nuclei using T2- or T2*-weighted MRI often entails long echo time, leading to long scan time. In this study, an inverse double-echo steady-state (iDESS) technique is proposed for efficiently depicting midbrain nuclei. Methods: Thirteen healthy subjects participated in this study. iDESS was performed along with two sets of T2*-weighted spoiled gradient-echo images (SPGR1, with scan time identical to iDESS and SPGR2, using clinical scanning parameters as a reference standard) for comparison. Generation of iDESS composite images combining two echo signals was optimized for maximal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the red nuclei and surrounding tissues. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated from the occipital lobe. Comparison was also made using phase-enhanced images as in standard susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Results: The iDESS images present significantly higher SNR efficiency (171.3) than SPGR1 (158.7, p = 0.013) and SPGR2 (95.5, p < 10−8). iDESS CNR efficiency (19.2) is also significantly greater than SPGR1 (6.9, p < 10−6) and SPGR2 (14.3, p = 0.0016). Compared with DESS, iDESS provides further advantage on enhanced phase information and hence improved contrast on SWI-processed images. Conclusions: iDESS efficiently depicts midbrain nuclei with improved CNR efficiency, increased SNR efficiency, and reduced scan time and is less prone to susceptibility signal loss from air-tissue interfaces. PMID:26133633

  13. Calibration and Validation of EchoMRI Whole Body Composition Analysis Based on Chemical Analysis of Piglets, in comparison with the same for DXA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and precision of a new quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) EchoMRI device body for composition analysis (BCA) of infants and to compare it with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The EchoMRI device measured fat, lean, free water, and total water,...

  14. A virtually 1H-free birdcage coil for zero echo time MRI without background signal.

    PubMed

    Weiger, Markus; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Froidevaux, Romain; Rösler, Manuela B; Gross, Simon; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2017-07-01

    MRI of tissues with rapid transverse relaxation can be performed efficiently using the zero echo time (ZTE) technique. At high bandwidths leading to large relative initial radiofrequency (RF) dead times, the method becomes increasingly sensitive to artifacts related to signal stemming from outside the field of view, particularly from the RF coils. Therefore, in this work, a birdcage coil was designed that is virtually free of 1H signal. A transmit-receive birdcage RF coil for MRI of joints at 7T was designed by rigorously avoiding materials containing 1H nuclei, by using purely mechanical connections without glue, and by spoiling of unwanted signal by application of ferromagnetic materials. The coil was tested for residual 1H signal using ZTE phantom and in vivo joint imaging. In standard ZTE imaging, no 1H signal was detected above noise level. Only at extreme averaging, residual signal was observed close to conductors associated with 1H-containing molecules at adjacent glass surfaces. Phantom images with dead times up to 3.8 Nyquist dwells were obtained with only negligible background artifacts. Furthermore, high-quality ZTE images of human joints were acquired. A virtually 1H-free birdcage coil is presented, thus enabling in vivo ZTE MRI practically free of background signal, even at high bandwidths. Magn Reson Med 78:399-407, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Optimization of DSC MRI Echo Times for CBV Measurements Using Error Analysis in a Pilot Study of High-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bell, L C; Does, M D; Stokes, A M; Baxter, L C; Schmainda, K M; Dueck, A C; Quarles, C C

    2017-09-01

    The optimal TE must be calculated to minimize the variance in CBV measurements made with DSC MR imaging. Simulations can be used to determine the influence of the TE on CBV, but they may not adequately recapitulate the in vivo heterogeneity of precontrast T2*, contrast agent kinetics, and the biophysical basis of contrast agent-induced T2* changes. The purpose of this study was to combine quantitative multiecho DSC MRI T2* time curves with error analysis in order to compute the optimal TE for a traditional single-echo acquisition. Eleven subjects with high-grade gliomas were scanned at 3T with a dual-echo DSC MR imaging sequence to quantify contrast agent-induced T2* changes in this retrospective study. Optimized TEs were calculated with propagation of error analysis for high-grade glial tumors, normal-appearing white matter, and arterial input function estimation. The optimal TE is a weighted average of the T2* values that occur as a contrast agent bolus transverses a voxel. The mean optimal TEs were 30.0 ± 7.4 ms for high-grade glial tumors, 36.3 ± 4.6 ms for normal-appearing white matter, and 11.8 ± 1.4 ms for arterial input function estimation (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < .001). Greater heterogeneity was observed in the optimal TE values for high-grade gliomas, and mean values of all 3 ROIs were statistically significant. The optimal TE for the arterial input function estimation is much shorter; this finding implies that quantitative DSC MR imaging acquisitions would benefit from multiecho acquisitions. In the case of a single-echo acquisition, the optimal TE prescribed should be 30-35 ms (without a preload) and 20-30 ms (with a standard full-dose preload). © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Assessing tumor cytoarchitecture using multi-echo DSC-MRI derived measures of the Transverse Relaxivity at Tracer Equilibrium (TRATE)

    PubMed Central

    Semmineh, Natenael B; Xu, Junzhong; Skinner, Jack T; Xie, Jingping; Li, Hua; Ayers, Gregory; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain tumor dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI studies, multi-echo acquisition methods are used to quantify the dynamic changes in T1 and T2* that occur when contrast agent (CA) extravasates. Such methods also enable the estimation of the effective tissue CA transverse relaxivity. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the Transverse Relaxivity at Tracer Equilibrium (TRATE) to tumor cytoarchitecture. Theory and Methods Computational and in vitro studies were used to evaluate the biophysical basis of TRATE. In 9L, C6 and human brain tumors, TRATE, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), the CA transfer constant (Ktrans), the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) and histological data were compared. Results Simulations and in vitro results indicate that TRATE is highly sensitive to variations in cellular properties such as cell size and density. The histologic cell density and TRATE values were significantly higher in 9L tumors as compared to C6 tumors. In animal and human tumors, a voxel-wise comparison of TRATE with ADC, ve, and Ktrans maps showed low spatial correlation. Conclusion The assessment of TRATE is clinically feasible and its sensitivity to tissue cytoarchitectural features not present in other imaging methods indicate that it could potentially serve as a unique structural signature or “trait” of cancer. PMID:25227668

  17. Bayesian algorithm using spatial priors for multiexponential T₂ relaxometry from multiecho spin echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dushyant; Nguyen, Thanh D; Gauthier, Susan A; Raj, Ashish

    2012-11-01

    Multiexponential T₂ relaxometry is a powerful research tool for detecting brain structural changes due to demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, because of unusually high signal-to-noise ratio requirement compared with other MR modalities and ill-posedness of the underlying inverse problem, the T₂ distributions obtained with conventional approaches are frequently prone to noise effects. In this article, a novel multivoxel Bayesian algorithm using spatial prior information is proposed. This prior takes into account the expectation that volume fractions and T₂ relaxation times of tissue compartments change smoothly within coherent brain regions. Three-dimensional multiecho spin echo MRI data were collected from five healthy volunteers at 1.5 T and myelin water fraction maps were obtained using the conventional and proposed algorithms. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method provides myelin water fraction maps with improved depiction of brain structures and significantly lower coefficients of variance in white matter.

  18. Assessment of a combined spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) DSC-MRI method for preclinical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Ashley M; Skinner, Jack T; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to optimize and validate a combined spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) sequence for dynamic susceptibility-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to obtain hemodynamic parameters in a preclinical setting. The SAGE EPI sequence was applied in phantoms and in vivo rat brain (normal, tumor, and stroke tissue). Partial and full Fourier encoding schemes were implemented and characterized. Maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), vessel size index (VSI), volume transfer constant (K(trans)), and volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space (ve) were obtained. Partial Fourier encoding provided shortened echo times with acceptable signal-to-noise ratio and temporal stability, thus enabling reliable characterization of T2, T2(*) and T1 in both phantoms and rat brain. The hemodynamic parameters CBV, CBF, and MTT for gradient-echo and spin-echo contrast were determined in tumor and stroke; VSI, K(trans), and ve were also computed in tumor tissue. The SAGE EPI sequence allows the acquisition of multiple gradient- and spin-echoes, from which measures of perfusion, permeability, and vessel size can be obtained in a preclinical setting. Partial Fourier encoding can be used to minimize SAGE echo times and reliably quantify dynamic T2 and T2(*) changes. This acquisition provides a more comprehensive assessment of hemodynamic status in brain tissue with vascular and perfusion abnormalities.

  19. Reproducibility of phase rotation stimulated echo acquisition mode at 3T in schizophrenia: Emphasis on glutamine.

    PubMed

    Bustillo, Juan R; Rediske, Nathan; Jones, Thomas; Rowland, Laura M; Abbott, Christopher; Wijtenburg, S Andrea

    2016-02-01

    To determine the reproducibility and reliability of glutamine (Gln), measured with a very short echo time phase rotation stimulated echo acquisition mode (VTE-PR STEAM) sequence at 3T, in subjects with schizophrenia. Seven subjects with schizophrenia were scanned twice with VTE-PR STEAM in a Siemens 3T TIM Trio scanner with a 32-channel head coil. Spectroscopic data were collected from two voxels in gray matter, one in the dorsal anterior cingulate and the other in the medial occipital cortex. Reproducibility was assessed using coefficients of variation (CVs) and reliability with standard error of measurement and intraclass correlations (ICCs). Phantoms containing increasing concentrations of Gln in a physiologic solution of other neurometabolites with overlapping resonances were scanned to assess the validity of spectral Gln measurement. Very good reliability and reproducibility for Gln in both regions of interest were supported by CVs of ≤10.0% and ICCs of ≥0.6, respectively. Phantom studies documented a robust correspondence between known Gln concentrations and VTE-PR STEAM measurements of this metabolite (R(2)  = 0.988). The VTE-PR STEAM approach at 3T permits the longitudinal assessment of Gln and other (1) H MR spectroscopy neurometabolites in a clinically plausible setting. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Phase incremented echo train acquisition applied to magnetic resonance pore imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, S. A.; Galvosas, P.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient phase cycling schemes remain a challenge for NMR techniques if the pulse sequences involve a large number of rf-pulses. Especially complex is the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence where the number of rf-pulses can range from hundreds to several thousands. Our recent implementation of Magnetic Resonance Pore Imaging (MRPI) is based on a CPMG rf-pulse sequence in order to refocus the effect of internal gradients inherent in porous media. While the spin dynamics for spin- 1 / 2 systems in CPMG like experiments are well understood it is still not straight forward to separate the desired pathway from the spectrum of unwanted coherence pathways. In this contribution we apply Phase Incremented Echo Train Acquisition (PIETA) to MRPI. We show how PIETA offers a convenient way to implement a working phase cycling scheme and how it allows one to gain deeper insights into the amplitudes of undesired pathways.

  1. Spin echo MRI in the evaluation of hearts with a double outlet right ventricle: usefulness and limitations.

    PubMed

    Beekmana, R P; Roest, A A; Helbing, W A; Hazekamp, M G; Schoof, P H; Bartelings, M M; Sobotka, M A; de Roos, A; Ottenkamp, J

    2000-04-01

    The surgical approach to a double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is dependent on the spatial relationship of the semilunar valves, outflow tracts and ventricular septal defect (VSD). The purpose of the study was to assess the value of MRI for the evaluation of cardiovascular anatomy in patients before and after surgery for DORV. Spin echo MRI was performed in 12 patients with DORV (eight preoperative and four postoperative patients). Thin-section MRI was performed in three orthogonal planes and selected angulated views were obtained. Conventional imaging by color Doppler echocardiography and cine-angiocardiography and surgical findings, when present, served as the reference standards. The results found that the spatial relationship between semilunar valves and VSD was accurately assessed by MRI in eight out of eight preoperative patients. In the four postoperative cases MRI depicted the morphology of both outflow tracts and provided adequate information on their patency. Of the eight preoperative patients, five have undergone corrective surgery and the MRI findings were confirmed. MRI provided additional information to conventional imaging preoperatively in three cases in which the VSD opened into the outlet portion of the DORV, without there being a direct relation to a semilunar valve. In two preoperative cases in which the VSD was directly committed to the aorta, conventional imaging was conclusive. MRI was unable to depict aberrant chordae tendineae in four out of four cases. We conclude that MRI provides accurate additional anatomic information in patients with DORV, which is helpful in presurgical planning as well as during follow-up. Spin echo MRI does not visualize aberrant chordae tendineae.

  2. Improving effect size estimation and statistical power with multi-echo fMRI and its impact on understanding the neural systems supporting mentalizing.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Michael V; Auyeung, Bonnie; Holt, Rosemary J; Waldman, Jack; Ruigrok, Amber N V; Mooney, Natasha; Bullmore, Edward T; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Kundu, Prantik

    2016-11-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research is routinely criticized for being statistically underpowered due to characteristically small sample sizes and much larger sample sizes are being increasingly recommended. Additionally, various sources of artifact inherent in fMRI data can have detrimental impact on effect size estimates and statistical power. Here we show how specific removal of non-BOLD artifacts can improve effect size estimation and statistical power in task-fMRI contexts, with particular application to the social-cognitive domain of mentalizing/theory of mind. Non-BOLD variability identification and removal is achieved in a biophysical and statistically principled manner by combining multi-echo fMRI acquisition and independent components analysis (ME-ICA). Without smoothing, group-level effect size estimates on two different mentalizing tasks were enhanced by ME-ICA at a median rate of 24% in regions canonically associated with mentalizing, while much more substantial boosts (40-149%) were observed in non-canonical cerebellar areas. Effect size boosting occurs via reduction of non-BOLD noise at the subject-level and consequent reductions in between-subject variance at the group-level. Smoothing can attenuate ME-ICA-related effect size improvements in certain circumstances. Power simulations demonstrate that ME-ICA-related effect size enhancements enable much higher-powered studies at traditional sample sizes. Cerebellar effects observed after applying ME-ICA may be unobservable with conventional imaging at traditional sample sizes. Thus, ME-ICA allows for principled design-agnostic non-BOLD artifact removal that can substantially improve effect size estimates and statistical power in task-fMRI contexts. ME-ICA could mitigate some issues regarding statistical power in fMRI studies and enable novel discovery of aspects of brain organization that are currently under-appreciated and not well understood.

  3. Quantifying Temperature-Dependent T1 Changes in Cortical Bone Using Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Scott, Serena J; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Jones, Peter D; Larson, Peder E Z; Diederich, Chris J; Krug, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time (UTE) MRI to quantify T1 changes in cortical bone due to heating. Methods Variable flip-angle T1 mapping combined with 3D UTE imaging was used to measure T1 in cortical bone. A calibration experiment was performed to detect T1 changes with temperature in ex vivo cortical bone samples from a bovine femur. Ultrasound heating experiments were performed using an interstitial applicator in ex vivo bovine femur specimens, and heat-induced T1 changes were quantified. Results The calibration experiment demonstrated that T1 increases with temperature in cortical bone. We observed a linear relationship between temperature and T1 with a linear coefficient of 0.67–0.84 ms/°C over a range of 25–70°C. The ultrasound heating experiments showed increased T1 changes in the heated regions, and the relationship between the temperature changes and T1 changes was similar to that of the calibration. Conclusion We demonstrated a temperature dependence of T1 in ex vivo cortical bone using a variable flip-angle UTE T1 mapping method. PMID:26390357

  4. Gaussian phase distribution approximations for oscillating gradient spin echo diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianuş, Andrada; Siow, Bernard; Drobnjak, Ivana; Zhang, Hui; Alexander, Daniel C.

    2013-02-01

    Oscillating gradients provide an optimal probe of small pore sizes in diffusion MRI. While sinusoidal oscillations have been popular for some time, recent work suggests additional benefits of square or trapezoidal oscillating waveforms. This paper presents analytical expressions of the free and restricted diffusion signal for trapezoidal and square oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) sequences using the Gaussian phase distribution (GPD) approximation and generalises existing similar expressions for sinusoidal OGSE. Accurate analytical models are necessary for exploitation of these pulse sequences in imaging studies, as they allow model fitting and parameter estimation in reasonable computation times. We evaluate the accuracy of the approximation against synthesised data from the Monte Carlo (MC) diffusion simulator in Camino and Callaghan's matrix method and we show that the accuracy of the approximation is within a few percent of the signal, while providing several orders of magnitude faster computation. Moreover, since the expressions for trapezoidal wave are complex, we test sine and square wave approximations to the trapezoidal OGSE signal. The best approximations depend on the gradient amplitude and the oscillation frequency and are accurate to within a few percent. Finally, we explore broader applications of trapezoidal OGSE, in particular for non-model based applications, such as apparent diffusion coefficient estimation, where only sinusoidal waveforms have been considered previously. We show that with the right apodisation, trapezoidal waves also have benefits by virtue of the higher diffusion weighting they provide compared to sinusoidal gradients.

  5. Gaussian phase distribution approximations for oscillating gradient spin echo diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ianuş, Andrada; Siow, Bernard; Drobnjak, Ivana; Zhang, Hui; Alexander, Daniel C

    2013-02-01

    Oscillating gradients provide an optimal probe of small pore sizes in diffusion MRI. While sinusoidal oscillations have been popular for some time, recent work suggests additional benefits of square or trapezoidal oscillating waveforms. This paper presents analytical expressions of the free and restricted diffusion signal for trapezoidal and square oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) sequences using the Gaussian phase distribution (GPD) approximation and generalises existing similar expressions for sinusoidal OGSE. Accurate analytical models are necessary for exploitation of these pulse sequences in imaging studies, as they allow model fitting and parameter estimation in reasonable computation times. We evaluate the accuracy of the approximation against synthesised data from the Monte Carlo (MC) diffusion simulator in Camino and Callaghan's matrix method and we show that the accuracy of the approximation is within a few percent of the signal, while providing several orders of magnitude faster computation. Moreover, since the expressions for trapezoidal wave are complex, we test sine and square wave approximations to the trapezoidal OGSE signal. The best approximations depend on the gradient amplitude and the oscillation frequency and are accurate to within a few percent. Finally, we explore broader applications of trapezoidal OGSE, in particular for non-model based applications, such as apparent diffusion coefficient estimation, where only sinusoidal waveforms have been considered previously. We show that with the right apodisation, trapezoidal waves also have benefits by virtue of the higher diffusion weighting they provide compared to sinusoidal gradients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Errors in the measurements of T2 using multiple-echo MRI techniques. I. Effects of radiofrequency pulse imperfections.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, S; Orphanoudakis, S C; Gmitro, A; O'Donnell, M; Gore, J C

    1986-06-01

    In principle, multiple-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to estimate the spin-spin relaxation time, T2, which can then be used for quantitative tissue characterization. Although multiple echoes can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio in an image, by echo addition, rf pulse imperfections modify the echo amplitudes resulting in significant errors in the estimate of T2. Imperfect 180 degree pulses do not completely invert the transverse magnetization so that the magnitude of the transverse component is reduced and a longitudinal component is generated. Successive application of such imperfect pulses generates many components that interact in a complex manner. The amplitudes of successive echoes are affected whenever the transverse components refocus, whereas the longitudinal components may be rotated into the transverse plane by subsequent pulses and may often add to the image signal or give rise to an image artifact. These effects have been analyzed theoretically and have been demonstrated for a wide range of rf pulse imperfections using both simple and composite pulses, through computer simulations based on the numerical solution of the Bloch equations. The theoretical and simulation results have been substantiated through experiments performed on a mineral oil phantom using a resistive prototype MR scanner operating at 6.35 MHz. In this paper we report the effects of improper pulse amplitude or duration for nonselective rf pulses on resonance. We separately describe the other types of imperfections caused by off-resonance effects and the use of selective pulses.

  7. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M.; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (23Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (23Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a 23Na resonator was constructed for whole body 23Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B1-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body 23Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm3 and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the 23Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, 23Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  8. Simultaneous Quantitative MRI Mapping of T1, T2* and Magnetic Susceptibility with Multi-Echo MP2RAGE

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Tobias; Möller, Harald E.; Schäfer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of relaxation times is essential for understanding the biophysical mechanisms underlying contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative experiments, while offering major advantages in terms of reproducibility, may benefit from simultaneous acquisitions. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of simultaneously recording relaxation-time and susceptibility maps with a prototype Multi-Echo (ME) Magnetization-Prepared 2 RApid Gradient Echoes (MP2RAGE) sequence. T1 maps can be obtained using the MP2RAGE sequence, which is relatively insensitive to inhomogeneities of the radio-frequency transmit field, B1+. As an extension, multiple gradient echoes can be acquired in each of the MP2RAGE readout blocks, which permits the calculation of T2* and susceptibility maps. We used computer simulations to explore the effects of the parameters on the precision and accuracy of the mapping. In vivo parameter maps up to 0.6 mm nominal resolution were acquired at 7 T in 19 healthy volunteers. Voxel-by-voxel correlations and the test-retest reproducibility were used to assess the reliability of the results. When using optimized paramenters, T1 maps obtained with ME-MP2RAGE and standard MP2RAGE showed excellent agreement for the whole range of values found in brain tissues. Simultaneously obtained T2* and susceptibility maps were of comparable quality as Fast Low-Angle SHot (FLASH) results. The acquisition times were more favorable for the ME-MP2RAGE (≈ 19 min) sequence as opposed to the sum of MP2RAGE (≈ 12 min) and FLASH (≈ 10 min) acquisitions. Without relevant sacrifice in accuracy, precision or flexibility, the multi-echo version may yield advantages in terms of reduced acquisition time and intrinsic co-registration, provided that an appropriate optimization of the acquisition parameters is performed. PMID:28081157

  9. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI.

  10. Fast Imaging Technique for fMRI: Consecutive Multishot Echo Planar Imaging Accelerated with GRAPPA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Daehun; Sung, Yul-Wan; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the proposed consecutive multishot echo planar imaging (cmsEPI) combined with a parallel imaging technique in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and acceleration for a functional imaging study. We developed cmsEPI sequence using both consecutively acquired multishot EPI segments and variable flip angles to minimize the delay between segments and to maximize the SNR, respectively. We also combined cmsEPI with the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) method. Temporal SNRs were measured at different acceleration factors and number of segments for functional sensitivity evaluation. We also examined the geometric distortions, which inherently occurred in EPI sequence. The practical acceleration factors, R = 2 or R = 3, of the proposed technique improved the temporal SNR by maximally 18% in phantom test and by averagely 8.2% in in vivo experiment, compared to cmsEPI without parallel imaging. The data collection time was decreased in inverse proportion to the acceleration factor as well. The improved temporal SNR resulted in better statistical power when evaluated on the functional response of the brain. In this study, we demonstrated that the combination of cmsEPI with the parallel imaging technique could provide the improved functional sensitivity for functional imaging study, compensating for the lower SNR by cmsEPI. PMID:26413518

  11. Robust MR assessment of cerebral blood volume and mean vessel size using SPION-enhanced ultrashort echo acquisition.

    PubMed

    Han, S H; Cho, J H; Jung, H S; Suh, J Y; Kim, J K; Kim, Y R; Cho, G; Cho, H

    2015-05-15

    Intravascular superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)-enhanced MR transverse relaxation rates (∆R2(⁎) and ∆R2) are widely used to investigate in vivo vascular parameters, such as the cerebral blood volume (CBV), microvascular volume (MVV), and mean vessel size index (mVSI, ∆R2(⁎)/∆R2). Although highly efficient, regional comparison of vascular parameters acquired using gradient-echo based ∆R2(⁎) is hampered by its high sensitivity to magnetic field perturbations arising from air-tissue interfaces and large vessels. To minimize such demerits, we took advantage of the dual contrast property of SPION and both theoretically and experimentally verified the direct benefit of replacing gradient-echo based ∆R2(⁎) measurement with ultra-short echo time (UTE)-based ∆R1 contrast to generate the robust CBV and mVSI maps. The UTE acquisition minimized the local measurement errors from susceptibility perturbations and enabled dose-independent CBV measurement using the vessel/tissue ∆R1 ratio, while independent spin-echo acquisition enabled simultaneous ∆R2 measurement and mVSI calculation of the cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb, which are animal brain regions typified by significant susceptibility-associated measurement errors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thin film MRI-high resolution depth imaging with a local surface coil and spin echo SPI.

    PubMed

    Ouriadov, Alexei V; MacGregor, Rodney P; Balcom, Bruce J

    2004-07-01

    A multiple echo, single point imaging technique, employing a local surface coil probe, is presented for examination of thin film samples. Depth images with a nominal resolution of 5 microm were acquired with acquisition times on the order of 10 min. The method may be used to observe dynamic phenomenon such as polymerization, wetting, and drying in thin film samples. It is readily adapted to spatially resolved diffusion coefficient and T2 relaxation time mapping.

  13. Detection of different kidney stone types: an ex vivo comparison of ultrashort echo time MRI to reference standard CT.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Cernigliaro, Joseph G; Pooley, Robert A; Bridges, Mellena D; Giesbrandt, Jamie G; Williams, James C; Haley, William E

    2016-01-01

    With the development of ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences, it may now be possible to detect kidney stones by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, kidney stones of varying composition and sizes were imaged using both UTE MRI as well as the reference standard of computed tomography (CT), with different surrounding materials and scan setups. One hundred and fourteen kidney stones were inserted into agarose and urine phantoms and imaged both on a dual-energy CT (DECT) scanner using a standard renal stone imaging protocol and on an MRI scanner using the UTE sequence with both head and body surface coils. A subset of the stones representing all composition types and sizes was then inserted into the collecting system of porcine kidneys and imaged in vitro with both CT and MRI. All of the stones were visible on both CT and MRI imaging. DECT was capable of differentiating between uric acid and nonuric acid stones. In MRI imaging, the choice of coil and large field of view (FOV) did not affect stone detection or image quality. The MRI images showed good visualization of the stones' shapes, and the stones' dimensions measured from MRI were in good agreement with the actual values (R(2)=0.886, 0.895, and 0.81 in the agarose phantom, urine phantom, and pig kidneys, respectively). The measured T2 relaxation times ranged from 4.2 to 7.5ms, but did not show significant differences among different stone composition types. UTE MRI compared favorably with the reference standard CT for imaging stones of different composition types and sizes using body surface coil and large FOV, which suggests potential usefulness of UTE MRI in imaging kidney stones in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-shot T1 mapping using simultaneous acquisitions of spin- and stimulated-echo-planar imaging (2D ss-SESTEPI).

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianfeng; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2010-09-01

    The conventional stimulated-echo NMR sequence only measures the longitudinal component while discarding the transverse component, after tipping up the prepared magnetization. This transverse magnetization can be used to measure a spin echo, in addition to the stimulated echo. Two-dimensional single-shot spin- and stimulated-echo-planar imaging (ss-SESTEPI) is an echo-planar-imaging-based single-shot imaging technique that simultaneously acquires a spin-echo-planar image and a stimulated-echo-planar image after a single radiofrequency excitation. The magnitudes of the spin-echo-planar image and stimulated-echo-planar image differ by T(1) decay and diffusion weighting for perfect 90 degrees radiofrequency and thus can be used to rapidly measure T(1). However, the spatial variation of amplitude of radiofrequency field induces uneven splitting of the transverse magnetization for the spin-echo-planar image and stimulated-echo-planar image within the imaging field of view. Correction for amplitude of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity is therefore critical for two-dimensional ss-SESTEPI to be used for T(1) measurement. We developed a method for amplitude of radiofrequency field inhomogeneity correction by acquiring an additional stimulated-echo-planar image with minimal mixing time, calculating the difference between the spin echo and the stimulated echo and multiplying the stimulated-echo-planar image by the inverse functional map. Diffusion-induced decay is corrected by measuring the average diffusivity during the prescanning. Rapid single-shot T(1) mapping may be useful for various applications, such as dynamic T(1) mapping for real-time estimation of the concentration of contrast agent in dynamic contrast enhancement MRI.

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the prostate: an apparent diffusion coefficient comparison of half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo and echo planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Cowin, Gary J; Wang, Deming

    2012-02-01

    Prostate cancer detection using diffusion-weighted imaging is highly affected by the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in an image. Echo planar imaging (EPI) is a fast sequence commonly used for diffusion imaging but has inherent magnetic susceptibility and chemical shift artefacts associated. A diffusion sequence that is less affected by these artefacts is therefore advantageous. The half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence was chosen. The diffusion sequences were compared in image quality, repeatability of the ADC value and the effect on the ADC value with varied b values. Eight volunteers underwent three scans of each sequence, on a 1.5-T Siemens system, using b values of 0, 150, 300, 450, 600, 750, 900 and 1000 s/mm(2). ADC maps were created to address the reproducibility of the ADC value when using two b values compared to eight b values. The ADC value using all b values with the HASTE sequence gave the best performance in all tested categories. Both sequences gave significantly different ADC mean values for two b values compared to when using eight b values (P<.05) suggesting larger error is present when using two b values. HASTE was shown to be an improvement over EPI in terms of repeatability, signal variation within a region of interest and standard deviation over the volunteer set. The improved accuracy of the ADC value in the HASTE sequence makes it potentially a more sensitive tumor detection technique.

  16. T2-weighted MRI of the uterus: fast spin echo vs. breath-hold fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Ascher, S M; O'Malley, J; Semelka, R C; Patt, R H; Rajan, S; Thomasson, D

    1999-03-01

    This study compared one routine T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2FSE) sequence with a breath-hold T2FSE (BH T2FSE) sequence of the female pelvis for image quality, uterine anatomy, lesion detection, and signal intensity measurements. Thirty-two consecutive women (mean age 41.7 years) were imaged at 1.5 T with one high-resolution routine T2FSE sequence and one BH T2FSE sequence in the sagittal plane as part of comprehensive pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. The different image sets were rated separately for imaging characteristics (overall image quality, uterine anatomy definition, lesion detection, and free fluid conspicuity) and then compared side by side. The image sets were also compared for artifacts (ghosting, blurring, pulsatility, and chemical shift misregistration). Signal-to-noise (S/N) and signal difference-to-noise (SD/N) ratios were calculated for the different uterine zones, uterine abnormalities, free fluid, rectus abdominis muscle, and bladder. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for uterine abnormalities. Twenty-eight uterine abnormalities were detected in 20 patients and included leiomyomata (13 patients), adenomyosis (7 patients), benign endometrial polyps (6 patients), endometrial carcinoma (1 patient), and pregnancy (1 patient). BH T2FSE was superior or equivalent to T2FSE for overall image quality in 23/32 patients (71.8%), uterine anatomy definition in 19/32 patients (59.3%), and lesion detection in 13/20 patients (65%). BH T2FSE performed less well than T2FSE for free fluid conspicuity in 5/5 (100%) patients. BH T2FSE was equivalent to or less affected than T2FSE for ghosting artifact in 24/32 patients (75%) and blurring artifact in 29/32 patients (90.6%). Pulsatility and chemical shift artifacts were not problematic for either image set. S/N and SD/N were higher for all BH T2FSE determinations compared with T2FSE. For the endometrium, junctional zone, myometrium, and bladder, these differences were statistically significant. There

  17. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Subashi, Ergys; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO{sub 4} phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K{sup trans} with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1{sub 0}). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model

  18. Quantitative Ultrashort Echo Time (UTE) MRI of Human Cortical Bone: Correlation with Porosity and Biomechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won C.; Chen, Peter C.; Chung, Christine B.; Masuda, Koichi; D’Lima, Darryl; Du, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    In this study we describe the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate short and long T2* components as well as the water content of cortical bone. Fourteen human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia were sectioned to produce 44 rectangular slabs of cortical bone for quantitative UTE MR imaging, micro computed tomography (μCT), and biomechanical testing. A two-dimensional (2D) UTE pulse sequence with a minimal nominal TE of 8 μs was used together with bi-component analysis to quantify the bound and free water in cortical bone using a clinical 3T scanner. Total water concentration was measured using a 3D UTE sequence together with a reference water phantom. UTE MR measures of water content (total, free and bound), T2* (short and long), and short and long T2* fractions were compared to porosity assessed with μCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation. Porosity significantly correlated positively with total (R2=0.23; P<0.01) and free (R2=0.31; P<0.001) water content as well as long T2* fraction (R2=0.25; P<0.001), and negatively with short T2* fraction and short T2* (R2=0.24; P<0.01). Failure strain significantly correlated positively with short T2* (R2=0.29; P<0.001), ultimate stress significantly correlated negatively with total (R2=0.25; P<0.001) and bound (R2=0.22; P<0.01) water content, and failure energy significantly correlated positively with both short (R2=0.30; P<0.001) and long (R2=0.17; P<0.01) T2* values. These results suggest that UTE MR measures are sensitive to the structure and failure properties of human cortical bone, and may provide a novel way of evaluating cortical bone quality. PMID:22190232

  19. Diagnostic capacity of non-echo planar diffusion-weighted MRI in the detection of primary and recurrent cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Laura; Cenjor, Carlos; Montoya, Julia; Alonso, Ana; Granell, Jose; Gutiérrez-Fonseca, Raimundo

    2015-01-01

    the aim of this study was to determine the certainty of non-echo-planar imaging diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (non-EPI DW MRI) in the diagnosis of primary and recurrent cholesteatoma in patients with clinical suspicion of cholesteatoma, assessing the sensitivity and specificity of the test in both groups. Seventy-five patients with clinical suspicion of cholesteatoma were included in our study. Forty-eight cases had primary suspicion of cholesteatoma and 27 cases had recurrent suspicion of cholesteatoma. All patients received non-EPI DW MRI tests before surgery, and radiological and surgical findings were compared. Sensitivity, specificity and the positive and negative predictive value for primary diagnosis of cholesteatoma group were 91.2%, 50%, 81.6% and 70%, respectively. For the recurrent cholesteatoma group these results were 100%, 66.7%, 90.9% and 100%, respectively. Non-echo-planar imaging diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a high sensitivity imaging test for detecting cholesteatoma, for both primary diagnosis and for recurrent cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of wrist MRI at 3.0T: comparison between isotropic 3D turbo spin echo and isotropic 3D fast field echo and 2D turbo spin echo.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jin Young; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to various joints. However, comparison for image quality between isotropic 3D MRI and two-dimensional (2D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence of the wrist at a 3T MR system has not been investigated. To compare the image quality of isotropic 3D MRI including TSE intermediate-weighted (VISTA) sequence and fast field echo (FFE) sequence with 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequence of the wrist joint at 3.0 T. MRI was performed in 10 wrists of 10 healthy volunteers with isotropic 3D sequences (VISTA and FFE) and 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequences at 3.0 T. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained by imaging phantom and noise-only image. Contrast ratios (CRs) were calculated between fluid and cartilage, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and the scapholunate ligament. Two radiologists independently assessed the visibility of TFCC, carpal ligaments, cartilage, tendons and nerves with a four-point grading scale. Statistical analysis to compare CRs (one way ANOVA with a Tukey test) and grades of visibility (Kruskal-Wallis test) between three sequences and those for inter-observer agreement (kappa analysis) were performed. The SNR of 2D TSE (46.26) was higher than those of VISTA (23.34) and 3D FFE (19.41). CRs were superior in 2D TSE than VISTA (P = 0.02) for fluid-cartilage and in 2D TSE than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for fluid-TFCC. The visibility was best in 2D TSE (P < 0.01) for TFCC and in VISTA (P = 0.01) for scapholunate ligament. The visibility was better in 2D TSE and 3D FFE (P = 0.04) for cartilage and in VISTA than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for TFCC. The inter-observer agreement for the visibility of anatomic structures was moderate or substantial. Image quality of 2D TSE was superior to isotropic 3D MR imaging for cartilage, and TFCC. 3D FFE has better visibility for cartilage than VISTA and VISTA has superior visibility for TFCC to 3D FFE and the visibility for scapholunate ligament

  1. Rapid brain MRI acquisition techniques at ultra-high fields

    PubMed Central

    Setsompop, Kawin; Feinberg, David A.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI provides large increases in signal-to-noise ratio as well as enhancement of several contrast mechanisms in both structural and functional imaging. Combined, these gains result in a substantial boost in contrast-to-noise ratio that can be exploited for higher spatial resolution imaging to extract finer-scale information about the brain. With increased spatial resolution, however, is a concurrent increased image encoding burden that can cause unacceptably long scan times for structural imaging and slow temporal sampling of the hemodynamic response in functional MRI—particularly when whole-brain imaging is desired. To address this issue, new directions of imaging technology development—such as the move from conventional 2D slice-by-slice imaging to more efficient Simultaneous MultiSlice (SMS) or MultiBand imaging (which can be viewed as “pseudo-3D” encoding) as well as full 3D imaging—have provided dramatic improvements in acquisition speed. Such imaging paradigms provide higher SNR efficiency as well as improved encoding efficiency. Moreover, SMS and 3D imaging can make better use of coil sensitivity information in multi-channel receiver arrays used for parallel imaging acquisitions through controlled aliasing in multiple spatial directions. This has enabled unprecedented acceleration factors of an order of magnitude or higher in these imaging acquisition schemes, with low image artifact levels and high SNR. Here we review the latest developments of SMS and 3D imaging methods and related technologies at ultra-high field for rapid high-resolution functional and structural imaging of the brain. PMID:26835884

  2. A voxel-based investigation for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain using ultra short echo times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Kjer, Hans M.; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.; Andersen, Jon AL; Andreasen, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, so-called MRI-only RT, would remove the systematic registration error between MR and computed tomography (CT), and provide co-registered MRI for assessment of treatment response and adaptive RT. Electron densities, however, need to be assigned to the MRI images for dose calculation and patient setup based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Here, we investigate the geometric and dosimetric performance for a number of popular voxel-based methods to generate a so-called pseudo CT (pCT). Five patients receiving cranial irradiation, each containing a co-registered MRI and CT scan, were included. An ultra short echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization was used. Six methods were investigated for three popular types of voxel-based approaches; (1) threshold-based segmentation, (2) Bayesian segmentation and (3) statistical regression. Each approach contained two methods. Approach 1 used bulk density assignment of MRI voxels into air, soft tissue and bone based on logical masks and the transverse relaxation time T2 of the bone. Approach 2 used similar bulk density assignments with Bayesian statistics including or excluding additional spatial information. Approach 3 used a statistical regression correlating MRI voxels with their corresponding CT voxels. A similar photon and proton treatment plan was generated for a target positioned between the nasal cavity and the brainstem for all patients. The CT agreement with the pCT of each method was quantified and compared with the other methods geometrically and dosimetrically using both a number of reported metrics and introducing some novel metrics. The best geometrical agreement with CT was obtained with the statistical regression methods which performed significantly better than the threshold and Bayesian segmentation methods (excluding spatial information). All methods agreed significantly better with CT than a reference water MRI

  3. Three-dimensional accurate detection of lung emphysema in rats using ultra-short and zero echo time MRI.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Rasche, Volker; Stiller, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    Emphysema is a life-threatening pathology that causes irreversible destruction of alveolar walls. In vivo imaging techniques play a fundamental role in the early non-invasive pre-clinical and clinical detection and longitudinal follow-up of this pathology. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using high resolution radial three-dimensional (3D) zero echo time (ZTE) and 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) MRI to accurately detect lung pathomorphological changes in a rodent model of emphysema.Porcine pancreas elastase (PPE) was intratracheally administered to the rats to produce the emphysematous changes. 3D ZTE MRI, low and high definition 3D UTE MRI and micro-computed tomography images were acquired 4 weeks after the PPE challenge. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured in PPE-treated and control rats. T2* values were computed from low definition 3D UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements were made after euthanizing the animals. Both ZTE and UTE MR images showed a significant decrease in the SNR measured in PPE-treated lungs compared with controls, due to the pathomorphological changes taking place in the challenged lungs. A significant decrease in T2* values in PPE-challenged animals compared with controls was measured using UTE MRI. Histomorphometric measurements showed a significant increase in the mean linear intercept in PPE-treated lungs. UTE yielded significantly higher SNR compared with ZTE (14% and 30% higher in PPE-treated and non-PPE-treated lungs, respectively).This study showed that optimized 3D radial UTE and ZTE MRI can provide lung images of excellent quality, with high isotropic spatial resolution (400 µm) and SNR in parenchymal tissue (>25) and negligible motion artifacts in freely breathing animals. These techniques were shown to be useful non-invasive instruments to accurately and reliably detect the pathomorphological alterations taking place in emphysematous lungs, without incurring the risks of cumulative radiation

  4. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer.

    PubMed

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-07-21

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (²³Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (²³Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a ²³Na resonator was constructed for whole body ²³Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B₁-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body ²³Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm³ and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the ²³Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, ²³Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  5. MRI of the abnormal cervical spinal cord using 2D spoiled gradient echo multiecho sequence (MEDIC) with magnetization transfer saturation pulse. A T2* weighted feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Held, P; Dorenbeck, U; Seitz, J; Fründ, R; Albrich, H

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of heavily T2* weighted 2D spoiled gradient echo multiecho sequence MEDIC (multi echo data image combination) with magnetization transfer saturation pulse (MTS) for detecting abnormality of the cervical spinal cord. 11 patients, 5 women and 6 men aged from 14 to 79 years (mean age 51.18 years), with traumatic, hemolytic-hemorrhagic or neoplastic diseases of the cervical spinal cord were examined with MRI. In cases with suspected myelopathy, the feasibility of the 2D spoiled gradient echo multiecho sequence MEDIC with MTS was evaluated in comparison with the results of spin echo T1W, spin echo T2W, multi echo (TSE in our case) and spin-echo multi-echo technique with magnetization preparation (turbo inversion recovery--TIR--in our case) sequences. Distortion of the "H" sign was found in all but one case. Hemorrhage was best shown by MEDIC, massive edema was very well visible using MEDIC, TIR and TSE T2W, whereas mild edema was visible with MEDIC only. Our preliminary experience in 11 patients shows that MEDIC can be used for the diagnosis of cervical spinal cord pathology.

  6. Ultrashort echo-time MRI versus CT for skull aberration correction in MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound: In vitro comparison on human calvaria.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Wilson; Eames, Matthew; Snell, John; Aubry, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) brain treatment systems compensate for skull-induced beam aberrations by adjusting the phase and amplitude of individual ultrasound transducer elements. These corrections are currently calculated based on a preacquired computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient's head. The purpose of the work presented here is to demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrashort echo-time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE MRI) instead of CT to calculate and apply aberration corrections on a clinical TcMRgFUS system. Phantom experiments were performed in three ex-vivo human skulls filled with tissue-mimicking hydrogel. Each skull phantom was imaged with both CT and UTE MRI. The MR images were then segmented into "skull" and "not-skull" pixels using a computationally efficient, threshold-based algorithm, and the resulting 3D binary skull map was converted into a series of 2D virtual CT images. Each skull was mounted in the head transducer of a clinical TcMRgFUS system (ExAblate Neuro, Insightec, Israel), and transcranial sonications were performed using a power setting of approximately 750 acoustic watts at several different target locations within the electronic steering range of the transducer. Each target location was sonicated three times: once using aberration corrections calculated from the actual CT scan, once using corrections calculated from the MRI-derived virtual CT scan, and once without applying any aberration correction. MR thermometry was performed in conjunction with each 10-s sonication, and the highest single-pixel temperature rise and surrounding-pixel mean were recorded for each sonication. The measured temperature rises were ∼ 45% larger for aberration-corrected sonications than for noncorrected sonications. This improvement was highly significant (p < 10(-4)). The difference between the single-pixel peak temperature rise and the surrounding-pixel mean, which reflects the sharpness of the

  7. Comparative accuracy of CT, dual-echo MRI and MR spectroscopy for preoperative liver fat quantification in living related liver donors

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Gupta, Subhash; Garg, Bhavya; Vohra, Sandeep; Wadhawan, Manav; Rastogi, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is of significant importance to assess the extent of hepatic steatosis in living donor liver transplant (LDLT) surgery to ensure optimum graft regeneration as well as donor safety. Aim: To establish the accuracy of non-invasive imaging methods including computed tomography (CT), dual-echo in- and opposed-phase magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) for quantification of liver fat content (FC) in prospective LDLT donors with histopathology as reference standard. Settings and Design: This retrospective study was conducted at our institution on LDLT donors being assessed for biliary and vascular anatomy depiction by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and CT scan, respectively, between July 2013 and October 2014. Materials and Methods: Liver FC was measured in 73 donors by dual-echoT1 MRI and MRS. Of these, CT liver attenuation index (LAI) values were available in 62 patients. Statistical Analysis: CT and MRI FC were correlated with histopathological reference standard using Spearman correlation coefficient. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predicative value, and positive and negative likelihood ratios with 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Results: CT LAI, dual-echo MRI, and MRS correlated well with the histopathology results (r = 0.713, 0.871, and 0.882, respectively). An accuracy of 95% and 96% was obtained for dual-echo MRI and MRS in FC estimation with their sensitivity being 97% and 94%, respectively. False-positive rate, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predicative value (NPV) were 0.08, 0.92, and 0.97, respectively, for dual-echo MRI and 0.03, 0.97, and 0.95, respectively, for MRS. CT LAI method of fat estimation has a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 73%, 77.7%, 70.4%, and 80%, respectively. Conclusion: Dual-echo MRI, MRS, and CT LAI are accurate measures to quantify the degree of hepatic steatosis in LDLT donors, thus reducing the need for invasive

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Zero-Echo-Time Attenuation Correction for Brain 18F-FDG PET/MRI: Comparison with Atlas Attenuation Correction.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Tetsuro; Ter Voert, Edwin E G W; Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Huellner, Martin; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2016-12-01

    Accurate attenuation correction (AC) on PET/MR is still challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of AC based on fast zero-echo-time (ZTE) MRI by comparing it with the default atlas-based AC on a clinical PET/MR scanner.

  9. Multi-echo fMRI replication sample of autobiographical memory, prospection and theory of mind reasoning tasks.

    PubMed

    DuPre, Elizabeth; Luh, Wen-Ming; Spreng, R Nathan

    2016-12-20

    The default network is involved in self-generated thought, a class of cognition that includes autobiographical memory, prospection, and reasoning about the mental states of others. We collected a replication sample of Spreng and Grady (J Cogn. Neurosci. 22, 1112-1123, 2010), confirming that the default network differentially supports each of these forms of self-generated thought. Here we describe this dataset of multi-echo fMRI data in 31 young adults during autobiographical remembering, imagining, and mentalizing; we also provide an additional resting-state scan for each subject. In this new sample, the findings from the original report are successfully replicated using the same analysis. Physiological measures were additionally collected and allow for interrogation of the impact of multi-echo independent components preprocessing both in task and rest. Future work on this dataset may provide insight into evoked brain response for cued self-generated thought, International Affective Picture System viewing, resting state dynamics, preprocessing procedures, and more. The dataset is accompanied by experimental code for independent behavioral data collection.

  10. Determination of blood circulation times of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by T2* relaxometry using ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI.

    PubMed

    Scharlach, Constantin; Warmuth, Carsten; Schellenberger, Eyk

    2015-11-01

    Blood circulation is an important determinant of the biodistribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Here we present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique based on the use of ultrafast echo times (UTE) for the noninvasive determination of blood half-lives at high particle concentrations, when conventional pulse sequences fail to produce a useful MR signal. Four differently coated iron oxide nanoparticles were administered intravenously at a dose of 500 μmol Fe/kg bodyweight and UTE images of C57BL/6 mice were acquired on a 1-T ICON scanner (Bruker). T2* relaxometry was done by acquiring UTE images with echo times of 0.1, 0.8 and 1.6 ms. Blood circulation time was then determined by fitting an exponential curve to the time course of the measured relaxation rates. Circulation time was shortest for particles coated with malic acid (t1/2=23 min) and longest for particles coated with tartaric acid (t1/2=63 min). UTE-based T2* relaxometry allows noninvasive determination of blood circulation time and is especially useful when high particle concentrations are present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-echo fMRI replication sample of autobiographical memory, prospection and theory of mind reasoning tasks

    PubMed Central

    DuPre, Elizabeth; Luh, Wen-Ming; Spreng, R. Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The default network is involved in self-generated thought, a class of cognition that includes autobiographical memory, prospection, and reasoning about the mental states of others. We collected a replication sample of Spreng and Grady (J Cogn. Neurosci. 22, 1112–1123, 2010), confirming that the default network differentially supports each of these forms of self-generated thought. Here we describe this dataset of multi-echo fMRI data in 31 young adults during autobiographical remembering, imagining, and mentalizing; we also provide an additional resting-state scan for each subject. In this new sample, the findings from the original report are successfully replicated using the same analysis. Physiological measures were additionally collected and allow for interrogation of the impact of multi-echo independent components preprocessing both in task and rest. Future work on this dataset may provide insight into evoked brain response for cued self-generated thought, International Affective Picture System viewing, resting state dynamics, preprocessing procedures, and more. The dataset is accompanied by experimental code for independent behavioral data collection. PMID:27996964

  12. Mixed model phase evolution for correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity effects in 3D quantitative gradient echo-based MRI.

