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Sample records for ecompagt integrates mtdna

  1. Quality matters: how does mitochondrial network dynamics and quality control impact on mtDNA integrity?

    PubMed

    Busch, Karin B; Kowald, Axel; Spelbrink, Johannes N

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian mtDNA encodes for 13 core proteins of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA mutations and deletions cause severe myopathies and neuromuscular diseases. Thus, the integrity of mtDNA is pivotal for cell survival and health of the organism. We here discuss the possible impact of mitochondrial fusion and fission on mtDNA maintenance as well as positive and negative selection processes. Our focus is centred on the important question of how the quality of mtDNA nucleoids can be assured when selection and mitochondrial quality control works on functional and physiological phenotypes constituted by oxidative phosphorylation proteins. The organelle control theory suggests a link between phenotype and nucleoid genotype. This is discussed in the light of new results presented here showing that mitochondrial transcription factor A/nucleoids are restricted in their intramitochondrial mobility and probably have a limited sphere of influence. Together with recent published work on mitochondrial and mtDNA heteroplasmy dynamics, these data suggest first, that single mitochondria might well be internally heterogeneous and second, that nucleoid genotypes might be linked to local phenotypes (although the link might often be leaky). We discuss how random or site-specific mitochondrial fission can isolate dysfunctional parts and enable their elimination by mitophagy, stressing the importance of fission in the process of mtDNA quality control. The role of fusion is more multifaceted and less understood in this context, but the mixing and equilibration of matrix content might be one of its important functions.

  2. [Experimental detection of integration of mTDNA in the nuclear genome induced by ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Abdullaev, S A; Fomenko, L A; Kuznetsova, E A; Gaziev, A I

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of mtDNA in the nuclear genome is usually regarded as a continued and dynamic process of forming numt-pseudogenes or numt-insertions. They can be regarded not only as a neutral polymorphism, but may be involved in oncogenesis, aging and genetic diseases. Experimental identification of numt-insertions arising de novo is limited due to the presence of numerous homology mtDNA constitutively existing in the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes. It is known that the chick nuclear DNA (nDNA) constitutively contains 12 numt-pseudogenes. We attempted to experimentally detect the formation of numt-insertions de novo in the nDNA of chick embryos (Gallus gallus) from the eggs exposed to X-rays. Free mtDNAs were removed from preparations of nDNA of liver embryos through double gel electrophoresis. Numt-inserts in nDNA of control and survival embryos (from irradiated eggs) were revealed by PCR using 11 pairs of primers flanking the region of mtDNA of about 300-400 bp. PCR analysis with nDNA of control group showed no presence of homology mtDNA amplified with selected primers. PCR assays of nDNA of eight embryos from irradiated eggs showed that nDNA of two embryos contained new sites of mtDNA. PCR amplification of 3 loci of mtDNA is stably detected in nDNA from one embryo and 4 loci of mtDNA in nDNA from another embryo. Sequencing of PCR amplicons synthesized on templates of these nDNA showed that their sequences are identical to mtDNA and accurately cover the sites of several genes and the site of mtDNA D-loop. Thus, the experimental results indicate that ionizing radiation can induce integration of mtDNA fragments in the nuclear genome, apparently, through the mechanism of nonhomologous end-joining repair of double-strand breaks of nDNA.

  3. Development of a control region-based mtDNA SNaPshot™ selection tool, integrated into a mini amplicon sequencing method.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Natalie E C; de Vries, Gerda; Sijen, Titia

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is regularly applied to forensic DNA samples with limited amounts of nuclear DNA (nDNA), such as hair shafts and bones. Generally, this mtDNA analysis involves examination of the hypervariable control region by Sanger sequencing of amplified products. When samples are severely degraded, small-sized amplicons can be applied and an earlier described mini-mtDNA method by Eichmann et al. [1] that accommodates ten mini amplicons in two multiplexes is found to be a very robust approach. However, in cases with large numbers of samples, like when searching for hairs with an mtDNA profile deviant from that of the victim, the method is time (and cost) consuming. Previously, Chemale et al. [2] described a SNaPshot™-based screening tool for a Brazilian population that uses standard-size amplicons for HVS-I and HVS-II. Here, we describe a similar tool adapted to the full control region and compatible with mini-mtDNA amplicons. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on their relative frequencies in a European population. They showed a high discriminatory power in a Dutch population (97.2%). The 18 SNPs are assessed in two SNaPshot™ multiplexes that pair to the two mini-mtDNA amplification multiplexes. Degenerate bases are included to limit allele dropout due to SNPs at primer binding site positions. Three SNPs provide haplogroup information. Reliability testing showed no differences with Sanger sequencing results. Since mini-mtSNaPshot screening uses only a small portion of the same PCR products used for Sanger sequencing, no additional DNA extract is consumed, which is forensically advantageous.

  4. Development of a control region-based mtDNA SNaPshot™ selection tool, integrated into a mini amplicon sequencing method.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Natalie E C; de Vries, Gerda; Sijen, Titia

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is regularly applied to forensic DNA samples with limited amounts of nuclear DNA (nDNA), such as hair shafts and bones. Generally, this mtDNA analysis involves examination of the hypervariable control region by Sanger sequencing of amplified products. When samples are severely degraded, small-sized amplicons can be applied and an earlier described mini-mtDNA method by Eichmann et al. [1] that accommodates ten mini amplicons in two multiplexes is found to be a very robust approach. However, in cases with large numbers of samples, like when searching for hairs with an mtDNA profile deviant from that of the victim, the method is time (and cost) consuming. Previously, Chemale et al. [2] described a SNaPshot™-based screening tool for a Brazilian population that uses standard-size amplicons for HVS-I and HVS-II. Here, we describe a similar tool adapted to the full control region and compatible with mini-mtDNA amplicons. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on their relative frequencies in a European population. They showed a high discriminatory power in a Dutch population (97.2%). The 18 SNPs are assessed in two SNaPshot™ multiplexes that pair to the two mini-mtDNA amplification multiplexes. Degenerate bases are included to limit allele dropout due to SNPs at primer binding site positions. Three SNPs provide haplogroup information. Reliability testing showed no differences with Sanger sequencing results. Since mini-mtSNaPshot screening uses only a small portion of the same PCR products used for Sanger sequencing, no additional DNA extract is consumed, which is forensically advantageous. PMID:26976467

  5. Respiratory and TCA cycle activities affect S. cerevisiae lifespan, response to caloric restriction and mtDNA stability.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Erich B; Cezário, Kizzy; Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Barros, Mario H; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2011-10-01

    We studied the importance of respiratory fitness in S. cerevisiae lifespan, response to caloric restriction (CR) and mtDNA stability. Mutants harboring mtDNA instability and electron transport defects do not respond to CR, while tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants presented extended lifespans due to CR. Interestingly, mtDNA is unstable in cells lacking dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase under CR conditions, and cells lacking aconitase under standard conditions (both enzymes are components of the TCA and mitochondrial nucleoid). Altogether, our data indicate that respiratory integrity is required for lifespan extension by CR and that mtDNA stability is regulated by nucleoid proteins in a glucose-sensitive manner.

  6. Keeping mtDNA in Shape between Generations

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery that mitochondria contain their own distinct DNA molecules, studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have yielded many surprises. In animals, transmission of the mtDNA genome is explicitly non-Mendelian, with a very high number of genome copies being inherited from the mother after a drastic bottleneck. Recent work has begun to uncover the molecular details of this unusual mode of transmission. Many surprising variations in animal mitochondrial biology are known; however, a series of recent studies have identified a core of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms relating to mtDNA inheritance, e.g., mtDNA bottlenecks during germ cell development, selection against specific mtDNA mutation types during maternal transmission, and targeted destruction of sperm mitochondria. In this review, we outline recent literature on the transmission of mtDNA in animals and highlight the implications for human health and ageing. PMID:25299061

  7. Keeping mtDNA in shape between generations.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James B; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-10-01

    Since the unexpected discovery that mitochondria contain their own distinct DNA molecules, studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have yielded many surprises. In animals, transmission of the mtDNA genome is explicitly non-Mendelian, with a very high number of genome copies being inherited from the mother after a drastic bottleneck. Recent work has begun to uncover the molecular details of this unusual mode of transmission. Many surprising variations in animal mitochondrial biology are known; however, a series of recent studies have identified a core of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms relating to mtDNA inheritance, e.g., mtDNA bottlenecks during germ cell development, selection against specific mtDNA mutation types during maternal transmission, and targeted destruction of sperm mitochondria. In this review, we outline recent literature on the transmission of mtDNA in animals and highlight the implications for human health and ageing.

  8. Intracellular evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the tragedy of the cytoplasmic commons.

    PubMed

    Haig, David

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria exist in large numbers per cell. Therefore, the strength of natural selection on individual mtDNAs for their contribution to cellular fitness is weak whereas the strength of selection in favor of mtDNAs that increase their own replication without regard for cellular functions is strong. This problem has been solved for most mitochondrial genes by their transfer to the nucleus but a few critical genes remain encoded by mtDNA. Organisms manage the evolution of mtDNA to prevent mutational decay of essential services mitochondria provide to their hosts. Bottlenecks of mitochondrial numbers in female germlines increase the homogeneity of mtDNAs within cells and allow intraorganismal selection to eliminate cells with low quality mitochondria. Mechanisms of intracellular "quality control" allow direct selection on the competence of individual mtDNAs. These processes maintain the integrity of mtDNAs within the germline but are inadequate to indefinitely maintain mitochondrial function in somatic cells. PMID:27062292

  9. Intracellular evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the tragedy of the cytoplasmic commons.

    PubMed

    Haig, David

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria exist in large numbers per cell. Therefore, the strength of natural selection on individual mtDNAs for their contribution to cellular fitness is weak whereas the strength of selection in favor of mtDNAs that increase their own replication without regard for cellular functions is strong. This problem has been solved for most mitochondrial genes by their transfer to the nucleus but a few critical genes remain encoded by mtDNA. Organisms manage the evolution of mtDNA to prevent mutational decay of essential services mitochondria provide to their hosts. Bottlenecks of mitochondrial numbers in female germlines increase the homogeneity of mtDNAs within cells and allow intraorganismal selection to eliminate cells with low quality mitochondria. Mechanisms of intracellular "quality control" allow direct selection on the competence of individual mtDNAs. These processes maintain the integrity of mtDNAs within the germline but are inadequate to indefinitely maintain mitochondrial function in somatic cells.

  10. Introduction of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from a patient with NARP into two human rho degrees cell lines is associated either with selection and maintenance of NARP mutant mtDNA or failure to maintain mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Vergani, L; Rossi, R; Brierley, C H; Hanna, M; Holt, I J

    1999-09-01

    Mitochondria from a patient heteroplasmic at nucleo-tide position 8993 of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were introduced into two human tumour cell lines lacking mtDNA. The donor mitochondria contained between 85 and 95% 8993G:C mtDNA. All detectable mtDNA in the mitochondrially transformed cells contained the pathological 8993G:C mutation 3 months after transformation. These results suggest that 8993G:C mtDNA had a selective advantage over 8993T:A mtDNA in both lung carcinoma and osteo-sarcoma cell backgrounds. In contrast, two other presumed pathological mtDNA variants were lost in favour of 'wild-type' mtDNA molecules in the same lung carcinoma cell background. Taken together, these findings suggest that the transmission bias of mtDNA variants is dependent upon a combination of nuclear background and mtDNA genotype. A second phenomenon observed was a marked decrease in the growth rate of many putative transformed cell lines after 6 weeks of culturing in selective medium, and in these cell lines mtDNA was not readily detectable by Southern blotting. Restriction endonuclease analysis and sequencing of amplified mtDNA demonstrated that the slow growing cells contained little or no mtDNA. It is concluded that these cells represented transient mitochondrial transformants.

  11. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  12. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  13. Effect of mtDNA point mutations on cellular bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowska, Joanna; Malinska, Dominika; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Duszynski, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    This overview discusses the results of research on the effects of most frequent mtDNA point mutations on cellular bioenergetics. Thirteen proteins coded by mtDNA are crucial for oxidative phosphorylation, 11 of them constitute key components of the respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV and 2 of mitochondrial ATP synthase. Moreover, pathogenic point mutations in mitochondrial tRNAs and rRNAs generate abnormal synthesis of the mtDNA coded proteins. Thus, pathogenic point mutations in mtDNA usually disturb the level of key parameter of the oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. the electric potential on the inner mitochondrial membrane (Δψ), and in a consequence calcium signalling and mitochondrial dynamics in the cell. Mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species is also modified in the mutated cells. The results obtained with cultured cells and describing biochemical consequences of mtDNA point mutations are full of contradictions. Still they help elucidate the biochemical basis of pathologies and provide a valuable tool for finding remedies in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). PMID:22406627

  14. Cell Cycle- and Ribonucleotide Reductase-Driven Changes in mtDNA Copy Number Influence mtDNA Inheritance Without Compromising Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2008-01-01

    Most eukaryotes maintain multiple copies of mtDNA, ranging from 20–50 in yeast to as many as 10,000 in mammalian cells. The mitochondrial genome encodes essential subunits of the respiratory chain, but the number of mtDNA molecules is apparently in excess of that needed to sustain adequate respiration, as evidenced by the “threshold effect” in mitochondrial diseases. Thus, other selective pressures apparently have contributed to the universal maintenance of multiple mtDNA molecules/cell. Here we analyzed the interplay between the two pathways proposed to regulate mtDNA copy number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the requirement of normal mtDNA copy number for mitochondrial gene expression, respiration, and inheritance. We provide the first direct evidence that upregulation of mtDNA can be achieved by increasing ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity via derepression of nuclear RNR gene transcription or elimination of allosteric-feedback regulation. Analysis of rad53 mutant strains also revealed upregulation of mtDNA copy number independent of that resulting from elevated RNR activity. We present evidence that a prolonged cell cycle allows accumulation of mtDNA in these strains. Analysis of multiple strains with increased or decreased mtDNA revealed that mechanisms are in place to prevent significant changes in mitochondrial gene expression and respiration in the face of ∼two-fold alterations in mtDNA copy number. However, depletion of mtDNA in abf2 null strains leads to defective mtDNA inheritance that is partially rescued by replenishing mtDNA via overexpression of RNR1. These results indicate that one role for multiple mtDNA copies is to ensure optimal inheritance of mtDNA during cell division. PMID:17721079

  15. MtDNA ancestry of Rio de Janeiro population, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Suellen; Hermida, Rose; Desidério, Márcia; Silva, Dayse A; de Carvalho, Elizeu F

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphism studies concerning HVI and HVII regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have improved the understanding of the admixture genetic process related to the occupation of the continents by human population groups. We have analyzed the mtDNA lineages of 190 healthy and maternally unrelated individuals born in the metropolitan region of the Rio de Janeiro city, the capital of the State of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil. The data showing that 57.9, 25.3 and 16.8 % of the matrilineages found in Rio de Janeiro come from African, Amerindian and European population groups. They are, respectively, in close agreement with historical records which indicate that the admixture population of Brazil is the resulting of interethnic asymmetry crosses between individuals from those population groups. The high proportion of African mtDNA lineages in the population of Rio de Janeiro is in accordance with studies related to other Brazilian states.

  16. Schizophrenia: maternal inheritance and heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tomoe; Arai, Makoto; Miyashita, Mitsuhiro; Arai, Mayumi; Obata, Nanako; Nohara, Izumi; Oshima, Kenichi; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Okazaki, Yuji; Doi, Nagafumi; Itokawa, Masanari

    2012-01-01

    Role of mitochondrial pathology in schizophrenia has not been fully clarified. We searched for distinctive variants in mtDNA extracted from the gray matter of postmortem brains and from peripheral blood samples. We screened mtDNA region containing 5 genes encoding subunits of cytochrome c oxidase and ATPases. Polymorphisms not already reported in databases are recorded as unregistered rare variants. Four unregistered, non-synonymous rare variants were detected in 4 schizophrenic samples. Seven registered non-synonymous variants were not previously detected in non-psychotic Japanese samples registered in the mtSNP database. These variants may contribute to disease pathophysiology. In one family, compound mutations showed co-segregation with schizophrenia. MtDNA mutations could confer a risk for schizophrenia in the Japanese population, although further analyses are needed.

  17. The mitochondrial nucleoid: integrating mitochondrial DNA into cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert; Bravo, Liliana; Garcia, Iraselia; Gaytan, Norma; Herrera, Alan; Maldonado, Alicia; Quintanilla, Brandi

    2013-05-01

    The packaging of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into DNA-protein assemblies called nucleoids provides an efficient segregating unit of mtDNA, coordinating mtDNA's involvement in cellular metabolism. From the early discovery of mtDNA as "extranuclear" genetic material, its organization into nucleoids and integration into both the mitochondrial organellar network and the cell at large via a variety of signal transduction pathways, mtDNA is a crucial component of the cell's homeostatic network. The mitochondrial nucleoid is composed of a set of DNA-binding core proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance and transcription, and a range of peripheral factors, which are components of signaling pathways controlling mitochondrial biogenesis, metabolism, apoptosis, and retrograde mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling. The molecular interactions of nucleoid components with the organellar network and cellular signaling pathways provide exciting clues to the dynamic integration of mtDNA into cellular metabolic homeostasis.

  18. Analysis of BRCA1 and mtDNA haplotypes and mtDNA polymorphism in familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Povedano, Cristina; Salgado, Josefa; Gil, Carmen; Robles, Maitane; Patiño-García, Ana; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects have been postulated to play an important role in the modulation and/or progression of cancer. In the past decade, a wide spectrum of mtDNA variations have been suggested as potentially sensitive and specific biomarkers for several human cancer types. In this context, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) described as protective or risk variants have been published, in particular in breast cancer, though not without controversy. Moreover, many mtDNA haplogroups have been associated with different phenotypes and diseases. We genotyped 18 SNPs, 15 of them defining European mtDNA haplogroups, including SNPs described as protective or risk variants, 7 SNPs that determine BRCA1 haplotypes and a BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism. We included in this study 90 Caucasian unrelated women with breast cancer with familial criteria and 96 controls. Our aim was to clarify the importance of any of these SNPs, mitochondrial haplogroups and BRCA1 haplotypes in the modulation of breast cancer. We detected no significant differences in the distribution of BRCA1 haplotypes between patients and controls. Haplogroup U and the 12308G variant of mtDNA were overrepresented within the control group (p = 0.005 and p = 0.036, respectively) compared to breast cancer. Finally, we identified a significant association between the BRCA1 intron 7 polymorphism and BRCA1 haplotypes. Specifically, (TTC)6/6 and (TTC)6/7 genotypes with the seven polymorphic site cassette of "H2-like" haplotypes, and the (TTC)7/7 genotype associated with the "H1-like" haplotypes (p < 0.001).

  19. [Distribution in early mouse embryos of foreign mtDNA transmitted along the paternal lineage].

    PubMed

    Kustova, M E; Kidgotko, O V; Sokolova, V A; Bass, M G; Zakharova, F M; Vasil'ev, V B

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of foreign mtDNA along the paternal lineage founded by male mice (F0), and distribution of that mtDNA in their progeny at early stages of prenatal development were studied. Transmitochondrial males of F0 obtained after injection of human mitochondria into mouse zygotes has been shown to transmit foreign mtDNA to subsequent generations. Individual peculiarities among the males studied, concerning transmission of foreign mtDNA to the progeny, are likely to exist. Besides, the distribution of human mtDNA among blastomeres of transmitochondrial embryos under study differed from that observed in previous investogation of its inheritance along the maternal lineage. PMID:25872374

  20. Fine characterization of the Iceman's mtDNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Franco; Ermini, Luca; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; Olivieri, Cristina; Luiselli, Donata

    2006-08-01

    Starting from specimens of the intestinal contents of the so-called Tyrolean Iceman or Otzi (5,350-5,100 years before present), it was possible by polymerase chain reaction to amplify fragments of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region that correspond to the sequence found in 1994 at the Munich and Oxford laboratories and which had been attributed to the original DNA of the mummy. The particularly favorable condition of the specimens, showing very low contamination levels, made it easier to extend the analyses to the coding region, which had not previously been considered. The mtDNA of the European population is currently divided into nine (H, T, U, V, W, X, I, J, and K) main groups (haplogroups). The K haplogroup, in particular, is composed of two (K1 and K2) subclusters. The results demonstrate that the Iceman's mtDNA belongs to the K1 subcluster, yet it does not fit any of the three known branches (a, b, and c) into which the K1 subcluster is presently divided. In addition, some other sites, reported to be linked to environmental adaptation or pathologies, were investigated.

  1. The Making of the African mtDNA Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; De la Fe, Tomás; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Ángel

    2002-01-01

    Africa presents the most complex genetic picture of any continent, with a time depth for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages >100,000 years. The most recent widespread demographic shift within the continent was most probably the Bantu dispersals, which archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest originated in West Africa 3,000–4,000 years ago, spreading both east and south. Here, we have carried out a thorough phylogeographic analysis of mtDNA variation in a total of 2,847 samples from throughout the continent, including 307 new sequences from southeast African Bantu speakers. The results suggest that the southeast Bantu speakers have a composite origin on the maternal line of descent, with ∼44% of lineages deriving from West Africa, ∼21% from either West or Central Africa, ∼30% from East Africa, and ∼5% from southern African Khoisan-speaking groups. The ages of the major founder types of both West and East African origin are consistent with the likely timing of Bantu dispersals, with those from the west somewhat predating those from the east. Despite this composite picture, the southeastern African Bantu groups are indistinguishable from each other with respect to their mtDNA, suggesting that they either had a common origin at the point of entry into southeastern Africa or have undergone very extensive gene flow since. PMID:12395296

  2. The making of the African mtDNA landscape.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; De la Fe, Tomás; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Angel

    2002-11-01

    Africa presents the most complex genetic picture of any continent, with a time depth for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages >100,000 years. The most recent widespread demographic shift within the continent was most probably the Bantu dispersals, which archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest originated in West Africa 3,000-4,000 years ago, spreading both east and south. Here, we have carried out a thorough phylogeographic analysis of mtDNA variation in a total of 2,847 samples from throughout the continent, including 307 new sequences from southeast African Bantu speakers. The results suggest that the southeast Bantu speakers have a composite origin on the maternal line of descent, with approximately 44% of lineages deriving from West Africa, approximately 21% from either West or Central Africa, approximately 30% from East Africa, and approximately 5% from southern African Khoisan-speaking groups. The ages of the major founder types of both West and East African origin are consistent with the likely timing of Bantu dispersals, with those from the west somewhat predating those from the east. Despite this composite picture, the southeastern African Bantu groups are indistinguishable from each other with respect to their mtDNA, suggesting that they either had a common origin at the point of entry into southeastern Africa or have undergone very extensive gene flow since.

  3. Reduced Mtdna Diversity in the Ngobe Amerinds of Panama

    PubMed Central

    Kolman, C. J.; Bermingham, E.; Cooke, R.; Ward, R. H.; Arias, T. D.; Guionneau-Sinclair, F.

    1995-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype diversity was determined for 46 Ngobe Amerinds sampled widely across their geographic range in western Panama. The Ngobe data were compared with mtDNA control region I sequences from two additional Amerind groups located at the northern and southern extremes of Amerind distribution, the Nuu-Chah-Nulth of the Pacific Northwest and the Chilean Mapuche and from one Na-Dene group, the Haida of the Pacific Northwest. The Ngobe exhibit the lowest mtDNA control region sequence diversity yet reported for an Amerind group. Moreover, they carry only two of the four Amerind founding lineages first described by Wallace and coworkers. We posit that the Ngobe passed through a population bottleneck caused by ethnogenesis from a small founding population and/or European conquest and colonization. Dating of the Ngobe population expansion using the HARPENDING et al. approach to the analysis of pairwise genetic differences indicates a Ngobe expansion at roughly 6800 years before present (range: 1850-14,000 years before present), a date more consistent with a bottleneck at Chibcha ethnogenesis than a conquest-based event. PMID:7635293

  4. Minifish shows high genetic variation in mtDNA size.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-W; Li, Q-L; Hu, X-J; Yuan, Y-M; Wen, M; Peng, L-Y; Liu, S-J; Hong, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    The genus Paedocypris is a newly described taxon of minifish species that are characterized by extensive chromosome evolution and one of the smallest known vertebrate nuclear genomes. Paedocypris features a tiny adult size, a short generation time, low fecundity and fragmented tropical habitats, which are factors that favor rapid speciation. Most recently, we have revealed that P. progenetica (Pp), the type species of the genus Paedocypris, has an unusual mtDNA bearing - within its D-loop - a tandem array of a 34-bp repeat sequence called the minifish repeat, which shows compromised replication efficiency in vitro. Here we report that Pp exhibits high genetic variation in mtDNA size. The efficiency of D-loop amplification was found to depend upon primers. Interestingly, Pp individuals of one and the same population differed drastically in mtDNA size resulting from varying copy numbers of the minifish repeat. We conclude that minifish has a high mutation rate and perhaps represents a rapidly evolving taxon of vertebrates.

  5. Similar patterns of clonally expanded somatic mtDNA mutations in the colon of heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and ageing humans.

    PubMed

    Baines, Holly L; Stewart, James B; Stamp, Craig; Zupanic, Anze; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Turnbull, Douglass M; Greaves, Laura C

    2014-07-01

    Clonally expanded mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations resulting in focal respiratory chain deficiency in individual cells are proposed to contribute to the ageing of human tissues that depend on adult stem cells for self-renewal; however, the consequences of these mutations remain unclear. A good animal model is required to investigate this further; but it is unknown whether mechanisms for clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations, and the mutational spectra, are similar between species. Here we show that mice, heterozygous for a mutation disrupting the proof-reading activity of mtDNA polymerase (PolgA(+/mut)) resulting in an increased mtDNA mutation rate, accumulate clonally expanded mtDNA point mutations in their colonic crypts with age. This results in focal respiratory chain deficiency, and by 81 weeks of age these animals exhibit a similar level and pattern of respiratory chain deficiency to 70-year-old human subjects. Furthermore, like in humans, the mtDNA mutation spectrum appears random and there is an absence of selective constraints. Computer simulations show that a random genetic drift model of mtDNA clonal expansion can accurately model the data from the colonic crypts of wild-type, PolgA(+/mut) animals, and humans, providing evidence for a similar mechanism for clonal expansion of mtDNA point mutations between these mice and humans.

  6. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA in leucocytes harbouring the 3243A→G mtDNA mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Angela; Taylor, Robert W; Durham, Steve E; Deschauer, Marcus; Schaefer, Andrew M; Samuels, David C; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2007-01-01

    Background The 3243A→G MTTL1 mutation is the most common heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation associated with disease. Previous studies have shown that the percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases in blood as patients get older, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Objectives and method To understand the dynamics of the process and the underlying mechanisms, an accurate fluorescent assay was established for 3243A→G heteroplasmy and the amount of mtDNA in blood with real‐time polymerase chain reaction was determined. The amount of mutated and wild‐type mtDNA was measured at two time points in 11 subjects. Results The percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases exponentially during life, and peripheral blood leucocytes in patients harbouring 3243A→G are profoundly depleted of mtDNA. Conclusions A similar decrease in mtDNA has been seen in other mitochondrial disorders, and in 3243A→G cell lines in culture, indicating that depletion of mtDNA may be a common secondary phenomenon in several mitochondrial diseases. Depletion of mtDNA is not always due to mutation of a nuclear gene involved in mtDNA maintenance. PMID:16950816

  7. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria. PMID:27418514

  8. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria.

  9. Human mtDNA Haplogroups Associated with High or Reduced Spermatozoa Motility

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lapeña, Ana-Cristina; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Montoya, Julio; Alvarez, Enrique; Díaz, Miguel; Urriés, Antonio; Montoro, Luis; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Enríquez, José A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of mtDNA mutations responsible for human diseases have been associated with molecular defects in the OXPHOS system. It has been proposed that mtDNA genetic alterations can also be responsible for sperm dysfunction. In addition, it was suggested that if sperm dysfunction is the main phenotypic consequence, these mutations could be fixed as stable mtDNA variants, because mtDNA is maternally inherited. To test this possibility, we have performed an extensive analysis of the distribution of mtDNA haplogroups in white men having fertility problems. We have found that asthenozoospermia, but not oligozoospermia, is associated with mtDNA haplogroups in whites. Thus, haplogroups H and T are significantly more abundant in nonasthenozoospermic and asthenozoospermic populations, respectively, and show significant differences in their OXPHOS performance. PMID:10936107

  10. An enhanced MITOMAP with a global mtDNA mutational phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lott, Marie T.; Procaccio, Vincent; Poole, Jason C.; Brandon, Marty C.; Mishmar, Dan; Yi, Christina; Kreuziger, James; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    The MITOMAP () data system for the human mitochondrial genome has been greatly enhanced by the addition of a navigable mutational mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenetic tree of ∼3000 mtDNA coding region sequences plus expanded pathogenic mutation tables and a nuclear-mtDNA pseudogene (NUMT) data base. The phylogeny reconstructs the entire mutational history of the human mtDNA, thus defining the mtDNA haplogroups and differentiating ancient from recent mtDNA mutations. Pathogenic mutations are classified by both genotype and phenotype, and the NUMT sequences permits detection of spurious inclusion of pseudogene variants during mutation analysis. These additions position MITOMAP for the implementation of our automated mtDNA sequence analysis system, Mitomaster. PMID:17178747

  11. A method for mutagenesis of mouse mtDNA and a resource of mouse mtDNA mutations for modeling human pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fayzulin, Rafik Z.; Perez, Michael; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Spadafora, Domenico; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease and have been associated with neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, diabetes and aging. Yet our progress toward delineating the precise contributions of mtDNA mutations to these conditions is impeded by the limited availability of faithful transmitochondrial animal models. Here, we report a method for the isolation of mutations in mouse mtDNA and its implementation for the generation of a collection of over 150 cell lines suitable for the production of transmitochondrial mice. This method is based on the limited mutagenesis of mtDNA by proofreading-deficient DNA-polymerase γ followed by segregation of the resulting highly heteroplasmic mtDNA population by means of intracellular cloning. Among generated cell lines, we identify nine which carry mutations affecting the same amino acid or nucleotide positions as in human disease, including a mutation in the ND4 gene responsible for 70% of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathies (LHON). Similar to their human counterparts, cybrids carrying the homoplasmic mouse LHON mutation demonstrated reduced respiration, reduced ATP content and elevated production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). The generated resource of mouse mtDNA mutants will be useful both in modeling human mitochondrial disease and in understanding the mechanisms of ROS production mediated by mutations in mtDNA. PMID:25820427

  12. Cellular Heterogeneity in the Level of mtDNA Heteroplasmy in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Jitesh; Ghimire, Sabitri; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Lu, Yuechao; Gerris, Jan; Van Coster, Rudy; Deroo, Tom; Deforce, Dieter; Vansteelandt, Stijn; De Sutter, Petra; Heindryckx, Björn

    2015-11-17

    Variation in the level of mtDNA heteroplasmy in adult tissues is commonly seen in patients with a mixture of wild-type and mutant mtDNA. A mixture of different mtDNA variants may influence such variation and cause mtDNA segregation bias. We analyzed cellular heterogeneity in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from a polymorphic mouse model containing NZB and BALB mtDNA genotypes. In ESCs, inter-colony heterogeneity varied up to 61%, whereas intra-colony heterogeneity varied up to 100%. Three out of five cell lines displayed nearly homoplasmic BALB and NZB mtDNA haplotypes in differentiated single cells. The proportion of NZB mtDNA genotype increased with progressive passaging (0.39%; p = 0.002). These results demonstrate the bimodal segregation of mtDNA haplotypes, indicating the occurrence of tissues with variable levels of heteroplasmies in individuals with mtDNA mutations. Furthermore, proliferation of one mtDNA genotype over another may pose the risk of accumulating mutant mtDNAs during subsequent cell divisions.

  13. Tumor-specific changes in mtDNA content in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Mambo, Elizabeth; Chatterjee, Aditi; Xing, Mingzhao; Tallini, Giovanni; Haugen, Bryan R; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Sukumar, Saraswati; Sidransky, David

    2005-10-10

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations are associated with various cancer types, suggesting that the mitochondrial genome may be a critical contributing factor in carcinogenesis. mtDNA alterations have been suggested as a potentially sensitive and specific biomarker for several cancer types. We examined mtDNA content in 25 pairs of normal and tumor breast tissue samples, 37 papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 21 benign thyroid neoplasms and in 20 paired normal and PTC samples. Our results showed that mtDNA content was reduced in 80% of the breast tumors relative to their corresponding normal. mtDNA was increased in papillary thyroid carcinomas, however, when compared to the corresponding normal DNA taken from the same individual. Also, mtDNA content was increased in none-paired PTC samples compared to the normal controls. Our findings indicate that changes in mtDNA content during carcinogenesis may be regulated in a tumor specific manner. Additionally, changes in mtDNA levels did not correlate with tumor grade and metastasis, suggesting that these alterations may occur in the early stages of tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that mtDNA content can be used as a molecular diagnostic tool to help identify genetic abnormalities in human tumors.

  14. How few whales were there after whaling? Inference from contemporary mtDNA diversity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J A; Patenaude, N J; Carroll, E L; Baker, C Scott

    2008-01-01

    Reconstructing the history of exploited populations of whales requires fitting a trajectory through at least three points in time: (i) prior to exploitation, when abundance is assumed to be at the maximum allowed by environmental carrying capacity; (ii) the point of minimum abundance or 'bottleneck', usually near the time of protection or the abandonment of the hunt; and (iii) near the present, when protected populations are assumed to have undergone some recovery. As historical abundance is usually unknown, this trajectory must be extrapolated according to a population dynamic model using catch records, an assumed rate of increase and an estimate of current abundance, all of which have received considerable attention by the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Relatively little attention has been given to estimating minimum abundance (N(min)), although it is clear that genetic and demographic forces at this point are critical to the potential for recovery or extinction of a local population. We present a general analytical framework to improve estimates of N(min) using the number of mtDNA haplotypes (maternal lineages) surviving in a contemporary population of whales or other exploited species. We demonstrate the informative potential of this parameter as an a posteriori constraint on Bayesian logistic population dynamic models based on the IWC Comprehensive Assessment of the intensively exploited southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) and published surveys of mtDNA diversity for this species. Estimated historical trajectories from all demographic scenarios suggested a substantial loss of mtDNA haplotype richness as a result of 19th century commercial whaling and 20th century illegal whaling by the Soviet Union. However, the relatively high rates of population increase used by the IWC assessment predicted a bottleneck that was implausibly narrow (median, 67 mature females), given our corrected estimates of N(min). Further, high levels of remnant sequence

  15. How few whales were there after whaling? Inference from contemporary mtDNA diversity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J A; Patenaude, N J; Carroll, E L; Baker, C Scott

    2008-01-01

    Reconstructing the history of exploited populations of whales requires fitting a trajectory through at least three points in time: (i) prior to exploitation, when abundance is assumed to be at the maximum allowed by environmental carrying capacity; (ii) the point of minimum abundance or 'bottleneck', usually near the time of protection or the abandonment of the hunt; and (iii) near the present, when protected populations are assumed to have undergone some recovery. As historical abundance is usually unknown, this trajectory must be extrapolated according to a population dynamic model using catch records, an assumed rate of increase and an estimate of current abundance, all of which have received considerable attention by the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Relatively little attention has been given to estimating minimum abundance (N(min)), although it is clear that genetic and demographic forces at this point are critical to the potential for recovery or extinction of a local population. We present a general analytical framework to improve estimates of N(min) using the number of mtDNA haplotypes (maternal lineages) surviving in a contemporary population of whales or other exploited species. We demonstrate the informative potential of this parameter as an a posteriori constraint on Bayesian logistic population dynamic models based on the IWC Comprehensive Assessment of the intensively exploited southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) and published surveys of mtDNA diversity for this species. Estimated historical trajectories from all demographic scenarios suggested a substantial loss of mtDNA haplotype richness as a result of 19th century commercial whaling and 20th century illegal whaling by the Soviet Union. However, the relatively high rates of population increase used by the IWC assessment predicted a bottleneck that was implausibly narrow (median, 67 mature females), given our corrected estimates of N(min). Further, high levels of remnant sequence

  16. Metabolic rescue in pluripotent cells from patients with mtDNA disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Folmes, Clifford D L; Wu, Jun; Morey, Robert; Mora-Castilla, Sergio; Ocampo, Alejandro; Ma, Li; Poulton, Joanna; Wang, Xinjian; Ahmed, Riffat; Kang, Eunju; Lee, Yeonmi; Hayama, Tomonari; Li, Ying; Van Dyken, Crystal; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Koski, Amy; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Amato, Paula; Wolf, Don P; Huang, Taosheng; Terzic, Andre; Laurent, Louise C; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2015-08-13

    Mitochondria have a major role in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation, which is dependent on the expression of critical genes encoded by mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Mutations in mtDNA can cause fatal or severely debilitating disorders with limited treatment options. Clinical manifestations vary based on mutation type and heteroplasmy (that is, the relative levels of mutant and wild-type mtDNA within each cell). Here we generated genetically corrected pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with mtDNA disease. Multiple induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines were derived from patients with common heteroplasmic mutations including 3243A>G, causing mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and 8993T>G and 13513G>A, implicated in Leigh syndrome. Isogenic MELAS and Leigh syndrome iPS cell lines were generated containing exclusively wild-type or mutant mtDNA through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in proliferating fibroblasts. Furthermore, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enabled replacement of mutant mtDNA from homoplasmic 8993T>G fibroblasts to generate corrected Leigh-NT1 PSCs. Although Leigh-NT1 PSCs contained donor oocyte wild-type mtDNA (human haplotype D4a) that differed from Leigh syndrome patient haplotype (F1a) at a total of 47 nucleotide sites, Leigh-NT1 cells displayed transcriptomic profiles similar to those in embryo-derived PSCs carrying wild-type mtDNA, indicative of normal nuclear-to-mitochondrial interactions. Moreover, genetically rescued patient PSCs displayed normal metabolic function compared to impaired oxygen consumption and ATP production observed in mutant cells. We conclude that both reprogramming approaches offer complementary strategies for derivation of PSCs containing exclusively wild-type mtDNA, through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in individual iPS cell lines or mitochondrial replacement by SCNT in homoplasmic mtDNA-based disease. PMID:26176921

  17. Within-population genetic effects of mtDNA on metabolic rate in Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed

    Kurbalija Novičić, Z; Immonen, E; Jelić, M; AnÐelković, M; Stamenković-Radak, M; Arnqvist, G

    2015-02-01

    A growing body of research supports the view that within-species sequence variation in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is functional, in the sense that it has important phenotypic effects. However, most of this empirical foundation is based on comparisons across populations, and few studies have addressed the functional significance of mtDNA polymorphism within populations. Here, using mitonuclear introgression lines, we assess differences in whole-organism metabolic rate of adult Drosophila subobscura fruit flies carrying either of three different sympatric mtDNA haplotypes. We document sizeable, up to 20%, differences in metabolic rate across these mtDNA haplotypes. Further, these mtDNA effects are to some extent sex specific. We found no significant nuclear or mitonuclear genetic effects on metabolic rate, consistent with a low degree of linkage disequilibrium between mitochondrial and nuclear genes within populations. The fact that mtDNA haplotype variation within a natural population affects metabolic rate, which is a key physiological trait with important effects on life-history traits, adds weight to the emergent view that mtDNA haplotype variation is under natural selection and it revitalizes the question as to what processes act to maintain functional mtDNA polymorphism within populations.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19875847

  19. The Use of Mitochondria-Targeted Endonucleases to Manipulate mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Bacman, Sandra R.; Williams, Sion L.; Pinto, Milena; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, mitochondria-targeted nucleases have been used to promote double-strand breaks in the mitochondrial genome. This was done in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) homoplasmic systems, where all mtDNA molecules can be affected, to create models of mitochondrial deficiencies. Alternatively, they were also used in a heteroplasmic model, where only a subset of the mtDNA molecules were substrates for cleavage. The latter approach showed that mitochondrial-targeted nucleases can reduce mtDNA haplotype loads in affected tissues, with clear implications for the treatment of patients with mitochondrial diseases. In the last few years, designer nucleases, such as ZFN and TALEN, have been adapted to cleave mtDNA, greatly expanding the potential therapeutic use. This chapter describes the techniques and approaches used to test these designer enzymes. PMID:25416366

  20. Geographic patterns of mtDNA diversity in Europe.

    PubMed

    Simoni, L; Calafell, F; Pettener, D; Bertranpetit, J; Barbujani, G

    2000-01-01

    Genetic diversity in Europe has been interpreted as a reflection of phenomena occurring during the Paleolithic ( approximately 45,000 years before the present [BP]), Mesolithic ( approximately 18,000 years BP), and Neolithic ( approximately 10,000 years BP) periods. A crucial role of the Neolithic demographic transition is supported by the analysis of most nuclear loci, but the interpretation of mtDNA evidence is controversial. More than 2,600 sequences of the first hypervariable mitochondrial control region were analyzed for geographic patterns in samples from Europe, the Near East, and the Caucasus. Two autocorrelation statistics were used, one based on allele-frequency differences between samples and the other based on both sequence and frequency differences between alleles. In the global analysis, limited geographic patterning was observed, which could largely be attributed to a marked difference between the Saami and all other populations. The distribution of the zones of highest mitochondrial variation (genetic boundaries) confirmed that the Saami are sharply differentiated from an otherwise rather homogeneous set of European samples. However, an area of significant clinal variation was identified around the Mediterranean Sea (and not in the north), even though the differences between northern and southern populations were insignificant. Both a Paleolithic expansion and the Neolithic demic diffusion of farmers could have determined a longitudinal cline of mtDNA diversity. However, additional phenomena must be considered in both models, to account both for the north-south differences and for the greater geographic scope of clinical patterns at nuclear loci. Conversely, two predicted consequences of models of Mesolithic reexpansion from glacial refugia were not observed in the present study.

  1. Progressive increase in mtDNA 3243A>G heteroplasmy causes abrupt transcriptional reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; Zhang, Jiangwen; Hancock, Saege; Derbeneva, Olga; Golhar, Ryan; Golik, Pawel; O'Hearn, Sean; Levy, Shawn; Potluri, Prasanth; Lvova, Maria; Davila, Antonio; Lin, Chun Shi; Perin, Juan Carlos; Rappaport, Eric F; Hakonarson, Hakon; Trounce, Ian A; Procaccio, Vincent; Wallace, Douglas C

    2014-09-23

    Variation in the intracellular percentage of normal and mutant mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNA) (heteroplasmy) can be associated with phenotypic heterogeneity in mtDNA diseases. Individuals that inherit the common disease-causing mtDNA tRNA(Leu(UUR)) 3243A>G mutation and harbor ∼10-30% 3243G mutant mtDNAs manifest diabetes and occasionally autism; individuals with ∼50-90% mutant mtDNAs manifest encephalomyopathies; and individuals with ∼90-100% mutant mtDNAs face perinatal lethality. To determine the basis of these abrupt phenotypic changes, we generated somatic cell cybrids harboring increasing levels of the 3243G mutant and analyzed the associated cellular phenotypes and nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mtDNA transcriptional profiles by RNA sequencing. Small increases in mutant mtDNAs caused relatively modest defects in oxidative capacity but resulted in sharp transitions in cellular phenotype and gene expression. Cybrids harboring 20-30% 3243G mtDNAs had reduced mtDNA mRNA levels, rounded mitochondria, and small cell size. Cybrids with 50-90% 3243G mtDNAs manifest induction of glycolytic genes, mitochondrial elongation, increased mtDNA mRNA levels, and alterations in expression of signal transduction, epigenomic regulatory, and neurodegenerative disease-associated genes. Finally, cybrids with 100% 3243G experienced reduced mtDNA transcripts, rounded mitochondria, and concomitant changes in nuclear gene expression. Thus, striking phase changes occurred in nDNA and mtDNA gene expression in response to the modest changes of the mtDNA 3243G mutant levels. Hence, a major factor in the phenotypic variation in heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations is the limited number of states that the nucleus can acquire in response to progressive changes in mitochondrial retrograde signaling. PMID:25192935

  2. Relaxed replication of mtDNA: A model with implications for the expression of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P F; Samuels, D C

    1999-01-01

    Heteroplasmic mtDNA defects are an important cause of human disease with clinical features that primarily involve nondividing (postmitotic) tissues. Within single cells the percentage level of mutated mtDNA must exceed a critical threshold level before the genetic defect is expressed. Although the level of mutated mtDNA may alter over time, the mechanism behind the change is not understood. It currently is not possible to directly measure the level of mutant mtDNA within living cells. We therefore developed a mathematical model of human mtDNA replication, based on a solid foundation of experimentally derived parameters, and studied the dynamics of intracellular heteroplasmy in postmitotic cells. Our simulations show that the level of intracellular heteroplasmy can vary greatly over a short period of time and that a high copy number of mtDNA molecules delays the time to fixation of an allele. We made the assumption that the optimal state for a cell is to contain 100% wild-type molecules. For cells that contain pathogenic mutations, the nonselective proliferation of mutant and wild-type mtDNA molecules further delays the fixation of both alleles, but this leads to a rapid increase in the mean percentage level of mutant mtDNA within a tissue. On its own, this mechanism will lead to the appearance of a critical threshold level of mutant mtDNA that must be exceeded before a cell expresses a biochemical defect. The hypothesis that we present is in accordance with the available data and may explain the late presentation and insidious progression of mtDNA diseases. PMID:10090901

  3. No variation and low synonymous substitution rates in coral mtDNA despite high nuclear variation

    PubMed Central

    Hellberg, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of most animals evolves more rapidly than nuclear DNA, and often shows higher levels of intraspecific polymorphism and population subdivision. The mtDNA of anthozoans (corals, sea fans, and their kin), by contrast, appears to evolve slowly. Slow mtDNA evolution has been reported for several anthozoans, however this slow pace has been difficult to put in phylogenetic context without parallel surveys of nuclear variation or calibrated rates of synonymous substitution that could permit quantitative rate comparisons across taxa. Here, I survey variation in the coding region of a mitochondrial gene from a coral species (Balanophyllia elegans) known to possess high levels of nuclear gene variation, and estimate synonymous rates of mtDNA substitution by comparison to another coral (Tubastrea coccinea). Results The mtDNA surveyed (630 bp of cytochrome oxidase subunit I) was invariant among individuals sampled from 18 populations spanning 3000 km of the range of B. elegans, despite high levels of variation and population subdivision for allozymes over these same populations. The synonymous substitution rate between B. elegans and T. coccinea (0.05%/site/106 years) is similar to that in most plants, but 50–100 times lower than rates typical for most animals. In addition, while substitutions to mtDNA in most animals exhibit a strong bias toward transitions, mtDNA from these corals does not. Conclusion Slow rates of mitochondrial nucleotide substitution result in low levels of intraspecific mtDNA variation in corals, even when nuclear loci vary. Slow mtDNA evolution appears to be the basal condition among eukaryotes. mtDNA substitution rates switch from slow to fast abruptly and unidirectionally. This switch may stem from the loss of just one or a few mitochondrion-specific DNA repair or replication genes. PMID:16542456

  4. Mitochondrial ROS Induces Cardiac Inflammation via a Pathway through mtDNA Damage in a Pneumonia-Related Sepsis Model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiao; Carlson, Deborah; Sun, Yuxiao; Ma, Lisha; Wolf, Steven E; Minei, Joseph P; Zang, Qun S

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that mitochondria-targeted vitamin E (Mito-Vit-E), a mtROS specific antioxidant, improves cardiac performance and attenuates inflammation in a pneumonia-related sepsis model. In this study, we applied the same approaches to decipher the signaling pathway(s) of mtROS-dependent cardiac inflammation after sepsis. Sepsis was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by intratracheal injection of S. pneumoniae. Mito-Vit-E, vitamin E or vehicle was administered 30 minutes later. In myocardium 24 hours post-inoculation, Mito-Vit-E, but not vitamin E, significantly protected mtDNA integrity and decreased mtDNA damage. Mito-Vit-E alleviated sepsis-induced reduction in mitochondria-localized DNA repair enzymes including DNA polymerase γ, AP endonuclease, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, and uracil-DNA glycosylase. Mito-Vit-E dramatically improved metabolism and membrane integrity in mitochondria, suppressed leakage of mtDNA into the cytoplasm, inhibited up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) pathway factors MYD88 and RAGE, and limited RAGE interaction with its ligand TFAM in septic hearts. Mito-Vit-E also deactivated NF-κB and caspase 1, reduced expression of the essential inflammasome component ASC, and decreased inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In vitro, both Mito-Vit-E and TLR9 inhibitor OND-I suppressed LPS-induced up-regulation in MYD88, RAGE, ASC, active caspase 1, and IL-1β in cardiomyocytes. Since free mtDNA escaped from damaged mitochondria function as a type of DAMPs to stimulate inflammation through TLR9, these data together suggest that sepsis-induced cardiac inflammation is mediated, at least partially, through mtDNA-TLR9-RAGE. At last, Mito-Vit-E reduced the circulation of myocardial injury marker troponin-I, diminished apoptosis and amended morphology in septic hearts, suggesting that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are a potential cardioprotective approach for sepsis. PMID:26448624

  5. The Effects of Natural Hybridization on the Regulation of Doubly Uniparental Mtdna Inheritance in Blue Mussels (Mytilus Spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, P. D.; Secor, C. L.; Hilbish, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    Blue mussels in the Mytilus edulis species complex have a doubly uniparental mode of mtDNA inheritance with separate maternal and paternal mtDNA lineages. Female mussels inherit their mtDNA solely from their mother, while males inherit mtDNA from both parents. In the male gonad the paternal mtDNA is preferentially replicated so that only paternal mtDNA is transmitted from fathers to sons. Hybridization is common among differentiated blue mussel taxa; whenever it involves M. trossulus, doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance is disrupted. We have found high frequencies of males without and females with paternal mtDNA among hybrid mussels produced by interspecific matings between M. galloprovincialis and M. trossulus. In contrast, hybridization between M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis does not affect doubly uniparental inheritance, indicating a difference in the divergence of the mechanisms regulating mtDNA inheritance among the three blue mussel taxa. Our data indicate a high frequency of disrupted mtDNA transmission in F(1) hybrids and suggest that two separate mechanisms, one regulating the transmission of paternal mtDNA to males and another inhibiting the establishment of paternal mtDNA in females, act to regulate doubly uniparental inheritance. We propose a model for the regulation of doubly uniparental inheritance that is consistent with these observations. PMID:8878689

  6. mtDNA Mutations and Their Role in Aging, Diseases and Forensic Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Zapico, Sara C.; Ubelaker, Douglas H.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are independent organelles with their own DNA. As a primary function, mitochondria produce the energy for the cell through Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in the Electron Transport Chain (ETC). One of the toxic products of this process is Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which can induce oxidative damage in macromolecules like lipids, proteins and DNA. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is less protected and has fewer reparation mechanisms than nuclear DNA (nDNA), and as such is more exposed to oxidative, mutation-inducing damage. This review analyzes the causes and consequences of mtDNA mutations and their relationship with the aging process. Neurodegenerative diseases, related with the aging, are consequences of mtDNA mutations resulting in a decrease in mitochondrial function. Also described are “mitochondrial diseases”, pathologies produced by mtDNA mutations and whose symptoms are related with mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, mtDNA haplogroups are defined in this review; these groups are important for determination of geographical origin of an individual. Additionally, different haplogroups exhibit variably longevity and risk of certain diseases. mtDNA mutations in aging and haplogroups are of special interest to forensic science research. Therefore this review will help to clarify the key role of mtDNA mutations in these processes and support further research in this area. PMID:24307969

  7. Digital PCR methods improve detection sensitivity and measurement precision of low abundance mtDNA deletions

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Frances R.; Martin, James L.; Frescura, Kristin; Damas, Joana; Pereira, Filipe; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Kaufman, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are a common cause of primary mitochondrial disorders, and have also been implicated in a broad collection of conditions, including aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Prevalent among these pathogenic variants are mtDNA deletions, which show a strong bias for the loss of sequence in the major arc between, but not including, the heavy and light strand origins of replication. Because individual mtDNA deletions can accumulate focally, occur with multiple mixed breakpoints, and in the presence of normal mtDNA sequences, methods that detect broad-spectrum mutations with enhanced sensitivity and limited costs have both research and clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated semi-quantitative and digital PCR-based methods of mtDNA deletion detection using double-stranded reference templates or biological samples. Our aim was to describe key experimental assay parameters that will enable the analysis of low levels or small differences in mtDNA deletion load during disease progression, with limited false-positive detection. We determined that the digital PCR method significantly improved mtDNA deletion detection sensitivity through absolute quantitation, improved precision and reduced assay standard error. PMID:27122135

  8. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle improves aging phenotypes in the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Williams, Siôn L; Hida, Aline; Peacock, Jacqueline D; Prolla, Tomas A; Lincoln, Joy; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-05-15

    Aging is an intricate process that increases susceptibility to sarcopenia and cardiovascular diseases. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is believed to contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, potentially shortening lifespan. The mtDNA mutator mouse, a mouse model with a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ, was shown to develop a premature aging phenotype, including sarcopenia, cardiomyopathy and decreased lifespan. This phenotype was associated with an accumulation of mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a crucial regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, in the muscle of mutator mice increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function and also improved the skeletal muscle and heart phenotypes of the mice. Deep sequencing analysis of their mtDNA showed that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis did not reduce the accumulation of mtDNA mutations but rather caused a small increase. These results indicate that increased muscle PGC-1α expression is able to improve some premature aging phenotypes in the mutator mice without reverting the accumulation of mtDNA mutations.