    PubMed

    Fatnassi, Chemseddine; Boucenna, Rachid; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-07-01

    In 3D gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), strong field gradients B0macro are visually observed at air/tissue interfaces. At low spatial resolution in particular, the respective field gradients lead to an apparent increase in intravoxel dephasing, and subsequently, to signal loss or inaccurate R2* estimates. If the strong field gradients are measured, their influence can be removed by postprocessing. Conventional corrections usually assume a linear phase evolution with time. For high macroscopic gradient inhomogeneities near the edge of the brain and at the paranasal sinuses, however, this assumption is often broken. Herein, we explored a novel model that considers both linear and stochastic dependences of the phase evolution with echo time in the presence of weak and strong macroscopic field inhomogeneities. We tested the performance of the model at large field gradients using simulation, phantom, and human in vivo studies. The performance of the proposed approach was markedly better than the standard correction method, providing a correction equivalent to that of the conventional approach in regions with high signal to noise ratio (SNR > 10), but appearing more robust in regions with low SNR (SNR < 4). The proposed technique shows promise to improve R2* measurements in regions of large susceptibilities. The clinical and research applications still require further investigation. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  14. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI.

  15. Differentiating BOLD and non-BOLD signals in fMRI time series using multi-echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Prantik; Inati, Souheil J; Evans, Jennifer W; Luh, Wen-Ming; Bandettini, Peter A

    2012-04-15

    A central challenge in the fMRI based study of functional connectivity is distinguishing neuronally related signal fluctuations from the effects of motion, physiology, and other nuisance sources. Conventional techniques for removing nuisance effects include modeling of noise time courses based on external measurements followed by temporal filtering. These techniques have limited effectiveness. Previous studies have shown using multi-echo fMRI that neuronally related fluctuations are Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signals that can be characterized in terms of changes in R(2)* and initial signal intensity (S(0)) based on the analysis of echo-time (TE) dependence. We hypothesized that if TE-dependence could be used to differentiate BOLD and non-BOLD signals, non-BOLD signal could be removed to denoise data without conventional noise modeling. To test this hypothesis, whole brain multi-echo data were acquired at 3 TEs and decomposed with Independent Components Analysis (ICA) after spatially concatenating data across space and TE. Components were analyzed for the degree to which their signal changes fit models for R(2)* and S(0) change, and summary scores were developed to characterize each component as BOLD-like or not BOLD-like. These scores clearly differentiated BOLD-like "functional network" components from non BOLD-like components related to motion, pulsatility, and other nuisance effects. Using non BOLD-like component time courses as noise regressors dramatically improved seed-based correlation mapping by reducing the effects of high and low frequency non-BOLD fluctuations. A comparison with seed-based correlation mapping using conventional noise regressors demonstrated the superiority of the proposed technique for both individual and group level seed-based connectivity analysis, especially in mapping subcortical-cortical connectivity. The differentiation of BOLD and non-BOLD components based on TE-dependence was highly robust, which allowed for the

  16. T2 selective π Echo-Planar Imaging for porous media MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2017-04-01

    The π Echo Planar Imaging (PEPI) method has recently been modified to permit proton density imaging of fluids in porous media with moderate T2 and short T2∗ signal components. In many applications, it is desirable to discriminate multiple T2 components within each image voxel. T2 selective imaging is explored in this paper through adiabatic inversion as a magnetization preparation with PEPI readout. When prior information of the sample relaxation times is known, responses of different species to broadband adiabatic inversion pulses can be predicted by Bloch equation simulation. Different relaxation components can be acquired by combining the images with and without inversion preparation pulses. T2 weighting can be easily introduced in the PEPI sequence by shifting the spatial encoding gradients based on its spin echo nature. T2 decay curves can be extracted for each image voxel from a series of T2 weighted images and spatially resolved T2 distributions can be generated. This method is reliable but slow. The two methods were implemented to image porous media samples with PEPI the common basis of spatial resolution. The results of both methods agree remarkably well.

  17. T2 selective π Echo-Planar Imaging for porous media MRI.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2017-02-08

    The π Echo Planar Imaging (PEPI) method has recently been modified to permit proton density imaging of fluids in porous media with moderate T2 and short T2(∗) signal components. In many applications, it is desirable to discriminate multiple T2 components within each image voxel. T2 selective imaging is explored in this paper through adiabatic inversion as a magnetization preparation with PEPI readout. When prior information of the sample relaxation times is known, responses of different species to broadband adiabatic inversion pulses can be predicted by Bloch equation simulation. Different relaxation components can be acquired by combining the images with and without inversion preparation pulses. T2 weighting can be easily introduced in the PEPI sequence by shifting the spatial encoding gradients based on its spin echo nature. T2 decay curves can be extracted for each image voxel from a series of T2 weighted images and spatially resolved T2 distributions can be generated. This method is reliable but slow. The two methods were implemented to image porous media samples with PEPI the common basis of spatial resolution. The results of both methods agree remarkably well.

  18. Quantification of Left Ventricular Volumes, Mass and Ejection Fraction using Cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Christopher M.; Kramer, Sage P.; Skrinjar, Oskar; Binkley, Cassi M.; Powell, David K.; Mattingly, Andrea C.; Epstein, Frederick H.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that magnitude images from cine Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI can accurately quantify left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction. Materials and Methods Thirteen mice (C57BL/6J) were imaged using a 7T ClinScan MRI. A short-axis stack of cine T2-weighted black blood (BB) images was acquired for calculation of left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF) using the gold standard sum-of-slices methodology. DENSE images were acquired during the same imaging session in three short-axis (basal, mid, apical) and two long-axis orientations. A custom surface fitting algorithm was applied to epicardial and endocardial borders from the DENSE magnitude images to calculate volumes, mass, and EF. Agreement between the DENSE-derived measures and BB-derived measures was assessed via coefficient of variation (CoV). Results 3D surface reconstruction was completed on the order of seconds from segmented images, and required fewer slices to be segmented. Volumes, mass, and EF from DENSE-derived surfaces matched well with BB data (CoVs ≤11%). Conclusion LV mass, volumes, and ejection fraction in mice can be quantified through sparse (5 slices) sampling with DENSE. This consolidation significantly reduces the time required to assess both mass/volume-based measures of cardiac function and advanced cardiac mechanics. PMID:24923710

  19. Quantification of left ventricular volumes, mass, and ejection fraction using cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Christopher M; Kramer, Sage P; Skrinjar, Oskar; Binkley, Cassi M; Powell, David K; Mattingly, Andrea C; Epstein, Frederick H; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that magnitude images from cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can accurately quantify left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and ejection fraction (EF). Thirteen mice (C57BL/6J) were imaged using a 7T ClinScan MRI. A short-axis stack of cine T2-weighted black blood (BB) images was acquired for calculation of LV volumes, mass, and EF using the gold standard sum-of-slices methodology. DENSE images were acquired during the same imaging session in three short-axis (basal, mid, apical) and two long-axis orientations. A custom surface fitting algorithm was applied to epicardial and endocardial borders from the DENSE magnitude images to calculate volumes, mass, and EF. Agreement between the DENSE-derived measures and BB-derived measures was assessed via coefficient of variation (CoV). 3D surface reconstruction was completed on the order of seconds from segmented images, and required fewer slices to be segmented. Volumes, mass, and EF from DENSE-derived surfaces matched well with BB data (CoVs ≤11%). LV mass, volumes, and EF in mice can be quantified through sparse (five slices) sampling with DENSE. This consolidation significantly reduces the time required to assess both mass/volume-based measures of cardiac function and advanced cardiac mechanics. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Rapid 3D imaging of the lower airway by MRI in patients with congenital heart disease: A retrospective comparison of delayed volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) to turbo spin echo (TSE).

    PubMed

    Goot, Benjamin H; Patel, Sonali; Fonseca, Brian

    2017-01-01

    When imaging the lower airway by MRI, the traditional technique turbo spin echo (TSE) results in high quality 2D images, however planning and acquisition times are lengthy. An alternative, delayed volume interpolated breath-holds examination (VIBE), is a 3D gradient echo technique that produces high spatial resolution imaging of the airway in one breath-hold. The objective of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of lower airway measurements obtained by delayed VIBE when compared to TSE. Patients with congenital heart disease who underwent a cardiac MRI (CMR) that included a delayed VIBE sequence from 5/2008 to 9/2013 were included. Standard TSE imaging was performed and delayed VIBE was acquired 5 min after gadolinium contrast administration. Airway measurements were made on both sequences by two observers in a blinded fashion to the other observer and other technique. Intraclass correlations (ICC) were calculated to assess for agreement between both techniques and the observers. 29 studies met inclusion criteria with a mean patient age of 8.8 years (2 months to 63 years) and mean patient weight of 30.2 kg (3.5-110). All delayed VIBE and TSE sequences were found to be of diagnostic quality. Mean acquisition time was shorter for the delayed VIBE (13.1 seconds) than TSE (949.9 seconds). Overall there was very good agreement between the delayed VIBE and TSE measurements for both observers (ICC 0.78-0.94) with the exception of the distal right bronchus (ICC 0.67) The interobserver agreement was also excellent for both TSE (ICC 0.78-0.96) and VIBE (ICC 0.85-0.96). Delayed VIBE is rapid and at least as accurate as the alternative TSE imaging for assessment of the lower airway by MRI across a wide spectrum of patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Compensation of slice profile mismatch in combined spin- and gradient-echo echo-planar imaging pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Schmiedeskamp, Heiko; Straka, Matus; Bammer, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Combined acquisition of gradient-echo and spin-echo signals in MRI time series reveals additional information for perfusion-weighted imaging and functional MRI because of differences in the sensitivity of gradient-echo and spin-echo measurements to the properties of the underlying vascular architecture. The acquisition of multiple echo trains within one time frame facilitates the simultaneous estimation of the transversal relaxation parameters R2 and R2*. However, the simultaneous estimation of these parameters tends to be incorrect in the presence of slice profile mismatches between signal excitation and subsequent refocusing pulses. It is shown here that improvements in pulse design reduced R2 and R2* estimation errors. Further improvements were achieved by augmented parameter estimation through the introduction of an additional parameter δ to correct for discordances in slice profiles to facilitate more quantitative measurements. Moreover, the analysis of time-resolved acquisitions revealed that the temporal stability of R2 estimates could be increased with improved pulse design, counteracting low contrast-to-noise ratios in spin-echo-based perfusion and functional MRI. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Evaluation of the RF field uniformity of a double-tuned 31P/1H birdcage RF coil for spin-echo MRI/MRS of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Robert L; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate the B1 field uniformity of a double-tuned birdcage coil designed for (31)P/(1)H MRI/MRS spin-echo (SE) imaging of the metatarsal head region of the foot in neuropathic diabetic patients. A low-pass double-tuned (31)P/(1)H RF birdcage coil was constructed to fit over the adult forefoot. Flip angle (FA) maps were created from B1 data acquired at the 3T (31)P (four normal subjects) and (1)H (five normal subjects) frequencies. T2-weighted (T2-W) (1)H images, (31)P rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) images, and composite SE pulse CSI data were acquired to demonstrate the uniformity of the resulting images and data. The means and standard deviations (SDs) of the range of FAs across the feet of the volunteer subjects indicated good uniformity (the maximum coefficients of variation (CVs) for all of the (31)P and (1)H FA maps were 7.6% and 7.3%, respectively). The FA values across the metatarsal head region indicated a maximum signal intensity variation of +/-3% in a RARE image acquired using an echo train length of 32. A (31)P/(1)H birdcage coil constructed for MRI/MRS studies of the human forefoot provided sufficient signal uniformity of SE data to facilitate accurate (31)P concentration measurements in muscle. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Improved Image Reconstruction for Partial Fourier Gradient-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-kuei; Oshio, Koichi; Panych, Lawrence P.

    2009-01-01

    The partial Fourier gradient-echo echo planar imaging (EPI) technique makes it possible to acquire high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI) data at an optimal echo time. This technique is especially important for fMRI studies at high magnetic fields, where the optimal echo time is short and may not be achieved with a full Fourier acquisition scheme. In addition, it has been shown that partial Fourier EPI provides better anatomic resolvability than full Fourier EPI. However, the partial Fourier gradient-echo EPI may be degraded by artifacts that are not usually seen in other types of imaging. Those unique artifacts in partial Fourier gradient-echo EPI, to our knowledge, have not yet been systematically evaluated. Here we use the k-space energy spectrum analysis method to understand and characterize two types of partial Fourier EPI artifacts. Our studies show that Type 1 artifact, originating from k-space energy loss, cannot be corrected with pure postprocessing, and Type 2 artifact can be eliminated with an improved reconstruction method. We propose a novel algorithm, that combines images obtained from two or more reconstruction schemes guided by k-space energy spectrum analysis, to generate partial Fourier EPI with greatly reduced Type 2 artifact. Quality control procedures for avoiding Type 1 artifact in partial Fourier EPI are also discussed. PMID:18383294

  4. Fast radio-frequency enforced steady state (FRESS) spin echo MRI for quantitative T2 mapping: minimizing the apparent repetition time (TR) dependence for fast T2 measurement

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jerry S.; Wang, Enfeng; Zhang, XiaoAn; Mandeville, Emiri; Lo, Eng H.; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Transverse relaxation time (T2) is a basic but very informative MRI parameter, widely used in imaging to examine a host of diseases, including multiple sclerosis, stroke, and tumor. However, short repetition time (TR) is often used to minimize scan time, which may introduce non-negligible errors in T2 measurement. Specifically, due to the use of refocusing pulse, the steady state magnetization depends not only on TR but also on the TE. Hence, if the TE dependence is not properly accounted for, it may be mistaken as T2-induced signal attenuation, leading to non-negligible T2 underestimation. Our study proposed a fast radio-frequency enforced steady state (FRESS) spin echo (SE) MRI sequence, which saturates the magnetization after the echo and ensures a TE-independent steady state. The proposed FRESS-SE MRI was evaluated with numerical simulation, implemented with echo planar imaging readout, and validated by both phantom and in vivo experiments. In summary, FRESS-SE T2 MRI technique was developed for fast and accurate T2 imaging, suitable for in vivo applications. PMID:21755552

  5. Optimal configuration of respiratory navigator gating for the quantification of left ventricular strain using spiral cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Sean M; Haggerty, Christopher M; Suever, Jonathan D; Wehner, Gregory J; Andres, Kristin N; Powell, David K; Zhong, Xiaodong; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2017-03-01

    To determine the optimal respiratory navigator gating configuration for the quantification of left ventricular strain using spiral cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. Two-dimensional spiral cine DENSE was performed on a 3 Tesla MRI using two single-navigator configurations (retrospective, prospective) and a combined "dual-navigator" configuration in 10 healthy adults and 20 healthy children. The adults also underwent breathhold DENSE as a reference standard for comparisons. Peak left ventricular strains, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and navigator efficiency were compared. Subjects also underwent dual-navigator gating with and without visual feedback to determine the effect on navigator efficiency. There were no differences in circumferential, radial, and longitudinal strains between navigator-gated and breathhold DENSE (P = 0.09-0.95) (as confidence intervals, retrospective: [-1.0%-1.1%], [-7.4%-2.0%], [-1.0%-1.2%]; prospective: [-0.6%-2.7%], [-2.8%-8.3%], [-0.3%-2.9%]; dual: [-1.6%-0.5%], [-8.3%-3.2%], [-0.8%-1.9%], respectively). The dual configuration maintained SNR compared with breathhold acquisitions (16 versus 18, P = 0.06). SNR for the prospective configuration was lower than for the dual navigator in adults (P = 0.004) and children (P < 0.001). Navigator efficiency was higher (P < 0.001) for both retrospective (54%) and prospective (56%) configurations compared with the dual configuration (35%). Visual feedback improved the dual configuration navigator efficiency to 55% (P < 0.001). When quantifying left ventricular strains using spiral cine DENSE MRI, a dual navigator configuration results in the highest SNR in adults and children. In adults, a retrospective configuration has good navigator efficiency without a substantial drop in SNR. Prospective gating should be avoided because it has the lowest SNR. Visual feedback represents an effective option to maintain navigator efficiency while using a dual

  6. T1-weighted dual-echo MRI for fat quantification in pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Martino, Michele Di; Catalano, Carlo; Panebianco, Valeria; Bezzi, Mario; Anania, Caterina; Chiesa, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine in obese children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in assessing liver fat concentration. METHODS: A case-control study was performed. Cases were 25 obese children with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Controls were 25 obese children matched for age and gender, without NAFLD at ultrasonography and with normal levels of aminotransferases and insulin. Hepatic fat fraction (HFF) by MRI was obtained using a modification of the Dixon method. RESULTS: HFF ranged from 2% to 44% [mean, 19.0% (95% CI, 15.1-27.4)] in children with NAFLD, while in the controls this value ranged from 0.08% to 4.69% [2.0% (1.3-2.5), P < 0.0001]. HFF was highly correlated with histological steatosis (r = 0.883, P < 0.0001) in the NAFLD children. According to the histological grade of steatosis, the mean HFF was 8.7% (95% CI, 6.0-11.6) for mild, 21.6% (15.3-27.0) for moderate, and 39.7% (34.4-45.0) for severe fatty liver infiltration. With a cutoff of 4.85%, HFF had a sensitivity of 95.8% for the diagnosis of histological steatosis ≥ 5%. All control children had HFF lower than 4.85%; thus, the specificity was 100%. After 12 mo, children with weight loss displayed a significant decrease in HFF. CONCLUSION: MRI is an accurate methodology for liver fat quantification in pediatric NAFLD. PMID:21799647

  7. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and R2* values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher R2* and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in R2* and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2–8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies. PMID:26661253

  8. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Klohs, Jan; Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and [Formula: see text] values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher [Formula: see text] and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in [Formula: see text] and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2-8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies.

  9. k-TE generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) for accelerated multiple gradient-recalled echo (MGRE) R2* mapping in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoming; Larson, Andrew C

    2009-03-01

    Multiple gradient-recalled echo (MGRE) methods are commonly used for abdominal R(2)* mapping. Accelerated MGRE acquisitions would offer the potential to shorten requisite breathhold times and/or increase spatial resolution and coverage. In both phantom and normal volunteer studies, view-sharing (VS) methods, generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA) methods, and newly proposed k-echo time (k-TE) GRAPPA methods were compared for the purpose of accelerating MGRE acquisitions. Utilization of water-selective spatial spectral excitation pulses reduced artifact levels for both VS and k-TE GRAPPA approaches. VS approaches were found to be highly sensitive to off-resonance effects, particularly at increasing acceleration rates. k-TE GRAPPA significantly reduced residual artifact levels compared to GRAPPA approaches while improving the accuracy of accelerated abdominal R(2)* measurements. These initial feasibility studies demonstrate that k-TE GRAPPA is an effective method to reduce scan times during abdominal R(2)*-mapping procedures.

  10. Fast T2 Mapping With Improved Accuracy Using Undersampled Spin-Echo MRI and Model-Based Reconstructions With a Generating Function

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Andreas; Uecker, Martin; Knoll, Florian; Frahm, Jens

    2015-01-01

    A model-based reconstruction technique for accelerated T2 mapping with improved accuracy is proposed using under-sampled Cartesian spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The technique employs an advanced signal model for T2 relaxation that accounts for contributions from indirect echoes in a train of multiple spin echoes. An iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse reconstruction problem directly estimates spin-density and T2 maps from undersampled raw data. The algorithm is validated for simulated data as well as phantom and human brain MRI at 3T. The performance of the advanced model is compared to conventional pixel-based fitting of echo-time images from fully sampled data. The proposed method yields more accurate T2 values than the mono-exponential model and allows for retrospective under-sampling factors of at least 6. Although limitations are observed for very long T2 relaxation times, respective reconstruction problems may be overcome by a gradient dampening approach. The analytical gradient of the utilized cost function is included as Appendix. The source code is made available to the community. PMID:24988592

  11. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the cervical spinal cord using a single-shot fast spin-echo technique: findings in normal subjects and in myelomalacia.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, K; Katase, S; Fujikawa, A; Hachiya, J; Kanazawa, H; Yodo, K

    2003-02-01

    We have implemented a new diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) sequence based on the single-shot fast spin-echo technique. We hypothesised that this would add information to conventional MRI for diagnosis of lesions of the cervical spinal cord. DWI was performed using a technique in which echo collection after the application of motion-probing gradients was done in the same manner as in the single-shot fast spin-echo technique. We first imaged six healthy volunteers to demonstrate the cervical spinal cord using the sequence. Then we applied the sequence to 12 patients with cervical myelomalacia due to chronic cord compression. The spinal cord was well seen in all subjects without the distortion associated with echo-planar DWI. In the patients, lesions appeared as areas of low- or isointense signal on DWI. Calculated apparent diffusion coefficients of the lesions (3.30+/-0.38x10(-3) mm(2)/s) were significantly higher than those of normal volunteers (2.26+/-0.08x10(-3) mm(2)/s). Increased diffusion in areas of cervical myelomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage, can be detected using this technique.

  12. Assessment of EchoMRI-AH versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry by iDXA to measure human body composition

    PubMed Central

    Marlatt, Kara L.; Greenway, Frank; Ravussin, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Background Comparison of percent fat mass across different body composition analysis devices is important given variation in technology accuracy and precision, as well as the growing need for cross-validation of devices often applied across longitudinal studies. Subjects/Methods We compared EchoMRI-AH and Lunar iDXA quantification of percent body fat (PBF) in 84 adults (43M, 41F) with mean age 39.7±15.9 y and BMI 26.2±5.3 kg/m2. Results PBF correlated strongly between devices (r>0.95, p<0.0001). A prediction equation was derived in half of the subjects, and the other half were used to cross-validate the proposed equation (EchoMRI-AH PBF=[0.94*iDXA PBF]+[0.14*Age]+[3.3*Female]−8.83). Mean PBF difference (predicted–measured) in the validation group was not different from 0 (diff=0.27%, 95%CI: −0.42–0.96, p=0.430). Bland-Altman plots showed a bias with higher measured PBF on EchoMRI-AH versus iDXA in all 84 subjects (β=0.13, p<0.0001). Conclusions The proposed prediction equation was valid in our cross-validation sample, and has the potential to be applied across multicenter studies. PMID:27901030

  13. Assessment of EchoMRI-AH versus dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry by iDXA to measure human body composition.

    PubMed

    Marlatt, K L; Greenway, F L; Ravussin, E

    2017-04-01

    Comparison of percent fat mass across different body composition analysis devices is important given variation in technology accuracy and precision, as well as the growing need for cross-validation of devices often applied across longitudinal studies. We compared EchoMRI-AH and Lunar iDXA quantification of percent body fat (PBF) in 84 adults (43M, 41F), with the mean age 39.7±15.9 years and body mass index (BMI) 26.2±5.3 kg/m(2). PBF correlated strongly between devices (r>0.95, P<0.0001). A prediction equation was derived in half of the subjects, and the other half were used to cross-validate the proposed equation (EchoMRI-AH PBF=[(0.94 × iDXA PBF)+(0.14 × Age)+(3.3 × Female)-8.83). The mean PBF difference (predicted-measured) in the validation group was not different from 0 (diff=0.27%, 95% confidence interval: -0.42-0.96, P=0.430). Bland-Altman plots showed a bias with higher measured PBF on EchoMRI-AH versus iDXA in all 84 subjects (β=0.13, P<0.0001). The proposed prediction equation was valid in our cross-validation sample, and it has the potential to be applied across multicenter studies.

  14. Isolated sixth cranial nerve aplasia visualized with Fast Imaging Employing Steady-State Acquisition (FIESTA) MRI.

    PubMed

    Pilyugina, Svetlana A; Fischbein, Nancy J; Liao, Y Joyce; McCulley, Timothy J

    2007-06-01

    An otherwise healthy 12-month-old girl presented for evaluation of reduced abduction of the left eye detected at 6 months of age. The remainder of the examination was unremarkable. A special MRI sequence-fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA)-visualized the right but not the left sixth nerve cisternal segment. This is the first reported use of the MRI FIESTA sequence to diagnose aplasia of the sixth cranial nerve.

  15. Postoperative arachnoiditis diagnosed by high resolution fast spin-echo MRI of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Fitt, G J; Stevens, J M

    1995-02-01

    Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis is cited as an important cause of recurrent pain and disability after extradural lumbar disc surgery. Myelography using oil-based or ionic water-soluble contrast media was a major contributing factor, and it was not possible to distinguish the prevalence of arachnoiditis probably due to surgery alone. Today it should be possible to make this distinction, which was the purpose of this study. Using high-resolution MRI in 129 patients symptomatic at least 1 year after surgery, a prevalence of arachnoiditis of 20% was found, which dropped to 3% when patients who had undergone oil-based myelography were excluded. Arachnoiditis was diffuse in 88% and focal in 12%. When oil-based media were involved it was focal in 13%, and when not, in one of three cases. It was concluded that arachnoiditis does occur after extradural lumbar disc surgery independently of the use of some myelographic contrast media, and that it may be diffuse or confined only to the operated level. Its prevalence was estimated at 4.6%, four cases focal and two cases diffuse. The causes and clinical significance can only be the subject of speculation.

  16. Fast and accurate simulations of diffusion-weighted MRI signals for the evaluation of acquisition sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensonnet, Gaëtan; Jacobs, Damien; Macq, Benoît.; Taquet, Maxime

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is a powerful tool to probe the diffusion of water through tissues. Through the application of magnetic gradients of appropriate direction, intensity and duration constituting the acquisition parameters, information can be retrieved about the underlying microstructural organization of the brain. In this context, an important and open question is to determine an optimal sequence of such acquisition parameters for a specific purpose. The use of simulated DW-MRI data for a given microstructural configuration provides a convenient and efficient way to address this problem. We first present a novel hybrid method for the synthetic simulation of DW-MRI signals that combines analytic expressions in simple geometries such as spheres and cylinders and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations elsewhere. Our hybrid method remains valid for any acquisition parameters and provides identical levels of accuracy with a computational time that is 90% shorter than that required by MC simulations for commonly-encountered microstructural configurations. We apply our novel simulation technique to estimate the radius of axons under various noise levels with different acquisition protocols commonly used in the literature. The results of our comparison suggest that protocols favoring a large number of gradient intensities such as a Cube and Sphere (CUSP) imaging provide more accurate radius estimation than conventional single-shell HARDI acquisitions for an identical acquisition time.

  17. Associations between Dietary Nutrient Intakes and Hepatic Lipid Contents in NAFLD Patients Quantified by ¹H-MRS and Dual-Echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yipeng; Zhang, Kewei; Chen, Yang; Li, Yanchuan; Li, Yuzheng; Fu, Kuang; Feng, Rennan

    2016-08-27

    Dietary habits are crucial in the progression of hepatic lipid accumulation and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, there are limited studies using ¹H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) and dual-echo in-phase and out-phase magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (dual-echo MRI) to assess the effects of dietary nutrient intakes on hepatic lipid contents. In the present study, we recruited 36 female adults (NAFLD:control = 19:17) to receive questionnaires and medical examinations, including dietary intakes, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, and ¹H-MRS and dual-echo MRI examinations. NAFLD patients were found to consume diets higher in energy, protein, fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Total energy intake was positively associated with hepatic fat fraction (HFF) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) after adjustment for age and body-mass index (BMI) (HFF: β = 0.24, p = 0.02; IHL: β = 0.38, p = 0.02). Total fat intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustment for age, BMI and total energy intake (HFF: β = 0.36, p = 0.03; IHL: β = 0.42, p = 0.01). SFA intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustments (HFF: β = 0.45, p = 0.003; IHL: β = 1.16, p = 0.03). In conclusion, hepatic fat content was associated with high energy, high fat and high SFA intakes, quantified by ¹H-MRS and dual-echo MRI in our population. Our findings are useful to provide dietary targets to prevent the hepatic lipid accumulation and NAFLD.

  18. Associations between Dietary Nutrient Intakes and Hepatic Lipid Contents in NAFLD Patients Quantified by 1H-MRS and Dual-Echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yipeng; Zhang, Kewei; Chen, Yang; Li, Yanchuan; Li, Yuzheng; Fu, Kuang; Feng, Rennan

    2016-01-01

    Dietary habits are crucial in the progression of hepatic lipid accumulation and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, there are limited studies using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and dual-echo in-phase and out-phase magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (dual-echo MRI) to assess the effects of dietary nutrient intakes on hepatic lipid contents. In the present study, we recruited 36 female adults (NAFLD:control = 19:17) to receive questionnaires and medical examinations, including dietary intakes, anthropometric and biochemical measurements, and 1H-MRS and dual-echo MRI examinations. NAFLD patients were found to consume diets higher in energy, protein, fat, saturated fatty acid (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Total energy intake was positively associated with hepatic fat fraction (HFF) and intrahepatic lipid (IHL) after adjustment for age and body-mass index (BMI) (HFF: β = 0.24, p = 0.02; IHL: β = 0.38, p = 0.02). Total fat intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustment for age, BMI and total energy intake (HFF: β = 0.36, p = 0.03; IHL: β = 0.42, p = 0.01). SFA intake was positively associated with HFF and IHL after adjustments (HFF: β = 0.45, p = 0.003; IHL: β = 1.16, p = 0.03). In conclusion, hepatic fat content was associated with high energy, high fat and high SFA intakes, quantified by 1H-MRS and dual-echo MRI in our population. Our findings are useful to provide dietary targets to prevent the hepatic lipid accumulation and NAFLD. PMID:27618908

  19. New opportunities for quantitative and time efficient 3D MRI of liquid and solid electrochemical cell components: Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Forsyth, Maria; O'Dell, Luke A

    2014-11-01

    The ability to image electrochemical processes in situ using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers exciting possibilities for understanding and optimizing materials in batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors. In these applications, however, the quality of the MRI measurement is inherently limited by the presence of conductive elements in the cell or device. To overcome related difficulties, optimal methodologies have to be employed. We show that time-efficient three dimensional (3D) imaging of liquid and solid lithium battery components can be performed by Sectoral Fast Spin Echo and Single Point Imaging with T1 Enhancement (SPRITE), respectively. The former method is based on the generalized phase encoding concept employed in clinical MRI, which we have adapted and optimized for materials science and electrochemistry applications. Hard radio frequency pulses, short echo spacing and centrically ordered sectoral phase encoding ensure accurate and time-efficient full volume imaging. Mapping of density, diffusivity and relaxation time constants in metal-containing liquid electrolytes is demonstrated. 1, 2 and 3D SPRITE approaches show strong potential for rapid high resolution (7)Li MRI of lithium electrode components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Automatic generation of digital anthropomorphic phantoms from simulated MRI acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C.; Gennert, M. A.; KÓ§nik, A.; Dasari, P. K.; King, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    In SPECT imaging, motion from patient respiration and body motion can introduce image artifacts that may reduce the diagnostic quality of the images. Simulation studies using numerical phantoms with precisely known motion can help to develop and evaluate motion correction algorithms. Previous methods for evaluating motion correction algorithms used either manual or semi-automated segmentation of MRI studies to produce patient models in the form of XCAT Phantoms, from which one calculates the transformation and deformation between MRI study and patient model. Both manual and semi-automated methods of XCAT Phantom generation require expertise in human anatomy, with the semiautomated method requiring up to 30 minutes and the manual method requiring up to eight hours. Although faster than manual segmentation, the semi-automated method still requires a significant amount of time, is not replicable, and is subject to errors due to the difficulty of aligning and deforming anatomical shapes in 3D. We propose a new method for matching patient models to MRI that extends the previous semi-automated method by eliminating the manual non-rigid transformation. Our method requires no user supervision and therefore does not require expert knowledge of human anatomy to align the NURBs to anatomical structures in the MR image. Our contribution is employing the SIMRI MRI simulator to convert the XCAT NURBs to a voxel-based representation that is amenable to automatic non-rigid registration. Then registration is used to transform and deform the NURBs to match the anatomy in the MR image. We show that our automated method generates XCAT Phantoms more robustly and significantly faster than the previous semi-automated method.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of DEFGEL and PAGAT formulae paired with an MRI acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosic, C.; McMillan, A.; Holmes, J.; Bednarz, B.; Culberson, W.

    2017-05-01

    Normoxic Polyacrylamide Gels, or nPAGs, are 3D gel dosimeters that measure dose through the process of radiation-induced polymerization. Two nPAG formulae are DEFGEL and PAGAT, which are very similar, but differ mainly due to different weight fractions of monomers. The dosimetric resolutions of the two formulae when paired with a Spin-Echo (SE) MRI sequence and a monoexponential fit were compared over a range of 0-15 Gy. It was found that in the dose range 0-6 Gy the PAGAT formula generally showed a much finer dose resolution, while the DEFGEL formula showed a finer resolution from 8-15 Gy.

  2. Towards MRI-Based Autonomous Robotic US Acquisitions: A First Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Hennersperger, Christoph; Fuerst, Bernhard; Virga, Salvatore; Zettinig, Oliver; Frisch, Benjamin; Neff, Thomas; Navab, Nassir

    2016-10-24

    Robotic ultrasound has the potential to assist and guide physicians during interventions. In this work, we present a set of methods and a workflow to enable autonomous MRI-guided ultrasound acquisitions. Our approach uses a structured-light 3D scanner for patient-to-robot and image-to-patient calibration, which in turn is used to plan 3D ultrasound trajectories. These MRI-based trajectories are followed autonomously by the robot and are further refined online using automatic MRI/US registration. Despite the low spatial resolution of structured light scanners, the initial planned acquisition path can be followed with an accuracy of 2.46±0.96 mm. This leads to a good initialization of the MRI/US registration: the 3D-scan-based alignment for planning and acquisition shows an accuracy (distance between planned ultrasound and MRI) of 4.47 mm, and 0.97 mm after an online-update of the calibration based on a closed loop registration.

  3. [Effect of motion correction associated with echo train length and number of blades in propeller MRI-computer simulation].

    PubMed

    Muro, Isao; Horie, Tomohiko; Kimura, Eri; Matsuo, Taichi; Ogihara, Yoshisada; Hanaki, Akira

    2004-02-01

    The PROPELLER (periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction) MRI method is available with a technique for motion correction. We studied changes in correction according to differences in echo train length (ETL) and number of blades, and measured correction accuracy according to linear translation and rotation, using computer simulation. A T(2)-weighted axial image of the head taken by FSE was utilized as the basic MR image. We reconstructed other images with differences in quantity of motion, ETL, and number of blades, also using computer simulation. After motion correction was performed, we measured correction accuracy with cross-correlation to the basic image. The method of motion correction was performed by the conversion of k-space data for each blade step using 2D Fourier-transform. After motion correction of the obtained image had been carried out, the image was converted to k-space data using reverse Fourier-transform. For data of 30 pixels with horizontal translation, cross-correlation coefficients for the stationary image were 0.6 for FSE without motion correction, 0.74 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image without motion correction, and 0.99 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image with motion correction. For data of 24 degrees with rotation, cross-correlation coefficients were 0.38 for FSE without motion correction, 0.53 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image without motion correction, and 0.93 for the PROPELLER (ETL 8, blades 32) image with motion correction. The cross-correlation coefficient of liner translation is higher than its rotation. Correction accuracy was better with larger numbers of ETL than without motion correction. The spatial resolution of the image was decreased in the corrected image more by rotation than linear translation. This study indicated that the PR method was able to inspect the imaging technique with little influence on movement.

  4. Tracking Adult Literacy Acquisition with Functional MRI: A Single-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Lucia W.; Amemiya, Eduardo; Tauil, Alexandre; Suguieda, Denis; Lacerda, Carolina; Klein, Elise; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated neuro-functional changes associated with late acquisition of reading in an illiterate adult who underwent 20 longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans during 2 years, while the participant progressed from complete illiteracy to a modest level of alphabetical decoding. Initially, the participant did not activate…

  5. MRI-derived measurements of human subcortical, ventricular and intracranial brain volumes: Reliability effects of scan sessions, acquisition sequences, data analyses, scanner upgrade, scanner vendors and field strengths.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, Jorge; Czanner, Silvester; Han, Xiao; Salat, David; van der Kouwe, Andre; Quinn, Brian; Pacheco, Jenni; Albert, Marilyn; Killiany, Ronald; Blacker, Deborah; Maguire, Paul; Rosas, Diana; Makris, Nikos; Gollub, Randy; Dale, Anders; Dickerson, Bradford C; Fischl, Bruce

    2009-05-15

    Automated MRI-derived measurements of in-vivo human brain volumes provide novel insights into normal and abnormal neuroanatomy, but little is known about measurement reliability. Here we assess the impact of image acquisition variables (scan session, MRI sequence, scanner upgrade, vendor and field strengths), FreeSurfer segmentation pre-processing variables (image averaging, B1 field inhomogeneity correction) and segmentation analysis variables (probabilistic atlas) on resultant image segmentation volumes from older (n=15, mean age 69.5) and younger (both n=5, mean ages 34 and 36.5) healthy subjects. The variability between hippocampal, thalamic, caudate, putamen, lateral ventricular and total intracranial volume measures across sessions on the same scanner on different days is less than 4.3% for the older group and less than 2.3% for the younger group. Within-scanner measurements are remarkably reliable across scan sessions, being minimally affected by averaging of multiple acquisitions, B1 correction, acquisition sequence (MPRAGE vs. multi-echo-FLASH), major scanner upgrades (Sonata-Avanto, Trio-TrioTIM), and segmentation atlas (MPRAGE or multi-echo-FLASH). Volume measurements across platforms (Siemens Sonata vs. GE Signa) and field strengths (1.5 T vs. 3 T) result in a volume difference bias but with a comparable variance as that measured within-scanner, implying that multi-site studies may not necessarily require a much larger sample to detect a specific effect. These results suggest that volumes derived from automated segmentation of T1-weighted structural images are reliable measures within the same scanner platform, even after upgrades; however, combining data across platform and across field-strength introduces a bias that should be considered in the design of multi-site studies, such as clinical drug trials. The results derived from the young groups (scanner upgrade effects and B1 inhomogeneity correction effects) should be considered as preliminary and in

  6. Advances in diffusion MRI acquisition and processing in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Jbabdi, Saad; Xu, Junqian; Andersson, Jesper L; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Glasser, Matthew F; Hernandez, Moises; Sapiro, Guillermo; Jenkinson, Mark; Feinberg, David A; Yacoub, Essa; Lenglet, Christophe; Ven Essen, David C; Ugurbil, Kamil; Behrens, Timothy EJ

    2013-01-01

    The Human Connectome Project (HCP) is a collaborative 5-year effort to map human brain connections and their variability in healthy adults. A consortium of HCP investigators will study a population of 1200 healthy adults using multiple imaging modalities, along with extensive behavioral and genetic data. In this overview, we focus on diffusion MRI (dMRI) and the structural connectivity aspect of the project. We present recent advances in acquisition and processing that allow us to obtain very high-quality in-vivo MRI data, while enabling scanning of a very large number of subjects. These advances result from 2 years of intensive efforts in optimising many aspects of data acquisition and processing during the piloting phase of the project. The data quality and methods described here are representative of the datasets and processing pipelines that will be made freely available to the community at quarterly intervals, beginning in 2013. PMID:23702418

  7. ICA-based artefact and accelerated fMRI acquisition for improved Resting State Network imaging

    PubMed Central

    Griffanti, Ludovica; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Beckmann, Christian F.; Auerbach, Edward J.; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Sexton, Claire E.; Zsoldos, Enikő; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Filippini, Nicola; Mackay, Clare E.; Moeller, Steen; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ugurbil, Kamil; Miller, Karla L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of resting state networks (RSNs) and the quantification of their functional connectivity in resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) are seriously hindered by the presence of artefacts, many of which overlap spatially or spectrally with RSNs. Moreover, recent developments in fMRI acquisition yield data with higher spatial and temporal resolutions, but may increase artefacts both spatially and/or temporally. Hence the correct identification and removal of non-neural fluctuations is crucial, especially in accelerated acquisitions. In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of three data-driven cleaning procedures, compare standard against higher (spatial and temporal) resolution accelerated fMRI acquisitions, and investigate the combined effect of different acquisitions and different cleanup approaches. We applied single-subject independent component analysis (ICA), followed by automatic component classification with FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) to identify artefactual components. We then compared two first-level (within-subject) cleaning approaches for removing those artefacts and motion-related fluctuations from the data. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedures were assessed using timeseries (amplitude and spectra), network matrix and spatial map analyses. For timeseries and network analyses we also tested the effect of a second-level cleaning (informed by group-level analysis). Comparing these approaches, the preferable balance between noise removal and signal loss was achieved by regressing out of the data the full space of motion-related fluctuations and only the unique variance of the artefactual ICA components. Using similar analyses, we also investigated the effects of different cleaning approaches on data from different acquisition sequences. With the optimal cleaning procedures, functional connectivity results from accelerated data were statistically comparable or significantly better than the standard (unaccelerated) acquisition

  8. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method.

  9. Closed-form expressions for flip angle variation that maximize total signal in T1-weighted rapid gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Drobnitzky, Matthias; Klose, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequences are commonly employed for T1-weighted structural brain imaging. Following a contrast preparation radiofrequency (RF) pulse, the data acquisition proceeds under nonequilibrium conditions of the relaxing longitudinal magnetization. Variation of the flip angle can be used to maximize total available signal. Simulated annealing or greedy algorithms have so far been published to numerically solve this problem, with signal-to-noise ratios optimized for clinical imaging scenarios by adhering to a predefined shape of the signal evolution. We propose an unconstrained optimization of the MPRAGE experiment that employs techniques from resource allocation theory. A new dynamic programming solution is introduced that yields closed-form expressions for optimal flip angle variation. Flip angle series are proposed that maximize total transverse magnetization (Mxy) for a range of physiologic T1 values. A 3D MPRAGE sequence is modified to allow for a controlled variation of the excitation angle. Experiments employing a T1 contrast phantom are performed at 3T. 1D acquisitions without phase encoding permit measurement of the temporal development of Mxy. Image mean signal and standard deviation for reference flip angle trains are compared in 2D measurements. Signal profiles at sharp phantom edges are acquired to access image blurring related to nonuniform Mxy development. A novel closed-form expression for flip angle variation is found that constitutes the optimal policy to reach maximum total signal. It numerically equals previously published results of other authors when evaluated under their simplifying assumptions. Longitudinal magnetization (Mz) is exhaustively used without causing abrupt changes in the measured MR signal, which is a prerequisite for artifact free images. Phantom experiments at 3T verify the expected benefit for total accumulated k-space signal when compared with published flip angle series. Describing

  10. Inter- and intra-rater reliability of patellofemoral kinematic and contact area quantification by fast spin echo MRI and correlation with cartilage health by quantitative T1ρ MRI☆

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Brian C.; Thuillier, Daniel U.; Pedoia, Valentina; Chen, Ellison Y.; Zhang, Zhihong; Feeley, Brian T.; Souza, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patellar maltracking is a leading cause of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The aim of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-rater reliability of a semi-automated program for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based patellofemoral kinematics. Methods Sixteen subjects (10 with PFPS [mean age 32.3; SD 5.2; eight females] and six controls without PFPS 19 [mean age 28.6; SD 2.8; three females]) participated in the study. One set of T2-weighted, fat-saturated fast spin-echo (FSE) MRIs were acquired from each subject in full extension and 30° of knee flexion. MRI including axial T1ρ relaxation time mapping sequences was also performed on each knee. Following image acquisitions, regions of interest for kinematic MRI, and patellar and trochlear cartilage were segmented and quantified with in-house designed spline- based MATLAB semi-automated software. Results Intraclass Correlations Coefficients (ICC) of calculated kinematic parameters were good to excellent, ICC > 0.8 in patellar flexion, rotation, tilt, and translation (anterior -posterior, medial -lateral, and superior -inferior), and contact area translation. Only patellar tilt in the flexed position and motion from extended to flexed state was significantly different between PFPS and control patients (p = 0.002 and p = 0.006, respectively). No significant correlations were identified between patellofemoral kinematics and contact area with T1ρ relaxation times. Conclusions A semi-automated, spline-based kinematic MRI technique for patellofemoral kinematic and contact area quantification is highly reproducible with the potential to help better understand the role of patellofemoral maltracking in PFPS and other knee disorders. PMID:26746045

  11. 1H stray-field long spin-echo trains and MRI: novel studies on the photopolymerization of a commercial dental resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Teresa G.; Guillot, Geneviève; Pereira, Sónia G.; Pires, Ricardo

    2002-06-01

    Photopolymerization of a commercial dental resin has been investigated by 1H stray-field (STRAFI) magnetic resonance. The resin is a visible light-cured system, included in a new generation adhesive, which is used to bond the restorative material to enamel or dentin. Different methods were used to follow the curing reaction, which involve long and short spin-echo train acquisitions to obtain one-slice and one-dimensional data, respectively. The echo attenuation, in the limit of very short time delays, could be described as the sum of two exponentials. While the intensity of the early echoes in the train appeared mainly governed by spin-spin relaxation, the decay of the last echoes seemed to depend also on spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame. The relative amplitude of the long-time component was found to decrease from 84% to 10% with the photopolymerization progress, and a STRAFI degree of conversion of 74% could thus be suggested. The influence of the curing protocol was observed in STRAFI profiles.

  12. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  13. Articular cartilage grading of the knee: diagnostic performance of fat-suppressed 3D volume isotropic turbo spin-echo acquisition (VISTA) compared with 3D T1 high-resolution isovolumetric examination (THRIVE).

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Han; Hahn, Seok; Lim, Daekeon; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-02-01

    Background Conventionally, two-dimensional (2D) fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences have been widely used for clinical cartilage imaging as well as gradient (GRE) sequences. Recently, three-dimensional (3D) volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced with one 3D volumetric scan, and this is replacing slice-by-slice 2D MR scans. Purpose To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic performance of two 3D sequences for abnormalities of knee cartilage: fat-suppressed (FS) FSE-based 3D volume isotropic turbo spin-echo acquisition (VISTA) and GRE-based 3D T1 high-resolution isovolumetric examination (THRIVE). Material and Methods The institutional review board approved the protocol of this retrospective review. This study enrolled 40 patients (41 knees) with arthroscopically confirmed abnormalities of cartilage. All patients underwent isovoxel 3D-VISTA and 3D-THRIVE MR sequences on 3T MRI. We assessed the cartilage grade on the two 3D sequences using arthroscopy as a gold standard. Inter-observer agreement for each technique was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Differences in the area under the curve (AUC) were compared between the 3D-THRIVE and 3D-VISTA. Results Although inter-observer agreement for both sequences was excellent, the inter-observer agreement for 3D-VISTA was higher than for 3D-THRIVE for cartilage grading in all regions of the knee. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic performance ( P > 0.05) between the two sequences for detecting cartilage grade. Conclusion FSE-based 3D-VISTA images had good diagnostic performance that was comparable to GRE-based 3D-THRIVE images in the evaluation of knee cartilage, and can be used in routine knee MR protocols for the evaluation of cartilage.

  14. Simultaneous and interleaved acquisition of NMR signals from different nuclei with a clinical MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Arthur W.; Kuehne, Andre; Gruetter, Rolf; Moser, Ewald; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Modification of a clinical MRI scanner to enable simultaneous or rapid interleaved acquisition of signals from two different nuclei. Methods A device was developed to modify the local oscillator signal fed to the receive channel(s) of an MRI console. This enables external modification of the frequency at which the receiver is sensitive and rapid switching between different frequencies. Use of the device was demonstrated with interleaved and simultaneous 31P and 1H spectroscopic acquisitions, and with interleaved 31P and 1H imaging. Results Signal amplitudes and signal‐to‐noise ratios were found to be unchanged for the modified system, compared with data acquired with the MRI system in the standard configuration. Conclusion Interleaved and simultaneous 1H and 31P signal acquisition was successfully demonstrated with a clinical MRI scanner, with only minor modification of the RF architecture. While demonstrated with 31P, the modification is applicable to any detectable nucleus without further modification, enabling a wide range of simultaneous and interleaved experiments to be performed within a clinical setting. Magn Reson Med 76:1636–1641, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26608834

  15. Prolongation of ERP latency and reaction time (RT) in simultaneous EEG/fMRI data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jinsoo; Peltier, Scott J; Yoon, Daehyun; Manschreck, Theo C; Deldin, Patricia J

    2016-08-01

    Recording EEG and fMRI data simultaneously inside a fully-operating scanner has been recognized as a novel approach in human brain research. Studies have demonstrated high concordance between the EEG signals and hemodynamic response. However, a few studies reported altered cognitive process inside the fMRI scanner such as delayed reaction time (RT) and reduced and/or delayed N100 and P300 event-related brain potential (ERP) components. The present study investigated the influence of electromagnetic field (static magnetic field, radio frequency (RF) pulse, and gradient switching) and experimental environment on posterior N100 and P300 ERP components in four different settings with six healthy subjects using a visual oddball task: (1) classic fMRI acquisition inside the scanner (e.g., supine position, mirror glasses for stimulus presentation), (2) standard behavioral experiment outside the scanner (e.g., seated position, keyboard response), (3) controlled fMRI acquisition inside the scanner (e.g., organic light-emitting diode (OLED) goggles for stimulus presentation) inside; and (4) modified behavioral experiment outside the scanner (e.g., supine position, OLED goggles). The study findings indicated that the experimental environment in simultaneous EEG/fMRI acquisition could substantially delay N1P, P300 latency, and RT inside the scanner, and was associated with a reduced N1P amplitude. There was no effect of electromagnetic field in the prolongation of RT, N1P and P300 latency inside the scanner. N1P, but not P300, latency was sensitive to stimulus presentation method inside the scanner. Future simultaneous EEG/fMRI data collection should consider experimental environment in both design and analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of parallel acquisition techniques generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) and modified sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) in functional MRI (fMRI) at 3T.

    PubMed

    Preibisch, Christine; Wallenhorst, Tim; Heidemann, Robin; Zanella, Friedhelm E; Lanfermann, Heinrich

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the parallel acquisition techniques, generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) and modified sensitivity encoding (mSENSE), and determine imaging parameters maximizing sensitivity toward functional activation at 3T. A total of eight imaging protocols with different parallel imaging techniques (GRAPPA and mSENSE) and reduction factors (R = 1, 2, 3) were compared at different matrix sizes (64 and 128) with respect to temporal noise characteristics, artifact behavior, and sensitivity toward functional activation. Echo planar imaging (EPI) with GRAPPA and a reduction factor of 2 revealed similar image quality and sensitivity than full k-space EPI. A higher incidence of artifacts and a marked sensitivity loss occurred at R = 3. Even though the same eight-channel head coil was used for signal detection in all experiments, GRAPPA generally showed more benign patterns of spatially-varying noise amplification, and mSENSE was also more susceptible to residual unfolding artifacts than GRAPPA. At 3T and a reduction factor of 2, parallel imaging can be used with only little penalty with regard to sensitivity. With our implementation and coil setup the performance of GRAPPA was clearly superior to mSENSE. Thus, it seems advisable to pay special attention to the employed parallel imaging method and its implementation.

  17. Reducing Contrast Contamination in Radial Turbo-Spin-Echo Acquisitions by Combining a Narrow-Band KWIC Filter With Parallel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Daniel; Breuer, Felix A.; Völker, Michael; Brandt, Tobias; Griswold, Mark A.; Jakob, Peter M.; Blaimer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cartesian turbo spin-echo (TSE) and radial TSE images are usually reconstructed by assembling data containing different contrast information into a single k-space. This approach results in mixed contrast contributions in the images, which may reduce their diagnostic value. The goal of this work is to improve the image contrast from radial TSE acquisitions by reducing the contribution of signals with undesired contrast information. Methods Radial TSE acquisitions allow the reconstruction of multiple images with different T2 contrasts using the k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) filter. In this work, the image contrast is improved by reducing the band-width of the KWIC filter. Data for the reconstruction of a single image are selected from within a small temporal range around the desired echo time. The resulting data set is undersampled and therefore an iterative parallel imaging algorithm is applied to remove aliasing artifacts. Results Radial TSE images of the human brain reconstructed with the proposed method show an improved contrast when compared to Cartesian TSE images or radial TSE images with conventional KWIC reconstructions. Conclusion The proposed method provides multi-contrast images from radial TSE data with contrasts similar to multi spin-echo images. Contaminations from unwanted contrast weightings are strongly reduced. PMID:24436227

  18. A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom for the quantitative evaluation of prostate DCE-MRI acquisition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Silvin P.; Browne, Jacinta E.; Meaney, James F.; Smith, David S.; Fagan, Andrew J.

    2016-10-01

    A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom device has been developed, which can be used for quantitatively assessing the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to accurately measure signal/concentration time-intensity curves (CTCs) associated with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Modelling of the complex pharmacokinetics of contrast agents as they perfuse through the tumour capillary network has shown great promise for cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring. However, clinical adoption has been hindered by methodological problems, resulting in a lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate acquisition and modelling methodology to use and a consequent wide discrepancy in published data. A heretofore overlooked source of such discrepancy may arise from measurement errors of tumour CTCs deriving from the imaging pulse sequence itself, while the effects on the fidelity of CTC measurement of using rapidly-accelerated sequences such as parallel imaging and compressed sensing remain unknown. The present work aimed to investigate these features by developing a test device in which ‘ground truth’ CTCs were generated and presented to the MRI scanner for measurement, thereby allowing for an assessment of the DCE-MRI protocol to accurately measure this curve shape. The device comprised a four-pump flow system wherein CTCs derived from prior patient prostate data were produced in measurement chambers placed within the imaged volume. The ground truth was determined as the mean of repeat measurements using an MRI-independent, custom-built optical imaging system. In DCE-MRI experiments, significant discrepancies between the ground truth and measured CTCs were found for both tumorous and healthy tissue-mimicking curve shapes. Pharmacokinetic modelling revealed errors in measured K trans, v e and k ep values of up to 42%, 31%, and 50% respectively, following a simple variation of the parallel imaging factor and number of signal averages in the acquisition

  19. 3D spiral cardiac/respiratory ordered fMRI data acquisition at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Stenger, V A; Peltier, S; Boada, F E; Noll, D C

    1999-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D), multi-shot functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquisitions are desirable because of higher resolution and reduced susceptibility artifacts, due to shorter readouts and thinner slices. However, 3D multi-shot techniques are more susceptible to physiological noise, which can increase inter-image variance and lead to inaccurate assessment of activation. This work presents a 3D spiral fMRI data acquisition method at 3 T in which the acquisition of views was ordered to match the phase of either the respiratory or the cardiac cycle. For the acquisition timing parameters used in this work, cardiac ordering was found to reduce inter-image variance by 19%. Cardiac ordered data acquisitions showed the same reduction in variance as sequentially ordered data with cardiac contributions estimated and removed using an externally acquired reference prior to reconstruction. Respiratory ordering showed no reduction in fluctuation noise due to poor alignment of views to the respiratory phase.

  20. Slice Accelerated Gradient-Echo Spin-Echo Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Imaging with Blipped CAIPI for Increased Slice Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Cornelius; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Cauley, Stephen; Bhat, Himanshu; Polaskova, Pavlina; Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Rapalino, Otto; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L.; Stufflebeam, Steven; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve slice coverage of gradient echo spin echo (GESE) sequences for dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using a simultaneous-multiple-slice (SMS) method. Methods Data were acquired on 3 Tesla (T) MR scanners with a 32-channel head coil. To evaluate use of SMS for DSC, an SMS GESE sequence with two-fold slice coverage and same temporal sampling was compared with a standard GESE sequence, both with 2× in-plane acceleration. A signal to noise ratio (SNR) comparison was performed on one healthy subject. Additionally, data with Gadolinium injection were collected on three patients with glioblastoma using both sequences, and perfusion analysis was performed on healthy tissues as well as on tumor. Results Retained SNR of SMS DSC is 90% for a gradient echo (GE) and 99% for a spin echo (SE) acquisition, compared with a standard acquisition without slice acceleration. Comparing cerebral blood volume maps, it was observed that the results of standard and SMS acquisitions are comparable for both GE and SE images. Conclusion Two-fold slice accelerated DSC MRI achieves similar SNR and perfusion metrics as a standard acquisition, while allowing a significant increase in slice coverage of the brain. The results also point to a possibility to improve temporal sampling rate, while retaining the same slice coverage. PMID:24285593

  1. Slice accelerated gradient-echo spin-echo dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging with blipped CAIPI for increased slice coverage.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Cornelius; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Cauley, Stephen; Bhat, Himanshu; Polaskova, Pavlina; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Rapalino, Otto; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L; Stufflebeam, Steven; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-09-01

    To improve slice coverage of gradient echo spin echo (GESE) sequences for dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI using a simultaneous-multiple-slice (SMS) method. Data were acquired on 3 Tesla (T) MR scanners with a 32-channel head coil. To evaluate use of SMS for DSC, an SMS GESE sequence with two-fold slice coverage and same temporal sampling was compared with a standard GESE sequence, both with 2× in-plane acceleration. A signal to noise ratio (SNR) comparison was performed on one healthy subject. Additionally, data with Gadolinium injection were collected on three patients with glioblastoma using both sequences, and perfusion analysis was performed on healthy tissues as well as on tumor. Retained SNR of SMS DSC is 90% for a gradient echo (GE) and 99% for a spin echo (SE) acquisition, compared with a standard acquisition without slice acceleration. Comparing cerebral blood volume maps, it was observed that the results of standard and SMS acquisitions are comparable for both GE and SE images. Two-fold slice accelerated DSC MRI achieves similar SNR and perfusion metrics as a standard acquisition, while allowing a significant increase in slice coverage of the brain. The results also point to a possibility to improve temporal sampling rate, while retaining the same slice coverage. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reducing acquisition time in clinical MRI by data undersampling and compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Kieren Grant

    2015-11-07

    MRI is often the most sensitive or appropriate technique for important measurements in clinical diagnosis and research, but lengthy acquisition times limit its use due to cost and considerations of patient comfort and compliance. Once an image field of view and resolution is chosen, the minimum scan acquisition time is normally fixed by the amount of raw data that must be acquired to meet the Nyquist criteria. Recently, there has been research interest in using the theory of compressed sensing (CS) in MR imaging to reduce scan acquisition times. The theory argues that if our target MR image is sparse, having signal information in only a small proportion of pixels (like an angiogram), or if the image can be mathematically transformed to be sparse then it is possible to use that sparsity to recover a high definition image from substantially less acquired data. This review starts by considering methods of k-space undersampling which have already been incorporated into routine clinical imaging (partial Fourier imaging and parallel imaging), and then explains the basis of using compressed sensing in MRI. The practical considerations of applying CS to MRI acquisitions are discussed, such as designing k-space undersampling schemes, optimizing adjustable parameters in reconstructions and exploiting the power of combined compressed sensing and parallel imaging (CS-PI). A selection of clinical applications that have used CS and CS-PI prospectively are considered. The review concludes by signposting other imaging acceleration techniques under present development before concluding with a consideration of the potential impact and obstacles to bringing compressed sensing into routine use in clinical MRI.

  3. Automatic honesty forgoing reward acquisition and punishment avoidance: a functional MRI investigation

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Mei; Ueda, Ryuhei; Ashida, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging investigations into human honesty suggest that honest moral decisions in individuals who consistently behave honestly occur automatically, without the need for active self-control. However, it remains unclear whether this observation can be applied to two different types of honesty: honesty forgoing dishonest reward acquisition and honesty forgoing dishonest punishment avoidance. To address this issue, a functional MRI study, using an incentivized prediction task in which participants were confronted with real and repeated opportunities for dishonest gain leading to reward acquisition and punishment avoidance, was conducted. Behavioral data revealed that the frequency of dishonesty was equivalent between the opportunities for dishonest reward acquisition and for punishment avoidance. Reaction time data demonstrated that two types of honest decisions in the opportunity for dishonest reward acquisition and punishment avoidance required no additional cognitive control. Neuroimaging data revealed that honest decisions in the opportunity for dishonest reward acquisition and those for punishment avoidance required no additional control-related activity compared with a control condition in which no opportunity for dishonest behavior was given. These results suggest that honesty flows automatically, irrespective of the concomitant motivation for dishonesty leading to reward acquisition and punishment avoidance. PMID:28746066

  4. MRI Compatible Ultrasound Transducers for Simultaneous Acquisition of Coregistered Ultrasound to MRI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speicher, Daniel; Bartscherer, T.; Becker, F. J.; Jenne, J. W.; Mrosk, K.; Degel, C.; Günther, M.; Tretbar, S.

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become an important part of radiological diagnostics as it shows high resolution volumes of human tissue without any radiation exposure. Beside the high costs for MR imaging the greatest disadvantage of this technology is that it is not real-time capable which leads to possible motion artifacts. Whereas Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool in radiology as it is real-time capable and cost effective. Therefore a combination of both modalities is obvious, not only to reduce motion artifacts in MR imaging but to save costs by reducing time in the MR scanner through coregistering ultrasound and MR images for deformation analysis. This work presents the manufacturing and measurement results of MR compatible ultrasound transducers for motion compensation and deformation analyses for clinical interventions under MRI conditions, based on ultrasound volumes acquired by a full MR compatible 180° rotating 8 MHz phased array.

  5. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  6. Functional connectivity analysis in resting state fMRI with echo-state networks and non-metric clustering for network structure recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; DSouza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2015-03-01

    Echo state networks (ESN) are recurrent neural networks where the hidden layer is replaced with a fixed reservoir of neurons. Unlike feed-forward networks, neuron training in ESN is restricted to the output neurons alone thereby providing a computational advantage. We demonstrate the use of such ESNs in our mutual connectivity analysis (MCA) framework for recovering the primary motor cortex network associated with hand movement from resting state functional MRI (fMRI) data. Such a framework consists of two steps - (1) defining a pair-wise affinity matrix between different pixel time series within the brain to characterize network activity and (2) recovering network components from the affinity matrix with non-metric clustering. Here, ESNs are used to evaluate pair-wise cross-estimation performance between pixel time series to create the affinity matrix, which is subsequently subject to non-metric clustering with the Louvain method. For comparison, the ground truth of the motor cortex network structure is established with a task-based fMRI sequence. Overlap between the primary motor cortex network recovered with our model free MCA approach and the ground truth was measured with the Dice coefficient. Our results show that network recovery with our proposed MCA approach is in close agreement with the ground truth. Such network recovery is achieved without requiring low-pass filtering of the time series ensembles prior to analysis, an fMRI preprocessing step that has courted controversy in recent years. Thus, we conclude our MCA framework can allow recovery and visualization of the underlying functionally connected networks in the brain on resting state fMRI.

  7. Enhancement of temporal resolution and BOLD sensitivity in real-time fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Ackley, Elena; Mutihac, Radu; Rick, Jochen; Shane, Matthew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver

    2012-05-15

    In this study, a new approach to high-speed fMRI using multi-slab echo-volumar imaging (EVI) is developed that minimizes geometrical image distortion and spatial blurring, and enables nonaliased sampling of physiological signal fluctuation to increase BOLD sensitivity compared to conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI). Real-time fMRI using whole brain 4-slab EVI with 286 ms temporal resolution (4mm isotropic voxel size) and partial brain 2-slab EVI with 136 ms temporal resolution (4×4×6 mm(3) voxel size) was performed on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI scanner equipped with 12-channel head coil. Four-slab EVI of visual and motor tasks significantly increased mean (visual: 96%, motor: 66%) and maximum t-score (visual: 263%, motor: 124%) and mean (visual: 59%, motor: 131%) and maximum (visual: 29%, motor: 67%) BOLD signal amplitude compared with EPI. Time domain moving average filtering (2s width) to suppress physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations further improved mean (visual: 196%, motor: 140%) and maximum (visual: 384%, motor: 200%) t-scores and increased extents of activation (visual: 73%, motor: 70%) compared to EPI. Similar sensitivity enhancement, which is attributed to high sampling rate at only moderately reduced temporal signal-to-noise ratio (mean: -52%) and longer sampling of the BOLD effect in the echo-time domain compared to EPI, was measured in auditory cortex. Two-slab EVI further improved temporal resolution for measuring task-related activation and enabled mapping of five major resting state networks (RSNs) in individual subjects in 5 min scans. The bilateral sensorimotor, the default mode and the occipital RSNs were detectable in time frames as short as 75 s. In conclusion, the high sampling rate of real-time multi-slab EVI significantly improves sensitivity for studying the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic responses and for characterizing functional networks at high field strength in short measurement times. Copyright © 2012

  8. SNR enhancement of highly-accelerated real-time cardiac MRI acquisitions based on non-local means algorithm.

    PubMed

    Naegel, Benoît; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Tognolini, Maurizio; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2009-08-01

    Real-time cardiac MRI appears as a promising technique to evaluate the mechanical function of the heart. However, ultra-fast MRI acquisitions come with an important signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty, which drastically reduces the image quality. Hence, a real-time denoising approach would be desirable for SNR amelioration. In the clinical context of cardiac dysfunction assessment, long acquisitions are required and for most patients the acquisition takes place with free breathing. Hence, it is necessary to compensate respiratory motion in real-time. In this article, a real-time and interactive method for sequential registration and denoising of real-time MR cardiac images is presented. The method has been experimented on 60 fast MRI acquisitions in five healthy volunteers and five patients. These experiments assessed the feasibility of the method in a real-time context.

  9. Simple analytical dual-band spectral-spatial RF pulses for B(1) + and susceptibility artifact reduction in gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cungeng; Deng, Weiran; Stenger, V Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Susceptibility artifacts and transmission radio frequency (RF) field (B(1) +) inhomogeneity are major limitations in high-field gradient echo MRI. Previously proposed numerical 2D spectral-spatial RF pulses have been shown to be promising for reducing the through-plane signal loss susceptibility artifact by incorporating a frequency-dependent through-plane phase correction. This method has recently been extended to 4D spectral-spatial RF pulse designs for reducing B(1) + inhomogeneity as well as the signal loss. In this manuscript, we present simple analytical pulse designs for constructing 2D and 4D spectral-spatial RF pulses as an alternative to the numerical approaches. The 2D pulse capable of exciting slices with reduced signal loss and is lipid suppressing. The 4D pulse simultaneously corrects signal loss as well as the B(1) + inhomogeneity from a body coil transmitter. The pulses are demonstrated with simulations and with gradient echo phantom and brain images at 3T using a standard RF body coil. The pulses were observed to work well for multiple slices and several volunteers. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Three-dimensional ultrashort echo time imaging of solid polymers on a 3-Tesla whole-body MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Springer, Fabian; Martirosian, Petros; Schwenzer, Nina F; Szimtenings, Michael; Kreisler, Peter; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2008-11-01

    With the introduction of ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences solid polymeric materials might become visible on clinical whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. The aim of this study was to characterize solid polymeric materials typically used for instruments in magnetic resonance guided interventions and implants. Relaxation behavior and signal yield were evaluated on a 3-Tesla whole-body MR unit. Nine different commonly used solid polymeric materials were investigated by means of a 3-dimensional (3D) UTE sequence with radial k-space sampling. The investigated polymeric samples with cylindrical shape (length, 150 mm; diameter, 30 mm) were placed in a commercial 8-channel knee coil. For assessment of transverse signal decay (T2*) images with variable echo times (TE) ranging from 0.07 milliseconds to 4.87 milliseconds were recorded. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) was calculated for all MR visible polymers with transverse relaxation times higher than T2* = 300 mus using an adapted method applying variable flip angles. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated at the shortest achievable echo time (TE = 0.07 milliseconds) for standardized sequence parameters. All relaxation times and SNR data are given as arithmetic mean values with standard deviations derived from 5 axially oriented slices placed around the isocenter of the coil and magnet. Six of the 9 investigated solid polymers were visible at TE = 0.07 milliseconds. Visible solid polymers showed markedly different SNR values, ie, polyethylene SNR = 1146 +/- 41, polypropylene SNR = 60 +/- 6. Nearly mono-exponential echo time dependent signal decay was observed: Transverse relaxation times differed from T2*=36 +/- 5 mus for polycarbonate to T2*=792 +/- 7 mus for polyvinylchloride (PVC). Two of the investigated solid polymers were applicable to T1 relaxation time calculation. Polyurethane had a spin-lattice relaxation time of T1 = 172 +/- 1 milliseconds, whereas PVC had T1 = 262 +/- 7 milliseconds

  11. Bunched phase encoding (BPE): a new fast data acquisition method in MRI.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Hisamoto; Duerk, Jeffrey L

    2006-03-01

    A new fast data acquisition method, "Bunched Phase Encoding" (BPE), is presented. In conventional rectilinear data acquisition, only a readout gradient (and no phase encoding gradient) is applied when k-space data are acquired. Reduction of the number of phase encoding lines by increasing the phase encoding step size often leads to aliasing artifacts. Papoulis's generalized sampling theory asserts that in some cases aliasing artifact-free signals can be reconstructed even if the Nyquist criterion is violated in some regions of the Fourier domain. In this study, Papoulis's theoretical construct is exploited to reduce the number of acquired phase encoding lines. To achieve this, k-space data are sampled along a "zigzag" trajectory during each readout; samples are acquired at a sampling frequency higher than that of the normal rectilinear acquisition. The total number of TR cycles and, hence, the total scan time can be reduced. The resultant signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) often varies across the reconstructed image when using the BPE technique, and the image SNR depends on the reconstruction method. This work is comparable to a gradient based version of parallel imaging. Evidence suggests it may serve as the basis for new opportunities for fast data acquisition in MRI. Magn Reson Med, 2006. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Volumetric MRI thermometry using a three-dimensional stack-of-stars echo-planar imaging pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Jonathan, Sumeeth V; Grissom, William A

    2017-08-07

    To measure temperature over a large brain volume with fine spatiotemporal resolution. A three-dimensional stack-of-stars echo-planar imaging sequence combining echo-planar imaging and radial sampling with golden angle spacing was implemented at 3T for proton resonance frequency-shift temperature imaging. The sequence acquires a 188x188x43 image matrix with 1.5x1.5x2.75 mm(3) spatial resolution. Temperature maps were reconstructed using sensitivity encoding (SENSE) image reconstruction followed by the image domain hybrid method, and using the k-space hybrid method. In vivo temperature maps were acquired without heating to measure temperature precision in the brain, and in a phantom during high-intensity focused ultrasound sonication. In vivo temperature standard deviation was less than 1°C at dynamic scan times down to 0.75 s. For a given frame rate, scanning at a minimum repetition time (TR) with minimum acceleration yielded the lowest standard deviation. With frame rates around 3 s, the scan was tolerant to a small number of receive coils, and temperature standard deviation was 48% higher than a standard two-dimensional Fourier transform temperature mapping scan, but provided whole-brain coverage. Phantom temperature maps with no visible aliasing were produced for dynamic scan times as short as 0.38 s. k-Space hybrid reconstructions were more tolerant to acceleration. Three-dimensional stack-of-stars echo-planar imaging temperature mapping provides volumetric brain coverage and fine spatiotemporal resolution. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. PBPK model of methotrexate in cerebrospinal fluid ventricles using a combined microdialysis and MRI acquisition.

    PubMed

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Noury, Fanny; Bruyère, Arnaud; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Le Corre, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the distribution of methotrexate (MTX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lateral ventricles and in cisterna magna after 3rd intraventricular CSF administration in a rabbit model. MTX or gadolinium chelate (Gd-DOTA) was administered in the 3rd ventricle with a local microdialysis to study the pharmacokinetics at the site of administration and with a simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition in the 3rd ventricle, the lateral ventricles and in the cisterna magna. A specific CSF Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was then extrapolated for MTX from Gd-DOTA data. The relative contribution of elimination and distribution processes to the overall disposition of MTX and Gd-DOTA in the 3rd ventricle was similar (i.e., around 60% for CLE and 40% for CLI) suggesting that Gd-DOTA was a suitable surrogate marker for MTX disposition in ventricular CSF. The PBPK predictions for MTX both in CSF of the 3rd ventricle and in plasma were in accordance with the in vivo results. The present study showed that the combination of local CSF microdialysis with MRI acquisition of the brain ventricles and a PBPK model could be a useful methodology to estimate the drug diffusion within CSF ventricles after direct brain CSF administration. Such a methodology would be of interest to clinicians for a rationale determination and optimization of drug dosing parameters in the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases.

  14. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    SciTech Connect

    Adluru, Ganesh Anderson, Jeffrey; Gur, Yaniv; Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions.

  15. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Edna; Frigau, Luca; Voyvodic-Casabo, Clara; Voyvodic, James; Wright, John

    2013-05-28

    BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1) already proficient in at least two languages; or (2) are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1) longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2) statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition.

  16. Multilingualism and fMRI: Longitudinal Study of Second Language Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Edna; Frigau, Luca; Voyvodic-Casabo, Clara; Voyvodic, James; Wright, John

    2013-01-01

    BOLD fMRI is often used for the study of human language. However, there are still very few attempts to conduct longitudinal fMRI studies in the study of language acquisition by measuring auditory comprehension and reading. The following paper is the first in a series concerning a unique longitudinal study devoted to the analysis of bi- and multilingual subjects who are: (1) already proficient in at least two languages; or (2) are acquiring Russian as a second/third language. The focus of the current analysis is to present data from the auditory sections of a set of three scans acquired from April, 2011 through April, 2012 on a five-person subject pool who are learning Russian during the study. All subjects were scanned using the same protocol for auditory comprehension on the same General Electric LX 3T Signa scanner in Duke University Hospital. Using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) for statistical analysis, proficiency measurements are shown to correlate significantly with scan results in the Russian conditions over time. The importance of both the left and right hemispheres in language processing is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the importance of contextualizing imaging data with corresponding behavioral and empirical testing data using a multivariate analysis of variance. This is the only study to date that includes: (1) longitudinal fMRI data with subject-based proficiency and behavioral data acquired in the same time frame; and (2) statistical modeling that demonstrates the importance of covariate language proficiency data for understanding imaging results of language acquisition. PMID:24961428

  17. A study of quantification of aortic compliance in mice using radial acquisition phase contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuandong

    Spatiotemporal changes in blood flow velocity measured using Phase contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to quantify Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) and Wall Shear Stress (WSS), well known indices of vessel compliance. A study was conducted to measure the PWV in the aortic arch in young healthy children using conventional phase contrast MRI and a post processing algorithm that automatically track the peak velocity in phase contrast images. It is shown that the PWV calculated using peak velocity-time data has less variability compared to that using mean velocity and flow. Conventional MR data acquisition techniques lack both the spatial and temporal resolution needed to accurately calculate PWV and WSS in in vivo studies using transgenic animal models of arterial diseases. Radial k-space acquisition can improve both spatial and temporal resolution. A major part of this thesis was devoted to developing technology for Radial Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance (RPCMR) cine imaging on a 7 Tesla Animal scanner. A pulse sequence with asymmetric radial k-space acquisition was designed and implemented. Software developed to reconstruct the RPCMR images include gridding, density compensation and centering of k-Space that corrects the image ghosting introduced by hardware response time. Image processing software was developed to automatically segment the vessel lumen and correct for phase offset due to eddy currents. Finally, in vivo and ex vivo aortic compliance measurements were conducted in a well-established mouse model for atherosclerosis: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO). Using RPCMR technique, a significantly higher PWV value as well as a higher average WSS was detected among 9 months old ApoE-KO mice compare to in wild type mice. A follow up ex-vivo test of tissue elasticity confirmed the impaired distensibility of aortic arteries among ApoE-KO mice.

  18. Efficient Correction of Inhomogeneous Static Magnetic Field-Induced Distortion in Echo Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Dominic; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Dale, Anders M.

    2009-01-01

    Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B0 field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct ‘real-time’ implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images. PMID:19944768

  19. Efficient correction of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-induced distortion in Echo Planar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Holland, Dominic; Kuperman, Joshua M; Dale, Anders M

    2010-03-01

    Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B(0) field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct "real-time" implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images.

  20. ECHO virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  1. Long-term follow-up results of linear accelerator-based radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma using serial three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takayuki; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Kamada, Kensaku; Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Izumi

    2015-02-01

    We examined the characteristic changes in vestibular schwannoma (VS) volume after treatment with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery (LBRS) and the long-term therapeutic effects, by performing three-dimensional (3D) MRI evaluations of tumor volumes. We included 44 patients in whom tumor volume changes could be observed using 3D-spoiled gradient-echo MRI for at least 5 years. Examinations were performed every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after treatment and every 6-12 months thereafter. Enlargement or shrinkage was determined as a change of at least 20% from the volume at the time of treatment. The median observation period was 13.8 years (range, 5.5-19.5 years). The tumor control rates at 5 and 10 years after treatment and at the final MRI were 90.9%, 90.0%, and 88.6%, respectively. Tumor volume changes were categorized into the following four patterns: enlargement, five patients (11.4%); stable, three patients (6.8%); transient enlargement, 24 patients (54.5%); and direct shrinkage, 12 patients (27.3%). Bimodal peaks were observed in three of the 24 patients with transient enlargement. Tumor volume changes from 5 and 10 years post-LBRS to the final observation point were observed in 27 (64.2%) and 10 patients (33.3%), respectively. The long-term tumor volume changes observed after LBRS suggest that radiation exerts long-term effects on tumors. Furthermore, while transient enlargements in tumor volume were characteristic, true tumor enlargements should be characterized by increased volumes of more than two-fold and continued growth for at least 2 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrashort-TE stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) improves the quantification of lipids and fatty acid chain unsaturation in the human liver at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Gajdošík, Martin; Chadzynski, Grzegorz L; Hangel, Gilbert; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Chmelík, Marek; Valkovič, Ladislav; Bogner, Wolfgang; Pohmann, Rolf; Scheffler, Klaus; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Ultrahigh-field, whole-body MR systems increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and improve the spectral resolution. Sequences with a short TE allow fast signal acquisition with low signal loss as a result of spin-spin relaxation. This is of particular importance in the liver for the precise quantification of the hepatocellular content of lipids (HCL). In this study, we introduce a spoiler Gradient-switching Ultrashort STimulated Echo AcqUisition (GUSTEAU) sequence, which is a modified version of a stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequence, with a minimum TE of 6 ms. With the high spectral resolution at 7 T, the efficient elimination of water sidebands and the post-processing suppression of the water signal, we estimated the composition of fatty acids (FAs) via the detection of the olefinic lipid resonance and calculated the unsaturation index (UI) of hepatic FAs. The performance of the GUSTEAU sequence for the assessment of UI was validated against oil samples and provided excellent results in agreement with the data reported in the literature. When measuring HCL with GUSTEAU in 10 healthy volunteers, there was a high correlation between the results obtained at 7 and 3 T (R(2) = 0.961). The test-retest measurements yielded low coefficients of variation for HCL (4 ± 3%) and UI (11 ± 8%) when measured with the GUSTEAU sequence at 7 T. A negative correlation was found between UI and HCL (n = 10; p < 0.033). The ultrashort TE MRS sequence (GUSTEAU; TE = 6 ms) provided high repeatability for the assessment of HCL. The improved spectral resolution at 7 T with the elimination of water sidebands and the offline water subtraction also enabled an assessment of the unsaturation of FAs. This all highlights the potential use of this MRS acquisition scheme for studies of hepatic lipid composition in vivo.

  3. Superior Abdominal 4D Flow MRI Data Consistency with Adjusted Preprocessing Workflow and Noncontrast Acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Keller, Eric J; Collins, Jeremy D; Rigsby, Cynthia; Carr, James C; Markl, Michael; Schnell, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    To assess the impact of an alternative preprocessing workflow on noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced abdominal four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow MRI) data consistency. Twenty patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension (5 women; 53 ± 10 years old) underwent 4D flow MRI at 3.0T before and after administration of 0.03 mmol/kg of gadofosveset trisodium with velocity sensitivities of 100 and 50 cm/s for arterial and venous flow quantifications, respectively. 4D flow MRI data were preprocessed using the conventional workflow (workflow 1), applying noise filters prior to eddy current correction, and an alternative workflow (workflow 2), first correcting for eddy currents and using noise filtering only if needed for anti-aliasing. Vessel segmentation quality was ranked by independent reviewers and compared via Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Flow quantification and conservation of mass at two portal and one arterial branch points were compared via paired t tests. Segmentation quality was significantly higher for workflow 2 (P < 0.05) with excellent interobserver agreement (κ = 0.92). Workflow 2 resulted in larger flow values (P < 0.05) with improved conservation of mass (7.3 ± 6.1% vs. 27.7 ± 25.0%, P < 0.001 [portal]; 10.7 ± 9.0% vs. 21.7 ± 21.6%, P = 0.02 [arterial]). Peak velocities and abdominal aortic flow were similar (P > 0.05). Noncontrast acquisitions yielded significantly smaller portal flow values (P < 0.05) with improved conservation of mass (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 8.7 ± 6.9%, P = 0.05 [portal]; 6.2 ± 4.5% vs. 13.7 ± 10.2%, P = 0.03 [arterial]). Superior abdominal 4D flow MRI data consistency was obtained by applying eddy current correction before any other data manipulation, using noise masking and velocity anti-aliasing cautiously, and using noncontrast acquisitions. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Optimizing Hippocampal Segmentation in Infants Utilizing MRI Post-Acquisition Processing

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deanne K.; Ahmadzai, Zohra M.; Wood, Stephen J.; Inder, Terrie E.; Warfield, Simon K.; Doyle, Lex W.; Egan, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    Research Objectives This study aims to determine the most reliable method for infant hippocampal segmentation by comparing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging post-acquisition processing techniques: contrast to noise ratio (CNR) enhancement, or reformatting to standard orientation. Methods MR scans were performed with a 1.5T GE scanner to obtain dual echo T2 and proton density (PD) images at term equivalent (38-42 weeks' gestational age). 15 hippocampi were manually traced four times on ten infant images by 2 independent raters on the original T2 image, as well as images processed by: a) combining T2 and PD images (T2-PD) to enhance CNR; then b) reformatting T2-PD images perpendicular to the long axis of the left hippocampus. CNRs and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. Results T2-PD images had 17% higher CNR (15.2) than T2 images (12.6). Original T2 volumes' ICC was 0.87 for rater 1 and 0.84 for rater 2, whereas T2-PD images' ICC was 0.95 for rater 1 and 0.87 for rater 2. Reliability of hippocampal segmentation on T2-PD images was not improved by reformatting images (rater 1 ICC= 0.88, rater 2 ICC= 0.66). Significance Post-acquisition processing can improve CNR and hence reliability of hippocampal segmentation in neonate MR scans when tissue contrast is poor. These findings may be applied to enhance boundary definition in infant segmentation for various brain structures or in any volumetric study where image contrast is sub-optimal, enabling hippocampal structure-function relationships to be explored. PMID:22194186

  5. Optimizing hippocampal segmentation in infants utilizing MRI post-acquisition processing.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Deanne K; Ahmadzai, Zohra M; Wood, Stephen J; Inder, Terrie E; Warfield, Simon K; Doyle, Lex W; Egan, Gary F

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to determine the most reliable method for infant hippocampal segmentation by comparing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging post-acquisition processing techniques: contrast to noise ratio (CNR) enhancement, or reformatting to standard orientation. MR scans were performed with a 1.5 T GE scanner to obtain dual echo T2 and proton density (PD) images at term equivalent (38-42 weeks' gestational age). 15 hippocampi were manually traced four times on ten infant images by 2 independent raters on the original T2 image, as well as images processed by: a) combining T2 and PD images (T2-PD) to enhance CNR; then b) reformatting T2-PD images perpendicular to the long axis of the left hippocampus. CNRs and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated. T2-PD images had 17% higher CNR (15.2) than T2 images (12.6). Original T2 volumes' ICC was 0.87 for rater 1 and 0.84 for rater 2, whereas T2-PD images' ICC was 0.95 for rater 1 and 0.87 for rater 2. Reliability of hippocampal segmentation on T2-PD images was not improved by reformatting images (rater 1 ICC = 0.88, rater 2 ICC = 0.66). Post-acquisition processing can improve CNR and hence reliability of hippocampal segmentation in neonate MR scans when tissue contrast is poor. These findings may be applied to enhance boundary definition in infant segmentation for various brain structures or in any volumetric study where image contrast is sub-optimal, enabling hippocampal structure-function relationships to be explored.

  6. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  7. Quantifying cortical bone water in vivo by three-dimensional ultra-short echo-time MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Hamidreza Saligheh; Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Magland, Jeremy F.; Ong, Henry; Li, Cheng; Song, Hee Kwon; Love, James; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-01-01

    Bone contains a significant fraction of water that is not detectable with ordinary Cartesian imaging sequences. The advent of ultra-short echo-time (UTE) methods has allowed the recovery of this submillisecond T2*water. In this work, we have developed a new three-dimensional hybrid-radial ultra-short echo-time (3D HRUTE) imaging technique based on slab selection by means of half-sinc pulses, variable-TE slice encoding and algorithms for quantification. The protocol consists of collecting two datasets differing in TR, from which T1 is extracted, which is needed for quantification. Unlike T2*, which has been found to vary within a narrow range and does not require individual correction, T1 is critically subject dependent (range, 100–350 ms). No soft-tissue suppression was used to preserve the signal-to-noise ratio of the short-T2 bone water protons or to minimize the loss of relatively mobile water in large pores. Critical for quantification is correction for spatial variations in reception field and selection of the endosteal boundary for inclusion of pixels in the bone water calculation, because of the ruffled boundary stemming from trabecularization of the endosteal surface. The reproducibility, evaluated in 10 subjects covering the age range 30–80 years, yielded an average coefficient of variation of 4.2% and an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95, suggesting that a treatment effect on the order of 5% could be detected in as few as 10 subjects. Lastly, experiments in specimens by means of graded deuterium exchange showed that approximately 90% of the detected signal arises from water protons, whose relaxation rates (1/T1 and 1/T2*) scale linearly with the isotopic volume fraction of light water after stepwise exchange with heavy water. The data thus show conclusively that the method quantifies water even though, in vivo, no distinction can be made between various fractions, such as collagen-bound vs pore-resident water. PMID:21274960

  8. Repeatability of a dual gradient-recalled echo MRI method for monitoring post-isometric contraction blood volume and oxygenation changes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, O A; Louie, E A; Copenhaver, E A; Damon, B M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a dual gradient-recalled echo (GRE) muscle functional MRI technique. On 2 days, subjects (n = 8) performed 10 s isometric dorsiflexion contractions under conditions of: (1) maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), (2) 50% MVC (50% MVC), or (3) 50% MVC with concurrent proximal arterial cuff occlusion (50% MVC(cuff)). Functional MRI data were acquired using single-slice dual GRE (TR/TE = 1000/6, 46 ms)-echo planar imaging for 20 s before, during, and for 180 s after each contraction. The mean signal intensity (SI) time courses at each TE (SI(6) and SI(46), reflecting variations in blood volume and %HbO(2), respectively) from the tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were characterized with the post-contraction change in SI and the time-to-peak SI (DeltaSI and TTP, respectively). DeltaSI(6) following an MVC was 36% higher than that obtained after a 50% MVC (p = 0.048). For DeltaSI(6), the highest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were observed for the TA muscle in the 50% MVC and MVC conditions, with values of 0.83 (p = 0.01) and 0.88 (p = 0.005), respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed repeatability coefficients (RCs) for the 50% MVC and MVC conditions in the TA muscle of 1.9 and 1.4, respectively. The most repeatable measures for DeltaSI(46) were obtained for the 50% MVC and MVC conditions in the EDL muscle (p = 0.01 and p = 0.04, respectively). Bland-Altman plots revealed RC's for 50% MVC and MVC conditions in the EDL muscle of 3.9 and 5.7, respectively. DeltaSI(6) and DeltaSI(46) increased as a function of the contraction intensity. The repeatability of the method depends on the muscle and contraction condition being evaluated, and in general, is higher following an MVC. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Phantom-based investigation of nonrigid registration constraints in mapping fMRI to anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studholme, Colin; Constable, R. Todd; Duncan, James S.

    2000-06-01

    In previous work we have introduced an approach to improving the registration of EPI fMRI data with anatomical MRI by accounting for differences in magnetic field induced geometric distortion in the two types of MRI acquisition. In particular we began to explore the use of imaging physics based constraints in a non-rigid multi-modality registration algorithm. In this paper we present phantom based experimental work examining the behavior of different non-rigid registration constraints compared to a field map acquisition of the MRI distortion. This acquisition provides a pixel by pixel 'ground truth' estimate of the displacement field within the EPI data. In our registration based approach we employ a B-spline based estimate of the relative geometric distortion with a multi-grid optimization scheme. We maximize the normalized mutual information between the two types of MRI scans to estimate the B-Spline parameters. Using the field map estimates as a gold standard, registration estimates using no additional geometric constraints are compared to those using the spin echo based signal conservation. We also examine the use of logarithmic EPI values in the criteria to provide additional sensitivity in areas of low signal. Results indicate that registration of EPI to conventional MRI incorporating a spin echo distortion model can provide comparable estimates of geometric distortion to those from field mapping data without the need for significant additional acquisitions during each fMRI sequence.

  10. The Role of Age of Acquisition on Past Tense Generation in Spanish-English Bilinguals: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Eric J.; Hernandez, Arturo E.

    2013-01-01

    At its most basic sense, the sensorimotor/emergentist (S/E) model suggests that early second language (L2) learning is preferentially reliant upon sensory and motor processes, while later L2 learning is accomplished by greater reliance on executive abilities. To investigate the S/E model using fMRI, neural correlates of L2 age of acquisition were…

  11. The Role of Age of Acquisition on Past Tense Generation in Spanish-English Bilinguals: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Eric J.; Hernandez, Arturo E.

    2013-01-01

    At its most basic sense, the sensorimotor/emergentist (S/E) model suggests that early second language (L2) learning is preferentially reliant upon sensory and motor processes, while later L2 learning is accomplished by greater reliance on executive abilities. To investigate the S/E model using fMRI, neural correlates of L2 age of acquisition were…

  12. Temporal resolution improvement of calibration-free dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with compressed sensing optimized turbo spin echo: The effects of replacing turbo factor with compressed sensing accelerations.

    PubMed

    Han, SoHyun; Cho, HyungJoon

    2016-07-01

    To enhance the temporal resolution of calibration-free dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) by implementing compressed sensing assisted turbo spin echo (CS-TSE) acquisition. The dynamic sparse sampling variables including acceleration factor, randomized phase encoding distributions, and reconstruction constraints were retrospectively optimized by minimizing the difference from fully sampled dynamic TSE at 7T. The degree of contrast enhancement and the calibration-free quantification of gadolinium (Gd) concentration were evaluated among fast low-angle shot (FLASH), TSE, and CS-TSE acquisitions with multiple phantoms (0.1-6 mM). The kidney-feeding in vivo arterial input function (AIF) was measured at multiple administration doses (0.1-0.3 mmol/kg) to evaluate the benefit of CS-TSE for quantifying rapidly changing high Gd concentrations in C57BL/6 mice (n = 22). In phantom studies, both calibration-free and calibrated conversions estimated equivalent Gd concentrations for CS-TSE (scatterplot slope = 0.9801, r(2)  = 0.9998, P < 0.001). In in vivo studies, 4-fold higher temporal resolution (0.96 sec) of CS-TSE over the corresponding TSE enabled robust measurement of AIF first-pass peak and resulting peak enhancement with CS-TSE were observed, with 1.1439- and 2.1258-fold times higher than those with TSE and FLASH acquisitions, respectively, at the 0.1 mmol/kg dose. Calibration-free estimates of AIF peak concentration with CS-TSE were in good agreement with the calibrated approach at multiple administration doses (scatterplot slope = 0.7800, r(2)  = 0.8014, P < 0.001). Temporal resolution-improved CS-TSE provides practical subsecond (0.96s) calibration-free dynamic MR quantification of high Gd concentration. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:138-147. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  14. Hybrid core shell nanoparticles entrapping Gd-DTPA and (18)F-FDG for simultaneous PET/MRI acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Vecchione, Donatella; Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Nicolai, Emanuele; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Torino, Enza

    2017-09-01

    Although there has been an improvement in the hardware and software of the PET/MRI system, the development of the nanoprobes exploiting the simultaneous acquisition of the bimodal data is still under investigation. Moreover, few studies on biocompatible and clinically relevant probes are available. This work presents a core-shell polymeric nanocarrier with improved relaxometric properties for simultaneous PET/MRI acquisitions. Core-shell nanoparticles entrapping the Gd-DTPA and (18)F-FDG are obtained by a complex coacervation. The boosting of r1 of the entrapped Gd-DTPA up to five-times compared with 'free Gd-DTPA', is confirmed by the PET/MRI scan. The sorption of (18)F-FDG into the nanoparticles is studied and designed to be integrated downstream for the production of the tracer.

  15. Comparison of 3D turbo spin-echo SPACE sequences with conventional 2D MRI sequences to assess the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Jost Karsten; Winterstein, Marianne; Akbar, Michael; Meyer, Esther; Paul, Dominik; Kauczor, Haus-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2014-10-01

    To determine the accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional (3D) T1- and proton density (PD)-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolution (SPACE) compared with conventional 2D sequences in assessment of the shoulder-joint. Ninety-three subjects were examined on a 3-T MRI system with both conventional 2D-TSE sequences in T1-, T2- and PD-weighting and 3D SPACE sequences in T1- and PD-weighting. All examinations were assessed independently by two reviewers for common pathologies of the shoulder-joint. Agreement between 2D- and 3D-sequences and inter-observer-agreement was evaluated using kappa-statistics. Using conventional 2D TSE sequences as standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 3D SPACE were 81.8%, 95.1%, and 93.5% for injuries of the supraspinatus-tendon (SSP), 81.3%, 93.5%, and 91.4% for the cartilage layer and 82.4%, 98.5%, and 97.5% for the long biceps tendon. Concordance between 2D and 3D was almost perfect for tendinopathies of the SSP (κ=0.85), osteoarthritis (κ=1), luxation of the biceps tendon (κ=1) and adjacent bone marrow (κ=0.92). Inter-observer-agreement was generally higher for conventional 2D TSE sequences (κ, 0.23-1.0), when compared to 3D SPACE sequences (κ, -0.33 to 1.0) except for disorders of the long biceps tendon and supraspinatus tendon rupture. Because of substantial and almost perfect concordance with conventional 2D TSE sequences for common shoulder pathologies, MRI examination-time can be reduced by nearly 40% (up to 11 min) using 3D-SPACE without loss of information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The PRESTO technique for fMRI

    PubMed Central

    van Gelderen, P.; Duyn, J.H.; Ramsey, N.F.; Liu, G.; Moonen, C.T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In the early days of BOLD fMRI, the acquisition of T2* weighted data was greatly facilitated by rapid scan techniques such as EPI. The latter, however, was only available on a few MRI systems that were equipped with specialized hardware that allowed rapid switching of the imaging gradients. For this reason, soon after the invention of fMRI, the scan technique PRESTO was developed to make rapid T2* weighted scanning available on standard clinical scanning. This method combined echo shifting, which allows for echo times longer than the sequence repetition time, with acquisition of multiple k-space lines per excitation. These two concepts were combined in order to achieve a method fast enough for fMRI, while maintaining a sufficiently long echo time for optimal contrast. PRESTO has been primarily used for 3D scanning, which minimized the contribution of large vessels due to inflow effects. Although PRESTO is still being used today, its appeal has lessened somewhat due to increased gradient performance of modern MRI scanners. Compared to 2D EPI, PRESTO may have somewhat reduced temporal stability, which is a disadvantage for fMRI that may not outweigh the advantage of reduced inflow effects provided by 3D scanning. In this overview, the history of the development of the PRESTO is presented, followed by a qualitative comparison with EPI. PMID:22245350

  17. The PRESTO technique for fMRI.

    PubMed

    van Gelderen, P; Duyn, J H; Ramsey, N F; Liu, G; Moonen, C T W

    2012-08-15

    In the early days of BOLD fMRI, the acquisition of T(2)(*) weighted data was greatly facilitated by rapid scan techniques such as EPI. The latter, however, was only available on a few MRI systems that were equipped with specialized hardware that allowed rapid switching of the imaging gradients. For this reason, soon after the invention of fMRI, the scan technique PRESTO was developed to make rapid T(2)(*) weighted scanning available on standard clinical scanners. This method combined echo shifting, which allows for echo times longer than the sequence repetition time, with acquisition of multiple k-space lines per excitation. These two concepts were combined in order to achieve a method fast enough for fMRI, while maintaining a sufficiently long echo time for optimal contrast. PRESTO has been primarily used for 3D scanning, which minimized the contribution of large vessels due to inflow effects. Although PRESTO is still being used today, its appeal has lessened somewhat due to increased gradient performance of modern MRI scanners. Compared to 2D EPI, PRESTO may have somewhat reduced temporal stability, which is a disadvantage for fMRI that may not outweigh the advantage of reduced inflow effects provided by 3D scanning. In this overview, the history of the development of the PRESTO is presented, followed by a qualitative comparison with EPI. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Single-shot echo-planar imaging with Nyquist ghost compensation: interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) echo-planar imaging (EPI).