  9. The role of the mtDNA set point in differentiation, development and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; St John, Justin C

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA replication is critical for maintaining mtDNA copy number to generate sufficient cellular energy that is required for development and for functional cells. In early development, mtDNA copy number is strictly regulated at different stages, and, as a result, the establishment of the mtDNA set point is required for sequential cell lineage commitment. The failure to establish the mtDNA set point results in incomplete differentiation or embryonic arrest. The regulation of mtDNA copy number during differentiation is closely associated with cellular gene expression, especially with the pluripotency network, and DNA methylation profiles. The findings from cancer research highlight the relationship between mitochondrial function, mtDNA copy number and DNA methylation in regulating differentiation. DNA methylation at exon 2 of DNA polymerase gamma subunit A (POLGA) has been shown to be a key factor, which can be modulated to change the mtDNA copy number and cell fate of differentiating and tumour cells. The present review combines multi-disciplinary data from mitochondria, development, epigenetics and tumorigenesis, which could provide novel insights for further research, especially for developmental disorders and cancers. PMID:27679856

  10. Geographical structuring in the mtDNA of Italians.

    PubMed Central

    Barbujani, G; Bertorelle, G; Capitani, G; Scozzari, R

    1995-01-01

    Geographical patterns of mtDNA variation were studied in 12 Italian samples (1072 individuals) by two different spatial autocorrelation methods. Separate analyses of the frequencies of 12 restriction morphs show North-South clines, differences between Sardinia and the mainland populations, and the effects of isolation by distance. A recently developed autocorrelation statistic summarizing molecular similarity at all sites (AIDA; autocorrelation index for DNA analysis) confirms the presence of a clinical pattern; differences between random pairs of haplotypes tend to increase with their geographical distance. The partition of gene diversity, however, reveals that most variability occurs within populations, whereas differences between populations are minor (GST = 0.057). When the data from the 12 samples are pooled, two descriptors of genetic variability (number of polymorphic sites and average sequence difference between pairs of individuals) do not behave as expected under neutrality. The presence of clinal patterns, Tajima's tests, and a simulation experiment agree in suggesting that population sizes increased rapidly in Italy and Sicily but not necessarily so in Sardinia. The distribution of pairwise sequence differences in the Italian peninsula (excluding Sardinia) permits a tentative location of the demographic increase between 8000 and 20,500 years ago. These dates are consistent with archaeological estimates of two distinct expansion processes, occurring, respectively, in the Neolithic and after the last glacial maximum in the Paleolithic. Conversely, there is no genetic evidence that such processes have had a major impact on the Sardinian population. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568095

  11. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Emilio J

    2013-09-01

    The frequencies of four mitochondrial Native American DNA haplogroups were determined in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia and compared to the frequencies previously obtained for Amerindian and Afro-Colombian populations. Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups ranged from 74% to 97%. The lowest frequencies were found in Departments on the Caribbean coast and in the Pacific region, where the frequency of Afro-Colombians is higher, while the highest mtDNA Amerindian haplogroup frequencies were found in Departments that historically have a strong Amerindian heritage. Interestingly, all four mtDNA haplogroups were found in all Departments, in contrast to the complete absence of haplogroup D and high frequencies of haplogroup A in Amerindian populations in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Our results indicate that all four Native American mtDNA haplogroups were widely distributed in Colombia at the time of the Spanish conquest.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Emilio J.

    2013-01-01

    The frequencies of four mitochondrial Native American DNA haplogroups were determined in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia and compared to the frequencies previously obtained for Amerindian and Afro-Colombian populations. Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups ranged from 74% to 97%. The lowest frequencies were found in Departments on the Caribbean coast and in the Pacific region, where the frequency of Afro-Colombians is higher, while the highest mtDNA Amerindian haplogroup frequencies were found in Departments that historically have a strong Amerindian heritage. Interestingly, all four mtDNA haplogroups were found in all Departments, in contrast to the complete absence of haplogroup D and high frequencies of haplogroup A in Amerindian populations in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Our results indicate that all four Native American mtDNA haplogroups were widely distributed in Colombia at the time of the Spanish conquest. PMID:24130438

  13. Polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cattle and buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Bhat, P P; Mishra, B P; Bhat, P N

    1990-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from two breeds of cattle, viz., [Hariana (Bos indicus), Holstein (Bos taurus)] and Indian water buffalo (Bubalis bubalus), was analyzed using 13 restriction endonucleases which recognized an average of about 40 six-base sites. Polymorphism among cattle was detected with six of these enzymes. The two Holstein differed at six sites, whereas the Hariana breed (Bos indicus) did not show any site polymorphism. Surprisingly, the Hariana type differed by only one site from one of the Holstein types. The total size of buffalo mtDNA was estimated to be 16.4 kb. Polymorphism within the Murrah buffalo breed was observed with respect to a Bg/I site. Scarcely any of the restriction fragments of buffalo mtDNA matched those of cattle mtDNA.

  14. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-04-02

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors.

  15. Reduced mtDNA copy number increases the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mei, H; Sun, S; Bai, Y; Chen, Y; Chai, R; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer drugs are toxic to cells by activating apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that mitochondria have key roles in apoptosis in mammalian cells, but the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number variation in the pathogenesis of tumor cell apoptosis remains largely unknown. We used the HEp-2, HNE2, and A549 tumor cell lines to explore the relationship between mtDNA copy number variation and cell apoptosis. We first induced apoptosis in three tumor cell lines and one normal adult human skin fibroblast cell line (HSF) with cisplatin (DDP) or doxorubicin (DOX) treatment and found that the mtDNA copy number significantly increased in apoptotic tumor cells, but not in HSF cells. We then downregulated the mtDNA copy number by transfection with shRNA-TFAM plasmids or treatment with ethidium bromide and found that the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDP or DOX was significantly increased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly in tumor cells with lower mtDNA copy numbers, and this might be related to a low level of antioxidant gene expression. Finally, we rescued the increase of ROS in tumor cells with lipoic acid or N-acetyl-L-cysteine and found that the apoptosis rate decreased. Our studies suggest that the increase of mtDNA copy number is a self-protective mechanism of tumor cells to prevent apoptosis and that reduced mtDNA copy number increases ROS levels in tumor cells, increases the tumor cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, and increases the rate of apoptosis. This research provides evidence that mtDNA copy number variation might be a promising new therapeutic target for the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25837486

  16. Genetic Control over mtDNA and Its Relationship to Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cai, Na; Li, Yihan; Chang, Simon; Liang, Jieqin; Lin, Chongyun; Zhang, Xiufei; Liang, Lu; Hu, Jingchu; Chan, Wharton; Kendler, Kenneth S; Malinauskas, Tomas; Huang, Guo-Jen; Li, Qibin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-12-21

    Control over the number of mtDNA molecules per cell appears to be tightly regulated, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Reversible alterations in the amount of mtDNA occur in response to stress suggesting that control over the amount of mtDNA is involved in stress-related diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). Using low-coverage sequence data from 10,442 Chinese women to compute the normalized numbers of reads mapping to the mitochondrial genome as a proxy for the amount of mtDNA, we identified two loci that contribute to mtDNA levels: one within the TFAM gene on chromosome 10 (rs11006126, p value = 8.73 × 10(-28), variance explained = 1.90%) and one over the CDK6 gene on chromosome 7 (rs445, p value = 6.03 × 10(-16), variance explained = 0.50%). Both loci replicated in an independent cohort. CDK6 is thus a new molecule involved in the control of mtDNA. We identify increased rates of heteroplasmy in women with MDD, and show from an experimental paradigm using mice that the increase is likely due to stress. Furthermore, at least one heteroplasmic variant is significantly associated with changes in the amount of mtDNA (position 513, p value = 3.27 × 10(-9), variance explained = 0.48%) suggesting site-specific heteroplasmy as a possible link between stress and increase in amount of mtDNA. These findings indicate the involvement of mitochondrial genome copy number and sequence in an organism's response to stress.

  17. Mutation patterns of mtDNA: Empirical inferences for the coding region

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been extensively used in population and evolutionary genetics studies. Thus, a valid estimate of human mtDNA evolutionary rate is important in many research fields. The small number of estimations performed for the coding region of the molecule, showed important differences between phylogenetic and empirical approaches. We analyzed a portion of the coding region of mtDNA (tRNALeu, ND1 and tRNAIle genes), using individuals belonging to extended families from the Azores Islands (Portugal) with the main aim of providing empirical estimations of the mutation rate of the coding region of mtDNA under different assumptions, and hence to better understand the mtDNA evolutionary process. Results Heteroplasmy was detected in 6.5% (3/46) of the families analyzed. In all of the families the presence of mtDNA heteroplasmy resulted from three new point mutations, and no cases of insertions or deletions were identified. Major differences were found in the proportion and type of heteroplasmy found in the genes studied when compared to those obtained in a previous report for the D-loop. Our empirical estimation of mtDNA coding region mutation rate, calculated taking into account the sex of individuals carrying new mutations, the probability of intra-individual fixation of mutations present in heteroplasmy and, to the possible extent, the effect of selection, is similar to that obtained using phylogenetic approaches. Conclusion Based on our results, the discrepancy previously reported between the human mtDNA coding region mutation rates observed along evolutionary timescales and estimations obtained using family pedigrees can be resolved when correcting for the previously cited factors. PMID:18518963

  18. [Application of mtDNA polymorphism in species identification of sarcosaphagous insects].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Cai, Ji-feng

    2011-04-01

    Species identification of sarcosaphagous insects is one of the important steps in forensic research based on the knowledge of entomology. Recent studies reveal that the application of molecular biology, especially the mtDNA sequences analysis, works well in the species identification of sarcosaphagous insects. The molecular biology characteristics, structures, polymorphism of mtDNA of sarcosaphagous insects, and the recent studies in species identification of sarcosaphagous insects are reviewed in this article.

  19. Random mtDNA mutations modulate proliferation capacity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kukat, Alexandra; Edgar, Daniel; Bratic, Ivana; Maiti, Priyanka; Trifunovic, Aleksandra

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Increased mtDNA mutations in MEFs lead to high level of spontaneous immortalization. {yields} This process is independent of endogenous ROS production. {yields} Aerobic glycolysis significantly contributes to spontaneous immortalization of MEFs. -- Abstract: An increase in mtDNA mutation load leads to a loss of critical cells in different tissues thereby contributing to the physiological process of organismal ageing. Additionally, the accumulation of senescent cells that display changes in metabolic function might act in an active way to further disrupt the normal tissue function. We believe that this could be the important link missing in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of premature ageing in the mtDNA mutator mice. We tested proliferation capacity of mtDNA mutator cells in vitro. When cultured in physiological levels of oxygen (3%) their proliferation capacity is somewhat lower than wild-type cells. Surprisingly, in conditions of increased oxidative stress (20% O{sub 2}) mtDNA mutator mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit continuous proliferation due to spontaneous immortalization, whereas the same conditions promote senescence in wild-type cells. We believe that an increase in aerobic glycolysis observed in mtDNA mutator mice is a major mechanism behind this process. We propose that glycolysis promotes proliferation and allows a fast turnover of metabolites, but also leads to energy crisis due to lower ATP production rate. This could lead to compromised replication and/or repair and therefore, in rare cases, might lead to mutations in tumor suppressor genes and spontaneous immortalization.

  20. Ancient mtDNA sequences from the First Australians revisited.

    PubMed

    Heupink, Tim H; Subramanian, Sankar; Wright, Joanne L; Endicott, Phillip; Westaway, Michael Carrington; Huynen, Leon; Parson, Walther; Millar, Craig D; Willerslev, Eske; Lambert, David M

    2016-06-21

    The publication in 2001 by Adcock et al. [Adcock GJ, et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98(2):537-542] in PNAS reported the recovery of short mtDNA sequences from ancient Australians, including the 42,000-y-old Mungo Man [Willandra Lakes Hominid (WLH3)]. This landmark study in human ancient DNA suggested that an early modern human mitochondrial lineage emerged in Asia and that the theory of modern human origins could no longer be considered solely through the lens of the "Out of Africa" model. To evaluate these claims, we used second generation DNA sequencing and capture methods as well as PCR-based and single-primer extension (SPEX) approaches to reexamine the same four Willandra Lakes and Kow Swamp 8 (KS8) remains studied in the work by Adcock et al. Two of the remains sampled contained no identifiable human DNA (WLH15 and WLH55), whereas the Mungo Man (WLH3) sample contained no Aboriginal Australian DNA. KS8 reveals human mitochondrial sequences that differ from the previously inferred sequence. Instead, we recover a total of five modern European contaminants from Mungo Man (WLH3). We show that the remaining sample (WLH4) contains ∼1.4% human DNA, from which we assembled two complete mitochondrial genomes. One of these was a previously unidentified Aboriginal Australian haplotype belonging to haplogroup S2 that we sequenced to a high coverage. The other was a contaminating modern European mitochondrial haplotype. Although none of the sequences that we recovered matched those reported by Adcock et al., except a contaminant, these findings show the feasibility of obtaining important information from ancient Aboriginal Australian remains. PMID:27274055

  1. Ancient mtDNA sequences from the First Australians revisited

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankar; Wright, Joanne L.; Endicott, Phillip; Westaway, Michael Carrington; Huynen, Leon; Parson, Walther; Millar, Craig D.; Willerslev, Eske; Lambert, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The publication in 2001 by Adcock et al. [Adcock GJ, et al. (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98(2):537–542] in PNAS reported the recovery of short mtDNA sequences from ancient Australians, including the 42,000-y-old Mungo Man [Willandra Lakes Hominid (WLH3)]. This landmark study in human ancient DNA suggested that an early modern human mitochondrial lineage emerged in Asia and that the theory of modern human origins could no longer be considered solely through the lens of the “Out of Africa” model. To evaluate these claims, we used second generation DNA sequencing and capture methods as well as PCR-based and single-primer extension (SPEX) approaches to reexamine the same four Willandra Lakes and Kow Swamp 8 (KS8) remains studied in the work by Adcock et al. Two of the remains sampled contained no identifiable human DNA (WLH15 and WLH55), whereas the Mungo Man (WLH3) sample contained no Aboriginal Australian DNA. KS8 reveals human mitochondrial sequences that differ from the previously inferred sequence. Instead, we recover a total of five modern European contaminants from Mungo Man (WLH3). We show that the remaining sample (WLH4) contains ∼1.4% human DNA, from which we assembled two complete mitochondrial genomes. One of these was a previously unidentified Aboriginal Australian haplotype belonging to haplogroup S2 that we sequenced to a high coverage. The other was a contaminating modern European mitochondrial haplotype. Although none of the sequences that we recovered matched those reported by Adcock et al., except a contaminant, these findings show the feasibility of obtaining important information from ancient Aboriginal Australian remains. PMID:27274055

  2. Mitochondrial transcription terminator family members mTTF and mTerf5 have opposing roles in coordination of mtDNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jõers, Priit; Lewis, Samantha C; Fukuoh, Atsushi; Parhiala, Mikael; Ellilä, Simo; Holt, Ian J; Jacobs, Howard T

    2013-01-01

    All genomes require a system for avoidance or handling of collisions between the machineries of DNA replication and transcription. We have investigated the roles in this process of the mTERF (mitochondrial transcription termination factor) family members mTTF and mTerf5 in Drosophila melanogaster. The two mTTF binding sites in Drosophila mtDNA, which also bind mTerf5, were found to coincide with major sites of replication pausing. RNAi-mediated knockdown of either factor resulted in mtDNA depletion and developmental arrest. mTTF knockdown decreased site-specific replication pausing, but led to an increase in replication stalling and fork regression in broad zones around each mTTF binding site. Lagging-strand DNA synthesis was impaired, with extended RNA/DNA hybrid segments seen in replication intermediates. This was accompanied by the accumulation of recombination intermediates and nicked/broken mtDNA species. Conversely, mTerf5 knockdown led to enhanced replication pausing at mTTF binding sites, a decrease in fragile replication intermediates containing single-stranded segments, and the disappearance of species containing segments of RNA/DNA hybrid. These findings indicate an essential and previously undescribed role for proteins of the mTERF family in the integration of transcription and DNA replication, preventing unregulated collisions and facilitating productive interactions between the two machineries that are inferred to be essential for completion of lagging-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:24068965

  3. POLRMT regulates the switch between replication primer formation and gene expression of mammalian mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Inge; Miranda, Maria; Posse, Viktor; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Siira, Stefan J.; Bonekamp, Nina A.; Neumann, Ulla; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital in providing cellular energy via their oxidative phosphorylation system, which requires the coordinated expression of genes encoded by both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA). Transcription of the circular mammalian mtDNA depends on a single mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT). Although the transcription initiation process is well understood, it is debated whether POLRMT also serves as the primase for the initiation of mtDNA replication. In the nucleus, the RNA polymerases needed for gene expression have no such role. Conditional knockout of Polrmt in the heart results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction causing dilated cardiomyopathy in young mice. We further studied the molecular consequences of different expression levels of POLRMT and found that POLRMT is essential for primer synthesis to initiate mtDNA replication in vivo. Furthermore, transcription initiation for primer formation has priority over gene expression. Surprisingly, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) exists in an mtDNA-free pool in the Polrmt knockout mice. TFAM levels remain unchanged despite strong mtDNA depletion, and TFAM is thus protected from degradation of the AAA+ Lon protease in the absence of POLRMT. Last, we report that mitochondrial transcription elongation factor may compensate for a partial depletion of POLRMT in heterozygous Polrmt knockout mice, indicating a direct regulatory role of this factor in transcription. In conclusion, we present in vivo evidence that POLRMT has a key regulatory role in the replication of mammalian mtDNA and is part of a transcriptional mechanism that provides a switch between primer formation for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial gene expression. PMID:27532055

  4. POLRMT regulates the switch between replication primer formation and gene expression of mammalian mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Inge; Miranda, Maria; Posse, Viktor; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Siira, Stefan J; Bonekamp, Nina A; Neumann, Ulla; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are vital in providing cellular energy via their oxidative phosphorylation system, which requires the coordinated expression of genes encoded by both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA). Transcription of the circular mammalian mtDNA depends on a single mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT). Although the transcription initiation process is well understood, it is debated whether POLRMT also serves as the primase for the initiation of mtDNA replication. In the nucleus, the RNA polymerases needed for gene expression have no such role. Conditional knockout of Polrmt in the heart results in severe mitochondrial dysfunction causing dilated cardiomyopathy in young mice. We further studied the molecular consequences of different expression levels of POLRMT and found that POLRMT is essential for primer synthesis to initiate mtDNA replication in vivo. Furthermore, transcription initiation for primer formation has priority over gene expression. Surprisingly, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) exists in an mtDNA-free pool in the Polrmt knockout mice. TFAM levels remain unchanged despite strong mtDNA depletion, and TFAM is thus protected from degradation of the AAA(+) Lon protease in the absence of POLRMT. Last, we report that mitochondrial transcription elongation factor may compensate for a partial depletion of POLRMT in heterozygous Polrmt knockout mice, indicating a direct regulatory role of this factor in transcription. In conclusion, we present in vivo evidence that POLRMT has a key regulatory role in the replication of mammalian mtDNA and is part of a transcriptional mechanism that provides a switch between primer formation for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial gene expression. PMID:27532055

  5. Evidence of animal mtDNA recombination between divergent populations of the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida.

    PubMed

    Hoolahan, Angelique H; Blok, Vivian C; Gibson, Tracey; Dowton, Mark

    2012-03-01

    Recombination is typically assumed to be absent in animal mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA). However, the maternal mode of inheritance means that recombinant products are indistinguishable from their progenitor molecules. The majority of studies of mtDNA recombination assess past recombination events, where patterns of recombination are inferred by comparing the mtDNA of different individuals. Few studies assess contemporary mtDNA recombination, where recombinant molecules are observed as direct mosaics of known progenitor molecules. Here we use the potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, to investigate past and contemporary recombination. Past recombination was assessed within and between populations of G. pallida, and contemporary recombination was assessed in the progeny of experimental crosses of these populations. Breeding of genetically divergent organisms may cause paternal mtDNA leakage, resulting in heteroplasmy and facilitating the detection of recombination. To assess contemporary recombination we looked for evidence of recombination between the mtDNA of the parental populations within the mtDNA of progeny. Past recombination was detected between a South American population and several UK populations of G. pallida, as well as between two South American populations. This suggests that these populations may have interbred, paternal mtDNA leakage occurred, and the mtDNA of these populations subsequently recombined. This evidence challenges two dogmas of animal mtDNA evolution; no recombination and maternal inheritance. No contemporary recombination between the parental populations was detected in the progeny of the experimental crosses. This supports current arguments that mtDNA recombination events are rare. More sensitive detection methods may be required to adequately assess contemporary mtDNA recombination in animals.

  6. Interpretation guidelines of mtDNA control region sequence electropherograms in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Manuel Crespillo

    2012-01-01

    Forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is a complementary technique to forensic nuclear DNA (nDNA) and trace evidence analysis. Its use has been accepted by the vast majority of courts of law around the world. However for the forensic community it is crucial to employ standardized methods and procedures to guaranty the quality of the results obtained in court. In this chapter, we describe the most important aspects regarding the interpretation and assessment of mtDNA analysis, and offer a simple guide which places particular emphasis on those aspects that can impact the final interpretation of the results. These include the criteria for authenticating a sequence excluding the contaminant origin, defining the quality of a sequence, editing procedure, alignment criteria for searching the databases, and the statistical evaluation of matches. It is not easy to establish a single guide to interpretation for mtDNA analysis; however, it is important to understand all variables that may in some way affect the final conclusion in the context of a forensic case. As a general rule, laboratories should be cautious before issuing the final conclusion of an mtDNA analysis, and consider any significant limitations regarding current understanding of specific aspects of the mtDNA molecule. PMID:22139669

  7. No Evidence of Neandertal mtDNA Contribution to Early Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The retrieval of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from four Neandertal fossils from Germany, Russia, and Croatia has demonstrated that these individuals carried closely related mtDNAs that are not found among current humans. However, these results do not definitively resolve the question of a possible Neandertal contribution to the gene pool of modern humans since such a contribution might have been erased by genetic drift or by the continuous influx of modern human DNA into the Neandertal gene pool. A further concern is that if some Neandertals carried mtDNA sequences similar to contemporaneous humans, such sequences may be erroneously regarded as modern contaminations when retrieved from fossils. Here we address these issues by the analysis of 24 Neandertal and 40 early modern human remains. The biomolecular preservation of four Neandertals and of five early modern humans was good enough to suggest the preservation of DNA. All four Neandertals yielded mtDNA sequences similar to those previously determined from Neandertal individuals, whereas none of the five early modern humans contained such mtDNA sequences. In combination with current mtDNA data, this excludes any large genetic contribution by Neandertals to early modern humans, but does not rule out the possibility of a smaller contribution. PMID:15024415

  8. Inspecting close maternal relatedness: Towards better mtDNA population samples in forensic databases

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Martin; Irwin, Jodi A.; Coble, Michael D.; Parson, Walther

    2011-01-01

    Reliable data are crucial for all research fields applying mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a genetic marker. Quality control measures have been introduced to ensure the highest standards in sequence data generation, validation and a posteriori inspection. A phylogenetic alignment strategy has been widely accepted as a prerequisite for data comparability and database searches, for forensic applications, for reconstructions of human migrations and for correct interpretation of mtDNA mutations in medical genetics. There is continuing effort to enhance the number of worldwide population samples in order to contribute to a better understanding of human mtDNA variation. This has often lead to the analysis of convenience samples collected for other purposes, which might not meet the quality requirement of random sampling for mtDNA data sets. Here, we introduce an additional quality control means that deals with one aspect of this limitation: by combining autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) marker with mtDNA information, it helps to avoid the bias introduced by related individuals included in the same (small) sample. By STR analysis of individuals sharing their mitochondrial haplotype, pedigree construction and subsequent software-assisted calculation of likelihood ratios based on the allele frequencies found in the population, closely maternally related individuals can be identified and excluded. We also discuss scenarios that allow related individuals in the same set. An ideal population sample would be representative for its population: this new approach represents another contribution towards this goal. PMID:21067986

  9. Heteroplasmy of Mouse mtDNA Is Genetically Unstable and Results in Altered Behavior and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; McManus, Meagan; Crimi, Marco; Waymire, Katrina; Lin, Chun Shi; Masubuchi, Satoru; Friend, Nicole; Koike, Maya; Chalkia, Dimitra; MacGregor, Grant; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Maternal inheritance of mtDNA is the rule in most animals, but the reasons for this pattern remain unclear. To investigate the consequence of overriding uniparental inheritance, we generated mice containing an admixture (heteroplasmy) of NZB and 129S6 mtDNAs in the presence of a congenic C57BL/6J nuclear background. Analysis of the segregation of the two mtDNAs across subsequent maternal generations revealed that proportion of NZB mtDNA was preferentially reduced. Ultimately, this segregation process produced NZB-129 heteroplasmic mice and their NZB or 129 mtDNA homo-plasmic counterparts. Phenotypic comparison of these three mtDNA lines demonstrated that the NZB-129 heteroplasmic mice, but neither homoplasmic counterpart, had reduced activity, food intake, respiratory exchange ratio; accentuated stress response; and cognitive impairment. Therefore, admixture of two normal but different mouse mtDNAs can be genetically unstable and can produce adverse physiological effects, factors that may explain the advantage of uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. PMID:23063123

  10. Dog mitochondrial genome sequencing to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2014-09-01

    A Belgian dog population sample and several population studies worldwide have confirmed that only a limited number of mtDNA control region haplotypes is observed in the majority of dogs. The high population frequency of these haplotypes negatively impacts both the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis and the evidential value of a match with one of these haplotypes in casework. Variation within the mtDNA coding region was explored to improve the discrimination power of dog mtDNA analysis. In the current study, the entire mitochondrial genome of 161 dogs was sequenced applying a quality assured strategy and resulted in a total of 119 different mitochondrial genome sequences. Our research was focused on those dogs with the six most common control region haplotypes from a previous Belgian population study. We identified 33 informative SNPs that successfully divide the six most common control region haplotypes into 32 clusters of mitochondrial genome sequences. Determining the identity of these 33 polymorphic sites in addition to control region sequencing in case of a match with one of these 6 control region haplotypes could augment the exclusion probability of forensic dog mtDNA analysis from 92.5% to 97.5%.

  11. Inspecting close maternal relatedness: Towards better mtDNA population samples in forensic databases.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Martin; Irwin, Jodi A; Coble, Michael D; Parson, Walther

    2011-03-01

    Reliable data are crucial for all research fields applying mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a genetic marker. Quality control measures have been introduced to ensure the highest standards in sequence data generation, validation and a posteriori inspection. A phylogenetic alignment strategy has been widely accepted as a prerequisite for data comparability and database searches, for forensic applications, for reconstructions of human migrations and for correct interpretation of mtDNA mutations in medical genetics. There is continuing effort to enhance the number of worldwide population samples in order to contribute to a better understanding of human mtDNA variation. This has often lead to the analysis of convenience samples collected for other purposes, which might not meet the quality requirement of random sampling for mtDNA data sets. Here, we introduce an additional quality control means that deals with one aspect of this limitation: by combining autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) marker with mtDNA information, it helps to avoid the bias introduced by related individuals included in the same (small) sample. By STR analysis of individuals sharing their mitochondrial haplotype, pedigree construction and subsequent software-assisted calculation of likelihood ratios based on the allele frequencies found in the population, closely maternally related individuals can be identified and excluded. We also discuss scenarios that allow related individuals in the same set. An ideal population sample would be representative for its population: this new approach represents another contribution towards this goal. PMID:21067986

  12. Deep sympatric mtDNA divergence in the autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata)

    PubMed Central

    Kvie, Kjersti S; Hogner, Silje; Aarvik, Leif; Lifjeld, Jan T; Johnsen, Arild

    2013-01-01

    Deep sympatric intraspecific divergence in mtDNA may reflect cryptic species or formerly distinct lineages in the process of remerging. Preliminary results from DNA barcoding of Scandinavian butterflies and moths showed high intraspecific sequence variation in the autumnal moth, Epirrita autumnata. In this study, specimens from different localities in Norway and some samples from Finland and Scotland, with two congeneric species as outgroups, were sequenced with mitochondrial and nuclear markers to resolve the discrepancy found between mtDNA divergence and present species-level taxonomy. We found five COI sub-clades within the E. autumnata complex, most of which were sympatric and with little geographic structure. Nuclear markers (ITS2 and Wingless) showed little variation and gave no indications that E. autumnata comprises more than one species. The samples were screened with primers for Wolbachia outer surface gene (wsp) and 12% of the samples tested positive. Two Wolbachia strains were associated with different mtDNA sub-clades within E. autumnata, which may indicate indirect selection/selective sweeps on haplotypes. Our results demonstrate that deep mtDNA divergences are not synonymous with cryptic speciation and this has important implications for the use of mtDNA in species delimitation, like in DNA barcoding. PMID:23404314

  13. Novel mtDNA mutations and oxidative phosphorylation dysfunction in Russian LHON families.

    PubMed

    Brown, M D; Zhadanov, S; Allen, J C; Hosseini, S; Newman, N J; Atamonov, V V; Mikhailovskaya, I E; Sukernik, R I; Wallace, D C

    2001-07-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is characterized by maternally transmitted, bilateral, central vision loss in young adults. It is caused by mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoded genes that contribute polypeptides to NADH dehydrogenase or complex I. Four mtDNA variants, the nucleotide pair (np) 3460A, 11778A, 14484C, and 14459A mutations, are known as "primary" LHON mutations and are found in most, but not all, of the LHON families reported to date. Here, we report the extensive genetic and biochemical analysis of five Russian families from the Novosibirsk region of Siberia manifesting maternally transmitted optic atrophy consistent with LHON. Three of the five families harbor known LHON primary mutations. Complete sequence analysis of proband mtDNA in the other two families has revealed novel complex I mutations at nps 3635A and 4640C, respectively. These mutations are homoplasmic and have not been reported in the literature. Biochemical analysis of complex I in patient lymphoblasts and transmitochondrial cybrids demonstrated a respiration defect with complex-I-linked substrates, although the specific activity of complex I was not reduced. Overall, our data suggests that the spectrum of mtDNA mutations associated with LHON in Russia is similar to that in Europe and North America and that the np 3635A and 4640C mutations may be additional mtDNA complex I mutations contributing to LHON expression.

  14. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  15. Contribution of non-reference alleles in mtDNA of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Spazzafumo, Liana; Balietti, Marta; Giorgetti, Belinda; Giuli, Cinzia; Postacchini, Demetrio; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2014-04-01

    Many observations suggest that mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could be responsible for the neurodegenerative changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we examined the signal intensity of the four alleles of each mtDNA nucleotide position (np) in whole blood of AD patients and age-matched controls using MitoChip v2.0 array. Our analysis identified 270 significantly different nps which, with one exception, showed an increased contribution of non-reference alleles in AD patients. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis showed that five of these nps could discriminate AD from control subjects with 80% of cases correctly classified. Our data support the hypothesis of mtDNA alterations as an important factor in the etiology of AD. PMID:25590040

  16. The unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA: isn't one enough?

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Beaupré, Hélène Doucet; Stewart, Donald T; Hoeh, Walter R; Blier, Pierre U

    2007-09-01

    Mitochondria possess their own genetic material (mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA), whose gene products are involved in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, transcription, and translation. In animals, mitochondrial DNA is typically transmitted to offspring by the mother alone. The discovery of 'doubly uniparental inheritance' (DUI) of mtDNA in some bivalves has challenged the paradigm of strict maternal inheritance (SMI). In this review, we survey recent advances in our understanding of DUI, which is a peculiar system of cytoplasmic DNA inheritance that involves distinct maternal and paternal routes of mtDNA transmission, a novel extension of a mitochondrial gene (cox2), recombination, and periodic 'role-reversals' of the normally male and female-transmitted mitochondrial genomes. DUI provides a unique opportunity for studying nuclear-cytoplasmic genome interactions and the evolutionary significance of different modes of mitochondrial inheritance.

  17. In vivo levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide increase with age in mtDNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Logan, Angela; Shabalina, Irina G; Prime, Tracy A; Rogatti, Sebastian; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Hartley, Richard C; Budd, Ralph C; Cannon, Barbara; Murphy, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    In mtDNA mutator mice, mtDNA mutations accumulate leading to a rapidly aging phenotype. However, there is little evidence of oxidative damage to tissues, and when analyzed ex vivo, no change in production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by mitochondria has been reported, undermining the mitochondrial oxidative damage theory of aging. Paradoxically, interventions that decrease mitochondrial ROS levels in vivo delay onset of aging. To reconcile these findings, we used the mitochondria-targeted mass spectrometry probe MitoB to measure hydrogen peroxide within mitochondria of living mice. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide was the same in young mutator and control mice, but as the mutator mice aged, hydrogen peroxide increased. This suggests that the prolonged presence of mtDNA mutations in vivo increases hydrogen peroxide that contributes to an accelerated aging phenotype, perhaps through the activation of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory redox signaling pathways.

  18. Land, language, and loci: mtDNA in Native Americans and the genetic history of Peru.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cecil M; Tito, Raúl Y; Lizárraga, Beatriz; Stone, Anne C

    2005-07-01

    Despite a long history of complex societies and despite extensive present-day linguistic and ethnic diversity, relatively few populations in Peru have been sampled for population genetic investigations. In order to address questions about the relationships between South American populations and about the extent of correlation between genetic distance, language, and geography in the region, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region I sequences and mtDNA haplogroup markers were examined in 33 individuals from the state of Ancash, Peru. These sequences were compared to those from 19 American Indian populations using diversity estimates, AMOVA tests, mismatch distributions, a multidimensional scaling plot, and regressions. The results show correlations between genetics, linguistics, and geographical affinities, with stronger correlations between genetics and language. Additionally, the results suggest a pattern of differential gene flow and drift in western vs. eastern South America, supporting previous mtDNA and Y chromosome investigations.

  19. mtDNA mutation C1494T, haplogroup A, and hearing loss in Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengye; Kong Qingpeng; Yao Yonggang . E-mail: ygyaozh@yahoo.com; Zhang Yaping

    2006-09-22

    Mutation C1494T in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene was recently reported in two large Chinese families with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss (AINHL) and was claimed to be pathogenic. This mutation, however, was first reported in a sample from central China in our previous study that was aimed to reconstruct East Asian mtDNA phylogeny. All these three mtDNAs formed a subclade defined by mutation C1494T in mtDNA haplogroup A. It thus seems that mutation C1494T is a haplogroup A-associated mutation and this matrilineal background may contribute a high risk for the penetrance of mutation C1494T in Chinese with AINHL. To test this hypothesis, we first genotyped mutation C1494T in 553 unrelated individuals from three regional Chinese populations and performed an extensive search for published complete or near-complete mtDNA data sets (>3000 mtDNAs), we then screened the C1494T mutation in 111 mtDNAs with haplogroup A status that were identified from 1823 subjects across China. The search for published mtDNA data sets revealed no other mtDNA besides the above-mentioned three carrying mutation C1494T. None of the 553 randomly selected individuals and the 111 haplogroup A mtDNAs was found to bear this mutation. Therefore, our results suggest that C1494T is a very rare event. The mtDNA haplogroup A background in general is unlikely to play an active role in the penetrance of mutation C1494T in AINHL.

  20. DNA methyltransferase 1 mutations and mitochondrial pathology: is mtDNA methylated?

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, Alessandra; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Caporali, Leonardo; Carelli, Valerio; Zanna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia-deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and Hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSN1E) are two rare, overlapping neurodegenerative syndromes that have been recently linked to allelic dominant pathogenic mutations in the DNMT1 gene, coding for DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). DNMT1 is the enzyme responsible for maintaining the nuclear genome methylation patterns during the DNA replication and repair, thus regulating gene expression. The mutations responsible for ADCA-DN and HSN1E affect the replication foci targeting sequence domain, which regulates DNMT1 binding to chromatin. DNMT1 dysfunction is anticipated to lead to a global alteration of the DNA methylation pattern with predictable downstream consequences on gene expression. Interestingly, ADCA-DN and HSN1E phenotypes share some clinical features typical of mitochondrial diseases, such as optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and deafness, and some biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. The recent discovery of a mitochondrial isoform of DNMT1 and its proposed role in methylating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that DNMT1 mutations may directly affect mtDNA and mitochondrial physiology. On the basis of this latter finding the link between DNMT1 abnormal activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in ADCA-DN and HSN1E appears intuitive, however, mtDNA methylation remains highly debated. In the last years several groups demonstrated the presence of 5-methylcytosine in mtDNA by different approaches, but, on the other end, the opposite evidence that mtDNA is not methylated has also been published. Since over 1500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome, the altered methylation of these genes may well have a critical role in leading to the mitochondrial impairment observed in ADCA-DN and HSN1E. Thus, many open questions still remain unanswered, such as why mtDNA should be methylated, and how this process is regulated and

  1. High leukocyte mtDNA content contributes to poor prognosis through ROS-mediated immunosuppression in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Xingchun; Chen, Yibing; Guo, Xu; Li, Jibin; Huang, Qichao; Yang, Yefa; Lyu, Zhuomin; Zhang, Hongxin; Xing, Jinliang

    2016-01-01

    Compelling epidemiological evidences indicate a significant association between leukocyte mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and incidence risk of several malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, whether leukocyte mtDNA content affect prognosis of HCC patients and underlying mechanism has never been explored. In our study, leukocyte mtDNA content was measured in 618 HCC patients and its prognostic value was analyzed. Moreover, we detected the immunophenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma concentrations of several cytokines in 40 HCC patients and assessed the modulating effects of mtDNA content on immunosuppression in cell models. Our results showed that HCC patients with high leukocyte mtDNA content exhibited a significantly worse recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those with low leukocyte mtDNA content. Leukocyte mtDNA content and TNM stage exhibited a notable joint effect in prognosis prediction. Furthermore, we found that patients with high leukocyte mtDNA content exhibited a higher frequency of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and lower frequency of NK cells in PBMCs and had higher TGF-β1 and lower TNF-α and IFN-γ plasma concentration when compared with those with low leukocyte mtDNA content, which suggests an immunosuppressive status. High leukocyte mtDNA content significantly enhanced the ROS-mediated secretion of TGF-β1, which accounted for higher Treg and lower NK frequency in PBMCs. In a conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that leukocyte mtDNA content is an independent prognostic marker complementing TNM stage and associated with an ROS-mediated immunosuppressive phenotype in HCC patients. PMID:26985767

  2. Tissue-specific mtDNA abundance from exome data and its correlation with mitochondrial transcription, mass and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Atlante, Anna; Gadaleta, Gemma; Pavesi, Giulio; Chiara, Matteo; De Virgilio, Caterina; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Prazzoli, Gian Marco; Picardi, Ernesto; Gissi, Carmela; Horner, David; Reyes, Aurelio; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Tullo, Apollonia; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a population of mitochondria, variable in number and shape, which in turn contain multiple copies of a tiny compact genome (mtDNA) whose expression and function is strictly coordinated with the nuclear one. mtDNA copy number varies between different cell or tissues types, both in response to overall metabolic and bioenergetics demands and as a consequence or cause of specific pathological conditions. Here we present a novel and reliable methodology to assess the effective mtDNA copy number per diploid genome by investigating off-target reads obtained by whole-exome sequencing (WES) experiments. We also investigate whether and how mtDNA copy number correlates with mitochondrial mass, respiratory activity and expression levels. Analyzing six different tissues from three age- and sex-matched human individuals, we found a highly significant linear correlation between mtDNA copy number estimated by qPCR and the frequency of mtDNA off target WES reads. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number showed highly significant correlation with mitochondrial gene expression levels as measured by RNA-Seq as well as with mitochondrial mass and respiratory activity. Our methodology makes thus feasible, at a large scale, the investigation of mtDNA copy number in diverse cell-types, tissues and pathological conditions or in response to specific treatments. PMID:25446395

  3. Stochastic modelling, Bayesian inference, and new in vivo measurements elucidate the debated mtDNA bottleneck mechanism.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Iain G; Burgstaller, Joerg P; Havlicek, Vitezslav; Kolbe, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Brem, Gottfried; Poulton, Jo; Jones, Nick S

    2015-06-02

    Dangerous damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be ameliorated during mammalian development through a highly debated mechanism called the mtDNA bottleneck. Uncertainty surrounding this process limits our ability to address inherited mtDNA diseases. We produce a new, physically motivated, generalisable theoretical model for mtDNA populations during development, allowing the first statistical comparison of proposed bottleneck mechanisms. Using approximate Bayesian computation and mouse data, we find most statistical support for a combination of binomial partitioning of mtDNAs at cell divisions and random mtDNA turnover, meaning that the debated exact magnitude of mtDNA copy number depletion is flexible. New experimental measurements from a wild-derived mtDNA pairing in mice confirm the theoretical predictions of this model. We analytically solve a mathematical description of this mechanism, computing probabilities of mtDNA disease onset, efficacy of clinical sampling strategies, and effects of potential dynamic interventions, thus developing a quantitative and experimentally-supported stochastic theory of the bottleneck.

  4. Stochastic modelling, Bayesian inference, and new in vivo measurements elucidate the debated mtDNA bottleneck mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Iain G; Burgstaller, Joerg P; Havlicek, Vitezslav; Kolbe, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Brem, Gottfried; Poulton, Jo; Jones, Nick S

    2015-01-01

    Dangerous damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be ameliorated during mammalian development through a highly debated mechanism called the mtDNA bottleneck. Uncertainty surrounding this process limits our ability to address inherited mtDNA diseases. We produce a new, physically motivated, generalisable theoretical model for mtDNA populations during development, allowing the first statistical comparison of proposed bottleneck mechanisms. Using approximate Bayesian computation and mouse data, we find most statistical support for a combination of binomial partitioning of mtDNAs at cell divisions and random mtDNA turnover, meaning that the debated exact magnitude of mtDNA copy number depletion is flexible. New experimental measurements from a wild-derived mtDNA pairing in mice confirm the theoretical predictions of this model. We analytically solve a mathematical description of this mechanism, computing probabilities of mtDNA disease onset, efficacy of clinical sampling strategies, and effects of potential dynamic interventions, thus developing a quantitative and experimentally-supported stochastic theory of the bottleneck. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07464.001 PMID:26035426

  5. Hybridization and massive mtDNA unidirectional introgression between the closely related Neotropical toads Rhinella marina and R. schneideri inferred from mtDNA and nuclear markers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The classical perspective that interspecific hybridization in animals is rare has been changing due to a growing list of empirical examples showing the occurrence of gene flow between closely related species. Using sequence data from cyt b mitochondrial gene and three intron nuclear genes (RPL9, c-myc, and RPL3) we investigated patterns of nucleotide polymorphism and divergence between two closely related toad species R. marina and R. schneideri. By comparing levels of differentiation at nuclear and mtDNA levels we were able to describe patterns of introgression and infer the history of hybridization between these species. Results All nuclear loci are essentially concordant in revealing two well differentiated groups of haplotypes, corresponding to the morphologically-defined species R. marina and R. schneideri. Mitochondrial DNA analysis also revealed two well-differentiated groups of haplotypes but, in stark contrast with the nuclear genealogies, all R. schneideri sequences are clustered with sequences of R. marina from the right Amazon bank (RAB), while R. marina sequences from the left Amazon bank (LAB) are monophyletic. An Isolation-with-Migration (IM) analysis using nuclear data showed that R. marina and R. schneideri diverged at ≈ 1.69 Myr (early Pleistocene), while R. marina populations from LAB and RAB diverged at ≈ 0.33 Myr (middle Pleistocene). This time of divergence is not consistent with the split between LAB and RAB populations obtained with mtDNA data (≈ 1.59 Myr), which is notably similar to the estimate obtained with nuclear genes between R. marina and R. schneideri. Coalescent simulations of mtDNA phylogeny under the speciation history inferred from nuclear genes rejected the hypothesis of incomplete lineage sorting to explain the conflicting signal between mtDNA and nuclear-based phylogenies. Conclusions The cytonuclear discordance seems to reflect the occurrence of interspecific hybridization between these two closely related

  6. mtDNA analysis of a prehistoric Oneota population: implications for the peopling of the New World.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, A C; Stoneking, M

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA was successfully extracted from 108 individuals from the Norris Farms Oneota, a prehistoric Native American population, to compare the mtDNA diversity from a pre-Columbian population with contemporary Native American and Asian mtDNA lineages and to examine hypotheses about the peopling of the New World. Haplogroup and hypervariable region I sequence data indicate that the lineages from haplogroups A, B, C, and D are the most common among Native Americans but that they were not the only lineages brought into the New World from Asia. The mtDNA evidence does not support the three-wave hypothesis of migration into the New World but rather suggests a single "wave" of people with considerable mtDNA diversity that exhibits a signature of expansion 23,000-37,000 years ago. PMID:9545408

  7. Characterization of mtDNA haplogroups in 14 Mexican indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda I; Arenas-Aranda, Diego; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Buentello-Malo, Leonor; González-Valencia, Gerardo; Torres, Javier; Alvarez, Berenice; Mendoza, Irma; Flores, Mario; Sandoval, Lucila; Loeza, Francisco; Ramos, Irma; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Salamanca, Fabio

    2007-06-01

    In this descriptive study we investigated the genetic structure of 513 Mexican indigenous subjects grouped in 14 populations (Mixteca-Alta, Mixteca-Baja, Otomi, Purépecha, Tzeltal, Tarahumara, Huichol, Nahua-Atocpan, Nahua-Xochimilco, Nahua-Zitlala, Nahua-Chilacachapa, Nahua-Ixhuatlancillo, Nahua-Necoxtla, and Nahua-Coyolillo) based on mtDNA haplogroups. These communities are geographically and culturally isolated; parents and grandparents were born in the community. Our data show that 98.6% of the mtDNA was distributed in haplogroups A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2, D1, and D2. Haplotype X6 was present in the Tarahumara (1/53) and Huichol (3/15), and haplotype L was present in the Nahua-Coyolillo (3/38). The first two principal components accounted for 95.9% of the total variation in the sample. The mtDNA haplogroup frequencies in the Purépecha and Zitlala were intermediate to cluster 1 (Otomi, Nahua-Ixhuatlancillo, Nahua-Xochimilco, Mixteca-Baja, and Tzeltal) and cluster 2 (Nahua-Necoxtla, Nahua-Atocpan, and Nahua-Chilacachapa). The Huichol, Tarahumara, Mixteca-Alta, and Nahua-Coyolillo were separated from the rest of the populations. According to these findings, the distribution of mtDNA haplogroups found in Mexican indigenous groups is similar to other Amerindian haplogroups, except for the African haplogroup found in one population.

  8. HAPLOFIND: a new method for high-throughput mtDNA haplogroup assignment.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Dario; Sevini, Federica; Castellani, Gastone; Lomartire, Laura; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    Deep sequencing technologies are completely revolutionizing the approach to DNA analysis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) studies entered in the "postgenomic era": the burst in sequenced samples observed in nuclear genomics is expected also in mitochondria, a trend that can already be detected checking complete mtDNA sequences database submission rate. Tools for the analysis of these data are available, but they fail in throughput or in easiness of use. We present here a new pipeline based on previous algorithms, inherited from the "nuclear genomic toolbox," combined with a newly developed algorithm capable of efficiently and easily classify new mtDNA sequences according to PhyloTree nomenclature. Detected mutations are also annotated using data collected from publicly available databases. Thanks to the analysis of all freely available sequences with known haplogroup obtained from GenBank, we were able to produce a PhyloTree-based weighted tree, taking into account each haplogroup pattern conservation. The combination of a highly efficient aligner, coupled with our algorithm and massive usage of asynchronous parallel processing, allowed us to build a high-throughput pipeline for the analysis of mtDNA sequences that can be quickly updated to follow the ever-changing nomenclature. HaploFind is freely accessible at the following Web address: https://haplofind.unibo.it.

  9. Cattle ancestry in bison: explanations for higher mtDNA than autosomal ancestry.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Philip W

    2010-08-01

    Understanding and documenting the process of hybridization and introgression between related species is a major focus of recent evolutionary research using molecular techniques. Many North American bison herds have cattle ancestry introduced by crossbreeding over a century ago. Molecular estimates of this ancestry have shown much higher levels for cattle mtDNA than for autosomal cattle genes. A large part of this difference appears to be the result of partial reproductive isolation between the two species where only bison bull x domestic cow crosses are successful, and all the surviving progeny are females. In addition, selection against autosomal cattle genes in bison may have contributed to differential levels of cattle ancestry. The impact of selection against cattle mtDNA and gene flow of bison mtDNA are examined to explain particular combinations of mtDNA and autosomal cattle ancestry. A bottleneck, after the level of cattle ancestry in bison was reduced to a low level, is consistent with the high variance over autosomal loci observed for cattle ancestry, and differential selection among cattle loci in bison does not need to be invoked. Further examination of the cattle genome in bison may shed light on whether these markers, or their associated regions, are indeed neutral.

  10. Forensic and phylogeographic characterization of mtDNA lineages from northern Thailand (Chiang Mai).

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Bettina; Bodner, Martin; Amory, Sylvain; Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander; Horst, David; Horst, Basil; Sanguansermsri, Torpong; Parson, Walther; Brandstätter, Anita

    2009-11-01

    The immigration of diverse ethnic groups over the past centuries from surrounding countries into Thailand left footprints in the genetic composition of Thai mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages. The entire mtDNA control region (1,122 bp) was typed in 190 unrelated male volunteers from the northern Thailand province of Chiang Mai following highest quality standards. For a more precise haplogroup classification, selected single nucleotide polymorphisms from the mtDNA coding region were genotyped. We found several new, so far undescribed mtDNA lineages. Quasi-median networks were constructed for visualisation of character conflicts. The data were put into population-genetic relationships with other Southeast Asian populations. Although the frequencies of the Thai haplogroups were characteristic for Southeast Asia in terms of haplotype composition and genetic structure, the Thai population was significantly different from other Southeast Asian populations. This necessitates establishing regional databases, especially for forensic applications. The population data have been submitted to the EMPOP database (www.empop.org) and will be available on publication. PMID:19727793

  11. Disuniting uniformity: a pied cladistic canvas of mtDNA haplogroup H in Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Roostalu, Urmas; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Kivisild, Toomas; Metspalu, Ene; Tambets, Kristiina; Reidla, Maere; Tolk, Helle-Viivi; Parik, Jüri; Pennarun, Erwan; Laos, Sirle; Lunkina, Arina; Golubenko, Maria; Barac, Lovorka; Pericic, Marijana; Balanovsky, Oleg P; Gusar, Vladislava; Khusnutdinova, Elsa K; Stepanov, Vadim; Puzyrev, Valery; Rudan, Pavao; Balanovska, Elena V; Grechanina, Elena; Richard, Christelle; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventré, André; Anagnou, Nicholas P; Pappa, Kalliopi I; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel N; Claustres, Mireille; Gölge, Mukaddes; Mikerezi, Ilia; Usanga, Esien; Villems, Richard

    2004-11-01

    It has been often stated that the overall pattern of human maternal lineages in Europe is largely uniform. Yet this uniformity may also result from an insufficient depth and width of the phylogenetic analysis, in particular of the predominant western Eurasian haplogroup (Hg) H that comprises nearly a half of the European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) pool. Making use of the coding sequence information from 267 mtDNA Hg H sequences, we have analyzed 830 mtDNA genomes, from 11 European, Near and Middle Eastern, Central Asian, and Altaian populations. In addition to the seven previously specified subhaplogroups, we define fifteen novel subclades of Hg H present in the extant human populations of western Eurasia. The refinement of the phylogenetic resolution has allowed us to resolve a large number of homoplasies in phylogenetic trees of Hg H based on the first hypervariable segment (HVS-I) of mtDNA. As many as 50 out of 125 polymorphic positions in HVS-I were found to be mutated in more than one subcluster of Hg H. The phylogeographic analysis revealed that sub-Hgs H1*, H1b, H1f, H2a, H3, H6a, H6b, and H8 demonstrate distinct phylogeographic patterns. The monophyletic subhaplogroups of Hg H provide means for further progress in the understanding of the (pre)historic movements of women in Eurasia and for the understanding of the present-day genetic diversity of western Eurasians in general.

  12. Analysis of mtDNA variant segregation during early human embryonic development: a tool for successful NARP preimplantation diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Steffann, J; Frydman, N; Gigarel, N; Burlet, P; Ray, P F; Fanchin, R; Feyereisen, E; Kerbrat, V; Tachdjian, G; Bonnefont, J‐P; Frydman, R; Munnich, A

    2006-01-01

    Background Diseases arising from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are usually serious pleiotropic disorders with maternal inheritance. Owing to the high recurrence risk in the progeny of carrier females, “at‐risk” couples often ask for prenatal diagnosis. However, reliability of such practices remains under debate. Preimplantation diagnosis (PGD), a theoretical alternative to conventional prenatal diagnosis, requires that the mutant load measured in a single cell from an eight cell embryo accurately reflects the overall heteroplasmy of the whole embryo, but this is not known to be the case. Objective To investigate the segregation of an mtDNA length polymorphism in blastomeres of 15 control embryos from four unrelated couples, the NARP mutation in blastomeres of three embryos from a carrier of this mutation. Results Variability of the mtDNA polymorphism heteroplasmy among blastomeres from each embryo was limited, ranging from zero to 19%, with a mean of 7%. PGD for the neurogenic ataxia retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) mtDNA mutation (8993T→G) was therefore carried out in the carrier mother of an affected child. One of three embryos was shown to carry 100% of mutant mtDNA species while the remaining two were mutation‐free. These two embryos were transferred, resulting in a singleton pregnancy with delivery of a healthy child. Conclusions This PGD, the first reported for a mtDNA mutation, illustrates the skewed meiotic segregation of the NARP mtDNA mutation in early human development. However, discrepancies between the segregation patterns of the NARP mutation and the HV2 polymorphism indicate that a particular mtDNA nucleotide variant might differentially influenced the mtDNA segregation, precluding any assumption on feasibility of PGD for other mtDNA mutations. PMID:16155197

  13. Insertion of a self-splicing intron into the mtDNA of atriploblastic animal

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, Y.; Halanych, K.; Boore, J.L.