    PubMed

    Poser, Benedikt A; Barth, Markus; Goa, Pål-Erik; Deng, Weiran; Stenger, V Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) is most commonly used for blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI, owing to its sensitivity and acquisition speed. A major problem with EPI is Nyquist (N/2) ghosting, most notably at high field. EPI data are acquired under an oscillating readout gradient and hence vulnerable to gradient imperfections such as eddy current delays and off-resonance effects, as these cause inconsistencies between odd and even k-space lines after time reversal. We propose a straightforward and pragmatic method herein termed "interleaved dual echo with acceleration (IDEA) EPI": two k-spaces (echoes) are acquired under the positive and negative readout lobes, respectively, by performing phase encoding blips only before alternate readout gradients. From these two k-spaces, two almost entirely ghost free images per shot can be constructed, without need for phase correction. The doubled echo train length can be compensated by parallel imaging and/or partial Fourier acquisition. The two k-spaces can either be complex averaged during reconstruction, which results in near-perfect cancellation of residual phase errors, or reconstructed into separate images. We demonstrate the efficacy of IDEA EPI and show phantom and in vivo images at both 3 T and 7 T.

  19. Understanding Intentions of Others Reflects Evoked Responses in the Human Mirror Neuron System: Evidence From Combined fMRI and EEG Repetition Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    acquisition Functional MRI recordings were conducted using a 3T TIM Trio Siemens Magnetom with a 12 channel phased- array head coil . Foam padding...attend to video-clips displaying hand-on- object actions, and to try to decode “why” actions were being performed. Functional MRI results confirmed...was used for head stabilization. For each functional run, an echo planar gradient-echo imaging sequence sensitive to BOLD contrast was used to

  20. ICA-based artefact removal and accelerated fMRI acquisition for improved resting state network imaging.

    PubMed

    Griffanti, Ludovica; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Beckmann, Christian F; Auerbach, Edward J; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Sexton, Claire E; Zsoldos, Enikő; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Filippini, Nicola; Mackay, Clare E; Moeller, Steen; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ugurbil, Kamil; Miller, Karla L; Smith, Stephen M

    2014-07-15

    The identification of resting state networks (RSNs) and the quantification of their functional connectivity in resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) are seriously hindered by the presence of artefacts, many of which overlap spatially or spectrally with RSNs. Moreover, recent developments in fMRI acquisition yield data with higher spatial and temporal resolutions, but may increase artefacts both spatially and/or temporally. Hence the correct identification and removal of non-neural fluctuations is crucial, especially in accelerated acquisitions. In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of three data-driven cleaning procedures, compare standard against higher (spatial and temporal) resolution accelerated fMRI acquisitions, and investigate the combined effect of different acquisitions and different cleanup approaches. We applied single-subject independent component analysis (ICA), followed by automatic component classification with FMRIB's ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) to identify artefactual components. We then compared two first-level (within-subject) cleaning approaches for removing those artefacts and motion-related fluctuations from the data. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedures was assessed using time series (amplitude and spectra), network matrix and spatial map analyses. For time series and network analyses we also tested the effect of a second-level cleaning (informed by group-level analysis). Comparing these approaches, the preferable balance between noise removal and signal loss was achieved by regressing out of the data the full space of motion-related fluctuations and only the unique variance of the artefactual ICA components. Using similar analyses, we also investigated the effects of different cleaning approaches on data from different acquisition sequences. With the optimal cleaning procedures, functional connectivity results from accelerated data were statistically comparable or significantly better than the standard (unaccelerated) acquisition, and

  1. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  2. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Samantha I; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C; Zacks, David N; Tjan, Bosco S

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function.

  3. Exploring the acquisition and production of grammatical constructions through human-robot interaction with echo state networks

    PubMed Central

    Hinaut, Xavier; Petit, Maxime; Pointeau, Gregoire; Dominey, Peter Ford

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal functions of human language is to allow people to coordinate joint action. This includes the description of events, requests for action, and their organization in time. A crucial component of language acquisition is learning the grammatical structures that allow the expression of such complex meaning related to physical events. The current research investigates the learning of grammatical constructions and their temporal organization in the context of human-robot physical interaction with the embodied sensorimotor humanoid platform, the iCub. We demonstrate three noteworthy phenomena. First, a recurrent network model is used in conjunction with this robotic platform to learn the mappings between grammatical forms and predicate-argument representations of meanings related to events, and the robot's execution of these events in time. Second, this learning mechanism functions in the inverse sense, i.e., in a language production mode, where rather than executing commanded actions, the robot will describe the results of human generated actions. Finally, we collect data from naïve subjects who interact with the robot via spoken language, and demonstrate significant learning and generalization results. This allows us to conclude that such a neural language learning system not only helps to characterize and understand some aspects of human language acquisition, but also that it can be useful in adaptive human-robot interaction. PMID:24834050

  4. Exploring the acquisition and production of grammatical constructions through human-robot interaction with echo state networks.

    PubMed

    Hinaut, Xavier; Petit, Maxime; Pointeau, Gregoire; Dominey, Peter Ford

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal functions of human language is to allow people to coordinate joint action. This includes the description of events, requests for action, and their organization in time. A crucial component of language acquisition is learning the grammatical structures that allow the expression of such complex meaning related to physical events. The current research investigates the learning of grammatical constructions and their temporal organization in the context of human-robot physical interaction with the embodied sensorimotor humanoid platform, the iCub. We demonstrate three noteworthy phenomena. First, a recurrent network model is used in conjunction with this robotic platform to learn the mappings between grammatical forms and predicate-argument representations of meanings related to events, and the robot's execution of these events in time. Second, this learning mechanism functions in the inverse sense, i.e., in a language production mode, where rather than executing commanded actions, the robot will describe the results of human generated actions. Finally, we collect data from naïve subjects who interact with the robot via spoken language, and demonstrate significant learning and generalization results. This allows us to conclude that such a neural language learning system not only helps to characterize and understand some aspects of human language acquisition, but also that it can be useful in adaptive human-robot interaction.

  5. MR assessment of left ventricular function: quantitative comparison of fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) with fast gradient echo cine technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Stern, Jessica S; Mai, Vu M; Pierchala, Linda N; Edelman, Robert R; Prasad, Pottumarthi V

    2002-11-01

    To evaluate the agreement of fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) cine technique with segmented k-space fast gradient echo (GRE) cine technique when using them for assessment of cardiac function. Eleven MR cine studies were performed on six healthy volunteers and five patients, using FIESTA and fast GRE techniques. The quantitative measurements of ventricular function obtained from the two techniques were compared. The data analysis was performed by two observers independently. Compared to fast GRE cine technique, FIESTA cine technique consistently resulted in higher end-diastolic volume (10.2%) and end-systolic volume (21.6%), but lower myocardial mass of left ventricle (19.2%) and ejection fraction (9.9%). The stroke volume obtained from the two techniques was very close. The primary explanation for this variability is that the two techniques have different mechanisms on establishing signal contrast. Compared to fast GRE technique, FIESTA provides significantly different results when using it for assessment of left ventricular function. It is important to consider this difference in the assessment of cardiac function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Simultaneous R2*, R2, and R2' quantification by combining S0 estimation of the free induction decay with a single spin echo: A single acquisition method for R2 insensitive quantification of holmium-166-loaded microspheres.

    PubMed

    van de Maat, G H; de Leeuw, H; Seevinck, P R; van den Bosch, M A A J; Nijsen, J F W; Bakker, C J G

    2015-01-01

    To present a new method, S0 estimation of the free induction decay combined with a single spin echo measurement (SOFIDSE), that enables simultaneous measurements of R2*, R2, and R2' in order to quantify the local concentration of holmium microspheres (Ho-MS) for radioembolization. SOFIDSE estimates R2* and the signal magnitude at time point 0, S0, from a multigradient echo readout of the free induction decay and subsequently estimates R2 using S0 and a single spin echo, from which R2' is deducted. The method was evaluated by comparing SOFIDSE R2 values with values obtained from shifted spin echo (SSE) measurements on a phantom setup containing Ho-MS and from dual spin echo measurements on a healthy volunteer. On average, SOFIDSE showed a small overestimation of R2 values compared with SSE independent of the microsphere concentration. R2' values determined by subtraction of either SOFIDSE R2 or SSE R2 from R2* showed excellent agreement (correlation coefficient = 1; P = 9 · 10(-11)). The Ho-MS-induced R2' values obtained by SOFIDSE were insensitive to the R2 value of the tissue in which they resided. SOFIDSE enables quantification of Ho-MS, in media with spatially or temporally varying R2 values, in a single acquisition. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  8. Repeatability of a Dual Gradient-Recalled Echo MRI Method for Monitoring Post-Isometric Contraction Blood Volume and Oxygenation Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, O.A.; Louie, E.A.; Copenhaver, E.A.; Damon, B.M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a dual gradient-recalled echo (GRE) muscle functional MRI technique. On two days, subjects (n=8) performed 10 s isometric dorsiflexion contractions under conditions of: 1) maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), 2) 50% MVC (50%MVC) or 3) 50% MVC with concurrent proximal arterial cuff occlusion (50%MVCcuff). Functional MRI data were acquired using single-slice dual GRE (TR/TE=1000/6, 46 ms) EPI for 20 seconds before, during, and for 180 seconds after each contraction. The mean signal intensity (SI) time courses at each TE (SI6 and SI46, reflecting variations in blood volume and %HbO2, respectively) from the tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum (EDL) muscles were characterized with the post-contraction change in SI and the time to peak SI (ΔSI and TTP, respectively). ΔSI6 and ΔSI46 were 36% and 31% higher following an MVC than after a 50%MVC (p = 0.05 and p = 0.07 respectively). For ΔSI6 the highest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were observed for the TA muscle at the 50%MVC and MVC condition, with values of 0.83 (p = 0.01) and 0.88 (p = 0.005), respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed repeatability coefficients (RC) for the 50%MVC and MVC conditions in the TA muscle of 1.9 and 1.4, respectively. The most repeatable measures for ΔSI46 were obtained for the 50%MVC and MVC conditions in the EDL muscle (p = 0.01 and p = 0.04, respectively). Bland-Altman plots revealed RC’s for 50%MVC and MVC conditions in the EDL muscle of 3.9 and 5.7, respectively. ΔSI6 and ΔSI46 increased as a function of contraction intensity. The repeatability of the method depends on the muscle and contraction condition being evaluated, and in general, is higher following an MVC. PMID:19382156

  9. Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Loveless, Mary E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). PMID:23105959

  10. Evaluation of MRI acquisition workflow with lean six sigma method: case study of liver and knee examinations.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Boll, Daniel T; Wall, Lisa K; Merkle, Elmar M

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess workflow for medical imaging studies, specifically comparing liver and knee MRI examinations by use of the Lean Six Sigma methodologic framework. The hypothesis tested was that the Lean Six Sigma framework can be used to quantify MRI workflow and to identify sources of inefficiency to target for sequence and protocol improvement. Audio-video interleave streams representing individual acquisitions were obtained with graphic user interface screen capture software in the examinations of 10 outpatients undergoing MRI of the liver and 10 outpatients undergoing MRI of the knee. With Lean Six Sigma methods, the audio-video streams were dissected into value-added time (true image data acquisition periods), business value-added time (time spent that provides no direct patient benefit but is requisite in the current system), and non-value-added time (scanner inactivity while awaiting manual input). For overall MRI table time, value-added time was 43.5% (range, 39.7-48.3%) of the time for liver examinations and 89.9% (range, 87.4-93.6%) for knee examinations. Business value-added time was 16.3% of the table time for the liver and 4.3% of the table time for the knee examinations. Non-value-added time was 40.2% of the overall table time for the liver and 5.8% for the knee examinations. Liver MRI examinations consume statistically significantly more non-value-added and business value-added times than do knee examinations, primarily because of respiratory command management and contrast administration. Workflow analyses and accepted inefficiency reduction frameworks can be applied with use of a graphic user interface screen capture program.

  11. The time window of MRI of murine atherosclerotic plaques after administration of CB2 receptor targeted micelles: inter-scan variability and relation between plaque signal intensity increase and gadolinium content of inversion recovery prepared versus non-prepared fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    te Boekhorst, B C M; Bovens, S M; van de Kolk, C W A; Cramer, M J M; Doevendans, P A F M; ten Hove, M; van der Weerd, L; Poelmann, R; Strijkers, G J; Pasterkamp, G; van Echteld, C J A

    2010-10-01

    Single fast spin echo scans covering limited time frames are mostly used for contrast-enhanced MRI of atherosclerotic plaque biomarkers. Knowledge on inter-scan variability of the normalized enhancement ratio of plaque (NER(plaque)) and relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium content for inversion-recovery fast spin echo is limited. Study aims were: evaluation of (1) timing of MRI after intravenous injection of cannabinoid-2 receptor (CB2-R) (expressed by human and mouse plaque macrophages) targeted micelles; (2) inter-scan variability of inversion-recovery fast spin echo and fast spin echo; (3) relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium content for inversion-recovery fast spin echo and fast spin echo. Inversion-recovery fast spin echo/fast spin echo imaging was performed before and every 15 min up to 48 h after injection of CB2-R targeted or control micelles using several groups of mice measured in an interleaved fashion. NER(plaque) (determined on inversion-recovery fast spin echo images) remained high (∼2) until 48 h after injection of CB2-R targeted micelles, whereas NER(plaque) decreased after 36 h in the control group. The inter-scan variability and relation between NER(plaque) and gadolinium (assessed with inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry) were compared between inversion-recovery fast spin echo and fast spin echo. Inter-scan variability was higher for inversion-recovery fast spin echo than for fast spin echo. Although gadolinium and NER(plaque) correlated well for both techniques, the NER of plaque was higher for inversion-recovery fast spin echo than for fast spin echo. In mice injected with CB2-R targeted micelles, NER(plaque) can be best evaluated at 36-48 h post-injection. Because NER(plaque) was higher for inversion-recovery fast spin echo than for fast spin echo, but with high inter-scan variability, repeated inversion-recovery fast spin echo imaging and averaging of the obtained NER(plaque) values is recommended.

  12. Clinical Utility of Continuous Radial MRI Acquisition at 3T in Patellofemoral Kinematic Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Daniel James; Campbell, Kirk A.; Alaia, Michael Joseph; Strauss, Eric Jason; Jazrawi, Laith M.; Chang, Gregory; Burke, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Continuous gradient-echo (GRE) acquisition or “dynamic magnetic resonance imaging”, allows for high-speed examination of pathologies based on joint motion. We sought to assess the efficacy of a radial GRE sequence with in the characterization of patellofemoral maltracking. Methods: Patients with suspected patellofemoral maltracking and asymptomatic volunteers were scanned using GRE (Siemens LiveView WIP; Malvern, PA, USA) at 3T in the axial plane at the patella level through a range of flexion-extension (0-30°). The mean time to perform the dynamic component ranged from 3-7 mins. Lateral maltracking (amount patella moved laterally through knee ranging) was measured. Patella lateralization was categorized as normal (≤ 2mm), mild (2-5mm), moderate (5-10mm), or severe (>10mm). Tibial tuberosity:trochlear groove (TT:TG) distance, trochlea depth, Insall-Salvati ratio, and patellofemoral cartilage quality (according to the modified Outerbridge grading system) were also assessed. Results: Eighteen symptomatic (6 men; 12 women, age range 14-51 years) and 10 asymptomatic subjects (6 men; 4 women, age range 25-68 years) were included. Two symptomatic patients underwent bilateral examinations. Lateralization in the symptomatic group was normal (n=10), mild (n=2), moderate (n=5) and severe (n=3). There was no abnormal maltracking in the volunteer group. Lateral tracking significantly correlated with TT:TG distance (F=38.0; p<.0001), trochlea depth (F=5.8; p=.023), Insall-Salvati ratio (F=4.642; p=.04) and Outerbridge Patella score (F=6.6; p=.016). Lateral tracking did not correlate with Outerbridge Trochlear score. Conclusion: Lateral tracking measured on GRE was found to significantly correlate with current measures of patellar instability including, TT:TG, trochlea depth, and the Insall-Salvati ratio. GRE is a rapid and easily performed addition to the standard protocol for kinematic patellofemoral motion and can add dynamic information on patellofemoral

  13. SU-F-R-32: Evaluation of MRI Acquisition Parameter Variations On Texture Feature Extraction Using ACR Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y; Wang, J; Wang, C; Chang, Z

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity of classic texture features to variations of MRI acquisition parameters. Methods: This study was performed on American College of Radiology (ACR) MRI Accreditation Program Phantom. MR imaging was acquired on a GE 750 3T scanner with XRM explain gradient, employing a T1-weighted images (TR/TE=500/20ms) with the following parameters as the reference standard: number of signal average (NEX) = 1, matrix size = 256×256, flip angle = 90°, slice thickness = 5mm. The effect of the acquisition parameters on texture features with and without non-uniformity correction were investigated respectively, while all the other parameters were kept as reference standard. Protocol parameters were set as follows: (a). NEX = 0.5, 2 and 4; (b).Phase encoding steps = 128, 160 and 192; (c). Matrix size = 128×128, 192×192 and 512×512. 32 classic texture features were generated using the classic gray level run length matrix (GLRLM) and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) from each image data set. Normalized range ((maximum-minimum)/mean) was calculated to determine variation among the scans with different protocol parameters. Results: For different NEX, 31 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%. For different phase encoding steps, 31 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%. For different acquisition matrix size without non-uniformity correction, 14 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%; for different acquisition matrix size with non-uniformity correction, 16 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%. Conclusion: Initial results indicated that those texture features that range within 10% are less sensitive to variations in T1-weighted MRI acquisition parameters. This might suggest that certain texture features might be more reliable to be used as potential biomarkers in MR quantitative image analysis.

  14. Optimization of saturation-recovery dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI acquisition protocol: monte carlo simulation approach demonstrated with gadolinium MR renography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jeff L; Conlin, Chris C; Carlston, Kristi; Xie, Luke; Kim, Daniel; Morrell, Glen; Morton, Kathryn; Lee, Vivian S

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI is widely used for the measurement of tissue perfusion and to assess organ function. MR renography, which is acquired using a DCE sequence, can measure renal perfusion, filtration and concentrating ability. Optimization of the DCE acquisition protocol is important for the minimization of the error propagation from the acquired signals to the estimated parameters, thus improving the precision of the parameters. Critical to the optimization of contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted protocols is the balance of the T1 -shortening effect across the range of gadolinium (Gd) contrast concentration in the tissue of interest. In this study, we demonstrate a Monte Carlo simulation approach for the optimization of DCE MRI, in which a saturation-recovery T1 -weighted gradient echo sequence is simulated and the impact of injected dose (D) and time delay (TD, for saturation recovery) is tested. The results show that high D and/or high TD cause saturation of the peak arterial signals and lead to an overestimation of renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, the use of low TD (e.g. 100 ms) and low D leads to similar errors in RPF and GFR, because of the Rician bias in the pre-contrast arterial signals. Our patient study including 22 human subjects compared TD values of 100 and 300 ms after the injection of 4 mL of Gd contrast for MR renography. At TD = 100 ms, we computed an RPF value of 157.2 ± 51.7 mL/min and a GFR of 33.3 ± 11.6 mL/min. These results were all significantly higher than the parameter estimates at TD = 300 ms: RPF = 143.4 ± 48.8 mL/min (p = 0.0006) and GFR = 30.2 ± 11.5 mL/min (p = 0.0015). In conclusion, appropriate optimization of the DCE MRI protocol using simulation can effectively improve the precision and, potentially, the accuracy of the measured parameters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Optimization of saturation-recovery dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI acquisition protocol: monte carlo simulation approach demonstrated with gadolinium MR renography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Conlin, Chris C.; Carlston, Kristi; Xie, Luke; Kim, Daniel; Morrell, Glen; Morton, Kathryn; Lee, Vivian S.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI is widely used for the measurement of tissue perfusion and to assess organ function. MR renography, which is acquired using a DCE sequence, can measure renal perfusion, filtration and concentrating ability. Optimization of the DCE acquisition protocol is important for the minimization of the error propagation from the acquired signals to the estimated parameters, thus improving the precision of the parameters. Critical to the optimization of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted protocols is the balance of the T1-shortening effect across the range of gadolinium (Gd) contrast concentration in the tissue of interest. In this study, we demonstrate a Monte Carlo simulation approach for the optimization of DCE MRI, in which a saturation-recovery T1-weighted gradient echo sequence is simulated and the impact of injected dose (D) and time delay (TD, for saturation recovery) is tested. The results show that high D and/or high TD cause saturation of the peak arterial signals and lead to an overestimation of renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, the use of low TD (e.g. 100 ms) and low D leads to similar errors in RPF and GFR, because of the Rician bias in the pre-contrast arterial signals. Our patient study including 22 human subjects compared TD values of 100 and 300 ms after the injection of 4 mL of Gd contrast for MR renography. At TD = 100 ms, we computed an RPF value of 157.2 ± 51.7 mL/min and a GFR of 33.3 ± 11.6 mL/min. These results were all significantly higher than the parameter estimates at TD = 300 ms: RPF = 143.4 ± 48.8 mL/min (p = 0.0006) and GFR = 30.2 ± 11.5 mL/min (p = 0.0015). In conclusion, appropriate optimization of the DCE MRI protocol using simulation can effectively improve the precision and, potentially, the accuracy of the measured parameters. PMID:27200499

  16. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  17. Skeletal muscle diffusion tensor-MRI fiber tracking: rationale, data acquisition and analysis methods, applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Froeling, Martijn; Buck, Amanda K W; Oudeman, Jos; Ding, Zhaohua; Nederveen, Aart J; Bush, Emily C; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical functions of muscles involve the generation of force and the actuation of movement by shortening or lengthening under load. These functions are influenced, in part, by the internal arrangement of muscle fibers with respect to the muscle's mechanical line of action. This property is known as muscle architecture. In this review, we describe the use of diffusion tensor (DT)-MRI muscle fiber tracking for the study of muscle architecture. In the first section, the importance of skeletal muscle architecture to function is discussed. In addition, traditional and complementary methods for the assessment of muscle architecture (brightness-mode ultrasound imaging and cadaver analysis) are presented. Next, DT-MRI is introduced and the structural basis for the reduced and anisotropic diffusion of water in muscle is discussed. The third section discusses issues related to the acquisition of skeletal muscle DT-MRI data and presents recommendations for optimal strategies. The fourth section discusses methods for the pre-processing of DT-MRI data, the available approaches for the calculation of the diffusion tensor and the seeding and propagating of fiber tracts, and the analysis of the tracking results to measure structural properties pertinent to muscle biomechanics. Lastly, examples are presented of how DT-MRI fiber tracking has been used to provide new insights into how muscles function, and important future research directions are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Echo planar imaging at 4 Tesla with minimum acoustic noise.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Dardo G; Ernst, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    To minimize the acoustic sound pressure levels of single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions on high magnetic field MRI scanners. The resonance frequencies of gradient coil vibrations, which depend on the coil length and the elastic properties of the materials in the coil assembly, were measured using piezoelectric transducers. The frequency of the EPI-readout train was adjusted to avoid the frequency ranges of mechanical resonances. Our MRI system exhibited two sharp mechanical resonances (at 720 and 1220 Hz) that can increase vibrational amplitudes up to six-fold. A small adjustment of the EPI-readout frequency made it possible to reduce the sound pressure level of EPI-based perfusion and functional MRI scans by 12 dB. Normal vibrational modes of MRI gradient coils can dramatically increase the sound pressure levels during echo planar imaging (EPI) scans. To minimize acoustic noise, the frequency of EPI-readout trains and the resonance frequencies of gradient coil vibrations need to be different. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. ECHO Tutorials | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tutorials describing key features in ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online. Users can search for compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  20. Accuracy of respiratory motion measurement of 4D-MRI: A comparison between cine and sequential acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Rhee, DongJoo; Cai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have recently developed a cine-mode T2*/T1-weighted 4D-MRI technique and a sequential-mode T2-weighted 4D-MRI technique for imaging respiratory motion. This study aims at investigating which 4D-MRI image acquisition mode, cine or sequential, provides more accurate measurement of organ motion during respiration. Methods: A 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom with a hypothesized tumor was used to simulate the image acquisition and the 4D-MRI reconstruction. The respiratory motion was controlled by the given breathing signal profiles. The tumor was manipulated to move continuously with the surrounding tissue. The motion trajectories were measured from both sequential- and cine-mode 4D-MRI images. The measured trajectories were compared with the average trajectory calculated from the input profiles, which was used as references. The error in 4D-MRI tumor motion trajectory (E) was determined. In addition, the corresponding respiratory motion amplitudes of all the selected 2D images for 4D reconstruction were recorded. Each of the amplitude was compared with the amplitude of its associated bin on the average breathing curve. The mean differences from the average breathing curve across all slice positions (D) were calculated. A total of 500 simulated respiratory profiles with a wide range of irregularity (Ir) were used to investigate the relationship between D and Ir. Furthermore, statistical analysis of E and D using XCAT controlled by 20 cancer patients’ breathing profiles was conducted. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was conducted to compare two modes. Results: D increased faster for cine-mode (D = 1.17 × Ir + 0.23) than sequential-mode (D = 0.47 × Ir + 0.23) as irregularity increased. For the XCAT study using 20 cancer patients’ breathing profiles, the median E values were significantly different: 0.12 and 0.10 cm for cine- and sequential-modes, respectively, with a p-value of 0.02. The median D values were significantly

  1. Accuracy of respiratory motion measurement of 4D-MRI: A comparison between cine and sequential acquisition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Rhee, DongJoo; Cai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The authors have recently developed a cine-mode T2*/T1-weighted 4D-MRI technique and a sequential-mode T2-weighted 4D-MRI technique for imaging respiratory motion. This study aims at investigating which 4D-MRI image acquisition mode, cine or sequential, provides more accurate measurement of organ motion during respiration. A 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom with a hypothesized tumor was used to simulate the image acquisition and the 4D-MRI reconstruction. The respiratory motion was controlled by the given breathing signal profiles. The tumor was manipulated to move continuously with the surrounding tissue. The motion trajectories were measured from both sequential- and cine-mode 4D-MRI images. The measured trajectories were compared with the average trajectory calculated from the input profiles, which was used as references. The error in 4D-MRI tumor motion trajectory (E) was determined. In addition, the corresponding respiratory motion amplitudes of all the selected 2D images for 4D reconstruction were recorded. Each of the amplitude was compared with the amplitude of its associated bin on the average breathing curve. The mean differences from the average breathing curve across all slice positions (D) were calculated. A total of 500 simulated respiratory profiles with a wide range of irregularity (Ir) were used to investigate the relationship between D and Ir. Furthermore, statistical analysis of E and D using XCAT controlled by 20 cancer patients' breathing profiles was conducted. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was conducted to compare two modes. D increased faster for cine-mode (D = 1.17 × Ir + 0.23) than sequential-mode (D = 0.47 × Ir + 0.23) as irregularity increased. For the XCAT study using 20 cancer patients' breathing profiles, the median E values were significantly different: 0.12 and 0.10 cm for cine- and sequential-modes, respectively, with a p-value of 0.02. The median D values were significantly different: 0.47 and 0.24 cm for cine

  2. ECHO Autism.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Micah O; Brown, Rachel; Curran, Alicia; Sohl, Kristin

    2017-03-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have complex medical problems, yet they are at high risk for unmet health care needs. Primary care providers are perfectly positioned to meet these needs; however, they often lack training in ASD. This pilot project developed and tested a new model for training primary care providers in best-practice care for ASD using the Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) framework. The 6-month ECHO Autism pilot project consisted of 12 biweekly clinics focused on screening and identification of ASD symptoms and management of medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Participants completed measures of practice behavior and self-efficacy in screening and management of children with ASD at baseline (pretest) and after 6 months of ECHO Autism (posttest). Statistically significant improvements were observed in self-efficacy, in adherence to ASD screening guidelines, and in use of ASD-specific resources. Participants also reported high satisfaction with the program.

  3. From EEG to BOLD: brain mapping and estimating transfer functions in simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Sato, João R; Rondinoni, Carlo; Sturzbecher, Marcio; de Araujo, Draulio B; Amaro, Edson

    2010-05-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) aims to disentangle the description of brain processes by exploiting the advantages of each technique. Most studies in this field focus on exploring the relationships between fMRI signals and the power spectrum at some specific frequency bands (alpha, beta, etc.). On the other hand, brain mapping of EEG signals (e.g., interictal spikes in epileptic patients) usually assumes an haemodynamic response function for a parametric analysis applying the GLM, as a rough approximation. The integration of the information provided by the high spatial resolution of MR images and the high temporal resolution of EEG may be improved by referencing them by transfer functions, which allows the identification of neural driven areas without strong assumptions about haemodynamic response shapes or brain haemodynamic's homogeneity. The difference on sampling rate is the first obstacle for a full integration of EEG and fMRI information. Moreover, a parametric specification of a function representing the commonalities of both signals is not established. In this study, we introduce a new data-driven method for estimating the transfer function from EEG signal to fMRI signal at EEG sampling rate. This approach avoids EEG subsampling to fMRI time resolution and naturally provides a test for EEG predictive power over BOLD signal fluctuations, in a well-established statistical framework. We illustrate this concept in resting state (eyes closed) and visual simultaneous fMRI-EEG experiments. The results point out that it is possible to predict the BOLD fluctuations in occipital cortex by using EEG measurements.

  4. Echo's Legacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Echo 1 Satellite is simply a very large balloon, the diameter of a 10 story building. Metallized Products, Inc. developed a special material for NASA used for the balloons's skin. For "bouncing signals," material had to be reflective, lightweight, and thin enough to be folded into a beach ball size canister for delivery into orbit, where it would automatically inflate. Material selected was mylar polyester, with a reflective layer of tiny aluminum particles so fine that Echo's skin had a thickness half that of cellophane on a cigarette package.

  5. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: Distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Amy Metcalfe, Peter; Liney, Gary; Holloway, Lois; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. Methods: A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. Results: MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%–70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through

  6. Continuous table acquisition MRI for radiotherapy treatment planning: distortion assessment with a new extended 3D volumetric phantom.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amy; Liney, Gary; Holloway, Lois; Dowling, Jason; Rivest-Henault, David; Metcalfe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Accurate geometry is required for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). When considering the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for RTP, geometric distortions observed in the acquired images should be considered. While scanner technology and vendor supplied correction algorithms provide some correction, large distortions are still present in images, even when considering considerably smaller scan lengths than those typically acquired with CT in conventional RTP. This study investigates MRI acquisition with a moving table compared with static scans for potential geometric benefits for RTP. A full field of view (FOV) phantom (diameter 500 mm; length 513 mm) was developed for measuring geometric distortions in MR images over volumes pertinent to RTP. The phantom consisted of layers of refined plastic within which vitamin E capsules were inserted. The phantom was scanned on CT to provide the geometric gold standard and on MRI, with differences in capsule location determining the distortion. MRI images were acquired with two techniques. For the first method, standard static table acquisitions were considered. Both 2D and 3D acquisition techniques were investigated. With the second technique, images were acquired with a moving table. The same sequence was acquired with a static table and then with table speeds of 1.1 mm/s and 2 mm/s. All of the MR images acquired were registered to the CT dataset using a deformable B-spline registration with the resulting deformation fields providing the distortion information for each acquisition. MR images acquired with the moving table enabled imaging of the whole phantom length while images acquired with a static table were only able to image 50%-70% of the phantom length of 513 mm. Maximum distortion values were reduced across a larger volume when imaging with a moving table. Increased table speed resulted in a larger contribution of distortion from gradient nonlinearities in the through-plane direction and an increased

  7. Multiband multi-echo imaging of simultaneous oxygenation and flow timeseries for resting state connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alexander D.; Nencka, Andrew S.; Lebel, R. Marc; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    A novel sequence has been introduced that combines multiband imaging with a multi-echo acquisition for simultaneous high spatial resolution pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) echo-planar imaging (MBME ASL/BOLD). Resting-state connectivity in healthy adult subjects was assessed using this sequence. Four echoes were acquired with a multiband acceleration of four, in order to increase spatial resolution, shorten repetition time, and reduce slice-timing effects on the ASL signal. In addition, by acquiring four echoes, advanced multi-echo independent component analysis (ME-ICA) denoising could be employed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and BOLD sensitivity. Seed-based and dual-regression approaches were utilized to analyze functional connectivity. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and BOLD coupling was also evaluated by correlating the perfusion-weighted timeseries with the BOLD timeseries. These metrics were compared between single echo (E2), multi-echo combined (MEC), multi-echo combined and denoised (MECDN), and perfusion-weighted (PW) timeseries. Temporal SNR increased for the MECDN data compared to the MEC and E2 data. Connectivity also increased, in terms of correlation strength and network size, for the MECDN compared to the MEC and E2 datasets. CBF and BOLD coupling was increased in major resting-state networks, and that correlation was strongest for the MECDN datasets. These results indicate our novel MBME ASL/BOLD sequence, which collects simultaneous high-resolution ASL/BOLD data, could be a powerful tool for detecting functional connectivity and dynamic neurovascular coupling during the resting state. The collection of more than two echoes facilitates the use of ME-ICA denoising to greatly improve the quality of resting state functional connectivity MRI. PMID:28253268

  8. Multiband multi-echo imaging of simultaneous oxygenation and flow timeseries for resting state connectivity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander D; Nencka, Andrew S; Lebel, R Marc; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    A novel sequence has been introduced that combines multiband imaging with a multi-echo acquisition for simultaneous high spatial resolution pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) echo-planar imaging (MBME ASL/BOLD). Resting-state connectivity in healthy adult subjects was assessed using this sequence. Four echoes were acquired with a multiband acceleration of four, in order to increase spatial resolution, shorten repetition time, and reduce slice-timing effects on the ASL signal. In addition, by acquiring four echoes, advanced multi-echo independent component analysis (ME-ICA) denoising could be employed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and BOLD sensitivity. Seed-based and dual-regression approaches were utilized to analyze functional connectivity. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and BOLD coupling was also evaluated by correlating the perfusion-weighted timeseries with the BOLD timeseries. These metrics were compared between single echo (E2), multi-echo combined (MEC), multi-echo combined and denoised (MECDN), and perfusion-weighted (PW) timeseries. Temporal SNR increased for the MECDN data compared to the MEC and E2 data. Connectivity also increased, in terms of correlation strength and network size, for the MECDN compared to the MEC and E2 datasets. CBF and BOLD coupling was increased in major resting-state networks, and that correlation was strongest for the MECDN datasets. These results indicate our novel MBME ASL/BOLD sequence, which collects simultaneous high-resolution ASL/BOLD data, could be a powerful tool for detecting functional connectivity and dynamic neurovascular coupling during the resting state. The collection of more than two echoes facilitates the use of ME-ICA denoising to greatly improve the quality of resting state functional connectivity MRI.

  9. MB-SWIFT functional MRI during deep brain stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Lauri J; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Zhang, Jinjin; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia

    2017-08-07

    Recently introduced 3D radial MRI pulse sequence entitled Multi-Band SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (MB-SWIFT) having virtually zero acquisition delay was used to obtain functional MRI (fMRI) contrast in rat's brain at 9.4 T during deep brain stimulation (DBS). The results demonstrate that MB-SWIFT allows functional images free of susceptibility artifacts, and provides an excellent fMRI activation contrast in the brain. Flip angle dependence of the MB-SWIFT fMRI signal and elimination of the fMRI contrast while using saturation bands, indicate a blood flow origin of the observed fMRI contrast. MB-SWIFT fMRI modality permits activation studies in the close proximity to an implanted lead, which is not possible to achieve with conventionally used gradient echo and spin echo - echo planar imaging fMRI techniques. We conclude that MB-SWIFT fMRI is a powerful imaging modality for investigations of functional responses during DBS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New Clinically-Feasible 3-T MRI Protocol to Discriminate Internal Brain Stem Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Michael J.; Chung, Sohae; Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Bruno, Mary T.; Fatterpekar, Girish M.; Shepherd, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Two new 3-T MRI contrast methods, track density imaging and echo modulation curve T2 mapping were combined with simultaneous multislice acquisition to reveal exquisite anatomical detail at 7 canonical levels of the brainstem. Compared to conventional MRI contrasts, many individual brainstem tracts and nuclear groups were directly visualized for the first time at 3-T. This new approach is clinically practical and feasible (total scan time = 20 min) allowing better brainstem anatomical localization and characterization. PMID:26869471

  11. Spatio-temporal registration in multiplane MRI acquisitions for 3D colon motiliy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Berkovich, Marina; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing and visualizing dynamic peristaltic motion of the colon in 3D from two series of differently oriented 2D MRI images. To this end, we have defined an MRI examination protocol, and introduced methods for spatio-temporal alignment of the two MRI image series into a common reference. This represents the main contribution of this paper, which enables the 3D analysis of peristaltic motion. The objective is to provide a detailed insight into this complex motion, aiding in the diagnosis and characterization of colon motion disorders. We have applied the proposed spatio-temporal method on Cine MRI data sets of healthy volunteers. The results have been inspected and validated by an expert radiologist. Segmentation and cylindrical approximation of the colon results in a 4D visualization of the peristaltic motion.

  12. Pulmonary 3 T MRI with ultrashort TEs: influence of ultrashort echo time interval on pulmonary functional and clinical stage assessments of smokers.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Seki, Shinichiro; Obara, Makoto; van Cauteren, Marc; Takahashi, Masaya; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2014-04-01

    To assess the influence of ultrashort TE (UTE) intervals on pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with UTEs (UTE-MRI) for pulmonary functional loss assessment and clinical stage classification of smokers. A total 60 consecutive smokers (43 men and 17 women; mean age 70 years) with and without COPD underwent thin-section multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), UTE-MRI, and pulmonary functional measurements. For each smoker, UTE-MRI was performed with three different UTE intervals (UTE-MRI A: 0.5 msec, UTE-MRI B: 1.0 msec, UTE-MRI C: 1.5 msec). By using the GOLD guidelines, the subjects were classified as: "smokers without COPD," "mild COPD," "moderate COPD," and "severe or very severe COPD." Then the mean T2* value from each UTE-MRI and CT-based functional lung volume (FLV) were correlated with pulmonary function test. Finally, Fisher's PLSD test was used to evaluate differences in each index among the four clinical stages. Each index correlated significantly with pulmonary function test results (P < 0.05). CT-based FLV and mean T2* values obtained from UTE-MRI A and B showed significant differences among all groups except between "smokers without COPD" and "mild COPD" groups (P < 0.05). UTE-MRI has a potential for management of smokers and the UTE interval is suggested as an important parameter in this setting. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Multi-VENC acquisition of four-dimensional phase-contrast MRI to improve precision of velocity field measurement.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-05-01

    The present study aims to improve precision of four-dimensional (4D) phase-contrast (PC) MRI technique by using multiple velocity encoding (VENC) parameters. The 3D flow fields in an in vitro stenosis phantom and an in vivo ascending aorta were determined using a 4D PC-MRI sequence with multiple VENC values. The velocity field obtained for large VENC was combined with that from small VENC, unless velocity data were lost by phase aliasing and phase dispersion. Noise levels of the combined velocity fields were compared with the increasing overlapping number of VENC parameters. The phantom measurement showed that the multi-VENC acquisition reduced the noise levels in radial and axial velocities (> 24 cm/s at VENC = 300 cm/s) down to 0.80 ± 0.45 cm/s and 5.60 ± 2.63 cm/s, respectively. This increased the velocity-to-noise ratio (VNR) by approximately two-fold to six-fold depending on the locations. As a result, the multi-VENC measurement could visualize the low-velocity recirculating flows more clearly. The multi-VENC measurement of 4D PC-MRI sequence increased the VNR distribution by reducing velocity noise. The improved VNR can be beneficial for investigating blood flow structures in a flow field with a high velocity dynamic range. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Wyrwicz, Alice M.; Li, Limin; Kao, C.-M.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2 × 8 LYSO scintillators (5.0 × 5.0 × 10.0 mm3 with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner. PMID:25937685

  15. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Chen, C-T; Eclov, N; Ronzhin, A; Murat, P; Ramberg, E; Los, S; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Li, Limin; Kao, C-M

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2 × 8 LYSO scintillators (5.0 × 5.0 × 10.0 mm(3) with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner.

  16. A feasibility study of a PET/MRI insert detector using strip-line and waveform sampling data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Eclov, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Los, S.; Wyrwicz, A. M.; Li, L.; Kao, C.-M.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing a time-of-flight Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector by using silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) on a strip-line and high speed waveform sampling data acquisition. In this design, multiple SiPMs are connected on a single strip-line and signal waveforms on the strip-line are sampled at two ends of the strip to reduce readout channels while fully exploiting the fast time response of SiPMs. In addition to the deposited energy and time information, the position of the hit SiPM along the strip-line is determined by the arrival time difference of the waveform. Due to the insensitivity of the SiPMs to magnetic fields and the compact front-end electronics, the detector approach is highly attractive for developing a PET insert system for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to provide simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To investigate the feasibility, experimental tests using prototype detector modules have been conducted inside a 9.4 T small animal MRI scanner (Bruker BioSpec 94/30 imaging spectrometer). On the prototype strip-line board, 16 SiPMs (5.2 mm pitch) are installed on two strip-lines and coupled to 2×8 LYSO scintillators (5.0×5.0×10.0 mm3 with 5.2 mm pitch). The outputs of the strip-line boards are connected to a Domino-Ring-Sampler (DRS4) evaluation board for waveform sampling. Preliminary experimental results show that the effect of interference on the MRI image due to the PET detector is negligible and that PET detector performance is comparable with the results measured outside the MRI scanner.

  17. Quantitative 3D Ultrashort Time-to-Echo (UTE) MRI and Micro-CT (μCT) Evaluation of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Condylar Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Daniel; Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Du, Jiang; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Temporomandibular dysfunction involves osteoarthritis of the TMJ, including degeneration and morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle. Purpose of this study was to determine accuracy of novel 3D-UTE MRI versus micro-CT (μCT) for quantitative evaluation of mandibular condyle morphology. Material & Methods Nine TMJ condyle specimens were harvested from cadavers (2M, 3F; Age 85 ± 10 yrs., mean±SD). 3D-UTE MRI (TR=50ms, TE=0.05 ms, 104 μm isotropic-voxel) was performed using a 3-T MR scanner and μCT (18 μm isotropic-voxel) was performed. MR datasets were spatially-registered with μCT dataset. Two observers segmented bony contours of the condyles. Fibrocartilage was segmented on MR dataset. Using a custom program, bone and fibrocartilage surface coordinates, Gaussian curvature, volume of segmented regions and fibrocartilage thickness were determined for quantitative evaluation of joint morphology. Agreement between techniques (MRI vs. μCT) and observers (MRI vs. MRI) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature and segmented volume of the bone were determined using intraclass correlation correlation (ICC) analyses. Results Between MRI and μCT, the average deviation of surface coordinates was 0.19±0.15 mm, slightly higher than spatial resolution of MRI. Average deviation of the Gaussian curvature and volume of segmented regions, from MRI to μCT, was 5.7±6.5% and 6.6±6.2%, respectively. ICC coefficients (MRI vs. μCT) for Gaussian curvature, mean curvature and segmented volumes were respectively 0.892, 0.893 and 0.972. Between observers (MRI vs. MRI), the ICC coefficients were 0.998, 0.999 and 0.997 respectively. Fibrocartilage thickness was 0.55±0.11 mm, as previously described in literature for grossly normal TMJ samples. Conclusion 3D-UTE MR quantitative evaluation of TMJ condyle morphology ex-vivo, including surface, curvature and segmented volume, shows high correlation against μCT and between observers. In addition, UTE MRI allows

  18. Three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition MRI and its diagnostic value for lumbar foraminal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Osamu; Fujikawa, Akira; Tachibana, Atsuko

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) in the diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS). Fifteen patients with LFS and 10 healthy volunteers were studied. All patients met the following criteria: (1) single L5 radiculopathy without compressive lesion in the spinal canal, (2) pain reproduction during provocative radiculography, and (3) improvement of symptoms after surgery. We retrospectively compared the symptomatic nerve roots to the asymptomatic nerve roots on fast spin-echo (FSE) T1 sagittal, FSE T2 axial and reconstituted 3D FIESTA images. The κ values for interobserver agreement in determining the presence of LFS were 0.525 for FSE T1 sagittal images, 0.735 for FSE T2 axial images, 0.750 for 3D FIESTA sagittal, 0.733 for axial images, and 0.953 for coronal images. The sensitivities and specificities were 60 and 86 % for FSE T1 sagittal images, 27 and 91 % for FSE T2 axial images, 60 and 97 % for 3D FIESTA sagittal images, 60 and 94 % for 3D FIESTA axial images, and 100 and 97 % for 3D FIESTA coronal images, respectively. 3D FIESTA can provide more reliable and additional information for the running course of lumbar nerve root, compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Particularly, use of 3D FIESTA coronal images enables accurate diagnosis for LFS.

  19. Fast and Tissue-Optimized Mapping of Magnetic Susceptibility and T2* with Multi-Echo and Multi-Shot Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Li, Wei; Avram, Alexandru Vlad; Gho, Sung-Min; Liu, Chunlei

    2011-01-01

    Gradient-echo MRI of resonance-frequency shift and T2* values exhibits unique tissue contrast and offers relevant physiological information. However, acquiring 3D-phase images and T2* maps [A1] with the standard spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) sequence is lengthy for routine imaging at high-spatial resolution and whole-brain coverage. In addition, with the standard SPGR sequence, optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) cannot be achieved for every tissue type given their distributed resonance frequency and T2* value. To address these two issues, a SNR optimized multi-echo sequence with a stack-of-spiral acquisition is proposed and implemented for achieving fast and simultaneous acquisition of image phase and T2* maps. The analytical behavior of the phase SNR is derived as a function of resonance frequency, T2* and echo time. This relationship is utilized to achieve tissue optimized SNR by combining phase images with different echo times. Simulations and in vivo experiments were designed to verify the theoretical predictions. Using the multi-echo spiral acquisition, whole-brain coverage with 1 mm isotropic resolution can be achieved within 2.5 minutes, shortening the scan time by a factor of 8. The resulting multi-echo phase map shows similar SNR to that of the standard SPGR. The acquisition can be further accelerated with non-Cartesian parallel imaging. The technique can be readily extended to other multi-shot readout trajectories besides spiral. It may provide a practical acquisition strategy for high resolution and simultaneous 3D mapping of magnetic susceptibility and T2*. PMID:21784162

  20. Automated approaches for analysis of multimodal MRI acquisitions in a study of cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Hodneland, Erlend; Ystad, Martin; Haasz, Judit; Munthe-Kaas, Antonella; Lundervold, Arvid

    2012-06-01

    In this work we describe an integrated and automated workflow for a comprehensive and robust analysis of multimodal MR images from a cohort of more than hundred subjects. Image examinations are done three years apart and consist of 3D high-resolution anatomical images, low resolution tensor-valued DTI recordings and 4D resting state fMRI time series. The integrated analysis of the data requires robust tools for segmentation, registration and fiber tracking, which we combine in an automated manner. Our automated workflow is strongly desired due to the large number of subjects. Especially, we introduce the use of histogram segmentation to processed fMRI data to obtain functionally important seed and target regions for fiber tracking between them. This enables analysis of individually important resting state networks. We also discuss various approaches for the assessment of white matter integrity parameters along tracts, and in particular we introduce the use of functional data analysis (FDA) for this task.