    2006-04-14

    Nephtys longosetosa is a carnivorous polychaete worm that lives in the intertidal and subtidal zones with worldwide distribution (pleijel&rouse2001). Its mitochondrial genome has the characteristics typical of most metazoans: 37 genes; circular molecule; almost no intergenic sequence; and no significant gene rearrangements when compared to other annelid mtDNAs (booremoritz19981995). Ubiquitous features as small intergenic regions and lack of introns suggested that metazoan mtDNAs are under strong selective pressures to reduce their genome size allowing for faster replication requirements (booremoritz19981995Lynch2005). Yet, in 1996 two type I introns were found in the mtDNA of the basal metazoan Metridium senile (FigureX). Breaking a long-standing rule (absence of introns in metazoan mtDNA), this finding was later supported by the further presence of group I introns in other cnidarians. Interestingly, only the class Anthozoa within cnidarians seems to harbor such introns. Although several hundreds of triploblastic metazoan mtDNAs have been sequenced, this study is the first evidence of mitochondrial introns in triploblastic metazoans. The cox1 gene of N. longosetosa has an intron of almost 2 kbs in length. This finding represents as well the first instance of a group II intron (anthozoans harbor group I introns) in all metazoan lineages. Opposite trends are observed within plants, fungi and protist mtDNAs, where introns (both group I and II) and other non-coding sequences are widespread. Plant, fungal and protist mtDNA structure and organization differ enormously from that of metazoan mtDNA. Both, plant and fungal mtDNA are dynamic molecules that undergo high rates of recombination, contain long intergenic spacer regions and harbor both group I and group II introns. However, as metazoans they have a conserved gene content. Protists, on the other hand have a striking variation of gene content and introns that account for the genome size variation. In contrast to

  14. Evolutionary neutrality of mtDNA introgression: evidence from complete mitogenome analysis in roe deer.

    PubMed

    Matosiuk, M; Sheremetyeva, I N; Sheremetyev, I S; Saveljev, A P; Borkowska, A

    2014-11-01

    Introgressive hybridization offers a unique platform for studying the molecular basis of natural selection acting on mitogenomes. Most of the mtDNA protein-coding genes are extremely conserved; however, some of the observed variations have potentially adaptive significance. Here, we evaluated whether the evolution of mtDNA in closely related roe deer species affected by widespread mtDNA introgression is neutral or adaptive. We characterized and compared 16 complete mitogenomes of European (Capreolus capreolus) and Siberian (C. pygargus) roe deer, including four of Siberian origin introgressed into European species. The average sequence divergence of species-specific lineages was estimated at 2.8% and varied across gene classes. Only 21 of 315 fixed differences identified in protein-coding genes represented nonsynonymous changes. Only three of them were determined to have arisen in the C. pygargus lineage since the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of both Capreolus species, reflecting a decelerated evolutionary ratio. The almost four-fold higher dN /dS ratio described for the European roe deer lineage is constrained by overall purifying selection, especially pronounced in the ND4 and ND5 genes. We suggest that the highly divergent C. capreolus lineage could have maintained a capability for genomic incorporation of the well-preserved and almost ancestral type of mtDNA present in C. pygargus. Our analyses did not indicate any signs of positive selection for Siberian roe deer mtDNA, suggesting that the present widespread introgression is evolutionarily neutral.

  15. Range-wide mtDNA phylogeography yields insights into the origins of Asian elephants.

    PubMed

    Vidya, T N C; Sukumar, Raman; Melnick, Don J

    2009-03-01

    Recent phylogeographic studies of the endangered Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) reveal two highly divergent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages, an elucidation of which is central to understanding the species's evolution. Previous explanations for the divergent clades include introgression of mtDNA haplotypes between ancestral species, allopatric divergence of the clades between Sri Lanka or the Sunda region and the mainland, historical trade of elephants, and retention of divergent lineages due to large population sizes. However, these studies lacked data from India and Myanmar, which host approximately 70 per cent of all extant Asian elephants. In this paper, we analyse mtDNA sequence data from 534 Asian elephants across the species's range to explain the current distribution of the two divergent clades. Based on phylogenetic reconstructions, estimates of times of origin of clades, probable ancestral areas of origin inferred from dispersal-vicariance analyses and the available fossil record, we believe both clades originated from Elephas hysudricus. This probably occurred allopatrically in different glacial refugia, the alpha clade in the Myanmar region and the beta clade possibly in southern India-Sri Lanka, 1.6-2.1Myr ago. Results from nested clade and dispersal-vicariance analyses indicate a subsequent isolation and independent diversification of the beta clade in both Sri Lanka and the Sunda region, followed by northward expansion of the clade. We also find more recent population expansions in both clades based on mismatch distributions. We therefore suggest a contraction-expansion scenario during severe climatic oscillations of the Quaternary, with range expansions from different refugia during warmer interglacials leading to the varying geographical overlaps of the two mtDNA clades. We also demonstrate that trade in Asian elephants has not substantially altered the species's mtDNA population genetic structure.

  16. A one step multiplex PCR assay for rapid screening of East Asian mtDNA haplogroups on forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Yoon, Jung Ah; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup typing has become an essential tool to study human evolutionary history and to infer the matrilineal bio-geographic ancestry. In forensic field, the screening of mtDNA haplogroups by genotyping of mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can help guarantee the quality of mtDNA sequence data as well as can reduce the need to sequence samples that do not match. Here, a multiplex mutagenically separated (MS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system was developed for simultaneous rapid detection of 14 coding region SNPs and one deletion motif representing common mtDNA haplogroups of East Asia. The multiplex MS PCR system we developed has the advantage of being a one step procedure that requires only a single PCR amplification with allele-specific primers and allowing straightforward designation of haplogroups along the branches of the phylogenetic tree. Therefore, it would be a simple, rapid, and reliable detection method useful for large-scale screening of mtDNA variations to determine East Asian mtDNA haplogroups.

  17. Mitochondrial mosaics in the liver of 3 infants with mtDNA defects

    PubMed Central

    Roels, Frank; Verloo, Patrick; Eyskens, François; François, Baudouin; Seneca, Sara; De Paepe, Boel; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Meersschaut, Valerie; Praet, Marleen; Scalais, Emmanuel; Espeel, Marc; Smet, Joél; Van Goethem, Gert; Van Coster, Rudy

    2009-01-01

    Background In muscle cytochrome oxidase (COX) negative fibers (mitochondrial mosaics) have often been visualized. Methods COX activity staining of liver for light and electron microscopy, muscle stains, blue native gel electrophoresis and activity assays of respiratory chain proteins, their immunolocalisation, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA analysis. Results Three unrelated infants showed a mitochondrial mosaic in the liver after staining for COX activity, i.e. hepatocytes with strongly reactive mitochondria were found adjacent to cells with many negative, or barely reactive, mitochondria. Deficiency was most severe in the patient diagnosed with Pearson syndrome. Ragged-red fibers were absent in muscle biopsies of all patients. Enzyme biochemistry was not diagnostic in muscle, fibroblasts and lymphocytes. Blue native gel electrophoresis of liver tissue, but not of muscle, demonstrated a decreased activity of complex IV; in both muscle and liver subcomplexes of complex V were seen. Immunocytochemistry of complex IV confirmed the mosaic pattern in two livers, but not in fibroblasts. MRI of the brain revealed severe white matter cavitation in the Pearson case, but only slight cortical atrophy in the Alpers-Huttenlocher patient, and a normal image in the 3rd. MtDNA in leucocytes showed a common deletion in 50% of the mtDNA molecules of the Pearson patient. In the patient diagnosed with Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome, mtDNA was depleted for 60% in muscle. In the 3rd patient muscular and hepatic mtDNA was depleted for more than 70%. Mutations in the nuclear encoded gene of POLG were subsequently found in both the 2nd and 3rd patients. Conclusion Histoenzymatic COX staining of a liver biopsy is fast and yields crucial data about the pathogenesis; it indicates whether mtDNA should be assayed. Each time a mitochondrial disorder is suspected and muscle data are non-diagnostic, a liver biopsy should be recommended. Mosaics are probably more frequent than observed until now. A

  18. Two distinct mtDNA lineages among captive African penguins in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murata, Michiko; Murakami, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    The African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) is one of the world's most endangered seabirds. In Japan, although the number of African penguins in captivity continues to increase, genetic data have not been collected for either wild or captive populations. To reveal genetic diversity and characterization in captive African penguins, we analyzed the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from a sample of 236 African penguins. Analysis of 433 bp of the control region and 1,140 bp of cytochrome b sequences revealed the existence of two mtDNA clades. Control region haplotypes were much more divergent (d=3.39%) between the two clades than within each clade. The divergence of these clades may reflect differences at the subspecies or geographical population level in African penguins. These findings suggest that at least two distinct maternal lineages exist in the wild populations of the African penguin. PMID:24317269

  19. Detection of Alu sequences and mtDNA in comets using padlock probes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Larsson, Chatarina; Henriksson, Sara; Collins, Andrew; Nilsson, Mats

    2006-07-01

    Single cell gel electrophoresis, or the comet assay, is widely used to measure DNA damage and repair. However, the behaviour of the DNA under the conditions used for the comet assay is not fully understood. In developing a method for studying specific gene sequences within comets, using 'padlock probes' (circularizable oligonucleotide probes), we have first applied probes that hybridize to Alu repetitive elements and to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). During the sequence of stages in the comet assay, mtDNA progressively disperses into the surrounding agarose gel, showing no tendency to remain with nuclear DNA in the comets. In contrast, Alu probes remain associated with both tail and head DNA. PMID:16940044

  20. Two distinct mtDNA lineages among captive African penguins in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murata, Michiko; Murakami, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    The African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) is one of the world's most endangered seabirds. In Japan, although the number of African penguins in captivity continues to increase, genetic data have not been collected for either wild or captive populations. To reveal genetic diversity and characterization in captive African penguins, we analyzed the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from a sample of 236 African penguins. Analysis of 433 bp of the control region and 1,140 bp of cytochrome b sequences revealed the existence of two mtDNA clades. Control region haplotypes were much more divergent (d=3.39%) between the two clades than within each clade. The divergence of these clades may reflect differences at the subspecies or geographical population level in African penguins. These findings suggest that at least two distinct maternal lineages exist in the wild populations of the African penguin.

  1. MtDNA mutation pattern in tumors and human evolution are shaped by similar selective constraints.

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, Ilia; Livneh, Erez A; Rubin, Eitan; Mishmar, Dan

    2009-04-01

    Multiple human mutational landscapes of normal and cancer conditions are currently available. However, while the unique mutational patterns of tumors have been extensively studied, little attention has been paid to similarities between malignant and normal conditions. Here we compared the pattern of mutations in the mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs) of cancer (98 sequences) and natural populations (2400 sequences). De novo mtDNA mutations in cancer preferentially colocalized with ancient variants in human phylogeny. A significant portion of the cancer mutations was organized in recurrent combinations (COMs), reaching a length of seven mutations, which also colocalized with ancient variants. Thus, by analyzing similarities rather than differences in patterns of mtDNA mutations in tumor and human evolution, we discovered evidence for similar selective constraints, suggesting a functional potential for these mutations.

  2. mtDNA mutation pattern in tumors and human evolution are shaped by similar selective constraints

    PubMed Central

    Zhidkov, Ilia; Livneh, Erez A.; Rubin, Eitan; Mishmar, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Multiple human mutational landscapes of normal and cancer conditions are currently available. However, while the unique mutational patterns of tumors have been extensively studied, little attention has been paid to similarities between malignant and normal conditions. Here we compared the pattern of mutations in the mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs) of cancer (98 sequences) and natural populations (2400 sequences). De novo mtDNA mutations in cancer preferentially colocalized with ancient variants in human phylogeny. A significant portion of the cancer mutations was organized in recurrent combinations (COMs), reaching a length of seven mutations, which also colocalized with ancient variants. Thus, by analyzing similarities rather than differences in patterns of mtDNA mutations in tumor and human evolution, we discovered evidence for similar selective constraints, suggesting a functional potential for these mutations. PMID:19211544

  3. Non-randomized mtDNA damage after ionizing radiation via charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xinguo; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Rong; He, Yang; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Although it is well known that there are mutation hot spots in mtDNA, whether there are damage hot spots remain elusive. In this study, the regional DNA damage of mitochondrial genome after ionizing radiation was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. The mtDNA damage level was found to be dose-dependent and regional unequal. The control region was the most susceptible region to oxidative damage. GGG, as an typical hole trap during charge transport, was found to be disproportionally enriched in the control region. A total of 107 vertebrate mitochondrial genomes were then analyzed to testify whether the GGG enrichment in control region was evolutionary conserved. Surprisingly, the triple G enrichment can be observed in most of the homeothermal animals, while the majority of heterothermic animals showed no triple G enrichment. These results indicated that the triple G enrichment in control region was related to the mitochondrial metabolism during evolution.

  4. Mitochondrial comparative genomics and phylogenetic signal assessment of mtDNA among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Maryam; Daubois, Laurence; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genes, such as cytochrome C oxidase genes (cox), have been widely used for barcoding in many groups of organisms, although this approach has been less powerful in the fungal kingdom due to the rapid evolution of their mt genomes. The use of mt genes in phylogenetic studies of Dikarya has been met with success, while early diverging fungal lineages remain less studied, particularly the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Advances in next-generation sequencing have substantially increased the number of publically available mtDNA sequences for the Glomeromycota. As a result, comparison of mtDNA across key AMF taxa can now be applied to assess the phylogenetic signal of individual mt coding genes, as well as concatenated subsets of coding genes. Here we show comparative analyses of publically available mt genomes of Glomeromycota, augmented with two mtDNA genomes that were newly sequenced for this study (Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM240159 and Glomus aggregatum DAOM240163), resulting in 16 complete mtDNA datasets. R. irregularis isolate DAOM240159 and G. aggregatum isolate DAOM240163 showed mt genomes measuring 72,293bp and 69,505bp with G+C contents of 37.1% and 37.3%, respectively. We assessed the phylogenies inferred from single mt genes and complete sets of coding genes, which are referred to as "supergenes" (16 concatenated coding genes), using Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests, in order to identify genes that best described AMF phylogeny. We found that rnl, nad5, cox1, and nad2 genes, as well as concatenated subset of these genes, provided phylogenies that were similar to the supergene set. This mitochondrial genomic analysis was also combined with principal coordinate and partitioning analyses, which helped to unravel certain evolutionary relationships in the Rhizophagus genus and for G. aggregatum within the Glomeromycota. We showed evidence to support the position of G. aggregatum within the R. irregularis 'species complex'. PMID:26868331

  5. Bridging near and remote Oceania: mtDNA and NRY variation in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Delfin, Frederick; Myles, Sean; Choi, Ying; Hughes, David; Illek, Robert; van Oven, Mannis; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Kayser, Manfred; Stoneking, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Although genetic studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of the colonization of Near and Remote Oceania, important gaps still exist. One such gap is the Solomon Islands, which extend between Bougainville and Vanuatu, thereby bridging Near and Remote Oceania, and include both Austronesian-speaking and Papuan-speaking groups. Here, we describe patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nonrecombining Y chromosome (NRY) variation in over 700 individuals from 18 populations in the Solomons, including 11 Austronesian-speaking groups, 3 Papuan-speaking groups, and 4 Polynesian Outliers (descended via back migration from Polynesia). We find evidence for ancient (pre-Lapita) colonization of the Solomons in old NRY paragroups as well as from M2-M353, which probably arose in the Solomons ∼9,200 years ago and is the most frequent NRY haplogroup there. There are no consistent genetic differences between Austronesian-speaking and Papuan-speaking groups, suggesting extensive genetic contact between them. Santa Cruz, which is located in Remote Oceania, shows unusually low frequencies of mtDNA and NRY haplogroups of recent Asian ancestry. This is in apparent contradiction with expectations based on archaeological and linguistic evidence for an early (∼3,200 years ago), direct colonization of Santa Cruz by Lapita people from the Bismarck Archipelago, via a migration that "leapfrogged" over the rest of the Solomons. Polynesian Outliers show dramatic island-specific founder events involving various NRY haplogroups. We also find that NRY, but not mtDNA, genetic distance is correlated with the geographic distance between Solomons groups and that historically attested spheres of cultural interaction are associated with the recent genetic structure of Solomons groups, as revealed by mtDNA HV1 sequence and Y-STR haplotype diversity. Our results fill an important lacuna in human genetic studies of Oceania and aid in understanding the colonization and genetic history of

  6. Murine cardiac mtDNA: effects of transgenic manipulation of nucleoside phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J; Hosseini, Seyed H; Cucoranu, Ioan; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Green, Elgin; Johnson, David; Wittich, Bree; Srivastava, Jaya; Ivey, Kristopher; Fields, Earl; Russ, Rodney; Raper, C Michael; Santoianni, Robert; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity results from pyrimidine nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV/AIDS. In the heart, this can deplete mitochondrial (mt) DNA and cause cardiac dysfunction (eg, left ventricle hypertrophy, LVH). Four unique transgenic, cardiac-targeted overexpressors (TGs) were generated to determine their individual impact on native mitochondrial biogenesis and effects of NRTI administration on development of mitochondrial toxicity. TGs included cardiac-specific overexpression of native thymidine kinase 2 (TK2), two pathogenic TK2 mutants (H121N and I212N), and a mutant of mtDNA polymerase, pol-γ (Y955C). Each was treated with antiretrovirals (AZT-HAART, 3 or 10 weeks, zidovudine (AZT) + lamivudine (3TC) + indinavir, or vehicle control). Parameters included left ventricle (LV) performance (echocardiography), LV mtDNA abundance (real-time PCR), and mitochondrial fine structure (electron microscopy, EM) as a function of duration of treatment and presence of TG. mtDNA abundance significantly decreased in Y955C TG, increased in TK2 native and I212N TGs, and was unchanged in H121N TGs at 10 weeks regardless of treatment. Y955C and I212N TGs exhibited LVH during growth irrespective of treatment. Y955C TGs exhibited cardiomyopathy (CM) at 3 and 10 weeks irrespective of treatment, whereas H121N and I212N TGs exhibited CM only after 10 weeks AZT-HAART. EM features were consistent with cardiac dysfunction. mtDNA abundance and cardiac functional changes were related to TG expression of mitochondrially related genes, mutations thereof, and NRTIs. PMID:19079325

  7. Pedigree analysis in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy families with a pathogenic mtDNA mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, A E; Sweeney, M G; Govan, G G; Riordan-Eva, P

    1995-01-01

    Eighty-nine index patients from 85 families were defined as having Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) by the presence of one of the mtDNA mutations at positions 11778 (66 families), 3460 (8 families), or 14484 (11 families). There were 62 secondary cases. Overall, 64% of index cases had a history of similarly affected relatives. The ratios of affected males to affected females were 3.7:1 (11778), 4.3:1 (3460), and 7.7:1 (14484). The 95th centile for age at onset of symptoms was close to 50 years in index, secondary, male, and female patients. There were no differences in the distributions of age at onset between different mutation groups, between index and secondary cases, or between males and females, apart from this being slightly later in all female patients than in male 11778 patients. There was no significant correlation between age at onset in index cases and that in their affected siblings or cousins. Heteroplasmy (< 96% mutant mtDNA) was detected in 4% of affected subjects (67%-90% mutant mtDNA) and in 13.6% of 140 unaffected relatives (< 5%-90% mutant mtDNA). Analysis of all pedigrees, excluding sibships < 50 years of age and index cases, indicated recurrence risks of 30%, 8%, 46%, 10%, 31%, and 6%, respectively, to the brothers, sisters, nephews, nieces, and male and female matrilineal first cousins of index cases. Affected females were more likely to have affected children, particularly daughters, than were unaffected female carriers. The pedigree data were entirely compatible with the previously proposed X-linked susceptibility locus, with a gene frequency of .08, penetrance of .11 in heterozygous females, and 40% of affected females being homozygous, the remainder being explained by heterozygosity and disadvantageous X inactivation. PMID:7611298

  8. Tracing European Founder Lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent; Hickey, Eileen; Vega, Emilce; Sykes, Bryan; Guida, Valentina; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; Cruciani, Fulvio; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Thomas, Mark; Rychkov, Serge; Rychkov, Oksana; Rychkov, Yuri; Gölge, Mukaddes; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Hill, Emmeline; Bradley, Dan; Romano, Valentino; Calì, Francesco; Vona, Giuseppe; Demaine, Andrew; Papiha, Surinder; Triantaphyllidis, Costas; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Hatina, Jiři; Belledi, Michele; Di Rienzo, Anna; Oppenheim, Ariella; Nørby, Søren; Al-Zaheri, Nadia; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Scozzari, Rosaria; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2,804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans. PMID:11032788

  9. Mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeasts: towards an integrated understanding.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Recent advances in yeast mitogenomics have significantly contributed to our understanding of the diversity of organization, structure and topology in the mitochondrial genome of budding yeasts. In parallel, new insights on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae highlighted an integrated scenario where recombination, replication and segregation of mtDNA are intricately linked to mitochondrial nucleoid (mt-nucleoid) structure and organelle sorting. In addition to this, recent discoveries of bifunctional roles of some mitochondrial proteins have interesting implications on mito-nuclear genome interactions and the relationship between mtDNA inheritance, yeast fitness and speciation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on yeast mitogenomics, mtDNA inheritance with regard to mt-nucleoid structure and organelle dynamics, and mito-nuclear genome interactions.

  10. Detection of age-related duplications in mtDNA from human muscles and bones.

    PubMed

    Lacan, Marie; Thèves, Catherine; Keyser, Christine; Farrugia, Audrey; Baraybar, Jose-Pablo; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2011-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the age-related accumulation of duplications in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extracted from skeletal muscle. This kind of mutation had not yet been studied in bone. The detection of age-related mutations in bone tissue could help to estimate age at death within the context of legal medicine or/and anthropological identification procedures, when traditional osteological markers studied are absent or inefficient. As we detected an accumulation of a point mutation in mtDNA from an older individual's bones in a previous study, we tried here to identify if three reported duplications (150, 190, 260 bp) accumulate in this type of tissue. We developed a sensitive method which consists in the use of back-to-back primers during amplification followed by an electrophoresis capillary analysis. The aim of this study was to confirm that at least one duplication appears systematically in muscle tissue after the age of 20 and to evaluate the duplication age appearance in bones extracted from the same individuals. We found that the number of duplications increase from 38 years and that at least one duplicated fragment is present in 50% of cases after 70 years in this tissue. These results confirm that several age-related mutations can be detected in the D-loop of mtDNA and open the way for the use of molecular markers for age estimation in forensic and/or anthropological identification.

  11. Coding region SNP analysis to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The high population frequencies of three control region haplotypes contribute to the low discrimination power of the dog mtDNA control region. It also diminishes the evidential power of a match with one of these haplotypes in forensic casework. A mitochondrial genome study of 214 Belgian dogs suggested 26 polymorphic coding region sites that successfully resolved dogs with the three most frequent control region haplotypes. In this study, three SNP assays were developed to determine the identity of the 26 informative sites. The control region of 132 newly sampled dogs was sequenced and added to the study of 214 dogs. The assays were applied to 58 dogs of the haplotypes of interest, which confirmed their suitability for enhancing dog mtDNA discrimination power. In the Belgian population study of 346 dogs, the set of 26 sites divided the dogs into 25 clusters of mtGenome sequences with substantially lower population frequency estimates than their control region sequences. In case of a match with one of the three control region haplotypes, using these three SNP assays in conjunction with control region sequencing would augment the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis from 92.9% to 97.0%.

  12. A new mtDNA mutation showing accumulation with time and restriction to skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, K.; Wilson, J.N.; Taylor, L.

    1997-02-01

    We have identified a new mutation in mtDNA, involving tRNA{sup Leu(CUN)} in a patient manifesting an isolated skeletal myopathy. This heteroplasmic A{r_arrow}G transition at position 12320 affects the T{Psi}C loop at a conserved site and was not found in 120 controls. Analysis of cultured fibroblasts, white blood cells/platelets, and skeletal muscle showed that only skeletal muscle contained the mutation and that only this tissue demonstrated a biochemical defect of respiratory-chain activity. In a series of four muscle-biopsy specimens taken over a 12-year period, there was a gradual increase, from 70% to 90%, in the overall level of mutation, as well as a marked clinical deterioration. Single-fiber PCR confirmed that the proportion of mutant mtDNA was highest in cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. This study, which reports a mutation involving tRNA{sup Leu(CUN)}, demonstrates clearly that mtDNA point mutations can accumulate over time and may be restricted in their tissue distribution. Furthermore, clinical deterioration seemed to follow the increase in the level of mutation, although, interestingly, the appearance of fibers deficient in respiratory-chain activity showed a lag period. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Peopling of Sahul: mtDNA variation in aboriginal Australian and Papua New Guinean populations.

    PubMed Central

    Redd, A J; Stoneking, M

    1999-01-01

    We examined genetic affinities of Aboriginal Australian and New Guinean populations by using nucleotide variation in the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region (CR). A total of 318 individuals from highland Papua New Guinea (PNG), coastal PNG, and Aboriginal Australian populations were typed with a panel of 29 sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes. The SSO-probe panel included five new probes that were used to type an additional 1,037 individuals from several Asian populations. The SSO-type data guided the selection of 78 individuals from Australia and east Indonesia for CR sequencing. A gene tree of these CR sequences, combined with published sequences from worldwide populations, contains two previously identified highland PNG clusters that do not include any Aboriginal Australians; the highland PNG clusters have coalescent time estimates of approximately 80,000 and 122,000 years ago, suggesting ancient isolation and genetic drift. SSO-type data indicate that 84% of the sample of PNG highlander mtDNA belong to these two clusters. In contrast, the Aboriginal Australian sequences are intermingled throughout the tree and cluster with sequences from multiple populations. Phylogenetic and multidimensional-scaling analyses of CR sequences and SSO types split PNG highland and Aboriginal Australian populations and link Aboriginal Australian populations with populations from the subcontinent of India. These mtDNA results do not support a close relationship between Aboriginal Australian and PNG populations but instead suggest multiple migrations in the peopling of Sahul. PMID:10441589

  14. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative damage in muscle of mtDNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Jill E; Safdar, Adeel; Abadi, Arkan; MacNeil, Lauren G; Crane, Justin D; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Kaufman, Brett A

    2014-10-01

    A causal role for mitochondrial dysfunction in mammalian aging is supported by recent studies of the mtDNA mutator mouse ("PolG" mouse), which harbors a defect in the proofreading-exonuclease activity of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. These mice exhibit accelerated aging phenotypes characteristic of human aging, including systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, exercise intolerance, alopecia and graying of hair, curvature of the spine, and premature mortality. While mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to cause increased oxidative stress in many systems, several groups have suggested that PolG mutator mice show no markers of oxidative damage. These mice have been presented as proof that mitochondrial dysfunction is sufficient to accelerate aging without oxidative stress. In this study, by normalizing to mitochondrial content in enriched fractions we detected increased oxidative modification of protein and DNA in PolG skeletal muscle mitochondria. We separately developed novel methods that allow simultaneous direct measurement of mtDNA replication defects and oxidative damage. Using this approach, we find evidence that suggests PolG muscle mtDNA is indeed oxidatively damaged. We also observed a significant decrease in antioxidants and expression of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway components and DNA repair enzymes in these mice, indicating an association of maladaptive gene expression with the phenotypes observed in PolG mice. Together, these findings demonstrate the presence of oxidative damage associated with the premature aging-like phenotypes induced by mitochondrial dysfunction.

  15. Coding region SNP analysis to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The high population frequencies of three control region haplotypes contribute to the low discrimination power of the dog mtDNA control region. It also diminishes the evidential power of a match with one of these haplotypes in forensic casework. A mitochondrial genome study of 214 Belgian dogs suggested 26 polymorphic coding region sites that successfully resolved dogs with the three most frequent control region haplotypes. In this study, three SNP assays were developed to determine the identity of the 26 informative sites. The control region of 132 newly sampled dogs was sequenced and added to the study of 214 dogs. The assays were applied to 58 dogs of the haplotypes of interest, which confirmed their suitability for enhancing dog mtDNA discrimination power. In the Belgian population study of 346 dogs, the set of 26 sites divided the dogs into 25 clusters of mtGenome sequences with substantially lower population frequency estimates than their control region sequences. In case of a match with one of the three control region haplotypes, using these three SNP assays in conjunction with control region sequencing would augment the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis from 92.9% to 97.0%. PMID:25299153

  16. Rapid deployment of the five founding Amerind mtDNA haplogroups via coastal and riverine colonization.

    PubMed

    Fix, Alan G

    2005-10-01

    Numerous studies of variation in mtDNA in Amerindian populations established that four haplogroups are present throughout both North and South America. These four haplogroups (A, B, C, and D) and perhaps a fifth (X) in North America are postulated to be present in the initial founding migration to the Americas. Furthermore, studies of ancient mtDNA in North America suggested long-term regional continuity of the frequencies of these founding haplogroups. Present-day tribal groups possess high frequencies of private mtDNA haplotypes (variants within the major haplogroups), consistent with early establishment of local isolation of regional populations. Clearly these patterns have implications for the mode of colonization of the hemisphere. Recently, the earlier consensus among archaeologists for an initial colonization by Clovis hunters arriving through an ice-free corridor and expanding in a "blitzkrieg " wave was shown to be inconsistent with extensive genetic variability in Native Americans; a coastal migration route avoids this problem. The present paper demonstrates through a computer simulation model how colonization along coasts and rivers could have rapidly spread the founding lineages widely through North America.

  17. mtDNA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in four Native American populations from southern Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A.; Chen, Y. S.; Semino, O.; Santachiara-Beneceretti, A. S.; Scott, C. R.; Lott, M. T.; Winter, M.; Wallace, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was examined in 60 Native Americans (Mixtecs from the Alta, Mixtecs from the Baja, Valley Zapotecs, and Highland Mixe) from southern Mexico by PCR amplification and high-resolution restriction endonuclease analysis. Four groups of mtDNA haplotypes (haplogroups A, B, C, and D) characterize Amerind populations, but only three (haplogroups A, B, and C) were observed in these Mexican populations. The comparison of their mtDNA variation with that observed in other populations from Mexico and Central America permits a clear distinction among the different Middle American tribes and raises questions about some of their linguistic affiliations. The males of these population samples were also analyzed for Y-chromosome RFLPs with the probes 49a, 49f, and 12f2. This analysis suggests that certain Y-chromosome haplotypes were brought from Asia during the colonization of the Americas, and a differential gene flow was introduced into Native American populations from European males and females. Images Figure 4 PMID:8304347

  18. Genetic analysis of 15 mtDNA SNP loci in Chinese Yi ethnic group using SNaPshot minisequencing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chun-Ting; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Qing-Xia; Wang, Hong-Dan; Yin, Cai-Yong; Fan, Han-Ting; Hu, Ling-Li; Shen, Chun-Mei; Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2016-01-15

    SNaPshot minisequencing is a rapid and robust methodology based on a single base extension with a labeled ddNTP. The present study detected 15 selected SNPs in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control and coding regions by minisequencing methodology using SNaPshot for forensic purpose. The samples were collected from 99 unrelated individuals of the Yi ethnic minority group in Yunnan Province. We have predominantly found high-frequency transitions (91.7%) and a significantly lower frequency of transversions (8.3%). The nt152, 489, 8701, 10,398, 16,183, and 16,362 loci were highly polymorphic, while the nt231, 473 and 581 loci were not polymorphic in the studied population. Based on these 15 SNPs, a total of 28 mtDNA haplotypes were defined in 99 individuals with the haplotype diversity of 0.9136. Also, we compared the mtDNA sequences of Yi group and other 9 populations worldwide and drew a Neighbor-Joining tree based on the shared 12 mtDNA SNP loci, which demonstrated a close relationship between Yi and Bai groups. In conclusion, the analysis of the 15 selected SNPs increases considerably the discrimination power of mtDNA. Moreover, the SNaPshot minisequencing method could quickly detect mtDNA SNPs, and is economical and sensitive. The set of selected 15 SNPs is highly informative and is capable for anthropology genetic analysis.

  19. Genetic analysis of 15 mtDNA SNP loci in Chinese Yi ethnic group using SNaPshot minisequencing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chun-Ting; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Qing-Xia; Wang, Hong-Dan; Yin, Cai-Yong; Fan, Han-Ting; Hu, Ling-Li; Shen, Chun-Mei; Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2016-01-15

    SNaPshot minisequencing is a rapid and robust methodology based on a single base extension with a labeled ddNTP. The present study detected 15 selected SNPs in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control and coding regions by minisequencing methodology using SNaPshot for forensic purpose. The samples were collected from 99 unrelated individuals of the Yi ethnic minority group in Yunnan Province. We have predominantly found high-frequency transitions (91.7%) and a significantly lower frequency of transversions (8.3%). The nt152, 489, 8701, 10,398, 16,183, and 16,362 loci were highly polymorphic, while the nt231, 473 and 581 loci were not polymorphic in the studied population. Based on these 15 SNPs, a total of 28 mtDNA haplotypes were defined in 99 individuals with the haplotype diversity of 0.9136. Also, we compared the mtDNA sequences of Yi group and other 9 populations worldwide and drew a Neighbor-Joining tree based on the shared 12 mtDNA SNP loci, which demonstrated a close relationship between Yi and Bai groups. In conclusion, the analysis of the 15 selected SNPs increases considerably the discrimination power of mtDNA. Moreover, the SNaPshot minisequencing method could quickly detect mtDNA SNPs, and is economical and sensitive. The set of selected 15 SNPs is highly informative and is capable for anthropology genetic analysis. PMID:26432004

  20. Mitochondrial DNA integrity changes with age but does not correlate with learning performance in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Hystad, E M; Amdam, G V; Eide, L

    2014-01-01

    The honey bee is a well-established model organism to study aging, learning and memory. Here, we used young and old forager honey bees to investigate whether age-related learning capacity correlates with mitochondrial function. The bees were selected for age and learning performance and mitochondrial function was evaluated by measuring mtDNA integrity, mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial gene expression. Quite unexpectedly, mtDNA from young bees showed more damage than mtDNA from older bees, but neither mtDNA integrity, nor mtDNA copy number nor mitochondrial gene expression correlated with learning performance. Although not statistically significant (p=0.07) the level of L-rRNA increased with age in good learners whereas it decreased in poor learners. Our results show that learning performance in honey bee does not correlate with absolute mitochondrial parameters like mtDNA damage, copy number or expression of mitochondrial genes, but may be associated with the ability to regulate mitochondrial activity.

  1. Near-complete elimination of mutant mtDNA by iterative or dynamic dose-controlled treatment with mtZFNs.

    PubMed

    Gammage, Payam A; Gaude, Edoardo; Van Haute, Lindsey; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Jackson, Christopher B; Rorbach, Joanna; Pekalski, Marcin L; Robinson, Alan J; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Frezza, Christian; Minczuk, Michal

    2016-09-19

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most cases, mutant and wild-type mtDNAs coexist, resulting in heteroplasmy. The selective elimination of mutant mtDNA, and consequent enrichment of wild-type mtDNA, can rescue pathological phenotypes in heteroplasmic cells. Use of the mitochondrially targeted zinc finger-nuclease (mtZFN) results in degradation of mutant mtDNA through site-specific DNA cleavage. Here, we describe a substantial enhancement of our previous mtZFN-based approaches to targeting mtDNA, allowing near-complete directional shifts of mtDNA heteroplasmy, either by iterative treatment or through finely controlled expression of mtZFN, which limits off-target catalysis and undesired mtDNA copy number depletion. To demonstrate the utility of this improved approach, we generated an isogenic distribution of heteroplasmic cells with variable mtDNA mutant level from the same parental source without clonal selection. Analysis of these populations demonstrated an altered metabolic signature in cells harbouring decreased levels of mutant m.8993T>G mtDNA, associated with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). We conclude that mtZFN-based approaches offer means for mtDNA heteroplasmy manipulation in basic research, and may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in selected mitochondrial diseases.

  2. Near-complete elimination of mutant mtDNA by iterative or dynamic dose-controlled treatment with mtZFNs.

    PubMed

    Gammage, Payam A; Gaude, Edoardo; Van Haute, Lindsey; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Jackson, Christopher B; Rorbach, Joanna; Pekalski, Marcin L; Robinson, Alan J; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Frezza, Christian; Minczuk, Michal

    2016-09-19

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most cases, mutant and wild-type mtDNAs coexist, resulting in heteroplasmy. The selective elimination of mutant mtDNA, and consequent enrichment of wild-type mtDNA, can rescue pathological phenotypes in heteroplasmic cells. Use of the mitochondrially targeted zinc finger-nuclease (mtZFN) results in degradation of mutant mtDNA through site-specific DNA cleavage. Here, we describe a substantial enhancement of our previous mtZFN-based approaches to targeting mtDNA, allowing near-complete directional shifts of mtDNA heteroplasmy, either by iterative treatment or through finely controlled expression of mtZFN, which limits off-target catalysis and undesired mtDNA copy number depletion. To demonstrate the utility of this improved approach, we generated an isogenic distribution of heteroplasmic cells with variable mtDNA mutant level from the same parental source without clonal selection. Analysis of these populations demonstrated an altered metabolic signature in cells harbouring decreased levels of mutant m.8993T>G mtDNA, associated with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). We conclude that mtZFN-based approaches offer means for mtDNA heteroplasmy manipulation in basic research, and may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in selected mitochondrial diseases. PMID:27466392

  3. Near-complete elimination of mutant mtDNA by iterative or dynamic dose-controlled treatment with mtZFNs

    PubMed Central

    Gammage, Payam A.; Gaude, Edoardo; Van Haute, Lindsey; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Jackson, Christopher B.; Rorbach, Joanna; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Robinson, Alan J.; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Frezza, Christian; Minczuk, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In most cases, mutant and wild-type mtDNAs coexist, resulting in heteroplasmy. The selective elimination of mutant mtDNA, and consequent enrichment of wild-type mtDNA, can rescue pathological phenotypes in heteroplasmic cells. Use of the mitochondrially targeted zinc finger-nuclease (mtZFN) results in degradation of mutant mtDNA through site-specific DNA cleavage. Here, we describe a substantial enhancement of our previous mtZFN-based approaches to targeting mtDNA, allowing near-complete directional shifts of mtDNA heteroplasmy, either by iterative treatment or through finely controlled expression of mtZFN, which limits off-target catalysis and undesired mtDNA copy number depletion. To demonstrate the utility of this improved approach, we generated an isogenic distribution of heteroplasmic cells with variable mtDNA mutant level from the same parental source without clonal selection. Analysis of these populations demonstrated an altered metabolic signature in cells harbouring decreased levels of mutant m.8993T>G mtDNA, associated with neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP). We conclude that mtZFN-based approaches offer means for mtDNA heteroplasmy manipulation in basic research, and may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention in selected mitochondrial diseases. PMID:27466392

  4. Homopolymeric tract heteroplasmy in mtDNA from tissues and single oocytes: Support for a genetic bottleneck

    SciTech Connect

    Marchington, D.R.; Hartshorne, G.M.; Barlow, D.; Poulton, J.

    1997-02-01

    While mtDNA polymorphisms at single base positions are common, the overwhelming majority of the mitochondrial genomes within a single individual are usually identical. When there is a point-mutation difference between a mother and her offspring, there may be a complete switching of mtDNA type within a single generation. It is generally assumed that there is a genetic bottleneck whereby a single or small number of founder mtDNA(s) populate the organism, but it is not known at which stages the restriction/amplification of mtDNA subtype(s) occur, and this uncertainty impedes antenatal diagnosis for mtDNA disorders. Length polymorphisms in homopolymeric tracts have been demonstrated in the large noncoding region of mtDNA. We have developed a new method, T-PCR (trimmed PCR), to quantitate heteroplasmy for two of these tracts (D310 and D16189). D310 variation is sufficient to indicate clonal origins of tissues and single oocytes. Tissues from normal individuals often possessed more than one length variant (heteroplasmy). However, there was no difference in the pattern of the length variants between somatic tissues in any control individual when bulk samples were taken. Oocytes from normal women undergoing in vitro fertilization were frequently heteroplasmic for length variants, and in two cases the modal length of the D310 tract differed in individual oocytes from the same woman. These data suggest that a restriction/amplification event, which we attribute to clonal expansion of founder mtDNA(s), has occurred by the time oocytes are mature, although further segregation may occur at a later stage. In contrast to controls, the length distribution of the D310 tract varied between tissues in a patient with heteroplasmic mtDNA rearrangements, suggesting that these mutants influence segregation. These findings have important implications for the genetic counselling of patients with pathogenic mtDNA mutations. 21 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. MtDNA analysis reveals enriched pathogenic mutations in Tibetan highlanders.

    PubMed

    Kang, Longli; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Menghan; Yan, Shi; Li, Lei; Liu, Lijun; Liu, Kai; Hu, Kang; Chen, Feng; Ma, Lifeng; Qin, Zhendong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan highlanders, including Tibetans, Monpas, Lhobas, Dengs and Sherpas, are considered highly adaptive to severe hypoxic environments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might be important in hypoxia adaptation given its role in coding core subunits of oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, we employed 549 complete highlander mtDNA sequences (including 432 random samples) to obtain a comprehensive view of highlander mtDNA profile. In the phylogeny of a total of 36,914 sequences, we identified 21 major haplogroups representing founding events of highlanders, most of which were coalesced in 10 kya. Through founder analysis, we proposed a three-phase model of colonizing the plateau, i.e., pre-LGM Time (30 kya, 4.68%), post-LGM Paleolithic Time (16.8 kya, 29.31%) and Neolithic Time (after 8 kya, 66.01% in total). We observed that pathogenic mutations occurred far more frequently in 22 highlander-specific lineages (five lineages carrying two pathogenic mutations and six carrying one) than in the 6,857 haplogroups of all the 36,914 sequences (P = 4.87 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, the number of possible pathogenic mutations carried by highlanders (in average 3.18 ± 1.27) were significantly higher than that in controls (2.82 ± 1.40) (P = 1.89 × 10(-4)). Considering that function-altering and pathogenic mutations are enriched in highlanders, we therefore hypothesize that they may have played a role in hypoxia adaptation. PMID:27498855

  6. Deciphering Past Human Population Movements in Oceania: Provably Optimal Trees of 127 mtDNA Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Melanie J.; Martinez-Arias, Rosa; Holland, Barbara R.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Penny, David

    2009-01-01

    The settlement of the many island groups of Remote Oceania occurred relatively late in prehistory, beginning approximately 3,000 years ago when people sailed eastwards into the Pacific from Near Oceania, where evidence of human settlement dates from as early as 40,000 years ago. Archeological and linguistic analyses have suggested the settlers of Remote Oceania had ancestry in Taiwan, as descendants of a proposed Neolithic expansion that began approximately 5,500 years ago. Other researchers have suggested that the settlers were descendants of peoples from Island Southeast Asia or the existing inhabitants of Near Oceania alone. To explore patterns of maternal descent in Oceania, we have assembled and analyzed a data set of 137 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from Oceania, Australia, Island Southeast Asia, and Taiwan that includes 19 sequences generated for this project. Using the MinMax Squeeze Approach (MMS), we report the consensus network of 165 most parsimonious trees for the Oceanic data set, increasing by many orders of magnitude the numbers of trees for which a provable minimal solution has been found. The new mtDNA sequences highlight the limitations of partial sequencing for assigning sequences to haplogroups and dating recent divergence events. The provably optimal trees found for the entire mtDNA sequences using the MMS method provide a reliable and robust framework for the interpretation of evolutionary relationships and confirm that the female settlers of Remote Oceania descended from both the existing inhabitants of Near Oceania and more recent migrants into the region. PMID:16855009

  7. Autosomal microsatellite and mtDNA genetic analysis in Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Romano, V; Calì, F; Ragalmuto, A; D'Anna, R P; Flugy, A; De Leo, G; Giambalvo, O; Lisa, A; Fiorani, O; Di Gaetano, C; Salerno, A; Tamouza, R; Charron, D; Zei, G; Matullo, G; Piazza, A

    2003-01-01

    DNA samples from 465 blood donors living in 7 towns of Sicily, the largest island of Italy, have been collected according to well defined criteria, and their genetic heterogeneity tested on the basis of 9 autosomal microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms for a total of 85 microsatellite allele and 10 mtDNA haplogroup frequencies. A preliminary account of the results shows that: a) the samples are genetically heterogeneous; b) the first principal coordinates of the samples are correlated more with their longitude than with their latitude, and this result is even more remarkable when one outlier sample (Butera) is not considered; c) distances among samples calculated from allele and haplogroup frequencies and from the isonymy matrix are weakly correlated (r = 0.43, P = 0.06) but such correlation disappears (r = 0.16) if the mtDNA haplogroups alone are taken into account; d) mtDNA haplogroups and microsatellite distances suggest settlements of people occurred at different times: divergence times inferred from microsatellite data seem to describe a genetic composition of the town of Sciacca mainly derived from settlements after the Roman conquest of Sicily (First Punic war, 246 BC), while all other divergence times take root from the second to the first millennium BC, and therefore seem to backdate to the pre-Hellenistic period. A more reliable association of these diachronic genetic strata to different historical populations (e.g. Sicani, Elymi, Siculi), if possible, must be postponed to the analysis of more samples and hopefully more informative uniparental DNA markers such as the recently available DHPLC-SNP polymorphisms of the Y chromosome.

  8. MtDNA analysis reveals enriched pathogenic mutations in Tibetan highlanders

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Longli; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Menghan; Yan, Shi; Li, Lei; Liu, Lijun; Liu, Kai; Hu, Kang; Chen, Feng; Ma, Lifeng; Qin, Zhendong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan highlanders, including Tibetans, Monpas, Lhobas, Dengs and Sherpas, are considered highly adaptive to severe hypoxic environments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might be important in hypoxia adaptation given its role in coding core subunits of oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, we employed 549 complete highlander mtDNA sequences (including 432 random samples) to obtain a comprehensive view of highlander mtDNA profile. In the phylogeny of a total of 36,914 sequences, we identified 21 major haplogroups representing founding events of highlanders, most of which were coalesced in 10 kya. Through founder analysis, we proposed a three-phase model of colonizing the plateau, i.e., pre-LGM Time (30 kya, 4.68%), post-LGM Paleolithic Time (16.8 kya, 29.31%) and Neolithic Time (after 8 kya, 66.01% in total). We observed that pathogenic mutations occurred far more frequently in 22 highlander-specific lineages (five lineages carrying two pathogenic mutations and six carrying one) than in the 6,857 haplogroups of all the 36,914 sequences (P = 4.87 × 10−8). Furthermore, the number of possible pathogenic mutations carried by highlanders (in average 3.18 ± 1.27) were significantly higher than that in controls (2.82 ± 1.40) (P = 1.89 × 10−4). Considering that function-altering and pathogenic mutations are enriched in highlanders, we therefore hypothesize that they may have played a role in hypoxia adaptation. PMID:27498855

  9. Age-Related and Heteroplasmy-Related Variation in Human mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome is present in many copies in human cells, and intra-individual variation in mtDNA sequences is known as heteroplasmy. Recent studies found that heteroplasmies are highly tissue-specific, site-specific, and allele-specific, however the functional implications have not been explored. This study investigates variation in mtDNA copy numbers (mtCN) in 12 different tissues obtained at autopsy from 152 individuals (ranging in age from 3 days to 96 years). Three different methods to estimate mtCN were compared: shotgun sequencing (in 4 tissues), capture-enriched sequencing (in 12 tissues) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR, in 2 tissues). The highest precision in mtCN estimation was achieved using shotgun sequencing data. However, capture-enrichment data provide reliable estimates of relative (albeit not absolute) mtCNs. Comparisons of mtCN from different tissues of the same individual revealed that mtCNs in different tissues are, with few exceptions, uncorrelated. Hence, each tissue of an individual seems to regulate mtCN in a tissue-related rather than an individual-dependent manner. Skeletal muscle (SM) samples showed an age-related decrease in mtCN that was especially pronounced in males, while there was an age-related increase in mtCN for liver (LIV) samples. MtCN in SM samples was significantly negatively correlated with both the total number of heteroplasmic sites and with minor allele frequency (MAF) at two heteroplasmic sites, 408 and 16327. Heteroplasmies at both sites are highly specific for SM, accumulate with aging and are part of functional elements that regulate mtDNA replication. These data support the hypothesis that selection acting on these heteroplasmic sites is reducing mtCN in SM of older individuals. PMID:26978189

  10. Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatters, James C; Kennett, Douglas J; Asmerom, Yemane; Kemp, Brian M; Polyak, Victor; Blank, Alberto Nava; Beddows, Patricia A; Reinhardt, Eduard; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Bolnick, Deborah A; Malhi, Ripan S; Culleton, Brendan J; Erreguerena, Pilar Luna; Rissolo, Dominique; Morell-Hart, Shanti; Stafford, Thomas W

    2014-05-16

    Because of differences in craniofacial morphology and dentition between the earliest American skeletons and modern Native Americans, separate origins have been postulated for them, despite genetic evidence to the contrary. We describe a near-complete human skeleton with an intact cranium and preserved DNA found with extinct fauna in a submerged cave on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. This skeleton dates to between 13,000 and 12,000 calendar years ago and has Paleoamerican craniofacial characteristics and a Beringian-derived mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup (D1). Thus, the differences between Paleoamericans and Native Americans probably resulted from in situ evolution rather than separate ancestry. PMID:24833392

  11. Complete genome sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Cusano, Roberto; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this work. Within the Chlorella genus, it represents the second species with a complete sequenced and annotated mitochondrial genome (GenBank accession no. KM241869). The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 52,528 bp and encodes a total of 31 protein coding genes, 3 rRNAs and 26 tRNAs. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana mtDNA is 70.89%, while the coding sequence is of 97.4%.

  12. [Variability of the mtDNA Control Region in Goose Anser albifrons Scopoli, 1769].

    PubMed

    Volkovsky, D V; Fisenko, P V; Gerasimov, Yu N; Zhuravlev, Yu N

    2016-03-01

    Sequence variation of the mtDNA (D loop) control region was examined in greater white-fronted goose Anser albifrons Scopoli, 1769 individuals (n = 71). The obtained sequences were compared with those from the NCBI GenBank database. The high level of similarity of the sample from Primorye (A. albifrons) with the sample from Japan (A. a. frontalis) at the level of molecular variation, genetic distance, phylogenetic reconstruction, and haplotype network was demonstrated. A hypothesis on the ways of spring goose migration in the Far East was made. It was confirmed that white-fronted geese wintering in Japan fly to their breeding grounds through Kamchatka. PMID:27281856

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Sicilian goats reveals a new mtDNA lineage.

    PubMed

    Sardina, M T; Ballester, M; Marmi, J; Finocchiaro, R; van Kaam, J B C H M; Portolano, B; Folch, J M

    2006-08-01

    The mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) sequence of 67 goats belonging to the Girgentana, Maltese and Derivata di Siria breeds was partially sequenced in order to present the first phylogenetic characterization of Sicilian goat breeds. These sequences were compared with published sequences of Indian and Pakistani domestic goats and wild goats. Mitochondrial lineage A was observed in most of the Sicilian goats. However, three Girgentana haplotypes were highly divergent from the Capra hircus clade, indicating that a new mtDNA lineage in domestic goats was found.

  14. Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatters, James C; Kennett, Douglas J; Asmerom, Yemane; Kemp, Brian M; Polyak, Victor; Blank, Alberto Nava; Beddows, Patricia A; Reinhardt, Eduard; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquin; Bolnick, Deborah A; Malhi, Ripan S; Culleton, Brendan J; Erreguerena, Pilar Luna; Rissolo, Dominique; Morell-Hart, Shanti; Stafford, Thomas W

    2014-05-16

    Because of differences in craniofacial morphology and dentition between the earliest American skeletons and modern Native Americans, separate origins have been postulated for them, despite genetic evidence to the contrary. We describe a near-complete human skeleton with an intact cranium and preserved DNA found with extinct fauna in a submerged cave on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. This skeleton dates to between 13,000 and 12,000 calendar years ago and has Paleoamerican craniofacial characteristics and a Beringian-derived mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup (D1). Thus, the differences between Paleoamericans and Native Americans probably resulted from in situ evolution rather than separate ancestry.

  15. Natural underlying mtDNA heteroplasmy as a potential source of intra-person hiPSC variability.

    PubMed

    Perales-Clemente, Ester; Cook, Alexandra N; Evans, Jared M; Roellinger, Samantha; Secreto, Frank; Emmanuele, Valentina; Oglesbee, Devin; Mootha, Vamsi K; Hirano, Michio; Schon, Eric A; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2016-09-15

    Functional variability among human clones of induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) remains a limitation in assembling high-quality biorepositories. Beyond inter-person variability, the root cause of intra-person variability remains unknown. Mitochondria guide the required transition from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism in nuclear reprogramming. Moreover, mitochondria have their own genome (mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA]). Herein, we performed mtDNA next-generation sequencing (NGS) on 84 hiPSC clones derived from a cohort of 19 individuals, including mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial patients. The analysis of mtDNA variants showed that low levels of potentially pathogenic mutations in the original fibroblasts are revealed through nuclear reprogramming, generating mutant hiPSCs with a detrimental effect in their differentiated progeny. Specifically, hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes with expanded mtDNA mutations non-related with any described human disease, showed impaired mitochondrial respiration, being a potential cause of intra-person hiPSC variability. We propose mtDNA NGS as a new selection criterion to ensure hiPSC quality for drug discovery and regenerative medicine. PMID:27436875

  16. Evidence that specific mtDNA point mutations may not accumulate in skeletal muscle during normal human aging.

    PubMed Central

    Pallotti, F.; Chen, X.; Bonilla, E.; Schon, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    It is unclear at present whether specific mtDNA point mutations accumulate during normal human aging. In order to address this question, we used quantitative PCR of total DNA isolated from skeletal muscle from normal individuals of various ages to search for the presence and amount of spontaneous mtDNA point mutations in two small regions of the human mitochondrial genome. We observed low levels of somatic mutations above background in both regions, but there was no correlation between the amount of mutation detected and the age of the subject. These results contrasted with our finding of an age-related increase in the amount of the mtDNA "common deletion" in these very samples. Thus, it appears that both somatic mtDNA point mutations and mtDNA deletions can arise at low frequency in normal individuals but that, unlike deletions, there is no preferential amplification or accumulation of specific point mutations in skeletal muscle over the course of the normal human life span. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8751860

  17. Cross-strand binding of TFAM to a single mtDNA molecule forms the mitochondrial nucleoid.

    PubMed

    Kukat, Christian; Davies, Karen M; Wurm, Christian A; Spåhr, Henrik; Bonekamp, Nina A; Kühl, Inge; Joos, Friederike; Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Park, Chan Bae; Posse, Viktor; Falkenberg, Maria; Jakobs, Stefan; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packaged by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) into mitochondrial nucleoids that are of key importance in controlling the transmission and expression of mtDNA. Nucleoid ultrastructure is poorly defined, and therefore we used a combination of biochemistry, superresolution microscopy, and electron microscopy to show that mitochondrial nucleoids have an irregular ellipsoidal shape and typically contain a single copy of mtDNA. Rotary shadowing electron microscopy revealed that nucleoid formation in vitro is a multistep process initiated by TFAM aggregation and cross-strand binding. Superresolution microscopy of cultivated cells showed that increased mtDNA copy number increases nucleoid numbers without altering their sizes. Electron cryo-tomography visualized nucleoids at high resolution in isolated mammalian mitochondria and confirmed the sizes observed by superresolution microscopy of cell lines. We conclude that the fundamental organizational unit of the mitochondrial nucleoid is a single copy of mtDNA compacted by TFAM, and we suggest a packaging mechanism.