  1. Golden-ratio rotated stack-of-stars acquisition for improved volumetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziwu; Han, Fei; Yan, Lirong; Wang, Danny J J; Hu, Peng

    2017-02-06

    To develop and evaluate an improved stack-of-stars radial sampling strategy for reducing streaking artifacts. The conventional stack-of-stars sampling strategy collects the same radial angle for every partition (slice) encoding. In an undersampled acquisition, such an aligned acquisition generates coherent aliasing patterns and introduces strong streaking artifacts. We show that by rotating the radial spokes in a golden-angle manner along the partition-encoding direction, the aliasing pattern is modified, resulting in improved image quality for gridding and more advanced reconstruction methods. Computer simulations were performed and phantom as well as in vivo images for three different applications were acquired. Simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments confirmed that the proposed method was able to generate images with less streaking artifact and sharper structures based on undersampled acquisitions in comparison with the conventional aligned approach at the same acceleration factors. By combining parallel imaging and compressed sensing in the reconstruction, streaking artifacts were mostly removed with improved delineation of fine structures using the proposed strategy. We present a simple method to reduce streaking artifacts and improve image quality in 3D stack-of-stars acquisitions by re-arranging the radial spoke angles in the 3D partition direction, which can be used for rapid volumetric imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Adaptive retrospective correction of motion artifacts in cranial MRI with multicoil three-dimensional radial acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ashley G; Velikina, Julia; Block, Walter; Wieben, Oliver; Samsonov, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Despite reduction in imaging times through improved hardware and rapid acquisition schemes, motion artifacts can compromise image quality in magnetic resonance imaging, especially in three-dimensional imaging with its prolonged scan durations. Direct extension of most state-of-the-art two-dimensional rigid body motion compensation techniques to the three-dimensional case is often challenging or impractical due to a significant increase in sampling requirements. This article introduces a novel motion correction technique that is capable of restoring image quality in motion corrupted two-dimensional and three-dimensional radial acquisitions without a priori assumptions about when motion occurs. The navigating properties of radial acquisitions-corroborated by multiple receiver coils-are exploited to detect actual instances of motion. Pseudorandom projection ordering provides flexibility of reconstructing navigator images from the obtained motion-free variable-width subsets for subsequent estimation of rigid body motion parameters by coregistration. The proposed approach does not require any additional navigators or external motion estimation schemes. The capabilities and limitations of the method are described and demonstrated through simulations and representative volunteer cranial acquisitions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. 19F-lanthanide complexes with increased sensitivity for 19F-MRI: optimization of the MR acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; Kenwright, Alan M; Parker, David; Blamire, Andrew M

    2011-10-01

    Fluorine-19 magnetic resonance methods offer advantages for molecular or cellular imaging in vivo due to the absence of radioactivity, lack of naturally occurring background signal, and the ability to easily combine measurements with anatomical MRI. Previous studies have shown that (19) F-MRI sensitivity is limited to millimolar concentrations by slow longitudinal relaxation. In this study, a new class of macrocyclic fluorinated lanthanide complexes is investigated where relaxation rates are significantly shortened by proximity of the fluorine group to a paramagnetic lanthanide ion located within the same molecule. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates are field dependent and in the range 50-150 s(-1) and 70-200 s(-1), respectively, at 7 T. Relaxation rates in these complexes are a function of the molecular structure and are independent of concentration at biologically relevant levels, so can be used as criteria to optimize imaging acquisition. Phantom experiments at 7 T indicate a lower limit for detection by imaging of 20 μM.

  4. Light Echo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    "Light Echo" Illuminates Dust Around Supergiant Star V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon) Credit: NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute conducts Hubble science operations. Goddard is responsible for HST project management, including mission and science operations, servicing missions, and all associated development activities. To learn more about the Hubble Space Telescope go here: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  5. Comparison between 2D and 3D gradient-echo sequences for MRI of human lung ventilation with hyperpolarized 3He.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jim M; Woodhouse, Neil; Paley, Martyn N J; Fichele, Stan; Said, Zead; Kasuboski, Larry; van Beek, Edwin J R

    2004-09-01

    Images of hyperpolarized 3He were acquired during breath-hold in four healthy volunteers with the use of an optimized 3D gradient-echo sequence. The images were compared with existing 2D gradient-echo methods. The average SNR from a 13-mm-thick slice in the peripheral lung was 1.4 times greater with 3D. In the airways the average SNR was 1.7 times greater with 3D. The higher SNR of 3D was particularly evident when regions of unimpeded gas diffusion, such as the major airways, were imaged with thin slices. This is because diffusion dephasing due to the slice-encoding gradient is minimized with a 3D sequence. The in vivo experimental findings were substantiated with experiments on phantoms of free gas, which showed more than four times the SNR with 3D compared to 2D. Theoretical simulations of the 2D and 3D k-space filters were also performed to predict the SNR and spatial resolution observed in the experimental images. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging signal and texture features for the prediction of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Rodriguez-Rojas, Juan; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Early diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) would confer many benefits. Several biomarkers have been proposed to achieve such a task, where features extracted from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have played an important role. However, studies have focused exclusively on morphological characteristics. This study aims to determine whether features relating to the signal and texture of the image could predict mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD progression. Clinical, biological, and positron emission tomography information and MRI images of 62 subjects from the AD neuroimaging initiative were used in this study, extracting 4150 features from each MRI. Within this multimodal database, a feature selection algorithm was used to obtain an accurate and small logistic regression model, generated by a methodology that yielded a mean blind test accuracy of 0.79. This model included six features, five of them obtained from the MRI images, and one obtained from genotyping. A risk analysis divided the subjects into low-risk and high-risk groups according to a prognostic index. The groups were statistically different (p-value=2.04e−11). These results demonstrated that MRI features related to both signal and texture add MCI to AD predictive power, and supported the ongoing notion that multimodal biomarkers outperform single-modality ones. PMID:26158047

  7. Optimal diffusion MRI acquisition for fiber orientation density estimation: an analytic approach.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan S; Dale, Anders M

    2009-11-01

    An important challenge in the design of diffusion MRI experiments is how to optimize statistical efficiency, i.e., the accuracy with which parameters can be estimated from the diffusion data in a given amount of imaging time. In model-based spherical deconvolution analysis, the quantity of interest is the fiber orientation density (FOD). Here, we demonstrate how the spherical harmonics (SH) can be used to form an explicit analytic expression for the efficiency of the minimum variance (maximally efficient) linear unbiased estimator of the FOD. Using this expression, we calculate optimal b-values for maximum FOD estimation efficiency with SH expansion orders of L = 2, 4, 6, and 8 to be approximately b = 1,500, 3,000, 4,600, and 6,200 s/mm(2), respectively. However, the arrangement of diffusion directions and scanner-specific hardware limitations also play a role in determining the realizable efficiency of the FOD estimator that can be achieved in practice. We show how some commonly used methods for selecting diffusion directions are sometimes inefficient, and propose a new method for selecting diffusion directions in MRI based on maximizing the statistical efficiency. We further demonstrate how scanner-specific hardware limitations generally lead to optimal b-values that are slightly lower than the ideal b-values. In summary, the analytic expression for the statistical efficiency of the unbiased FOD estimator provides important insight into the fundamental tradeoff between angular resolution, b-value, and FOD estimation accuracy.

  8. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisition at low, high and ultra-high magnetic fields up to 9.4 T: perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Irene; Arrubla, Jorge; Felder, Jörg; Shah, N Jon

    2014-11-15

    In this perspectives article we highlight the advantages of simultaneous acquisition of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As MRI moves towards using ultra-high magnetic fields in the quest for increased signal-to-noise, the question arises whether combined EEG-fMRI measurements are feasible at magnetic fields of 7 T and higher. We describe the challenges of MRI-EEG at 1.5, 3, 7 and 9.4 T and review the proposed solutions. In an outlook, we discuss further developments such as simultaneous trimodal imaging using MR, positron emission tomography (PET) and EEG under the same physiological conditions in the same subject. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization of Acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-Ligand PET/MRI in Patients with Local and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lütje, Susanne; Blex, Sebastian; Gomez, Benedikt; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt M.; Umutlu, Lale; Forsting, Michael; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Wetter, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this optimization study was to minimize the acquisition time of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) in patients with local and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) to obtain a sufficient image quality and quantification accuracy without any appreciable loss. Methods Twenty patients with PCa were administered intravenously with the 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA ligand (mean activity 99 MBq/patient, range 76–148 MBq) and subsequently underwent PET/MRI at, on average, 168 min (range 77–320 min) after injection. PET and MR imaging data were acquired simultaneously. PET acquisition was performed in list mode and PET images were reconstructed at different time intervals (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 min). Data were analyzed regarding radiotracer uptake in tumors and muscle tissue and PET image quality. Tumor uptake was quantified in terms of the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean) within a spherical volume of interest (VOI). Reference VOIs were drawn in the gluteus maximus muscle on the right side. PET image quality was evaluated by experienced nuclear physicians/radiologists using a five-point ordinal scale from 5–1 (excellent—insufficient). Results Lesion detectability linearly increased with increasing acquisition times, reaching its maximum at PET acquisition times of 4 min. At this image acquisition time, tumor lesions in 19/20 (95%) patients were detected. PET image quality showed a positive correlation with increasing acquisition time, reaching a plateau at 4–6 min image acquisition. Both SUVmax and SUVmean correlated inversely with acquisition time and reached a plateau at acquisition times after 4 min. Conclusion In the applied image acquisition settings, the optimal acquisition time of 68Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/MRI in patients with local and metastatic PCa was identified to be 4 min per bed position. At this acquisition time, PET image quality and lesion detectability reach a maximum

  10. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  11. Detection of experimental ERP effects in combined EEG-fMRI: evaluating the benefits of interleaved acquisition and independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavric, Aureliu; Bregadze, Nino; Benattayallah, Abdelmalek

    2011-02-01

    The present study examined the benefit of rapid alternation of EEG and fMRI (a common strategy for avoiding artifact caused by rapid switching of MRI gradients) for detecting experimental modulations of ERPs in combined EEG-fMRI. The study also assessed the advantages of aiding the extraction of specific ERP components by means of signal decomposition using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). 'Go-nogo' task stimuli were presented either during fMRI scanning or in the gaps between fMRI scans, resulting in 'gradient' and 'no-gradient' ERPs. 'Go-nogo' differences in the N2 and P3 components were subjected to conventional ERP analysis, as well as single-trial and reliability analyses. Comparable N2 and P3 enhancement on 'nogo' trials was found in the 'gradient' and 'no-gradient' ERPs. ICA-based signal decomposition resulted in better validity (as indicated by topography), greater stability and lower measurement error of the predicted ERP effects. While there was little or no benefit of acquiring ERPs in the gaps between fMRI scans, ICA decomposition did improve the detection of experimental ERP modulations. Simultaneous and continuous EEG-fMRI acquisition is preferable to interleaved protocols. ICA-based decomposition is useful not only for artifact cancellation, but also for the extraction of specific ERP components. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-speed 3T MR spectroscopic imaging of prostate with flyback echo-planar encoding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H; Ozturk-Isik, Esin; Xu, Duan; Hurd, Ralph E; Kelley, Douglas A C; Pauly, John M; Kurhanewicz, John; Nelson, Sarah J; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2007-06-01

    Prostate MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) at 3T may provide two-fold higher spatial resolution over 1.5T, but this can result in longer acquisition times to cover the entire gland using conventional phase-encoding. In this study, flyback echo-planar readout trajectories were incorporated into a Malcolm Levitt's composite-pulse decoupling sequence (MLEV)-point-resolved spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) to accelerate the acquisition of large array (16 x 16 x 8), high spatial (0.154 cm(3)) resolution MRSI data by eight-fold to just 8.5 minutes. Artifact free, high-quality MRSI data was obtained in nine prostate cancer patients. Easy data reconstruction and the robustness of the flyback echo-planar encoding make this technique particularly suitable for the clinical setting. The short acquisition time provided by this method reduces the 3T prostate MRI/MRSI exam time, allows longer repetition times, and/or allows the acquisition of additional MR acquisitions within the same exam. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Correction of translation-induced artifacts in wrist MRI scans using orthogonal acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Edward B.; Manduca, Armando

    2002-05-01

    Correction of motion artifacts in MRI due to interview in-plane 2-D rigid body translations is possible using only the raw data of two standard 2DFT images acquired of the same object with phase encode direction swapped. Previous techniques simply use multiple or orthogonal images to reduce artifacts by ghost interference or geometric averaging. The orthogonal k-space phase difference (ORKPHAD) provides an overdetermined system of linear equations that can be solved directly to compensate for the phase errors caused by the translation. This technique was used to correct images of a volunteer's moving wrist. For all slices of the motion corrupted data volumes, artifacts were dramatically reduced. Though the algorithm only accounts for interview translational motion, it is robust enough to correct real in vivo images that may also be corrupted by small amounts of rotational or out-of-plane motion. Experiments underway show the algorithm can tolerate bulk rotation of several degrees between orthogonal image pairs and that corrections using fractional NEX scans are possible. The current results and such ongoing advancements should make this correction technique practical for certain clinical scenarios vulnerable to in-plane translation.

  14. Two-dimensional radial acquisition technique with density adaption in sodium MRI.

    PubMed

    Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M; Heiler, Patrick M; Schad, Lothar R

    2011-04-01

    Conventional 2D radial projections suffer from losses in signal-to-noise ratio efficiency because of the nonuniform k-space sampling. In this study, a 2D projection reconstruction method with variable gradient amplitudes is presented to cover the k-space uniformly. The gradient is designed to keep the average sampling density constant. By this, signal-to-noise ratio is increased, and the linear form of the radial trajectory is kept. The simple gradient design and low hardware requirements in respect of slew rate allow an easy implementation at MR scanners. Measurements with the density-adapted 2D radial trajectory were compared with the conventional projection reconstruction method. It is demonstrated that the density-adapted 2D radial trajectory technique provides higher signal-to-noise ratio (up to 28% in brain tissue), less blurring, and fewer artifacts in the presence of magnetic field inhomogeneities than imaging with the conventional 2D radial trajectory scheme. The presented sequence is well-suited for electrocardiographically gated sodium heart MRI and other applications with short relaxation times. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Age of second language acquisition affects nonverbal conflict processing in children: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Struys, Esli; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert

    2014-09-01

    In their daily communication, bilinguals switch between two languages, a process that involves the selection of a target language and minimization of interference from a nontarget language. Previous studies have uncovered the neural structure in bilinguals and the activation patterns associated with performing verbal conflict tasks. One question that remains, however is whether this extra verbal switching affects brain function during nonverbal conflict tasks. In this study, we have used fMRI to investigate the impact of bilingualism in children performing two nonverbal tasks involving stimulus-stimulus and stimulus-response conflicts. Three groups of 8-11-year-old children--bilinguals from birth (2L1), second language learners (L2L), and a control group of monolinguals (1L1)--were scanned while performing a color Simon and a numerical Stroop task. Reaction times and accuracy were logged. Compared to monolingual controls, bilingual children showed higher behavioral congruency effect of these tasks, which is matched by the recruitment of brain regions that are generally used in general cognitive control, language processing or to solve language conflict situations in bilinguals (caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus, STG, precuneus). Further, the activation of these areas was found to be higher in 2L1 compared to L2L. The coupling of longer reaction times to the recruitment of extra language-related brain areas supports the hypothesis that when dealing with language conflicts the specialization of bilinguals hampers the way they can process with nonverbal conflicts, at least at early stages in life.

  16. Age of second language acquisition affects nonverbal conflict processing in children: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Struys, Esli; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Baeken, Chris; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background In their daily communication, bilinguals switch between two languages, a process that involves the selection of a target language and minimization of interference from a nontarget language. Previous studies have uncovered the neural structure in bilinguals and the activation patterns associated with performing verbal conflict tasks. One question that remains, however is whether this extra verbal switching affects brain function during nonverbal conflict tasks. Methods In this study, we have used fMRI to investigate the impact of bilingualism in children performing two nonverbal tasks involving stimulus–stimulus and stimulus–response conflicts. Three groups of 8–11-year-old children – bilinguals from birth (2L1), second language learners (L2L), and a control group of monolinguals (1L1) – were scanned while performing a color Simon and a numerical Stroop task. Reaction times and accuracy were logged. Results Compared to monolingual controls, bilingual children showed higher behavioral congruency effect of these tasks, which is matched by the recruitment of brain regions that are generally used in general cognitive control, language processing or to solve language conflict situations in bilinguals (caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus, STG, precuneus). Further, the activation of these areas was found to be higher in 2L1 compared to L2L. Conclusion The coupling of longer reaction times to the recruitment of extra language-related brain areas supports the hypothesis that when dealing with language conflicts the specialization of bilinguals hampers the way they can process with nonverbal conflicts, at least at early stages in life. PMID:25328840

  17. Two-dimensional spectroscopic imaging with combined free induction decay and long-TE acquisition (FID echo spectroscopic imaging, FIDESI) for the detection of intramyocellular lipids in calf muscle at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Just Kukurova, Ivica; Valkovič, Ladislav; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdošík, Martin; Krššák, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Chmelík, Marek

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a two-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D CSI) sequence, with simultaneous acquisition of free induction decay (FID) and long TEs, for the detection and quantification of intramyocellular lipids (IMCLs) in the calf at 7 T. The feasibility of the new 2D CSI sequence, which acquires FID (acquisition delay, 1.3 ms) and an echo (long TE) in one measurement, was evaluated in phantoms and volunteers (n = 5): TR/TE*/TE = 800/1.3/156 ms; 48 × 48 matrix; field of view, 200 × 200 × 20 mm(3) ; Hamming filter; no water suppression; measurement time, 22 min 2 s. The IMCL concentration and subcutaneous lipid contamination were assessed. Spectra in the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus (SOL) muscles were analyzed. The water signal from the FID acquisition was used as an internal concentration reference. In the spectra from subcutaneous adipose tissue (SUB) and bone marrow (BM), an unsaturation index (UI) of the vinyl-H (5.3 ppm) to methyl-CH3 ratio, and a polyunsaturation index (pUI) of the diallylic-H (2.77 ppm) to -CH3 ratio, were calculated. Long-TE spectra from muscles showed a simplified spectral pattern with well-separated IMCL for several muscle groups in the same scan. The IMCL to water ratio was largest in SOL (0.66% ± 0.23%), and lower in GM (0.37% ± 0.14%) and TA (0.36% ± 0.12%). UI and pUI for SUB were 0.65 ± 0.06 and 0.18 ± 0.04, respectively, and for BM were 0.60 ± 0.16 and 0.18 ± 0.08, respectively. The new sequence, with the proposed name 'free induction decay echo spectroscopic imaging' (FIDESI), provides information on both specific lipid resonances and water signal from different tissues in the calf, with high spectral and spatial resolution, as well as minimal voxel bleeding and subcutaneous lipid contamination, in clinically acceptable measurement times.

  18. Micro-MRI-based image acquisition and processing system for assessing the response to therapeutic intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilić, B.; Ladinsky, G. A.; Saha, P. K.; Wehrli, F. W.

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is the cause of over 1.5 million bone fractures annually. Most of these fractures occur in sites rich in trabecular bone, a complex network of bony struts and plates found throughout the skeleton. The three-dimensional structure of the trabecular bone network significantly determines mechanical strength and thus fracture resistance. Here we present a data acquisition and processing system that allows efficient noninvasive assessment of trabecular bone structure through a "virtual bone biopsy". High-resolution MR images are acquired from which the trabecular bone network is extracted by estimating the partial bone occupancy of each voxel. A heuristic voxel subdivision increases the effective resolution of the bone volume fraction map and serves a basis for subsequent analysis of topological and orientational parameters. Semi-automated registration and segmentation ensure selection of the same anatomical location in subjects imaged at different time points during treatment. It is shown with excerpts from an ongoing clinical study of early post-menopausal women, that significant reduction in network connectivity occurs in the control group while the structural integrity is maintained in the hormone replacement group. The system described should be suited for large-scale studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in subjects with metabolic bone disease.

  19. The role of age of acquisition on past tense generation in Spanish-English bilinguals: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Eric J; Hernandez, Arturo E

    2013-04-01

    At its most basic sense, the sensorimotor/emergentist (S/E) model suggests that early second language (L2) learning is preferentially reliant upon sensory and motor processes, while later L2 learning is accomplished by greater reliance on executive abilities. To investigate the S/E model using fMRI, neural correlates of L2 age of acquisition were examined by employing a past-tense generation task on 22 L2 proficient bilinguals. Early bilinguals preferentially recruited left hemisphere sensorimotor regions involved in motoric control and articulation. In contrast, later learners, to a greater degree, engaged regions involved in executive cognitive control and lexical access. The data support the notion that early L2 learners devote neural resources to motor control during lexical retrieval. In contrast, later L2 learners recruit executive control mechanisms to generate the past tense. These data are consistent with the S/E model of bilingual language learning, and serve as an extension of cognitive control theories.

  20. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging for Better Sensitivity to Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Holdsworth, S.J.; Yeom, K.W.; Antonucci, M.U.; Andre, J.B.; Rosenberg, J.; Aksoy, M.; Straka, M.; Fischbein, N.J.; Bammer, R.; Moseley, M.E.; Zaharchuk, G.; Skare, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Parallel imaging facilitates the acquisition of echo-planar images with a reduced TE, enabling the incorporation of an additional image at a later TE. Here we investigated the use of a parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo EPI sequence to improve lesion conspicuity in diffusion-weighted imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo DWI data were acquired in 50 consecutive patients suspected of stroke at 1.5T. The dual-echo acquisition included 2 EPI for 1 diffusion-preparation period (echo 1 [TE = 48 ms] and echo 2 [TE = 105 ms]). Three neuroradiologists independently reviewed the 2 echoes by using the routine DWI of our institution as a reference. Images were graded on lesion conspicuity, diagnostic confidence, and image quality. The apparent diffusion coefficient map from echo 1 was used to validate the presence of acute infarction. Relaxivity maps calculated from the 2 echoes were evaluated for potential complementary information. RESULTS Echo 1 and 2 DWIs were rated as better than the reference DWI. While echo 1 had better image quality overall, echo 2 was unanimously favored over both echo 1 and the reference DWI for its high sensitivity in detecting acute infarcts. CONCLUSIONS Parallel imaging–enhanced dual-echo diffusion-weighted EPI is a useful method for evaluating lesions with reduced diffusivity. The long TE of echo 2 produced DWIs that exhibited superior lesion conspicuity compared with images acquired at a shorter TE. Echo 1 provided higher SNR ADC maps for specificity to acute infarction. The relaxivity maps may serve to complement information regarding blood products and mineralization. PMID:24763417

  1. USPIO-enhanced 3D-cine self-gated cardiac MRI based on a stack-of-stars golden angle short echo time sequence: Application on mice with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Trotier, Aurélien J; Castets, Charles R; Lefrançois, William; Ribot, Emeline J; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudière, Eric; Miraux, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    To develop and assess a 3D-cine self-gated method for cardiac imaging of murine models. A 3D stack-of-stars (SOS) short echo time (STE) sequence with a navigator echo was performed at 7T on healthy mice (n = 4) and mice with acute myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 4) injected with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles. In all, 402 spokes were acquired per stack with the incremental or the golden angle method using an angle increment of (360/402)° or 222.48°, respectively. A cylindrical k-space was filled and repeated with a maximum number of repetitions (NR) of 10. 3D cine cardiac images at 156 μm resolution were reconstructed retrospectively and compared for the two methods in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The golden angle images were also reconstructed with NR = 10, 6, and 3, to assess cardiac functional parameters (ejection fraction, EF) on both animal models. The combination of 3D SOS-STE and USPIO injection allowed us to optimize the identification of cardiac peaks on navigator signal and generate high CNR between blood and myocardium (15.3 ± 1.0). The golden angle method resulted in a more homogeneous distribution of the spokes inside a stack (P < 0.05), enabling reducing the acquisition time to 15 minutes. EF was significantly different between healthy and MI mice (P < 0.05). The method proposed here showed that 3D-cine images could be obtained without electrocardiogram or respiratory gating in mice. It allows precise measurement of cardiac functional parameters even on MI mice. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:355-365. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Comparison of Diffusion MRI Acquisition Protocols for the In Vivo Characterization of the Mouse Spinal Cord: Variability Analysis and Application to an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Model.

    PubMed

    Figini, Matteo; Scotti, Alessandro; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Bonanno, Silvia; Padelli, Francesco; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Zucca, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) has relevant applications in the microstructural characterization of the spinal cord, especially in neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have a pivotal role in the study of such diseases; however, in vivo spinal dMRI of small animals entails additional challenges that require a systematical investigation of acquisition parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare three acquisition protocols and identify the scanning parameters allowing a robust estimation of the main diffusion quantities and a good sensitivity to neurodegeneration in the mouse spinal cord. For all the protocols, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to noise ratios and the mean value and variability of Diffusion Tensor metrics were evaluated in healthy controls. For the estimation of fractional anisotropy less variability was provided by protocols with more diffusion directions, for the estimation of mean, axial and radial diffusivity by protocols with fewer diffusion directions and higher diffusion weighting. Intermediate features (12 directions, b = 1200 s/mm2) provided the overall minimum inter- and intra-subject variability in most cases. In order to test the diagnostic sensitivity of the protocols, 7 G93A-SOD1 mice (model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) at 10 and 17 weeks of age were scanned and the derived diffusion parameters compared with those estimated in age-matched healthy animals. The protocols with an intermediate or high number of diffusion directions provided the best differentiation between the two groups at week 17, whereas only few local significant differences were highlighted at week 10. According to our results, a dMRI protocol with an intermediate number of diffusion gradient directions and a relatively high diffusion weighting is optimal for spinal cord imaging. Further work is needed to confirm these results and for a finer tuning of acquisition parameters. Nevertheless, our findings could be important for the

  3. Comparison of Diffusion MRI Acquisition Protocols for the In Vivo Characterization of the Mouse Spinal Cord: Variability Analysis and Application to an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzo, Stefania; Bonanno, Silvia; Padelli, Francesco; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Zucca, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) has relevant applications in the microstructural characterization of the spinal cord, especially in neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have a pivotal role in the study of such diseases; however, in vivo spinal dMRI of small animals entails additional challenges that require a systematical investigation of acquisition parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare three acquisition protocols and identify the scanning parameters allowing a robust estimation of the main diffusion quantities and a good sensitivity to neurodegeneration in the mouse spinal cord. For all the protocols, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to noise ratios and the mean value and variability of Diffusion Tensor metrics were evaluated in healthy controls. For the estimation of fractional anisotropy less variability was provided by protocols with more diffusion directions, for the estimation of mean, axial and radial diffusivity by protocols with fewer diffusion directions and higher diffusion weighting. Intermediate features (12 directions, b = 1200 s/mm2) provided the overall minimum inter- and intra-subject variability in most cases. In order to test the diagnostic sensitivity of the protocols, 7 G93A-SOD1 mice (model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) at 10 and 17 weeks of age were scanned and the derived diffusion parameters compared with those estimated in age-matched healthy animals. The protocols with an intermediate or high number of diffusion directions provided the best differentiation between the two groups at week 17, whereas only few local significant differences were highlighted at week 10. According to our results, a dMRI protocol with an intermediate number of diffusion gradient directions and a relatively high diffusion weighting is optimal for spinal cord imaging. Further work is needed to confirm these results and for a finer tuning of acquisition parameters. Nevertheless, our findings could be important for the

  4. MRI-based motion correction of thoracic PET: initial comparison of acquisition protocols and correction strategies suitable for simultaneous PET/MRI systems.

    PubMed

    Dikaios, Nikolaos; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Graves, Martin J; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A; Fryer, Tim D

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquired on equipment capable of simultaneous MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) could potentially provide the gold standard method for motion correction of PET. To assess the latter, in this study we compared fast 2D and 3D MRI of the torso and used deformation parameters from real MRI data to correct simulated PET data for respiratory motion. PET sinogram data were simulated using SimSET from a 4D pseudo-PET image series created by segmenting MR images acquired over a respiratory cycle. Motion-corrected PET images were produced using post-reconstruction registration (PRR) and motion-compensated image reconstruction (MCIR). MRI-based motion correction improved PET image quality at the lung-liver and lung-spleen boundaries and in the heart but little improvement was obtained where MRI contrast was low. The root mean square error in SUV units per voxel compared to a motion-free image was reduced from 0.0271 (no motion correction) to 0.0264 (PRR) and 0.0250 (MCIR). Motion correction using MRI can improve thoracic PET images but there are limitations due to the quality of fast MRI.

  5. Diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhagic lesions: comparison between 3D-SWAN (3D T2*-weighted imaging with multi-echo acquisition) and 2D-T2*-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Yoshiko; Kakeda, Shingo; Hiai, Yasuhiro; Ide, Satoshi; Ogasawara, Atsushi; Ooki, Hodaka; Watanabe, Keita; Nishimura, Joji; Ohnari, Norihiro; Korogi, Yukunori

    2014-03-01

    3D-susceptibility-weighted angiography (SWAN) can produce high-resolution images that yield excellent susceptibility-weighted contrast at a relatively short acquisition time. To compare SWAN- and 2D-T2*-weighted gradient-echo images (T2*-WI) for their sensitivity in the depiction of cerebral hemorrhagic lesions. We subjected 75 patients with suspected cerebral hemorrhagic lesions to SWAN and T2*-WI at 3T. We first measured the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) using an agar phantom that contained different concentrations of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). The acquisition time for SWAN and T2*-WI was similar (182 vs. 196 s). Neuroradiologists compared the two imaging methods for lesion detectability and conspicuity. The CNR of the phantom was higher on SWAN images. Of the 75 patients, 50 were found to have a total of 278 cerebral hemorrhagic lesions (microbleeds, n = 229 [82.4%]; intracerebral hemorrhage, n = 18 [6.5%]; superficial siderosis, n = 13 [4.7%]; axonal injuries, n = 8 [2.9%]; subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH] or brain contusion, n = 3 each [1.0%]; subdural hematoma, n = 2 [0.7%]; cavernous hemangioma or dural arterteriovenous fistula, n = 1 each [0.4%]). In none of the lesions was the SWAN sequence inferior to T2*-WI with respect to lesion detectability and conspicuity. In fact, SWAN yielded better lesion conspicuity in patients with superficial siderosis and SAH: it detected significantly more lesions than T2*-WI (P < 0.01) and it was particularly useful for the detection of microbleeds and lesions near the skull base. SWAN is equal or superior to standard T2*-WI for the diagnosis of various cerebral hemorrhagic lesions. Because its acquisition time is reasonable it may replace T2*-WI.

  6. Intradiurnal Fluctuations of Off-Resonance Saturation Effects in Healthy Human Achilles Tendons Assessed with a 3D Ultrashort Echo Time MRI Sequence at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Grosse, U; Syha, R; Partovi, S; Keßler, D E; Bongers, M; Seith, F; Nikolaou, K; Robbin, M; Schick, F; Springer, F

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation in healthy subjects has an impact on off-resonance saturation ratios (OSR) or the volume of the Achilles tendon after a prolonged time of reduced levels of physical activity. 7 healthy volunteers were repeatedly investigated on 3 consecutive days on a 3 T whole body MR scanner using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging sequence with a Gaussian off-resonance saturation pulse at a frequency offset of 2000 Hz to calculate OSR values. For accurate volumetric quantification of the Achilles tendon, a newly developed contour detection snake algorithm was applied on high-resolution isotropic T2-weighted SPACE sequence datasets. Single-measure intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to estimate test-retest reliability. For OSR and tendon volume measurements on three consecutive days, excellent reproducibility could be achieved with ICC values above 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Comparing the results of all three days, a statistically significant mean individual percentage decrease (- 4.1  ± 1.5 %; p = 0.001) of calculated tendon OSR values was found for the evening measurements. No statistically significant difference between tendon volumes in the morning and the evening could be detected (p = 0.589). The results of this in-vivo study demonstrate a significant influence of gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation after reduced physical activity on OSR values in the Achilles tendon, but not on tendon volume. Taken together with the demonstrated excellent reproducibility, these findings are important for future studies investigating temporal changes of the Achilles tendon microstructure. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  8. High angular resolution diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes: compensation and correction in experiment design and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lundell, Henrik; Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) diffusion MRI can be advantageous over pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) for diffusion times that are long compared with T2. It therefore has potential for biomedical diffusion imaging applications at 7T and above where T2 is short. However, gradient pulses other than the diffusion gradients in the STEAM sequence contribute much greater diffusion weighting than in PGSE and lead to a disrupted experimental design. Here, we introduce a simple compensation to the STEAM acquisition that avoids the orientational bias and disrupted experiment design that these gradient pulses can otherwise produce. The compensation is simple to implement by adjusting the gradient vectors in the diffusion pulses of the STEAM sequence, so that the net effective gradient vector including contributions from diffusion and other gradient pulses is as the experiment intends. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data were acquired with and without the proposed compensation. The data were processed to derive standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps, which highlight the need for the compensation. Ignoring the other gradient pulses, a bias in DTI parameters from STEAM acquisition is found, due both to confounds in the analysis and the experiment design. Retrospectively correcting the analysis with a calculation of the full B matrix can partly correct for these confounds, but an acquisition that is compensated as proposed is needed to remove the effect entirely. PMID:24890716

  9. Impact of PET acquisition durations on image quality and lesion detectability in whole-body (68)Ga-PSMA PET-MRI.

    PubMed

    Noto, Benjamin; Büther, Florian; Auf der Springe, Katharina; Avramovic, Nemanja; Heindel, Walter; Schäfers, Michael; Allkemper, Thomas; Stegger, Lars

    2017-12-01

    While (68)Ga-PSMA PET-MRI might be superior to PET-CT with regard to soft tissue assessment in prostate cancer evaluation, it is also known to potentially introduce additional PET image artefacts. Therefore, the impact of PET acquisition duration and attenuation data on artefact occurrence, lesion detectability, and quantification was investigated. To this end, whole-body PET list mode data from 12 patients with prostate cancer were acquired 1 h after injection of 2 MBq/kg [(68)Ga]HBED-CC-PSMA on a hybrid PET-MRI system. List mode data were further transformed into data sets representing 300, 180, 90, and 30 s acquisition duration per bed position. Standard attenuation and scatter corrections were performed based on MRI-derived attenuation maps, complemented by emission-based attenuation data in areas not covered by MRI. A total of 288 image data sets were reconstructed with varying acquisition durations for emission and attenuation data with and without scatter and prompt gamma correction, and further analysed regarding image quality and diagnostic performance. Decreased PET acquisition durations resulted in a significantly increased incidence of halo artefacts around kidneys and bladder, decreased lesion detectability and lower SUV as well as markedly lower arm attenuation values: Halo artefacts were present in 5 out of 12 cases at 300-s duration, in 6 at 180 s, in 10 at 90 s, and in 11 cases at 30 s. Using attenuation data of the 300 s scans restored artefact occurrence to the original 300-s level. Prompt gamma correction only led to small improvements in terms of artefact occurrence and size. Of the 141 detected lesions in the 300-s images one lesion was not detected at 180 s, 28 at 90 s, and 64 at 30 s. Using the 300-s attenuation map decreased non-detectability of lesions to zero at 180 s, 9 at 90 s, and 52 at 30 s. Attenuation maps at 90 and 30 s demonstrated markedly lower mean arm attenuation values (0.002 cm(-1)) than those at 300 s (0

  10. An open-source hardware and software system for acquisition and real-time processing of electrophysiology during high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Purdon, Patrick L; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-11-15

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open-source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (<0.6microV p-p input noise), electromagnetic compatibility for MRI (tested up to 7T), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has been used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7T examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3T fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level.

  11. An Open-Source Hardware and Software System for Acquisition and Real-Time Processing of Electrophysiology during High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, Patrick L.; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (< 0.6 uV p-p input noise), electromagnetic compatibility for MRI (tested up to 7 Tesla), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7 Tesla examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3 Tesla fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level. PMID:18761038

  12. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. On the measurement of absolute cerebral blood volume (CBV) using vascular-space-occupancy (VASO) MRI.

    PubMed

    Uh, Jinsoo; Lewis-Amezcua, Kelly; Varghese, Rani; Lu, Hanzhang

    2009-03-01

    Recently, a vascular-space-occupancy (VASO) MRI technique was developed for quantitative assessment of cerebral blood volume (CBV). This method uses the T(1)-shortening effect of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) with imaging parameters chosen that null the precontrast blood magnetization but allow the postcontrast blood magnetization to recover to equilibrium. A key advantage of VASO CBV estimation is that it provides a straightforward procedure for converting MR signals to absolute physiologic values. However, as with other T(1)-based steady-state approaches, several important factors need to be considered that influence the accuracy of CBV values obtained with VASO MRI. Here, the transverse relaxation (T(2)/T(2) (*)) effect in VASO MRI was investigated using multiecho spin-echo and gradient-echo experiments, resulting in underestimation of CBV by 14.9% +/- 1.1% and 16.0% +/- 2.5% for spin echo (TE = 10 ms) and gradient echo (TE = 6 ms), respectively. In addition, the influence of contrast agent clearance was studied by acquiring multiple postcontrast VASO images at 2.2-min intervals, which showed that the concentration of Gd-DTPA in the first 14 min (single dose) was sufficient for the blood magnetization to fully recover to equilibrium. Finally, the effect of vascular Gd-DTPA leakage was assessed for scalp tissue, and signal extrapolation as a function of postinjection time was demonstrated to be useful in minimizing the associated errors. Specific recommendations for VASO MRI acquisition and processing strategies are provided.

  14. Prediction of pork quality parameters by applying fractals and data mining on MRI.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Daniel; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Caro, Andrés; Amigo, José Manuel; Dahl, Anders B; ErsbØll, Bjarne K; Antequera, Teresa

    2017-09-01

    This work firstly investigates the use of MRI, fractal algorithms and data mining techniques to determine pork quality parameters non-destructively. The main objective was to evaluate the capability of fractal algorithms (Classical Fractal algorithm, CFA; Fractal Texture Algorithm, FTA and One Point Fractal Texture Algorithm, OPFTA) to analyse MRI in order to predict quality parameters of loin. In addition, the effect of the sequence acquisition of MRI (Gradient echo, GE; Spin echo, SE and Turbo 3D, T3D) and the predictive technique of data mining (Isotonic regression, IR and Multiple linear regression, MLR) were analysed. Both fractal algorithm, FTA and OPFTA are appropriate to analyse MRI of loins. The sequence acquisition, the fractal algorithm and the data mining technique seems to influence on the prediction results. For most physico-chemical parameters, prediction equations with moderate to excellent correlation coefficients were achieved by using the following combinations of acquisition sequences of MRI, fractal algorithms and data mining techniques: SE-FTA-MLR, SE-OPFTA-IR, GE-OPFTA-MLR, SE-OPFTA-MLR, with the last one offering the best prediction results. Thus, SE-OPFTA-MLR could be proposed as an alternative technique to determine physico-chemical traits of fresh and dry-cured loins in a non-destructive way with high accuracy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Retrospective 3D motion correction using spherical navigator echoes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Patricia M; Liu, Junmin; Wade, Trevor; Tavallaei, Mohammad Ali; Drangova, Maria

    2016-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a rapid spherical navigator echo (SNAV) motion correction technique, then apply it for retrospective correction of brain images. The pre-rotated, template matching SNAV method (preRot-SNAV) was developed in combination with a novel hybrid baseline strategy, which includes acquired and interpolated templates. Specifically, the SNAV templates are only rotated around X- and Y-axis; for each rotated SNAV, simulated baseline templates that mimic object rotation about the Z-axis were interpolated. The new method was first evaluated with phantom experiments. Then, a customized SNAV-interleaved gradient echo sequence was used to image three volunteers performing directed head motion. The SNAV motion measurements were used to retrospectively correct the brain images. Experiments were performed using a 3.0T whole-body MRI scanner and both single and 8-channel head coils. Phantom rotations and translations measured using the hybrid baselines agreed to within 0.9° and 1mm compared to those measured with the original preRot-SNAV method. Retrospective motion correction of in vivo images using the hybrid preRot-SNAV effectively corrected for head rotation up to 4° and 4mm. The presented hybrid approach enables the acquisition of pre-rotated baseline templates in as little as 2.5s, and results in accurate measurement of rotations and translations. Retrospective 3D motion correction successfully reduced motion artifacts in vivo. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Echoes of the supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, D.; Allen, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The light echoes of SN 1987A are studied using photographs of the Tarantula nebula, including Sanduleak -69 deg 202, taken from 1984 to 1988. The formation of light echoes, and the process of extracting echo images for photographs are examined. The technique of photographic subtraction is described. Consideration is given to the formation of well-defined rings by light echoes. The possibility of using the photographs of SN 1987A light echoes in the construction of a three-dimensional model of the dust sheet in the LMC is noted.

  17. ECHO State Comparative Maps | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  18. Resources - ECHO Data | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  19. ECHO Site Map | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  20. Learn More About ECHO | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  1. Contact Us about ECHO | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  2. ECHO Release Notes | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  3. ECHO Gov Login | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  4. ECHO Rest Services Documentation | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  5. ECHO Gov Login | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  6. A Three-Dimensional Regional Strain Computation Method with Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) in Non-Ischemic, Non-Valvular Dilated Cardiomyopathy Patients and Healthy Subjects Validated by Tagged MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Julia; Knutsen, Andrew K.; Cupps, Brian P.; Zhong, Xiaodong; Pasque, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Fast cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MR has higher spatial resolution and enables rapid post-processing. Thus we compared the accuracy of regional strains computation by DENSE with tagged MR in healthy and non-ischemic, non-valvular dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) subjects. Materials and Methods Validation of 3D regional strains computed with DENSE was conducted in reference to standard tagged MRI (TMRI) in healthy subjects and patients with DCM. Additional repeatability studies in healthy subjects were conducted to increase confidence in DENSE. A meshfree multiquadrics radial point interpolation method (RPIM) was used for computing Lagrange strains in sixteen left ventricular segments. Bland-Altman analysis and Student's t-tests were conducted to observe similarities in regional strains between sequences and in DENSE repeatability studies. Results Regional circumferential strains ranged from -0.21 ± 0.07 (Lateral-Apex) to -0.11 ± 0.05 (Posterorseptal-Base) in healthy subjects and -0.15 ± 0.04 (Anterior-Apex) to -0.02 ± 0.08 (Posterorseptal-Base) in DCM patients. Computed mean differences in regional circumferential strain from the DENSE-TMRI comparison study was 0.01 ± 0.03 (95% limits of agreement) in normal subjects, -0.01 ± 0.06 in DCM patients and 0.0 ± 0.02 in repeatability studies, with similar agreements in longitudinal and radial strains. Conclusion We found agreement between DENSE and tagged MR in patients and volunteers in terms of evaluation of regional strains. PMID:24753028

  7. Are Nonlinguistic Functions in ''Broca's Area'' Prerequisites for Language Acquisition? fMRI Findings from an Ontogenetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ralph-Axel; Basho, Surina

    2004-01-01

    There is incomplete consensus on the anatomical demarcation of Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus and its functional characterization remains a matter of debate. Exclusive syntactic specialization has been proposed, but is overall inconsistent with the neuroimaging literature. We examined three functional MRI (fMRI) datasets on…

  8. Are Nonlinguistic Functions in ''Broca's Area'' Prerequisites for Language Acquisition? fMRI Findings from an Ontogenetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ralph-Axel; Basho, Surina

    2004-01-01

    There is incomplete consensus on the anatomical demarcation of Broca's area in the left inferior frontal gyrus and its functional characterization remains a matter of debate. Exclusive syntactic specialization has been proposed, but is overall inconsistent with the neuroimaging literature. We examined three functional MRI (fMRI) datasets on…

  9. Sparse Reconstruction Challenge for diffusion MRI: Validation on a physical phantom to determine which acquisition scheme and analysis method to use?

    PubMed

    Ning, Lipeng; Laun, Frederik; Gur, Yaniv; DiBella, Edward V R; Deslauriers-Gauthier, Samuel; Megherbi, Thinhinane; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Zucchelli, Mauro; Menegaz, Gloria; Fick, Rutger; St-Jean, Samuel; Paquette, Michael; Aranda, Ramon; Descoteaux, Maxime; Deriche, Rachid; O'Donnell, Lauren; Rathi, Yogesh

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is the modality of choice for investigating in-vivo white matter connectivity and neural tissue architecture of the brain. The diffusion-weighted signal in dMRI reflects the diffusivity of water molecules in brain tissue and can be utilized to produce image-based biomarkers for clinical research. Due to the constraints on scanning time, a limited number of measurements can be acquired within a clinically feasible scan time. In order to reconstruct the dMRI signal from a discrete set of measurements, a large number of algorithms have been proposed in recent years in conjunction with varying sampling schemes, i.e., with varying b-values and gradient directions. Thus, it is imperative to compare the performance of these reconstruction methods on a single data set to provide appropriate guidelines to neuroscientists on making an informed decision while designing their acquisition protocols. For this purpose, the SPArse Reconstruction Challenge (SPARC) was held along with the workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (at MICCAI 2014) to validate the performance of multiple reconstruction methods using data acquired from a physical phantom. A total of 16 reconstruction algorithms (9 teams) participated in this community challenge. The goal was to reconstruct single b-value and/or multiple b-value data from a sparse set of measurements. In particular, the aim was to determine an appropriate acquisition protocol (in terms of the number of measurements, b-values) and the analysis method to use for a neuroimaging study. The challenge did not delve on the accuracy of these methods in estimating model specific measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) or mean diffusivity, but on the accuracy of these methods to fit the data. This paper presents several quantitative results pertaining to each reconstruction algorithm. The conclusions in this paper provide a valuable guideline for choosing a suitable algorithm and the corresponding

  10. Sparse Reconstruction Challenge for diffusion MRI: Validation on a physical phantom to determine which acquisition scheme and analysis method to use?