  18. Decreased Diversity but Increased Substitution Rate in Host mtDNA as a Consequence of Wolbachia Endosymbiont Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, D. DeWayne; Dyer, Kelly A.; Ahrens, Mike; McAbee, Kevin; Jaenike, John

    2004-01-01

    A substantial fraction of insects and other terrestrial arthropods are infected with parasitic, maternally transmitted endosymbiotic bacteria that manipulate host reproduction. In addition to imposing direct selection on the host to resist these effects, endosymbionts may also have indirect effects on the evolution of the mtDNA with which they are cotransmitted. Patterns of mtDNA diversity and evolution were examined in Drosophila recens, which is infected with the endosymbiont Wolbachia, and its uninfected sister species D. subquinaria. The level of mitochondrial, but not nuclear, DNA diversity is much lower in D. recens than in D. subquinaria, consistent with the hypothesized diversity-purging effects of an evolutionarily recent Wolbachia sweep. The dN/dS ratio in mtDNA is significantly greater in D. recens, suggesting that Muller's ratchet has brought about an increased rate of substitution of slightly deleterious mutations. The data also reveal elevated rates of synonymous substitutions in D. recens, suggesting that these sites may experience weak selection. These findings show that maternally transmitted endosymbionts can severely depress levels of mtDNA diversity within an infected host species, while accelerating the rate of divergence among mtDNA lineages in different species. PMID:15611174

  19. A Phenotype-Driven Approach to Generate Mouse Models with Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations Causing Mitochondrial Disease.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Johanna H K; Baines, Holly L; Bratic, Ana; Simard, Marie-Lune; Freyer, Christoph; Mourier, Arnaud; Stamp, Craig; Filograna, Roberta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Greaves, Laura C; Stewart, James B

    2016-09-13

    Mutations of mtDNA are an important cause of human disease, but few animal models exist. Because mammalian mitochondria cannot be transfected, the development of mice with pathogenic mtDNA mutations has been challenging, and the main strategy has therefore been to introduce mutations found in cell lines into mouse embryos. Here, we describe a phenotype-driven strategy that is based on detecting clonal expansion of pathogenic mtDNA mutations in colonic crypts of founder mice derived from heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice. As proof of concept, we report the generation of a mouse line transmitting a heteroplasmic pathogenic mutation in the alanine tRNA gene of mtDNA displaying typical characteristics of classic mitochondrial disease. In summary, we describe a straightforward and technically simple strategy based on mouse breeding and histology to generate animal models of mtDNA-mutation disease, which will be of great importance for studies of disease pathophysiology and preclinical treatment trials. PMID:27626666

  20. The GHEP–EMPOP collaboration on mtDNA population data—A new resource for forensic casework

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, L.; Zimmermann, B.; Goios, A.; Rodriguez-Monge, A.; Paneto, G.G.; Alves, C.; Alonso, A.; Fridman, C.; Cardoso, S.; Lima, G.; Anjos, M.J.; Whittle, M.R.; Montesino, M.; Cicarelli, R.M.B.; Rocha, A.M.; Albarrán, C.; de Pancorbo, M.M.; Pinheiro, M.F.; Carvalho, M.; Sumita, D.R.; Parson, W.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) population data for forensic purposes are still scarce for some populations, which may limit the evaluation of forensic evidence especially when the rarity of a haplotype needs to be determined in a database search. In order to improve the collection of mtDNA lineages from the Iberian and South American subcontinents, we here report the results of a collaborative study involving nine laboratories from the Spanish and Portuguese Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GHEP-ISFG) and EMPOP. The individual laboratories contributed population data that were generated throughout the past 10 years, but in the majority of cases have not been made available to the scientific community. A total of 1019 haplotypes from Iberia (Basque Country, 2 general Spanish populations, 2 North and 1 Central Portugal populations), and Latin America (3 populations from São Paulo) were collected, reviewed and harmonized according to defined EMPOP criteria. The majority of data ambiguities that were found during the reviewing process (41 in total) were transcription errors confirming that the documentation process is still the most error-prone stage in reporting mtDNA population data, especially when performed manually. This GHEP–EMPOP collaboration has significantly improved the quality of the individual mtDNA datasets and adds mtDNA population data as valuable resource to the EMPOP database (www.empop.org). PMID:21075696

  1. Cladistic analysis of Heliconius butterflies and relatives (Nymphalidae: Heliconiiti): a revised phylogenetic position for Eueides based on sequences from mtDNA and a nuclear gene

    PubMed Central

    Brower, A. V. Z.; Egan, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    A new phylogenetic hypothesis for Heliconius and related genera is presented, based on DNA sequence data from mtDNA combined with a region of the wingless gene. This study also adds eight new taxa to a previous cladistic hypothesis based on the mtDNA alone. Simultaneous phylogenetic analysis of the two gene regions together supports a topology largely in agreement with traditional views of heliconiine relationships based on morphology and suggests that the mtDNA support for the sister relationship between Eueides and H. charithonia is due to convergent evolution of homoplasious mtDNA sites.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Sudanese and Southern Sudanese Chicken Breeds Using mtDNA D-Loop

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Charles E.; Yousif, Ibrahim A.; Ibrahim, Muntasir E.; Musa, Hassan H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the genetic relationships and diversity and to estimate the amount of gene flow among the five chicken populations from Sudan and South Sudan and commercial strain of egg line White Leghorn chickens. The chicken populations were genotyped using mtDNA D-loop as a molecular marker. PCR product of the mtDNA D-loop segment was 600 bp and 14 haplotypes were identified. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicated that the indigenous Sudanese chickens can be grouped into two clades, IV and IIIa only. Median joining networks analysis showed that haplotype LBB49 has the highest frequency. The hierarchal analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that genetic variation within the population was 88.6% and the differentiation among the population was 11.4%. When the populations was redefined into two geographical zones, rich and poor Savanna, the results were fractioned into three genetic variations: between individuals within population 95.5%, between populations within the group 0.75%, and genetic variation between groups 3.75%. The pair wise Fst showed high genetic difference between Betwil populations and the rest with Fst ranging from 0.1492 to 0.2447. We found that there is large number of gene exchanges within the Sudanese indigenous chicken (Nm = 4.622). PMID:25535590

  3. Somatic mtDNA Mutation Spectra in the Aging Human Putamen

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Siôn L.; Mash, Deborah C.; Züchner, Stephan; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and single nucleotide variants (SNVs) is a well-accepted facet of the biology of aging, yet comprehensive mutation spectra have not been described. To address this, we have used next generation sequencing of mtDNA-enriched libraries (Mito-Seq) to investigate mtDNA mutation spectra of putamen from young and aged donors. Frequencies of the “common” deletion and other “major arc” deletions were significantly increased in the aged cohort with the fold increase in the frequency of the common deletion exceeding that of major arc deletions. SNVs also increased with age with the highest rate of accumulation in the non-coding control region which contains elements necessary for translation and replication. Examination of predicted amino acid changes revealed a skew towards pathogenic SNVs in the coding region driven by mutation bias. Levels of the pathogenic m.3243A>G tRNA mutation were also found to increase with age. Novel multimeric tandem duplications that resemble murine control region multimers and yeast ρ− mtDNAs, were identified in both young and aged specimens. Clonal ∼50 bp deletions in the control region were found at high frequencies in aged specimens. Our results reveal the complex manner in which the mitochondrial genome alters with age and provides a foundation for studies of other tissues and disease states. PMID:24339796

  4. MtDNA profile of West Africa Guineans: towards a better understanding of the Senegambia region.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Alexandra; Brehm, António; Kivisild, Toomas; Metspalu, Ene; Villems, Richard

    2004-07-01

    The matrilineal genetic composition of 372 samples from the Republic of Guiné-Bissau (West African coast) was studied using RFLPs and partial sequencing of the mtDNA control and coding region. The majority of the mtDNA lineages of Guineans (94%) belong to West African specific sub-clusters of L0-L3 haplogroups. A new L3 sub-cluster (L3h) that is found in both eastern and western Africa is present at moderately low frequencies in Guinean populations. A non-random distribution of haplogroups U5 in the Fula group, the U6 among the "Brame" linguistic family and M1 in the Balanta-Djola group, suggests a correlation between the genetic and linguistic affiliation of Guinean populations. The presence of M1 in Balanta populations supports the earlier suggestion of their Sudanese origin. Haplogroups U5 and U6, on the other hand, were found to be restricted to populations that are thought to represent the descendants of a southern expansion of Berbers. Particular haplotypes, found almost exclusively in East-African populations, were found in some ethnic groups with an oral tradition claiming Sudanese origin. PMID:15225159

  5. Comparison of mitotyper rules and phylogenetic-based mtDNA nomenclature systems.

    PubMed

    Polanskey, Deborah; Den Hartog, Bobi K; Elling, John W; Fisher, Constance L; Kepler, Russell B; Budowle, Bruce

    2010-09-01

    A consistent nomenclature scheme is necessary to characterize a forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype. A standard nomenclature, called the Mitotyper Rules™, has been developed that applies typing rules in a hierarchical manner reflecting the forensic practitioner's nomenclature preferences. In this work, an empirical comparison between the revised hierarchical nomenclature rules and the phylogenetic approach to mtDNA type description has been conducted on 5173 samples from the phylogenetically typed European Mitochondrial DNA Population database (EMPOP) to identify the degree and significance of any differences. The comparison of the original EMPOP types and the results of retyping these sequences using the Mitotyper Rules demonstrates a high degree of concordance between the two alignment schemes. Differences in types resulted mainly because the Mitotyper Rules selected an alignment with the fewest number of differences compared with the rCRS. In addition, several identical regions were described in more than one way in the EMPOP dataset, demonstrating a limitation of a solely phylogenetic approach in that it may not consistently type nonhaplogroup-specific sites. Using a rule-based approach, commonly occurring as well as private variants are subjected to the same rules for naming, which is particularly advantageous when typing partial sequence data. PMID:20666918

  6. mtDNA analysis reveals a major late Paleolithic population expansion from southwestern to northeastern Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J; D'Urbano, L; Lahermo, P; Moral, P; Sellitto, D; Rengo, C; Forster, P; Savontaus, M L; Bonné-Tamir, B; Scozzari, R

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was studied in 419 individuals from nine Eurasian populations, by high-resolution RFLP analysis, and it was followed by sequencing of the control region of a subset of these mtDNAs and a detailed survey of previously published data from numerous other European populations. This analysis revealed that a major Paleolithic population expansion from the "Atlantic zone" (southwestern Europe) occurred 10,000-15,000 years ago, after the Last Glacial Maximum. As an mtDNA marker for this expansion we identified haplogroup V, an autochthonous European haplogroup, which most likely originated in the northern Iberian peninsula or southwestern France at about the time of the Younger Dryas. Its sister haplogroup, H, which is distributed throughout the entire range of Caucasoid populations and which originated in the Near East approximately 25,000-30,000 years ago, also took part in this expansion, thus rendering it by far the most frequent (40%-60%) haplogroup in western Europe. Subsequent migrations after the Younger Dryas eventually carried those "Atlantic" mtDNAs into central and northern Europe. This scenario, already implied by archaeological records, is given overwhelming support from both the distribution of the autochthonous European Y chromosome type 15, as detected by the probes 49a/f, and the synthetic maps of nuclear data. PMID:9545392

  7. A discordance between mtDNA diversity and blood-protein heterozygosity in Northern Siberian populations

    SciTech Connect

    Malyarchuk, B.A.

    1996-11-01

    Jorde et al. reported a discordance between mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA) sequence diversities among Africans, Asians, and Europeans. These authors noted that the degree of relatedness estimated for these groups, as displayed in neighbor-joining trees, differs depending on whether mtDNA or nDNA data are used. A similar discordance is observed between northern Siberian aboriginal populations. Among northern Asian peoples, the greatest degree of heterozygosity in blood-protein genes is found in the northernmost groups, with decreasing nDNA diversity at these loci in the more southerly groups. Thus, of 35 loci examined in Asiatic Eskimo, Chukchi, and Koryak individuals, 12 were found to be polymorphic: AcP*1, PGM*1, PGD, GPT, GLO*1 EsD, Hp, Pp, E*2 Gc, ABO, and PTC. The average heterozygosity of these groups, from northernmost to southernmost, is as follows: Eskimo (n =402), .333 {+-} .003; coastal Chukchi (n = 1,776), .329 {+-} .004; reindeer Chukchi (n = 559), .306 {+-} .007; and Kamchatkan Koryak (n = 675), .259 {+-} .006. These differences in heterozygosity value are significant (P < .01), except for the comparison of the Eskimo and coastal Chukchi data (P < .1). 7 refs.

  8. Genetic Diversity of mtDNA D-loop Polymorphisms in Laotian Native Fowl Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, K.; Worawut, R.; Taura, S.; Shimogiri, T.; Nishida, T.; Okamoto, S.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we studied the genetic diversity of native fowls in Laos by analyzing a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence polymorphism. A 546-bp fragment of the mtDNA D-loop region was sequenced in 129 chickens from the areas of Vientiane, Luang Prabang and Pakse. In total, 29 haplotypes were identified and formed five clades. Haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity of the native fowls in Laos were 0.85536±0.0172 and 0.010158±0.005555, respectively. Although the Laotian native fowls were distributed across five clades, most of them were clustered in two main clades (A and B), which were originated in China. The other haplotypes were contained in clades D, F, and I, which originated from continental southeast Asia. These results suggest that multiple maternal lineages were involved in the origin of domestic chicken in Laos. Moreover, there appear to be at least two maternal lineages, one from China and the other from the southeast Asian continent. PMID:25049921

  9. Investigation of the genetic diversity among native Turkish sheep breeds using mtDNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Oner, Yasemin; Calvo, Jorge Hugo; Elmaci, Cengiz

    2013-04-01

    A total of 135 unrelated sheep from nine Turkish native sheep breeds (Daglıc, Kivircik, Imroz, Chios, Morkaraman, Ivesi, Hemsin, Karayaka and Akkaraman) were investigated to determinate the maternal genetic diversity using a sequence of a 531-bp segment of the mtDNA control region. Analysis of the mtDNA control region sequence revealed 63 haplotypes and 53 polymorphic sites. Haplotype diversity, nucleotide diversity and the average number of nucleotide differences were estimated to be 0.9496 ± 0.011, 0.01407 ± 0.00060 and 7.456, respectively. The sequence analysis also revealed high level of genetic diversity among the native Turkish breeds. These breeds were grouped into three major maternal haplogroups: A, B and C, with one animal belonging from the Akkaraman breed to the rare haplogroup E. Irregular shape of mismatch distribution of haplogroup C could be an indicator that haplogroup C may represent different haplogroups. Contrarily to previous studies carried out on Turkish native breeds, majority of animals grouped in haplogroup A in the present study. This result and the irregular shape of mismatch curve of haplogroup C indicate that genetic structure of Turkish native sheep breeds could be more complicated than it is thought.

  10. Using ancient mtDNA to reconstruct the population history of northeastern North America.

    PubMed

    Shook, Beth Alison Schultz; Smith, David Glenn

    2008-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was extracted and analyzed from the skeletal remains of 44 individuals, representing four prehistoric populations, and compared to that from two other prehistoric and several contemporary Native American populations to investigate biological relationships and demographic history in northeastern North America. The mtDNA haplogroup frequencies of ancient human remains from the Morse (Red Ocher tradition, 2,700 BP) and Orendorf (Mississippian tradition, 800 BP) sites from the Central Illinois River Valley, and the Great Western Park (Western Basin tradition, 800 BP) and Glacial Kame (2,900 BP) populations from southwestern Ontario, change over time while maintaining a regional continuity between localities. Haplotype patterns suggest that some ancestors of present day Native Americans in northeastern North America have been in that region for at least 3,000 years but have experienced extensive gene flow throughout time, resulting, at least in part, from a demic expansion of ancestors of modern Algonquian-speaking people. However, genetic drift has also been a significant force, and together with a major population crash after European contact, has altered haplogroup frequencies and caused the loss of many haplotypes.

  11. mtDNA variation in Inuit populations of Greenland and Canada: migration history and population structure.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Agnar; Pálsson, Gísli; Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Angulalik, Emily; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen Dröfn; Yngvadóttir, Bryndís; Stefánsson, Kári

    2006-05-01

    We examined 395 mtDNA control-region sequences from Greenlandic Inuit and Canadian Kitikmeot Inuit with the aim of shedding light on the migration history that underlies the present geographic patterns of genetic variation at this locus in the Arctic. In line with previous studies, we found that Inuit populations carry only sequences belonging to haplotype clusters A2 and D3. However, a comparison of Arctic populations from Siberia, Canada, and Greenland revealed considerable differences in the frequencies of these haplotypes. Moreover, large sample sizes and regional information about birthplaces of maternal grandmothers permitted the detection of notable differences in the distribution of haplotypes among subpopulations within Greenland. Our results cast doubt on the prevailing hypothesis that contemporary Inuit trace their all of their ancestry to so-called Thule groups that expanded from Alaska about 800-1,000 years ago. In particular, discrepancies in mutational divergence between the Inuit populations and their putative source mtDNA pool in Siberia/Alaska for the two predominant haplotype clusters, A2a and A2b, are more consistent with the possibility that expanding Thule groups encountered and interbred with existing Dorset populations in Canada and Greenland.

  12. Comparative mtDNA analyses of three sympatric macropodids from a conservation area on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Husband, Thomas P

    2016-07-01

    Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei), New Guinea pademelon (Thylogale browni), and small dorcopsis (Dorcopsulus vanheurni) are sympatric macropodid taxa, of conservation concern, that inhabit the Yopno-Urawa-Som (YUS) Conservation Area on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. We sequenced three partial mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes from the three taxa to (i) investigate network structure; and (ii) identify conservation units within the YUS Conservation Area. All three taxa displayed a similar pattern in the spatial distribution of their mtDNA haplotypes and the Urawa and Som rivers on the Huon may have acted as a barrier to maternal gene flow. Matschie's tree kangaroo and New Guinea pademelon within the YUS Conservation Area should be managed as single conservation units because mtDNA nucleotides were not fixed for a given geographic area. However, two distinct conservation units were identified for small dorcopsis from the two different mountain ranges within the YUS Conservation Area.

  13. Increased retinal mtDNA damage in the CFH variant associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferrington, Deborah A; Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Leary, Michaela M; Atilano, Shari R; Terluk, Marcia R; Karunadharma, Pabalu; Chen, George Kuei-Jie; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Swaroop, Anand; Montezuma, Sandra R; Kenney, M Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness among the elderly in the developed world. Genetic analysis of AMD has identified 34 high-risk loci associated with AMD. The genes at these high risk loci belong to diverse biological pathways, suggesting different mechanisms leading to AMD pathogenesis. Thus, therapies targeting a single pathway for all AMD patients will likely not be universally effective. Recent evidence suggests defects in mitochondria (mt) of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) may constitute a key pathogenic event in some AMD patients. The purpose of this study is to determine if individuals with a specific genetic background have a greater propensity for mtDNA damage. We used human eyebank tissues from 76 donors with AMD and 42 age-matched controls to determine the extent of mtDNA damage in the RPE that was harvested from the macula using a long extension polymerase chain reaction assay. Genotype analyses were performed for ten common AMD-associated nuclear risk alleles (ARMS2, TNFRSF10A, CFH, C2, C3, APOE, CETP, LIPC, VEGF and COL10A1) and mtDNA haplogroups. Sufficient samples were available for genotype association with mtDNA damage for TNFRSF10A, CFH, CETP, VEGFA, and COL10A1. Our results show that AMD donors carrying the high risk allele for CFH (C) had significantly more mtDNA damage compared with donors having the wild-type genetic profile. The data from an additional 39 donors (12 controls and 27 AMD) genotyped for CFH alleles further supported these findings. Taken together, these studies provide the rationale for a more personalized approach for treating AMD by uncovering a significant correlation between the CFH high risk allele and accelerated mtDNA damage. Patients harboring this genetic risk factor may benefit from therapies that stabilize and protect the mt in the RPE. PMID:26854823

  14. Novel Protein Genes in Animal mtDNA: A New Sex Determination System in Freshwater Mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoida)?

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T.; Shepardson, Sally; Trdan, Richard J.; Bogan, Arthur E.; Chapman, Eric G.; Ruminas, Andrew J.; Piontkivska, Helen; Hoeh, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) function depends critically on optimal interactions between components encoded by mt and nuclear DNAs. mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance (SMI) is thought to have evolved in animal species to maintain mito-nuclear complementarity by preventing the spread of selfish mt elements thus typically rendering mtDNA heteroplasmy evolutionarily ephemeral. Here, we show that mtDNA intraorganismal heteroplasmy can have deterministic underpinnings and persist for hundreds of millions of years. We demonstrate that the only exception to SMI in the animal kingdom, that is, the doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance system in bivalves, with its three-way interactions among egg mt-, sperm mt- and nucleus-encoded gene products, is tightly associated with the maintenance of separate male and female sexes (dioecy) in freshwater mussels. Specifically, this mother-through-daughter and father-through-son mtDNA inheritance system, containing highly differentiated mt genomes, is found in all dioecious freshwater mussel species. Conversely, all hermaphroditic species lack the paternally transmitted mtDNA (=possess SMI) and have heterogeneous macromutations in the recently discovered, novel protein-coding gene (F-orf) in their maternally transmitted mt genomes. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we have localized the F-open reading frame (ORF) protein, likely involved in specifying separate sexes, in mitochondria and in the nucleus. Our results support the hypothesis that proteins coded by the highly divergent maternally and paternally transmitted mt genomes could be directly involved in sex determination in freshwater mussels. Concomitantly, our study demonstrates novel features for animal mt genomes: the existence of additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins with functional significance and the involvement of mtDNA-encoded proteins in extra-mt functions. Our results open new avenues for the identification, characterization, and functional analyses of ORFs in the

  15. Overexpression of TFAM or Twinkle Increases mtDNA Copy Number and Facilitates Cardioprotection Associated with Limited Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Fujino, Takeo; Arai, Shinobu; Saku, Keita; Kakino, Takamori; Tyynismaa, Henna; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Kang, Dongchon; Suomalainen, Anu; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number decreases in animal and human heart failure (HF), yet its role in cardiomyocytes remains to be elucidated. Thus, we investigated the cardioprotective function of increased mtDNA copy number resulting from the overexpression of human transcription factor A of mitochondria (TFAM) or Twinkle helicase in volume overload (VO)-induced HF. Methods and Results Two strains of transgenic (TG) mice, one overexpressing TFAM and the other overexpressing Twinkle helicase, exhibit an approximately 2-fold equivalent increase in mtDNA copy number in heart. These TG mice display similar attenuations in eccentric hypertrophy and improved cardiac function compared to wild-type (WT) mice without any deterioration of mitochondrial enzymatic activities in response to VO, which was accompanied by a reduction in matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and reactive oxygen species after 8 weeks of VO. Moreover, acute VO-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 upregulation was also suppressed at 24 h in both TG mice. In isolated rat cardiomyocytes, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mitoROS) upregulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed mitoROS and their upregulation. Additionally, mitoROS were equally suppressed in H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts that overexpress hTFAM or rat Twinkle, both of which exhibit increased mtDNA copy number. Furthermore, mitoROS and mitochondrial protein oxidation from both TG mice were suppressed compared to WT mice. Conclusions The overexpression of TFAM or Twinkle results in increased mtDNA copy number and facilitates cardioprotection associated with limited mitochondrial oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that increasing mtDNA copy number could be a useful therapeutic strategy to target mitoROS in HF. PMID:25822152

  16. MtDNA haplogroup analysis of black Brazilian and sub-Saharan populations: implications for the Atlantic slave trade.

    PubMed

    Silva, Wilson Araújo; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Marrero, Andrea; Elion, Jacques; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Zago, Marco Antonio

    2006-02-01

    Seventy individuals from two African and four black Brazilian populations were studied for the first hypervariable segment of mtDNA. To delineate a more complete phylogeographic scenario of the African mtDNA haplogroups in Brazil and to provide additional information on the nature of the Atlantic slave trade, we analyzed our data together with previously published data. The results indicate different sources of African slaves for the four major Brazilian regions. In addition, the data revealed patterns that differ from those expected on the basis of historical registers, thus suggesting the role of ethnic sex differences in the slave trade.

  17. Decreased Integrity, Content, and Increased Transcript Level of Mitochondrial DNA Are Associated with Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiao-Dan; Chen, Zhao-Li; Qu, Ming-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Wen; Li, Su-Xia; Chen, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of keratoconus (KC). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is involved in mitochondrial function, and the mtDNA content, integrity, and transcript level may affect the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and be involved in the pathogenesis of KC. We designed a case-control study to research the relationship between KC and mtDNA integrity, content and transcription. One-hundred ninety-eight KC corneas and 106 normal corneas from Chinese patients were studied. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the relative mtDNA content, transcript levels of mtDNA and related genes. Long-extension PCR was used to detect mtDNA damage. ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP were measured by respective assay kit, and Mito-Tracker Green was used to label the mitochondria. The relative mtDNA content of KC corneas was significantly lower than that of normal corneas (P = 9.19×10−24), possibly due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) gene (P = 3.26×10−3). In contrast, the transcript levels of mtDNA genes were significantly increased in KC corneas compared with normal corneas (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [ND1]: P = 1.79×10−3; cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 [COX1]: P = 1.54×10−3; NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, [ND6]: P = 4.62×10−3). The latter may be the result of increased expression levels of mtDNA transcription-related genes mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) (P = 2.55×10−4) and transcription factor B2 mitochondrial (TFB2M) (P = 7.88×10−5). KC corneas also had increased mtDNA damage (P = 3.63×10−10), higher ROS levels, and lower mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels compared with normal corneas. Decreased integrity, content and increased transcript level of mtDNA are associated with KC. These changes may affect the generation of ROS and play a role in the pathogenesis of KC. PMID:27783701

  18. Molecular population genetics of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus): mtDNA variation.

    PubMed

    Clegg, S M; Hale, P; Moritz, C

    1998-06-01

    The genetic population structure of a large, wide-ranging marsupial, the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was assessed using sequence and haplotype frequency data of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from locations across the species range in Australia. Results from sequence data revealed extensive haplotype diversity within the red kangaroo (32/34 sequences were unique). Sequence diversity was distributed within rather than between geographical regions across the species range. Genetic connectivity across the range of the species has therefore been maintained over the long term. On a smaller within-region scale, significant genetic structuring was evident from heterogeneity of haplotype frequencies amongst sampling sites. The geographical scale of panmictic populations differed across the continent with more restricted genetic populations occurring in areas with greater topographic and habitat complexity. We propose that these differences in area of genetic populations are the result of population responses to limiting ecological factors during drought.

  19. MtDNA analysis of global populations support that major population expansions began before Neolithic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Yan, Shi; Qin, Zhen-Dong; Jin, Li

    2012-10-01

    Agriculture resulted in extensive population growths and human activities. However, whether major human expansions started after Neolithic Time still remained controversial. With the benefit of 1000 Genome Project, we were able to analyze a total of 910 samples from 11 populations in Africa, Europe and Americas. From these random samples, we identified the expansion lineages and reconstructed the historical demographic variations. In all the three continents, we found that most major lineage expansions (11 out of 15 star lineages in Africa, all autochthonous lineages in Europe and America) coalesced before the first appearance of agriculture. Furthermore, major population expansions were estimated after Last Glacial Maximum but before Neolithic Time, also corresponding to the result of major lineage expansions. Considering results in current and previous study, global mtDNA evidence showed that rising temperature after Last Glacial Maximum offered amiable environments and might be the most important factor for prehistorical human expansions.

  20. Variability of the honey bee mite Varroa destructor in Serbia, based on mtDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Gajic, Bojan; Radulovic, Zeljko; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Kulisic, Zoran; Vucicevic, Milos; Simeunovic, Predrag; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2013-09-01

    Only two mitochondrial haplotypes (Korea and Japan) of Varroa destructor, the ectoparasitic honey bee mite, are known to be capable of infesting and successfully reproducing in Apis mellifera colonies worldwide. Varroa destructor (then called Varroa jacobsoni) was observed in Serbia for the first time in 1976. In order to obtain insight into the genetic variability of the mites parasitizing A. mellifera we analyzed 45 adult female mites sampled from nine localities dispersed throughout Serbia. Four fragments within cox1, atp6, cox3 and cytb mtDNA genes were sequenced. The Korea haplotype of V. destructor was found to be present at all localities, but also two new haplotypes (Serbia 1 and Peshter 1) were revealed, based on cox1 and cytb sequence variability. The simultaneous occurrence of Korea and Serbia 1 haplotypes was observed at five localities, whereas Peshter 1 haplotype was identifed at only one place.

  1. MtDNA polymorphism in the Hungarians: comparison to three other Finno-Ugric-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Lahermo, P; Laitinen, V; Sistonen, P; Béres, J; Karcagi, V; Savontaus, M L

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation as well as restriction site polymorphisms were examined in 437 individuals from four Finno-Ugric-speaking populations. These included the Hungarians (Budapest region and the Csángós from Hungary and Romania), the Finns and two Saami groups from northeastern Finland (Inari Saami and Skolt Saami), and the Erzas from central Russia. The mtDNA data obtained in this study were combined with our previous data on Y chromosomal variation for eight different loci in these populations. The genetic variation observed among the Hungarians resembled closely that found in other European populations. The Hungarians could not be distinguished from the neighboring populations (e.g., the Austrians) any more than from their Finno-Ugric linguistic relatives.

  2. A novel mtDNA ND6 gene mutation associated with LHON in a Caucasian family.

    PubMed

    Zhadanov, Sergey I; Atamanov, Vasily V; Zhadanov, Nikolay I; Oleinikov, Oleg V; Osipova, Ludmila P; Schurr, Theodore G

    2005-07-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a frequent cause of inherited blindness. A routine screening for common mtDNA mutations constitutes an important first in its diagnosis. However, a substantial number of LHON patients do not harbor known variants, both pointing to the genetic heterogeneity of LHON and bringing into question its genetic diagnosis. We report a familial case that exhibited typical features of LHON but lacked any of the common mutations. Genetic analysis revealed a novel pathogenic defect in the ND6 gene at 14279A that was not detected in any haplogroup-matched controls screened for it, nor has it been previously reported. This mutation causes a substantial conformational change in the secondary structure of the polypeptide matrix coil and may explain the LHON expression. Thus, it expands the spectrum of deleterious changes affecting ND6-encoding subunit and further highlights the functional significance of this gene, providing additional clues to the disease pathogenesis.

  3. Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas): a preliminary study using mtDNA sequence analysis with evidence of random distribution of MitoTracker-stained sperm mitochondria in fertilized eggs.

    PubMed

    Obata, Mayu; Shimizu, Michiyo; Sano, Natsumi; Komaru, Akira

    2008-03-01

    In many bivalve species, paternal and maternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from sperm and eggs is transmitted to the offspring. This phenomenon is known as doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI). In these species, sperm mtDNA (M type) is inherited by the male gonad of the offspring. Egg mtDNA (F type) is inherited by both male and female somatic cells and female gonadal cells. In Mytilidae, sperm mitochondria are distributed in the cytoplasm of differentiating male germ cells because they are transmitted to the male gonad. In the present study, we investigated maternal inheritance of mtDNA in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Sequence analysis of two mitochondrial non-coding regions revealed an identical sequence pattern in the gametes and adductor muscle samples taken from six males and five females. To observe whether sperm mitochondria were specifically located in the cytoplasm of differentiating germ cells, their distribution was recorded in C. gigas fertilized eggs by vital staining with MitoTracker Green. Although the 1D blastomere was identified in the cytoplasm of differentiating germ cells, sperm mitochondria were located at the 1D blastomere in only 32% of eggs during the 8-cell stage. Thus, in C. gigas, sperm mitochondria do not specifically locate in the germ cell region at the 1D blastomere. We suggest that the distribution of sperm mitochondria is not associated with germ cell formation in C. gigas. Furthermore, as evidenced by the mtDNA sequences of two non-coding regions, we conclude that mitochondrial DNA is maternally inherited in this species.

  4. MtDNA diversity of Ghana: a forensic and phylogeographic view

    PubMed Central

    Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander; Zimmermann, Bettina; Bodner, Martin; Thye, Thorsten; Tschentscher, Frank; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Göbel, Tanja M.K.; Schneider, Peter M.; Parson, Walther

    2012-01-01

    West Africa is characterized by a migration history spanning more than 150,000 years. Climate changes but also political circumstances were responsible for several early but also recent population movements that shaped the West African mitochondrial landscape. The aim of the study was to establish a Ghanaian mtDNA dataset for forensic purposes and to investigate the diversity of the Ghanaian population sample with respect to surrounding populations. We sequenced full mitochondrial control regions of 193 Akan people from Ghana and excluded two apparently close maternally related individuals due to preceding kinship testing. The remaining dataset comprising 191 sequences was applied as etalon for quasi-median network analysis and was subsequently combined with 99 additional control region sequences from surrounding West African countries. All sequences were incorporated into the EMPOP database enriching the severely underrepresented African mtDNA pool. For phylogeographic considerations, the Ghanaian haplotypes were compared to those of 19 neighboring populations comprising a total number of 6198 HVS1 haplotypes. We found extensive genetic admixture between the Ghanaian lineages and those from adjacent populations diminishing with geographical distance. The extent of genetic admixture reflects the long but also recent history of migration waves within West Africa mainly caused by changing environmental conditions. Also, evidence for potential socio-economical influences such as trade routes is provided by the occurrence of U6b and U6d sequences found in Dubai but also in Tunisia leading to the African West Coast via Mauritania and Senegal but also via Niger, Nigeria to Cameroon. PMID:21723214

  5. Mitochondrial Genome Rearrangements in Glomus Species Triggered by Homologous Recombination between Distinct mtDNA Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms. AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence, were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigate dpo diversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity. We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants. PMID:23925788

  6. MtDNA diversity of Ghana: a forensic and phylogeographic view.

    PubMed

    Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander; Zimmermann, Bettina; Bodner, Martin; Thye, Thorsten; Tschentscher, Frank; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Göbel, Tanja M K; Schneider, Peter M; Parson, Walther

    2012-03-01

    West Africa is characterized by a migration history spanning more than 150,000 years. Climate changes but also political circumstances were responsible for several early but also recent population movements that shaped the West African mitochondrial landscape. The aim of the study was to establish a Ghanaian mtDNA dataset for forensic purposes and to investigate the diversity of the Ghanaian population sample with respect to surrounding populations. We sequenced full mitochondrial control regions of 193 Akan people from Ghana and excluded two apparently close maternally related individuals due to preceding kinship testing. The remaining dataset comprising 191 sequences was applied as etalon for quasi-median network analysis and was subsequently combined with 99 additional control region sequences from surrounding West African countries. All sequences were incorporated into the EMPOP database enriching the severely underrepresented African mtDNA pool. For phylogeographic considerations, the Ghanaian haplotypes were compared to those of 19 neighboring populations comprising a total number of 6198 HVS1 haplotypes. We found extensive genetic admixture between the Ghanaian lineages and those from adjacent populations diminishing with geographical distance. The extent of genetic admixture reflects the long but also recent history of migration waves within West Africa mainly caused by changing environmental conditions. Also, evidence for potential socio-economical influences such as trade routes is provided by the occurrence of U6b and U6d sequences found in Dubai but also in Tunisia leading to the African West Coast via Mauritania and Senegal but also via Niger, Nigeria to Cameroon.

  7. Genetic variability of HVRII mtDNA in cord blood and respiratory morbidity in children.

    PubMed

    Schmuczerova, J; Brdicka, R; Dostal, M; Sram, R J; Topinka, J

    2009-06-18

    Genetic polymorphisms were examined using direct sequencing of the hypervariable region II (HVRII) in the D-loop of mtDNA in the cord blood of 355 children living in two areas of the Czech Republic - the industrial district of Teplice and the agricultural district of Prachatice. The incidence of the most frequent nucleotide variants of HVRII, C150T (10.1%), T152C (19.7%), T195C (19.7%) and 309.nC (41.4% for 309.2C and 13.8% for 309.3C), and the respiratory morbidity at the ages of 0-2 years and 2-6 years were investigated, considering many other factors such as locality, gender, ethnicity, heating by coal in household, maternal age, asthma bronchiale, allergic rhinitis, pollinosis, conjunctivitis and maternal tobacco exposure during and after pregnancy. We found that the T195C transversion in HVRII is connected with an increased risk of early childhood (0-2 years) bronchitis (RR 1.38, p=0.034, 95% CI 1.04-1.85) and with increased risk of otitis media in children aged 2-6 years (RR 1.62, p=0.032, 95% CI 1.04-2.53). Another polymorphism, 309.nC, is associated with an increased risk of bronchitis in children aged 2-6 years (RR 1.46, p=0.030, 95% CI 1.04-2.06). The results indicate that genetic polymorphisms in mtDNA may be an important factor not only for various types of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, but also for respiratory morbidity in children.

  8. Mitochondrial genome rearrangements in glomus species triggered by homologous recombination between distinct mtDNA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms.AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence,were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigated podiversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity.We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants.

  9. A melting pot of multicontinental mtDNA lineages in admixed Venezuelans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Ignacio-Veiga, Ana; Alvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Pastoriza-Mourelle, Ana; Ruíz, Yarimar; Pineda, Lennie; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The arrival of Europeans in Colonial and post-Colonial times coupled with the forced introduction of sub-Saharan Africans have dramatically changed the genetic background of Venezuela. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate, through the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation, the extent of admixture and the characterization of the most likely continental ancestral sources of present-day urban Venezuelans. We analyzed two admixed populations that have experienced different demographic histories, namely, Caracas (n = 131) and Pueblo Llano (n = 219). The native American component of admixed Venezuelans accounted for 80% (46% haplogroup [hg] A2, 7% hg B2, 21% hg C1, and 6% hg D1) of all mtDNAs; while the sub-Saharan and European contributions made up ∼10% each, indicating that Trans-Atlantic immigrants have only partially erased the native American nature of Venezuelans. A Bayesian-based model allowed the different contributions of European countries to admixed Venezuelans to be disentangled (Spain: ∼38.4%, Portugal: ∼35.5%, Italy: ∼27.0%), in good agreement with the documented history. Seventeen entire mtDNA genomes were sequenced, which allowed five new native American branches to be discovered. B2j and B2k, are supported by two different haplotypes and control region data, and their coalescence ages are 3.9 k.y. (95% C.I. 0-7.8) and 2.6 k.y. (95% C.I. 0.1-5.2), respectively. The other clades were exclusively observed in Pueblo Llano and they show the fingerprint of strong recent genetic drift coupled with severe historical consanguinity episodes that might explain the high prevalence of certain Mendelian and complex multi-factorial diseases in this region. PMID:22120584

  10. mtDNA diversity in Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarai azarai) of the Argentinean Chaco.

    PubMed

    Babb, Paul L; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Baiduc, Caitlin A; Gagneux, Pascal; Evans, Sian; Schurr, Theodore G

    2011-10-01

    Owl monkeys (Aotus spp.) inhabit much of South America yet represent an enigmatic evolutionary branch among primates. While morphological, cytogenetic, and immunological evidence suggest that owl monkey populations have undergone isolation and diversification since their emergence in the New World, problems with adjacent species ranges, and sample provenance have complicated efforts to characterize genetic variation within the genus. As a result, the phylogeographic history of owl monkey species and subspecies remains unclear, and the extent of genetic diversity at the population level is unknown. To explore these issues, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) variation in a population of wild Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarai azarai) living in the Gran Chaco region of Argentina. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome from one individual (16,585 base pairs (bp)) and analyzed 1,099 bp of the hypervariable control region (CR) and 696 bp of the cytochrome oxidase II (COII) gene in 117 others. In addition, we sequenced the mitochondrial genome (16,472 bp) of one Nancy Ma's owl monkey (A. nancymaae). Based on the whole mtDNA and COII data, we observed an ancient phylogeographic discontinuity among Aotus species living north, south, and west of the Amazon River that began more than eight million years ago. Our population analyses identified three major CR lineages and detected a high level of haplotypic diversity within A. a. azarai. These data point to a recent expansion of Azara's owl monkeys into the Argentinean Chaco. Overall, we provide a detailed view of owl monkey mtDNA variation at genus, species, and population levels.

  11. A Signal, from Human mtDNA, of Postglacial Recolonization in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Macaulay, Vincent; Richards, Martin; Cruciani, Fulvio; Rengo, Chiara; Martinez-Cabrera, Vicente; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas; Metspalu, Ene; Parik, Jüri; Tolk, Helle-Viivi; Tambets, Kristiina; Forster, Peter; Karger, Bernd; Francalacci, Paolo; Rudan, Pavao; Janicijevic, Branka; Rickards, Olga; Savontaus, Marja-Liisa; Huoponen, Kirsi; Laitinen, Virpi; Koivumäki, Satu; Sykes, Bryan; Hickey, Eileen; Novelletto, Andrea; Moral, Pedro; Sellitto, Daniele; Coppa, Alfredo; Al-Zaheri, Nadia; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Semino, Ornella; Scozzari, Rosaria

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial HVS-I sequences from 10,365 subjects belonging to 56 populations/geographical regions of western Eurasia and northern Africa were first surveyed for the presence of the T→C transition at nucleotide position 16298, a mutation which has previously been shown to characterize haplogroup V mtDNAs. All mtDNAs with this mutation were then screened for a number of diagnostic RFLP sites, revealing two major subsets of mtDNAs. One is haplogroup V proper, and the other has been termed “pre*V,” since it predates V phylogenetically. The rather uncommon pre*V tends to be scattered throughout Europe (and northwestern Africa), whereas V attains two peaks of frequency: one situated in southwestern Europe and one in the Saami of northern Scandinavia. Geographical distributions and ages support the scenario that pre*V originated in Europe before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), whereas the more recently derived haplogroup V arose in a southwestern European refugium soon after the LGM. The arrival of V in eastern/central Europe, however, occurred much later, possibly with (post-)Neolithic contacts. The distribution of haplogroup V mtDNAs in modern European populations would thus, at least in part, reflect the pattern of postglacial human recolonization from that refugium, affecting even the Saami. Overall, the present study shows that the dissection of mtDNA variation into small and well-defined evolutionary units is an essential step in the identification of spatial frequency patterns. Mass screening of a few markers identified using complete mtDNA sequences promises to be an efficient strategy for inferring features of human prehistory. PMID:11517423

  12. HVSI polymorphism indicates multiple origins of mtDNA in the Hazarewal population of Northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Akbar, N; Ahmad, H; Nadeem, M S; Hemphill, B E; Muhammad, K; Ahmad, W; Ilyas, M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an important tool used to explore ethnogenetics and the evolutionary history of human populations. In this study, hypervariable segment I (HVSI) from mtDNA was analyzed to establish the genetic lineage of the Hazarewal populations residing in the Mansehra and Abbottabad districts of Northern Pakistan. HVSI was extracted from genetic specimens obtained from 225 unrelated male and female individuals belonging to seven distinct Pakistani ethnic groups (31 Abbassis, 44 Awans, 38 Gujars, 16 Jadoons, 23 Karlals, 33 Syeds, and 40 Tanolis). Eighty-three haplogroups, 39 of which were unique, were identified; haplogroup H was predominantly represented (in 40% of the people), followed by haplogroups M (21.78%), R (16.89%), N (15.56%), L (3.11%), and HV (2.67%). The results revealed a sex-biased genetic contribution from putative West Eurasian, South Asian, and Sub-Saharan populations to the genetic lineage of Hazarewal ancestry, with the effect of Eurasians being predominant. The HVSI nucleotide sequences exhibited some characteristic deletion mutations between 16,022 and 16,193 bp, which is characteristic of specific ethnic groups. HVSI sequence homology showed that Hazarewal populations fall into three major clusters: Syeds and Awans sorted out into cluster I; Tanolis, Gujars, and Karlals segregated in cluster II; and Abbassis and Jadoons in cluster III. Here, we have reported the firsthand genetic information and evolutionary sketch of the selected populations residing alongside the historical Silk Route, which provides a baseline for collating the origin, route of migration, and phylogenetics of the population. PMID:27420957

  13. A signal, from human mtDNA, of postglacial recolonization in Europe.

    PubMed

    Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J; Macaulay, V; Richards, M; Cruciani, F; Rengo, C; Martinez-Cabrera, V; Villems, R; Kivisild, T; Metspalu, E; Parik, J; Tolk, H V; Tambets, K; Forster, P; Karger, B; Francalacci, P; Rudan, P; Janicijevic, B; Rickards, O; Savontaus, M L; Huoponen, K; Laitinen, V; Koivumäki, S; Sykes, B; Hickey, E; Novelletto, A; Moral, P; Sellitto, D; Coppa, A; Al-Zaheri, N; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A S; Semino, O; Scozzari, R

    2001-10-01

    Mitochondrial HVS-I sequences from 10,365 subjects belonging to 56 populations/geographical regions of western Eurasia and northern Africa were first surveyed for the presence of the T-->C transition at nucleotide position 16298, a mutation which has previously been shown to characterize haplogroup V mtDNAs. All mtDNAs with this mutation were then screened for a number of diagnostic RFLP sites, revealing two major subsets of mtDNAs. One is haplogroup V proper, and the other has been termed "pre*V," since it predates V phylogenetically. The rather uncommon pre*V tends to be scattered throughout Europe (and northwestern Africa), whereas V attains two peaks of frequency: one situated in southwestern Europe and one in the Saami of northern Scandinavia. Geographical distributions and ages support the scenario that pre*V originated in Europe before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), whereas the more recently derived haplogroup V arose in a southwestern European refugium soon after the LGM. The arrival of V in eastern/central Europe, however, occurred much later, possibly with (post-)Neolithic contacts. The distribution of haplogroup V mtDNAs in modern European populations would thus, at least in part, reflect the pattern of postglacial human recolonization from that refugium, affecting even the Saami. Overall, the present study shows that the dissection of mtDNA variation into small and well-defined evolutionary units is an essential step in the identification of spatial frequency patterns. Mass screening of a few markers identified using complete mtDNA sequences promises to be an efficient strategy for inferring features of human prehistory.

  14. Maternal admixture and population structure in Mexican-Mestizos based on mtDNA haplogroups.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cortés, Gabriela; Salazar-Flores, Joel; Haro-Guerrero, Javier; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Velarde-Félix, Jésus S; Muñoz-Valle, José F; López-Casamichana, Mavil; Carrillo-Tapia, Eduardo; Canseco-Avila, Luis M; Bravi, Claudio M; López-Armenta, Mauro; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2013-08-01

    The maternal ancestry (mtDNA) has important applications in different research fields, such as evolution, epidemiology, identification, and human population history. This is particularly interesting in Mestizos, which constitute the main population in Mexico (∼93%) resulting from post-Columbian admixture between Spaniards, Amerindians, and African slaves, principally. Consequently, we conducted minisequencing analysis (SNaPshot) of 11 mitochondrial single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 742 Mestizos of 10 populations from different regions in Mexico. The predominant maternal ancestry was Native American (92.9%), including Haplogroups A, B, C, and D (47, 23.7, 15.9, and 6.2%, respectively). Conversely, European and African ancestries were less frequent (5.3 and 1.9%, respectively). The main characteristics of the maternal lineages observed in Mexican-Mestizos comprised the following: 1) contrasting geographic gradient of Haplogroups A and C; 2) increase of European lineages toward the Northwest; 3) low or absent, but homogeneous, African ancestry throughout the Mexican territory; 4) maternal lineages in Mestizos roughly represent the genetic makeup of the surrounding Amerindian groups, particularly toward the Southeast, but not in the North and West; 5) continuity over time of the geographic distribution of Amerindian lineages in Mayas; and 6) low but significant maternal population structure (FST  = 2.8%; P = 0.0000). The average ancestry obtained from uniparental systems (mtDNA and Y-chromosome) in Mexican-Mestizos was correlated with previous ancestry estimates based on autosomal systems (genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short tandem repeats). Finally, the comparison of paternal and maternal lineages provided additional information concerning the gender bias admixture, mating patterns, and population structure in Mestizos throughout the Mexican territory.

  15. Extensive tissue-related and allele-related mtDNA heteroplasmy suggests positive selection for somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Schröder, Roland; Ni, Shengyu; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Heteroplasmy in human mtDNA may play a role in cancer, other diseases, and aging, but patterns of heteroplasmy variation across different tissues have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we analyzed complete mtDNA genome sequences at ∼3,500× average coverage from each of 12 tissues obtained at autopsy from each of 152 individuals. We identified 4,577 heteroplasmies (with an alternative allele frequency of at least 0.5%) at 393 positions across the mtDNA genome. Surprisingly, different nucleotide positions (nps) exhibit high frequencies of heteroplasmy in different tissues, and, moreover, heteroplasmy is strongly dependent on the specific consensus allele at an np. All of these tissue-related and allele-related heteroplasmies show a significant age-related accumulation, suggesting positive selection for specific alleles at specific positions in specific tissues. We also find a highly significant excess of liver-specific heteroplasmies involving nonsynonymous changes, most of which are predicted to have an impact on protein function. This apparent positive selection for reduced mitochondrial function in the liver may reflect selection to decrease damaging byproducts of liver mitochondrial metabolism (i.e., “survival of the slowest”). Overall, our results provide compelling evidence for positive selection acting on some somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:25675502

  16. Identification of an mtDNA mutation hot spot in UV-induced mouse skin tumors producing altered cellular biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jandova, Jana; Eshaghian, Alex; Shi, Mingjian; Li, Meiling; King, Lloyd E; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role of mtDNA alterations in the development of cancer, as mtDNA point mutations are found at high frequency in a variety of human tumors. To determine the biological effects of mtDNA mutations in UV-induced skin tumors, hairless mice were irradiated to produce tumors, and the tumor mtDNAs were screened for single-nucleotide changes using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE), followed by direct sequencing. A mutation hot spot (9821insA) in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA arginine (mt-Tr) locus (tRNA(Arg)) was discovered in approximately one-third of premalignant and malignant skin tumors. To determine the functional relevance of this particular mutation in vitro, cybrid cell lines containing different mt-Tr (tRNA(Arg)) alleles were generated. The resulting cybrid cell lines contained the same nuclear genotype and differed only in their mtDNAs. The biochemical analysis of the cybrids revealed that the mutant haplotype is associated with diminished levels of complex I protein (CI), resulting in lower levels of baseline oxygen consumption and lower cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. We hypothesize that this specific mtDNA mutation alters cellular biochemistry, supporting the development of keratinocyte neoplasia.

  17. Detailed mtDNA genotypes permit a reassessment of the settlement and population structure of the Andaman Islands.

    PubMed

    Barik, S S; Sahani, R; Prasad, B V R; Endicott, P; Metspalu, M; Sarkar, B N; Bhattacharya, S; Annapoorna, P C H; Sreenath, J; Sun, D; Sanchez, J J; Ho, S Y W; Chandrasekar, A; Rao, V R

    2008-05-01

    The population genetics of the Indian subcontinent is central to understanding early human prehistory due to its strategic location on the proposed corridor of human movement from Africa to Australia during the late Pleistocene. Previous genetic research using mtDNA has emphasized the relative isolation of the late Pleistocene colonizers, and the physically isolated Andaman Island populations of Island South-East Asia remain the source of claims supporting an early split between the populations that formed the patchy settlement pattern along the coast of the Indian Ocean. Using whole-genome sequencing, combined with multiplexed SNP typing, this study investigates the deep structure of mtDNA haplogroups M31 and M32 in India and the Andaman Islands. The identification of a so far unnoticed rare polymorphism shared between these two lineages suggests that they are actually sister groups within a single haplogroup, M31'32. The enhanced resolution of M31 allows for the inference of a more recent colonization of the Andaman Islands than previously suggested, but cannot reject the very early peopling scenario. We further demonstrate a widespread overlap of mtDNA and cultural markers between the two major language groups of the Andaman archipelago. Given the "completeness" of the genealogy based on whole genome sequences, and the multiple scenarios for the peopling of the Andaman Islands sustained by this inferred genealogy, our study hints that further mtDNA based phylogeographic studies are unlikely to unequivocally support any one of these possibilities.

  18. Segregation of mtDNA Throughout Human Embryofetal Development: m.3243A > G as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Monnot, Sophie; Gigarel, Nadine; Samuels, David C; Burlet, Philippe; Hesters, Laetitia; Frydman, Nelly; Frydman, René; Kerbrat, Violaine; Funalot, Benoit; Martinovic, Jelena; Benachi, Alexandra; Feingold, Josué; Munnich, Arnold; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Steffann, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a wide range of serious diseases with high transmission risk and maternal inheritance. Tissue heterogeneity of the heteroplasmy rate (“mutant load”) accounts for the wide phenotypic spectrum observed in carriers. Owing to the absence of therapy, couples at risk to transmit such disorders commonly ask for prenatal (PND) or preimplantation diagnosis (PGD). The lack of data regarding heteroplasmy distribution throughout intrauterine development, however, hampers the implementation of such procedures. We tracked the segregation of the m.3243A > G mutation (MT-TL1 gene) responsible for the MELAS syndrome in the developing embryo/fetus, using tissues and cells from eight carrier females, their 38 embryos and 12 fetuses. Mutant mtDNA segregation was found to be governed by random genetic drift, during oogenesis and somatic tissue development. The size of the bottleneck operating for m.3243A > G during oogenesis was shown to be individual-dependent. Comparison with data we achieved for the m.8993T > G mutation (MT-ATP6 gene), responsible for the NARP/Leigh syndrome, indicates that these mutations differentially influence mtDNA segregation during oogenesis, while their impact is similar in developing somatic tissues. These data have major consequences for PND and PGD procedures in mtDNA inherited disorders. Hum Mutat 32:116–125, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21120938

  19. Paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA as an integral part of mitochondrial inheritance in metapopulations of Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J N; Nafisinia, M; Sutovsky, P; Ballard, J W O

    2013-01-01

    Maternal inheritance is one of the hallmarks of animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and central to its success as a molecular marker. This mode of inheritance and subsequent lack of heterologous recombination allows us to retrace evolutionary relationships unambiguously down the matriline and without the confounding effects of recombinant genetic information. Accumulating evidence of biparental inheritance of mtDNA (paternal leakage), however, challenges our current understanding of how this molecule is inherited. Here, using Drosophila simulans collected from an East African metapopulation exhibiting recurring mitochondrial heteroplasmy, we conducted single fly matings and screened F1 offspring for the presence of paternal mtDNA using allele-specific PCR assays (AS-PCR). In all, 27 out of 4092 offspring were identified as harboring paternal mtDNA, suggesting a frequency of 0.66% paternal leakage in this species. Our findings strongly suggest that recurring mtDNA heteroplasmy as observed in natural populations of Drosophila simulans is most likely caused by repeated paternal leakage. Our findings further suggest that this phenomenon to potentially be an integral part of mtDNA inheritance in these populations and consequently of significance for mtDNA as a molecular marker.

  20. Molecular phylogeny of fire ants of the Solenopsis saevissima species-group based on mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, D DeWayne; Ahrens, Michael E; Ross, Kenneth G

    2006-01-01

    The systematics of South American fire ants (Solenopsis saevissima species-group) has been plagued by difficulties in recognizing species and their relationships on the basis of morphological characters. We surveyed mtDNA sequences from 623 individuals representing 13 described and undescribed species within the species-group and 18 individuals representing other major Solenopsis lineages to generate a phylogeny of the mitochondrial genome. Our analyses support the monophyly of the S. saevissima species-group, consistent with a single Neotropical origin and radiation of this important group of ants, as well as the monophyly of the socially polymorphic species within the group, consistent with a single origin of polygyny (multiple queens per colony) as a derived form of social organization. The mtDNA sequences of the inquiline social parasite S. daguerrei form a clade that appears to be distantly related to sequences from the several host species, consistent with the view that advanced social parasitism did not evolve via sympatric speciation of intraspecific parasites. An important general finding is that species-level polyphyly of the mtDNA appears to be the rule in this group of ants. The existence of multiple divergent mtDNA lineages within several nominal species (including the pest S. invicta) suggests that the pattern of widespread polyphyly often stems from morphological delimitation that overcircumscribes species. However, in two cases the mtDNA polyphyly likely results from recent interspecific hybridization. While resolving species boundaries and relationships is important for understanding general patterns of diversification of South American fire ants, these issues are of added importance because invasive fire ants are emerging as global pests and becoming important model organisms for evolutionary research.

  1. The mitochondrial DNA makeup of Romanians: A forensic mtDNA control region database and phylogenetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Turchi, Chiara; Stanciu, Florin; Paselli, Giorgia; Buscemi, Loredana; Parson, Walther; Tagliabracci, Adriano

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the pattern of Romanian population from a mitochondrial perspective and to establish an appropriate mtDNA forensic database, we generated a high-quality mtDNA control region dataset from 407 Romanian subjects belonging to four major historical regions: Moldavia, Transylvania, Wallachia and Dobruja. The entire control region (CR) was analyzed by Sanger-type sequencing assays and the resulting 306 different haplotypes were classified into haplogroups according to the most updated mtDNA phylogeny. The Romanian gene pool is mainly composed of West Eurasian lineages H (31.7%), U (12.8%), J (10.8%), R (10.1%), T (9.1%), N (8.1%), HV (5.4%),K (3.7%), HV0 (4.2%), with exceptions of East Asian haplogroup M (3.4%) and African haplogroup L (0.7%). The pattern of mtDNA variation observed in this study indicates that the mitochondrial DNA pool is geographically homogeneous across Romania and that the haplogroup composition reveals signals of admixture of populations of different origin. The PCA scatterplot supported this scenario, with Romania located in southeastern Europe area, close to Bulgaria and Hungary, and as a borderland with respect to east Mediterranean and other eastern European countries. High haplotype diversity (0.993) and nucleotide diversity indices (0.00838±0.00426), together with low random match probability (0.0087) suggest the usefulness of this control region dataset as a forensic database in routine forensic mtDNA analysis and in the investigation of maternal genetic lineages in the Romanian population.

  2. The mitochondrial DNA makeup of Romanians: A forensic mtDNA control region database and phylogenetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Turchi, Chiara; Stanciu, Florin; Paselli, Giorgia; Buscemi, Loredana; Parson, Walther; Tagliabracci, Adriano

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the pattern of Romanian population from a mitochondrial perspective and to establish an appropriate mtDNA forensic database, we generated a high-quality mtDNA control region dataset from 407 Romanian subjects belonging to four major historical regions: Moldavia, Transylvania, Wallachia and Dobruja. The entire control region (CR) was analyzed by Sanger-type sequencing assays and the resulting 306 different haplotypes were classified into haplogroups according to the most updated mtDNA phylogeny. The Romanian gene pool is mainly composed of West Eurasian lineages H (31.7%), U (12.8%), J (10.8%), R (10.1%), T (9.1%), N (8.1%), HV (5.4%),K (3.7%), HV0 (4.2%), with exceptions of East Asian haplogroup M (3.4%) and African haplogroup L (0.7%). The pattern of mtDNA variation observed in this study indicates that the mitochondrial DNA pool is geographically homogeneous across Romania and that the haplogroup composition reveals signals of admixture of populations of different origin. The PCA scatterplot supported this scenario, with Romania located in southeastern Europe area, close to Bulgaria and Hungary, and as a borderland with respect to east Mediterranean and other eastern European countries. High haplotype diversity (0.993) and nucleotide diversity indices (0.00838±0.00426), together with low random match probability (0.0087) suggest the usefulness of this control region dataset as a forensic database in routine forensic mtDNA analysis and in the investigation of maternal genetic lineages in the Romanian population. PMID:27414754

  3. Pikeperch Sander lucioperca egg quality cannot be predicted by total antioxidant capacity and mtDNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Fabian J; Overton, Julia L; Wuertz, Sven

    2016-04-01

    In farmed pikeperch, there is a high variability in egg quality restraining the propagation of this species in aquaculture. The identification of reliable biomarkers for predicting successful embryo development already at an early stage (unfertilized oocyte) could help improve production efficiency. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragmentation have been established as biomarkers for oxidative stress and damage of macromolecules, potentially influencing embryo development. Therefore, we evaluated these biomarkers in eggs of commercially farmed pikeperch (44 females). We measured egg TAC, as well as lesion rates per 10 kb of 12S and cytochrome b (cytb) as target regions within the mitochondrial genome by qPCR. It was tested whether these markers correlate with embryo development (fertilization rate, embryo survival, hatching rate). There was no significant relation of mtDNA lesion rates or TAC with these egg quality parameters. We detected average lesion rates (± SD) of 1.50 (± 1.57) and 1.89 (± 2.14) in 12S and cytb mtDNA respectively. Lesion rates in 12S and cytb were highly correlated within samples (P < 0.0001) and were independent of the observed TAC. The results suggest that TAC does not prevent mtDNA fragmentation and that embryos rather seem to be able to cope with the observed fragmentation of mtDNA. However, in post-ovulatory aged eggs of three females with little to no fertilization success, lesion rates of cytb were significantly elevated, whereas TAC was significantly lower compared to other females, suggesting a possible role of oxidative stress during post-ovulatory ageing. PMID:26922635

  4. PCA and clustering reveal alternate mtDNA phylogeny of N and M clades.

    PubMed

    Alexe, G; Satya, R Vijaya; Seiler, M; Platt, D; Bhanot, T; Hui, S; Tanaka, M; Levine, A J; Bhanot, G

    2008-11-01

    Phylogenetic trees based on mtDNA polymorphisms are often used to infer the history of recent human migrations. However, there is no consensus on which method to use. Most methods make strong assumptions which may bias the choice of polymorphisms and result in computational complexity which limits the analysis to a few samples/polymorphisms. For example, parsimony minimizes the number of mutations, which biases the results to minimizing homoplasy events. Such biases may miss the global structure of the polymorphisms altogether, with the risk of identifying a "common" polymorphism as ancient without an internal check on whether it either is homoplasic or is identified as ancient because of sampling bias (from oversampling the population with the polymorphism). A signature of this problem is that different methods applied to the same data or the same method applied to different datasets results in different tree topologies. When the results of such analyses are combined, the consensus trees have a low internal branch consensus. We determine human mtDNA phylogeny from 1737 complete sequences using a new, direct method based on principal component analysis (PCA) and unsupervised consensus ensemble clustering. PCA identifies polymorphisms representing robust variations in the data and consensus ensemble clustering creates stable haplogroup clusters. The tree is obtained from the bifurcating network obtained when the data are split into k = 2,3,4,...,kmax clusters, with equal sampling from each haplogroup. Our method assumes only that the data can be clustered into groups based on mutations, is fast, is stable to sample perturbation, uses all significant polymorphisms in the data, works for arbitrary sample sizes, and avoids sample choice and haplogroup size bias. The internal branches of our tree have a 90% consensus accuracy. In conclusion, our tree recreates the standard phylogeny of the N, M, L0/L1, L2, and L3 clades, confirming the African origin of modern humans

  5. Regional Variation in mtDNA of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagen, Christian A.; Pitman, James C.; Sandercock, Brett K.; Wolfe, Don H.; Robel, Robel J.; Applegate, Roger D.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative loss of habitat and long-term decline in the populations of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) have led to concerns for the species' viability throughout its range in the southern Great Plains. For more efficient conservation past and present distributions of genetic variation need to be understood. We examined the distribution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in the Lesser Prairie-Chicken across Kansas, Colorado, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. Throughout the range we found little genetic differentiation except for the population in New Mexico, which was significantly different from most other publications. We did, however, find significant isolation by distance at the rangewide scale (r=0.698). We found no relationship between haplotype phylogeny and geography, and our analyses provide evidence for a post-glacial population expansion within the species that is consistent with the idea that speciation within Tympanuchus is recent. Conservation actions that increase the likelihood of genetically viable populations in the future should be evaluated for implementation.

  6. Identification of Polynesian mtDNA haplogroups in remains of Botocudo Amerindians from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Vanessa Faria; Stenderup, Jesper; Rodrigues-Carvalho, Cláudia; Silva, Hilton P.; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Líryo, Andersen; Kivisild, Toomas; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Campos, Paula F.; Rasmussen, Morten; Willerslev, Eske; Pena, Sergio Danilo J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a consensus that modern humans arrived in the Americas 15,000–20,000 y ago during the Late Pleistocene, most probably from northeast Asia through Beringia. However, there is still debate about the time of entry and number of migratory waves, including apparent inconsistencies between genetic and morphological data on Paleoamericans. Here we report the identification of mitochondrial sequences belonging to haplogroups characteristic of Polynesians in DNA extracted from ancient skulls of the now extinct Botocudo Indians from Brazil. The identification of these two Polynesian haplogroups was confirmed in independent replications in Brazil and Denmark, ensuring reliability of the data. Parallel analysis of 12 other Botocudo individuals yielded only the well-known Amerindian mtDNA haplogroup C1. Potential scenarios to try to help understand these results are presented and discussed. The findings of this study may be relevant for the understanding of the pre-Columbian and/or post-Columbian peopling of the Americas. PMID:23576724

  7. Phylogeny of Darwin’s finches as revealed by mtDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akie; O’hUigin, Colm; Figueroa, Felipe; Grant, Peter R.; Grant, B. Rosemary; Tichy, Herbert; Klein, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Darwin’s finches comprise a group of passerine birds first collected by Charles Darwin during his visit to the Galápagos Archipelago. The group, a textbook example of adaptive radiation (the diversification of a founding population into an array of species differentially adapted to diverse environmental niches), encompasses 14 currently recognized species, of which 13 live on the Galápagos Islands and one on the Cocos Island in the Pacific Ocean. Although Darwin’s finches have been studied extensively by morphologists, ecologists, and ethologists, their phylogenetic relationships remain uncertain. Here, sequences of two mtDNA segments, the cytochrome b and the control region, have been used to infer the evolutionary history of the group. The data reveal the Darwin’s finches to be a monophyletic group with the warbler finch being the species closest to the founding stock, followed by the vegetarian finch, and then by two sister groups, the ground and the tree finches. The Cocos finch is related to the tree finches of the Galápagos Islands. The traditional classification of ground finches into six species and tree finches into five species is not reflected in the molecular data. In these two groups, ancestral polymorphisms have not, as yet, been sorted out among the cross-hybridizing species. PMID:10220425

  8. Ancestral Puebloan mtDNA in Context of the Greater Southwest

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Kathy R.; Smith, David Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) was extracted from the human remains of seventy-three individuals from the Tommy and Mine Canyon sites (dated to PI-II and PIII, respectively), located on the B-Square Ranch in the Middle San Juan region of New Mexico. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups of forty-eight (65.7%) of these samples were identified, and their frequency distributions were compared with those of other prehistoric and modern populations from the Greater Southwest and Mexico. The haplogroup frequency distributions for the two sites were statistically significantly different from each other, with the Mine Canyon site exhibiting an unusually high frequency of haplogroup A for a Southwestern population, indicating the possible influence of migration or other evolutionary forces. However, both sites exhibited a relatively high frequency of haplogroup B, typical of Southwestern populations, suggesting continuity in the Southwest, as has been hypothesized by others (S. Carlyle 2003; Carlyle, et al. 2000; Kemp 2006; Malhi, et al. 2003; Smith, et al. 2000). The first hypervariable region of twenty-three individuals (31.5%) was also sequenced to confirm haplogroup assignments and compared with other sequences from the region. This comparison further strengthens the argument for population continuity in the Southwest without a detectable influence from Mesoamerica. PMID:20514346

  9. Early Eurasian migration traces in the Tarim Basin revealed by mtDNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yinqiu; Li, Chunxiang; Gao, Shizhu; Xie, Chengzhi; Zhou, Hui

    2010-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms of 58 samples from the Daheyan village located in the central Taklamakan Desert of the Tarim Basin were determined in this study. Among the 58 samples, 29 haplotypes belonging to 18 different haplogroups were analyzed. Almost all the mtDNAs belong to a subset of either the defined Western or Eastern Eurasian pool. Extensive Eastern Eurasian lineages exist in the Daheyan population in which Northern-prevalent haplogroups present higher frequencies. In the limited existing Western Eurasian lineages, two sub-haplogroups, U3 and X2, that are rare in Central Asia were found in this study, which may be indicative of the remnants of an early immigrant population from the Near East and Caucasus regions preserved only in the Tarim Basin. The presence of U3 in modern and archeological samples in the Tarim Basin suggests that the immigration took place earlier than 2,000 years ago and points to human continuity in this area, with at least one Western lineage originating from the Near East and Caucasus regions. PMID:20091803

  10. Autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome associated with an 8.5 kb mtDNA single deletion

    SciTech Connect

    Barrientos, A.; Casademont, J.; Cardellach, F.

    1996-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome (MIM 222300) is characterized by optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, neurosensory hearing loss, urinary tract abnormalities, and neurological dysfunction. The association of clinical manifestations in tissues and organs unrelated functionally or embryologically suggested the possibility of a mitochondrial implication in the disease, which has been demonstrated in two sporadic cases. Nonetheless, familial studies suggested an autosomal recessive mode of transmission, and recent data demonstrated linkage with markers on the short arm of human chromosome 4. The patient reported here, as well as her parents and unaffected sister, carried a heteroplasmic 8.5-kb deletion in mtDNA. The deletion accounted for 23% of mitochondrial genomes in lymphocytes from the patient and {approximately}5% in the tissues studied from members of her family. The presence of the deletion in the patient in a proportion higher than in her unaffected parents suggests a putative defect in a nuclear gene that acts at the mitochondrial level. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Rampant nuclear insertion of mtDNA across diverse lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J; Whiting, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies. PMID:25333882

  12. Autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome associated with an 8.5-kb mtDNA single deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, A.; Casademont, J.; Saiz, A.; Cardellach, F.; Volpini, V.; Solans, A.; Tolosa, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.; Estivill, X.; Nunes, V.

    1996-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (MIM 222300) is characterized by optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, neurosensory hearing loss, urinary tract abnormalities, and neurological dysfunction. The association of clinical manifestations in tissues and organs unrelated functionally or embryologically suggested the possibility of a mitochondrial implication in the disease, which has been demonstrated in two sporadic cases. Nonetheless, familial studies suggested an autosomal recessive mode of transmission, and recent data demonstrated linkage with markers on the short arm of human chromosome 4. The patient reported here, as well as her parents and unaffected sister, carried a heteroplasmic 8.5-kb deletion in mtDNA. The deletion accounted for 23% of mitochondrial genomes in lymphocytes from the patient and approximately 5% in the tissues studied from members of her family. The presence of the deletion in the patient in a proportion higher than in her unaffected parents suggests a putative defect in a nuclear gene that acts at the mitochondrial level. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8651280

  13. Forensic and phylogeographic characterisation of mtDNA lineages from Somalia.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Martin; Fendt, Liane; Röck, Alexander W; Zimmermann, Bettina; Rockenbauer, Eszter; Hansen, Anders J; Parson, Walther; Morling, Niels

    2012-07-01

    The African mitochondrial (mt) phylogeny is coarsely resolved but the majority of population data generated so far is limited to the analysis of the first hypervariable segment (HVS-1) of the control region (CR). Therefore, this study aimed on the investigation of the entire CR of 190 unrelated Somali individuals to enrich the severely underrepresented African mtDNA pool. The majority (60.5 %) of the haplotypes were of sub-Saharan origin with L0a1d, L2a1h and L3f being the most frequently observed haplogroups. This is in sharp contrast to previous data reported from the Y-chromosome, where only about 5 % of the observed haplogroups were of sub-Saharan provenance. We compared the genetic distances based on population pairwise F (st) values between 11 published East, Central and North African as well as western Asian populations and the Somali sequences and displayed them in a multi-dimensional scaling plot. Genetic proximity evidenced by clustering roughly reflected the relative geographic location of the populations. The sequences will be included in the EMPOP database ( www.empop.org ) under accession number EMP00397 upon publication (Parson and Dür Forensic Sci Int Genet 1:88-92, 2007).

  14. Rampant nuclear insertion of mtDNA across diverse lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J; Whiting, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies.

  15. Abundant mtDNA diversity and ancestral admixture in Colombian criollo cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G; Bermudez, Nelson; Olivera-Angel, Martha; Estrada, Luzardo; Ossa, Jorge; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2003-01-01

    Various cattle populations in the Americas (known as criollo breeds) have an origin in some of the first livestock introduced to the continent early in the colonial period (16th and 17th centuries). These cattle constitute a potentially important genetic reserve as they are well adapted to local environments and show considerable variation in phenotype. To examine the genetic ancestry and diversity of Colombian criollo we obtained mitochondrial DNA control region sequence information for 110 individuals from seven breeds. Old World haplogroup T3 is the most commonly observed CR lineage in criollo (0.65), in agreement with a mostly European ancestry for these cattle. However, criollo also shows considerable frequencies of haplogroups T2 (0.9) and T1 (0.26), with T1 lineages in criollo being more diverse than those reported for West Africa. The distribution and diversity of Old World lineages suggest some North African ancestry for criollo, probably as a result of the Arab occupation of Iberia prior to the European migration to the New World. The mtDNA diversity of criollo is higher than that reported for European and African cattle and is consistent with a differentiated ancestry for some criollo breeds. PMID:14668394

  16. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seong-Su; Kim, Seung Chang; Choi, Seong-Bok; Kim, Su-Hyun; Lee, Chang Woo; Jung, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Eun Sung; Choi, Young-Sun; Kim, Sung-Bok; Kim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Chang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4) were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a), and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds. PMID:26954229

  17. Early Eurasian migration traces in the Tarim Basin revealed by mtDNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yinqiu; Li, Chunxiang; Gao, Shizhu; Xie, Chengzhi; Zhou, Hui

    2010-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms of 58 samples from the Daheyan village located in the central Taklamakan Desert of the Tarim Basin were determined in this study. Among the 58 samples, 29 haplotypes belonging to 18 different haplogroups were analyzed. Almost all the mtDNAs belong to a subset of either the defined Western or Eastern Eurasian pool. Extensive Eastern Eurasian lineages exist in the Daheyan population in which Northern-prevalent haplogroups present higher frequencies. In the limited existing Western Eurasian lineages, two sub-haplogroups, U3 and X2, that are rare in Central Asia were found in this study, which may be indicative of the remnants of an early immigrant population from the Near East and Caucasus regions preserved only in the Tarim Basin. The presence of U3 in modern and archeological samples in the Tarim Basin suggests that the immigration took place earlier than 2,000 years ago and points to human continuity in this area, with at least one Western lineage originating from the Near East and Caucasus regions.

  18. MtDNA variability in whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) populations in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Valle, G E; Lourenção, A L; Zucchi, M I; Pinheiro, J B; Abreu, A G

    2011-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) consists of a complex of morphologically indistinct biotypes that vary mainly in their capacity to transmit plant viruses and to induce physiological disorders in plants of economic importance. The adaptability of B. tabaci to many regions of the world has fostered the appearance of various biotypes and has resulted in a broad spectrum of host plants. Our goal was to identify which biotypes were present in four B. tabaci populations in Brazil. We quantified genetic variability between and within populations. Three individuals were collected from three host plant species: two populations on soybean (Campinas and Rondonópolis), one on pumpkin (Barreiras) and one on tomato (Cruz das Almas) in three States of Brazil (São Paulo, Mato Grosso, and Bahia). We chose one sequence of the B biotype, obtained from GenBank; the Campinas population, which had been previously characterized as biotype B, was used as a control for this biotype. We also included one sequence of the Q biotype, obtained from GenBank, as an outgroup. The COI region of the mtDNA gene was partially amplified with the CI-J-2195 and L2-N-3014 pair of primers, and the reaction products were sequenced. Based on distance-based algorithm analyses, we found that all haplotypes belong to biotype B, which was confirmed by the haplotype network. Genetic structure analyses showed that the host plant species does not influence population structuring of this pest; only the geographic location mattered. PMID:21968683

  19. Genetic architecture of trout from Albania as revealed by mtDNA control region variation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    To determine the genetic architecture of trout in Albania, 87 individuals were collected from 19 riverine and lacustrine sites in Albania, FYROM and Greece. All individuals were analyzed for sequence variation in the mtDNA control region. Among fourteen haplotypes detected, four previously unpublished haplotypes, bearing a close relationship to haplotypes of the Adriatic and marmoratus lineages of Salmo trutta, were revealed. Ten previously described haplotypes, characteristic of S. ohridanus, S. letnica and the Adriatic and Mediterranean lineages of S. trutta, were also detected. Haplotypes detected in this study were placed in a well supported branch of S. ohridanus, and a cluster of Mediterranean – Adriatic – marmoratus haplotypes, which were further delimited into three subdivisions of Mediterranean, marmoratus, and a previously non-described formation of four Adriatic haplotypes (Balkan cluster). Haplotypes of the Balkan cluster and the other Adriatic haplotypes, do not represent a contiguous haplotype lineage and appear not to be closely related, indicating independent arrivals into the Adriatic drainage and suggesting successive colonization events. Despite the presence of marmoratus haplotypes in Albania, no marbled phenotype was found, confirming previously reported findings that there is no association between this phenotype and marmoratus haplotypes. PMID:19284692

  20. Phylogeny of Darwin's finches as revealed by mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; O'hUigin, C; Figueroa, F; Grant, P R; Grant, B R; Tichy, H; Klein, J

    1999-04-27

    Darwin's finches comprise a group of passerine birds first collected by Charles Darwin during his visit to the Galápagos Archipelago. The group, a textbook example of adaptive radiation (the diversification of a founding population into an array of species differentially adapted to diverse environmental niches), encompasses 14 currently recognized species, of which 13 live on the Galápagos Islands and one on the Cocos Island in the Pacific Ocean. Although Darwin's finches have been studied extensively by morphologists, ecologists, and ethologists, their phylogenetic relationships remain uncertain. Here, sequences of two mtDNA segments, the cytochrome b and the control region, have been used to infer the evolutionary history of the group. The data reveal the Darwin's finches to be a monophyletic group with the warbler finch being the species closest to the founding stock, followed by the vegetarian finch, and then by two sister groups, the ground and the tree finches. The Cocos finch is related to the tree finches of the Galápagos Islands. The traditional classification of ground finches into six species and tree finches into five species is not reflected in the molecular data. In these two groups, ancestral polymorphisms have not, as yet, been sorted out among the cross-hybridizing species.

  1. MtDNA variability in whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) populations in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Valle, G E; Lourenção, A L; Zucchi, M I; Pinheiro, J B; Abreu, A G

    2011-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) consists of a complex of morphologically indistinct biotypes that vary mainly in their capacity to transmit plant viruses and to induce physiological disorders in plants of economic importance. The adaptability of B. tabaci to many regions of the world has fostered the appearance of various biotypes and has resulted in a broad spectrum of host plants. Our goal was to identify which biotypes were present in four B. tabaci populations in Brazil. We quantified genetic variability between and within populations. Three individuals were collected from three host plant species: two populations on soybean (Campinas and Rondonópolis), one on pumpkin (Barreiras) and one on tomato (Cruz das Almas) in three States of Brazil (São Paulo, Mato Grosso, and Bahia). We chose one sequence of the B biotype, obtained from GenBank; the Campinas population, which had been previously characterized as biotype B, was used as a control for this biotype. We also included one sequence of the Q biotype, obtained from GenBank, as an outgroup. The COI region of the mtDNA gene was partially amplified with the CI-J-2195 and L2-N-3014 pair of primers, and the reaction products were sequenced. Based on distance-based algorithm analyses, we found that all haplotypes belong to biotype B, which was confirmed by the haplotype network. Genetic structure analyses showed that the host plant species does not influence population structuring of this pest; only the geographic location mattered.

  2. Rampant Nuclear Insertion of mtDNA across Diverse Lineages within Orthoptera (Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hojun; Moulton, Matthew J.; Whiting, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts) are non-functional fragments of mtDNA inserted into the nuclear genome. Numts are prevalent across eukaryotes and a positive correlation is known to exist between the number of numts and the genome size. Most numt surveys have relied on model organisms with fully sequenced nuclear genomes, but such analyses have limited utilities for making a generalization about the patterns of numt accumulation for any given clade. Among insects, the order Orthoptera is known to have the largest nuclear genome and it is also reported to include several species with a large number of numts. In this study, we use Orthoptera as a case study to document the diversity and abundance of numts by generating numts of three mitochondrial loci across 28 orthopteran families, representing the phylogenetic diversity of the order. We discover that numts are rampant in all lineages, but there is no discernable and consistent pattern of numt accumulation among different lineages. Likewise, we do not find any evidence that a certain mitochondrial gene is more prone to nuclear insertion than others. We also find that numt insertion must have occurred continuously and frequently throughout the diversification of Orthoptera. Although most numts are the result of recent nuclear insertion, we find evidence of very ancient numt insertion shared by highly divergent families dating back to the Jurassic period. Finally, we discuss several factors contributing to the extreme prevalence of numts in Orthoptera and highlight the importance of exploring the utility of numts in evolutionary studies. PMID:25333882

  3. Genetic architecture of trout from Albania as revealed by mtDNA control region variation.

    PubMed

    Snoj, Ales; Marić, Sasa; Berrebi, Patrick; Crivelli, Alain J; Shumka, Spase; Susnik, Simona

    2009-02-02

    To determine the genetic architecture of trout in Albania, 87 individuals were collected from 19 riverine and lacustrine sites in Albania, FYROM and Greece. All individuals were analyzed for sequence variation in the mtDNA control region. Among fourteen haplotypes detected, four previously unpublished haplotypes, bearing a close relationship to haplotypes of the Adriatic and marmoratus lineages of Salmo trutta, were revealed. Ten previously described haplotypes, characteristic of S. ohridanus, S. letnica and the Adriatic and Mediterranean lineages of S. trutta, were also detected. Haplotypes detected in this study were placed in a well supported branch of S. ohridanus, and a cluster of Mediterranean-Adriatic-marmoratus haplotypes, which were further delimited into three subdivisions of Mediterranean, marmoratus, and a previously non-described formation of four Adriatic haplotypes (Balkan cluster). Haplotypes of the Balkan cluster and the other Adriatic haplotypes, do not represent a contiguous haplotype lineage and appear not to be closely related, indicating independent arrivals into the Adriatic drainage and suggesting successive colonization events. Despite the presence of marmoratus haplotypes in Albania, no marbled phenotype was found, confirming previously reported findings that there is no association between this phenotype and marmoratus haplotypes.

  4. The cAMP phosphodiesterase Prune localizes to the mitochondrial matrix and promotes mtDNA replication by stabilizing TFAM

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Qi, Yun; Zhou, Kiet; Zhang, Guofeng; Linask, Kaari; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Compartmentalized cAMP signaling regulates mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and oxidative phosphorylation. However, regulators of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway, and its broad impact on organelle function, remain to be explored. Here, we report that Drosophila Prune is a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase that localizes to the mitochondrial matrix. Knocking down prune in cultured cells reduces mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels. Our data suggest that Prune stabilizes TFAM and promotes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication through downregulation of mitochondrial cAMP signaling. In addition, our work demonstrates the prevalence of mitochondrial cAMP signaling in metazoan and its new role in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25648146

  5. Evaluation of cytochrome b mtDNA sequences in genetic diversity studies of Channa marulius (Channidae: Perciformes).

    PubMed

    Habib, Maria; Lakra, W S; Mohindra, Vindhya; Khare, Praveen; Barman, A S; Singh, Akanksha; Lal, Kuldeep K; Punia, Peyush; Khan, Asif A

    2011-02-01

    Channa marulius (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. The present study evaluated partial Cytochrome b gene sequence of mtDNA for determining the genetic variation in wild populations of C. marulius. Genomic DNA extracted from C. marulius samples (n = 23) belonging to 3 distant rivers; Mahanadi, Teesta and Yamuna was analyzed. Sequencing of 307 bp Cytochrome b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 5 haplotypes with haplotype diversity value of 0.763 and nucleotide diversity value of 0.0128. Single population specific haplotype was observed in Mahanadi and Yamuna samples and 3 haplotypes in Teesta samples. The analysis of data demonstrated the suitability of partial Cytochrome b sequence in determining the genetic diversity in C. marulius population. PMID:20443065

  6. Segregation pattern and biochemical effect of the G3460A mtDNA mutation in 27 members of LHON family.

    PubMed

    Kaplanová, Vilma; Zeman, Jirí; Hansíková, Hana; Cerná, Leona; Houst'ková, Hana; Misovicová, Nadezda; Houstek, Josef

    2004-08-30

    Inheritance and expression of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are crucial for the pathogenesis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We have investigated the segregation and functional consequences of G3460A mtDNA mutation in 27 members of a three-generation family with LHON syndrome. Specific activity of respiratory chain complex I in platelets was reduced in average to 56%, but no direct correlation between the mutation load and its biochemical expression was found. Heteroplasmy in blood, platelets and hair follicles varied from 7% to 100%. Segregation pattern exhibited tissue specificity and influence of different nuclear backgrounds in four branches of the pedigree. Longitudinal analysis revealed a significant (p=0.02) decrease in blood mutation load. Although enzyme assay showed reduction of complex I activity, our results give additional support to the hypothesis that expression of LHON mutation depends on complex nuclear-mitochondrial interaction.

  7. Evaluation of cytochrome b mtDNA sequences in genetic diversity studies of Channa marulius (Channidae: Perciformes).

    PubMed

    Habib, Maria; Lakra, W S; Mohindra, Vindhya; Khare, Praveen; Barman, A S; Singh, Akanksha; Lal, Kuldeep K; Punia, Peyush; Khan, Asif A

    2011-02-01

    Channa marulius (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. The present study evaluated partial Cytochrome b gene sequence of mtDNA for determining the genetic variation in wild populations of C. marulius. Genomic DNA extracted from C. marulius samples (n = 23) belonging to 3 distant rivers; Mahanadi, Teesta and Yamuna was analyzed. Sequencing of 307 bp Cytochrome b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 5 haplotypes with haplotype diversity value of 0.763 and nucleotide diversity value of 0.0128. Single population specific haplotype was observed in Mahanadi and Yamuna samples and 3 haplotypes in Teesta samples. The analysis of data demonstrated the suitability of partial Cytochrome b sequence in determining the genetic diversity in C. marulius population.

  8. Comparative genomics of Drosophila mtDNA: Novel features of conservation and change across functional domains and lineages.

    PubMed

    Montooth, Kristi L; Abt, Dawn N; Hofmann, Jeffrey W; Rand, David M

    2009-07-01

    To gain insight on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution, we assembled and analyzed the mitochondrial genomes of Drosophila erecta, D. ananassae, D. persimilis, D. willistoni, D. mojavensis, D. virilis and D. grimshawi together with the sequenced mtDNAs of the melanogaster subgroup. Genomic comparisons across the well-defined Drosophila phylogeny impart power for detecting conserved mtDNA regions that maintain metabolic function and regions that evolve uniquely on lineages. Evolutionary rate varies across intergenic regions of the mtDNA. Rapidly evolving intergenic regions harbor the majority of mitochondrial indel divergence. In contrast, patterns of nearly perfect conservation within intergenic regions reveal a refined set of nucleotides underlying the binding of transcription termination factors. Sequencing of 5' cDNA ends indicates that cytochrome C oxidase I (CoI) has a novel (T/C)CG start codon and that perfectly conserved regions upstream of two NADH dehydrogenase (ND) genes are transcribed and likely extend these protein sequences. Substitutions at synonymous sites in the Drosophila mitochondrial proteomes reflect a mutation process that is biased toward A and T nucleotides and differs between mtDNA strands. Differences in codon usage bias across genes reveal that weak selection at silent sites may offset the mutation bias. The mutation-selection balance at synonymous sites has also diverged between the Drosophila and Sophophora lineages. Rates of evolution are highly heterogeneous across the mitochondrial proteome, with ND accumulating many more amino acid substitutions than CO. These oxidative phosphorylation complex-specific rates of evolution vary across lineages and may reflect physiological and ecological change across the Drosophila phylogeny.

  9. Circumpolar diversity and geographic differentiation of mtDNA in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia).

    PubMed

    Sremba, Angela L; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany; Branch, Trevor A; LeDuc, Rick L; Baker, C Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) was hunted to near extinction between 1904 and 1972, declining from an estimated initial abundance of more than 250,000 to fewer than 400. Here, we describe mtDNA control region diversity and geographic differentiation in the surviving population of the Antarctic blue whale, using 218 biopsy samples collected under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) during research cruises from 1990-2009. Microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA sequences identified 166 individuals among the 218 samples and documented movement of a small number of individuals, including a female that traveled at least 6,650 km or 131° longitude over four years. mtDNA sequences from the 166 individuals were aligned with published sequences from 17 additional individuals, resolving 52 unique haplotypes from a consensus length of 410 bp. From this minimum census, a rarefaction analysis predicted that only 72 haplotypes (95% CL, 64, 86) have survived in the contemporary population of Antarctic blue whales. However, haplotype diversity was relatively high (0.968±0.004), perhaps as a result of the longevity of blue whales and the relatively recent timing of the bottleneck. Despite the potential for circumpolar dispersal, we found significant differentiation in mtDNA diversity (F(ST) = 0.032, p<0.005) and microsatellite alleles (F(ST) = 0.005, p<0.05) among the six Antarctic Areas historically used by the IWC for management of blue whales. PMID:22412889

  10. [Sequence polymorphism of mtDNA HVR Iand HVR II of Oroqen ethnic group in Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Yan, Chun-Xia; Chen, Feng; Dang, Yong-Hui; Li, Tao; Zheng, Hai-Bo; Chen, Teng; Li, Sheng-Bin

    2008-04-01

    Venous blood samples from 50 unrelated Oroqen individuals living in Inner Mongolia were collected and their mtDNA HVR I and HVR II sequences were detected by using ABI PRISM377 sequencers. The number of polymorphic loci, haplotype, haplotype frequence, average nucleotide variability and other polymorphic parameters were calculated. Based on Oroqen mtDNA sequence data obtained in our experiments and published data, genetic distance between Oroqen ethnic group and other populations were computered by Nei's measure. Phylogenetic tree was constructed by Neighbor Joining method. Comparing with Anderson sequence, 52 polymorphic loci in HVR I and 24 loci in HVR II were found in Oroqen mtDNA sequence, 38 and 27 haplotypes were defined herewith. Haplotype diversity and average nucleotide variability were 0.964+/-0.018 and 7.379 in HVR I, 0.929+/-0.019 and 2.408 in HVR II respectively. Fst and dA genetic distance between 12 populations were calculated based on HVR I sequence, and their relative coefficients were 0.993(P < 0.01). A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on genetic distances and included Oroqen, Taiwan and South Han population in a clade, which indicated near genetic relation between them, and far relation with northern Han, Mongolian and other foreign populations. The genetic polymorphism of mtDNA HVR I and HVR II in Oroqen ethnic group has some specificities compared with that of other populations. These data provide a useful tool in forensic identification, population genetic study and other research fields.

  11. Anthropology. Comment on "Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans".

    PubMed

    Prüfer, Kay; Meyer, Matthias

    2015-02-20

    Chatters et al. (Reports, 16 May 2014, p. 750) reported the retrieval of DNA sequences from a 12,000- to 13,000-year-old human tooth discovered in an underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula. They propose that this ancient human individual's mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) belongs to haplogroup D1. However, our analysis of postmortem damage patterns finds no evidence for an ancient origin of these sequences. PMID:25700510

  12. Circumpolar diversity and geographic differentiation of mtDNA in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia).

    PubMed

    Sremba, Angela L; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany; Branch, Trevor A; LeDuc, Rick L; Baker, C Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) was hunted to near extinction between 1904 and 1972, declining from an estimated initial abundance of more than 250,000 to fewer than 400. Here, we describe mtDNA control region diversity and geographic differentiation in the surviving population of the Antarctic blue whale, using 218 biopsy samples collected under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) during research cruises from 1990-2009. Microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA sequences identified 166 individuals among the 218 samples and documented movement of a small number of individuals, including a female that traveled at least 6,650 km or 131° longitude over four years. mtDNA sequences from the 166 individuals were aligned with published sequences from 17 additional individuals, resolving 52 unique haplotypes from a consensus length of 410 bp. From this minimum census, a rarefaction analysis predicted that only 72 haplotypes (95% CL, 64, 86) have survived in the contemporary population of Antarctic blue whales. However, haplotype diversity was relatively high (0.968±0.004), perhaps as a result of the longevity of blue whales and the relatively recent timing of the bottleneck. Despite the potential for circumpolar dispersal, we found significant differentiation in mtDNA diversity (F(ST) = 0.032, p<0.005) and microsatellite alleles (F(ST) = 0.005, p<0.05) among the six Antarctic Areas historically used by the IWC for management of blue whales.

  13. The genetic relationship between the Finns and the Finnish Saami (Lapps): analysis of nuclear DNA and mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Lahermo, P; Sajantila, A; Sistonen, P; Lukka, M; Aula, P; Peltonen, L; Savontaus, M L

    1996-06-01

    The genetic relationships between two Finno-Ugric-speaking populations, the Finns and the Finnish Saami (Lapps), were studied by using PCR for six nuclear-DNA marker loci, mitochondrial restriction-site polymorphism, and sequence variation of a 360-bp segment of the mitochondrial control region. The allele frequencies of each of the nuclear-DNA marker loci and the frequencies of mtDNA restriction haplotypes were significantly different between the populations. The Saami showed exceptionally low variation in their mtDNA restriction sites. The 9-bp deletion common in East Asian populations was not observed, nor did the haplotype data fit into the haplogroup categorization of Torroni et al. The average number of nucleotide substitutions from the mtDNA haplotype data indicated that the Finnish Saami may be closer to the Finns than to the other reference populations, whereas nuclear DNA suggested that the Finns are more closely related to the European reference populations than to the Finnish Saami. The similarity of the Finns to the other Europeans was even more pronounced according to the sequence data. We were unable to distinguish between the Finns and either the Swiss or Sardinian reference populations, whereas the Finnish Saami clearly stood apart. The Finnish Saami are distinct from other Circumarctic populations, although two of the lineages found among the Saami showed closer relationship to the Circumarctic than to the European lineages. The sequence data indicated an exceptionally high divergence for the Saami mtDNA control lineages. The distribution of the pairwise nucleotide differences in the Saami suggested that this population has not experienced an expansion similar to what was indicated for the Finns and the reference populations.

  14. Anthropology. Response to Comment on "Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans".

    PubMed

    Kemp, Brian M; Lindo, John; Bolnick, Deborah A; Malhi, Ripan S; Chatters, James C

    2015-02-20

    Prüfer and Meyer raise concerns over the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) results we reported for the Hoyo Negro individual, citing failure of a portion of these data to conform to their expectations of ancient DNA (aDNA). Because damage patterns in aDNA vary, outright rejection of our findings on this basis is unwarranted, especially in light of our other observations.

  15. Anthropology. Comment on "Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans".

    PubMed

    Prüfer, Kay; Meyer, Matthias

    2015-02-20

    Chatters et al. (Reports, 16 May 2014, p. 750) reported the retrieval of DNA sequences from a 12,000- to 13,000-year-old human tooth discovered in an underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula. They propose that this ancient human individual's mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) belongs to haplogroup D1. However, our analysis of postmortem damage patterns finds no evidence for an ancient origin of these sequences.

  16. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenzhou Bao, Qingli Sun, Lixin Huang, Xin Wang, Tao Zhang, Shuang Li, Han Zhang, Luyong

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  17. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  18. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways.

    PubMed

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-12-17

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  19. The mitochondrial genome of Hydra oligactis (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) sheds new light on animal mtDNA evolution and cnidarian phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Ehsan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2008-02-29

    The 16,314-nuceotide sequence of the linear mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule of Hydra oligactis (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa)--the first from the class Hydrozoa--has been determined. This sequence contains genes for 13 energy pathway proteins, small and large subunit rRNAs, and methionine and tryptophan tRNAs, as is typical for cnidarians. All genes have the same transcriptional orientation and their arrangement in the genome is similar to that of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita. In addition, a partial copy of cox1 is present at one end of the molecule in a transcriptional orientation opposite to the rest of the genes, forming a part of inverted terminal repeat characteristic of linear mtDNA and linear mitochondrial plasmids. The sequence close to at least one end of the molecule contains several homonucleotide runs as well as small inverted repeats that are able to form strong secondary structures and may be involved in mtDNA maintenance and expression. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial genes of H. oligactis and other cnidarians supports the Medusozoa hypothesis but also suggests that Anthozoa may be paraphyletic, with octocorallians more closely related to the Medusozoa than to the Hexacorallia. The latter inference implies that Anthozoa is paraphyletic and that the polyp (rather than a medusa) is the ancestral body type in Cnidaria.

  20. An update to MitoTool: using a new scoring system for faster mtDNA haplogroup determination.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2013-07-01

    The determination of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups is not only crucial in anthropological and forensic studies, but is also helpful in the medical field to prevent establishment of wrong disease associations. In recent years, high-throughput technologies and the huge amounts of data they create, as well as the regular updates to the mtDNA phylogenetic tree, mean that there is a need for an automated approach which can make a speedier determination of haplogroups than can be made by using the traditional manual method. Here, we update the MitoTool (www.mitotool.org) by incorporating a novel scoring system for the determination of mtDNA into haplogroups, which has advantages on speed, accuracy and ease of implementation. In order to make the access to MitoTool easier, we also provide a stand-alone version of the program that will run on a local computer and this version is freely available at the MitoTool website.

  1. Genetic Population Structure of Thunnus albacares in the Central Pacific Ocean Based on mtDNA COI Gene Sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwen; Chen, Xinjun; Xu, Qianghua; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Dai, Xiaojie; Xu, Liuxiong

    2015-04-01

    Thunnus albacares is an important fishery species throughout the world. Polymorphisms of sequence variations in mtDNA COI genes were assessed to explore the genetic differentiations among 11 populations of T. albacares sampled from the central Pacific Ocean. Sixty-one mtDNA haplotypes and 38 variable sites were detected. Analysis of mtDNA COI sequences revealed that tuna from the 11 localities were characterized by moderately high haplotype diversity (h = 0.650 ± 0.040), while sequence divergence between haplotypes was relatively low (π = 0.00364 ± 0.00044). Analyses of molecular variance and FST analysis supported that significant genetic differentiations existed between some of the sampled populations. Tests of neutral evolution and mismatch distribution analysis suggested that T. albacares might have experienced a population expansion, which possibly occurred within the last 0.82 million years. Our study unraveled the genetic structure of the extant population of T. albacares and addressed the related fishery management issues including fishery stock identification and management. PMID:25854852

  2. Low penetrance of the 14484 LHON mutation when it arises in a non-haplogroup J mtDNA background.

    PubMed

    Howell, Neil; Herrnstadt, Corinna; Shults, Cliff; Mackey, David A

    2003-06-01

    The penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pedigrees is determined primarily by a mutation in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), but secondary factors are also necessary for manifestation of the disorder. It has been proposed that mtDNA polymorphisms affect penetrance in LHON pedigrees. In particular, it has been postulated that one or more polymorphisms associated with European haplogroup J mtDNAs substantially increase the penetrance of the primary LHON mutation at nucleotide 14484. We report here a haplogroup H matrilineal pedigree (VIC14) in which the single affected member carries the 14484 LHON mutation, but who manifested a milder and atypical optic nerve disorder. In addition, during a population screen, we identified an individual who carried the 14484 mutation but who had normal vision. Finally, the 14484 mutation is under-represented among haplogroup H mtDNAs that carry a LHON mutation. These results, in conjunction with other studies that are reviewed, indicate that 14484 LHON mutations have a low penetrance when they arise in a haplogroup H mtDNA background.

  3. Functional Characterization of Three Concomitant MtDNA LHON Mutations Shows No Synergistic Effect on Mitochondrial Activity.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Hernández-Sierra, Rosana; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier; González Manrique, Mar; Blázquez, Alberto; Martín, Miguel Angel; Ayuso, Carmen; Garesse, Rafael; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of more than one non-severe pathogenic mutation in the same mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule is very rare. Moreover, it is unclear whether their co-occurrence results in an additive impact on mitochondrial function relative to single mutation effects. Here we describe the first example of a mtDNA molecule harboring three Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-associated mutations (m.11778G>A, m.14484T>C, m.11253T>C) and the analysis of its genetic, biochemical and molecular characterization in transmitochondrial cells (cybrids). Extensive characterization of cybrid cell lines harboring either the 3 mutations or the single classic m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C mutations revealed no differences in mitochondrial function, demonstrating the absence of a synergistic effect in this model system. These molecular results are in agreement with the ophthalmological characteristics found in the triple mutant patient, which were similar to those carrying single mtDNA LHON mutations.

  4. Functional Characterization of Three Concomitant MtDNA LHON Mutations Shows No Synergistic Effect on Mitochondrial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J.; Hernández-Sierra, Rosana; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier; González Manrique, Mar; Blázquez, Alberto; Martín, Miguel Angel; Ayuso, Carmen; Garesse, Rafael; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of more than one non-severe pathogenic mutation in the same mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule is very rare. Moreover, it is unclear whether their co-occurrence results in an additive impact on mitochondrial function relative to single mutation effects. Here we describe the first example of a mtDNA molecule harboring three Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-associated mutations (m.11778G>A, m.14484T>C, m.11253T>C) and the analysis of its genetic, biochemical and molecular characterization in transmitochondrial cells (cybrids). Extensive characterization of cybrid cell lines harboring either the 3 mutations or the single classic m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C mutations revealed no differences in mitochondrial function, demonstrating the absence of a synergistic effect in this model system. These molecular results are in agreement with the ophthalmological characteristics found in the triple mutant patient, which were similar to those carrying single mtDNA LHON mutations. PMID:26784702

  5. Long-term bezafibrate treatment improves skin and spleen phenotypes of the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Hida, Aline; Garcia, Sofia; Prolla, Tomas A; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological agents, such as bezafibrate, that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and PPAR γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathways have been shown to improve mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mouse is a mouse model of aging that harbors a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ. These mice develop many features of premature aging including hair loss, anemia, osteoporosis, sarcopenia and decreased lifespan. They also have increased mtDNA mutations and marked mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that mutator mice treated with bezafibrate for 8-months had delayed hair loss and improved skin and spleen aging-like phenotypes. Although we observed an increase in markers of fatty acid oxidation in these tissues, we did not detect a generalized increase in mitochondrial markers. On the other hand, there were no improvements in muscle function or lifespan of the mutator mouse, which we attributed to the rodent-specific hepatomegaly associated with fibrate treatment. These results showed that despite its secondary effects in rodent's liver, bezafibrate was able to improve some of the aging phenotypes in the mutator mouse. Because the associated hepatomegaly is not observed in primates, long-term bezafibrate treatment in humans could have beneficial effects on tissues undergoing chronic bioenergetic-related degeneration.

  6. Degradation of paternal mitochondria after fertilization: implications for heteroplasmy, assisted reproductive technologies and mtDNA inheritance.

    PubMed

    Sutovsky, Peter; Van Leyen, Klaus; McCauley, Tod; Day, Billy N; Sutovsky, Miriam

    2004-01-01

    Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA has long been regarded as a major paradox in developmental biology. While some confusion may still persist in popular science, research data clearly document that the paternal sperm-borne mitochondria of most mammalian species enter the ooplasm at fertilization and are specifically targeted for degradation by the resident ubiquitin system. Ubiquitin is a proteolytic chaperone that forms covalently linked polyubiquitin chains on the targeted proteinaceous substrates. The polyubiquitin tag redirects the substrate proteins to a 26-S proteasome, a multi-subunit proteolytic organelle. Thus, specific proteasomal inhibitors reversibly block sperm mitochondrial degradation in ooplasm. Lysosomal degradation and the activity of membrane-lipoperoxidating enzyme 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX) may also contribute to sperm mitochondrial degradation in the ooplasm, but probably is not crucial. Prohibitin, the major protein of the inner mitochondrial membrane, appears to be ubiquitinated in the sperm mitochondria. Occasional occurrence of paternal inheritance of mtDNA has been suggested in mammals including humans. While most such evidence has been widely disputed, it warrants further examination. Of particular concern is the documented heteroplasmy, i.e. mixed mtDNA inheritance after ooplasmic transplantation. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has inherent potential for delaying the degradation of sperm mitochondria. However, paternal mtDNA inheritance after ICSI has not been documented so far.

  7. Transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ and mtDNA mutator mice, but not aged mice, share the same spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Hikari; Suzuki, Michiko; Morishima, Hitomi; Ota, Azusa; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Maeno, Akiteru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-24

    The spectra of phenotypes associated with aging and mitochondrial diseases sometimes appear to overlap with each other. We used aged mice and a mouse model of mitochondrial diseases (transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ with deleted mtDNA) to study whether premature aging phenotypes observed in mtDNA mutator mice are associated with aging or mitochondrial diseases. Here, we provide convincing evidence that all the mice examined had musculoskeletal disorders of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy, which correspond to phenotypes prevalently observed in the elderly. However, precise investigation of musculoskeletal disorders revealed that the spectra of osteoporosis and muscle atrophy phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice were very close to those in mito-miceΔ, but different from those of aged mice. Therefore, mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, but not aged mice, share the spectra of musculoskeletal disorders.

  8. [A case or Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON): differential diagnosis with post inflammatory atrophy of nerve II using the mtDNA analysis].

    PubMed

    Lubos, Leszek; Wajgt, Andrzej; Maciejowski, Maciej; Mroczek-Tońska, Katarzyna; Bartnik, Ewa; Dziekanowska, Danuta

    2003-01-01

    The Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a disease due to a mtDNA mutation. The disorder results from enzymatic perturbations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Clinically the LHON may present as a progressive axonal atrophy of the optic nerves with or without other neurological symptoms. The process of reaching the diagnosis of the LHON by means of the molecular analysis of mtDNA is discussed.

  9. Manipulation of mtDNA heteroplasmy in all striated muscles of newborn mice by AAV9-mediated delivery of a mitochondria-targeted restriction endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Bacman, S R; Williams, S L; Duan, D; Moraes, C T

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are frequently caused by heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. As these mutations express themselves only at high relative ratios, any approach able to manipulate mtDNA heteroplasmy can potentially be curative. In this study, we developed a system to manipulate mtDNA heteroplasmy in all skeletal muscles from neonate mice. We selected muscle because it is one of the most clinically affected tissues in mitochondrial disorders. A mitochondria-targeted restriction endonuclease (mito-ApaLI) expressed from AAV9 particles was delivered either by intraperitoneal or intravenous injection in neonate mice harboring two mtDNA haplotypes, only one of which was susceptible to ApaLI digestion. A single injection was able to elicit a predictable and marked change in mtDNA heteroplasmy in all striated muscles analyzed, including heart. No health problems or reduction in mtDNA levels were observed in treated mice, suggesting that this approach could have clinical applications for mitochondrial myopathies.