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Laun, Frederik; Gur, Yaniv; DiBella, Edward V. R.; Deslauriers-Gauthier, Samuel; Megherbi, Thinhinane; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Zucchelli, Mauro; Menegaz, Gloria; Fick, Rutger; St-Jean, Samuel; Paquette, Michael; Aranda, Ramon; Descoteaux, Maxime; Deriche, Rachid; O’Donnell, Lauren; Rathi, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is the modality of choice for investigating in-vivo white matter connectivity and neural tissue architecture of the brain. The diffusion-weighted signal in dMRI reflects the diffusivity of water molecules in brain tissue and can be utilized to produce image-based biomarkers for clinical research. Due to the constraints on scanning time, a limited number of measurements can be acquired within a clinically feasible scan time. In order to reconstruct the dMRI signal from a discrete set of measurements, a large number of algorithms have been proposed in recent years in conjunction with varying sampling schemes, i.e., with varying b-values and gradient directions. Thus, it is imperative to compare the performance of these reconstruction methods on a single data set to provide appropriate guidelines to neuroscientists on making an informed decision while designing their acquisition protocols. For this purpose, the SParse Reconstruction Challenge (SPARC) was held along with the workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (at MICCAI 2014) to validate the performance of multiple reconstruction methods using data acquired from a physical phantom. A total of 16 reconstruction algorithms (9 teams) participated in this community challenge. The goal was to reconstruct single b-value and/or multiple b-value data from a sparse set of measurements. In particular, the aim was to determine an appropriate acquisition protocol (in terms of the number of measurements, b-values) and the analysis method to use for a neuroimaging study. The challenge did not delve on the accuracy of these methods in estimating model specific measures such as fractional anisotropy (FA) or mean diffusivity, but on the accuracy of these methods to fit the data. This paper presents several quantitative results pertaining to each reconstruction algorithm. The conclusions in this paper provide a valuable guideline for choosing a suitable algorithm and the corresponding

  11. UTE MRI of the Osteochondral Junction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Reni; Chen, Karen; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    The osteochondral junction is composed of numerous tissue components and serves important functions relating to structural stability and proper nutrition in joints such as the knee and spine. Conventional MR techniques have been inadequate at imaging the tissues of the osteochondral junction primarily because of the intrinsically short T2 nature of these tissues, rendering them “invisible” with the standard acquisitions. Ultrashort time to echo (UTE) MR techniques acquire sufficient MR signal of osteochondral tissues, thereby allowing direct evaluation. This article reviews the anatomy of the osteochondral junction of the knee and the spine, technical aspects of UTE MRI, and the application of UTE MRI for evaluation of the osteochondral junction. PMID:25061547

  12. MRI simulator: a teaching tool for radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, Debra A.; Kishore, Sheel; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    1990-08-01

    The increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a clinical modality has put an enormous burden on medical institutions to cost-effectively teach Mill scanning techniques to technologists and physicians. Since MRI scanner time is a scarce resource, it would be ideal if the teaching could be effectively performed off-line. In order to meet this goal, the Radiology Department has designed and developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Simulator. The Simulator in its current implementation mimics the General Electric Signa scanner's user-interface for image acquisition. The design is general enough to be applied to other MRI scanners. One unique feature of the simulator is its incorporation of an image-synthesis module which permits the user to derive images for any arbitrary combination of pulsing parameters for spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion recovery pulse sequences. These images are computed in five seconds. The development platform chosen is a standard Apple Macintosh-Il computer with no specialized hardware peripherals. The user-interface is implemented in HyperCard. All other software development including synthesis and display functions are implemented under the MPW 'C' environment. The scan parameters, demographics and images are tracked using an Oracle database. Images are currently stored on magnetic disk but could be stored on optical media with minimal effort.

  13. Techniques for Fast Stereoscopic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Stereoscopic MRI can impart 3D perception with only two image acquisitions. This economy over standard multiplanar 3D volume renderings allows faster frame rates, which are needed for real-time imaging applications. Real-time 3D perception may enhance the appreciation of complex anatomical structures, and may improve hand-eye coordination while manipulating a medical device during an image-guided interventional procedure. To this goal, a system is being developed to acquire and display stereoscopic MR images in real-time. A clinically used, fast gradient-recalled echo-train sequence has been modified to produce stereo image pairs. Features have been added for depth cueing, view sharing, and bulk signal suppression. A workstation was attached to a clinical MR scanner for fast data extraction, image reconstruction and stereoscopic image display. PMID:11477636

  14. T2-weighted fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging of extraocular muscles

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.; Dushyanth, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide unique information about extraocular muscle (EOM) structure and function. Prior high-resolution motility imaging studies employed T1 weighting, which provides intrinsic contrast of dark-appearing EOMs against bright orbital fat and is suitable for intravenous contrast. However, time-consuming T1 sequences are subject to motion artifacts. We evaluated an alternative T2-weighted fast spin-echo pulse sequence that emphasizes tissue-free fluid. Methods We prospectively used high resolution, surface coil technique for orbital MRI at 1.5T in 21 normal and 113 living strabismic subjects and 2 monkey cadavers using T2 fast spin-echo (T2FSE) weighting (long repetition time, short echo time). T2FSE was compared with T1 in 17 subjects, and with T1 in 506 different living subjects, and 12 cadavers. Results For 2 mm thick coronal MRIs of 312 μm resolution spanning the entire orbit, T1 acquisition required 218 seconds, whereas T2FSE required 150 seconds (31% faster). T2-defined the globe border better, and provided intrinsic contrast between EOMs and their pulleys. While both T1 and T2 demonstrated motor nerves to EOMs in living subjects, only T1 was satisfactory with injected contrast and in cadavers. Conclusions For motility imaging, T2FSE is faster than T1 MRI and demonstrates superior tissue details of EOMs and other orbital tissues. T2FSE of the orbits can be performed using widely available standard equipment. We suggest that T2FSE be the preferred method for clinical imaging of EOM structure, function, and innervation, although T1 may be more appropriate when intravenous contrast must be employed. PMID:21397801

  15. The role of age of acquisition and language usage in early, high-proficient bilinguals: an fMRI study during verbal fluency.

    PubMed

    Perani, Daniela; Abutalebi, Jubin; Paulesu, Eraldo; Brambati, Simona; Scifo, Paola; Cappa, Stefano F; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2003-07-01

    We assessed the effects of age of acquisition and language exposure on the cerebral correlates of lexical retrieval in high-proficient, early-acquisition bilinguals. Functional MRI was used to study Spanish-Catalan bilinguals who acquired either Spanish or Catalan as a first language in the first years of life. Subjects were exposed to the second language at 3 years of age, and have used both languages in daily life since then. Subjects had a comparable level of proficiency in the comprehension of both languages. Lexical retrieval with the verbal fluency task resulted in the well-established pattern of left hemispheric activation centered on the inferior frontal region. The effect of age of acquisition was assessed by dividing the subjects into two groups, on the basis of the language acquired first (Catalan-born or Spanish-born bilinguals). Functional comparisons indicated that less extensive brain activation was associated with lexical retrieval in the language acquired earlier in life. The two groups were also different in language usage/exposure, as assessed with a specific questionnaire; in particular, the exposure to the second language (Spanish) was less intensive in the case of Catalans. This was reflected in a significant interaction, indicating a more extensive activation in Catalans during production in Spanish. Overall, these results indicate that, during a production task, both age of acquisition and language exposure affect the pattern of brain activation in bilinguals, even if both languages are acquired early and with a comparable level of proficiency.

  16. Motion correction in periodically-rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) and turboprop MRI.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Ashish A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2009-07-01

    Periodically-rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) and Turboprop MRI are characterized by greatly reduced sensitivity to motion, compared to their predecessors, fast spin-echo (FSE) and gradient and spin-echo (GRASE), respectively. This is due to the inherent self-navigation and motion correction of PROPELLER-based techniques. However, it is unknown how various acquisition parameters that determine k-space sampling affect the accuracy of motion correction in PROPELLER and Turboprop MRI. The goal of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of motion correction in both techniques, to identify an optimal rotation correction approach, and determine acquisition strategies for optimal motion correction. It was demonstrated that blades with multiple lines allow more accurate estimation of motion than blades with fewer lines. Also, it was shown that Turboprop MRI is less sensitive to motion than PROPELLER. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the number of blades does not significantly affect motion correction. Finally, clinically appropriate acquisition strategies that optimize motion correction are discussed for PROPELLER and Turboprop MRI. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Echo-planar rotating-frame imaging.

    PubMed

    Casanova, F; Robert, H; Perlo, J; Pusiol, D

    2003-06-01

    A new rotating-frame imaging method that produces a complete cross section of an object in a single experiment is reported. The echo planar rotating frame imaging (EPROFI) technique uses two perpendicular RF gradients for two-dimensional spatial encoding and fully exploits the formation of rotary echoes for fast sampling of spatial frequencies. The acquisition scheme yields the Fourier transform of the spin distribution on Cartesian coordinates for straightforward image reconstruction. Implementation of the technique on a low-field portable NMR probe is described and results are presented for test objects with different geometries.

  18. Partitioning k-space for cylindrical three-dimensional rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement imaging in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Spencer Noakes, T Leigh; Henkelman, R Mark; Nieman, Brian J

    2017-09-13

    Three-dimensional rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) scans require the assignment of each phase encode step in two dimensions to an echo in the echo train. Although this assignment is frequently made across the entire Cartesian grid, collection of only the central cylinder of k-space by eliminating the corners in each phase encode dimension reduces the scan time by ~22% with negligible impact on image quality. The recipe for the assignment of echoes to grid points for such an acquisition is less straightforward than for the simple full Cartesian acquisition case, and has important implications for image quality. We explored several methods of partitioning k-space-exploiting angular symmetry in one extreme or emulating a cropped Cartesian acquisition in the other-and acquired three-dimensional RARE magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the ex vivo mouse brain. We evaluated each partitioning method for sensitivity to artifacts and then further considered strategies to minimize these through averaging or interleaving of echoes and by empirical phase correction. All scans were collected 16 at a time with multiple-mouse MRI. Although all schemes considered could be used to generate images, the results indicate that the emulation of a standard Cartesian echo assignment, by partitioning preferentially along one dimension within the cylinder, is more robust to artifacts. Samples at the periphery of the bore showed larger phase deviations and higher sensitivity to artifacts, but images of good quality could still be obtained with an optimized acquisition protocol. A protocol for high-resolution (40 μm) ex vivo images using this approach is presented, and has been used routinely with a success rate of 99% in over 1000 images. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. How Can Dolphins Recognize Fish According to Their Echoes? A Statistical Analysis of Fish Echoes

    PubMed Central

    Yovel, Yossi; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2010-01-01

    Echo-based object classification is a fundamental task of animals that use a biosonar system. Dolphins and porpoises should be able to rely on echoes to discriminate a predator from a prey or to select a desired prey from an undesired object. Many studies have shown that dolphins and porpoises can discriminate between objects according to their echoes. All of these studies however, used unnatural objects that can be easily characterized in human terminologies (e.g., metallic spheres, disks, cylinders). In this work, we collected real fish echoes from many angles of acquisition using a sonar system that mimics the emission properties of dolphins and porpoises. We then tested two alternative statistical approaches in classifying these echoes. Our results suggest that fish species can be classified according to echoes returning from porpoise- and dolphin-like signals. These results suggest how dolphins and porpoises can classify fish based on their echoes and provide some insight as to which features might enable the classification. PMID:21124908

  20. Is High Temporal Resolution Achievable for Paediatric Cardiac Acquisitions during Several Heart Beats? Illustration with Cardiac Phase Contrast Cine-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonnemains, Laurent; Odille, Freddy; Meyer, Christophe; Hossu, Gabriella; Felblinger, Jacques; Vuissoz, Pierre-André

    2015-01-01

    Background During paediatric cardiac Cine-MRI, data acquired during cycles of different lengths must be combined. Most of the time, Feinstein’s model is used to project multiple cardiac cycles of variable lengths into a mean cycle. Objective To assess the effect of Feinstein projection on temporal resolution of Cine-MRI. Methods 1/The temporal errors during Feinstein’s projection were computed in 306 cardiac cycles fully characterized by tissue Doppler imaging with 6-phase analysis (from a population of 7 children and young adults). 2/The effects of these temporal errors on tissue velocities were assessed by simulating typical tissue phase mapping acquisitions and reconstructions. 3/Myocardial velocities curves, extracted from high-resolution phase-contrast cine images, were compared for the 6 volunteers with lowest and highest heart rate variability, within a population of 36 young adults. Results 1/The mean of temporal misalignments was 30 ms over the cardiac cycle but reached 60 ms during early diastole. 2/During phase contrast MRI simulation, early diastole velocity peaks were diminished by 6.1 cm/s leading to virtual disappearance of isovolumic relaxation peaks. 3/The smoothing and erasing of isovolumic relaxation peaks was confirmed on tissue phase mapping velocity curves, between subjects with low and high heart rate variability (p = 0.05). Conclusions Feinstein cardiac model creates temporal misalignments that impair high temporal resolution phase contrast cine imaging when beat-to-beat heart rate is changing. PMID:26599755

  1. Is High Temporal Resolution Achievable for Paediatric Cardiac Acquisitions during Several Heart Beats? Illustration with Cardiac Phase Contrast Cine-MRI.

    PubMed

    Bonnemains, Laurent; Odille, Freddy; Meyer, Christophe; Hossu, Gabriella; Felblinger, Jacques; Vuissoz, Pierre-André

    2015-01-01

    During paediatric cardiac Cine-MRI, data acquired during cycles of different lengths must be combined. Most of the time, Feinstein's model is used to project multiple cardiac cycles of variable lengths into a mean cycle. To assess the effect of Feinstein projection on temporal resolution of Cine-MRI. 1/The temporal errors during Feinstein's projection were computed in 306 cardiac cycles fully characterized by tissue Doppler imaging with 6-phase analysis (from a population of 7 children and young adults). 2/The effects of these temporal errors on tissue velocities were assessed by simulating typical tissue phase mapping acquisitions and reconstructions. 3/Myocardial velocities curves, extracted from high-resolution phase-contrast cine images, were compared for the 6 volunteers with lowest and highest heart rate variability, within a population of 36 young adults. 1/The mean of temporal misalignments was 30 ms over the cardiac cycle but reached 60 ms during early diastole. 2/During phase contrast MRI simulation, early diastole velocity peaks were diminished by 6.1 cm/s leading to virtual disappearance of isovolumic relaxation peaks. 3/The smoothing and erasing of isovolumic relaxation peaks was confirmed on tissue phase mapping velocity curves, between subjects with low and high heart rate variability (p = 0.05). Feinstein cardiac model creates temporal misalignments that impair high temporal resolution phase contrast cine imaging when beat-to-beat heart rate is changing.

  2. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  3. Chondral lesions in the patellofemoral joint in MRI: Intra-individual comparison of short-tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR) with 2D multiple-echo data image combination sequence (MEDIC).

    PubMed

    Bodelle, Boris; Luboldt, Wolfgang; Wichmann, Julian L; Fischer, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J; Beeres, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the value of the 2D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) sequence relative to the short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequence regarding the depiction of chondral lesions in the patellofemoral joint. During a period of 6 month patients with acute pain at the anterior aspect of the knee, joint effusion and suspected chondral lesion defect in the patellofemoral joint underwent MRI including axial MEDIC and STIR imaging. Patients with chondral lesions in the patellofemoral joint on at least one sequence were included. The MEDIC and STIR sequence were quantitatively compared regarding the patella cartilage-to-effusion contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitatively regarding the depiction of chondral lesions independently scored by two radiologists on a 3-point scale (1 = not depicted; 2 = blurred depicted; 3 = clearly depicted) using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney-Test. For the analysis of inter-observer agreement the Cohen's Weighted Kappa test was used. 30 of 58 patients (male: female, 21:9; age: 44 ± 12 yrs) revealed cartilage lesions (fissures, n = 5 including fibrillation; gaps, n = 15; delamination, n = 7; osteoarthritis, n = 3) and were included in this study. The STIR-sequence was significantly (p < 0.001) superior to the MEDIC-sequence regarding both, the patella cartilage-to-effusion CNR (mean CNR: 232 ± 61 vs. 40 ± 16) as well as the depiction of chondral lesion (mean score: 2.83 ± 0.4 vs. 1.75 ± 0.7) with substantial inter-observer agreement in the rating of both sequences (κ = 0.76-0.89). For the depiction of chondral lesions in the patellofemoral joint, the axial STIR-sequence should be chosen in preference to the axial MEDIC-sequence.

  4. Spatial Distortion in MRI-Guided Stereotactic Procedures: Evaluation in 1.5-, 3- and 7-Tesla MRI Scanners.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jan-Oliver; Giese, Henrik; Biller, Armin; Nagel, Armin M; Kiening, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is replacing computed tomography (CT) as the main imaging modality for stereotactic transformations. MRI is prone to spatial distortion artifacts, which can lead to inaccuracy in stereotactic procedures. Modern MRI systems provide distortion correction algorithms that may ameliorate this problem. This study investigates the different options of distortion correction using standard 1.5-, 3- and 7-tesla MRI scanners. A phantom was mounted on a stereotactic frame. One CT scan and three MRI scans were performed. At all three field strengths, two 3-dimensional sequences, volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo, were acquired, and automatic distortion correction was performed. Global stereotactic transformation of all 13 datasets was performed and two stereotactic planning workflows (MRI only vs. CT/MR image fusion) were subsequently analysed. Distortion correction on the 1.5- and 3-tesla scanners caused a considerable reduction in positional error. The effect was more pronounced when using the VIBE sequences. By using co-registration (CT/MR image fusion), even a lower positional error could be obtained. In ultra-high-field (7 T) MR imaging, distortion correction introduced even higher errors. However, the accuracy of non-corrected 7-tesla sequences was comparable to CT/MR image fusion 3-tesla imaging. MRI distortion correction algorithms can reduce positional errors by up to 60%. For stereotactic applications of utmost precision, we recommend a co-registration to an additional CT dataset. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Role of MRI for detecting micro cracks in teeth.

    PubMed

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Garwood, Michael; Gaalaas, Laurence; Nixdorf, Donald R

    To evaluate the limit of tooth crack width visualization by two MRI pulse sequences in comparison with CBCT. Two extracted human teeth with known crack locations and dimensions, as determined by reference standard microCT, were selected for experimental imaging. Crack location/dimension and the presence of common dental restorative materials such as amalgam were typical of that found clinically. Experimental imaging consisted of conventional CBCT scans and MRI scans with two pulse sequences including Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) and gradient echo (GRE). CBCT and MR images of extracted teeth were acquired using acquisition parameters identical to those used for in vivo imaging. Experimental and reference standard images were registered and the limit of tooth crack visualization was determined. Collected images indicate that SWIFT could demonstrate cracks with 20-µm width, which is 10 times narrower than the imaging voxel size. Cracks of this size were not visible in GRE images, even with a short echo time of 2.75 ms. The CBCT images were distorted by artefacts owing to close location of metallic restorations. The successful visualization of cracks with the SWIFT MRI sequence compared with other clinical modalities suggests that SWIFT MRI can effectively detect microcracks in teeth and therefore may have potential to be a non-invasive method for the in vivo detection of cracks in human teeth.

  6. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  7. Accurate alignment of functional EPI data to anatomical MRI using a physics-based distortion model.

    PubMed

    Studholme, C; Constable, R T; Duncan, J S

    2000-11-01

    Mapping of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to conventional anatomical MRI is a valuable step in the interpretation of fMRI activations. One of the main limits on the accuracy of this alignment arises from differences in the geometric distortion induced by magnetic field inhomogeneity. This paper describes an approach to the registration of echo planar image (EPI) data to conventional anatomical images which takes into account this difference in geometric distortion. We make use of an additional spin echo EPI image and use the known signal conservation in spin echo distortion to derive a specialized multimodality nonrigid registration algorithm. We also examine a plausible modification using log-intensity evaluation of the criterion to provide increased sensitivity in areas of low EPI signal. A phantom-based imaging experiment is used to evaluate the behavior of the different criteria, comparing nonrigid displacement estimates to those provided by a imagnetic field mapping acquisition. The algorithm is then applied to a range of nine brain imaging studies illustrating global and local improvement in the anatomical alignment and localization of fMRI activations.

  8. A flexible fast spin echo triple-echo Dixon technique.

    PubMed

    Son, Jong Bum; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Madewell, John E; Bayram, Ersin; Hazle, John D; Low, Russell N; Ma, Jingfei

    2017-03-01

    To develop a flexible fast spin echo (FSE) triple-echo Dixon (FTED) technique. An FSE pulse sequence was modified by replacing each readout gradient with three fast-switching bipolar readout gradients with minimal interecho dead time. The corresponding three echoes were used to generate three raw images with relative phase shifts of -θ, 0, and θ between water and fat signals. A region growing-based two-point Dixon phase correction algorithm was used to joint process two separate pairs of the three raw images, yielding a final set of water-only and fat-only images. The flexible FTED technique was implemented on 1.5T and 3.0T scanners and evaluated in five subjects for fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and in one subject for post-contrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging. The flexible FTED technique achieved a high data acquisition efficiency, comparable to that of FSE, and was flexible in scan protocols. The joint two-point Dixon phase correction algorithm helped to ensure consistency in the processing of the two separate pairs of raw images. Reliable and uniform separation of water and fat was achieved in all of the test cases. The flexible FTED technique incorporates the benefits of both FSE and Dixon imaging and provided more flexibility than the original FTED in applications such as fat-suppressed T2-weighted and T1-weighted imaging. Magn Reson Med 77:1049-1057, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Retrospective correction of B0-field-induced geometric distortions in multislice echo planar images: a 3D solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, Roderick W.; Coburn, Edward A.

    2000-04-01

    A method has been developed to utilize a 3D B0 fieldmap, with a multi-volume-of-interest segmentation map, to quantify and correct geometric distortions in echo-planar images. The purpose is to provide accurate co-registration of anatomical MRI to functional MRI time course sequences. A data structure capable of extracting and reporting the necessary information forms a central part of the solution. Images were obtained from a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an experimental y-gradient insert coil. Two 3D-gradient echo sequences supply the data needed to calculate the B0 map across the volume. Segmentation of the volume into brain/background produces the data needed for the phase unwrapping and volume(s) of interest generation, from which the global B0 variation map is obtained. Subsequent EPI acquisition yields the fMRI time- course information. Tests were carried out on a phantom and a human volunteer engaged in a motor task (finger-tapping). Strong distortions were measured, and subsequently corrected, particularly near the petrous bone/mastoid air cells and in the frontal and maxillary sinuses. Additionally, a strong eddy current resulting from the unshielded y-gradient was detected. The method facilitates geometric distortion correction through an imaging volume, containing multiple regions of interest within a slice, starting from a single starting point.

  10. Gradient-Modulated PETRA MRI.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Goerke, Ute; Wang, Luning; Ellermann, Jutta; Metzger, Gregory J; Garwood, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T 2(*) signal decay is a common issue in radial ultrashort echo time MRI sequences. One solution is to use a higher readout bandwidth, but this may be impractical for some techniques like pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA), which is a hybrid method of zero echo time and single point imaging techniques. Specifically, PETRA has severe specific absorption rate (SAR) and radiofrequency (RF) pulse peak power limitations when using higher bandwidths in human measurements. In this study, we introduce gradient modulation (GM) to PETRA to reduce image blurring artifacts while keeping SAR and RF peak power low. Tolerance of GM-PETRA to image blurring was evaluated in simulations and experiments by comparing with the conventional PETRA technique. We performed inner ear imaging of a healthy subject at 7T. GM-PETRA showed significantly less image blurring due to off-resonance and fast T2(*) signal decay compared to PETRA. In in vivo imaging, GM-PETRA nicely captured complex structures of the inner ear such as the cochlea and semicircular canals. Gradient modulation can improve the PETRA image quality and mitigate SAR and RF peak power limitations without special hardware modification in clinical scanners.

  11. PARACEST MRI With Improved Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanshu; Ali, M. Meser; Yoo, Byunghee; Griswold, Mark A.; Tkach, Jean A.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) is a novel contrast mechanism for MRI. A PARACEST MRI methodology with high temporal resolution is highly desired for in vivo MRI applications of molecular imaging. To address this need, a strategy has been developed that includes a long selective saturation period before each repetition of a Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence. This strategy is suitable for the application of PARACEST contrast agents to environments with long T1 relaxation times. An alternative strategy uses short selective saturation periods before the acquisition of each k-space trajectory to maintain steady state conditions, which can be implemented with a Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) pulse sequence. These short saturation periods lengthen the total scan time as compared to the first approach but compensate for the loss in PARACEST contrast related to T1 relaxation. Both approaches have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo with significantly improved temporal resolutions as compared to a conventional gradient-echo PARACEST method without sacrificing CNR efficiency. These demonstrations also adopted a strategy for measuring the PARACEST effect that only requires selective saturation at a single MR frequency, which further improves temporal resolution for PARACEST detection. PMID:19165903

  12. SU-F-I-16: Short Breast MRI with High-Resolution T2-Weighted and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced T1-Weighted Images

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J; Son, J; Arun, B; Hazle, J; Hwang, K; Madewell, J; Yang, W; Dogan, B; Wang, K; Bayram, E

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and demonstrate a short breast (sb) MRI protocol that acquires both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in approximately ten minutes. Methods: The sb-MRI protocol consists of two novel pulse sequences. The first is a flexible fast spin-echo triple-echo Dixon (FTED) sequence for high-resolution fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, and the second is a 3D fast dual-echo spoiled gradient sequence (FLEX) for volumetric fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging before and post contrast agent injection. The flexible FTED sequence replaces each single readout during every echo-spacing period of FSE with three fast-switching bipolar readouts to produce three raw images in a single acquisition. These three raw images are then post-processed using a Dixon algorithm to generate separate water-only and fat-only images. The FLEX sequence acquires two echoes using dual-echo readout after each RF excitation and the corresponding images are post-processed using a similar Dixon algorithm to yield water-only and fat-only images. The sb-MRI protocol was implemented on a 3T MRI scanner and used for patients who had undergone concurrent clinical MRI for breast cancer screening. Results: With the same scan parameters (eg, spatial coverage, field of view, spatial and temporal resolution) as the clinical protocol, the total scan-time of the sb-MRI protocol (including the localizer, bilateral T2-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images) was 11 minutes. In comparison, the clinical breast MRI protocol took 43 minutes. Uniform fat suppression and high image quality were consistently achieved by sb-MRI. Conclusion: We demonstrated a sb-MRI protocol comprising both T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images can be performed in approximately ten minutes. The spatial and temporal resolution of the images easily satisfies the current breast MRI accreditation guidelines by the American College of Radiology. The protocol has the

  13. MRI of the human eye using magnetization transfer contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lizak, M J; Datiles, M B; Aletras, A H; Kador, P F; Balaban, R S

    2000-11-01

    To determine the feasibility of using magnetization transfer contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track cataractous lens changes. A fast spin-echo sequence was modified to include a magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) preparation pulse train. This consisted of twenty 8.5-msec sinc pulses, 1200 Hz upfield from the water resonance and 1.2-Hz power. The MTC preparation pulse was followed by acquisition through fast spin-echo imaging. The imaging parameters were number of excitations (NEX) = 1, echo time (TE) = 14 msec, recovery time (TR) = 2 sec, echo train length of eight echos, and a matrix size of 256 x 160. To reduce motion artifacts, the volunteers were asked to fixate on a blinking LED. Normal and MTC-enhanced images were acquired from normal volunteers and volunteers with nuclear or cortical cataracts. The eye was adequately imaged, with few motion artifacts appearing. The lens was well resolved, despite the short T(2). The cornea and ciliary body were also clearly visible. In the lens, resolution of the epithelium and cortex were enhanced with MTC. In addition, contrast-to-noise ratios were measured for each image. Examination of the contrast-to-noise ratio confirmed that MTC increased the contrast between the nucleus and cortex. Unenhanced MRIs showed significant differences between the cortex of normal volunteers and volunteers with cataracts. MTC-enhanced images improved the sensitivity to changes in the nucleus. In this preliminary study, we were able to use MTC-enhanced MRI to obtain high-contrast images of the human lens. Regular and enhanced MRIs detected statistically significant differences between normal and cataractous lenses.

  14. Light echoes - Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1988-01-01

    The sudden brilliance of a nova eruption will be reflected on surrounding dust grains to create a phantom nebula. Previous searches for these light echoes have used relatively short exposures with photograhic detectors. This paper reports on a search around eight recent novae with long exposures using a CCD camera. Despite an increase of sensitivity by over an order of magnitude, no light echoes were detected. It is found that the average grain density must be less than about 10 to the -9th per cu cm for distances from 0.1 pc to 1000 pc from the novae. The light echo around Nova Persei 1901 was caused by reflection off clouds with grain densities of several times 10 to the -9th per cu cm which are at distances between 0.1 pc and 10 pc. Echoes from dust in a circumstellar shell or ejected during a previous eruption will be effectively unobservable.

  15. Maps | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  16. Facilities | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. Resources | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  18. Trends | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  19. Help | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  20. Generation of attenuation map for MR-based attenuation correction of PET data in the head area employing 3D short echo time MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khateri, Parisa; Salighe Rad, Hamidreza; Fathi, Anahita; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2013-02-01

    Attenuation correction is a crucial step to get accurate quantification of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data. An attenuation map to provide attenuation coefficients at 511 keV can be generated using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). One of the main steps involved in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) of PET data is to separate bone from air. Low signal intensity of bone in conventional MRI makes it difficult to separate bone from air in the head area, while their attenuation coefficients are very different. In literature, several groups proposed ultrashort echo-time (UTE) sequences to differentiate bone from air [4,5,7], because these sequences are capable of imaging tissues with short T2* relaxation time, such as cortical bone; however, they are difficult to use, expensive and time-consuming. Employing short echo-time (STE) MRI in combination with long echo-time (LTE) MRI, and along with high performance image processing algorithms is a good substitute for UTE-based PET attenuation correction; they are widely available, easy to use, inexpensive and much faster than UTE pulse sequences. In this work, we propose the use of STE sequences along with LTE ones, as well as a dedicated image processing method to differentiate bone from air cavities in the head area by creating contrast between the tissues. Attenuation coefficients at 511 kev, relying on literature [5], will then be assigned to the voxels. Acquisition was performed on a clinical 3T Tim Trio scanner (Siemens Medical Solution, Erlangen, Germany), employing a dual echo sequence. To achieve an optimized protocol with the best result for discrimination of bone and air, two types of acquisitions were performed, with and without fat suppression; the acquisition parameters were as follows: TE=1.21/5 ms, TR=5/17, FA=30, and TE=1.12/3.16 ms, TR=5/5, FA=12 for non-fat-suppressed and fat-suppressed protocol, respectively. Contrast enhancement and tissue segmentation were applied as processing steps, to

  1. Light echoes from ancient supernovae in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Rest, Armin; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Olsen, Knut; Prieto, Jose Luis; Smith, R Chris; Welch, Douglas L; Becker, Andrew; Bergmann, Marcel; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Cook, Kem; Garg, Arti; Huber, Mark; Miknaitis, Gajus; Minniti, Dante; Nikolaev, Sergei; Stubbs, Christopher

    2005-12-22

    The light from historical supernovae could in principle still be visible as scattered-light echoes centuries after the explosion. The detection of light echoes could allow us to pinpoint the supernova event both in position and age and, most importantly, permit the acquisition of spectra to determine the 'type' of the supernova centuries after the direct light from the explosion first reached Earth. Although echoes have been discovered around some nearby extragalactic supernovae, targeted searches have not found any echoes in the regions of historical Galactic supernovae. Here we report three faint variable-surface-brightness complexes with high apparent proper motions pointing back to three of the six smallest (and probably youngest) previously catalogued supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which are believed to have been thermonuclear (type Ia) supernovae. Using the distance and apparent proper motions of these echo arcs, we estimate ages of 610 and 410 years for two of them.

  2. Accelerated self-gated UTE MRI of the murine heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Noorman, Nils; De Graaf, Wolter L.; Florack, Luc J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain radial Ultra-Short TE (UTE) MRI Cine of the beating mouse heart within reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated UTE with golden angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The stochastic nature of the retrospective triggering acquisition scheme produces an under-sampled and random kt-space filling that allows for compressed sensing reconstruction, hence reducing scan time. As a standard, an intragate multislice FLASH sequence with an acquisition time of 4.5 min per slice was used to produce standard Cine movies of 4 mice hearts with 15 frames per cardiac cycle. The proposed self-gated sequence is used to produce Cine movies with short echo time. The total scan time was 11 min per slice. 6 slices were planned to cover the heart from the base to the apex. 2X, 4X and 6X under-sampled k-spaces cine movies were produced from 2, 1 and 0.7 min data acquisitions for each slice. The accelerated cine movies of the mouse hearts were successfully reconstructed with a compressed sensing algorithm. Compared to the FLASH cine images, the UTE images showed much less flow artifacts due to the short echo time. Besides, the accelerated movies had high image quality and the undersampling artifacts were effectively removed. Left ventricular functional parameters derived from the standard and the accelerated cine movies were nearly identical.

  3. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, J D; Shams, E; Stortz, G; Schellenberg, G; Bishop, D; Khan, M S; Kozlowski, P; Retière, F; Sossi, V; Thompson, C J; Goertzen, A L

    2016-11-21

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  4. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, J. D.; Shams, E.; Stortz, G.; Schellenberg, G.; Bishop, D.; Khan, M. S.; Kozlowski, P.; Retière, F.; Sossi, V.; Thompson, C. J.; Goertzen, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  5. Hydro-MRI of the small bowel: effect of contrast volume, timing of contrast administration, and data acquisition on bowel distention.

    PubMed

    Kuehle, Christiane A; Ajaj, Waleed; Ladd, Susanne C; Massing, Sandra; Barkhausen, Joerg; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess oral contrast agents, volumes of the agents, and time points of data acquisition in regard to small-bowel distention and patient acceptance. Six healthy volunteers underwent imaging on 16 different days. Four volumes (450, 900, 1,350, and 1,800 mL) of each of the four contrast compounds (0.2% locust bean gum plus 2.5% mannitol, VoLumen containing 2.0% sorbitol, VoLumen containing 1.4% sorbitol, and tap water) were used. Two-dimensional true fast imaging with steady-state free precession data sets were acquired at 5-minute intervals after contrast ingestion. Distention values for small-bowel segments (duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum) and occurrence of side effects were documented. Analysis of bowel distention revealed significantly greater distention for all carbohydrate sugar alcohol-containing solutions compared with water but no significant difference among the three contrast agents. Sufficient duodenal distention was achieved with 900 mL of any of the contrast agents, but imaging had to be performed soon after ingestion. For MRI of the distal jejunum and ileum, a volume of 1,350 mL is preferable, and the time point of data acquisition plays a minor role. Ingestion of 1,800 mL of the carbohydrate sugar alcohol solutions led to a significantly higher rate of side effects such as abdominal cramps than did ingestion of smaller volumes. The data indicate that sufficient contrast consumption and optimal timing of data acquisition are essential to distention of the small bowel. Oral contrast agent protocols should be adapted to the bowel region in question.

  6. In vivo Quantitative evaluation of brain tissue damage in Multiple Sclerosis using Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Sati, Pascal; Cross, Anne H.; Luo, Jie; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional MRI based on weighted spin-echo (SE) images aids in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, MRI markers derived from SE sequences provide limited information about lesion severity and correlate poorly with patient disability assessed with clinical tests. In this study, we introduced a novel method [based on quantitative R2* (1/T2*) histograms] for estimating the severity of brain tissue damage in MS lesions. We applied at 1.5 T an advanced, multi-gradient-echo MRI technique [gradient echo plural contrast imaging (GEPCI)] to obtain images of the brains of healthy control subjects and subjects with MS. GEPCI is a simple yet robust technique allowing simultaneous acquisition of inherently co-registered quantitative T2* and FLAIR-like maps, along with T1-weighted images within a clinically acceptable time frame. Images obtained with GEPCI appear highly similar to standard scans; hence, they can be used in a reliable and conventional way for a clinical evaluation of the disease. Yet, the main advantage of GEPCI approach is its quantitative nature. Analysis of R2* histograms of white matter revealed a difference in the distribution between healthy subjects and subjects with MS. Based on this difference, we developed a new method for grading the severity of tissue damage [tissue-damage score (TDS)] in MS lesions. This method also provides a tissue damage load (TDL) assessing both lesion load and lesion severity, and a mean tissue damage score (MTDS) estimating the average MS lesion damage. We found promising correlations between the results derived from this method and the standard measure of clinical disability. PMID:20338247

  7. Echoes in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kang; Lu, Peifen; Ma, Junyang; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Zhang, Wenbin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian; Karras, Gabriel; Siour, Guillaume; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Faucher, Olivier; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-10-01

    Echo in mountains is a well-known phenomenon, where an acoustic pulse is mirrored by the rocks, often with reverberating recurrences. For spin echoes in magnetic resonance and photon echoes in atomic and molecular systems, the role of the mirror is played by a second, time-delayed pulse that is able to reverse the flow of time and recreate the original impulsive event. Recently, alignment and orientation echoes were discussed in terms of rotational-phase-space filamentation, and they were optically observed in laser-excited molecular gases. Here, we observe hitherto unreported fractional echoes of high order, spatially rotated echoes, and the counterintuitive imaginary echoes at negative times. Coincidence Coulomb explosion imaging is used for a direct spatiotemporal analysis of various molecular alignment echoes, and the implications to echo phenomena in other fields of physics are discussed.

  8. High-Resolution DCE-MRI of the Pituitary Gland Using Radial k-Space Acquisition with Compressed Sensing Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Espagnet, M.C.; Bangiyev, L.; Haber, M.; Block, K.T.; Babb, J.; Ruggiero, V.; Boada, F.; Gonen, O.; Fatterpekar, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDANDPURPOSE The pituitary gland is located outside of the blood-brain barrier. Dynamic T1 weighted contrast enhanced sequence is considered to be the gold standard to evaluate this region. However, it does not allow assessment of intrinsic permeability properties of the gland. Our aim was to demonstrate the utility of radial volumetric interpolated brain examination with the golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique to evaluate permeability characteristics of the individual components (anterior and posterior gland and the median eminence) of the pituitary gland and areas of differential enhancement and to optimize the study acquisition time. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed in 52 patients (group 1, 25 patients with normal pituitary glands; and group 2, 27 patients with a known diagnosis of microadenoma). Radial volumetric interpolated brain examination sequences with golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique were evaluated with an ROI-based method to obtain signal-time curves and permeability measures of individual normal structures within the pituitary gland and areas of differential enhancement. Statistical analyses were performed to assess differences in the permeability parameters of these individual regions and optimize the study acquisition time. RESULTS Signal-time curves from the posterior pituitary gland and median eminence demonstrated a faster wash-in and time of maximum enhancement with a lower peak of enhancement compared with the anterior pituitary gland (P < .005). Time-optimization analysis demonstrated that 120 seconds is ideal for dynamic pituitary gland evaluation. In the absence of a clinical history, differences in the signal-time curves allow easy distinction between a simple cyst and a microadenoma. CONCLUSIONS This retrospective study confirms the ability of the golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique to evaluate the permeability characteristics of the pituitary gland and establishes 120

  9. High-Resolution DCE-MRI of the Pituitary Gland Using Radial k-Space Acquisition with Compressed Sensing Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rossi Espagnet, M C; Bangiyev, L; Haber, M; Block, K T; Babb, J; Ruggiero, V; Boada, F; Gonen, O; Fatterpekar, G M

    2015-08-01

    The pituitary gland is located outside of the blood-brain barrier. Dynamic T1 weighted contrast enhanced sequence is considered to be the gold standard to evaluate this region. However, it does not allow assessment of intrinsic permeability properties of the gland. Our aim was to demonstrate the utility of radial volumetric interpolated brain examination with the golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique to evaluate permeability characteristics of the individual components (anterior and posterior gland and the median eminence) of the pituitary gland and areas of differential enhancement and to optimize the study acquisition time. A retrospective study was performed in 52 patients (group 1, 25 patients with normal pituitary glands; and group 2, 27 patients with a known diagnosis of microadenoma). Radial volumetric interpolated brain examination sequences with golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique were evaluated with an ROI-based method to obtain signal-time curves and permeability measures of individual normal structures within the pituitary gland and areas of differential enhancement. Statistical analyses were performed to assess differences in the permeability parameters of these individual regions and optimize the study acquisition time. Signal-time curves from the posterior pituitary gland and median eminence demonstrated a faster wash-in and time of maximum enhancement with a lower peak of enhancement compared with the anterior pituitary gland (P < .005). Time-optimization analysis demonstrated that 120 seconds is ideal for dynamic pituitary gland evaluation. In the absence of a clinical history, differences in the signal-time curves allow easy distinction between a simple cyst and a microadenoma. This retrospective study confirms the ability of the golden-angle radial sparse parallel technique to evaluate the permeability characteristics of the pituitary gland and establishes 120 seconds as the ideal acquisition time for dynamic pituitary gland

  10. A new production method of elastic silicone carotid phantom based on MRI acquisition using rapid prototyping technique.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Duhamel, Yvan; Olympe, Guillaume; Ramond, Bruno; Langevin, Francois

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experimental simulations of blood fluid in carotid artery require ideal phantoms that are as precise as possible. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a method for carotid phantom fabrication by rapid prototyping technique (RP). By using 3D reconstructed projection of the 3D time-of-flight (TOF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequence, a 12.5 cm multi-dimensional spatial structure of a carotid artery has been set up. Y-shaped and patient specific models have been generated respectively using silicone elastomer, which has a high resilience and a good tensile strength. The final patient specific model has internal carotid artery (ICA) with a highly spiraling siphon and an external carotid artery (ECA). Elastic properties of carotid walls have also been evaluated by Young's elastic modulus test and dynamic behaviors in optical and echography simulation experiments.

  11. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Reese, Timothy G.; Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  12. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: phantom and patient studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; Reese, Timothy G; Ahlman, Mark A; Bluemke, David A; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-02-01

    Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide relatively accurate motion fields and yield

  13. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Noble, David J; Scoffings, Daniel; Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Williams, Michael V; Jefferies, Sarah J

    2016-11-01

    There is no consensus approach to covering skull base meningeal reflections-and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) therein-of the posterior fossa cranial nerves (CNs VII-XII) when planning radiotherapy (RT) for medulloblastoma and ependymoma. We sought to determine whether MRI and specifically fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences can answer this anatomical question and guide RT planning. 96 posterior fossa FIESTA sequences were reviewed. Following exclusions, measurements were made on the following scans for each foramen respectively (left, right); internal acoustic meatus (IAM) (86, 84), jugular foramen (JF) (83, 85) and hypoglossal canal (HC) (42, 45). A protocol describes measurement procedure. Two observers measured distances for five cases and agreement was assessed. One observer measured all the remaining cases. IAM and JF measurement interobserver variability was compared. Mean measurement difference between observers was -0.275 mm (standard deviation 0.557). IAM and JF measurements were normally distributed. Mean IAM distance was 12.2 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8-15.6]; JF was 7.3 mm (95% CI 4.0-10.6). The HC was difficult to visualize on many images and data followed a bimodal distribution. Dural reflections of posterior fossa CNs are well demonstrated by FIESTA MRI. Measuring CSF extension into these structures is feasible and robust; mean CSF extension into IAM and JF was measured. We plan further work to assess coverage of these structures with photon and proton RT plans. Advances in knowledge: We have described CSF extension beyond the internal table of the skull into the IAM, JF and HC. Oncologists planning RT for patients with medulloblastoma and ependymoma may use these data to guide contouring.

  14. ECHO Status for International Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Beth; Lubelczyk, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The EOS Clearinghouse (ECHO) is a clearinghouse of spatial and temporal metadata, inclusive of NASA's Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) data holdings, that enables the science community to more easily exchange NASA data and information. Currently, ECHO has metadata descriptors for over 55 million individual data granules and 13 million browse images. The majority of ECHO's holdings come directly from data held in the NASA DAACs. The science disciplines and domains represented in ECHO are diverse and include metadata for all of NASA's Science Focus Area data. As middleware for a service-oriented enterprise, ECHO offers access to its capabilities through a set of publicly available Application Program Interfaces (APIs). More information about ECHO is available at http://eos.nasa.gov.echo. The presentation will discuss the status of the ECHO Partners, holdings, and activities, including the transition from the EOS Data Gateway to the Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST)

  15. ECHO Status for International Partners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Beth; Lubelczyk, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The EOS Clearinghouse (ECHO) is a clearinghouse of spatial and temporal metadata, inclusive of NASA's Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) data holdings, that enables the science community to more easily exchange NASA data and information. Currently, ECHO has metadata descriptors for over 55 million individual data granules and 13 million browse images. The majority of ECHO's holdings come directly from data held in the NASA DAACs. The science disciplines and domains represented in ECHO are diverse and include metadata for all of NASA's Science Focus Area data. As middleware for a service-oriented enterprise, ECHO offers access to its capabilities through a set of publicly available Application Program Interfaces (APIs). More information about ECHO is available at http://eos.nasa.gov.echo. The presentation will discuss the status of the ECHO Partners, holdings, and activities, including the transition from the EOS Data Gateway to the Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST)

  16. Echo Boom Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordai, Phillipe; Rizzo, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Like their baby-boomer parents, the echo-boom generation is reshaping the college and university landscape. At 80 million strong, this group of children and young adults born between 1980 and 1995 now is flooding the college and university system, spurring a college building boom. According to Campus Space Crunch, a Hillier Architecture survey of…

  17. ICV Echo Ultrasound Scan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-31

    View of Integrated Cardiovascular (ICV) Echo Ultrasound Scan,in the Columbus module. ICV aims to quantify the extent,time course and clinical significance of cardiac atrophy (decrease in the size of the heart muscle) in space. Photo was taken during Expedition 34.

  18. Rotary echo nutation NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R.; Tijink, G. A. H.; Veeman, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment which combines rotary echoes and nutation NMR is investigated and used to study different sodium sites in zeolite NaA. It is shown that with this technique sodium ions with different relaxation rates in the rotating frame can be distinguished.

  19. Echo Boom Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordai, Phillipe; Rizzo, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Like their baby-boomer parents, the echo-boom generation is reshaping the college and university landscape. At 80 million strong, this group of children and young adults born between 1980 and 1995 now is flooding the college and university system, spurring a college building boom. According to Campus Space Crunch, a Hillier Architecture survey of…

  20. Simultaneous functional MRI acquisition of distributed brain regions with high temporal resolution using a 2D-selective radiofrequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    To perform simultaneous functional MRI of multiple, distributed brain regions at high temporal resolution using a 2D-selective radiofrequency (2DRF) excitation. A tailored 2DRF excitation is used to excite several, small regions-of-interest distributed in the brain. They are acquired in a single projection image with an appropriately chosen orientation such that the different regions-of-interest can be discriminated by their position in the projection plane. Thus, they are excited and acquired simultaneously with a temporal resolution comparable to that of a single-slice measurement. The feasibility of this approach for functional neuroimaging (in-plane resolution 2 × 2 mm(2) ) at high temporal resolution (80 ms) is demonstrated in healthy volunteers for regions-of-interest in the visual and motor system using checkerboard and finger tapping block-design paradigms. Task-related brain activation could be observed in both the visual and the motor system simultaneously with a high temporal resolution. For an onset shift of 240 ms for half of the checkerboard, a delay of the hemodynamic response in the corresponding hemisphere of the visual cortex could be detected. Limiting the excited magnetization to the desired target regions with a 2DRF excitation reduces the imaging sampling requirements which can improve the temporal resolution significantly. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Fuzzy cluster analysis of high-field functional MRI data.