  10. Mutation of OPA1 causes dominant optic atrophy with external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, deafness and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions: a novel disorder of mtDNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Gavin; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Blakely, Emma L; Stewart, Joanna D; He, Langping; Schaefer, Andrew M; Griffiths, Philip G; Ahlqvist, Kati; Suomalainen, Anu; Reynier, Pascal; McFarland, Robert; Turnbull, Douglass M; Chinnery, Patrick F; Taylor, Robert W

    2008-02-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance cause a wide range of clinical phenotypes associated with the secondary accumulation of multiple mtDNA deletions in affected tissues. The majority of families with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) harbour mutations in genes encoding one of three well-characterized proteins--pol gamma, Twinkle or Ant 1. Here we show that a heterozygous mis-sense mutation in OPA1 leads to multiple mtDNA deletions in skeletal muscle and a mosaic defect of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). The disorder presented with visual failure and optic atrophy in childhood, followed by PEO, ataxia, deafness and a sensory-motor neuropathy in adult life. COX-deficient skeletal muscle fibres contained supra-threshold levels of multiple mtDNA deletions, and genetic linkage, sequencing and expression analysis excluded POLG1, PEO1 and SLC25A4, the gene encoding Ant 1, as the cause. This demonstrates the importance of OPA1 in mtDNA maintenance, and implicates OPA1 in diseases associated with secondary defects of mtDNA. PMID:18065439

  11. African origin for Madagascan dogs revealed by mtDNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Arman; Oskarsson, Mattias C. R.; van Asch, Barbara; Rabakonandriania, Elisabeth; Savolainen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar was one of the last major land masses to be inhabited by humans. It was initially colonized by Austronesian speaking Indonesians 1500–2000 years ago, but subsequent migration from Africa has resulted in approximately equal genetic contributions from Indonesia and Africa, and the material culture has mainly African influences. The dog, along with the pig and the chicken, was part of the Austronesian Neolithic culture, and was furthermore the only domestic animal to accompany humans to every continent in ancient times. To illuminate Madagascan cultural origins and track the initial worldwide dispersal of dogs, we here investigated the ancestry of Madagascan dogs. We analysed mtDNA control region sequences in dogs from Madagascar (n=145) and compared it with that from potential ancestral populations in Island Southeast Asia (n=219) and sub-Saharan Africa (n=493). We found that 90% of the Madagascan dogs carried a haplotype that was also present in sub-Saharan Africa and that the remaining lineages could all be attributed to a likely origin in Africa. By contrast, only 26% of Madagascan dogs shared haplotypes with Indonesian dogs, and one haplotype typical for Austronesian dogs, carried by more than 40% of Indonesian and Polynesian dogs, was absent among the Madagascan dogs. Thus, in contrast to the human population, Madagascan dogs seem to trace their origin entirely from Africa. These results suggest that dogs were not brought to Madagascar by the initial Austronesian speaking colonizers on their transoceanic voyage, but were introduced at a later stage, together with human migration and cultural influence from Africa. PMID:26064658

  12. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Bertola, Laura D; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A; Driscoll, Carlos A; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A; Tumenta, Pricelia N; Jirmo, Tuqa H; de Snoo, Geert R; de Iongh, Hans H; Vrieling, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted.

  13. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, Laura D.; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A.; Tumenta, Pricelia N.; Jirmo, Tuqa H.; de Snoo, Geert R.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted. PMID:26466139

  14. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Bertola, Laura D; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A; Driscoll, Carlos A; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A; Tumenta, Pricelia N; Jirmo, Tuqa H; de Snoo, Geert R; de Iongh, Hans H; Vrieling, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted. PMID:26466139

  15. Y-Chromosome and mtDNA Genetics Reveal Significant Contrasts in Affinities of Modern Middle Eastern Populations with European and African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Badro, Danielle A.; Youhanna, Sonia C.; Salloum, Angélique; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Johnsrud, Brian; Khazen, Georges; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Soria-Hernanz, David F.; Wells, R. Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Platt, Daniel E.; Zalloua, Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including North and sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Middle Eastern populations. In this study 5,174 mtDNA and 4,658 Y-chromosome samples were investigated using PCA, MDS, mean-linkage clustering, AMOVA, and Fisher exact tests of FST's, RST's, and haplogroup frequencies. Geographic differentiation in affinities of Middle Eastern populations with Africa and Europe showed distinct contrasts between mtDNA and Y-chromosome data. Specifically, Lebanon's mtDNA shows a very strong association to Europe, while Yemen shows very strong affinity with Egypt and North and East Africa. Previous Y-chromosome results showed a Levantine coastal-inland contrast marked by J1 and J2, and a very strong North African component was evident throughout the Middle East. Neither of these patterns were observed in the mtDNA. While J2 has penetrated into Europe, the pattern of Y-chromosome diversity in Lebanon does not show the widespread affinities with Europe indicated by the mtDNA data. Lastly, while each population shows evidence of connections with expansions that now define the Middle East, Africa, and Europe, many of the populations in the Middle East show distinctive mtDNA and Y-haplogroup characteristics that indicate long standing settlement with relatively little impact from and movement into other populations. PMID:23382925

  16. Results of the 2003-2004 GEP-ISFG collaborative study on mitochondrial DNA: focus on the mtDNA profile of a mixed semen-saliva stain.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, Manuel; Paredes, Miguel R; Prieto, Lourdes; Montesino, Marta; Salas, Antonio; Albarran, Cristina; Alvarez-Iglesias, V; Amorin, Antonio; Berniell-Lee, Gemma; Brehm, Antonio; Carril, Juan C; Corach, Daniel; Cuevas, Nerea; Di Lonardo, Ana M; Doutremepuich, Christian; Espinheira, Rosa M; Espinoza, Marta; Gómez, Felix; González, Alberto; Hernández, Alexis; Hidalgo, M; Jimenez, Magda; Leite, Fabio P N; López, Ana M; López-Soto, Manuel; Lorente, Jose A; Pagano, Shintia; Palacio, Ana M; Pestano, José J; Pinheiro, Maria F; Raimondi, Eduardo; Ramón, M M; Tovar, Florangel; Vidal-Rioja, Lidia; Vide, Maria C; Whittle, Martín R; Yunis, Juan J; Garcia-Hirschfel, Julia

    2006-07-13

    We report here a review of the seventh mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exercise undertaken by the Spanish and Portuguese working group (GEP) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) corresponding to the period 2003-2004. Five reference bloodstains from five donors (M1-M5), a mixed stain of saliva and semen (M6), and a hair sample (M7) were submitted to each participating laboratory for nuclear DNA (nDNA; autosomal STR and Y-STR) and mtDNA analysis. Laboratories were asked to investigate the contributors of samples M6 and M7 among the reference donors (M1-M5). A total of 34 laboratories reported total or partial mtDNA sequence data from both, the reference bloodstains (M1-M5) and the hair sample (M7) concluding a match between mtDNA profiles of M5 and M7. Autosomal STR and Y-STR profiling was the preferred strategy to investigate the contributors of the semen/saliva mixture (M6). Nuclear DNA profiles were consistent with a mixture of saliva from the donor (female) of M4 and semen from donor M5, being the semen (XY) profile the dominant component of the mixture. Strikingly, and in contradiction to the nuclear DNA analysis, mtDNA sequencing results yield a more simple result: only the saliva contribution (M4) was detected, either after preferential lysis or after complete DNA digestion. Some labs provided with several explanations for this finding and carried out additional experiments to explain this apparent contradictory result. The results pointed to the existence of different relative amounts of nuclear and mtDNAs in saliva and semen. We conclude that this circumstance could strongly influence the interpretation of the mtDNA evidence in unbalanced mixtures and in consequence lead to false exclusions. During the GEP-ISFG annual conference a validation study was planned to progress in the interpretation of mtDNA from different mixtures.

  17. Different genetic components in the Ethiopian population, identified by mtDNA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Passarino, G; Semino, O; Quintana-Murci, L; Excoffier, L; Hammer, M; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A S

    1998-01-01

    Seventy-seven Ethiopians were investigated for mtDNA and Y chromosome-specific variations, in order to (1) define the different maternal and paternal components of the Ethiopian gene pool, (2) infer the origins of these maternal and paternal lineages and estimate their relative contributions, and (3) obtain information about ancient populations living in Ethiopia. The mtDNA was studied for the RFLPs relative to the six classical enzymes (HpaI, BamHI, HaeII, MspI, AvaII, and HincII) that identify the African haplogroup L and the Caucasoid haplogroups I and T. The sample was also examined at restriction sites that define the other Caucasoid haplogroups (H, U, V, W, X, J, and K) and for the simultaneous presence of the DdeI10394 and AluI10397 sites, which defines the Asian haplogroup M. Four polymorphic systems were examined on the Y chromosome: the TaqI/12f2 and the 49a,f RFLPs, the Y Alu polymorphic element (DYS287), and the sY81-A/G (DYS271) polymorphism. For comparison, the last two Y polymorphisms were also examined in 87 Senegalese previously classified for the two TaqI RFLPs. Results from these markers led to the hypothesis that the Ethiopian population (1) experienced Caucasoid gene flow mainly through males, (2) contains African components ascribable to Bantu migrations and to an in situ differentiation process from an ancestral African gene pool, and (3) exhibits some Y-chromosome affinities with the Tsumkwe San (a very ancient African group). Our finding of a high (20%) frequency of the "Asian" DdeI10394AluI10397 (++) mtDNA haplotype in Ethiopia is discussed in terms of the "out of Africa" model. PMID:9463310

  18. Contrasting patterns of Y chromosome and mtDNA variation in Africa: evidence for sex-biased demographic processes.

    PubMed

    Wood, Elizabeth T; Stover, Daryn A; Ehret, Christopher; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Spedini, Gabriella; McLeod, Howard; Louie, Leslie; Bamshad, Mike; Strassmann, Beverly I; Soodyall, Himla; Hammer, Michael F

    2005-07-01

    To investigate associations between genetic, linguistic, and geographic variation in Africa, we type 50 Y chromosome SNPs in 1122 individuals from 40 populations representing African geographic and linguistic diversity. We compare these patterns of variation with those that emerge from a similar analysis of published mtDNA HVS1 sequences from 1918 individuals from 39 African populations. For the Y chromosome, Mantel tests reveal a strong partial correlation between genetic and linguistic distances (r=0.33, P=0.001) and no correlation between genetic and geographic distances (r=-0.08, P>0.10). In contrast, mtDNA variation is weakly correlated with both language (r=0.16, P=0.046) and geography (r=0.17, P=0.035). AMOVA indicates that the amount of paternal among-group variation is much higher when populations are grouped by linguistics (Phi(CT)=0.21) than by geography (Phi(CT)=0.06). Levels of maternal genetic among-group variation are low for both linguistics and geography (Phi(CT)=0.03 and 0.04, respectively). When Bantu speakers are removed from these analyses, the correlation with linguistic variation disappears for the Y chromosome and strengthens for mtDNA. These data suggest that patterns of differentiation and gene flow in Africa have differed for men and women in the recent evolutionary past. We infer that sex-biased rates of admixture and/or language borrowing between expanding Bantu farmers and local hunter-gatherers played an important role in influencing patterns of genetic variation during the spread of African agriculture in the last 4000 years.

  19. Species phylogeny and diversification process of Northeast Asian Pungitius revealed by AFLP and mtDNA markers.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Møller, Peter R; Shedko, Sergei V; Ramatulla, Temirbekov; Joen, Sang-Rin; Zhang, Chun-Guang; Sideleva, Valentina G; Takata, Keisuke; Sakai, Harumi; Goto, Akira; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2016-06-01

    Pungitius is a highly diversified genus of sticklebacks (Gasterosteidae) occurring widely in northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Several ecologically and genetically divergent types that are largely isolated reproductively but occasionally hybridize in sympatry have been discovered in Northeast Asia, although the taxonomy and evolutionary relationships among them remain unclear. We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers to infer phylogenies among individuals collected from sympatric and allopatric populations, including the type localities of the described species. Phylogenetic analyses based on 2683 polymorphic AFLP loci confirmed seven species, each of which (except for one entirely allopatric species P. platygaster) was clearly differentiated from one or two other sympatric species and constituted a highly supported monophyletic clade with conspecific allopatric populations. The phylogeny showed that two lineages arose early; one gave rise to two species (circumpolar species P. pungitius and Paratethys species P. platygaster) and the other to five species endemic to Northeast Asia (P. sinensis, P. tymensis, P. polyakovi, P. kaibarae, and P. bussei). The brackish-water, freshwater, and Omono types previously discovered in Japan were reidentified as P. pungitius, P. sinensis, and P. kaibarae, respectively. A marked incongruence was noted between the phylogenies of AFLP and mtDNA markers, suggesting the occasional occurrence of hybridization and mtDNA introgression among distinct species. Our results highlight that the marginal seas of Northeast Asia played a key role as barriers to or facilitators of gene flow in the evolution of species diversity of Pungitius concentrated in this region. PMID:26997522

  20. Slowly Progressive Encephalopathy with Hearing Loss Due to a Mutation in the mtDNA tRNALeu(CUN) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Çoku, Jorida; Shanske, Sara; Mehrazin, Mahsa; Tanji, Kurenai; Naini, Ali; Emmanuele, Valentina; Patterson, Marc; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in the tRNALeu(UCN) gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been invariably accompanied by skeletal myopathy with or without chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). We report a young woman with a heteroplasmic m.12276G>A mutation in tRNALeu(UCN), who had childhood-onset and slowly progressive encephalopathy with ataxia, cognitive impairment, and hearing loss. Sequencing of the 22 tRNA mitochondrial genes is indicated in all unusual neurological syndromes, even in the absence of maternal inheritance. PMID:20022607

  1. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Margarida; Sequeira, Fernando; Luiselli, Donata; Beleza, Sandra; Rocha, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyaneka-Nkumbi and Kuvale). We assessed the differentiation between these populations and their levels of admixture with Khoe-San groups, and examined their relationship with other sub-Saharan populations. We further combined our dataset with previously published data on Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation to explore a general isolation with migration model and infer the demographic parameters underlying current genetic diversity in Bantu populations. Results Correspondence analysis, lineage sharing patterns and admixture estimates indicate that the gene pool from southwestern Angola is predominantly derived from West-Central Africa. The pastoralist Herero-speaking Kuvale people were additionally characterized by relatively high frequencies of Y-chromosome (12%) and mtDNA (22%) Khoe-San lineages, as well as by the presence of the -14010C lactase persistence mutation (6%), which likely originated in non-Bantu pastoralists from East Africa. Inferred demographic parameters show that both male and female populations underwent significant size growth after the split between the western and eastern branches of Bantu expansions occurring 4000 years ago. However, males had lower population sizes and migration rates than females throughout the Bantu dispersals. Conclusion Genetic variation in southwestern Angola essentially results from the encounter of an offshoot of West-Central Africa with autochthonous Khoisan-speaking peoples from the south. Interactions between the Bantus and the Khoe-San likely

  2. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D; Copeland, William C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  3. Interference of Co-amplified nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences on the determination of human mtDNA heteroplasmy by Using the SURVEYOR nuclease and the WAVE HS system.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Li, Shiue-Li; Hsu, Wei-Chien; Tang, Petrus

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity and high-throughput mutation detection techniques are useful for screening the homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but might be susceptible to interference from nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs) co-amplified during polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we first evaluated the platform of SURVEYOR Nuclease digestion of heteroduplexed DNA followed by the detection of cleaved DNA by using the WAVE HS System (SN/WAVE-HS) for detecting human mtDNA variants and found that its performance was slightly better than that of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). The potential interference from co-amplified NUMTs on screening mtDNA heteroplasmy when using these 2 highly sensitive techniques was further examined by using 2 published primer sets containing a total of 65 primer pairs, which were originally designed to be used with one of the 2 techniques. We confirmed that 24 primer pairs could amplify NUMTs by conducting bioinformatic analysis and PCR with the DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Using mtDNA extracted from the mitochondria of human 143B cells and a cybrid line with the nuclear background of 143B-ρ0 cells, we demonstrated that NUMTs could affect the patterns of chromatograms for cell DNA during SN-WAVE/HS analysis of mtDNA, leading to incorrect judgment of mtDNA homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status. However, we observed such interference only in 2 of 24 primer pairs selected, and did not observe such effects during DHPLC analysis. These results indicate that NUMTs can affect the screening of low-level mtDNA variants, but it might not be predicted by bioinformatic analysis or the amplification of DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Therefore, using purified mtDNA from cultured cells with proven purity to evaluate the effects of NUMTs from a primer pair on mtDNA detection by using PCR-based high-sensitivity methods prior to the use of a primer pair in real studies would be a more practical strategy.

  4. Japanese Wolves are Genetically Divided into Two Groups Based on an 8-Nucleotide Insertion/Deletion within the mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Naotaka; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Sasaki, Motoki; Matsui, Akira; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Maruyama, Masashi; Hongo, Hitomi; Vostretsov, Yuri E; Gasilin, Viatcheslav; Kosintsev, Pavel A; Quanjia, Chen; Chunxue, Wang

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (198- to 598-bp) of four ancient Canis specimens (two Canis mandibles, a cranium, and a first phalanx) was examined, and each specimen was genetically identified as Japanese wolf. Two unique nucleotide substitutions, the 78-C insertion and the 482-G deletion, both of which are specific for Japanese wolf, were observed in each sample. Based on the mtDNA sequences analyzed, these four specimens and 10 additional Japanese wolf samples could be classified into two groups- Group A (10 samples) and Group B (4 samples)-which contain or lack an 8-bp insertion/deletion (indel), respectively. Interestingly, three dogs (Akita-b, Kishu 25, and S-husky 102) that each contained Japanese wolf-specific features were also classified into Group A or B based on the 8-bp indel. To determine the origin or ancestor of the Japanese wolf, mtDNA control regions of ancient continental Canis specimens were examined; 84 specimens were from Russia, and 29 were from China. However, none of these 113 specimens contained Japanese wolf-specific sequences. Moreover, none of 426 Japanese modern hunting dogs examined contained these Japanese wolf-specific mtDNA sequences. The mtDNA control region sequences of Groups A and B appeared to be unique to grey wolf and dog populations. PMID:26853868

  5. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Japanese Wolves are Genetically Divided into Two Groups Based on an 8-Nucleotide Insertion/Deletion within the mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Naotaka; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Sasaki, Motoki; Matsui, Akira; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Maruyama, Masashi; Hongo, Hitomi; Vostretsov, Yuri E; Gasilin, Viatcheslav; Kosintsev, Pavel A; Quanjia, Chen; Chunxue, Wang

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (198- to 598-bp) of four ancient Canis specimens (two Canis mandibles, a cranium, and a first phalanx) was examined, and each specimen was genetically identified as Japanese wolf. Two unique nucleotide substitutions, the 78-C insertion and the 482-G deletion, both of which are specific for Japanese wolf, were observed in each sample. Based on the mtDNA sequences analyzed, these four specimens and 10 additional Japanese wolf samples could be classified into two groups- Group A (10 samples) and Group B (4 samples)-which contain or lack an 8-bp insertion/deletion (indel), respectively. Interestingly, three dogs (Akita-b, Kishu 25, and S-husky 102) that each contained Japanese wolf-specific features were also classified into Group A or B based on the 8-bp indel. To determine the origin or ancestor of the Japanese wolf, mtDNA control regions of ancient continental Canis specimens were examined; 84 specimens were from Russia, and 29 were from China. However, none of these 113 specimens contained Japanese wolf-specific sequences. Moreover, none of 426 Japanese modern hunting dogs examined contained these Japanese wolf-specific mtDNA sequences. The mtDNA control region sequences of Groups A and B appeared to be unique to grey wolf and dog populations.

  7. Killer whale nuclear genome and mtDNA reveal widespread population bottleneck during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Moura, Andre E; Janse van Rensburg, Charlene; Pilot, Malgorzata; Tehrani, Arman; Best, Peter B; Thornton, Meredith; Plön, Stephanie; de Bruyn, P J Nico; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Hoelzel, Alan Rus

    2014-05-01

    Ecosystem function and resilience is determined by the interactions and independent contributions of individual species. Apex predators play a disproportionately determinant role through their influence and dependence on the dynamics of prey species. Their demographic fluctuations are thus likely to reflect changes in their respective ecological communities and habitat. Here, we investigate the historical population dynamics of the killer whale based on draft nuclear genome data for the Northern Hemisphere and mtDNA data worldwide. We infer a relatively stable population size throughout most of the Pleistocene, followed by an order of magnitude decline and bottleneck during the Weichselian glacial period. Global mtDNA data indicate that while most populations declined, at least one population retained diversity in a stable, productive ecosystem off southern Africa. We conclude that environmental changes during the last glacial period promoted the decline of a top ocean predator, that these events contributed to the pattern of diversity among extant populations, and that the relatively high diversity of a population currently in productive, stable habitat off South Africa suggests a role for ocean productivity in the widespread decline. PMID:24497033

  8. Molecular systematics of the neotropical shovelnose catfish genus Pseudoplatystoma Bleeker 1862 based on nuclear and mtDNA markers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Costa, L F; Piorski, N M; Willis, S C; Galetti, P M; Ortí, G

    2011-04-01

    Pseudoplatystoma is a commercially important genus of Neotropical migratory catfishes widely distributed in all major river basins of South America. Historically, only three species were recognized, but a recent revision proposed eight putative morphospecies for the genus. A molecular study based on mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) provided support for recognition of only some of the species and raised questions about species boundaries in this group. We present a more encompassing analysis based on mtDNA (cytochrome b, 818bp) and nuclear DNA-based phylogenies (Rag1 intron 1, 664bp and S7 intron 1, 635bp) for a more extensive sampling (279 individuals from 42 localities) of all putative species in all major river basins. Patterns generated by individual gene genealogies and a multispecies coalescent analysis provided evidence to suggest recognition of only four distinct species in this genus: Pseudoplatystoma magdaleniatum, Pseudoplatystoma corruscans, Pseudoplatystoma tigrimun (sensu lato) and Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum (sensu lato). The species phylogeny places P. magdaleniatum as the sister group to all the other species in the genus, but the relationships among P. fasciatum s.l, P. tigrimum s.l., and P. corruscans could not be resolved with confidence. PMID:21315164

  9. Phylogeographical analysis of mtDNA data indicates postglacial expansion from multiple glacial refugia in woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou).

    PubMed

    Klütsch, Cornelya F C; Manseau, Micheline; Wilson, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Glacial refugia considerably shaped the phylogeographical structure of species and may influence intra-specific morphological, genetic, and adaptive differentiation. However, the impact of the Quaternary ice ages on the phylogeographical structure of North American temperate mammalian species is not well-studied. Here, we surveyed ~1600 individuals of the widely distributed woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) using mtDNA control region sequences to investigate if glacial refugia contributed to the phylogeographical structure in this subspecies. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction, a median-joining network, and mismatch distributions supported postglacial expansions of woodland caribou from three glacial refugia dating back to 13544-22005 years. These three lineages consisted almost exclusively of woodland caribou mtDNA haplotypes, indicating that phylogeographical structure was mainly shaped by postglacial expansions. The putative centres of these lineages are geographically separated; indicating disconnected glacial refugia in the Rocky Mountains, east of the Mississippi, and the Appalachian Mountains. This is in congruence with the fossil record that caribou were distributed in these areas during the Pleistocene. Our results suggest that the last glacial maximum substantially shaped the phylogeographical structure of this large mammalian North American species that will be affected by climatic change. Therefore, the presented results will be essential for future conservation planning in woodland caribou. PMID:23285137

  10. Shallow mtDNA coalescence in Atlantic pygmy angelfishes (genus Centropyge) indicates a recent invasion from the Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bowen, B W; Muss, A; Rocha, L A; Grant, W S

    2006-01-01

    Pygmy angelfishes (genus Centropyge) are widespread and species-rich in the Indo-Pacific, but only three species are recognized in the Atlantic: Centropyge resplendens on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Centropyge argi in the Caribbean, and Centropyge aurantonotus in Brazil and the southern Caribbean. Atlantic species are distinguished only by color patterns and are very similar to Centropyge acanthops (Cac) in the western Indian Ocean, raising the possibility that pygmy angelfish recently invaded the Atlantic Ocean via southern Africa. To test this zoogeographic hypothesis, we compared a 454-bp segment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region among pygmy angelfishes of the subgenus Xiphypops, which includes the three Atlantic species, the Indian Ocean species, and an Indo-Pacific species [Centropyge fisheri (Cfi)]. The Indian Ocean species Cac is closest to the Atlantic species (d = 0.059) relative to Cfi (d = 0.077). The mtDNA genealogy indicates a colonization pathway from the Indian Ocean directly to the West Atlantic, followed by at least two waves of dispersal to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The gene tree for the three Atlantic species is polyphyletic, raising questions about taxonomic assignments based on color pattern. Mismatch distributions place Atlantic founder events and population expansions at about 250,000-500,000 years ago. Estimates of effective female population sizes from mismatch and coalescence analyses are consistent with founder events by tens of individuals in the western Atlantic, followed by expansions to several million individuals.

  11. mtDNA variation of aboriginal Siberians reveals distinct genetic affinities with Native Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Sukernik, R I; Schurr, T G; Starikorskaya, Y B; Cabell, M F; Crawford, M H; Comuzzie, A G; Wallace, D C

    1993-01-01

    The mtDNA variation of 411 individuals from 10 aboriginal Siberian populations was analyzed in an effort to delineate the relationships between Siberian and Native American populations. All mtDNAs were characterized by PCR amplification and restriction analysis, and a subset of them was characterized by control region sequencing. The resulting data were then compiled with previous mtDNA data from Native Americans and Asians and were used for phylogenetic analyses and sequence divergence estimations. Aboriginal Siberian populations exhibited mtDNAs from three (A, C, and D) of the four haplogroups observed in Native Americans. However, none of the Siberian populations showed mtDNAs from the fourth haplogroup, group B. The presence of group B deletion haplotypes in East Asian and Native American populations but their absence in Siberians raises the possibility that haplogroup B could represent a migratory event distinct from the one(s) which brought group A, C, and D mtDNAs to the Americas. Our findings support the hypothesis that the first humans to move from Siberia to the Americas carried with them a limited number of founding mtDNAs and that the initial migration occurred between 17,000-34,000 years before present. Images Figure 4 PMID:7688933

  12. More reliable estimates of divergence times in Pan using complete mtDNA sequences and accounting for population structure

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Anne C.; Battistuzzi, Fabia U.; Kubatko, Laura S.; Perry, George H.; Trudeau, Evan; Lin, Hsiuman; Kumar, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Here, we report the sequencing and analysis of eight complete mitochondrial genomes of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from each of the three established subspecies (P. t. troglodytes, P. t. schweinfurthii and P. t. verus) and the proposed fourth subspecies (P. t. ellioti). Our population genetic analyses are consistent with neutral patterns of evolution that have been shaped by demography. The high levels of mtDNA diversity in western chimpanzees are unlike those seen at nuclear loci, which may reflect a demographic history of greater female to male effective population sizes possibly owing to the characteristics of the founding population. By using relaxed-clock methods, we have inferred a timetree of chimpanzee species and subspecies. The absolute divergence times vary based on the methods and calibration used, but relative divergence times show extensive uniformity. Overall, mtDNA produces consistently older times than those known from nuclear markers, a discrepancy that is reduced significantly by explicitly accounting for chimpanzee population structures in time estimation. Assuming the human–chimpanzee split to be between 7 and 5 Ma, chimpanzee time estimates are 2.1–1.5, 1.1–0.76 and 0.25–0.18 Ma for the chimpanzee/bonobo, western/(eastern + central) and eastern/central chimpanzee divergences, respectively. PMID:20855302

  13. Killer whale nuclear genome and mtDNA reveal widespread population bottleneck during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Moura, Andre E; Janse van Rensburg, Charlene; Pilot, Malgorzata; Tehrani, Arman; Best, Peter B; Thornton, Meredith; Plön, Stephanie; de Bruyn, P J Nico; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Hoelzel, Alan Rus

    2014-05-01

    Ecosystem function and resilience is determined by the interactions and independent contributions of individual species. Apex predators play a disproportionately determinant role through their influence and dependence on the dynamics of prey species. Their demographic fluctuations are thus likely to reflect changes in their respective ecological communities and habitat. Here, we investigate the historical population dynamics of the killer whale based on draft nuclear genome data for the Northern Hemisphere and mtDNA data worldwide. We infer a relatively stable population size throughout most of the Pleistocene, followed by an order of magnitude decline and bottleneck during the Weichselian glacial period. Global mtDNA data indicate that while most populations declined, at least one population retained diversity in a stable, productive ecosystem off southern Africa. We conclude that environmental changes during the last glacial period promoted the decline of a top ocean predator, that these events contributed to the pattern of diversity among extant populations, and that the relatively high diversity of a population currently in productive, stable habitat off South Africa suggests a role for ocean productivity in the widespread decline.

  14. A 28,000 Years Old Cro-Magnon mtDNA Sequence Differs from All Potentially Contaminating Modern Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Caramelli, David; Milani, Lucio; Vai, Stefania; Modi, Alessandra; Pecchioli, Elena; Girardi, Matteo; Pilli, Elena; Lari, Martina; Lippi, Barbara; Ronchitelli, Annamaria; Mallegni, Francesco; Casoli, Antonella; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Barbujani, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA sequences from ancient speciments may in fact result from undetected contamination of the ancient specimens by modern DNA, and the problem is particularly challenging in studies of human fossils. Doubts on the authenticity of the available sequences have so far hampered genetic comparisons between anatomically archaic (Neandertal) and early modern (Cro-Magnoid) Europeans. Methodology/Principal Findings We typed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region I in a 28,000 years old Cro-Magnoid individual from the Paglicci cave, in Italy (Paglicci 23) and in all the people who had contact with the sample since its discovery in 2003. The Paglicci 23 sequence, determined through the analysis of 152 clones, is the Cambridge reference sequence, and cannot possibly reflect contamination because it differs from all potentially contaminating modern sequences. Conclusions/Significance: The Paglicci 23 individual carried a mtDNA sequence that is still common in Europe, and which radically differs from those of the almost contemporary Neandertals, demonstrating a genealogical continuity across 28,000 years, from Cro-Magnoid to modern Europeans. Because all potential sources of modern DNA contamination are known, the Paglicci 23 sample will offer a unique opportunity to get insight for the first time into the nuclear genes of early modern Europeans. PMID:18628960

  15. Eight new mtDNA sequences of glass sponges reveal an extensive usage of +1 frameshifting in mitochondrial translation.

    PubMed

    Haen, Karri M; Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2014-02-10

    Three previously studied mitochondrial genomes of glass sponges (phylum Porifera, class Hexactinellida) contained single nucleotide insertions in protein coding genes inferred as sites of +1 translational frameshifting. To investigate the distribution and evolution of these sites and to help elucidate the mechanism of frameshifting, we determined eight new complete or nearly complete mtDNA sequences from glass sponges and examined individual mitochondrial genes from three others. We found nine new instances of single nucleotide insertions in these sequences and analyzed them both comparatively and phylogenetically. The base insertions appear to have been gained and lost repeatedly in hexactinellid mt protein genes, suggesting no functional significance for the frameshifting sites. A high degree of sequence conservation, the presence of unusual tRNAs, and a distinct pattern of codon usage suggest the "out-of-frame pairing" model of translational frameshifting. Additionally, we provide evidence that relaxed selection pressure on glass sponge mtDNA - possibly a result of their low growth rates and deep-water lifestyle - has allowed frameshift insertions to be tolerated for hundreds of millions of years. Our study provides the first example of a phylogenetically diverse and extensive usage of translational frameshifting in animal mitochondrial coding sequences.

  16. Sirt3-MnSOD axis represses nicotine-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and mtDNA damage in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Yu, Chen; Shen, Guangsi; Li, Guangfei; Shen, Junkang; Xu, Youjia; Gong, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested an important role played by reactive oxygen species in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Tobacco smoking is an important risk factor for the development of osteoporosis, and nicotine is one of the major components in tobacco. However, the mechanism by which nicotine promotes osteoporosis is not fully understood. Here, in this study, we found that nicotine-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in osteoblasts differentiated from mouse mesenchymal stem cell. The activity of MnSOD, one of the mitochondrial anti-oxidative enzymes, was significantly reduced by nicotine due to the reduced level of Sirt3. Moreover, it was also found that Sirt3 could promote MnSOD activity by deacetylating MnSOD. Finally, Mn(III)tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin (MnTBAP, a MnSOD mimetic) was found to markedly reduce the effect of nicotine on osteoblasts. In summary, Sirt3-MnSOD axis was identified as a negative component in nicotine-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and mtDNA damage, and MnTBAP may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for osteoporosis. PMID:25757953

  17. Genetic characterization of Clupisoma garua (Hamilton 1822) from six Indian populations using mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Darpan; Lakra, W S; Nautiyal, Prakash; Goswami, Mukunda; Shyamakant, Komal; Malakar, Abhishekh

    2014-02-01

    Clupisoma garua (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. This study investigates the genetic diversity and population structure of six Indian populations of C. garua using cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We sequenced cyt b gene of 64 individuals collected from five distant rivers: Ganga, Gomti, Betwa, Gandak and Brahmaputra. Sequencing of 1054 bp cyt b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 19 haplotypes with a haplotype diversity value of 1.000 and a nucleotide diversity value of 0.0258 ± 0.00164. The Gandak river fish population showed highest nucleotide diversity. The fixation index analysis indicated significant genetic divergence among populations from different geographical areas. Both the neighbor-joining tree and median-joining network analysis of the haplotype data showed distinct patterns of phylo-geographic structure. The hierarchical analysis of molecular variance revealed that intra-group variation among populations was highly significant. The results of this study suggest that C. garua populations, especially geographically isolated groups, have developed significant genetic structures within the population. In addition, tests of neutrality suggest that C. garua may have experienced a population expansion. The study results establish cyt b as polymorphic and a potential marker to determine the population structure of C. garua. Information of genetic variation and population structure generated from this study would be useful for planning effective strategies for the conservation and rehabilitation of Schilibid cat fishes.

  18. Ancient Mtdna Sequences And Radiocarbon Dating Of Human Bones From The Chalcolithic Caves Of Wadi El-Makkukh.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, M.; Tzur, S.; Arensburg, B.; Zias, J.; Nagar, Y.; Weiner, S.; Boaretto, E.

    DNA from fossil human bones can provide valuable information for understanding intra- and inter-population relationships. Using the DNA preserved inside crystal aggregates from human fossil bones containing relatively large amounts of collagen, we demonstrate the presence of reproducible mtDNA control region sequences. Radiocarbon dates from each bone show that the burial caves were used for up to 600 years during the Chalcolithic period (5th-4th millennium BP). A comparison of the ancient DNA sequences with modern mtDNA databases indicates that all samples can most likely be assigned to the R haplogroup sub-clades, which are common in West-Eurasia. In four cases more precise and confident haplogroup identifications could be achieved (H, U3a and H6). The H haplogroup is present in three out of the four assigned ancient samples. This haplogroup is prevalent today in West - Eurasia. The results reported here tend to genetically link this Chalcolithic group of individuals to the current West Eurasian populations.

  19. Phylogeographical Analysis of mtDNA Data Indicates Postglacial Expansion from Multiple Glacial Refugia in Woodland Caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou)

    PubMed Central

    Klütsch, Cornelya F. C.; Manseau, Micheline; Wilson, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Glacial refugia considerably shaped the phylogeographical structure of species and may influence intra-specific morphological, genetic, and adaptive differentiation. However, the impact of the Quaternary ice ages on the phylogeographical structure of North American temperate mammalian species is not well-studied. Here, we surveyed ∼1600 individuals of the widely distributed woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) using mtDNA control region sequences to investigate if glacial refugia contributed to the phylogeographical structure in this subspecies. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction, a median-joining network, and mismatch distributions supported postglacial expansions of woodland caribou from three glacial refugia dating back to 13544–22005 years. These three lineages consisted almost exclusively of woodland caribou mtDNA haplotypes, indicating that phylogeographical structure was mainly shaped by postglacial expansions. The putative centres of these lineages are geographically separated; indicating disconnected glacial refugia in the Rocky Mountains, east of the Mississippi, and the Appalachian Mountains. This is in congruence with the fossil record that caribou were distributed in these areas during the Pleistocene. Our results suggest that the last glacial maximum substantially shaped the phylogeographical structure of this large mammalian North American species that will be affected by climatic change. Therefore, the presented results will be essential for future conservation planning in woodland caribou. PMID:23285137

  20. Analysis of mtDNA HVRII in several human populations using an immobilised SSO probe hybridisation assay.

    PubMed

    Comas, D; Reynolds, R; Sajantila, A

    1999-01-01

    Several populations were typed for the hypervariable region II (HVRII) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region using immobilised sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes. A total of 16 SSO probes was used to type 1081 individuals from eight different ethnic groups (African Americans, Somali, US Europeans, US Hispanics, Bosnians, Finns, Saami and Japanese). Data was compared with already published sequence data by analysis of principal components, genetic distances and analysis of the molecular variance (AMOVA). The analyses performed group the samples in several clusters according to their geographical origins. Most of the variability detected is assigned to differences between individuals and only 7% is assigned to differences among groups of populations within and between geographical regions. Several features are patent in the samples studied: Somali, as a representative East African population, seem to have experienced a detectable amount of Caucasoid maternal influence; different degrees of admixture in the US samples studied are detected; Finns and Saami belong to the European genetic landscape, although Saami present an outlier position attributable to a strong maternal founder effect. The technique used is a rapid and simple method to detect human variation in the mtDNA HVRII in a large number of samples, which might be useful in forensic and population genetic studies.

  1. Coexistence of minicircular and a highly rearranged mtDNA molecule suggests that recombination shapes mitochondrial genome organization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Meng; Austin, Andrew D; Johnson, Norman F; Dowton, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Recombination has been proposed as a possible mechanism to explain mitochondrial (mt) gene rearrangements, although the issue of whether mtDNA recombination occurs in animals has been controversial. In this study, we sequenced the entire mt genome of the megaspilid wasp Conostigmus sp., which possessed a highly rearranged mt genome. The sequence of the A+T-rich region contained a number of different types of repeats, similar to those reported previously in the nematode Meloidogyne javanica, in which recombination was discovered. In Conostigmus, we detected the end products of recombination: a range of minicircles. However, using isolated (cloned) fragments of the A+T-rich region, we established that some of these minicircles were found to be polymerase chain reaction (PCR) artifacts. It appears that regions with repeats are prone to PCR template switching or PCR jumping. Nevertheless, there is strong evidence that one minicircle is real, as amplification primers that straddle the putative breakpoint junction produce a single strong amplicon from genomic DNA but not from the cloned A+T-rich region. The results provide support for the direct link between recombination and mt gene rearrangement. Furthermore, we developed a model of recombination which is important for our understanding of mtDNA evolution.

  2. Killer Whale Nuclear Genome and mtDNA Reveal Widespread Population Bottleneck during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Andre E.; Janse van Rensburg, Charlene; Pilot, Malgorzata; Tehrani, Arman; Best, Peter B.; Thornton, Meredith; Plön, Stephanie; de Bruyn, P.J. Nico; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Dahlheim, Marilyn E.; Hoelzel, Alan Rus

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem function and resilience is determined by the interactions and independent contributions of individual species. Apex predators play a disproportionately determinant role through their influence and dependence on the dynamics of prey species. Their demographic fluctuations are thus likely to reflect changes in their respective ecological communities and habitat. Here, we investigate the historical population dynamics of the killer whale based on draft nuclear genome data for the Northern Hemisphere and mtDNA data worldwide. We infer a relatively stable population size throughout most of the Pleistocene, followed by an order of magnitude decline and bottleneck during the Weichselian glacial period. Global mtDNA data indicate that while most populations declined, at least one population retained diversity in a stable, productive ecosystem off southern Africa. We conclude that environmental changes during the last glacial period promoted the decline of a top ocean predator, that these events contributed to the pattern of diversity among extant populations, and that the relatively high diversity of a population currently in productive, stable habitat off South Africa suggests a role for ocean productivity in the widespread decline. PMID:24497033

  3. High prevalence of non-synonymous substitutions in mtDNA of cichlid fishes from Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kazumasa; Inomata, Nobuyuki; Mizoiri, Shinji; Aibara, Mitsuto; Terai, Yohey; Okada, Norihiro; Tachida, Hidenori

    2014-12-01

    When a population size is reduced, genetic drift may fix slightly deleterious mutations, and an increase in nonsynonymous substitution is expected. It has been suggested that past aridity has seriously affected and decreased the populations of cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria, while geographical studies have shown that the water levels in Lake Tanganyika and Lake Malawi have remained fairly constant. The comparably stable environments in the latter two lakes might have kept the populations of cichlid fishes large enough to remove slightly deleterious mutations. The difference in the stability of cichlid fish population sizes between Lake Victoria and the Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi is expected to have caused differences in the nonsynonymous/synonymous ratio, ω (=dN/dS), of the evolutionary rate. Here, we estimated ω and compared it between the cichlids of the three lakes for 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes using maximum likelihood methods. We found that the lineages of the cichlids in Lake Victoria had a significantly higher ω for several mitochondrial loci. Moreover, positive selection was indicated for several codons in the mtDNA of the Lake Victoria cichlid lineage. Our results indicate that both adaptive and slightly deleterious molecular evolution has taken place in the Lake Victoria cichlids' mtDNA genes, whose nonsynonymous sites are generally conserved. PMID:25241383

  4. Phylogeographical analysis of mtDNA data indicates postglacial expansion from multiple glacial refugia in woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou).

    PubMed

    Klütsch, Cornelya F C; Manseau, Micheline; Wilson, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Glacial refugia considerably shaped the phylogeographical structure of species and may influence intra-specific morphological, genetic, and adaptive differentiation. However, the impact of the Quaternary ice ages on the phylogeographical structure of North American temperate mammalian species is not well-studied. Here, we surveyed ~1600 individuals of the widely distributed woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) using mtDNA control region sequences to investigate if glacial refugia contributed to the phylogeographical structure in this subspecies. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction, a median-joining network, and mismatch distributions supported postglacial expansions of woodland caribou from three glacial refugia dating back to 13544-22005 years. These three lineages consisted almost exclusively of woodland caribou mtDNA haplotypes, indicating that phylogeographical structure was mainly shaped by postglacial expansions. The putative centres of these lineages are geographically separated; indicating disconnected glacial refugia in the Rocky Mountains, east of the Mississippi, and the Appalachian Mountains. This is in congruence with the fossil record that caribou were distributed in these areas during the Pleistocene. Our results suggest that the last glacial maximum substantially shaped the phylogeographical structure of this large mammalian North American species that will be affected by climatic change. Therefore, the presented results will be essential for future conservation planning in woodland caribou.

  5. Genetic characterization of Clupisoma garua (Hamilton 1822) from six Indian populations using mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Darpan; Lakra, W S; Nautiyal, Prakash; Goswami, Mukunda; Shyamakant, Komal; Malakar, Abhishekh

    2014-02-01

    Clupisoma garua (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. This study investigates the genetic diversity and population structure of six Indian populations of C. garua using cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We sequenced cyt b gene of 64 individuals collected from five distant rivers: Ganga, Gomti, Betwa, Gandak and Brahmaputra. Sequencing of 1054 bp cyt b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 19 haplotypes with a haplotype diversity value of 1.000 and a nucleotide diversity value of 0.0258 ± 0.00164. The Gandak river fish population showed highest nucleotide diversity. The fixation index analysis indicated significant genetic divergence among populations from different geographical areas. Both the neighbor-joining tree and median-joining network analysis of the haplotype data showed distinct patterns of phylo-geographic structure. The hierarchical analysis of molecular variance revealed that intra-group variation among populations was highly significant. The results of this study suggest that C. garua populations, especially geographically isolated groups, have developed significant genetic structures within the population. In addition, tests of neutrality suggest that C. garua may have experienced a population expansion. The study results establish cyt b as polymorphic and a potential marker to determine the population structure of C. garua. Information of genetic variation and population structure generated from this study would be useful for planning effective strategies for the conservation and rehabilitation of Schilibid cat fishes. PMID:23676141

  6. Comparison between the complete mtDNA sequences of the blue and the fin whale, two species that can hybridize in nature.

    PubMed

    Arnason, U; Gullberg, A

    1993-10-01

    The sequence of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule of the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) was determined. The molecule is 16,402 bp long and its organization conforms with that of other eutherian mammals. The molecule was compared with the mtDNA of the congeneric fin whale (B. physalus). It was recently documented that the two species can hybridize and that male offspring are infertile whereas female offspring may be fertile. The present comparison made it possible to determine the degree of mtDNA difference that occurs between two species that are not completely separated by hybridization incompatibility. The difference between the complete mtDNA sequences was 7.4%. Lengths of peptide coding genes were the same in both species. Except for a small portion of the control region, disruption in alignment was usually limited to insertion/deletion of a single nucleotide. Nucleotide differences between peptide coding genes ranged from 7.1 to 10.5%, and difference at the inferred amino acid level was 0.0-7.9%. In the rRNA genes the mean transition difference was 3.8%. This figure is similar in degree to the difference (3.4%) between the 12S rRNA gene of humans and the chimpanzee. The mtDNA differences between the two whale species, involving both peptide coding and rRNA genes, suggest an evolutionary separation of > or = 5 million years. Although hybridization between more distantly related mammalian species may not be excluded, it is probable that the blue and fin whales are nearly as different in their mtDNA sequences as hybridizing mammal species may be.

  7. Transmission of human mtDNA heteroplasmy in the Genome of the Netherlands families: support for a variable-size bottleneck

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Rothwell, Rebecca; Vermaat, Martijn; Wachsmuth, Manja; Schröder, Roland; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; van Oven, Mannis; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Swertz, Morris A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kayser, Manfred; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Zöllner, Sebastian; de Knijff, Peter; Stoneking, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented a bottleneck in the transmission of mtDNA genomes from mothers to offspring, several aspects remain unclear, including the size and nature of the bottleneck. Here, we analyze the dynamics of mtDNA heteroplasmy transmission in the Genomes of the Netherlands (GoNL) data, which consists of complete mtDNA genome sequences from 228 trios, eight dizygotic (DZ) twin quartets, and 10 monozygotic (MZ) twin quartets. Using a minor allele frequency (MAF) threshold of 2%, we identified 189 heteroplasmies in the trio mothers, of which 59% were transmitted to offspring, and 159 heteroplasmies in the trio offspring, of which 70% were inherited from the mothers. MZ twin pairs exhibited greater similarity in MAF at heteroplasmic sites than DZ twin pairs, suggesting that the heteroplasmy MAF in the oocyte is the major determinant of the heteroplasmy MAF in the offspring. We used a likelihood method to estimate the effective number of mtDNA genomes transmitted to offspring under different bottleneck models; a variable bottleneck size model provided the best fit to the data, with an estimated mean of nine individual mtDNA genomes transmitted. We also found evidence for negative selection during transmission against novel heteroplasmies (in which the minor allele has never been observed in polymorphism data). These novel heteroplasmies are enhanced for tRNA and rRNA genes, and mutations associated with mtDNA diseases frequently occur in these genes. Our results thus suggest that the female germ line is able to recognize and select against deleterious heteroplasmies. PMID:26916109

  8. High regional genetic diversity and lack of host-specificity in Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) as revealed by mtDNA variation.

    PubMed

    Piwczyński, M; Pabijan, M; Grzywacz, A; Glinkowski, W; Bereś, P K; Buszko, J

    2016-08-01

    The European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) infests a wide array of host plants and is considered one of the most serious pests of maize in Europe. Recent studies suggest that individuals feeding on maize in Europe should be referred to O. nubilalis (sensu nov.), while those infesting dicots as Ostrinia scapulalis (sensu nov.). We test if the clear genetic distinctiveness among individuals of O. nubilalis living on maize vs. dicots is tracked by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We used fragments of COI and COII genes of 32 individuals traditionally recognized as O. nubilalis collected on three host plants, maize, mugwort and hop, growing in different parts of Poland. In addition, we reconstructed the mtDNA phylogeny of Ostrinia species based on our data and sequences retrieved from GenBank to assess host and/or biogeographic patterns. We also compared haplotype variation found in Poland (east-central Europe) with other regions (Anatolia, Eastern Europe, Balkans, Far East, North America). Our study showed high mtDNA diversity of O. nubilalis in Poland in comparison with other regions and revealed rare haplotypes likely of Asian origin. We did not find distinct mtDNA haplotypes in larvae feeding on maize vs. dicotyledonous plants. Phylogenetic analyses showed an apparent lack of mtDNA divergence among putatively distinct lineages belonging to the O. nubilalis group as identical haplotypes are shared by Asian and European individuals. We argue that human-mediated dispersal, hybridization and sporadic host jumps are likely responsible for the lack of a geographic pattern in mtDNA variation. PMID:27019346

  9. The role of mtDNA background in disease expression: a new primary LHON mutation associated with Western Eurasian haplogroup J.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael D; Starikovskaya, Elena; Derbeneva, Olga; Hosseini, Seyed; Allen, Jon C; Mikhailovskaya, Irina E; Sukernik, Rem I; Wallace, Douglas C

    2002-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted form of blindness caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. Approximately 90% of LHON cases are caused by 3460A, 11778A, or 14484C mtDNA mutations. These are designated "primary" mutations because they impart a high risk for LHON expression. Although the 11778A and 14484C mutations unequivocally predispose carriers to LHON, they are preferentially associated with mtDNA haplogroup J, one of nine Western Eurasian mtDNA lineages, suggesting a synergistic and deleterious interaction between these LHON mutations and haplogroup J polymorphism(s). We report here the characterization of a new primary LHON mutation in the mtDNA ND4L gene at nucleotide pair 10663. The homoplasmic 10663C mutation has been found in three independent LHON patients who lack a known primary mutation and all of which belong to haplogroup J. This mutation has not been found in a large number of haplotype-matched or non-haplogroup-J control mtDNAs. Phylogenetic analysis with primarily complete mtDNA sequence data demonstrates that the 10663C mutation has arisen at least three independent times in haplogroup J, indicating that it is not a rare lineage-specific polymorphism. Analysis of complex I function in patient lymphoblasts and transmitochondrial cybrids has revealed a partial complex I defect similar in magnitude to the 14484C mutation. Thus, the 10663C mutation appears to be a new primary LHON mutation that is pathogenic when co-occurring with haplogroup J. These results strongly support a role for haplogroup J in the expression of certain LHON mutations.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants in the European haplogroups HV, JT, and U do not have a major role in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Torrell, Helena; Salas, Antonio; Abasolo, Nerea; Morén, Constanza; Garrabou, Glòria; Valero, Joaquín; Alonso, Yolanda; Vilella, Elisabet; Costas, Javier; Martorell, Lourdes

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that certain genetic factors involved in schizophrenia could be located in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Therefore, we hypothesized that mtDNA mutations and/or variants would be present in schizophrenia patients and may be related to schizophrenia characteristics and mitochondrial function. This study was performed in three steps: (1) identification of pathogenic mutations and variants in 14 schizophrenia patients with an apparent maternal inheritance of the disease by sequencing the entire mtDNA; (2) case-control association study of 23 variants identified in step 1 (16 missense, 3 rRNA, and 4 tRNA variants) in 495 patients and 615 controls, and (3) analyses of the associated variants according to the clinical, psychopathological, and neuropsychological characteristics and according to the oxidative and enzymatic activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. We did not identify pathogenic mtDNA mutations in the 14 sequenced patients. Two known variants were nominally associated with schizophrenia and were further studied. The MT-RNR2 1811A > G variant likely does not play a major role in schizophrenia, as it was not associated with clinical, psychopathological, or neuropsychological variables, and the MT-ATP6 9110T > C p.Ile195Thr variant did not result in differences in the oxidative and enzymatic functions of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The patients with apparent maternal inheritance of schizophrenia did not exhibit any mutations in their mtDNA. The variants nominally associated with schizophrenia in the present study were not related either to phenotypic characteristics or to mitochondrial function. We did not find evidence pointing to a role for mtDNA sequence variation in schizophrenia.

  11. Evolutionary history and phylogenetic relationship between Auxis thazard and Auxis rochei inferred from COI sequences of mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girish; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Shyama, S K

    2013-01-01

    Tunas of the genus Auxis are cosmopolitan species and the smallest members of the tribe Thunnini, the true tunas. In the present study, COI sequences of mtDNA were employed to examine the evolutionary history and phylogenetic relationship between A. thazard and A. rochei. A total of 29 COI sequences were retrieved from NCBI. Historic demographic analyses of sequence data showed that A. thazard has undergone sudden population expansion in the past while population size of A. rochei has been remain constant for long period. Non-significant value of Tajimas's D (P = 0.22400) and Fu's FS (P = 0.21400) test fail to reject the null hypothesis of neutral evolution for A. rochei. Phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences demonstrated separate clusters for both species and are strongly supported by 98% bootstrap value. The results of the present study suggest the recent founding of A. thazard in world ocean while A. rochei represents the ancestral species. PMID:24084241

  12. Personal identification of cold case remains through combined contribution from anthropological, mtDNA, and bomb-pulse dating analyses.

    PubMed

    Speller, Camilla F; Spalding, Kirsty L; Buchholz, Bruce A; Hildebrand, Dean; Moore, Jason; Mathewes, Rolf; Skinner, Mark F; Yang, Dongya Y

    2012-09-01

    In 1968, a child's cranium was recovered from the banks of a northern Canadian river and held in a trust until the "cold case" was reopened in 2005. The cranium underwent reanalysis at the Centre for Forensic Research, Simon Fraser University, using recently developed anthropological analysis, "bomb-pulse" radiocarbon analysis, and forensic DNA techniques. Craniometrics, skeletal ossification, and dental formation indicated an age-at-death of 4.4 ± 1 year. Radiocarbon analysis of enamel from two teeth indicated a year of birth between 1958 and 1962. Forensic DNA analysis indicated the child was a male, and the obtained mitochondrial profile matched a living maternal relative to the presumed missing child. These multidisciplinary analyses resulted in a legal identification 41 years after the discovery of the remains, highlighting the enormous potential of combining radiocarbon analysis with anthropological and mtDNA analyses in producing confident personal identifications for forensic cold cases dating to within the last 60 years.

  13. Contribution to the study of Acanthodactylus (Sauria: Lacertidae) mtDNA diversity focusing on the A. boskianus species group.