    PubMed

    Windischberger, Christian; Barth, Markus; Lamm, Claus; Schroeder, Lee; Bauer, Herbert; Gur, Ruben C; Moser, Ewald

    2003-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast today is an established brain research method and quickly gains acceptance for complementary clinical diagnosis. However, neither the basic mechanisms like coupling between neuronal activation and haemodynamic response are known exactly, nor can the various artifacts be predicted or controlled. Thus, modeling functional signal changes is non-trivial and exploratory data analysis (EDA) may be rather useful. In particular, identification and separation of artifacts as well as quantification of expected, i.e. stimulus correlated, and novel information on brain activity is important for both, new insights in neuroscience and future developments in functional MRI of the human brain. After an introduction on fuzzy clustering and very high-field fMRI we present several examples where fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA) of fMRI time series helps to identify and locally separate various artifacts. We also present and discuss applications and limitations of fuzzy cluster analysis in very high-field functional MRI: differentiate temporal patterns in MRI using (a) a test object with static and dynamic parts, (b) artifacts due to gross head motion artifacts. Using a synthetic fMRI data set we quantitatively examine the influences of relevant FCA parameters on clustering results in terms of receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) and compare them with a commonly used model-based correlation analysis (CA) approach. The application of FCA in analyzing in vivo fMRI data is shown for (a) a motor paradigm, (b) data from multi-echo imaging, and (c) a fMRI study using mental rotation of three-dimensional cubes. We found that differentiation of true "neural" from false "vascular" activation is possible based on echo time dependence and specific activation levels, as well as based on their signal time-course. Exploratory data analysis methods in general and fuzzy cluster analysis in particular may

  2. Automated liver sampling using a gradient dual-echo Dixon-based technique.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Mustafa R; Dale, Brian M; Merkle, Elmar M; Boll, Daniel T

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the liver requires input from a physicist or physician at the time of acquisition to insure proper voxel selection, while in multiecho chemical shift imaging, numerous regions of interest must be manually selected in order to ensure analysis of a representative portion of the liver parenchyma. A fully automated technique could improve workflow by selecting representative portions of the liver prior to human analysis. Complete volumes from three-dimensional gradient dual-echo acquisitions with two-point Dixon reconstruction acquired at 1.5 and 3 T were analyzed in 100 subjects, using an automated liver sampling algorithm, based on ratio pairs calculated from signal intensity image data as fat-only/water-only and log(in-phase/opposed-phase) on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Using different gridding variations of the algorithm, the average correct liver volume samples ranged from 527 to 733 mL. The average percentage of sample located within the liver ranged from 95.4 to 97.1%, whereas the average incorrect volume selected was 16.5-35.4 mL (2.9-4.6%). Average run time was 19.7-79.0 s. The algorithm consistently selected large samples of the hepatic parenchyma with small amounts of erroneous extrahepatic sampling, and run times were feasible for execution on an MRI system console during exam acquisition. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Noise cancellation signal processing method and computer system for improved real-time electrocardiogram artifact correction during MRI data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Odille, Freddy; Pasquier, Cédric; Abächerli, Roger; Vuissoz, Pierre-André; Zientara, Gary P; Felblinger, Jacques

    2007-04-01

    A system was developed for real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis and artifact correction during magnetic resonance (MR) scanning, to improve patient monitoring and triggering of MR data acquisitions. Based on the assumption that artifact production by magnetic field gradient switching represents a linear time invariant process, a noise cancellation (NC) method is applied to ECG artifact linear prediction. This linear prediction is performed using a digital finite impulse response (FIR) matrix, that is computed employing ECG and gradient waveforms recorded during a training scan. The FIR filters are used during further scanning to predict artifacts by convolution of the gradient waveforms. Subtracting the artifacts from the raw ECG signal produces the correction with minimal delay. Validation of the system was performed both off-line, using prerecorded signals, and under actual examination conditions. The method is implemented using a specially designed Signal Analyzer and Event Controller (SAEC) computer and electronics. Real-time operation was demonstrated at 1 kHz with a delay of only 1 ms introduced by the processing. The system opens the possibility of automatic monitoring algorithms for electrophysiological signals in the MR environment.

  4. Noncontrast Peripheral MRA with Spiral Echo Train Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fielden, Samuel W.; Mugler, John P.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Norton, Patrick T.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Meyer, Craig H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a spin echo train sequence with spiral readout gradients with improved artery–vein contrast for noncontrast angiography. Theory Venous T2 becomes shorter as the echo spacing is increased in echo train sequences, improving contrast. Spiral acquisitions, due to their data collection efficiency, facilitate long echo spacings without increasing scan times. Methods Bloch equation simulations were performed to determine optimal sequence parameters, and the sequence was applied in five volunteers. In two volunteers, the sequence was performed with a range of echo times and echo spacings to compare with the theoretical contrast behavior. A Cartesian version of the sequence was used to compare contrast appearance with the spiral sequence. Additionally, spiral parallel imaging was optionally used to improve image resolution. Results In vivo, artery–vein contrast properties followed the general shape predicted by simulations, and good results were obtained in all stations. Compared with a Cartesian implementation, the spiral sequence had superior artery–vein contrast, better spatial resolution (1.2 mm2 versus 1.5 mm2), and was acquired in less time (1.4 min versus 7.5 min). Conclusion The spiral spin echo train sequence can be used for flow-independent angiography to generate threedimensional angiograms of the periphery quickly and without the use of contrast agents. PMID:24753164

  5. A high resolution and high contrast MRI for differentiation of subcortical structures for DBS targeting: the Fast Gray Matter Acquisition T1 Inversion Recovery (FGATIR).

    PubMed

    Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Haq, Ihtsham U; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S; Bova, Frank J

    2009-08-01

    DBS depends on precise placement of the stimulating electrode into an appropriate target region. Image-based (direct) targeting has been limited by the ability of current technology to visualize DBS targets. We have recently developed and employed a Fast Gray Matter Acquisition T1 Inversion Recovery (FGATIR) 3T MRI sequence to more reliably visualize these structures. The FGATIR provides significantly better high resolution thin (1 mm) slice visualization of DBS targets than does either standard 3T T1 or T2-weighted imaging. The T1 subcortical image revealed relatively poor contrast among the targets for DBS, though the sequence did allow localization of striatum and thalamus. T2 FLAIR scans demonstrated better contrast between the STN, SNr, red nucleus (RN), and pallidum (GPe/GPi). The FGATIR scans allowed for localization of the thalamus, striatum, GPe/GPi, RN, and SNr and displayed sharper delineation of these structures. The FGATIR also revealed features not visible on other scan types: the internal lamina of the GPi, fiber bundles from the internal capsule piercing the striatum, and the boundaries of the STN. We hope that use of the FGATIR to aid initial targeting will translate in future studies to faster and more accurate procedures with consequent improvements in clinical outcomes.

  6. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers.

  7. Quantitative Characterizations of Ultrashort Echo (UTE) Images for Supporting Air-Bone Separation in the Head

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina; Feng, Mary; Grodzki, David M.; Balter, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate separation of air and bone is critical for creating synthetic CT from MRI to support Radiation Oncology workflow. This study compares two different ultrashort echo-time sequences in the separation of air from bone, and evaluates post-processing methods that correct intensity nonuniformity of images and account for intensity gradients at tissue boundaries to improve this discriminatory power. CT and MRI scans were acquired on 12 patients under an institution review board-approved prospective protocol. The two MRI sequences tested were ultra-short TE imaging using 3D radial acquisition (UTE), and using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA). Gradient nonlinearity correction was applied to both MR image volumes after acquisition. MRI intensity nonuniformity was corrected by vendor-provided normalization methods, and then further corrected using the N4itk algorithm. To overcome the intensity-gradient at air-tissue boundaries, spatial dilations, from 0 to 4 mm, were applied to threshold-defined air regions from MR images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, by comparing predicted (defined by MR images) versus “true” regions of air and bone (defined by CT images), were performed with and without residual bias field correction and local spatial expansion. The post-processing corrections increased the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) from 0.944 ± 0.012 to 0.976 ± 0.003 for UTE images, and from 0.850 ± 0.022 to 0.887 ± 0.012 for PETRA images, compared to without corrections. When expanding the threshold-defined air volumes, as expected, sensitivity of air identification decreased with an increase in specificity of bone discrimination, but in a non-linear fashion. A 1-mm air mask expansion yielded AUC increases of 1% and 4% for UTE and PETRA images, respectively. UTE images had significantly greater discriminatory power in separating air from bone than PETRA images. Post-processing strategies improved the

  8. Quantitative characterizations of ultrashort echo (UTE) images for supporting air-bone separation in the head.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Lawrence, Theodore S; Tsien, Christina; Feng, Mary; Grodzki, David M; Balter, James M

    2015-04-07

    Accurate separation of air and bone is critical for creating synthetic CT from MRI to support Radiation Oncology workflow. This study compares two different ultrashort echo-time sequences in the separation of air from bone, and evaluates post-processing methods that correct intensity nonuniformity of images and account for intensity gradients at tissue boundaries to improve this discriminatory power. CT and MRI scans were acquired on 12 patients under an institution review board-approved prospective protocol. The two MRI sequences tested were ultra-short TE imaging using 3D radial acquisition (UTE), and using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA). Gradient nonlinearity correction was applied to both MR image volumes after acquisition. MRI intensity nonuniformity was corrected by vendor-provided normalization methods, and then further corrected using the N4itk algorithm. To overcome the intensity-gradient at air-tissue boundaries, spatial dilations, from 0 to 4 mm, were applied to threshold-defined air regions from MR images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, by comparing predicted (defined by MR images) versus 'true' regions of air and bone (defined by CT images), were performed with and without residual bias field correction and local spatial expansion. The post-processing corrections increased the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) from 0.944 ± 0.012 to 0.976 ± 0.003 for UTE images, and from 0.850 ± 0.022 to 0.887 ± 0.012 for PETRA images, compared to without corrections. When expanding the threshold-defined air volumes, as expected, sensitivity of air identification decreased with an increase in specificity of bone discrimination, but in a non-linear fashion. A 1 mm air mask expansion yielded AUC increases of 1 and 4% for UTE and PETRA images, respectively. UTE images had significantly greater discriminatory power in separating air from bone than PETRA images. Post-processing strategies improved the

  9. Quantitative characterizations of ultrashort echo (UTE) images for supporting air-bone separation in the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina; Feng, Mary; Grodzki, David M.; Balter, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate separation of air and bone is critical for creating synthetic CT from MRI to support Radiation Oncology workflow. This study compares two different ultrashort echo-time sequences in the separation of air from bone, and evaluates post-processing methods that correct intensity nonuniformity of images and account for intensity gradients at tissue boundaries to improve this discriminatory power. CT and MRI scans were acquired on 12 patients under an institution review board-approved prospective protocol. The two MRI sequences tested were ultra-short TE imaging using 3D radial acquisition (UTE), and using pointwise encoding time reduction with radial acquisition (PETRA). Gradient nonlinearity correction was applied to both MR image volumes after acquisition. MRI intensity nonuniformity was corrected by vendor-provided normalization methods, and then further corrected using the N4itk algorithm. To overcome the intensity-gradient at air-tissue boundaries, spatial dilations, from 0 to 4 mm, were applied to threshold-defined air regions from MR images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, by comparing predicted (defined by MR images) versus ‘true’ regions of air and bone (defined by CT images), were performed with and without residual bias field correction and local spatial expansion. The post-processing corrections increased the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) from 0.944 ± 0.012 to 0.976 ± 0.003 for UTE images, and from 0.850 ± 0.022 to 0.887 ± 0.012 for PETRA images, compared to without corrections. When expanding the threshold-defined air volumes, as expected, sensitivity of air identification decreased with an increase in specificity of bone discrimination, but in a non-linear fashion. A 1 mm air mask expansion yielded AUC increases of 1 and 4% for UTE and PETRA images, respectively. UTE images had significantly greater discriminatory power in separating air from bone than PETRA images. Post-processing strategies improved the

  10. Echo: skin stress test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    Skin Stress Test of the 12-foot satellite built as a prototype of the full-scale Echo satellite. The 12-foot diameter of the sphere was chosen because that was the ceiling height in the Langley model shop. The proposal to build the 12-foot satellite was made in November 1957. - Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, pp. 170-171.

  11. Project Echo: Receiving System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, E. A.

    1961-01-01

    A tracking horn-reflector antenna, a maser preamplifier (and standby parametric preamplifier), and a special FM demodulator were combined to form a low-noise receiving system which made possible the establishment of a high-quality voice circuit via the Echo I passive satellite. This paper describes the 2390-Mc receiving system located at the Bell Telephone Laboratories facility in Holmdel, New Jersey.

  12. Multi-modal quantitative MRI investigation of brain tissue neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Khader M; Walimuni, Indika S; Abid, Humaira; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the utility of multimodal quantitative MRI (qMRI) and atlas-based methods to identify characteristics of lesion-driven injury and neurodegeneration in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). This work is health insurance portability and accountability act compliant. High resolution T1-weighted, dual echo, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion tensor MRI images were prospectively acquired on 68 RRMS patients (range, 25-58 years) and 68 age-matched controls. The data were analyzed using standardized human brain atlas-based tissue segmentation procedures to obtain regional volumes and their corresponding T2 relaxation times and DTI maps. Group-averaged brain atlas-based qMRI maps of T2, fractional anisotropy and diffusivities are visually presented and compared between controls and RRMS. The analysis shows a widespread injury in RRMS. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) was substantial in RRMS. The qMRI attributes of the neocortex in combination with the CC such as T2 and diffusivities were elevated and correlated with disability. Using a standardized multimodal qMRI acquisition and analyses that accounted for lesion distribution we demonstrate that cerebral pathology is widespread in RRMS. Our analysis of CC and neocortex qMRI metrics in relation to disability points to a neurodegenerative injury component that is independent from lesions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Resting-state fMRI in the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen M; Andersson, Jesper; Auerbach, Edward J.; Beckmann, Christian F; Bijsterbosch, Janine; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Duff, Eugene; Feinberg, David A; Griffanti, Ludovica; Harms, Michael P; Kelly, Michael; Laumann, Timothy; Miller, Karla L; Moeller, Steen; Petersen, Steve; Power, Jonathan; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Snyder, Abraham Z; Vu, An; Woolrich, Mark W; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Van Essen, David; Glasser, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) allows one to study functional connectivity in the brain by acquiring fMRI data while subjects lie inactive in the MRI scanner, and taking advantage of the fact that functionally related brain regions spontaneously co-activate. rfMRI is one of the two primary data modalities being acquired for the Human Connectome Project (the other being diffusion MRI). A key objective is to generate a detailed in vivo mapping of functional connectivity in a large cohort of healthy adults (over 1,000 subjects), and to make these datasets freely available for use by the neuroimaging community. In each subject we acquire a total of one hour of whole-brain rfMRI data at 3 Tesla, with a spatial resolution of 2×2×2mm and a temporal resolution of 0.7s, capitalizing on recent developments in slice-accelerated echo-planar imaging. We will also scan a subset of the cohort at higher field strength and resolution. In this paper we outline the work behind, and rationale for, decisions taken regarding the rfMRI data acquisition protocol and pre-processing pipelines, and present some initial results showing data quality and example functional connectivity analyses. PMID:23702415

  14. Fundamental Study of Three-dimensional Fast Spin-echo Imaging with Spoiled Equilibrium Pulse.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Masashi; Kaji, Naoto; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional fast spin-echo (3D FSE) imaging with variable refocusing flip angle has been recently applied to pre- or post-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. To reduce the acquisition time, this sequence requires higher echo train length (ETL), which potentially causes decreased T1 contrast. Spoiled equilibrium (SpE) pulse consists of a resonant +90° radiofrequency (RF) pulse and is applied at the end of the echo train. This +90° RF pulse brings residual transverse magnetization to the negative longitudinal axis, which makes it possible to increase T1 contrast. The purpose of our present study was to examine factors that influence the effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse and the relationship between T1 contrast improvement and imaging parameters and to understand the characteristics of spoiled equilibrium pulse. Phantom studies were conducted using an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom made of polyvinyl alcohol gel. To evaluate the effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse with changes in repetition time (TR), ETL, and refocusing flip angle, we measured the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse was evaluated by calculating the enhancement rate of CNR. The factors that influence the effect of spoiled equilibrium pulse are TR, ETL, and relaxation time of tissues. Spoiled equilibrium pulse is effective with increasing TR and decreasing ETL. The shorter the T1 value, the better the spoiled equilibrium pulse functions. However, for tissues in which the T1 value is long (>600 ms), at a TR of 600 ms, improvement in T1 contrast by applying spoiled equilibrium pulse cannot be expected.

  15. Spin echo in synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.

    2007-01-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency Δνspin of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time τ between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference-overlap effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference-overlap effect occurs when Δνspin is too small, or when τ is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings overlap each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive interference patterns depending on the exact value of τ. Typically, the beam’s energy spread is large and this interference-overlap effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time τ after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when τ is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an analysis

  16. Spin Echo in Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander W.; Courant, Ernest D.; /Brookhaven

    2006-12-01

    As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread) is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time {tau} between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference effect occurs when {Delta}{nu}{sub spin} is too small, or when {tau} is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings interfere with each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive patterns depending on the exact value of {tau}. Typically, the beam's energy spread is large and this interference effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time {tau} after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when {tau} is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging) way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron. After giving an

  17. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  18. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips - which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe to be recruited to future fMRI experiments

  19. Effect of scanner acoustic background noise on strict resting-state fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Rondinoni, C.; Amaro, E.; Cendes, F.; Santos, A.C.dos; Salmon, C.E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) resting-state experiments are aimed at identifying brain networks that support basal brain function. Although most investigators consider a ‘resting-state’ fMRI experiment with no specific external stimulation, subjects are unavoidably under heavy acoustic noise produced by the equipment. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of auditory input on the resting-state networks (RSNs). Twenty-two healthy subjects were scanned using two similar echo-planar imaging sequences in the same 3T MRI scanner: a default pulse sequence and a reduced “silent” pulse sequence. Experimental sessions consisted of two consecutive 7-min runs with noise conditions (default or silent) counterbalanced across subjects. A self-organizing group independent component analysis was applied to fMRI data in order to recognize the RSNs. The insula, left middle frontal gyrus and right precentral and left inferior parietal lobules showed significant differences in the voxel-wise comparison between RSNs depending on noise condition. In the presence of low-level noise, these areas Granger-cause oscillations in RSNs with cognitive implications (dorsal attention and entorhinal), while during high noise acquisition, these connectivities are reduced or inverted. Applying low noise MR acquisitions in research may allow the detection of subtle differences of the RSNs, with implications in experimental planning for resting-state studies, data analysis, and ergonomic factors. PMID:23579634

  20. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  1. Imaging tooth enamel using zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychert, Kevin M.; Zhu, Gang; Kmiec, Maciej M.; Nemani, Venkata K.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Flood, Ann B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-03-01

    In an event where many thousands of people may have been exposed to levels of radiation that are sufficient to cause the acute radiation syndrome, we need technology that can estimate the absorbed dose on an individual basis for triage and meaningful medical decision making. Such dose estimates may be achieved using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tooth biodosimetry, which measures the number of persistent free radicals that are generated in tooth enamel following irradiation. However, the accuracy of dose estimates may be impacted by individual variations in teeth, especially the amount and distribution of enamel in the inhomogeneous sensitive volume of the resonator used to detect the radicals. In order to study the relationship between interpersonal variations in enamel and EPR-based dose estimates, it is desirable to estimate these parameters nondestructively and without adding radiation to the teeth. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is capable of acquiring structural and biochemical information without imparting additional radiation, which may be beneficial for many EPR dosimetry studies. However, the extremely short T2 relaxation time in tooth structures precludes tooth imaging using conventional MRI methods. Therefore, we used zero echo time (ZTE) MRI to image teeth ex vivo to assess enamel volumes and spatial distributions. Using these data in combination with the data on the distribution of the transverse radio frequency magnetic field from electromagnetic simulations, we then can identify possible sources of variations in radiation-induced signals detectable by EPR. Unlike conventional MRI, ZTE applies spatial encoding gradients during the RF excitation pulse, thereby facilitating signal acquisition almost immediately after excitation, minimizing signal loss from short T2 relaxation times. ZTE successfully provided volumetric measures of tooth enamel that may be related to variations that impact EPR dosimetry and facilitate the development

  2. Echo 30" Sub Satellite

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-07

    James Hansen describes the work on Project Echo s air density experiment known as the Sub-Satellite. Before launch engineers subjected the sub-satellite to many tests. Here, the sub-satellite is shown prior to tests to determine the capacity of the 30-inch Sub-Satellite to withstand the high temperature of direct sunlight in space, Langley researchers subjected it to 450 F heat test. Results indicated that the aluminum-covered Mylar plastic would effectively reflect the dangerous heat. -- Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 168.

  3. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  4. TRANSVERSE ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-09-18

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  5. Light Echoes of Historic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rest, Armin; Sinnott, B.; Welch, D. L.; Prieto, J. L.; Bianco, F.

    2014-01-01

    Light echoes, light from a variable source scattered off dust, have been observed for over a century. The recent discovery of light echoes around centuries-old supernovae in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud have allowed the spectroscopic characterization of these events, even without contemporaneous photometry and spectroscopy using modern instrumentation. Here we review the recent scientific advances using light echoes of ancient and historic transients, and focus on our latest work on SN 1987A's and Eta Carinae's light echoes.

  6. 'Snap-shot' velocity vector mapping using echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Alexander B; Sederman, Andrew J; Newling, Benedict; Mantle, Mick D; Gladden, Lynn F

    2010-06-01

    A 'snap-shot' ultra-fast MRI velocimetry technique based upon the echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence is presented. The new technique is an extension of the GERVAIS pulse sequence previously developed by Sederman et al. (2004) and is capable of acquiring both reference and velocity encoded phase maps following a single excitation for generation of three-component velocity vectors in under 125 ms. This approach allows velocity images of systems with a dynamic, non-periodic geometry to be obtained by MRI. The technique proved to be accurate within 5% error by comparison with Poiseuille flow in a pipe and for the transverse plane flow field in a Couette cell. It was further applied to obtain the velocity field around an impeller in a stirred vessel; an unsteady yet periodic system which otherwise could only be studied by triggered acquisitions. Good agreement was evident between the present technique and triggered conventional velocity encoded pulse sequences. Finally, new experimental data attainable only by the new sequence is demonstrated as the flow field within a mobile droplet of oil is captured as it rises through a column of water. The technique promises to be highly useful in velocimetric measurements of dynamic, non-periodic systems, and in particular for the characterisation of multiphase flow systems.

  7. Simultaneous fMRI and local field potential measurements during epileptic seizures in medetomidine sedated rats using RASER pulse sequence

    PubMed Central

    Airaksinen, Antti M; Niskanen, Juha-Pekka; Chamberlain, Ryan; Huttunen, Joanna K; Nissinen, Jari; Garwood, Michael; Pitkänen, Asla; Gröhn, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of animal models of epilepsy are methodologically challenging, but essential to better understand abnormal brain activity and hemodynamics during seizures. In the present study, fMRI of medetomidine sedated rats was performed using novel Rapid Acquisition by Sequential Excitation and Refocusing (RASER) fast imaging pulse sequence and simultaneous local field potential (LFP) measurements during kainic acid (KA) induced seizures. The image distortion caused by the hippocampal measuring electrode was clearly seen in echo planar imaging (EPI) images, whereas no artifact was seen in RASER images. Robust blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses were observed in the hippocampus during KA induced seizures. The recurrent epileptic seizures were detected in the LFP signal after KA injection. The presented combination of deep electrode LFP measurements and fMRI under medetomidine anesthesia, that does not significantly suppress KA induced seizures, provides a unique tool for studying abnormal brain activity in rats. PMID:20725933

  8. Echo 1 container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Echo 1 container: The design of this container was one of the most difficult technical tasks. Hansen writes: 'After several weeks of examining potential solutions to this problem, the Langley engineers narrowed the field of ideas to five. They then built working models of these five container designs, and 12-foot-diameter models of the satellite for simulation studies. With help from Langley's Engineering Service and Mechanical Service divisions, the Echo group built a special 41-foot-diameter spherical vacuum chamber equipped with pressure-proof windows. There the dynamics of opening the container and inflating the satelloon could be studies as the satelloon fell to the bottom of the tank.' 'The container-opening mechanism that eventually resulted from these vacuum tests was surely one of the oddest explosive devices ever contrived. The container was a sphere that opened at its equator into top and bottom hemispheres. the top half fit on the bottom half much like a lid fits snugly atop a kitchen pot. The joint between the two hemispheres, therefore, formed a sliding valve. The halves had to move apart an inch or two before the canister was actually open. It was in this joint between the hemispheres that the charge was placed.' The whole whole system was laced together with fishing line which resulted in many disdainful comments from visiting scientists and engineers but the system worked. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 180.

  9. Dissecting a Light Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for audio animation

    This animation illustrates how a light echo works, and how an optical illusion of material moving outward is created.

    A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one.

    The animation starts by showing the explosion of a star, which results in a flash of light that moves outward in all directions. The direction of our line of sight from Earth is indicated by the blue arrow.

    When the light flash reaches surrounding dust, shown here as three dark clouds, the dust is heated up, creating infrared light that begins to travel toward Earth (indicated by the red arrows). Dust closest to the explosion lights up first, while the explosion's shock wave takes longer to reach more distant material. This results in light from different parts of the cloud reaching Earth at different times, creating the illusion of motion over time.

    As the animation shows, the inclination of the cloud toward our line of sight can result in the material seeming to move both away from and toward the central star.

  10. Neutron Speed Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, A.

    Neutron speed echo (NSPE) technique is in a way a generalization of the neutron spin echo (NSE) technique. Similar to NSE spectrometers, the resolution of such NSPE spectrometer is extremely high and is not connected with the monochromatization of the incoming beam. However, in contrast to NSE spectrometers, the operation of proposed spectrometer does not necessarily require a polarized neutron beam. Such decoupling the polarization and the resolution is in clear contrast to NSE technique. Because the resolution of a NSPE spectrometer can be a few orders higher than the resolution of NSE spectrometers, one can achieve the energy resolution of about 10-14 eV by the use of ultra cold neutrons; a fact that can be used in some fundamental physics experiments. Though the scattering on the sample impose limitations on the resolution of a NSPE spectrometer, the use of the proposed technique in a low-resolution mode can be useful in the combination with triple-axis spectrometers and allow for the significant improvement of their energy resolution, however, without the use of polarized neutrons. This fact opens new possibilities for the study of magnetic phenomena in solids, where the NSE method is principally not applicable because of the neutron precession in the sample, especially by combining polarization analysis with high-resolution spectroscopy. The proposed technique also allows for an easy implementation of the principle of the NSE focusing, when the resolution ellipse is aligned along a dispersion curve.

  11. Dissecting a Light Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for audio animation

    This animation illustrates how a light echo works, and how an optical illusion of material moving outward is created.

    A light echo occurs when a star explodes, acting like a cosmic flashbulb. The light from this explosion zips through nearby dust clumps, illuminating and heating them up slightly. This brief period of warming causes them to glow in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one.

    The animation starts by showing the explosion of a star, which results in a flash of light that moves outward in all directions. The direction of our line of sight from Earth is indicated by the blue arrow.

    When the light flash reaches surrounding dust, shown here as three dark clouds, the dust is heated up, creating infrared light that begins to travel toward Earth (indicated by the red arrows). Dust closest to the explosion lights up first, while the explosion's shock wave takes longer to reach more distant material. This results in light from different parts of the cloud reaching Earth at different times, creating the illusion of motion over time.

    As the animation shows, the inclination of the cloud toward our line of sight can result in the material seeming to move both away from and toward the central star.

  12. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  13. Non-water-suppressed short-echo-time magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using a concentric ring k-space trajectory.

    PubMed

    Emir, Uzay E; Burns, Brian; Chiew, Mark; Jezzard, Peter; Thomas, M Albert

    2017-03-08

    Water-suppressed MRS acquisition techniques have been the standard MRS approach used in research and for clinical scanning to date. The acquisition of a non-water-suppressed MRS spectrum is used for artefact correction, reconstruction of phased-array coil data and metabolite quantification. Here, a two-scan metabolite-cycling magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) scheme that does not use water suppression is demonstrated and evaluated. Specifically, the feasibility of acquiring and quantifying short-echo (TE  = 14 ms), two-dimensional stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) MRSI spectra in the motor cortex is demonstrated on a 3 T MRI system. The increase in measurement time from the metabolite-cycling is counterbalanced by a time-efficient concentric ring k-space trajectory. To validate the technique, water-suppressed MRSI acquisitions were also performed for comparison. The proposed non-water-suppressed metabolite-cycling MRSI technique was tested for detection and correction of resonance frequency drifts due to subject motion and/or hardware instability, and the feasibility of high-resolution metabolic mapping over a whole brain slice was assessed. Our results show that the metabolite spectra and estimated concentrations are in agreement between non-water-suppressed and water-suppressed techniques. The achieved spectral quality, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 20 and linewidth <7 Hz allowed reliable metabolic mapping of five major brain metabolites in the motor cortex with an in-plane resolution of 10 × 10 mm(2) in 8 min and with a Cramér-Rao lower bound of less than 20% using LCModel analysis. In addition, the high SNR of the water peak of the non-water-suppressed technique enabled voxel-wise single-scan frequency, phase and eddy current correction. These findings demonstrate that our non-water-suppressed metabolite-cycling MRSI technique can perform robustly on 3 T MRI systems and within a clinically feasible acquisition time.

  14. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  15. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  16. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  17. SU-D-207A-04: Use of Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging (GEPCI) in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study Targeting Brain Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B; Rao, Y; Tsien, C; Huang, J; Green, O; Mutic, S; Gach, H; Wen, J; Yablonskiy, D

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement the Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging(GEPCI) technique in MRI-simulation for radiation therapy and assess the feasibility of using GEPCI images with advanced inhomogeneity correction in MRI-guided radiotherapy for brain treatment. Methods: An optimized multigradient-echo GRE sequence (TR=50ms;TE1=4ms;delta-TE=4ms;flip angle=300,11 Echoes) was developed to generate both structural (T1w and T2*w) and functional MRIs (field and susceptibility maps) from a single acquisition. One healthy subject (Subject1) and one post-surgical brain cancer patient (Subject2) were scanned on a Philips Ingenia 1.5T MRI used for radiation therapy simulation. Another healthy subject (Subject3) was scanned on a 0.35T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) system (ViewRay). A voxel spread function (VSF) was used to correct the B0 inhomogeneities caused by surgical cavities and edema for Subject2. GEPCI images and standard radiotherapy planning MRIs for this patient were compared focusing the delineation of radiotherapy target region. Results: GEPCI brain images were successfully derived from all three subjects with scan times of <7 minutes. The images derived for Subjects1&2 demonstrated that GEPCI can be applied and combined into radiotherapy MRI simulation. Despite low field, T1-weighted and R2* images were successfully reconstructed for Subject3 and were satisfactory for contour and target delineation. The R2* distribution of grey matter (center=12,FWHM=4.5) and white matter (center=14.6, FWHM=2) demonstrated the feasibility for tissue segmentation and quantification. The voxel spread function(VSF) corrected surgical site related inhomogeneities for Subject2. R2* and quantitative susceptibility map(QSM) images for Subject2 can be used to quantitatively assess the brain structure response to radiation over the treatment course. Conclusion: We implemented the GEPCI technique in MRI-simulation and in MR-IGRT system for radiation therapy. The images demonstrated that it

  18. Dual Inversion Recovery Ultrashort Echo Time (DIR-UTE) Imaging and Quantification of the Zone of Calcified Cartilage (ZCC)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Carl, Michael; Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Chang, Eric; Bydder, Graeme M; Chung, Christine B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to image the zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC), and quantify its T2*, T1 and T1ρ. DESIGN In this feasibility study a dual inversion recovery ultrashort echo time (DIR-UTE) sequence was developed for high contrast imaging of the ZCC. T2* of the ZCC was measured with DIR-UTE acquisitions at progressively increasing TEs. T1 of the ZCC was measured with saturation recovery UTE acquisitions at progressively increasing saturation recovery times. T1ρ of the ZCC was measured with spin-locking prepared DIR-UTE acquisitions at progressively increasing spin-locking times. RESULTS The feasibility of the qualitative and quantitative DIR-UTE techniques was demonstrated on phantoms and in six cadaveric patellae using a clinical 3T scanner. On average the ZCC has a short T2* ranging from 1.0 to 3.3 ms (mean ± standard deviation = 2.0 ± 1.2 ms), a short T1 ranging from 256 to 389 ms (mean ± standard deviation = 305 ± 45 ms), and a short T1ρ ranging from 2.2 to 4.6 ms (mean ± standard deviation = 3.6 ± 1.2 ms). CONCLUSION UTE MR based techniques have been developed for high resolution imaging of the ZCC and quantitative evaluation of its T2*, T1 and T1ρ relaxation times, providing noninvasive assessment of collagen orientation and proteoglycan content at the zone of calcified cartilage and the bone cartilage interface. These measurements may be useful for non-invasive assessment of the ZCC, including understanding the involvement of this tissue component in osteoarthritis. PMID:23025927

  19. Human hip joint cartilage: MRI quantitative thickness and volume measurements discriminating acetabulum and femoral head.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Abram, François; Beaudoin, Gilles; Berthiaume, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2008-12-01

    This paper aims at developing a quantitative system for measuring human hip cartilage thickness and volume using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A new MRI-acquisition technique, named axial rotation, where the acquisition planes are organized around a virtual axis, was used. The MRI protocol consists of a 2-D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) using water excitation. Inner and outer interface contours of acetabulum and femoral head cartilage are obtained using a semiautomated 3-D segmentation method and combined to form 3-D surfaces. A local spherical coordinate system computed from the original contours enables cartilage thickness and volume computation. An anatomical labeling is performed automatically for thickness and volume measurements in predefined subregions: inferior, anterior, superior, and posterior. A registration module is introduced allowing the assessment of cartilage changes over time. Validation of the system was conducted with three protocols each involving data obtained from nine subjects: 1) registration process accuracy; 2) intrareader reproducibility; and 3) intervisit coefficient of variation. Data showed excellent correlation coefficients for either the intrareader (r>or=0.0942, p<0.0001 ) or intervisit (r>or=0.0837, p<0.005) protocols. This noninvasive system, which enables the quantification of cartilage thickness and volume in the human hip joint using MRI, is the first to discriminate the acetabular and femoral head cartilage throughout the entire hip without the use of an external device, and to implement hip registration for follow-up studies on the same subject.

  20. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Stuart; Gomes, Ana L; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D; Smart, Sean C

    2016-01-01

    To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10-100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50-100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse's temperature approached the set target. The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality.

  1. An MRI-Compatible High Frequency AC Resistive Heating System for Homeothermic Maintenance in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana L.; Kinchesh, Paul; Kersemans, Veerle; Allen, Philip D.; Smart, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an MRI-compatible resistive heater, using high frequency alternating current (AC), for temperature maintenance of anaesthetised animals. Materials and Methods An MRI-compatible resistive electrical heater was formed from narrow gauge wire connected to a high frequency (10–100 kHz) AC power source. Multiple gradient echo images covering a range of echo times, and pulse-acquire spectra were acquired with the wire heater powered using high frequency AC or DC power sources and without any current flowing in order to assess the sensitivity of the MRI acquisitions to the presence of current flow through the heater wire. The efficacy of temperature maintenance using the AC heater was assessed by measuring rectal temperature immediately following induction of general anaesthesia for a period of 30 minutes in three different mice. Results Images and spectra acquired in the presence and absence of 50–100 kHz AC through the wire heater were indistinguishable, whereas DC power created field shifts and lineshape distortions. Temperature lost during induction of anaesthesia was recovered within approximately 20 minutes and a stable temperature was reached as the mouse’s temperature approached the set target. Conclusion The AC-powered wire heater maintains adequate heat input to the animal to maintain body temperature, and does not compromise image quality. PMID:27806062

  2. Improving the spatial resolution of Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging via the blipped-CAIPI acquisition scheme

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Tang; Setsompop, Kawin; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W.; Witzel, Thomas; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Using simultaneous acquisition from multiple channels of a radio-frequency (RF) coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) achieves functional MRI acquisitions at a rate of 100 ms per whole-brain volume. InI accelerates the scan by leaving out partition encoding steps and reconstructs images by solving under-determined inverse problems using RF coil sensitivity information. Hence, the correlated spatial information available in the coil array causes spatial blurring in the InI reconstruction. Here, we propose a method that employs gradient blips in the partition encoding direction during the acquisition to provide extra spatial encoding in order to better differentiate signals from different partitions. According to our simulations, this blipped-InI (bInI) method can increase the average spatial resolution by 15.1% (1.3 mm) across the whole brain and from 32.6% (4.2 mm) in subcortical regions, as compared to the InI method. In a visual fMRI experiment, we demonstrate that, compared to InI, the spatial distribution of bInI BOLD response is more consistent with that of a conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI) at the level of individual subjects. With the improved spatial resolution, especially in subcortical regions, bInI can be a useful fMRI tool for obtaining high spatiotemporal information for clinical and cognitive neuroscience studies. PMID:24374076

  3. Improving the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance inverse imaging via the blipped-CAIPI acquisition scheme.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Tang; Setsompop, Kawin; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Witzel, Thomas; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous acquisition from multiple channels of a radio-frequency (RF) coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) achieves functional MRI acquisitions at a rate of 100ms per whole-brain volume. InI accelerates the scan by leaving out partition encoding steps and reconstructs images by solving under-determined inverse problems using RF coil sensitivity information. Hence, the correlated spatial information available in the coil array causes spatial blurring in the InI reconstruction. Here, we propose a method that employs gradient blips in the partition encoding direction during the acquisition to provide extra spatial encoding in order to better differentiate signals from different partitions. According to our simulations, this blipped-InI (bInI) method can increase the average spatial resolution by 15.1% (1.3mm) across the whole brain and from 32.6% (4.2mm) in subcortical regions, as compared to the InI method. In a visual fMRI experiment, we demonstrate that, compared to InI, the spatial distribution of bInI BOLD response is more consistent with that of a conventional echo-planar imaging (EPI) at the level of individual subjects. With the improved spatial resolution, especially in subcortical regions, bInI can be a useful fMRI tool for obtaining high spatiotemporal information for clinical and cognitive neuroscience studies.

  4. Retrospective estimation of the susceptibility driven field map for distortion correction in echo planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kim, Boklye

    2013-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence used for acquiring functional MRI (fMRI) time series data provides the advantage of high temporal resolution, but also is highly sensitive to the magnetic field inhomogeneity resulting in geometric distortions. A static field-inhomogeneity map measured before or after the fMRI scan to correct for such distortions does not account for magnetic field changes due to the head motion during the time series acquisition. In practice, the field map dynamically changes with head motion during the scan and leads to variations in the geometric distortion. We model in this work the field inhomogeneity with the object and the scanner dependent terms. The object-specific term varies with the object's magnetic susceptibility and orientation, i.e., head position with respect to B0. Thus, the simple transformation of the acquired field may not yield an accurate field map. We assume that the scanner-specific field remains unchanged and independent of the head motion. Our approach in this study is to retrospectively estimate the object's magnetic susceptibility (chi) map from an observed high-resolution static field map using an estimator derived from a probability density function of non-uniform noise. This approach is capable of finding the susceptibility map regardless of the wrapping effect. A dynamic field map at each head position can be estimated by applying a rigid body transformation to the estimated chi-map and the 3-D susceptibility voxel convolution (SVC) which is a physics-based discrete convolution model for computing chi-induced field inhomogeneity.

  5. Help Content for ECHO Reports | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  6. Guide to Regulated Facilities in ECHO | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There are multiple ways ECHO can be used to search compliance data. By default, ECHO searches focus on larger, more regulated facilities. Each search page allows users to search a more comprehensive group of facilities by electing to search for minor or smaller facilities. Information is presented that explains the types and approximate numbers of facilities that are included in searches when the default and custom options are used.

  7. Characterization of signal properties in atherosclerotic plaque components by intravascular MRI.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W J; Prichard, J W; Hu, Y L; Olson, P R; Benckart, D H; Kramer, C M; Vido, D A; Reichek, N

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of distinguishing between atherosclerotic plaque components solely on the basis of biochemical differences. However, to date, the majority of plaque characterization has been performed by using high-field strength units or special coils, which are not clinically applicable. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate MRI properties in histologically verified plaque components in excised human carotid endarterectomy specimens with the use of a 5F catheter-based imaging coil, standard acquisition software, and a clinical scanner operating at 0.5 T. Human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 17 patients were imaged at 37 degrees C by use of an opposed solenoid intravascular radiofrequency coil integrated into a 5F double-lumen catheter interfaced to a 0.5-T General Electric interventional scanner. Cross-sectional intravascular MRI (156x250 microm in-plane resolution) that used different imaging parameters permitted the calculation of absolute T1and T2, the magnetization transfer contrast ratio, the magnitude of regional signal loss associated with an inversion recovery sequence (inversion ratio), and regional signal loss in gradient echo (gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio) in plaque components. Histological staining included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, Kossa, oil red O, and Gomori's iron stain. X-ray micrographs were also used to identify regions of calcium. Seven plaque components were evaluated: fibrous cap, smooth muscle cells, organizing thrombus, fresh thrombus, lipid, edema, and calcium. The magnetization transfer contrast ratio was significantly less in the fibrous cap (0.62+/-13) than in all other components (P<0.05) The inversion ratio was greater in lipid (0.91+/-0.09) than all other components (P<0.05). Calcium was best distinguished by using the gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio, which was lower in calcium (0.36+/-0.2) than in all plaque components, except for the organizing thrombus (P<0

  8. A new application of compressive sensing in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lenti, Flavia; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Image formation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the procedure which allows the generation of the image starting from data acquired in the so called k-space. At the present, many image formation techniques have been presented, working with different k-space filling strategies. Recently, Compressive Sampling (CS) has been successfully used for image formation from non fully sampled k-space acquisitions, due to its interesting property of reconstructing signal from highly undetermined linear systems. The main advantage consists in greatly reducing the acquisition time. Within this manuscript, a novel application of CS to MRI field is presented, named Intra Voxel Analysis (IVA). The idea is to achieve the so-called super resolution, i.e. the possibility of distinguish anatomical structures smaller than the spatial resolution of the image. For this aim, multiple Spin Echo images acquired with different Echo Times are required. The output of the algorithm is the estimation of the number of contributions present in the same pixel, i.e. the number of tissues inside the same voxel, and their spin-spin relaxation times. This allows us not only to identify the number of involved tissues, but also to discriminate them. At the present, simulated case studies have been considered, obtaining interesting and promising results. In particular, a study on the required number of images, on the estimation noise and on the regularization parameter of different CS algorithms has been conducted. As future work, the method will be applied to real clinical datasets, in order to validate the estimations.

  9. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming for Echo-Planar Imaging of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Nixon, Terence W.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (Juchem et al., J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13 Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8 mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3 mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large

  10. Dance of the Light Echoes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-29

    This composite image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope shows the remnant of a star that exploded, called Cassiopeia A center and its surrounding light echoes -- dances of light through dusty clouds, created when stars blast apart.

  11. Echoes of a Stellar Ending

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    Listed as Cassiopeia A, this remnant of the supernova is one of the brightest radio sources in the known universe. More recently, NASA WISE telescope detected infrared echoes of the flash of light rippling outwards from the supernova.

  12. Custom Search | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  13. Data Downloads | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide for searching and downloading. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  14. Effluent Charts | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  15. Enforcement Cases | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  16. Resources (beta) | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  17. Very-low-field MRI of laser polarized xenon-129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D.; Tobias, William A.; Mugler, John P.; Miller, G. Wilson

    2014-12-01

    We describe a homebuilt MRI system for imaging laser-polarized xenon-129 at a very low holding field of 2.2 mT. A unique feature of this system was the use of Maxwell coils oriented at so-called "magic angles" to generate the transverse magnetic field gradients, which provided a simple alternative to Golay coils. We used this system to image a laser-polarized xenon-129 phantom with both a conventional gradient-echo and a fully phase-encoded pulse sequence. In other contexts, a fully phase-encoded acquisition, also known as single-point or constant-time imaging, has been used to enable distortion-free imaging of short-T2∗ species. Here we used this technique to overcome imperfections associated with our homebuilt MRI system while also taking full advantage of the long T2∗ available at very low field. Our results demonstrate that xenon-129 image quality can be dramatically improved at low field by combining a fully phase-encoded k-space acquisition with auxiliary measurements of system imperfections including B0 field drift and gradient infidelity.

  18. Very-low-field MRI of laser polarized xenon-129.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuan; Cates, Gordon D; Tobias, William A; Mugler, John P; Miller, G Wilson

    2014-12-01

    We describe a homebuilt MRI system for imaging laser-polarized xenon-129 at a very low holding field of 2.2mT. A unique feature of this system was the use of Maxwell coils oriented at so-called "magic angles" to generate the transverse magnetic field gradients, which provided a simple alternative to Golay coils. We used this system to image a laser-polarized xenon-129 phantom with both a conventional gradient-echo and a fully phase-encoded pulse sequence. In other contexts, a fully phase-encoded acquisition, also known as single-point or constant-time imaging, has been used to enable distortion-free imaging of short-T2(∗) species. Here we used this technique to overcome imperfections associated with our homebuilt MRI system while also taking full advantage of the long T2(∗) available at very low field. Our results demonstrate that xenon-129 image quality can be dramatically improved at low field by combining a fully phase-encoded k-space acquisition with auxiliary measurements of system imperfections including B0 field drift and gradient infidelity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  20. Foetal "black bone" MRI: utility in assessment of the foetal spine.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A J; Blaser, S; Vladimirov, A; Drossman, D; Chitayat, D; Ryan, G

    2015-02-01

    Foetal CT has recently been added to the foetal imaging armamentarium, but this carries with it the risks of ionizing radiation, both to the mother and the foetus. Foetal "black bone" MRI is a new technique that allows assessment of the foetal skeleton without the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation and is a potential new sequence in foetal MRI examination. Retrospective review of all foetal MRI studies over the past 4- to 5-year period identified 36 cases where susceptibility weighted imaging was used. Cases were selected from this group to demonstrate the potential utility of this sequence. This sequence is most frequently useful not only in the assessment of spinal abnormalities, most commonly the bony abnormalities in myelomeningocele, but also in cases of scoliosis, segmentation anomalies and sacrococcygeal teratoma. Although the utility of this sequence is still being evaluated, it provides excellent contrast between the mineralized skeleton and surrounding soft tissues compared with standard half Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin echo sequences. Further assessment is required to determine whether black bone MRI can more accurately evaluate the level of bony defect in spina bifida aperta, an important prognostic factor. Potential further uses include the assessment of skeletal dysplasias, evaluation of the skull base and craniofacial skeleton in certain congenital anomalies and the post-mortem evaluation of the foetal skeleton potentially obviating the need for necropsy. Foetal black bone MRI can be performed using susceptibility weighted imaging and allows better demonstration of the mineralized skeleton compared with standard sequences.

  1. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  2. Localization of the cortical motor area by functional magnetic resonance imaging with gradient echo and echo-planar methods, using clinical 1.5 Tesla MR imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K

    1997-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gradient echo and echo-planar sequences was applied to healthy volunteers and neurological patients to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and localizing the motor cortex. Time course of the change in signal intensity by an alternate repetition of motor task (squeezing hand) and rest periods was also examined. The motor cortex was localized as the area of signal increase in 88.9% of 45 healthy volunteers by gradient echo method, which mainly reflected the cortical vein, and 83.3% of 30 healthy volunteers by echo-planar method, which mainly reflected the cerebral gyrus. Among 21 volunteers who participated in the both studies, success rate in the localization for the motor cortex was 90.5% (21 volunteers) by gradient echo method and 81% (17 volunteers) by echo-planar method. It was also shown from the time course of the change in signal intensity that signal increase in the most significantly activated area generally corresponded with the periods of the motor task, and the latency between the onset of signal increase and the onset of motor task was usually about 4 seconds. In four of 6 patients with brain tumor, the motor cortex was localized, although activated areas were displaced or distorted. The results indicate that fMRI, either with gradient echo or echo-planar sequence, is a useful method for localizing the primary motor area activated during the motor task and clinically available for noninvasive evaluation of the anatomical relation between brain tumors and the motor area before surgical therapy.

  3. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-12-27

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  4. S/N and fMRI sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petridou, Natalia; Loew, Murray H.; Bandettini, Peter A.

    2002-05-01

    It is commonly thought that improvements in image S/N translate directly to improvements in fMRI sensitivity. This study demonstrates that improvements in image S/N by means of increased field strength, and the use of surface coils, does not translate to similar gains in temporal S/N, due to physiological noise. An analysis of the S/N dependence on signal strength for both the imaginary and real noise components is presented. The real noise component, which is lower than the imaginary component, is a significant contributor to temporal variations in single-shot fMRI procedures. The imaginary component becomes an important contributor to time series fluctuations in multi-shot or 3D techniques. In the experiments presented here, the relationship between image and temporal S/N is examined by modulating the signal strength by means of echo time stepping, field strength modulation, and RF coil comparison. The spatial and temporal noise contributions of the resting brain are characterized by comparing phantom, subject, and thermal noise measurements. The sensitivity of both spiral and EPI single-shot acquisition methods to physiologic and systematic noise is characterized. The results suggest that the fMRI sensitivity plateaus as image S/N is increased unless physiological noise is filtered out.