    PubMed

    Psonis, N; Lymberakis, P; Poursanidis, D; Poulakakis, N

    2016-09-01

    The Acanthodactylus boskianus species group includes three species (A. boskianus, A. nilsoni, and A. schreiberi) of unclear phylogeny and phylogeographic history. By sequencing fragments of two mtDNA genes and performing phylogenetic, demographic, and chronophylogenetic analyses, we aimed at identifying their phylogenetic relationships while unravelling their biogeographic history. The analyses indicated that A. boskianus is a species complex, while A. s. schreiberi and A. s. ataturi show, both, low intraspecific genetic diversity. From a biogeographic point of view, the ancestor of A. s. schreiberi colonized Cyprus from the Middle East through overseas dispersal during the Pleistocene, whereas A. s. ataturi is considered to be a relict of a previously wider distribution. PMID:27402069

  14. Phylogeography of the rice frog, Fejervarya multistriata (Anura: Ranidae), from China based on mtDNA D-loop sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Zhong-Quan; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2008-08-01

    The rice frog, Fejervarya multistriata, is an amphibian widely distributed in China. In this study, we sampled the species across its distributional area in China and sequenced the mtDNA D-loop to investigate the genetic diversity and geographical pattern of the frog population. The results revealed 38 haplotypes in the population, with K2P values varying from 0.19% to 4.22%. Both a phylogenetic analysis and a nested clade analysis (NCA) detected two geographically isolated lineages respectively distributed around the Yangtze drainage (Yangtze lineage) and the south of China (southern lineage). NCA inferred a contiguous range expansion within the Yangtze lineage and allopatric fragmentation within the southern lineage, which might be partly due to the limited samples from this lineage. Accordingly, Fu's Fs test also indicated a population expansion after glacial movement. Therefore, we assumed that the species history responding to glacial events shaped the present population pattern of F. multistriata on the Chinese mainland.

  15. High penetrance of sequencing errors and interpretative shortcomings in mtDNA sequence analysis of LHON patients.

    PubMed

    Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Yao, Yong-Gang; Salas, Antonio; Kivisild, Toomas; Bravi, Claudio M

    2007-01-12

    For identifying mutation(s) that are potentially pathogenic it is essential to determine the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from patients suffering from a particular mitochondrial disease, such as Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). However, such sequencing efforts can, in the worst case, be riddled with errors by imposing phantom mutations or misreporting variant nucleotides, and moreover, by inadvertently regarding some mutations as novel and pathogenic, which are actually known to define minor haplogroups. Under such circumstances it remains unclear whether the disease-associated mutations would have been determined adequately. Here, we re-analyse four problematic LHON studies and propose guidelines by which some of the pitfalls could be avoided.

  16. Previously Unclassified Mutation of mtDNA m.3472T>C: Evidence of Pathogenicity in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sheremet, N L; Nevinitsyna, T A; Zhorzholadze, N V; Ronzina, I A; Itkis, Y S; Krylova, T D; Tsygankova, P G; Malakhova, V A; Zakharova, E Y; Tokarchuk, A V; Panteleeva, A A; Karger, E M; Lyamzaev, K G; Avetisov, S E

    2016-07-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) refers to a group of mitochondrial diseases and is characterized by defects of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and decreased level of oxidative phosphorylation. The list of LHON primary mtDNA mutations is regularly updated. In this study, we describe the homoplasmic nucleotide substitution m.3472T>C in the MT-ND1 (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 1) gene and specific changes in cell metabolism in a patient with LHON and his asymptomatic sister. To confirm the presence of mutation-related mitochondrial dysfunction, respiration of skin fibroblasts and platelets from the patient and his sister was studied, as well as the mitochondrial potential and production of reactive oxygen species in the skin fibroblasts. In addition, based on characteristics of the toxic effect of paraquat, a new approach was developed for detecting the functional activity of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  17. Migration and interaction in a contact zone: mtDNA variation among Bantu-speakers in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000-5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200-2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses.

  18. Migration and interaction in a contact zone: mtDNA variation among Bantu-speakers in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000-5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200-2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses. PMID:24901532

  19. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Strict sex-specific mtDNA segregation in the germ line of the DUI species Venerupis philippinarum (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Milani, Liliana; Passamonti, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) is one of the most striking exceptions to the common rule of standard maternal inheritance of metazoan mitochondria. In DUI, two mitochondrial genomes are present, showing different transmission routes, one through eggs (F-type) and the other through sperm (M-type). In this paper, we report results from a multiplex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis on the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum (formerly Tapes philippinarum). We quantified M- and F-types in somatic tissues, gonads, and gametes. Nuclear and external reference sequences were used, and the whole experimental process was designed to avoid any possible cross-contamination. In most male somatic tissues, the M-type is largely predominant: This suggests that the processes separating sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) in somatic tissues are less precise than in other DUI species. In the germ line, we evidenced a strict sex-specific mtDNA segregation because both sperm and eggs do carry exclusively M- and F-types, respectively, an observation that is in contrast with a previous analysis on Mytilus galloprovincialis. More precisely, whereas two mtDNAs are present in the whole gonad, only the sex-specific one is detected in gametes. Because of this, we propose that the mtDNA transmission is achieved through a three-checkpoint process in V. philippinarum. The cytological mechanisms of male mitochondria segregation in males and degradation in females during the embryo development (here named Checkpoint #1 and Checkpoint #2) are already well known for DUI species; a Checkpoint #3 would act when primordial germ cells (PGCs) are first formed and would work in both males and females. We believe that Checkpoint #3 is a mere variation of the "mitochondrial bottleneck" in species with standard maternal inheritance, established when their PGCs separate during embryo cleavage.

  1. Early Holocenic and Historic mtDNA African Signatures in the Iberian Peninsula: The Andalusian Region as a Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Candela L.; Soares, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean M.; Novelletto, Andrea; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Rito, Teresa; Oliveira, Marisa; Melhaoui, Mohammed; Baali, Abdellatif; Pereira, Luisa; Calderón, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Determining the timing, identity and direction of migrations in the Mediterranean Basin, the role of “migratory routes” in and among regions of Africa, Europe and Asia, and the effects of sex-specific behaviors of population movements have important implications for our understanding of the present human genetic diversity. A crucial component of the Mediterranean world is its westernmost region. Clear features of transcontinental ancient contacts between North African and Iberian populations surrounding the maritime region of Gibraltar Strait have been identified from archeological data. The attempt to discern origin and dates of migration between close geographically related regions has been a challenge in the field of uniparental-based population genetics. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) studies have been focused on surveying the H1, H3 and V lineages when trying to ascertain north-south migrations, and U6 and L in the opposite direction, assuming that those lineages are good proxies for the ancestry of each side of the Mediterranean. To this end, in the present work we have screened entire mtDNA sequences belonging to U6, M1 and L haplogroups in Andalusians—from Huelva and Granada provinces—and Moroccan Berbers. We present here pioneer data and interpretations on the role of NW Africa and the Iberian Peninsula regarding the time of origin, number of founders and expansion directions of these specific markers. The estimated entrance of the North African U6 lineages into Iberia at 10 ky correlates well with other L African clades, indicating that U6 and some L lineages moved together from Africa to Iberia in the Early Holocene. Still, founder analysis highlights that the high sharing of lineages between North Africa and Iberia results from a complex process continued through time, impairing simplistic interpretations. In particular, our work supports the existence of an ancient, frequently denied, bridge connecting the Maghreb and Andalusia. PMID:26509580

  2. The congruence between matrilineal genetic (mtDNA) and geographic diversity of Iranians and the territorial populations

    PubMed Central

    Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Eskandari, Ghafar; Nikmanesh, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): From the ancient era, emergence of Agriculture in the connecting region of Mesopotamia and the Iranian plateau at the foothills of the Zagros Mountains, made Iranian gene pool as an important source of populating the region. It has differentiated the population spread and different language groups. In order to trace the maternal genetic affinity between Iranians and other populations of the area and to establish the place of Iranians in a broad framework of ethnically and linguistically diverse groups of Middle Eastern and South Asian populations, a comparative study of territorial groups was designed and used in the population statistical analysis. Materials and Methods: Mix of 616 samples was sequenced for complete mtDNA or hyper variable regions in this study. A published dataset of neighboring populations was used as a comparison in the Iranian matrilineal lineage study based on mtDNA haplogroups. Results: Statistical analyses data, demonstrate a close genetic structure of all Iranian populations, thus suggesting their origin from a common maternal ancestral gene pool and show that the diverse maternal genetic structure does not reflect population differentiation in the region in their language. Conclusion: In the aggregate of the eastward spreads of proto-Elamo-Dravidian language from the Southwest region of Iran, the Elam province, a reasonable degree of homogeneity has been observed among Iranians in this study. The approach will facilitate our perception of the more detailed relationship of the ethnic groups living in Iran with the other ancient peoples of the area, testing linguistic hypothesis and population movements. PMID:25810873

  3. European Y-chromosomal lineages in Polynesians: a contrast to the population structure revealed by mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hurles, M E; Irven, C; Nicholson, J; Taylor, P G; Santos, F R; Loughlin, J; Jobling, M A; Sykes, B C

    1998-01-01

    We have used Y-chromosomal polymorphisms to trace paternal lineages in Polynesians by use of samples previously typed for mtDNA variants. A genealogical approach utilizing hierarchical analysis of eight rare-event biallelic polymorphisms, seven microsatellite loci, and internal structural analysis of the hypervariable minisatellite, MSY1, has been used to define three major paternal-lineage clusters in Polynesians. Two of these clusters, both defined by novel MSY1 modular structures and representing 55% of the Polynesians studied, are also found in coastal Papua New Guinea. Reduced Polynesian diversity, relative to that in Melanesians, is illustrated by the presence of several examples of identical MSY1 codes and microsatellite haplotypes within these lineage clusters in Polynesians. The complete lack of Y chromosomes having the M4 base substitution in Polynesians, despite their prevalence (64%) in Melanesians, may also be a result of the multiple bottleneck events during the colonization of this region of the world. The origin of the M4 mutation has been dated by use of two independent methods based on microsatellite-haplotype and minisatellite-code diversity. Because of the wide confidence limits on the mutation rates of these loci, the M4 mutation cannot be conclusively dated relative to the colonization of Polynesia, 3,000 years ago. The other major lineage cluster found in Polynesians, defined by a base substitution at the 92R7 locus, represents 27% of the Polynesians studied and, most probably, originates in Europe. This is the first Y-chromosomal evidence of major European admixture with indigenous Polynesian populations and contrasts sharply with the picture given by mtDNA evidence. PMID:9837833

  4. Migration and Interaction in a Contact Zone: mtDNA Variation among Bantu-Speakers in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Chiara; Vicente, Mário; Oliveira, Sandra; Bostoen, Koen; Rocha, Jorge; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Bantu speech communities expanded over large parts of sub-Saharan Africa within the last 4000–5000 years, reaching different parts of southern Africa 1200–2000 years ago. The Bantu languages subdivide in several major branches, with languages belonging to the Eastern and Western Bantu branches spreading over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. There is still debate whether this linguistic divide is correlated with a genetic distinction between Eastern and Western Bantu speakers. During their expansion, Bantu speakers would have come into contact with diverse local populations, such as the Khoisan hunter-gatherers and pastoralists of southern Africa, with whom they may have intermarried. In this study, we analyze complete mtDNA genome sequences from over 900 Bantu-speaking individuals from Angola, Zambia, Namibia, and Botswana to investigate the demographic processes at play during the last stages of the Bantu expansion. Our results show that most of these Bantu-speaking populations are genetically very homogenous, with no genetic division between speakers of Eastern and Western Bantu languages. Most of the mtDNA diversity in our dataset is due to different degrees of admixture with autochthonous populations. Only the pastoralist Himba and Herero stand out due to high frequencies of particular L3f and L3d lineages; the latter are also found in the neighboring Damara, who speak a Khoisan language and were foragers and small-stock herders. In contrast, the close cultural and linguistic relatives of the Herero and Himba, the Kuvale, are genetically similar to other Bantu-speakers. Nevertheless, as demonstrated by resampling tests, the genetic divergence of Herero, Himba, and Kuvale is compatible with a common shared ancestry with high levels of drift, while the similarity of the Herero, Himba, and Damara probably reflects admixture, as also suggested by linguistic analyses. PMID:24901532

  5. GENETIC STRUCTURE OF CREEK CHUB (SEMOTILUS ATROMACULATUS) POPULATIONS IN COAL MINING-IMPACTED AREAS OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES, AS DETERMINED BY MTDNA SEQUENCING AND AFLP ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of intraspecific patterns in genetic diversity of stream fishes provides a potentially powerful method for assessing the status and trends in the condition of aquatic ecosystems. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (590 bases of cytochrome B) and nuclear DNA...

  6. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  7. Complete mtDNA sequences of two millipedes suggest a new model for mitochondrial gene rearrangements: Duplication and non-random loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Wesley M.

    2001-11-08

    We determined the complete mtDNA sequences of the millipedes Narceus annularus and Thyropygus sp. (Arthropoda: Diplopoda) and identified in both genomes all 37 genes typical for metazoan mtDNA. The arrangement of these genes is identical in the two millipedes, but differs from that inferred to be ancestral for arthropods by the location of four genes/gene clusters. This novel gene arrangement is unusual for animal mtDNA, in that genes with opposite transcriptional polarities are clustered in the genome and the two clusters are separated by two non-coding regions. The only exception to this pattern is the gene for cysteine tRNA, which is located in the part of the genome that otherwise contains all genes with the opposite transcriptional polarity. We suggest that a mechanism involving complete mtDNA duplication followed by the loss of genes, predetermined by their transcriptional polarity and location in the genome, could generate this gene arrangement from the one ancestral for arthropods. The proposed mechanism has important implications for phylogenetic inferences that are drawn on the basis of gene arrangement comparisons.

  8. mtDNA control-region sequence variation suggests multiple independent origins of an "Asian-specific" 9-bp deletion in sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Soodyall, H.; Vigilant, L.; Hill, A. V.; Stoneking, M.; Jenkins, T.

    1996-01-01

    The intergenic COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion in human mtDNA, which is found at varying frequencies in Asia, Southeast Asia, Polynesia, and the New World, was also found in 81 of 919 sub-Saharan Africans. Using mtDNA control-region sequence data from a subset of 41 individuals with the deletion, we identified 22 unique mtDNA types associated with the deletion in Africa. A comparison of the unique mtDNA types from sub-Saharan Africans and Asians with the 9-bp deletion revealed that sub-Saharan Africans and Asians have sequence profiles that differ in the locations and frequencies of variant sites. Both phylogenetic and mismatch-distribution analysis suggest that 9-bp deletion arose independently in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and that the deletion has arisen more than once in Africa. Within Africa, the deletion was not found among Khoisan peoples and was rare to absent in western and southwestern African populations, but it did occur in Pygmy and Negroid populations from central Africa and in Malawi and southern African Bantu-speakers. The distribution of the 9-bp deletion in Africa suggests that the deletion could have arisen in central Africa and was then introduced to southern Africa via the recent "Bantu expansion." PMID:8644719

  9. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  10. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  11. Complete mtDNA genomes of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups: a melting pot of recent and ancient lineages in the Asia-Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Delfin, Frederick; Min-Shan Ko, Albert; Li, Mingkun; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen D; Tabbada, Kristina A; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Calacal, Gayvelline C; Sagum, Minerva S; Datar, Francisco A; Padilla, Sabino G; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Philippines is a strategic point in the Asia-Pacific region for the study of human diversity, history and origins, as it is a cross-road for human migrations and consequently exhibits enormous ethnolinguistic diversity. Following on a previous in-depth study of Y-chromosome variation, here we provide new insights into the maternal genetic history of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups by surveying complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from a total of 14 groups (11 groups in this study and 3 groups previously published) including previously published mtDNA hypervariable segment (HVS) data from Filipino regional center groups. Comparison of HVS data indicate genetic differences between ethnolinguistic and regional center groups. The complete mtDNA genomes of 14 ethnolinguistic groups reveal genetic aspects consistent with the Y-chromosome, namely: diversity and heterogeneity of groups, no support for a simple dichotomy between Negrito and non-Negrito groups, and different genetic affinities with Asia-Pacific groups that are both ancient and recent. Although some mtDNA haplogroups can be associated with the Austronesian expansion, there are others that associate with South Asia, Near Oceania and Australia that are consistent with a southern migration route for ethnolinguistic group ancestors into the Asia-Pacific, with a timeline that overlaps with the initial colonization of the Asia-Pacific region, the initial colonization of the Philippines and a possible separate post-colonization migration into the Philippine archipelago. PMID:23756438

  12. Association of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes with mitochondrial DNA as integral nucleoid constituents

    PubMed Central

    Kienhöfer, Joachim; Häussler, Dagmar Johanna Franziska; Ruckelshausen, Florian; Muessig, Elisabeth; Weber, Klaus; Pimentel, David; Ullrich, Volker; Bürkle, Alexander; Bachschmid, Markus Michael

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is organized in protein-DNA macrocomplexes called nucleoids. Average nucleoids contain 2–8 mtDNA molecules, which are organized by the histone-like mitochondrial transcription factor A. Besides well-characterized constituents, such as single-stranded binding protein or polymerase γ (Polγ), various other proteins with ill-defined functions have been identified. We report for the first time that mammalian nucleoids contain essential enzymes of an integral antioxidant system. Intact nucleoids were isolated with sucrose density gradients from rat and bovine heart as well as human Jurkat cells. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) was detected by Western blot in the nucleoid fractions. DNA, mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase (GPx1), and Polγ were coimmunoprecipitated with SOD2 from nucleoid fractions, which suggests that an antioxidant system composed of SOD2 and GPx1 are integral constituents of nucleoids. Interestingly, in cultured bovine endothelial cells the association of SOD2 with mtDNA was absent. Using a sandwich filter-binding assay, direct association of SOD2 by salt-sensitive ionic forces with a chemically synthesized mtDNA fragment was demonstrated. Increasing salt concentrations during nucleoid isolation on sucrose density gradients disrupted the association of SOD2 with mitochondrial nucleoids. Our biochemical data reveal that nucleoids contain an integral antioxidant system that may protect mtDNA from superoxide-induced oxidative damage.—Kienhöfer, J., Häussler, D. J. F., Ruckelshausen, F., Muessig, E., Weber, K., Pimentel, D., Ullrich, V., Bürkle, A., Bachschmid, M. M. Association of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes with mitochondrial DNA as integral nucleoid constituents. PMID:19228881

  13. Mapping frequencies of endogenous oxidative damage and the kinetic response to oxidative stress in a region of rat mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Driggers, W J; Holmquist, G P; LeDoux, S P; Wilson, G L

    1997-01-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly being damaged and repaired and our genomes exist at lesion equilibrium for damage created by endogenous mutagens. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has the highest lesion equilibrium frequency recorded; presumably due to damage by H2O2 and free radicals generated during oxidative phosphorylation processes. We measured the frequencies of single strand breaks and oxidative base damage in mtDNA by ligation-mediated PCR and a quantitative Southern blot technique coupled with digestion by the enzymes endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. Addition of 5 mM alloxan to cultured rat cells increased the rate of oxidative base damage and, by several fold, the lesion frequency in mtDNA. After removal of this DNA damaging agent from culture, the single strand breaks and oxidative base damage frequency decreased to levels slightly below normal at 4 h and returned to normal levels at 8 h, the overshoot at 4 h being attributed to an adaptive up-regulation of mitochondrial excision repair activity. Guanine positions showed the highest endogenous lesion frequencies and were the most responsive positions to alloxan-induced oxidative stress. Although specific bases were consistently hot spots for damage, there was no evidence that removal of these lesions occurred in a strand-specific manner. The data reveal non-random oxidative damage to several nucleotides in mtDNA and an apparent adaptive, non-strand selective response for removal of such damage. These are the first studies to characterize oxidative damage and its subsequent removal at the nucleotide level in mtDNA. PMID:9336469

  14. mtDNA haplotypes differ in their probability of being eliminated by a mass die-off in an abundant seabird.

    PubMed

    Drovetski, S V; Kitaysky, A S; Mode, N A; Zink, R M; Iqbal, U; Barger, C

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we take advantage of a natural experiment--a 2004 mass die-off of the Common Murre in Alaska to determine whether closely related mtDNA haplotypes differ in their probability of being eliminated during such a short term but a marked event removing hundreds of thousands of individuals. We sequenced complete mtDNA ND2 gene (1041 bp) for 168 Common Murres sampled from seven breeding colonies across Alaska before the 2004 die-off and 127 dead murres washed ashore during the die-off. We found little mtDNA variation and lack of geographical structuring among the seven Common Murre breeding colonies in Alaska. A comparison of the single-dominant mtDNA haplotype's frequency between live murres sampled on breeding colonies before the die-off (73.2%; 95% confidence interval 66.3-79.9%) and dead murres sampled during the die-off (59.1%; 95% confidence interval 50.4-67.4%; Fisher's exact P=0.01) showed that carriers of the dominant haplotype were significantly less likely to die than carriers of other haplotypes. At the same time, the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions did not differ between live (10:35) and dead birds (18:34; Fisher's exact P=0.26), indicating that non-synonymous substitutions were as likely to be eliminated as synonymous substitutions. These results are consistent with the possibility of positive selection on the dominant mtDNA haplotype during the die-off. PMID:22354113

  15. A trans-Amazonian screening of mtDNA reveals deep intraspecific divergence in forest birds and suggests a vast underestimation of species diversity.

    PubMed

    Milá, Borja; Tavares, Erika S; Muñoz Saldaña, Alberto; Karubian, Jordan; Smith, Thomas B; Baker, Allan J

    2012-01-01

    The Amazonian avifauna remains severely understudied relative to that of the temperate zone, and its species richness is thought to be underestimated by current taxonomy. Recent molecular systematic studies using mtDNA sequence reveal that traditionally accepted species-level taxa often conceal genetically divergent subspecific lineages found to represent new species upon close taxonomic scrutiny, suggesting that intraspecific mtDNA variation could be useful in species discovery. Surveys of mtDNA variation in Holarctic species have revealed patterns of variation that are largely congruent with species boundaries. However, little information exists on intraspecific divergence in most Amazonian species. Here we screen intraspecific mtDNA genetic variation in 41 Amazonian forest understory species belonging to 36 genera and 17 families in 6 orders, using 758 individual samples from Ecuador and French Guiana. For 13 of these species, we also analyzed trans-Andean populations from the Ecuadorian Chocó. A consistent pattern of deep intraspecific divergence among trans-Amazonian haplogroups was found for 33 of the 41 taxa, and genetic differentiation and genetic diversity among them was highly variable, suggesting a complex range of evolutionary histories. Mean sequence divergence within families was the same as that found in North American birds (13%), yet mean intraspecific divergence in Neotropical species was an order of magnitude larger (2.13% vs. 0.23%), with mean distance between intraspecific lineages reaching 3.56%. We found no clear relationship between genetic distances and differentiation in plumage color. Our results identify numerous genetically and phenotypically divergent lineages which may result in new species-level designations upon closer taxonomic scrutiny and thorough sampling, although lineages in the tropical region could be older than those in the temperate zone without necessarily representing separate species. In-depth phylogeographic surveys

  16. Unexpected population genetic structure of European roe deer in Poland: an invasion of the mtDNA genome from Siberian roe deer.

    PubMed

    Matosiuk, Maciej; Borkowska, Anetta; Świsłocka, Magdalena; Mirski, Paweł; Borowski, Zbigniew; Krysiuk, Kamil; Danilkin, Aleksey A; Zvychaynaya, Elena Y; Saveljev, Alexander P; Ratkiewicz, Mirosław

    2014-05-01

    Introgressive hybridization is a widespread evolutionary phenomenon which may lead to increased allelic variation at selective neutral loci and to transfer of fitness-related traits to introgressed lineages. We inferred the population genetic structure of the European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Poland from mitochondrial (CR and cyt b) and sex-linked markers (ZFX, SRY, DBY4 and DBY8). Analyses of CR mtDNA sequences from 452 individuals indicated widespread introgression of Siberian roe deer (C. pygargus) mtDNA in the European roe deer genome, 2000 km from the current distribution range of C. pygargus. Introgressed individuals constituted 16.6% of the deer studied. Nearly 75% of them possessed haplotypes belonging to the group which arose 23 kyr ago and have not been detected within the natural range of Siberian roe deer, indicating that majority of present introgression has ancient origin. Unlike the mtDNA results, sex-specific markers did not show signs of introgression. Species distribution modelling analyses suggested that C. pygargus could have extended its range as far west as Central Europe after last glacial maximum. The main hybridization event was probably associated with range expansion of the most abundant European roe deer lineage from western refugia and took place in Central Europe after the Younger Dryas (10.8-10.0 ka BP). Initially, introgressed mtDNA variants could have spread out on the wave of expansion through the mechanism of gene surfing, reaching high frequencies in European roe deer populations and leading to observed asymmetrical gene flow. Human-mediated introductions of C. pygargus had minimal effect on the extent of mtDNA introgression.

  17. Comprehensive study of mtDNA among Southwest Asian dogs contradicts independent domestication of wolf, but implies dog–wolf hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Arman; Kluetsch, Cornelya F C; Zhang, Ai-bing; Erdogan, Metin; Uhlén, Mathias; Houshmand, Massoud; Tepeli, Cafer; Ashtiani, Seyed Reza Miraei; Savolainen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity indicate explicitly that dogs were domesticated, probably exclusively, in southern East Asia. However, Southwest Asia (SwAsia) has had poor representation and geographical coverage in these studies. Other studies based on archaeological and genome-wide SNP data have suggested an origin of dogs in SwAsia. Hence, it has been suspected that mtDNA evidence for this scenario may have remained undetected. In the first comprehensive investigation of genetic diversity among SwAsian dogs, we analyzed 582 bp of mtDNA for 345 indigenous dogs from across SwAsia, and compared with 1556 dogs across the Old World. We show that 97.4% of SwAsian dogs carry haplotypes belonging to a universal mtDNA gene pool, but that only a subset of this pool, five of the 10 principal haplogroups, is represented in SwAsia. A high frequency of haplogroup B, potentially signifying a local origin, was not paralleled with the high genetic diversity expected for a center of origin. Meanwhile, 2.6% of the SwAsian dogs carried the rare non-universal haplogroup d2. Thus, mtDNA data give no indication that dogs originated in SwAsia through independent domestication of wolf, but dog–wolf hybridization may have formed the local haplogroup d2 within this region. Southern East Asia remains the only region with virtually full extent of genetic variation, strongly indicating it to be the primary and probably sole center of wolf domestication. An origin of dogs in southern East Asia may have been overlooked by other studies due to a substantial lack of samples from this region. PMID:22393507

  18. Comparative mitochondrial genomics of freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoida) with doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA: gender-specific open reading frames and putative origins of replication.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Beaupré, Hélène Doucet; Stewart, Donald T; Piontkivska, Helen; Karmakar, Moumita; Bogan, Arthur E; Blier, Pierre U; Hoeh, Walter R

    2009-12-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA in marine mussels (Mytiloida), freshwater mussels (Unionoida), and marine clams (Veneroida) is the only known exception to the general rule of strict maternal transmission of mtDNA in animals. DUI is characterized by the presence of gender-associated mitochondrial DNA lineages that are inherited through males (male-transmitted or M types) or females (female-transmitted or F types), respectively. This unusual system constitutes an excellent model for studying basic aspects of mitochondrial DNA inheritance and the evolution of mtDNA genomes in general. Here we compare published mitochondrial genomes of unionoid bivalve species with DUI, with an emphasis on characterizing unassigned regions, to identify regions of the F and M mtDNA genomes that could (i) play a role in replication or transcription of the mtDNA molecule and/or (ii) determine whether a genome will be transmitted via the female or the male gamete. Our results reveal the presence of one F-specific and one M-specific open reading frames (ORFs), and we hypothesize that they play a role in the transmission and/or gender-specific adaptive functions of the M and F mtDNA genomes in unionoid bivalves. Three major unassigned regions shared among all F and M unionoid genomes have also been identified, and our results indicate that (i) two of them are potential heavy-strand control regions (O(H)) for regulating replication and/or transcription and that (ii) multiple and potentially bidirectional light-strand origins of replication (O(L)) are present in unionoid F and M mitochondrial genomes. We propose that unassigned regions are the most promising candidate sequences in which to find regulatory and/or gender-specific sequences that could determine whether a mitochondrial genome will be maternally or paternally transmitted.

  19. Previous estimates of mitochondrial DNA mutation level variance did not account for sampling error: comparing the mtDNA genetic bottleneck in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Wonnapinij, Passorn; Chinnery, Patrick F; Samuels, David C

    2010-04-01

    In cases of inherited pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, a mother and her offspring generally have large and seemingly random differences in the amount of mutated mtDNA that they carry. Comparisons of measured mtDNA mutation level variance values have become an important issue in determining the mechanisms that cause these large random shifts in mutation level. These variance measurements have been made with samples of quite modest size, which should be a source of concern because higher-order statistics, such as variance, are poorly estimated from small sample sizes. We have developed an analysis of the standard error of variance from a sample of size n, and we have defined error bars for variance measurements based on this standard error. We calculate variance error bars for several published sets of measurements of mtDNA mutation level variance and show how the addition of the error bars alters the interpretation of these experimental results. We compare variance measurements from human clinical data and from mouse models and show that the mutation level variance is clearly higher in the human data than it is in the mouse models at both the primary oocyte and offspring stages of inheritance. We discuss how the standard error of variance can be used in the design of experiments measuring mtDNA mutation level variance. Our results show that variance measurements based on fewer than 20 measurements are generally unreliable and ideally more than 50 measurements are required to reliably compare variances with less than a 2-fold difference.

  20. Determination of population origin: a comparison of autosomal SNPs, Y-chromosomal and mtDNA haplogroups using a Malagasy population as example

    PubMed Central

    Poetsch, Micaela; Wiegand, Aline; Harder, Melanie; Blöhm, Rowena; Rakotomavo, Noel; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms have been used for population studies for a long time. However, there is another possibility to define the origin of a population: autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose allele frequencies differ considerably in different populations. In an attempt to compare the usefulness of these approaches we studied a population from Madagascar using all the three mentioned approaches. Former investigations of Malagasy maternal (mtDNA) and paternal (Y chromosome) lineages have led to the assumption that the Malagasy are an admixed population with an African and Asian-Indonesian heritage. Our additional study demonstrated that more than two-third of the Malagasy investigated showed clearly a West African genotype regarding only the autosomal SNPs despite the fact that 64% had an Asian mtDNA and more than 70% demonstrated an Asian-Indonesian heritage in either mtDNA or Y-chromosomal haplogroup or both. Nonetheless, the admixture of the Malagasy could be confirmed. A clear African or Asian-Indonesian heritage according to all the three DNA approaches investigated was only found in 14% and 1% of male samples, respectively. Not even the European or Northern African influences, detected in 9% of males (Y-chromosomal analysis) and 11% of samples (autosomal SNPs) were consistent. No Malagasy in our samples showed a European or Northern African origin in both categories. So, the analysis of autosomal SNPs could confirm the admixed character of the Malagasy population, even if it pointed to a greater African influence as detectable by Y-chromosomal or mtDNA analysis. PMID:23612573

  1. Segregation and manifestations of the mtDNA tRNA[sup Lys] A[r arrow]G[sup (8344)] mutation of myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, N.G.; Tulinius, M.H.; Holme, E.; Oldfors, A.; Andersen, O.; Wahlstroem, J. ); Aasly, J. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors have studied the segregation and manifestations of the tRNA[sup Lys] A[r arrow]G[sup (8344)] mutation of mtDNA. Three unrelated patients with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome were investigated, along with 30 of their maternal relatives. Mutated mtDNA was not always found in the offspring of women carrying the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation. Four women had 10%-33% of mutated mtDNA in lymphocytes, and no mutated mtDNA was found in 7 of their 14 investigated children. The presence of mutated mtDNA was excluded at a level of 3:1,000. Five women had a proportion of 43%-73% mutated mtDNA in lymphocytes, and mutated mtDNA was found in all their 12 investigated children. This suggests that the risk for transmission of mutated mtDNA to the offspring increases if high levels are present in the mother and that, above a threshold level of 35%-40%, it is very likely that transmission will occur to all children. The three patients with MERRF syndrone had, in muscle, both 94%-96% mutated mtDNA and biochemical and histochemical evidence of a respiratory-chain dysfunction. Four relatives had a proportion of 61%-92% mutated mtDNA in muscle, and biochemical measurements showed a normal respiratory-chain function in muscle in all cases. These findings suggest that >92% of mtDNA with the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in muscle is required to cause a respiratory-chain dysfunction that can be detected by biochemical methods. There was a positive correlation between the levels of mtDNA with the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in lymphocytes and the levels in muscle, in all nine investigated cases. The levels of mutated mtDNA were higher in muscle than in lymphocytes in all cases. 30 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. A novel quantitative assay of mitophagy: Combining high content fluorescence microscopy and mitochondrial DNA load to quantify mitophagy and identify novel pharmacological tools against pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Diot, Alan; Hinks-Roberts, Alex; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Dombi, Eszter; Morten, Karl; Brady, Stefen; Fratter, Carl; Carver, Janet; Muir, Rebecca; Davis, Ryan; Green, Charlotte J; Johnston, Iain; Hilton-Jones, David; Sue, Carolyn; Mortiboys, Heather; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular mechanism for the recycling of mitochondrial fragments. This process is able to improve mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quality in heteroplasmic mtDNA disease, in which mutant mtDNA co-exists with normal mtDNA. In disorders where the load of mutant mtDNA determines disease severity it is likely to be an important determinant of disease progression. Measuring mitophagy is technically demanding. We used pharmacological modulators of autophagy to validate two techniques for quantifying mitophagy. First we used the IN Cell 1000 analyzer to quantify mitochondrial co-localisation with LC3-II positive autophagosomes. Unlike conventional fluorescence and electron microscopy, this high-throughput system is sufficiently sensitive to detect transient low frequency autophagosomes. Secondly, because mitophagy preferentially removes pathogenic heteroplasmic mtDNA mutants, we developed a heteroplasmy assay based on loss of m.3243A>G mtDNA, during culture conditions requiring oxidative metabolism ("energetic stress"). The effects of the pharmacological modulators on these two measures were consistent, confirming that the high throughput imaging output (autophagosomes co-localising with mitochondria) reflects mitochondrial quality control. To further validate these methods, we performed a more detailed study using metformin, the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug that is still sometimes used in Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness (MIDD). This confirmed our initial findings and revealed that metformin inhibits mitophagy at clinically relevant concentrations, suggesting that it may have novel therapeutic uses. PMID:26196248

  3. Evidence for a Fourteenth mtDNA-Encoded Protein in the Female-Transmitted mtDNA of Marine Mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Sophie; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Passamonti, Marco; Milani, Liliana; Stewart, Donald T.; Hoeh, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    Background A novel feature for animal mitochondrial genomes has been recently established: i.e., the presence of additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins with functional significance. This feature has been observed in freshwater mussels with doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA (DUI). The latter unique system of mtDNA transmission, which also exists in some marine mussels and marine clams, is characterized by one mt genome inherited from the female parent (F mtDNA) and one mt genome inherited from the male parent (M mtDNA). In freshwater mussels, the novel mtDNA-encoded proteins have been shown to be mt genome-specific (i.e., one novel protein for F genomes and one novel protein for M genomes). It has been hypothesized that these novel, F- and M-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins (and/or other F- and/or M-specific mtDNA sequences) could be responsible for the different modes of mtDNA transmission in bivalves but this remains to be demonstrated. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated all complete (or nearly complete) female- and male-transmitted marine mussel mtDNAs previously sequenced for the presence of ORFs that could have functional importance in these bivalves. Our results confirm the presence of a novel F genome-specific mt ORF, of significant length (>100aa) and located in the control region, that most likely has functional significance in marine mussels. The identification of this ORF in five Mytilus species suggests that it has been maintained in the mytilid lineage (subfamily Mytilinae) for ∼13 million years. Furthermore, this ORF likely has a homologue in the F mt genome of Musculista senhousia, a DUI-containing mytilid species in the subfamily Crenellinae. We present evidence supporting the functionality of this F-specific ORF at the transcriptional, amino acid and nucleotide levels. Conclusions/Significance Our results offer support for the hypothesis that “novel F genome-specific mitochondrial genes” are involved in key

  4. Multiple differences in calling songs and other traits between solitary and gregarious Mormon crickets from allopatric mtDNA clades

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Nathan W; Gwynne, Darryl T; Bailey, William V; Ritchie, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    Background In acoustic species, traits such as male calling song are likely to diverge quickly between allopatric populations due to sexual selection, and divergence in parameters such as carrier frequency, chirp structure, and other important song characters can influence sexual isolation. Here we make use of two forms of Mormon crickets to examine differences in a broad suite of traits that have the potential to influence speciation via sexual isolation. Mormon crickets in "gregarious" populations aggregate into dense migratory bands, and females are the sexually competitive sex (sex-role reversal). There is also a non-outbreak "solitary" form. These two forms are largely but not perfectly correlated with a significant mtDNA subdivision within the species that is thought to have arisen in allopatry. Combined information about multiple, independently evolving traits, such as morphology and structural and behavioural differences in calling song, provides greater resolution of the overall differences between these allopatric populations, and allows us to assess their stage of divergence. We test two predictions, first that the forms differ in song and second that gregarious males are more reluctant to sing than solitary males due to sex role reversal. We also tested for a difference in the relationship between the size of the forewing resonator, the mirror, and carrier frequency, as most models of sound production in crickets indicate that mirror size should predict carrier frequency. Results Multivariate analyses showed that solitary and gregarious individuals from different populations representing the two mtDNA clades had almost non-overlapping distributions based on multiple song and morphological measurements. Carrier frequency differed between the two, and gregarious males were more reluctant to sing overall. Mirror size predicted carrier frequency; however, the relationship between mirror size and surface area varied between solitary and gregarious forms

  5. Divorcing the Late Upper Palaeolithic demographic histories of mtDNA haplogroups M1 and U6 in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A Southwest Asian origin and dispersal to North Africa in the Early Upper Palaeolithic era has been inferred in previous studies for mtDNA haplogroups M1 and U6. Both haplogroups have been proposed to show similar geographic patterns and shared demographic histories. Results We report here 24 M1 and 33 U6 new complete mtDNA sequences that allow us to refine the existing phylogeny of these haplogroups. The resulting phylogenetic information was used to genotype a further 131 M1 and 91 U6 samples to determine the geographic spread of their sub-clades. No southwest Asian specific clades for M1 or U6 were discovered. U6 and M1 frequencies in North Africa, the Middle East and Europe do not follow similar patterns, and their sub-clade divisions do not appear to be compatible with their shared history reaching back to the Early Upper Palaeolithic. The Bayesian Skyline Plots testify to non-overlapping phases of expansion, and the haplogroups’ phylogenies suggest that there are U6 sub-clades that expanded earlier than those in M1. Some M1 and U6 sub-clades could be linked with certain events. For example, U6a1 and M1b, with their coalescent ages of ~20,000–22,000 years ago and earliest inferred expansion in northwest Africa, could coincide with the flourishing of the Iberomaurusian industry, whilst U6b and M1b1 appeared at the time of the Capsian culture. Conclusions Our high-resolution phylogenetic dissection of both haplogroups and coalescent time assessments suggest that the extant main branching pattern of both haplogroups arose and diversified in the mid-later Upper Palaeolithic, with some sub-clades concomitantly with the expansion of the Iberomaurusian industry. Carriers of these maternal lineages have been later absorbed into and diversified further during the spread of Afro-Asiatic languages in North and East Africa. PMID:23206491

  6. mtDNA variation indicates Mongolia may have been the source for the founding population for the New World.

    PubMed Central

    Merriwether, D. A.; Hall, W. W.; Vahlne, A.; Ferrell, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    mtDNA RFLP variation was analyzed in 42 Mongolians from Ulan Bator. All four founding lineage types (A [4.76%], B [2.38%], C [11.9%], and D [19.04%]) identified by Torroni and colleagues were detected. Seven of the nine founding lineage types proposed by Bailliet and colleagues and Merriwether and Ferrell were detected (A2 [4.76%], B [2.38%], C1 [11.9%], D1 [7.14%], D2 [11.9%], X6 [16.7%], and X7 [9.5%]). Sixty-four percent of these 42 individuals had "Amerindian founding lineage" haplotypes. A survey of 24 restriction sites yielded 16 polymorphic sites and 21 different haplotypes. The presence of all four of the founding lineages identified by the Torroni group (and seven of Merriwether and Ferrell's nine founding lineages), combined with Mongolia's location with respect to the Bering Strait, indicates that Mongolia is a potential location for the origin of the founders of the New World. Since lineage B, which is widely distributed in the New World, is absent in Siberia, we conclude that Mongolia or a geographic location common to both contemporary Mongolians and American aboriginals is the more likely origin of the founders of the New World. PMID:8659526

  7. A new mtDNA COI gene lineage near An. janconnae of the Albitarsis Complex from Caribbean Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Lina A; Orrego, Lina M; Gómez, Giovan F; López, Andrés; Luckhart, Shirley; Conn, Jan E; Correa, Margarita M

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the taxonomic status and vector distribution of anophelines is crucial to malaria control efforts. Previous phylogenetic analyses have supported the description of six species of the Neotropical malaria vector Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) albitarsis s.l. (Diptera: Culicidae): Anopheles albitarsis, An. deaneorum, An. marajoara, An. oryzalimnetes, An. janconnae and An. albitarsis F. To evaluate the taxonomic status of An. albitarsis s.l. mosquitoes collected in various localities of the Colombian Caribbean region, specimens were analyzed using the complete mtDNA Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) gene, the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region and partial nuclear DNA White gene sequences. Phylogenetic analyses of the COI sequences detected a new lineage near An. janconnae in the Caribbean region of Colombia and determined its position relative to the other members of the complex. However, the ITS2 and White gene sequences lacked resolution to support a new lineage near An. janconnae or the An. janconnae clade. Nothing is known about the possible involvement in malaria transmission in Colombia of this new lineage, but its phylogenetic closeness to Anopheles janconnae, which has been incriminated in local malaria transmission in Brazil, is provocative. PMID:21225199

  8. Where West Meets East: The Complex mtDNA Landscape of the Southwest and Central Asian Corridor

    PubMed Central

    Quintana-Murci, Lluís; Chaix, Raphaëlle; Wells, R. Spencer; Behar, Doron M.; Sayar, Hamid; Scozzari, Rosaria; Rengo, Chiara; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Semino, Ornella; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Coppa, Alfredo; Ayub, Qasim; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Qasim Mehdi, S.; Torroni, Antonio; McElreavey, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The southwestern and Central Asian corridor has played a pivotal role in the history of humankind, witnessing numerous waves of migration of different peoples at different times. To evaluate the effects of these population movements on the current genetic landscape of the Iranian plateau, the Indus Valley, and Central Asia, we have analyzed 910 mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) from 23 populations of the region. This study has allowed a refinement of the phylogenetic relationships of some lineages and the identification of new haplogroups in the southwestern and Central Asian mtDNA tree. Both lineage geographical distribution and spatial analysis of molecular variance showed that populations located west of the Indus Valley mainly harbor mtDNAs of western Eurasian origin, whereas those inhabiting the Indo-Gangetic region and Central Asia present substantial proportions of lineages that can be allocated to three different genetic components of western Eurasian, eastern Eurasian, and south Asian origin. In addition to the overall composite picture of lineage clusters of different origin, we observed a number of deep-rooting lineages, whose relative clustering and coalescent ages suggest an autochthonous origin in the southwestern Asian corridor during the Pleistocene. The comparison with Y-chromosome data revealed a highly complex genetic and demographic history of the region, which includes sexually asymmetrical mating patterns, founder effects, and female-specific traces of the East African slave trade. PMID:15077202

  9. Comparison between Mt-DNA D-Loop and Cyt B primers for porcine DNA detection in meat products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzah, Azhana; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd.; Babji, Abdul Salam

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to detect the presence of porcine DNA in meat products in the market using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and commercial PCR-southern hybridization analysis. Porcine DNA detection in meat products was tested due to some issues associated with the adulteration of food products in Malaysia. This is an important issue especially for Halal authentication which is required for some religious practices such as in Islam and Hinduisms. Many techniques have been developed for determining the Halal status of food products. In this paper, mt-DNA D-loop primer and cytochrome (cyt) b were used to detect the presence of porcine DNA in meat products. Positive and negative controls were always present for each batch of extraction. DNA of raw pork meat was used as a positive control while nucleus free water is used as negative control. A pair of oligonucleotide primer was used namely Pork1 and Pork2 which produced amplicon of 531 base pair (bp) in size. While, PCR-southern hybridization was conducted using primers readily supplied by commercial PCR-Southern hybridization and produced amplicon with 276 bp in size. In the present study, demonstrated that none of the samples were contaminated with porcine residuals but selected samples with pork meat were positive. The species-specific PCR amplification yielded excellent results for identification of pork derivatives in food products and it is a potentially reliable and suitable technique in routine food analysis for Halal certification.

  10. Length heteroplasmy of the polyC-polyT-polyC stretch in the dog mtDNA control region.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-09-01

    Previously, the mitochondrial control region of 214 Belgian dogs was sequenced. Analysis of this data indicated length heteroplasmy of the polyT stretch in the polyC-polyT-polyC stretch from positions 16661 to 16674. Nine polyC-polyT-polyC haplotype combinations were observed, consisting of seven major haplotypes (highest signal intensity) combined with minor haplotypes (lower signal intensity) one T shorter than the major haplotype in all but three dogs. The longer the polyT stretch, the smaller was the difference in signal intensity between the major and minor haplotype peaks. Additional sequencing, cloning, and PCR trap experiments were performed to further study the intra-individual variation of this mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) region. Cloning experiments demonstrated that the proportion of clones displaying the minor haplotypes also increased with the length of the polyT stretch. Clone amplification showed that in vitro polymerase errors might contribute to the length heteroplasmy of polyT stretches with at least 10 Ts. Although major and minor polyC-polyT-polyC haplotypes did not differ intra-individually within and between tissues in this study, interpretation of polyT stretch variation should be handled with care in forensic casework. PMID:25394743

  11. [Development of a DNA biochip for detection of known mtDNA mutations associated with MELAS and MERRF syndromes.].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Li, Wei; DU, Wei-Dong; Cao, Hui-Min; Tang, Hua-Yang; Tang, Xian-Fa; Sun, Zhong-Wu; Zhao, Hui; Jin, Qing-Hui; Zhao, Jian-Long; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2008-10-01

    We developed an oligonucleotide biochip for synchronous multiplex detection of 31 known mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with MELAS (Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) and MERRF (Myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers). Allele-specific oligonucleotide probes were covalently immobilized on aldehyde modified glass slides, and then hybridized with Cy5-labled DNA fragments amplified from sample DNAs by a multiplex asymmetric PCR (MAP) method. Five patients with MELAS, 5 patients with MERRF and 20 healthy controls were investigated using the oligonucleotide biochip. The results showed that all the cases with MELAS had an A3243G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene. In the MERRF group, 4 cases were found to be an A8344G mutation and 1 case was a T8356C mutation, and both mutations were in the MT-TK gene. In the healthy controls, none of the 31 related mutations was found. The results of the DNA biochip were consistent with those by DNA sequencing. Clearly, the DNA biochip combined with MAP method would become a valuable tool in multiplex detecting of the point mutations in mtDNA leading to MELAS and/or MERRF syndrome. Moreover, this biochip format could be modified to extend to the screening scope of SNPs for any other human mitochondrial diseases.

  12. A rare variant of the mtDNA HVS1 sequence in the hairs of Napoléon's family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the finding of a rare variant in the sequence of the hypervariable segment (HVS1) of mitochondrial (mtDNA) extracted from two preserved hairs, authenticated as belonging to the French Emperor Napoléon I (Napoléon Bonaparte). This rare variant is a mutation that changes the base C to T at position 16,184 (16184C→T), and it constitutes the only mutation found in this HVS1 sequence. This mutation is rare, because it was not found in a reference database (P < 0.05). In a personal database (M. Pala) comprising 37,000 different sequences, the 16184C→T mutation was found in only three samples, thus in this database the mutation frequency was 0.00008%. This mutation 16184C→T was also the only variant found subsequently in the HVS1 sequences of mtDNAs extracted from Napoléon's mother (Letizia) and from his youngest sister (Caroline), confirming that this mutation is maternally inherited. This 16184C→T variant could be used for genetic verification to authenticate any doubtful material and determine whether it should indeed be attributed to Napoléon. PMID:21092341

  13. Population structure of African buffalo inferred from mtDNA sequences and microsatellite loci: high variation but low differentiation.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, B T; Siegismund, H R; Arctander, P

    1998-02-01

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa and is found in most major vegetation types, wherever permanent sources of water are available, making it physically able to disperse through a wide range of habitats. Despite this, the buffalo has been assumed to be strongly philopatric and to form large aggregations that remain within separate home ranges with little interchange between units, but the level of differentiation within the species is unknown. Genetic differences between populations were assessed using mitochondrial DNA (control region) sequence data and analysis of variation at six microsatellite loci among 11 localities in eastern and southern Africa. High levels of genetic variability were found, suggesting that reported severe population bottlenecks due to outbreak of rinderpest during the last century did not strongly reduce the genetic variability within the species. The high level of genetic variation within the species was found to be evenly distributed among populations and only at the continental level were we able to consistently detect significant differentiation, contrasting with the assumed philopatric behaviour of the buffalo. Results of mtDNA and microsatellite data were found to be congruent, disagreeing with the alleged male-biased dispersal. We propose that the observed pattern of the distribution of genetic variation between buffalo populations at the regional level can be caused by fragmentation of a previous panmictic population due to human activity, and at the continental level, reflects an effect of geographical distance between populations.

  14. mtDNA variation indicates Mongolia may have been the source for the founding population for the New World.

    PubMed

    Merriwether, D A; Hall, W W; Vahlne, A; Ferrell, R E

    1996-07-01

    mtDNA RFLP variation was analyzed in 42 Mongolians from Ulan Bator. All four founding lineage types (A [4.76%], B [2.38%], C [11.9%], and D [19.04%]) identified by Torroni and colleagues were detected. Seven of the nine founding lineage types proposed by Bailliet and colleagues and Merriwether and Ferrell were detected (A2 [4.76%], B [2.38%], C1 [11.9%], D1 [7.14%], D2 [11.9%], X6 [16.7%], and X7 [9.5%]). Sixty-four percent of these 42 individuals had "Amerindian founding lineage" haplotypes. A survey of 24 restriction sites yielded 16 polymorphic sites and 21 different haplotypes. The presence of all four of the founding lineages identified by the Torroni group (and seven of Merriwether and Ferrell's nine founding lineages), combined with Mongolia's location with respect to the Bering Strait, indicates that Mongolia is a potential location for the origin of the founders of the New World. Since lineage B, which is widely distributed in the New World, is absent in Siberia, we conclude that Mongolia or a geographic location common to both contemporary Mongolians and American aboriginals is the more likely origin of the founders of the New World. PMID:8659526

  15. Comparison of mtDNA haplogroups in Hungarians with four other European populations: a small incidence of descents with Asian origin.

    PubMed

    Nadasi, Edit; Gyurus, P; Czakó, Márta; Bene, Judit; Kosztolányi, Sz; Fazekas, Sz; Dömösi, P; Melegh, B

    2007-06-01

    Hungarians are unique among the other European populations because according to history, the ancient Magyars had come from the eastern side of the Ural Mountains and settled down in the Carpathian basin in the 9th century AD. Since variations in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) are routinely used to infer the histories of different populations, we examined the distribution of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) sites of the mtDNA in apparently healthy, unrelated Hungarian subjects in order to collect data on the genetic origin of the Hungarian population. Among the 55 samples analyzed, the large majority belonged to haplogroups common in other European populations, however, three samples fulfilled the requirements of haplogroup M. Since haplogroup M is classified as a haplogroup characteristic mainly for Asian populations, the presence of haplogroup M found in approximately 5% of the total suggests that an Asian matrilineal ancestry, even if in a small incidence, can be detected among modern Hungarians.

  16. The investigation of genetic diversity and evolution of Daweishan Mini chicken based on the complete mitochondrial (mt)DNA D-loop region sequence.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Xu; Tang, Xiu-Jun; Lu, Jun-Xian; Fan, Yan-Feng; Chen, Da-Wei; Tang, Meng-Jun; Gu, Rong; Gao, Yu-Shi

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the genetic diversity and origin of Daweishan Mini chickens using mtDNA sequence polymorphism. Blood samples from 30 Daweishan Mini chickens were collected. The complete D-loop was PCR amplified, sequenced and compared with the DNA data of five Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) subspecies. Eighteen variable sites that defined six haplotypes were observed. The six haplotypes were clustered into four clades (A, B, D and E), of which clade A and B were dominant. Clades Aand B were clustered with G.g. spadiceus, indicating these two clades may have originated from this subspecies. These results show there is diversity in the middle of the mtDNA D-loop, and indicate there are multiple maternal origins for Daweishan Mini chickens. It appears that G.g. spadiceus contributed more to the evolution of the Daweishan Mini chickens breed than the other four subspecies tested here. PMID:26153755

  17. Detection of the mtDNA 14484 mutation on an African-specific haplotype: Implications about its role in causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Torroni, A.; Petrozzi, M.; Terracina, M.

    1996-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease whose primary clinical manifestation is acute or subacute bilateral loss of central vision leading to central scotoma and blindness. To date, LHON has been associated with 18 mtDNA missense mutations, even though, for many of these mutations, it remains unclear whether they cause the disease, contribute to the pathology, or are nonpathogenic mtDNA polymorphisms. On the basis of numerous criteria, which include the specificity for LHON, the frequency in the general population, and the penetrance within affected pedigrees, the detection of associated defects in the respiratory chain, mutations at three nucleotide positions (nps), 11778 (G{r_arrow}A), 3460 (G{r_arrow}A), and 14484 (T{r_arrow}C) have been classified as high-risk and primary LHON mutations. Overall, these three mutations encompass {ge}90% of the LHON cases. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Phylogeographic analysis of complete mtDNA genomes from Walleye Pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus Pallas, 1811) shows an ancient origin of genetic biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Steven M; Marshall, H Dawn

    2008-12-01

    Ursvik et al. compared the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome sequences of Walleye Pollock (Gadus ( = Theragra) chalcogrammus) from the Pacific Ocean with a pair of fish from an isolated population of Norwegian pollock in the Barents Sea. They concluded that the Norwegian population was recently introduced from the Pacific. We test this hypothesis within a temporal framework provided by a phylogeographic analysis of complete genomes from the pollocks' sister species, Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua), and their divergence 3.5 mya. Pollock have a coalescent ancestor 189 +/- 25 kya. The two Norwegian fish have a common ancestor 87 +/- 7 kya, which suggests an ancient origin rather than a recent human-mediated introduction. Mitochondrial genomic biodiversity in pollock antedates the most recent glacial cycle. The clade structure of the whole-genome tree indicates that previously described single-locus mtDNA haplotypes and haplogroups are typically paraphyletic.