  5. Evaluation of highly accelerated simultaneous multi-slice EPI for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; T Vu, A; Xu, J; Moeller, S; Ugurbil, K; Yacoub, E; Feinberg, D A

    2015-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) is the MRI technique that is most widely used for blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI). Recent advances in EPI speed have been made possible with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) methods which combine acceleration factors M from multiband (MB) radiofrequency pulses and S from simultaneous image refocusing (SIR) to acquire a total of N=S×M images in one echo train, providing up to N times speed-up in total acquisition time over conventional EPI. We evaluated accelerations as high as N=48 using different combinations of S and M which allow for whole brain imaging in as little as 100ms at 3T with a 32 channel head coil. The various combinations of acceleration parameters were evaluated by tSNR as well as BOLD contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and information content from checkerboard and movie clips in fMRI experiments. We found that at low acceleration factors (N≤6), setting S=1 and varying M alone yielded the best results in all evaluation metrics, while at acceleration N=8 the results were mixed using both S=1 and S=2 sequences. At higher acceleration factors (N>8), using S=2 yielded maximal BOLD CNR and information content as measured by classification of movie clip frames. Importantly, we found significantly greater BOLD information content using relatively fast TRs in the range of 300ms-600ms compared to a TR of 2s, suggesting that faster TRs capture more information per unit time in task based fMRI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Measurement of Intramuscular Fat by Muscle Echo Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hui-Ju; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Zhao, Qun; McCully, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare ultrasound echo intensity (EI) to high-resolution T1-weighted MRI and to establish calibration equations to estimate percent intramuscular fat from EI. Methods Thirty-one participants underwent both ultrasound and MRI testing of 4 muscles: rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG). Results Strong correlations were found between MRI percent fat and muscle EI after correcting for subcutaneous fat thickness (r = 0.91 in RF, r = 0.80 in BF, r = 0.80 in TA, r = 0.76 in MG). Three types of calibration equations were established. Conclusion Muscle ultrasound is a practical and reproducible method that can be used as an imaging technique for examination of percent intramuscular fat. Future ultrasound studies are needed to establish equations for other muscle groups to enhance its use in both research and clinical settings. PMID:25787260

  7. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification.

  8. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  9. STIR vs. T1-weighted fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of bone marrow edema of the knee: computer-assisted quantitative comparison and influence of injected contrast media volume and acquisition parameters.

    PubMed

    Mayerhoefer, Marius E; Breitenseher, Martin J; Kramer, Josef; Aigner, Nicolas; Norden, Cornelia; Hofmann, Siegfried

    2005-12-01

    To compare short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted (T1w) gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced fat-suppressed MRI of bone marrow edema (BME) of the knee, and investigate the influence of injected contrast media volume and variation of major acquisition parameters on apparent BME volume and signal contrast. STIR and T1w Gd-enhanced fat-suppressed images were obtained from 30 patients with BME of the knee. Two groups of patients were examined with different MR scanners, acquisition parameters, and contrast media volumes. For both sequences, BME volume and signal contrast were assessed by computer-assisted quantification, and were compared through their arithmetic means and correlation coefficients (r(2)). The injected contrast media volume was also correlated with BME volume and signal contrast differences between sequences. A strong correlation between the STIR and Gd-enhanced T1w images was found for BME volume (r(2) = 0.96-0.99) and BME signal contrast (r(2) = 0.86-0.94). Despite the differences in MR acquisition parameters and injected contrast media volume, both sequences depicted an almost identical BME volume in both groups. Contrast media volume showed a moderate correlation (r(2) = 0.40) with BME volume differences. STIR is the optimum method for determining the size and signal contrast of BME. The injected contrast media volume appears to have only a limited influence on apparent BME volume.

  10. A new method for joint susceptibility artefact correction and super-resolution for dMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthotto, Lars; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has become increasingly relevant in clinical research and neuroscience. It is commonly carried out using the ultra-fast MRI acquisition technique Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI). While offering crucial reduction of acquisition times, two limitations of EPI are distortions due to varying magnetic susceptibilities of the object being imaged and its limited spatial resolution. In the recent years progress has been made both for susceptibility artefact correction and increasing of spatial resolution using image processing and reconstruction methods. However, so far, the interplay between both problems has not been studied and super-resolution techniques could only be applied along one axis, the slice-select direction, limiting the potential gain in spatial resolution. In this work we describe a new method for joint susceptibility artefact correction and super-resolution in EPI-MRI that can be used to increase resolution in all three spatial dimensions and in particular increase in-plane resolutions. The key idea is to reconstruct a distortion-free, high-resolution image from a number of low-resolution EPI data that are deformed in different directions. Numerical results on dMRI data of a human brain indicate that this technique has the potential to provide for the first time in-vivo dMRI at mesoscopic spatial resolution (i.e. 500μm) a spatial resolution that could bridge the gap between white-matter information from ex-vivo histology (≍1μm) and in-vivo dMRI (≍2000μm).

  11. Stellar Echo Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Chris; Lerch, Kieran; Lucente, Mark; Meza-Galvan, Jesus; Mitchell, Dan; Ruedin, Josh; Williams, Spencer; Zollars, Byron

    2016-01-01

    All stars exhibit intensity fluctuations over several timescales, from nanoseconds to years. These intensity fluctuations echo off bodies and structures in the star system. We posit that it is possible to take advantage of these echoes to detect, and possibly image, Earth-scale exoplanets. Unlike direct imaging techniques, temporal measurements do not require fringe tracking, maintaining an optically-perfect baseline, or utilizing ultra-contrast coronagraphs. Unlike transit or radial velocity techniques, stellar echo detection is not constrained to any specific orbital inclination. Current results suggest that existing and emerging technology can already enable stellar echo techniques at flare stars, such as Proxima Centauri, including detection, spectroscopic interrogation, and possibly even continent-level imaging of exoplanets in a variety of orbits. Detection of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars appears to be extremely challenging, but cannot be fully quantified without additional data on micro- and millisecond-scale intensity fluctuations of the Sun. We consider survey missions in the mold of Kepler and place preliminary constraints on the feasibility of producing 3D tomographic maps of other structures in star systems, such as accretion disks. In this report we discuss the theory, limitations, models, and future opportunities for stellar echo imaging.

  12. Acoustic Echoes in Model Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Justin; Nagel, Sidney

    2012-02-01

    At low temperatures, glasses and crystals behave in qualitatively different ways. In particular, glasses have a great many more low-energy excitations that have traditionally been explained in terms of a distribution of dilute, two-level quantum states that are created by clusters of particles tunneling between two nearly degenerate ground states. Strong evidence for this model has come from the saturation effects and acoustic echoes [1] observed in these excitations. We show that, in contrast to conventional wisdom, the quasi-localized, strongly anharmonic, normal modes of jammed systems [2] can produce acoustic echoes due to the shift in the mode frequency with increasing amplitude. We observe this both in jammed packings of spherical particles with finite-range, Hertzian repulsions, and in model glasses interacting with a Lennard-Jones potential. In contrast to pulse echoes in two-level systems, a distinguishing feature of these ``anharmonic echoes'' is the appearance of multiple echoes after two excitation pulses, a feature also observed in experiments [1].[4pt] [1] B. Golding and J. E. Graebner. Phys. Rev. Lett. 37, 852 (1976).[0pt] [2] N. Xu, V. Vitelli, A. J. Liu, and S. R. Nagel. Europhys. Lett. 90, 56001 (2010).

  13. Short T2 contrast with three-dimensional ultrashort echo time imaging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Bydder, Mark; Takahashi, Atsushi M.; Carl, Michael; Chung, Christine B.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in imaging short T2 species which show little or no signal with conventional magnetic resonance (MR) pulse sequences. In this paper, we describe the use of three-dimensional ultrashort echo time (3D UTE) sequences with TEs down to 8 μs for imaging of these species. Image contrast was generated with acquisitions using dual echo 3D UTE with echo subtraction, dual echo 3D UTE with rescaled subtraction, long T2 saturation 3D UTE, long T2 saturation dual echo 3D UTE with echo subtraction, single adiabatic inversion recovery 3D UTE, single adiabatic inversion recovery dual echo 3D UTE with echo subtraction and dual adiabatic inversion recovery 3D UTE. The feasibility of using these approaches was demonstrated in in vitro and in vivo imaging of calcified cartilage, aponeuroses, menisci, tendons, ligaments and cortical bone with a 3-T clinical MR scanner. Signal-to-noise ratios and contrast-to-noise ratios were used to compare the techniques. PMID:21440400

  14. Commissioning the Echo-Seeding Experiment Echo-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.a E.Colby; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Woodley, M.; Xiang, D.; Pernet, P-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2011-06-02

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment is intended to test the EEHG principle at low electron beam energy, 120 MeV, and determine the sensitivities and limitations to understand the expected performance at the higher energy scales and harmonic numbers required for x-ray FELs. In this paper we present the experimental results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  15. Automated shimming at 1.5 T using echo-planar image frequency maps.

    PubMed

    Reese, T G; Davis, T L; Weisskoff, R M

    1995-01-01

    Using echo-planar imaging, we developed an automated image-based procedure to shim the static (B0) field. Our method uses the rapid acquisition capability of echo-planar imaging to collect the required frequency data rapidly, rendering the shim data acquisition time negligible in comparison with the total study time. We address image distortion issues involved in echo-planar imaging acquisition of the data and formulate analytic methods for arriving at an optimal shim for the NMR imaging experiment in a single iteration. We investigated the use of cost functions other than least-squares (Chebychev, high-order numeric) and found that choice between the cost functions we tested was irrelevant to resultant image quality, at least when used in conjunction with low-order shims. With appropriate integration, the method has become routine practice for investigators at our laboratory.

  16. SU-D-18C-01: A Novel 4D-MRI Technology Based On K-Space Retrospective Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Yin, F; Cai, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Current 4D-MRI techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of an entirely new framework of 4D-MRI based on k-space retrospective sorting. Methods: An important challenge of the proposed technique is to determine the number of repeated scans(NR) required to obtain sufficient k-space data for 4D-MRI. To do that, simulations using 29 cancer patients' respiratory profiles were performed to derive the relationship between data acquisition completeness(Cp) and NR, also relationship between NR(Cp=95%) and the following factors: total slice(NS), respiratory phase bin length(Lb), frame rate(fr), resolution(R) and image acquisition starting-phase(P0). To evaluate our technique, a computer simulation study on a 4D digital human phantom (XCAT) were conducted with regular breathing (fr=0.5Hz; R=256×256). A 2D echo planer imaging(EPI) MRI sequence were assumed to acquire raw k-space data, with respiratory signal and acquisition time for each k-space data line recorded simultaneously. K-space data was re-sorted based on respiratory phases. To evaluate 4D-MRI image quality, tumor trajectories were measured and compared with the input signal. Mean relative amplitude difference(D) and cross-correlation coefficient(CC) are calculated. Finally, phase-sharing sliding window technique was applied to investigate the feasibility of generating ultra-fast 4D-MRI. Result: Cp increased with NR(Cp=100*[1-exp(-0.19*NR)], when NS=30, Lb=100%/6). NR(Cp=95%) was inversely-proportional to Lb (r=0.97), but independent of other factors. 4D-MRI on XCAT demonstrated highly accurate motion information (D=0.67%, CC=0.996) with much less artifacts than those on image-based sorting 4D-MRI. Ultra-fast 4D-MRI with an apparent temporal resolution of 10 frames/second was reconstructed using the phase-sharing sliding window technique. Conclusions: A novel 4D-MRI

  17. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lorenzato, Mário Müller; Salim, Rodrigo; Kfuri-Junior, Maurício; Crema, Michel Daoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE) protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively) and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively). For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively) and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively). In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively) and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively). There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition. PMID:27141127

  18. Selective spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized pyruvate and its metabolites using a single-echo variable phase advance method in balanced SSFP

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Gopal; Wang, Xiaoen; Vinogradov, Elena; Bhatt, Rupal S.; Sukhatme, Vikas; Seth, Pankaj; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.; Grant, Aaron K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP), the signal intensity has a well-known dependence on the off-resonance frequency, or, equivalently, the phase advance between successive radiofrequency (RF) pulses. The signal profile can be used to resolve the contributions from the spectrally separated metabolites. This work describes a method based on use of a variable RF phase advance to acquire spatial and spectral data in a time-efficient manner for hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Theory and Methods The technique relies on the frequency response from a bSSFP acquisition to acquire relatively rapid, high-resolution images that may be reconstructed to separate contributions from different metabolites. The ability to produce images from spectrally separated metabolites was demonstrated in-vitro, as well as in-vivo following administration of hyperpolarized 1-13C pyruvate in mice with xenograft tumors. Results In-vivo images of pyruvate, alanine, pyruvate hydrate and lactate were reconstructed from 4 images acquired in 2 seconds with an in-plane resolution of 1.25 × 1.25mm2 and 5mm slice thickness. Conclusions The phase advance method allowed acquisition of spectroscopically selective images with high spatial and temporal resolution. This method provides an alternative approach to hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic MRI that can be combined with other techniques such as multi-echo or fluctuating equilibrium bSSFP. PMID:26507361

  19. Fluid echoes in a pure electron plasma.

    PubMed

    Yu, J H; O'Neil, T M; Driscoll, C F

    2005-01-21

    Experimental observations of diocotron wave echoes on a magnetized electron column are reported, representing Kelvin wave echoes on a rotating near-ideal fluid. The echoes occur by reversal of an inviscid wave damping process, and the phase-space mixing and unmixing are directly imaged. The basic echo characteristics agree with a simple nonlinear ballistic theory. At late times, the echo is degraded, and the maximal observed echo times agree with a theory of electron-electron collisions acting on separately evolving velocity classes.

  20. TU-EF-BRA-03: Free Induction Decay (without the Decay) and Spin-Echo Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.

    2015-06-15

    ), which involves a brief introduction to the Fourier transform and k-space. This leads to conventional Spin-Echo (S-E) reconstruction techniques for creating clinical images from raw data, and sets the stage for: Part IV. Spin-Echo; S-E / Spin Warp in a 2D Slice (Price) discusses application of the S- E sequence of radiofrequency pulses and gradient magnetic fields to the 1D patient. T2 is introduced but not explained. This Part also considers how to manipulate the image acquisition parameters so as to generate clinical pictures with contrast dominated by spatial variations in PD, T1, or T2. We conclude by demonstrating the spin-warp approach to imaging in 2D with a simple 2×2, 4-voxel example. Much of this material is presented in more detail in the chapter “MRI of the One-dimensional Patient, Part I”, in Advances in Medical Physics, Vol 5 (2014). Copies are on display at the Medical Physics Publishing booth. Learning Objectives: The participant will learn about the processes of NMR and T1 spin relaxation in a tissue voxel in a uniform magnetic field. The participant will learn about combining spin-up/spin-down NMR and T1 processes with a linear gradient to effect frequency-encoding of voxel spatial position. This approach can be used to create proton density and T1 MRI maps, respectively, of the contents of multi-voxel 1D phantoms. The participant will learn about how the ‘classical’ model of NMR it can generate Free Induction Decay (FID) images of 1D phantoms, which involves the use of the Fourier transform in k-space. This can lead simply into standard Spin-Echo images. The participant will learn about extending Spin-Echo imaging into 2 and more dimensions.

  1. Differences in cortical development assessed by fetal MRI in late-onset intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Egaña-Ugrinovic, Gabriela; Sanz-Cortes, Magdalena; Figueras, Francesc; Bargalló, Nuria; Gratacós, Eduard

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate cortical development parameters by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in late-onset intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) fetuses and normally grown fetuses. A total of 52 IUGR and 50 control fetuses were imaged using a 3T MRI scanner at 37 weeks of gestational age. T2 half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo anatomical acquisitions were obtained in 3 planes. Cortical sulcation (fissures depth corrected by biparietal diameter), brain volumetry, and asymmetry indices were assessed by means of manual delineation and compared between cases and controls. Late-onset IUGR fetuses had significantly deeper measurements in the left insula (late-onset IUGR: 0.293 vs control: 0.267; P = .02) and right insula (0.379 vs 0.318; P < .01) and the left cingulate fissure (0.096 vs 0.087; P = .03) and significantly lower intracranial (441.25 cm(3) vs 515.82 cm(3); P < .01), brain (276.47 cm(3) vs 312.07 cm(3); P < .01), and left opercular volumes (2.52 cm(3) vs 3.02 cm(3); P < .01). IUGR fetuses showed significantly higher right insular asymmetry indices. Late-onset IUGR fetuses had a different pattern of cortical development assessed by MRI, supporting the existence of in utero brain reorganization. Cortical development could be useful to define fetal brain imaging-phenotypes characteristic of IUGR. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lung volume quantified by MRI reflects extracellular-matrix deposition and altered pulmonary function in bleomycin models of fibrosis: effects of SOM230.

    PubMed

    Egger, Christine; Gérard, Christelle; Vidotto, Nella; Accart, Nathalie; Cannet, Catherine; Dunbar, Andrew; Tigani, Bruno; Piaia, Alessandro; Jarai, Gabor; Jarman, Elizabeth; Schmid, Herbert A; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2014-06-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal disease, characterized by loss of lung elasticity and alveolar surface area, secondary to alveolar epithelial cell injury, reactive inflammation, proliferation of fibroblasts, and deposition of extracellular matrix. The effects of oropharyngeal aspiration of bleomycin in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice, as well as of intratracheal administration of ovalbumin to actively sensitized Brown Norway rats on total lung volume as assessed noninvasively by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated here. Lung injury and volume were quantified by using nongated or respiratory-gated MRI acquisitions [ultrashort echo time (UTE) or gradient-echo techniques]. Lung function of bleomycin-challenged rats was examined additionally using a flexiVent system. Postmortem analyses included histology of collagen and hydroxyproline assays. Bleomycin induced an increase of MRI-assessed total lung volume, lung dry and wet weights, and hydroxyproline content as well as collagen amount. In bleomycin-treated rats, gated MRI showed an increased volume of the lung in the inspiratory and expiratory phases of the respiratory cycle and a temporary decrease of tidal volume. Decreased dynamic lung compliance was found in bleomycin-challenged rats. Bleomycin-induced increase of MRI-detected lung volume was consistent with tissue deposition during fibrotic processes resulting in decreased lung elasticity, whereas influences by edema or emphysema could be excluded. In ovalbumin-challenged rats, total lung volume quantified by MRI remained unchanged. The somatostatin analog, SOM230, was shown to have therapeutic effects on established bleomycin-induced fibrosis in rats. This work suggests MRI-detected total lung volume as readout for tissue-deposition in small rodent bleomycin models of pulmonary fibrosis.

  3. SU-F-303-02: Achieving 4D MRI in Regular Breathing Cycle with Extended Acquisition Time of Dynamic MR Images

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C; Beddar, S; Wen, Z; Stemkens, B; Tijssen, R; Berg, C van den

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to obtain four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images that are more representative of a patient’s typical breathing cycle by utilizing an extended acquisition time while minimizing the image artifacts. Methods: The 4D MR data were acquired with the balanced steady state free precession in two-dimensional sagittal plane of view. Each slice was acquired repeatedly for about 15 s, thereby obtaining multiple images at each of the 10 phases in the respiratory cycle. This improves the probability that at least one of the images were acquired at the desired phase during a regular breathing cycle. To create optimal 4D MR images, an iterative approach was used to identify the set of images that yielded the highest slice-to-slice similarity. To assess the effectiveness of the approach, the data set was truncated into periods of 7 s (50 time points), 11 s (75 time points) and the full 15 s (100 time points). The 4D MR images were then sorted with data of the three different acquisition periods for comparison. Results: In general, the 4D MR images sorted using data from longer acquisition periods showed less mismatched artifacts. In addition, the normalized cross correlation (NCC) between slices of a 4D volume increases with increased acquisition period. The average NCC was 0.791 from the 7 s period, 0.794 from the 11 s period and 0.796 from the 15 s period. Conclusion: Our preliminary study showed that extending the acquisition time with the proposed sorting technique can improve image quality and reduce artifact presence in the 4D MR images. Data acquisition over two breathing cycles is a good trade-off between artifact reduction and scan time. This research was partially funded by the the Center for Radiation Oncology Research from UT MD Anderson Cancer Center.

  4. Sub-millimeter T2 weighted fMRI at 7 T: comparison of 3D-GRASE and 2D SE-EPI.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Valentin G; De Martino, Federico; Vu, An T; Poser, Benedikt A; Feinberg, David A; Goebel, Rainer; Yacoub, Essa

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows studying human brain function non-invasively up to the spatial resolution of cortical columns and layers. Most fMRI acquisitions rely on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast employing T(*) 2 weighted 2D multi-slice echo-planar imaging (EPI). At ultra-high magnetic field (i.e., 7 T and above), it has been shown experimentally and by simulation, that T2 weighted acquisitions yield a signal that is spatially more specific to the site of neuronal activity at the cost of functional sensitivity. This study compared two T2 weighted imaging sequences, inner-volume 3D Gradient-and-Spin-Echo (3D-GRASE) and 2D Spin-Echo EPI (SE-EPI), with evaluation of their imaging point-spread function (PSF), functional specificity, and functional sensitivity at sub-millimeter resolution. Simulations and measurements of the imaging PSF revealed that the strongest anisotropic blurring in 3D-GRASE (along the second phase-encoding direction) was about 60% higher than the strongest anisotropic blurring in 2D SE-EPI (along the phase-encoding direction). In a visual paradigm, the BOLD sensitivity of 3D-GRASE was found to be superior due to its higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR). High resolution cortical depth profiles suggested that the contrast mechanisms are similar between the two sequences, however, 2D SE-EPI had a higher surface bias owing to the higher T(*) 2 contribution of the longer in-plane EPI echo-train for full field of view compared to the reduced field of view of zoomed 3D-GRASE.

  5. Multi-Vendor Implementation and Comparison of Volumetric Whole-Brain Echo-Planar MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sabati, Mohammad; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Gu, Meng; Wei, Juan; Zhu, Henry; Barker, Peter B.; Spielman, Daniel M.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Maudsley, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess volumetric proton MR spectroscopic imaging of the human brain on multi-vendor MRI instruments. Methods Echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) was developed on instruments from three manufacturers, with matched specifications and acquisition protocols that accounted for differences in sampling performance, RF power, and data formats. Inter-site reproducibility was evaluated for signal-normalized maps of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Creatine (Cre) and Choline using phantom and human subject measurements. Comparative analyses included metrics for spectral quality, spatial coverage, and mean values in atlas-registered brain regions. Results Inter-site differences for phantom measurements were under 1.7% for individual metabolites and 0.2% for ratio measurements. Spatial uniformity ranged from 79% to 91%. The human studies found differences of mean values in the temporal lobe, but good agreement in other white-matter regions, with maximum differences relative to their mean of under 3.2%. For NAA/Cre, the maximum difference was 1.8%. In grey-matter a significant difference was observed for frontal lobe NAA. Primary causes of inter-site differences were attributed to shim quality, B0 drift, and accuracy of RF excitation. Correlation coefficients for measurements at each site were over 0.60, indicating good reliability. Conclusion A volumetric intensity-normalized MRSI acquisition can be implemented in a comparable manner across multi-vendor MR instruments. PMID:25354190

  6. Direct magnetic field estimation based on echo planar raw data.

    PubMed

    Testud, Frederik; Splitthoff, Daniel Nicolas; Speck, Oliver; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2010-07-01

    Gradient recalled echo echo planar imaging is widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging. The fast data acquisition is, however, very sensitive to field inhomogeneities which manifest themselves as artifacts in the images. Typically used correction methods have the common deficit that the data for the correction are acquired only once at the beginning of the experiment, assuming the field inhomogeneity distribution B(0) does not change over the course of the experiment. In this paper, methods to extract the magnetic field distribution from the acquired k-space data or from the reconstructed phase image of a gradient echo planar sequence are compared and extended. A common derivation for the presented approaches provides a solid theoretical basis, enables a fair comparison and demonstrates the equivalence of the k-space and the image phase based approaches. The image phase analysis is extended here to calculate the local gradient in the readout direction and improvements are introduced to the echo shift analysis, referred to here as "k-space filtering analysis." The described methods are compared to experimentally acquired B(0) maps in phantoms and in vivo. The k-space filtering analysis presented in this work demonstrated to be the most sensitive method to detect field inhomogeneities.

  7. Z-spectrum appearance and interpretation in the presence of fat: Influence of acquisition parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Keupp, Jochen; Wang, Xinzeng; Dimitrov, Ivan; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Lenkinski, Robert E; Vinogradov, Elena

    2017-09-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is increasingly evolving from brain to body applications. One of the known problems in the body imaging is the presence of strong lipid signals. Although their influence on the CEST effect is acknowledged, there was no study that focuses on the interplay among echo time, fat fraction, and Z-spectrum. This study strives to address these points, with the emphasis on the application in the breast. Z-spectra were simulated in phase and out of phase of the main fat peak at -3.4 ppm, with the fat fraction varying from 0 to 100%. The magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry in two ranges, centering at the exchanging pool and at 3.5 ppm approximately opposite the nonexchanging fat pool, were calculated and were plotted against fat fraction. The results were verified in phantoms and in vivo. The results demonstrate the combined influence of fat fraction and echo time on the Z-spectrum for gradient echo based CEST acquisitions. The influence is straightforward in the in-phase images, but it is more complicated in the out-of-phase images, potentially leading to erroneous CEST contrast. This study provides a basis for understanding the origin and appearance of lipid artifacts in CEST imaging, and lays the foundation for their efficient removal. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Towards inherently distortion-free MR images for image-guided radiotherapy on an MRI accelerator.

    PubMed

    Crijns, S P M; Bakker, C J G; Seevinck, P R; de Leeuw, H; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2012-03-07

    In MR-guided interventions, it is mandatory to establish a solid relationship between the imaging coordinate system and world coordinates. This is particularly important in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) on an MRI accelerator, as the interaction of matter with γ-radiation cannot be visualized. In conventional acquisitions, off-resonance effects cause discrepancies between coordinate systems. We propose to mitigate this by using only phase encoding and to reduce the longer acquisitions by under-sampling and regularized reconstruction. To illustrate the performance of this acquisition in the presence of off-resonance phenomena, phantom and in vivo images are acquired using spin-echo (SE) and purely phase-encoded sequences. Data are retrospectively under-sampled and reconstructed iteratively. We observe accurate geometries in purely phase-encoded images for all cases, whereas SE images of the same phantoms display image distortions. Regularized reconstruction yields accurate phantom images under high acceleration factors. In vivo images were reconstructed faithfully while using acceleration factors up to 4. With the proposed technique, inherently undistorted images with one-to-one correspondence to world coordinates can be obtained. It is a valuable tool in geometry quality assurance, treatment planning and online image guidance. Under-sampled acquisition combined with regularized reconstruction can be used to accelerate the acquisition while retaining geometrical accuracy.

  9. IN VITRO AND PRELIMINARY IN VIVO VALIDATION OF ECHO PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY IN CAROTID VASCULAR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fuxing; Lanning, Craig; Mazzaro, Luciano; Barker, Alex J.; Gates, Philip; Strain, W. David; Fulford, Jonathan; Gosling, Oliver E.; Shore, Angela C.; Bellenger, Nick G.; Rech, Bryan; Chen, Jiusheng; Chen, James; Shandas, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive, easy-to-use and accurate measurements of wall shear stress (WSS) in human blood vessels have always been challenging in clinical applications. Echo particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV) has shown promise for clinical measurements of local hemodynamics and wall shear rate. So far, however, the method has only been validated under simple flow conditions. In this study, we validated Echo PIV under in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. For in-vitro validation, we used an anatomically-correct, compliant carotid bifurcation flow phantom with pulsatile flow conditions, using optical particle image velocimetry (optical PIV) as the reference standard. For in-vivo validation, we compared Echo PIV-derived two dimensional velocity fields obtained at the carotid bifurcation in 5 normal subjects against phase-contrast MRI-derived velocity measurements obtained at the same locations. For both studies, time-dependent, two-dimensional two-component velocity vectors, peak/centerline velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate (WSR) waveforms at the common carotid artery (CCA), carotid bifurcation and distal internal carotid artery (ICA) were examined. Linear regression, correlation analysis and Bland-Altman analysis were used to quantify the agreement of different waveforms measured by the two techniques. In-vitro results showed that Echo PIV produced good images of time-dependent velocity vector maps over the cardiac cycle with excellent temporal (up to 0.7 msec) and spatial (~0.5 mm) resolutions and quality, on par with optical PIV results. Further, good agreement was found between Echo PIV and optical PIV results for velocity and WSR measurements. In-vivo results also showed good agreement between Echo PIV velocities and PC-MRI velocities. We conclude that Echo PIV provides accurate velocity vector and WSR measurements in the carotid bifurcation and has significant potential as a clinical tool for cardiovascular hemodynamics evaluation. PMID:21316562

  10. Generalized INverse imaging (GIN): ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correction.

    PubMed

    Boyacioğlu, Rasim; Barth, Markus

    2013-10-01

    An ultrafast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, called generalized inverse imaging (GIN), is proposed, which combines inverse imaging with a phase constraint-leading to a less underdetermined reconstruction-and physiological noise correction. A single 3D echo planar imaging (EPI) prescan is sufficient to obtain the necessary coil sensitivity information and reference images that are used to reconstruct standard images, so that standard analysis methods are applicable. A moving dots stimulus paradigm was chosen to assess the performance of GIN. We find that the spatial localization of activation for GIN is comparable to an EPI protocol and that maximum z-scores increase significantly. The high temporal resolution of GIN (50 ms) and the acquisition of the phase information enable unaliased sampling and regression of physiological signals. Using the phase time courses obtained from the 32 channels of the receiver coils as nuisance regressors in a general linear model results in significant improvement of the functional activation, rendering the acquisition of external physiological signals unnecessary. The proposed physiological noise correction can in principle be used for other fMRI protocols, such as simultaneous multislice acquisitions, which acquire the phase information sufficiently fast and sample physiological signals unaliased.

  11. PROMO: Real-time prospective motion correction in MRI using image-based tracking.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan; Roddey, Cooper; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Han, Eric; Rettmann, Dan; Santos, Juan; Kuperman, Josh; Dale, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts caused by patient motion during scanning remain a serious problem in most MRI applications. The prospective motion correction technique attempts to address this problem at its source by keeping the measurement coordinate system fixed with respect to the patient throughout the entire scan process. In this study, a new image-based approach for prospective motion correction is described, which utilizes three orthogonal two-dimensional spiral navigator acquisitions, along with a flexible image-based tracking method based on the extended Kalman filter algorithm for online motion measurement. The spiral navigator/extended Kalman filter framework offers the advantages of image-domain tracking within patient-specific regions-of-interest and reduced sensitivity to off-resonance-induced corruption of rigid-body motion estimates. The performance of the method was tested using offline computer simulations and online in vivo head motion experiments. In vivo validation results covering a broad range of staged head motions indicate a steady-state error of less than 10% of the motion magnitude, even for large compound motions that included rotations over 15 deg. A preliminary in vivo application in three-dimensional inversion recovery spoiled gradient echo (IR-SPGR) and three-dimensional fast spin echo (FSE) sequences demonstrates the effectiveness of the spiral navigator/extended Kalman filter framework for correcting three-dimensional rigid-body head motion artifacts prospectively in high-resolution three-dimensional MRI scans. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. PROMO – Real-time Prospective Motion Correction in MRI using Image-based Tracking

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan; Roddey, Cooper; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Han, Eric; Rettmann, Dan; Santos, Juan; Kuperman, Josh; Dale, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts caused by patient motion during scanning remain a serious problem in most MRI applications. The prospective motion correction technique attempts to address this problem at its source by keeping the measurement coordinate system fixed with respect to the patient throughout the entire scan process. In this study, a new image-based approach for prospective motion correction is described, which utilizes three orthogonal 2D spiral navigator acquisitions (SP-Navs) along with a flexible image-based tracking method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithm for online motion measurement. The SP-Nav/EKF framework offers the advantages of image-domain tracking within patient-specific regions-of-interest and reduced sensitivity to off-resonance-induced corruption of rigid-body motion estimates. The performance of the method was tested using offline computer simulations and online in vivo head motion experiments. In vivo validation results covering a broad range of staged head motions indicate a steady-state error of the SP-Nav/EKF motion estimates of less than 10 % of the motion magnitude, even for large compound motions that included rotations over 15 degrees. A preliminary in vivo application in 3D inversion recovery spoiled gradient echo (IR-SPGR) and 3D fast spin echo (FSE) sequences demonstrates the effectiveness of the SP-Nav/EKF framework for correcting 3D rigid-body head motion artifacts prospectively in high-resolution 3D MRI scans. PMID:20027635

  13. Accelerated Fast Spin-Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart Using a Self-Calibrated Split-Echo Approach

    PubMed Central

    Klix, Sabrina; Hezel, Fabian; Fuchs, Katharina; Ruff, Jan; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Design, validation and application of an accelerated fast spin-echo (FSE) variant that uses a split-echo approach for self-calibrated parallel imaging. Methods For self-calibrated, split-echo FSE (SCSE-FSE), extra displacement gradients were incorporated into FSE to decompose odd and even echo groups which were independently phase encoded to derive coil sensitivity maps, and to generate undersampled data (reduction factor up to R = 3). Reference and undersampled data were acquired simultaneously. SENSE reconstruction was employed. Results The feasibility of SCSE-FSE was demonstrated in phantom studies. Point spread function performance of SCSE-FSE was found to be competitive with traditional FSE variants. The immunity of SCSE-FSE for motion induced mis-registration between reference and undersampled data was shown using a dynamic left ventricular model and cardiac imaging. The applicability of black blood prepared SCSE-FSE for cardiac imaging was demonstrated in healthy volunteers including accelerated multi-slice per breath-hold imaging and accelerated high spatial resolution imaging. Conclusion SCSE-FSE obviates the need of external reference scans for SENSE reconstructed parallel imaging with FSE. SCSE-FSE reduces the risk for mis-registration between reference scans and accelerated acquisitions. SCSE-FSE is feasible for imaging of the heart and of large cardiac vessels but also meets the needs of brain, abdominal and liver imaging. PMID:24728341

  14. Facility Search Criteria Help | ECHO | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides powerful search capabilities offering more than 100 search criteria to target your results. Use the ECHO to search compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide.

  15. Feasibility of vocal fold abduction and adduction assessment using cine-MRI.

    PubMed

    Baki, Marina Mat; Menys, Alex; Atkinson, David; Bassett, Paul; Morley, Simon; Beale, Timothy; Sandhu, Guri; Naduvilethil, Georgekutty; Stevenson, Nicola; Birchall, Martin A; Punwani, Shonit

    2017-02-01

    Determine feasibility of vocal fold (VF) abduction and adduction assessment by cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) METHODS: Cine-MRI of the VF was performed on five healthy and nine unilateral VF paralysis (UVFP) participants using an axial gradient echo acquisition with temporal resolution of 0.7 s. VFs were continuously imaged with cine-MRI during a 10-s period of quiet respiration and phonation. Scanning was repeated twice within an individual session and then once again at a 1-week interval. Asymmetry of VF position during phonation (VF phonation asymmetry, VFPa) and respiration (VF respiration asymmetry, VFRa) was determined. Percentage reduction in total glottal area between respiration and phonation (VF abduction potential, VFAP) was derived to measure overall mobility. An un-paired t-test was used to compare differences between groups. Intra-session, inter-session and inter-reader repeatability of the quantitative metrics was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). VF position asymmetry (VFPa and VFRa) was greater (p=0.012; p=0.001) and overall mobility (VFAP) was lower (p=0.008) in UVFP patients compared with healthy participants. ICC of repeatability of all metrics was good, ranged from 0.82 to 0.95 except for the inter-session VFPa (0.44). Cine-MRI is feasible for assessing VF abduction and adduction. Derived quantitative metrics have good repeatability. • Cine-MRI is used to assess vocal folds (VFs) mobility: abduction and adduction. • New quantitative metrics are derived from VF position and abduction potential. • Cine-MRI able to depict the difference between normal and abnormal VF mobility. • Cine-MRI derived quantitative metrics have good repeatability.

  16. Towards real-time thermometry using simultaneous multislice MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, P. T. S.; Bos, C.; de Boorder, T.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Moonen, C. T. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2016-09-01

    MR-guided thermal therapies, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) and laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) are increasingly being applied in oncology and neurology. MRI is used for guidance since it can measure temperature noninvasively based on the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS). For therapy guidance using PRFS thermometry, high temporal resolution and large spatial coverage are desirable. We propose to use the parallel imaging technique simultaneous multislice (SMS) in combination with controlled aliasing (CAIPIRINHA) to accelerate the acquisition. We compare this with the sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acceleration technique. Two experiments were performed to validate that SMS can be used to increase the spatial coverage or the temporal resolution. The first was performed in agar gel using LITT heating and a gradient-echo sequence with echo-planar imaging (EPI), and the second was performed in bovine muscle using HIFU heating and a gradient-echo sequence without EPI. In both experiments temperature curves from an unaccelerated scan and from SMS, SENSE, and SENSE/SMS accelerated scans were compared. The precision was quantified by a standard deviation analysis of scans without heating. Both experiments showed a good agreement between the temperature curves obtained from the unaccelerated, and SMS accelerated scans, confirming that accuracy was maintained during SMS acceleration. The standard deviations of the temperature measurements obtained with SMS were significantly smaller than when SENSE was used, implying that SMS allows for higher acceleration. In the LITT and HIFU experiments SMS factors up to 4 and 3 were reached, respectively, with a loss of precision of less than a factor of 3. Based on these results we conclude that SMS acceleration of PRFS thermometry is a valuable addition to SENSE, because it allows for a higher temporal resolution or bigger spatial coverage, with a higher precision.

  17. 3D-FT thin sections MRI of prolactin-secreting pituitary microadenomas.

    PubMed

    Girard, N; Brue, T; Chabert-Orsini, V; Raybaud, C; Jaquet, P; Poncet, M; Grisoli, F; Cahen, S

    1994-07-01

    We studied 76 patients with endocrinological features of prolactin-secreting microadenoma by MRI, using three dimensional (3D) gradient echo acquisition (FLASH) sequences. MRI revealed a focal signal abnormality in the pituitary in all 37 patients who had not previously taken bromocriptine. However, focal abnormality was shown in only half the patients had been on dopamine agonist therapy; the MRI findings in these 39 patients were not affected by the duration and dosage bromocriptine, nor by the time elapsed since its discontinuation. The microadenoma gave spontaneous high signal on the unenhanced T1-weighted images in 8 cases; it was not seen on unenhanced images in 25 cases. It appeared as low signal within the enhancing gland in 51 cases but enhanced in 7 cases. The 3D technique gives thin (1 mm) slices and therefore facilitates detection of small focal abnormalities in the pituitary gland (2 x 2 mm). In the 19 previously treated patients in whom MRI did not demonstrate a focal abnormality, it showed localised atrophy of the gland in 3, a large, round gland with homogeneous signal in 1, and a heterogeneous appearance in 11; it was normal in 4 cases.

  18. Fat ViP MRI: Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging of water-fat systems.

    PubMed

    Salvati, Roberto; Hitti, Eric; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Gambarota, Giulio

    2016-06-01

    Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI) is a method to generate reference signals on MR images, using external radiofrequency (RF) signals. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of ViP MRI to generate complex-data images of phantoms mimicking water-fat systems. Various numerical phantoms with a given fat fraction, T2* and field map were designed. The k-space of numerical phantoms was converted into RF signals to generate virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were performed at 4.7T using a multi-gradient-echo sequence on virtual and physical phantoms. The data acquisition of virtual and physical phantoms was simultaneous. Decomposition of the water and fat signals was performed using a complex-based water-fat separation algorithm. Overall, a good agreement was observed between the fat fraction, T2* and phase map values of the virtual and numerical phantoms. In particular, fat fractions of 10.5±0.1 (vs 10% of the numerical phantom), 20.3±0.1 (vs 20%) and 30.4±0.1 (vs 30%) were obtained in virtual phantoms. The ViP MRI method allows for generating imaging phantoms that i) mimic water-fat systems and ii) can be analyzed with water-fat separation algorithms based on complex data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous imaging of locus coeruleus and substantia nigra with a quantitative neuromelanin MRI approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangchuan; Huddleston, Daniel E; Langley, Jason; Ahn, Sinyeob; Barnum, Christopher J; Factor, Stewart A; Levey, Allan I; Hu, Xiaoping

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative MRI of neuromelanin (NM) containing structures (referred to as NM-MRI) in the brainstem, namely the locus coeruleus (LC) and substantia nigra (SN), may assist with the early detection of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as differential diagnosis in the early disease stages. In this study, two gradient echo (GRE) sequences with magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) preparation pulses were developed to simultaneously image the LC and SN. This has been a challenge with NM-MRI techniques used in previous studies due to the relatively high specific absorption rate (SAR) induced by these techniques. In addition, a semi-automated quantitative analysis scheme was applied to estimate volumes and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the LC and SN based on segmentation of both structures. Compared to a T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence typically used for simultaneous imaging of the LC and SN, the two GRE-MTC sequences exhibited improved performance in terms of higher sensitivity (in CNR) in imaging the SN and lower SAR during the scans. A multiple-measurement protocol was adopted as well so that motion degraded measurements could be removed and artifacts associated with motion could be corrected. The present approach has demonstrated advantages in image acquisition (lower SAR and higher sensitivity), image pre-processing (with motion correction) and quantitative image analysis (segmentation-based estimation of volume and CNR) when compared with existing NM-MRI approaches. This approach has potential for detection and monitoring of neurodegeneration in LC and SN in disease states including AD and PD.

  20. [Neurofunctional MRI imaging of higher cognitive performance of the human brain].

    PubMed

    Bellemann, M E; Spitzer, M; Brix, G; Kammer, T; Loose, R; Schwartz, A; Gückel, F

    1995-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers a powerful experimental tool for mapping activated cortical regions in man. Thereby, the paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin in the red blood cells acts as an endogenous susceptibility contrast agent, which allows the noninvasive detection of stimulus-induced transient changes in regional cerebral blood flow and volume. Fifteen normal subjects were examined on a conventional 1.5-T MR system to visualize cortical activation during the performance of high-level cognitive tasks. A computer-controlled videoprojector was employed to present psychometrically optimized activation paradigms. Reaction times and error rates of the volunteers were acquired online during stimulus presentation. The time course of cortical activation was measured in a series of strongly T2*-weighted gradient-echo images from three or four adjacent slices. For anatomical correlation, picture elements showing a stimulus-related significant signal increase were color-coded and superimposed on T1-weighted spin-echo images. Analysis of the fMRI data revealed a subtle (range 2-5%), but statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in signal intensity during the periods of induced cortical activation. Judgment of semantic relatedness of word pairs, for example, activated selectively cortical areas in left frontal and left temporal brain regions. The strength of cortex activation in the semantic task decreased significantly in the course of stimulus presentation and was paralleled by a decrease in the corresponding reaction times. With its move into the area of cognitive neuroscience, fMRI calls both for the careful design of activation schemes and for the acquisition of behavioral data. For example, brain regions involved in language processing could only be identified clearly when psychometrically matched activation paradigms were employed. The reaction time data correlated well with selective learning and thus helped to facilitate interpretation of the fMRI

  1. Rapid Isotropic 3D-Sodium MRI of the Knee Joint In-vivo at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligong; Wu, Yan; Chang, Gregory; Oesingmann, Niels; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring high resolution, isotropic 3D-sodium MR images of the whole knee joint in vivo at ultra high field strength (7.0T) via a 3D-radial acquisition with ultra short echo times and clinically acceptable acquisition times. Materials and Methods Five healthy controls (4 males, 1 female; mean ± standard deviation (SD) age 28.7 ± 4.8 years) and five patients with osteoarthritis (OA) (3 males, 2 females; mean ± SD age 52.4 ± 5.6 years) underwent 23Na–MRI on a 7T, multi-nuclei equipped whole body scanner. A quadrature 23Na knee coil and a 3D-gradient echo (GRE) imaging sequence with a radial acquisition were utilized. Cartilage sodium concentration was measured and compared between the healthy controls and OA patients. Results The average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for different spatial resolutions (1.2 mm – 4 mm) varied from ∼14 – 120, respectively. The mean sodium concentration of healthy subjects ranged from ∼240 ± 28 mM/L – 280 ± 22 mM/L. However, in OA patients the sodium concentrations were reduced, significantly by ∼30 – 60%, depending upon the degree of cartilage degeneration. Conclusion The preliminary results suggest that sodium imaging at 7T may be a feasible potential alternative for physiologic OA imaging and clinical diagnosis. PMID:19711406

  2. Quantitative pharmacologic MRI in mice

    PubMed Central

    Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora-Adriana; Procissi, Daniel; Demyanenko, Andrey V.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacologic MRI (phMRI) uses functional MRI techniques to provide a non-invasive in vivo measurement of the hemodynamic effects of drugs. The cerebral blood volume change (ΔCBV) serves as a surrogate for neuronal activity via neurovascular coupling mechanisms. By assessing the location and time course of brain activity in mouse mutant studies, phMRI can provide valuable insights into how different behavioral phenotypes are expressed in differing brain activity response to drug challenge. In this report, we evaluate the utility of three different intravascular ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agents for phMRI using a gradient-echo technique with temporal resolution of one minute at high magnetic field. The tissue half life of the USPIOs was studied using a nonlinear detrending model. All three studied USPIOs are candidates for CBV weighted phMRI-experiments, with r2/r1 ratios ≥ 20 and apparent half-lives ≥ 1.5 h at the described doses. An echo time of about 10 ms or longer results in a fCNR > 75 after USPIO injection, with negligible decrease during 1.5 to 2 hours. phMRI experiments were conducted at 7T using cocaine as a psychotropic substance and acetazolamide, a global vasodilator, as a positive control. Cocaine acts as a dopamine-serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, increasing extracellular concentrations of these neurotransmitters and thus increasing dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. phMRI indicated that CBV was reduced in the normal mouse brain after cocaine challenge, with largest effects in nucleus accumbens, while after acetazolamide the blood volume was increased in both cerebral and extra-cerebral tissue. PMID:21793079

  3. Application of accelerated acquisition and highly constrained reconstruction methods to MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang

    2011-12-01

    There are many Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications that require rapid data acquisition. In conventional proton MRI, representative applications include real-time dynamic imaging, whole-chest pulmonary perfusion imaging, high resolution coronary imaging, MR T1 or T2 mapping, etc. The requirement for fast acquisition and novel reconstruction methods is either due to clinical demand for high temporal resolution, high spatial resolution, or both. Another important category in which fast MRI methods are highly desirable is imaging with hyperpolarized (HP) contrast media, such as HP 3He imaging for evaluation of pulmonary function, and imaging of HP 13C-labeled substrates for the study of in vivo metabolic processes. To address these needs, numerous MR undersampling methods have been developed and combined with novel image reconstruction techniques. This thesis aims to develop novel data acquisition and image reconstruction techniques for the following applications. (I) Ultrashort echo time spectroscopic imaging (UTESI). The need for acquiring many echo images in spectroscopic imaging with high spatial resolution usually results in extended scan times, and thus requires k-space undersampling and novel imaging reconstruction methods to overcome the artifacts related to the undersampling. (2) Dynamic hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic imaging. HP 13C compounds exhibit non-equilibrium T1 decay and rapidly evolving spectral dynamics, and therefore it is vital to utilize the polarized signal wisely and efficiently to observe the entire temporal dynamic of the injected "C compounds as well as the corresponding downstream metabolites. (3) Time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography. The diagnosis of vascular diseases often requires large coverage of human body anatomies with high spatial resolution and sufficient temporal resolution for the separation of arterial phases from venous phases. The goal of simultaneously achieving high spatial and temporal resolution has

  4. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  5. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.