  19. Identification of a group of cryptic marine limpet species, Cellana karachiensis (Mollusca: Patellogastropoda) off Veraval coast, India, using mtDNA COI sequencing.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sneha; Poriya, Paresh; Vakani, Bhavik; Singh, S P; Kundu, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Present communication reports the phylogenetic relationship between three groups of a marine limpet having different color banding patterns using COI sequencing. Samples were sequenced for mtDNA COI gene using universal primer. Comparative BLAST revealed that all three types were around 99.59% identical with Cellana karachiensis, first record of this species from Indian coasts. Apart from the morphological variations, the mtDNA COI gene analysis revealed around 1% nucleotide variations between these three types. The observed dissimilarity in COI sequences was possibly too little to consider these types as three different species. The derivation of amino acid positions indicated that these types could possibly be a complex of three cryptic species of C. karachiensis. The study proposes that the Oman and Indian populations of C. karachiensis might have derived by allopatric speciation due to geographical isolation. The group of these three cryptic species, sharing same habitat between themselves, possibly showed sympatric speciation.

  20. Comparison of mtDNA haplogroups in Hungarians with four other European populations: a small incidence of descents with Asian origin.

    PubMed

    Nadasi, Edit; Gyurus, P; Czakó, Márta; Bene, Judit; Kosztolányi, Sz; Fazekas, Sz; Dömösi, P; Melegh, B

    2007-06-01

    Hungarians are unique among the other European populations because according to history, the ancient Magyars had come from the eastern side of the Ural Mountains and settled down in the Carpathian basin in the 9th century AD. Since variations in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) are routinely used to infer the histories of different populations, we examined the distribution of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) sites of the mtDNA in apparently healthy, unrelated Hungarian subjects in order to collect data on the genetic origin of the Hungarian population. Among the 55 samples analyzed, the large majority belonged to haplogroups common in other European populations, however, three samples fulfilled the requirements of haplogroup M. Since haplogroup M is classified as a haplogroup characteristic mainly for Asian populations, the presence of haplogroup M found in approximately 5% of the total suggests that an Asian matrilineal ancestry, even if in a small incidence, can be detected among modern Hungarians. PMID:17585514

  1. Population genetic structure and colonization sequence of Drosophila subobscura in the Canaries and Madeira Atlantic Islands as inferred by autosomal, sex-linked and mtDNA traits.

    PubMed

    Pinto, F M; Brehm, A; Hernández, M; Larruga, J M; González, A M; Cabrera, V M

    1997-01-01

    The genetic structure in Atlantic Islands and continental populations of Drosophila subobscura has been studied using autosomal and sex-linked allozymes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes. From the data it is deduced that whereas the Canary islands have long been isolated, the neighboring island of Madeira has been subjected to continuous migration from the mainland. In addition, sex-linked allozymes and mtDNA data show a large divergence between the geologically younger western islands of the Canarian Archipelago and the older central ones, finding strong founder effects in the former. Divergence rates of sex-linked and mitochondrial genes relative to autosomic loci several times higher than expected under neutrality have been explained by differential migration between sexes. The Canarian Archipelago colonization fits in well with a stepping-stone model of a directional east-west migration that parallels the geological origin of these Islands.

  2. mtDNA and Y-chromosome diversity in Aymaras and Quechuas from Bolivia: different stories and special genetic traits of the Andean Altiplano populations.

    PubMed

    Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Moral, Pedro; Saenz-Ruales, Nancy; Gerbault, Pascale; Tonasso, Laure; Villena, Mercedes; Vasquez, René; Bravi, Claudio M; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Two Bolivian samples belonging to the two main Andean linguistic groups (Aymaras and Quechuas) were studied for mtDNA and Y-chromosome uniparental markers to evaluate sex-specific differences and give new insights into the demographic processes of the Andean region. mtDNA-coding polymorphisms, HVI-HVII control regions, 17 Y-STRs, and three SNPs were typed in two well-defined populations with adequate size samples. The two Bolivian samples showed more genetic differences for the mtDNA than for the Y-chromosome. For the mtDNA, 81% of Aymaras and 61% of Quechuas presented haplogroup B2. Native American Y-chromosomes were found in 97% of Aymaras (89% hg Q1a3a and 11% hg Q1a3*) and 78% of Quechuas (100% hg Q1a3a). Our data revealed high diversity values in the two populations, in agreement with other Andean studies. The comparisons with the available literature for both sets of markers indicated that the central Andean area is relatively homogeneous. For mtDNA, the Aymaras seemed to have been more isolated throughout time, maintaining their genetic characteristics, while the Quechuas have been more permeable to the incorporation of female foreigners and Peruvian influences. On the other hand, male mobility would have been widespread across the Andean region according to the homogeneity found in the area. Particular genetic characteristics presented by both samples support a past common origin of the Altiplano populations in the ancient Aymara territory, with independent, although related histories, with Peruvian (Quechuas) populations.

  3. Transcription from the second heavy-strand promoter of human mtDNA is repressed by transcription factor A in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lodeiro, Maria F; Uchida, Akira; Bestwick, Megan; Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Arnold, Jamie J; Shadel, Gerald S; Cameron, Craig E

    2012-04-24

    Cell-based studies support the existence of two promoters on the heavy strand of mtDNA: heavy-strand promoter 1 (HSP1) and HSP2. However, transcription from HSP2 has been reported only once in a cell-free system, and never when recombinant proteins have been used. Here, we document transcription from HSP2 using an in vitro system of defined composition. An oligonucleotide template representing positions 596-685 of mtDNA was sufficient to observe transcription by the human mtRNA polymerase (POLRMT) that was absolutely dependent on mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M). POLRMT/TFB2M-dependent transcription was inhibited by concentrations of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) stoichiometric with the transcription template, a condition that activates transcription from the light-strand promoter (LSP) in vitro. Domains of TFAM required for LSP activation were also required for HSP2 repression, whereas other mtDNA binding proteins failed to alter transcriptional output. Binding sites for TFAM were located on both sides of the start site of transcription from HSP2, suggesting that TFAM binding interferes with POLRMT and/or TFB2M binding. Consistent with a competitive binding model for TFAM repression of HSP2, the impact of TFAM concentration on HSP2 transcription was diminished by elevating the POLRMT and TFB2M concentrations. In the context of our previous studies of LSP and HSP1, it is now clear that three promoters exist in human mtDNA. Each promoter has a unique requirement for and/or response to the level of TFAM present, thus implying far greater complexity in the regulation of mammalian mitochondrial transcription than recognized to date.

  4. Anthropology. Response to Comment on "Late Pleistocene human skeleton and mtDNA link Paleoamericans and modern Native Americans".

    PubMed

    Kemp, Brian M; Lindo, John; Bolnick, Deborah A; Malhi, Ripan S; Chatters, James C

    2015-02-20

    Prüfer and Meyer raise concerns over the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) results we reported for the Hoyo Negro individual, citing failure of a portion of these data to conform to their expectations of ancient DNA (aDNA). Because damage patterns in aDNA vary, outright rejection of our findings on this basis is unwarranted, especially in light of our other observations. PMID:25700511

  5. MtDNA COI-COII marker and drone congregation area: an efficient method to establish and monitor honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) conservation centres.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Bénédicte; Alburaki, Mohamed; Legout, Hélène; Moulin, Sibyle; Mougel, Florence; Garnery, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    Honeybee subspecies have been affected by human activities in Europe over the past few decades. One such example is the importation of nonlocal subspecies of bees which has had an adverse impact on the geographical repartition and subsequently on the genetic diversity of the black honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera. To restore the original diversity of this local honeybee subspecies, different conservation centres were set up in Europe. In this study, we established a black honeybee conservation centre Conservatoire de l'Abeille Noire d'Ile de France (CANIF) in the region of Ile-de-France, France. CANIF's honeybee colonies were intensively studied over a 3-year period. This study included a drone congregation area (DCA) located in the conservation centre. MtDNA COI-COII marker was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of CANIF's honeybee populations and the drones found and collected from the DCA. The same marker (mtDNA) was used to estimate the interactions and the haplotype frequency between CANIF's honeybee populations and 10 surrounding honeybee apiaries located outside of the CANIF. Our results indicate that the colonies of the conservation centre and the drones of the DCA show similar stable profiles compared to the surrounding populations with lower level of introgression. The mtDNA marker used on both DCA and colonies of the conservation centre seems to be an efficient approach to monitor and maintain the genetic diversity of the protected honeybee populations.

  6. Genetic differences between Chibcha and Non-Chibcha speaking tribes based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups from 21 Amerindian tribes from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Usme-Romero, Solangy; Alonso, Milena; Hernandez-Cuervo, Helena; Yunis, Emilio J.; Yunis, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the frequency of four mitochondrial DNA haplogroups in 424 individuals from 21 Colombian Amerindian tribes. Our results showed a high degree of mtDNA diversity and genetic heterogeneity. Frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups A and C were high in the majority of populations studied. The distribution of these four mtDNA haplogroups from Amerindian populations was different in the northern region of the country compared to those in the south. Haplogroup A was more frequently found among Amerindian tribes in northern Colombia, while haplogroup D was more frequent among tribes in the south. Haplogroups A, C and D have clinal tendencies in Colombia and South America in general. Populations belonging to the Chibcha linguistic family of Colombia and other countries nearby showed a strong genetic differentiation from the other populations tested, thus corroborating previous findings. Genetically, the Ingano, Paez and Guambiano populations are more closely related to other groups of south eastern Colombia, as also inferred from other genetic markers and from archeological data. Strong evidence for a correspondence between geographical and linguistic classification was found, and this is consistent with evidence that gene flow and the exchange of customs and knowledge and language elements between groups is facilitated by close proximity. PMID:23885195

  7. Convergence of multiple signaling pathways is required to coordinately up-regulate mtDNA and mitochondrial biogenesis during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anthony D; Parikh, Neal; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S

    2007-12-01

    The quantity and activity of mitochondria vary dramatically in tissues and are modulated in response to changing cellular energy demands and environmental factors. The amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes required for cellular ATP production, is also tightly regulated, but by largely unknown mechanisms. Using murine T cells as a model system, we have addressed how specific signaling pathways influence mitochondrial biogenesis and mtDNA copy number. T cell receptor (TCR) activation results in a large increase in mitochondrial mass and membrane potential and a corresponding amplification of mtDNA, consistent with a vital role for mitochondrial function for growth and proliferation of these cells. Independent activation of protein kinase C (via PMA) or calcium-related pathways (via ionomycin) had differential and sub-maximal effects on these mitochondrial parameters, as did activation of naïve T cells with proliferative cytokines. Thus, the robust mitochondrial biogenesis response observed upon TCR activation requires synergy of multiple downstream signaling pathways. One such pathway involves AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which we show has an unprecedented role in negatively regulating mitochondrial biogenesis that is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent. That is, inhibition of AMPK after TCR signaling commences results in excessive, but uncoordinated mitochondrial proliferation. Thus mitochondrial biogenesis is not under control of a single master regulatory circuit, but rather requires the convergence of multiple signaling pathways with distinct downstream consequences on the organelle's structure, composition, and function.

  8. Marked genetic structuring and extreme dispersal limitation in the Pyrenean brook newt Calotriton asper (Amphibia: Salamandridae) revealed by genome-wide AFLP but not mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Milá, Borja; Carranza, Salvador; Guillaume, Olivier; Clobert, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Direct estimation of dispersal rates at large geographic scales can be technically and logistically challenging, especially in small animals of low vagility like amphibians. The use of molecular markers to reveal patterns of genetic structure provides an indirect way to infer dispersal rates and patterns of recent and historical gene flow among populations. Here, we use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data and genome-wide amplified fragment length polymorphism markers to examine population structure in the Pyrenean brook newt (Calotriton asper) across four main drainages in the French Pyrenees. mtDNA sequence data (2040 bp) revealed three phylogroups shallowly differentiated and with low genetic diversity. In sharp contrast, variation in 382 amplified fragment length polymorphism loci was high and revealed a clear pattern of isolation by distance consistent with long-term restriction of gene flow at three spatial scales: (i) among all four main drainages, (ii) between sites within drainages, and (iii) even between adjacent populations separated by less than 4 km. The high pairwise F(ST) values between localities across numerous loci, together with the high frequency of fixed alleles in several populations, suggests a combination of marked geographic isolation, small population sizes and very limited dispersal in C. asper. The contrasting lack of variation detected in mtDNA sequence data is intriguing and underscores the importance of multilocus approaches to detect true patterns of gene flow in natural populations of amphibians.

  9. Human mtDNA hypervariable regions, HVR I and II, hint at deep common maternal founder and subsequent maternal gene flow in Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swarkar; Saha, Anjana; Rai, Ekta; Bhat, Audesh; Bamezai, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    We have analysed the hypervariable regions (HVR I and II) of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in individuals from Uttar Pradesh (UP), Bihar (BI) and Punjab (PUNJ), belonging to the Indo-European linguistic group, and from South India (SI), that have their linguistic roots in Dravidian language. Our analysis revealed the presence of known and novel mutations in both hypervariable regions in the studied population groups. Median joining network analyses based on mtDNA showed extensive overlap in mtDNA lineages despite the extensive cultural and linguistic diversity. MDS plot analysis based on Fst distances suggested increased maternal genetic proximity for the studied population groups compared with other world populations. Mismatch distribution curves, respective neighbour joining trees and other statistical analyses showed that there were significant expansions. The study revealed an ancient common ancestry for the studied population groups, most probably through common founder female lineage(s), and also indicated that human migrations occurred (maybe across and within the Indian subcontinent) even after the initial phase of female migration to India.

  10. Simultaneous detection of human mitochondrial DNA and nuclear-inserted mitochondrial-origin sequences (NumtS) using forensic mtDNA amplification strategies and pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Bintz, Brittania J; Dixon, Groves B; Wilson, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies enable the identification of minor mitochondrial DNA variants with higher sensitivity than Sanger methods, allowing for enhanced identification of minor variants. In this study, mixtures of human mtDNA control region amplicons were subjected to pyrosequencing to determine the detection threshold of the Roche GS Junior(®) instrument (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN). In addition to expected variants, a set of reproducible variants was consistently found in reads from one particular amplicon. A BLASTn search of the variant sequence revealed identity to a segment of a 611-bp nuclear insertion of the mitochondrial control region (NumtS) spanning the primer-binding sites of this amplicon (Nature 1995;378:489). Primers (Hum Genet 2012;131:757; Hum Biol 1996;68:847) flanking the insertion were used to confirm the presence or absence of the NumtS in buccal DNA extracts from twenty donors. These results further our understanding of human mtDNA variation and are expected to have a positive impact on the interpretation of mtDNA profiles using deep-sequencing methods in casework.

  11. MtDNA COI-COII marker and drone congregation area: an efficient method to establish and monitor honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) conservation centres.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Bénédicte; Alburaki, Mohamed; Legout, Hélène; Moulin, Sibyle; Mougel, Florence; Garnery, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    Honeybee subspecies have been affected by human activities in Europe over the past few decades. One such example is the importation of nonlocal subspecies of bees which has had an adverse impact on the geographical repartition and subsequently on the genetic diversity of the black honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera. To restore the original diversity of this local honeybee subspecies, different conservation centres were set up in Europe. In this study, we established a black honeybee conservation centre Conservatoire de l'Abeille Noire d'Ile de France (CANIF) in the region of Ile-de-France, France. CANIF's honeybee colonies were intensively studied over a 3-year period. This study included a drone congregation area (DCA) located in the conservation centre. MtDNA COI-COII marker was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of CANIF's honeybee populations and the drones found and collected from the DCA. The same marker (mtDNA) was used to estimate the interactions and the haplotype frequency between CANIF's honeybee populations and 10 surrounding honeybee apiaries located outside of the CANIF. Our results indicate that the colonies of the conservation centre and the drones of the DCA show similar stable profiles compared to the surrounding populations with lower level of introgression. The mtDNA marker used on both DCA and colonies of the conservation centre seems to be an efficient approach to monitor and maintain the genetic diversity of the protected honeybee populations. PMID:25335970

  12. De novo COX2 mutation in a LHON family of Caucasian origin: implication for the role of mtDNA polymorphism in human pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhadanov, Sergey I; Atamanov, Vasiliy V; Zhadanov, Nikolay I; Schurr, Theodore G

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain mutations with phylogeographic importance as haplogroup markers may also influence the phenotypic expression of particular mitochondrial disorders. One such disorder, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), demonstrates a clear expression bias in mtDNAs belonging to haplogroup J, a West Eurasian maternal lineage defined by polymorphic markers that have been called 'secondary' disease mutations. In this report, we present evidence for a de novo heteroplasmic COX2 mutation associated with a LHON clinical phenotype. This particular mutation-at nucleotide position 7,598-occurs in West Eurasian haplogroup H, the most common maternal lineage among individuals of European descent, whereas previous studies have detected this mutation only in East Eurasian haplogroup E. A review of the available mtDNA sequence data indicates that the COX2 7598 mutation occurs as a homoplasic event at the tips of these phylogenetic branches, suggesting that it could be a variant that is rapidly eliminated by selection. This finding points to the potential background influence of polymorphisms on the expression of mild deleterious mutations such as LHON mtDNA defects and further highlights the difficulties in distinguishing deleterious mtDNA changes from neutral polymorphisms and their significance in the development of mitochondriopathies.

  13. Autosomal, mtDNA, and Y-Chromosome Diversity in Amerinds: Pre- and Post-Columbian Patterns of Gene Flow in South America

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Natalia R.; Mondragón, María C.; Soto, Iván D.; Parra, María V.; Duque, Constanza; Ortíz-Barrientos, Daniel; García, Luis F.; Velez, Iván D.; Bravo, María L.; Múnera, Juan G.; Bedoya, Gabriel; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate sex-specific differences in gene flow between Native American populations from South America and between those populations and recent immigrants to the New World, we examined the genetic diversity at uni- and biparental genetic markers of five Native American populations from Colombia and in published surveys from native South Americans. The Colombian populations were typed for five polymorphisms in mtDNA, five restriction sites in the β-globin gene cluster, the DQA1 gene, and nine autosomal microsatellites. Elsewhere, we published results for seven Y-chromosome microsatellites in the same populations. Autosomal polymorphisms showed a mean GST of 6.8%, in agreement with extensive classical marker studies of South American populations. MtDNA and Y-chromosome markers resulted in GST values of 0.18 and 0.165, respectively. When only Y chromosomes of confirmed Amerind origin were used in the calculations (as defined by the presence of allele T at locus DYS199), GST increased to 0.22. GST values calculated from published data for other South American natives were 0.3 and 0.29 for mtDNA and Amerind Y chromosomes, respectively. The concordance of these estimates does not support an important difference in migration rates between the sexes throughout the history of South Amerinds. Admixture analysis of the Colombian populations suggests an asymmetric pattern of mating involving mostly immigrant men and native women. PMID:11032789

  14. Evolutionary history of the greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) inferred from analysis of mtDNA, Y, and X chromosome markers.

    PubMed

    Brändli, Laura; Handley, Lori-Jayne Lawson; Vogel, Peter; Perrin, Nicolas

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the evolutionary history of the greater white-toothed shrew across its distribution in northern Africa and mainland Europe using sex-specific (mtDNA and Y chromosome) and biparental (X chromosome) markers. All three loci confirm a large divergence between eastern (Tunisia and Sardinia) and western (Morocco and mainland Europe) lineages, and application of a molecular clock to mtDNA divergence estimates indicates a more ancient separation (2.25 M yr ago) than described by some previous studies, supporting claims for taxonomic revision. Moroccan ancestry for the mainland European population is inconclusive from phylogenetic trees, but is supported by greater nucleotide diversity and a more ancient population expansion in Morocco than in Europe. Signatures of rapid population expansion in mtDNA, combined with low X and Y chromosome diversity, suggest a single colonization of mainland Europe by a small number of Moroccan shrews >38 K yr ago. This study illustrates that multilocus genetic analyses can facilitate the interpretation of species' evolutionary history but that phylogeographic inference using X and Y chromosomes is restricted by low levels of observed polymorphism.

  15. Inhibition of mitochondrial genome expression triggers the activation of CHOP-10 by a cell signaling dependent on the integrated stress response but not the mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Michel, Sebastien; Canonne, Morgane; Arnould, Thierry; Renard, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondria-to-nucleus communication, known as retrograde signaling, is important to adjust the nuclear gene expression in response to organelle dysfunction. Among the transcription factors described to respond to mitochondrial stress, CHOP-10 is activated by respiratory chain inhibition, mitochondrial accumulation of unfolded proteins and mtDNA mutations. In this study, we show that altered/impaired expression of mtDNA induces CHOP-10 expression in a signaling pathway that depends on the eIF2α/ATF4 axis of the integrated stress response rather than on the mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

  16. Defects of mtDNA Replication Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis During Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Human Cardiomyocytes and Chagasic Patients: The Role of Nrf1/2 and Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xianxiu; Gupta, Shivali; Zago, Maria P.; Davidson, Mercy M.; Dousset, Pierre; Amoroso, Alejandro; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is a key determinant in chagasic cardiomyopathy development in mice; however, its relevance in human Chagas disease is not known. We determined if defects in mitochondrial biogenesis and dysregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) coactivator-1 (PGC-1)–regulated transcriptional pathways constitute a mechanism or mechanisms underlying mitochondrial oxidative-phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiency in human Chagas disease. Methods and Results We utilized human cardiomyocytes and left-ventricular tissue from chagasic and other cardiomyopathy patients and healthy donors (n>6/group). We noted no change in citrate synthase activity, yet mRNA and/or protein levels of subunits of the respiratory complexes were significantly decreased in Trypanosoma cruzi–infected cardiomyocytes (0 to 24 hours) and chagasic hearts. We observed increased mRNA and decreased nuclear localization of PGC-1-coactivated transcription factors, yet the expression of genes for PPARγ-regulated fatty acid oxidation and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF1/2)–regulated mtDNA replication and transcription machinery was enhanced in infected cardiomyocytes and chagasic hearts. The D-loop formation was normal or higher, but mtDNA replication and mtDNA content were decreased by 83% and 40% to 65%, respectively. Subsequently, we noted that reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative stress, and mtDNA oxidation were significantly increased, yet NRF1/2-regulated antioxidant gene expression remained compromised in infected cardiomyocytes and chagasic hearts. Conclusions The replication of mtDNA was severely compromised, resulting in a significant loss of mtDNA and expression of OXPHOS genes in T cruzi–infected cardiomyocytes and chagasic hearts. Our data suggest increased ROS generation and selective functional incapacity of NRF2-mediated antioxidant gene expression played a role in the defects in mtDNA replication and unfitness of mtDNA for

  17. Evolution of Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata (Anura: Discoglossidae) in the Carpathian Basin: a history of repeated mt-DNA introgression across species.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Judit; Alcobendas, Marina; Martínez-Solano, Iñigo; García-París, Mario

    2006-03-01

    The structure and geographic location of hybrid zones change through time. Current patterns result from present and historical population-environment interactions that act on each of the hybridizing taxa. This is particularly evident for species involved in complex hybrid zones, such as that formed by the toad species Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata (Anura: Discoglossidae), which interact along extensive areas in Central Europe. We used data on external morphology and partial sequences of the cytochrome oxidase I (cox1) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotid dehydrogenase subunit 4 (nad4) mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) genes to analyze the current patterns of genetic structure shown by both species of Bombina along their contact zone in Hungary. Phylogenetic, phylogeographic, and historical demography analyses were applied to 1.5kb mt-DNA obtained from 119 individuals representing 24 populations from Hungary and additional specimens from Slovakia, Albania, and Bosnia-Herzegovina. We use these data to infer the evolutionary history of the isolated populations of B. variegata in Hungary and to discriminate between competing biogeographic scenarios accounting for the historical interactions between species in this region. Results from the inferred phylogenetic branching pattern and sequence divergence among species and populations support the following: (i) recent population expansion has occurred in Hungarian populations of B. bombina, which are genetically very homogeneous; (ii) the Hungarian populations of B. variegata correspond to two distinct mitochondrial lineages (Carpathian and Alpine, respectively); average maximum-likelihood-corrected sequence divergence between these lineages is 8.96% for cox1 and 10.85% for nad4; (iii) mt-DNA divergence among the three isolated western populations of B. variegata from Transdanubia is low, with four closely related haplotypes, which suggests that the isolation between these populations is the result of a recent process

  18. Phylogeny and Patterns of Diversity of Goat mtDNA Haplogroup A Revealed by Resequencing Complete Mitogenomes

    PubMed Central

    Doro, Maria Grazia; Piras, Daniela; Leoni, Giovanni Giuseppe; Casu, Giuseppina; Vaccargiu, Simona; Parracciani, Debora; Naitana, Salvatore; Pirastu, Mario; Novelletto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced to near completion the entire mtDNA of 28 Sardinian goats, selected to represent the widest possible diversity of the most widespread mitochondrial evolutionary lineage, haplogroup (Hg) A. These specimens were reporters of the diversity in the island but also elsewhere, as inferred from their affiliation to each of 11 clades defined by D-loop variation. Two reference sequences completed the dataset. Overall, 206 variations were found in the full set of 30 sequences, of which 23 were protein-coding non-synonymous single nucleotide substitutions. Many polymorphic sites within Hg A were informative for the reconstruction of its internal phylogeny. Bayesian and network clustering revealed a general similarity over the entire molecule of sequences previously assigned to the same D-loop clade, indicating evolutionarily meaningful lineages. Two major sister groupings emerged within Hg A, which parallel distinct geographical distributions of D-loop clades in extant stocks. The pattern of variation in protein-coding genes revealed an overwhelming role of purifying selection, with the quota of surviving variants approaching neutrality. However, a simple model of relaxation of selection for the bulk of variants here reported should be rejected. Non-synonymous diversity of Hg's A, B and C denoted that a proportion of variants not greater than that allowed in the wild was given the opportunity to spread into domesticated stocks. Our results also confirmed that a remarkable proportion of pre-existing Hg A diversity became incorporated into domestic stocks. Our results confirm clade A11 as a well differentiated and ancient lineage peculiar of Sardinia. PMID:24763315

  19. Worldwide structure of mtDNA diversity among Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris): implications for threatened populations.

    PubMed

    Dalebout, Merel L; Robertson, Kelly M; Frantzis, Alexandros; Engelhaupt, Dan; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Rosario-Delestre, Raul J; Baker, C Scott

    2005-10-01

    We present the first description of phylogeographic structure among Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) worldwide using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences obtained from strandings (n = 70), incidental fisheries takes (n = 11), biopsy (n = 1), and whale-meat markets (n = 5). Over a 290-base pair fragment, 23 variable sites defined 33 unique haplotypes among the total of 87 samples. Nucleotide diversity at the control region was relatively low (pi = 1.27%+/- 0.723%) compared to wide-ranging baleen whales, but higher than strongly matrifocal sperm, pilot and killer whales. Phylogenetic reconstruction using maximum likelihood revealed four distinct haplotype groups, each of which displayed strong frequency differences among ocean basins, but no reciprocal monophyly or fixed character differences. Consistent with this phylogeographic pattern, an analysis of molecular variance showed high levels of differentiation among ocean basins (F(ST) = 0.14, Phi ST = 0.42; P < 0.001). Estimated rates of female migration among ocean basins were low (generally < or = 2 individuals per generation). Regional sample sizes were too small to detect subdivisions within oceans except in the North Atlantic, where the Mediterranean Sea (n = 12) was highly differentiated due to the presence of two private haplotypes. One market product purchased in South Korea grouped with other haplotypes found only in the North Atlantic, suggesting a violation of current agreements banning international trade in cetacean species. Together, these results demonstrate a high degree of isolation and low maternal gene flow among oceanic, and in some cases, regional populations of Cuvier's beaked whales. This has important implications for understanding the threats of human impact, including fisheries by-catch, direct hunting, and disturbance or mortality from anthropogenic sound. PMID:16156808

  20. Worldwide structure of mtDNA diversity among Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris): implications for threatened populations.

    PubMed

    Dalebout, Merel L; Robertson, Kelly M; Frantzis, Alexandros; Engelhaupt, Dan; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Rosario-Delestre, Raul J; Baker, C Scott

    2005-10-01

    We present the first description of phylogeographic structure among Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) worldwide using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences obtained from strandings (n = 70), incidental fisheries takes (n = 11), biopsy (n = 1), and whale-meat markets (n = 5). Over a 290-base pair fragment, 23 variable sites defined 33 unique haplotypes among the total of 87 samples. Nucleotide diversity at the control region was relatively low (pi = 1.27%+/- 0.723%) compared to wide-ranging baleen whales, but higher than strongly matrifocal sperm, pilot and killer whales. Phylogenetic reconstruction using maximum likelihood revealed four distinct haplotype groups, each of which displayed strong frequency differences among ocean basins, but no reciprocal monophyly or fixed character differences. Consistent with this phylogeographic pattern, an analysis of molecular variance showed high levels of differentiation among ocean basins (F(ST) = 0.14, Phi ST = 0.42; P < 0.001). Estimated rates of female migration among ocean basins were low (generally < or = 2 individuals per generation). Regional sample sizes were too small to detect subdivisions within oceans except in the North Atlantic, where the Mediterranean Sea (n = 12) was highly differentiated due to the presence of two private haplotypes. One market product purchased in South Korea grouped with other haplotypes found only in the North Atlantic, suggesting a violation of current agreements banning international trade in cetacean species. Together, these results demonstrate a high degree of isolation and low maternal gene flow among oceanic, and in some cases, regional populations of Cuvier's beaked whales. This has important implications for understanding the threats of human impact, including fisheries by-catch, direct hunting, and disturbance or mortality from anthropogenic sound.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis between domestic and wild duck species in Korea using mtDNA D-loop sequences.

    PubMed

    Jin, S D; Hoque, Md R; Seo, D W; Paek, W K; Kang, T H; Kim, H K; Lee, J H

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the consumption of duck meat has increased; therefore, we need to reveal the origin and gene flow of domestic ducks in Korea. In order to discriminate between duck species, D-loop variations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been investigated. In this study, 45 individuals from seven species of wild and domestic ducks in Korea were considered for the D-loop region sequences. With the participation of all the sequences, a phylogenetic neighbor-joining tree was constructed to differentiate between the wild and domestic duck species. In consideration of these sequences, a total 66 haplotypes were obtained (indel included) with an average haplotype of 76.9%, and a haplotype and nucleotide diversity of 0.91 and 0.01, respectively. Also, an estimation of the sequence divergence within and between species was measured in 0.045 and 0.013-0.095, respectively. Meanwhile, the lowest distances of 0.024, 0.013 and 0.018 were observed in three species, including the Mallard, Spot-billed and domestic duck, respectively, which have relatively close genetic relationships. All haplotypes were used for the median-joining network analysis to differentiate all duck species, while three duck species were closely related. Moreover, 26 indel polymorphisms were identified which could be used for the discrimination among the duck species. Based on our results, duck species were effectively discriminated in a D-loop region, which could then be used for an appropriate genetic conservation program for the wild duck and domestic duck breeds in Korea.

  2. The mitochondrial nucleoid protein, Mgm101p, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in the maintenance of rho(+) and ori/rep-devoid petite genomes but is not required for hypersuppressive rho(-) mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xiao Ming; Clark-Walker, G Desmond; Chen, Xin Jie

    2002-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MGM101 gene encodes a DNA-binding protein targeted to mitochondrial nucleoids. MGM101 is essential for maintenance of a functional rho(+) genome because meiotic segregants, with a disrupted mgm101 allele, cannot undergo more than 10 divisions on glycerol medium. Quantitative analysis of mtDNA copy number in a rho(+) strain carrying a temperature-sensitive allele, mgm101-1, revealed that the amount of mtDNA is halved each cell division upon a shift to the restrictive temperature. These data suggest that mtDNA replication is rapidly blocked in cells lacking MGM101. However, a small proportion of meiotic segregants, disrupted in MGM101, have rho(-) genomes that are stably maintained. Interestingly, all surviving rho(-) mtDNAs contain an ori/rep sequence. Disruption of MGM101 in hypersuppressive (HS) strains does not have a significant effect on the propagation of HS rho(-) mtDNA. However, in petites lacking an ori/rep, disruption of MGM101 leads to either a complete loss or a dramatically decreased stability of mtDNA. This discriminatory effect of MGM101 suggests that replication of rho(+) and ori/rep-devoid rho(-) mtDNAs is carried out by the same process. By contrast, the persistence of ori/rep-containing mtDNA in HS petites lacking MGM101 identifies a distinct replication pathway. The alternative mtDNA replication mechanism provided by ori/rep is independent of mitochondrial RNA polymerase encoded by RPO41 as a HS rho(-) genome is stably maintained in a mgm101, rpo41 double mutant. PMID:11973295

  3. Reading Mammal Diversity from Flies: The Persistence Period of Amplifiable Mammal mtDNA in Blowfly Guts (Chrysomya megacephala) and a New DNA Mini-Barcode Target.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping-Shin; Sing, Kong-Wah; Wilson, John-James

    2015-01-01

    Most tropical mammal species are threatened or data-deficient. Data collection is impeded by the traditional monitoring approaches which can be laborious, expensive and struggle to detect cryptic diversity. Monitoring approaches using mammal DNA derived from invertebrates are emerging as cost- and time-effective alternatives. As a step towards development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring in the biodiversity hotspot of Peninsular Malaysia, our objectives were (i) to determine the persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts through a laboratory feeding experiment (ii) to design and test primers that can selectively amplify mammal COI DNA mini-barcodes in the presence of high concentrations of blowfly DNA. The persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts was 24 h to 96 h post-feeding indicating the need for collecting flies within 24 h of capture to detect mammal mtDNA of sufficient quantity and quality. We designed a new primer combination for a COI DNA mini-barcode that did not amplify blowfly DNA and showed 89% amplification success for a dataset of mammals from Peninsular Malaysia. The short (205 bp) DNA mini-barcode could distinguish most mammal species (including separating dark taxa) and is of suitable length for high-throughput sequencing. Our new DNA mini-barcode target and a standardized trapping protocol with retrieval of blowflies every 24 h could point the way forward in the development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring.

  4. Convergence of multiple signaling pathways is required to coordinately up-regulate mtDNA and mitochondrial biogenesis during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Anthony D.; Parikh, Neal; Kaech, Susan M.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    The quantity and activity of mitochondria vary dramatically in tissues and are modulated in response to changing cellular energy demands and environmental factors. The amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes required for cellular ATP production, is also tightly regulated, but by largely unknown mechanisms. Using murine T cells as a model system, we have addressed how specific signaling pathways influence mitochondrial biogenesis and mtDNA levels. T cell receptor (TCR) activation results in a large increase in mitochondrial mass and membrane potential and a corresponding increase of mtDNA copy number, indicating the vital role for mitochondrial function for the growth and proliferation of these cells. Independent activation of protein kinase C (via PMA) or calcium-related pathways (via ionomycin) had differential and sub-maximal effects on these mitochondrial parameters, as did activation of naïve T cells with proliferative cytokines. Thus, the robust mitochondrial biogenesis response observed upon TCR activation requires synergy of multiple downstream signaling pathways. One such pathway involves AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which we show has an unprecedented role in negatively regulating mitochondrial biogenesis that is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent. That is, inhibition of AMPK after TCR signaling commences results in excessive, but uncoordinated mitochondrial proliferation. We propose that mitochondrial biogenesis is not under control of a master regulatory circuit, but rather requires the convergence of multiple signaling pathways with distinct downstream consequences on the organelle’s structure, composition, and function. PMID:17890163

  5. Reading Mammal Diversity from Flies: The Persistence Period of Amplifiable Mammal mtDNA in Blowfly Guts (Chrysomya megacephala) and a New DNA Mini-Barcode Target

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ping-Shin; Sing, Kong-Wah; Wilson, John-James

    2015-01-01

    Most tropical mammal species are threatened or data-deficient. Data collection is impeded by the traditional monitoring approaches which can be laborious, expensive and struggle to detect cryptic diversity. Monitoring approaches using mammal DNA derived from invertebrates are emerging as cost- and time-effective alternatives. As a step towards development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring in the biodiversity hotspot of Peninsular Malaysia, our objectives were (i) to determine the persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts through a laboratory feeding experiment (ii) to design and test primers that can selectively amplify mammal COI DNA mini-barcodes in the presence of high concentrations of blowfly DNA. The persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts was 24 h to 96 h post-feeding indicating the need for collecting flies within 24 h of capture to detect mammal mtDNA of sufficient quantity and quality. We designed a new primer combination for a COI DNA mini-barcode that did not amplify blowfly DNA and showed 89% amplification success for a dataset of mammals from Peninsular Malaysia. The short (205 bp) DNA mini-barcode could distinguish most mammal species (including separating dark taxa) and is of suitable length for high-throughput sequencing. Our new DNA mini-barcode target and a standardized trapping protocol with retrieval of blowflies every 24 h could point the way forward in the development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring. PMID:25898278

  6. Increased expression of ApoE and protection from amyloid-beta toxicity in transmitochondrial cybrids with haplogroup K mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Kunal; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R; Coskun, Pinar; Cáceres-Del-Carpio, Javier; Udar, Nitin; Boyer, David S; Jazwinski, S Michal; Miceli, Michael V; Nesburn, Anthony B; Kuppermann, Baruch D; Kenney, M Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups, defined by specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) patterns, represent populations of diverse geographic origins and have been associated with increased risk or protection of many diseases. The H haplogroup is the most common European haplogroup while the K haplogroup is highly associated with the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Transmitochondrial cybrids (cell lines with identical nuclei, but mtDNA from either H (n=8) or K (n=8) subjects) were analyzed by the Seahorse flux analyzer, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cybrids were treated with amyloid-β peptides and cell viabilities were measured. Other cybrids were demethylated with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and expression levels for APOE and NFkB2 were measured. Results show K cybrids have (a) significantly lower mtDNA copy numbers, (b) higher expression levels for MT-DNA encoded genes critical for oxidative phosphorylation, (c) lower Spare Respiratory Capacity, (d) increased expression of inhibitors of the complement pathway and important inflammasome-related genes; and (e) significantly higher levels of APOE transcription that were independent of methylation status. After exposure to amyloid-β1-42 peptides (active form), H haplogroup cybrids demonstrated decreased cell viability compared to those treated with amyloid-β42-1 (inactive form) (p<0.0001), while this was not observed in the K cybrids (p=0.2). K cybrids had significantly higher total global methylation levels and differences in expression levels for two acetylation genes and four methylation genes. Demethylation with 5-aza-dC altered expression levels for NFkB2, while APOE transcription patterns were unchanged. Our findings support the hypothesis that mtDNA-nuclear retrograde signaling may mediate expression levels of APOE, a key factor in many age-related diseases. Future studies will focus on identification of the mitochondrial-nuclear retrograde signaling

  7. Massively parallel sequencing of the entire control region and targeted coding region SNPs of degraded mtDNA using a simplified library preparation method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Oh, Se Yoon; Jung, Sang-Eun; Yang, In Seok; Lee, Yang-Han; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to forensic genetics is being explored by an increasing number of laboratories because of the potential of high-throughput sequencing for recovering genetic information from multiple markers and multiple individuals in a single run. A cumbersome and technically challenging library construction process is required for NGS. In this study, we propose a simplified library preparation method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis that involves two rounds of PCR amplification. In the first-round of multiplex PCR, six fragments covering the entire mtDNA control region and 22 fragments covering interspersed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region that can be used to determine global haplogroups and East Asian haplogroups were amplified using template-specific primers with read sequences. In the following step, indices and platform-specific sequences for the MiSeq(®) system (Illumina) were added by PCR. The barcoded library produced using this simplified workflow was successfully sequenced on the MiSeq system using the MiSeq Reagent Nano Kit v2. A total of 0.4 GB of sequences, 80.6% with base quality of >Q30, were obtained from 12 degraded DNA samples and mapped to the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS). A relatively even read count was obtained for all amplicons, with an average coverage of 5200 × and a less than three-fold read count difference between amplicons per sample. Control region sequences were successfully determined, and all samples were assigned to the relevant haplogroups. In addition, enhanced discrimination was observed by adding coding region SNPs to the control region in in silico analysis. Because the developed multiplex PCR system amplifies small-sized amplicons (<250 bp), NGS analysis using the library preparation method described here allows mtDNA analysis using highly degraded DNA samples. PMID:26844917

  8. Development and validation of a D-loop mtDNA SNP assay for the screening of specimens in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Chemale, Gustavo; Paneto, Greiciane Gaburro; Menezes, Meiga Aurea Mendes; de Freitas, Jorge Marcelo; Jacques, Guilherme Silveira; Cicarelli, Regina Maria Barretto; Fagundes, Paulo Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is usually a last resort in routine forensic DNA casework. However, it has become a powerful tool for the analysis of highly degraded samples or samples containing too little or no nuclear DNA, such as old bones and hair shafts. The gold standard methodology still constitutes the direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or cloned amplicons from the HVS-1 and HVS-2 (hypervariable segment) control region segments. Identifications using mtDNA are time consuming, expensive and can be very complex, depending on the amount and nature of the material being tested. The main goal of this work is to develop a less labour-intensive and less expensive screening method for mtDNA analysis, in order to aid in the exclusion of non-matching samples and as a presumptive test prior to final confirmatory DNA sequencing. We have selected 14 highly discriminatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on simulations performed by Salas and Amigo (2010) to be typed using SNaPShot(TM) (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA). The assay was validated by typing more than 100 HVS-1/HVS-2 sequenced samples. No differences were observed between the SNP typing and DNA sequencing when results were compared, with the exception of allelic dropouts observed in a few haplotypes. Haplotype diversity simulations were performed using 172 mtDNA sequences representative of the Brazilian population and a score of 0.9794 was obtained when the 14 SNPs were used, showing that the theoretical prediction approach for the selection of highly discriminatory SNPs suggested by Salas and Amigo (2010) was confirmed in the population studied. As the main goal of the work is to develop a screening assay to skip the sequencing of all samples in a particular case, a pair-wise comparison of the sequences was done using the selected SNPs. When both HVS-1/HVS-2 SNPs were used for simulations, at least two differences were observed in 93.2% of the comparisons

  9. Development and validation of a D-loop mtDNA SNP assay for the screening of specimens in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Chemale, Gustavo; Paneto, Greiciane Gaburro; Menezes, Meiga Aurea Mendes; de Freitas, Jorge Marcelo; Jacques, Guilherme Silveira; Cicarelli, Regina Maria Barretto; Fagundes, Paulo Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is usually a last resort in routine forensic DNA casework. However, it has become a powerful tool for the analysis of highly degraded samples or samples containing too little or no nuclear DNA, such as old bones and hair shafts. The gold standard methodology still constitutes the direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or cloned amplicons from the HVS-1 and HVS-2 (hypervariable segment) control region segments. Identifications using mtDNA are time consuming, expensive and can be very complex, depending on the amount and nature of the material being tested. The main goal of this work is to develop a less labour-intensive and less expensive screening method for mtDNA analysis, in order to aid in the exclusion of non-matching samples and as a presumptive test prior to final confirmatory DNA sequencing. We have selected 14 highly discriminatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on simulations performed by Salas and Amigo (2010) to be typed using SNaPShot(TM) (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA). The assay was validated by typing more than 100 HVS-1/HVS-2 sequenced samples. No differences were observed between the SNP typing and DNA sequencing when results were compared, with the exception of allelic dropouts observed in a few haplotypes. Haplotype diversity simulations were performed using 172 mtDNA sequences representative of the Brazilian population and a score of 0.9794 was obtained when the 14 SNPs were used, showing that the theoretical prediction approach for the selection of highly discriminatory SNPs suggested by Salas and Amigo (2010) was confirmed in the population studied. As the main goal of the work is to develop a screening assay to skip the sequencing of all samples in a particular case, a pair-wise comparison of the sequences was done using the selected SNPs. When both HVS-1/HVS-2 SNPs were used for simulations, at least two differences were observed in 93.2% of the comparisons

  10. Complete mtDNA of Ciona intestinalis reveals extensive gene rearrangement and the presence of an atp8 and an extra trnM gene in ascidians.

    PubMed

    Gissi, Carmela; Iannelli, Fabio; Pesole, Graziano

    2004-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) of the model organism Ciona intestinalis (Urochordata, Ascidiacea) has been amplified by long-PCR using specific primers designed on putative mitochondrial transcripts identified from publicly available mitochondrial-like expressed sequence tags. The C. intestinalis mtDNA encodes 39 genes: 2 rRNAs, 13 subunits of the respiratory complexes, including ATPase subunit 8 ( atp8), and 24 tRNAs, including 2 tRNA-Met with anticodons 5'-UAU-3'and 5'-CAU-3', respectively. All genes are transcribed from the same strand. This gene content seems to be a common feature of ascidian mtDNAs, as we have verified the presence of a previously undetected atp8 and of two trnM genes in the two other sequenced ascidian mtDNAs. Extensive gene rearrangement has been found in C. intestinalis with respect not only to the common Vertebrata/Cephalochordata/Hemichordata gene organization but also to other ascidian mtDNAs, including the cogeneric Ciona savignyi. Other features such as the absence of long noncoding regions, the shortness of rRNA genes, the low GC content (21.4%), and the absence of asymmetric base distribution between the two strands suggest that this genome is more similar to those of some protostomes than to deuterostomes. PMID:15114417

  11. Occurrence of Deformed wing virus, Chronic bee paralysis virus and mtDNA variants in haplotype K of Varroa destructor mites in Syrian apiaries.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Daher-Hjaij, Nouraldin; Ismaeil, Faiz; Mando, Jamal; Khaled, Bassem Solaiman; Kubaa, Raied Abou

    2016-05-01

    A small-scale survey was conducted on 64 beehives located in four governorates of Syria in order to assess for the first time the presence of honeybee-infecting viruses and of Varroa destructor mites in the country. RT-PCR assays conducted on 192 honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) using virus-specific primers showed that Deformed wing virus (DWV) was present in 49 (25.5%) of the tested samples and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) in 2 (1.04%), whereas Acute bee paralysis virus, Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus were absent. Nucleotide sequences of PCR amplicons obtained from DWV and CBPV genomes shared 95-97 and 100% identity with isolates reported in the GenBank, respectively. The phylogenetic tree grouped the Syrian DWV isolates in one cluster, distinct from all those of different origins reported in the database. Furthermore, 19 adult V. destructor females were genetically analyzed by amplifying and sequencing four fragments in cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), ATP synthase 6 (atp6), cox3 and cytochrome b (cytb) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. Sequences of concatenated V. destructor mtDNA genes (2696 bp) from Syria were similar to the Korean (K) haplotype and were found recurrently in all governorates. In addition, two genetic lineages of haplotype K with slight variations (0.2-0.3%) were present only in Tartous and Al-Qunaitra governorates. PMID:26914360

  12. A new mtDNA mutation in the tRNA[sup Lys] gene associated with myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, G.; Moraes, C.T.; Shanske, S.; DiMauro, S. ); Oh, S.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) has been associated with an A[r arrow]G transition at mtDNA nt 8344, within a conserved region of the tRNA[sup Lys] gene. Although the 8344 mutation is highly prevalent in patients with MERRF, it is not observed in 10%-20% of the cases, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. The authors have sequenced the tRNA[sup Lys] gene of five MERRF patients lacking the common 8344 mutation. One of these showed a novel T[r arrow]C transition at nucleotide position 8356, disrupting a highly conserved base pair in the T[Psi]C stem. The mutant mtDNA population was essentially homoplasmic in muscle but was heteroplasmic in blood (47%). Neither 20 patients with other mitochondrial diseases nor 25 controls carried this mutation. These findings suggest that tRNA[sup Lys] alterations may play a specific role in the pathogenesis of MERRF syndrome. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Investigating the prehistory of Tungusic peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri region with complete mtDNA genome sequences and Y-chromosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Ana T; Whitten, Mark; Wiebe, Victor; Crawford, Michael; Butthof, Anne; Spitsyn, Victor; Makarov, Sergey; Novgorodov, Innokentiy; Osakovsky, Vladimir; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Evenks and Evens, Tungusic-speaking reindeer herders and hunter-gatherers, are spread over a wide area of northern Asia, whereas their linguistic relatives the Udegey, sedentary fishermen and hunter-gatherers, are settled to the south of the lower Amur River. The prehistory and relationships of these Tungusic peoples are as yet poorly investigated, especially with respect to their interactions with neighbouring populations. In this study, we analyse over 500 complete mtDNA genome sequences from nine different Evenk and even subgroups as well as their geographic neighbours from Siberia and their linguistic relatives the Udegey from the Amur-Ussuri region in order to investigate the prehistory of the Tungusic populations. These data are supplemented with analyses of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and STR haplotypes in the Evenks, Evens, and neighbouring Siberian populations. We demonstrate that whereas the North Tungusic Evenks and Evens show evidence of shared ancestry both in the maternal and in the paternal line, this signal has been attenuated by genetic drift and differential gene flow with neighbouring populations, with isolation by distance further shaping the maternal genepool of the Evens. The Udegey, in contrast, appear quite divergent from their linguistic relatives in the maternal line, with a mtDNA haplogroup composition characteristic of populations of the Amur-Ussuri region. Nevertheless, they show affinities with the Evenks, indicating that they might be the result of admixture between local Amur-Ussuri populations and Tungusic populations from the north. PMID:24349531

  14. Investigating the Prehistory of Tungusic Peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri Region with Complete mtDNA Genome Sequences and Y-chromosomal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Ana T.; Whitten, Mark; Wiebe, Victor; Crawford, Michael; Butthof, Anne; Spitsyn, Victor; Makarov, Sergey; Novgorodov, Innokentiy; Osakovsky, Vladimir; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Evenks and Evens, Tungusic-speaking reindeer herders and hunter-gatherers, are spread over a wide area of northern Asia, whereas their linguistic relatives the Udegey, sedentary fishermen and hunter-gatherers, are settled to the south of the lower Amur River. The prehistory and relationships of these Tungusic peoples are as yet poorly investigated, especially with respect to their interactions with neighbouring populations. In this study, we analyse over 500 complete mtDNA genome sequences from nine different Evenk and even subgroups as well as their geographic neighbours from Siberia and their linguistic relatives the Udegey from the Amur-Ussuri region in order to investigate the prehistory of the Tungusic populations. These data are supplemented with analyses of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and STR haplotypes in the Evenks, Evens, and neighbouring Siberian populations. We demonstrate that whereas the North Tungusic Evenks and Evens show evidence of shared ancestry both in the maternal and in the paternal line, this signal has been attenuated by genetic drift and differential gene flow with neighbouring populations, with isolation by distance further shaping the maternal genepool of the Evens. The Udegey, in contrast, appear quite divergent from their linguistic relatives in the maternal line, with a mtDNA haplogroup composition characteristic of populations of the Amur-Ussuri region. Nevertheless, they show affinities with the Evenks, indicating that they might be the result of admixture between local Amur-Ussuri populations and Tungusic populations from the north. PMID:24349531

  15. Simultaneous occurrence of the 11778 (ND4) and the 9438 (COX III) mtDNA mutations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Molecular, biochemical, and clinical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, R.J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Zwart, R.

    1995-10-01

    Three mtDNA point mutations at nucleotide position (np) 3460, at np 11778 and at np 14484, are thought to be of primary importance in the pathogenesis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute central vision loss. These mutations are present in genes coding for subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the respiratory chain, occur exclusively in LHON maternal pedigrees, and have never been reported to occur together. Johns and Neufeld postulated that an mtDNA mutation at np 9438, in the gene coding for one of the subunits (COX III) of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), was also of primary importance. Johns and Neufeld (1993) found this mutation, which changed a conserved glycine to a serine, in 5 unrelated LHON probands who did not carry one of the presently known primary mutations, but they did not find it in 400 controls. However, the role of this sequence variant has been questioned in the Journal when it has been found to occur in apparently healthy African and Cuban individuals. Subsequently, Johns et al. described this mutation in two Cuban individuals presenting with optic and peripheral neuropathy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Genetic diversity in captive and wild Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, based on mtDNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Husband, Thomas P

    2009-05-01

    The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) population is at a critical point for assessing long-term viability. This population, established from 19 genetically uncharacterized D. matschiei, has endured a founder effect because only four individuals contributed the majority of offspring. The highly variable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced for five of the female-founders by examining extant representatives of their maternal lineage and compared with wild (n = 13) and captive (n = 18) D. matschiei from Papua New Guinea (PNG). AZA female-founder D. matschiei control region haplotype diversity was low, compared with captive D. matschiei held in PNG. AZA D. matschiei have only two control region haplotypes because four out of five AZA female-founder D. matschiei had an identical sequence. Both AZA haplotypes were identified among the 17 wild and captive D. matschiei haplotypes from PNG. Genomic DNA extracted from wild D. matschiei fecal samples was a reliable source of mtDNA that could be used for a larger scale study. We recommend a nuclear DNA genetic analysis to more fully characterize AZA D. matschiei genetic diversity and to assist their Species Survival Plan((R)). An improved understanding of D. matschiei genetics will contribute substantially to the conservation of these unique animals both in captivity and the wild.

  17. Complete mtDNA of Ciona intestinalis reveals extensive gene rearrangement and the presence of an atp8 and an extra trnM gene in ascidians.

    PubMed

    Gissi, Carmela; Iannelli, Fabio; Pesole, Graziano

    2004-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) of the model organism Ciona intestinalis (Urochordata, Ascidiacea) has been amplified by long-PCR using specific primers designed on putative mitochondrial transcripts identified from publicly available mitochondrial-like expressed sequence tags. The C. intestinalis mtDNA encodes 39 genes: 2 rRNAs, 13 subunits of the respiratory complexes, including ATPase subunit 8 ( atp8), and 24 tRNAs, including 2 tRNA-Met with anticodons 5'-UAU-3'and 5'-CAU-3', respectively. All genes are transcribed from the same strand. This gene content seems to be a common feature of ascidian mtDNAs, as we have verified the presence of a previously undetected atp8 and of two trnM genes in the two other sequenced ascidian mtDNAs. Extensive gene rearrangement has been found in C. intestinalis with respect not only to the common Vertebrata/Cephalochordata/Hemichordata gene organization but also to other ascidian mtDNAs, including the cogeneric Ciona savignyi. Other features such as the absence of long noncoding regions, the shortness of rRNA genes, the low GC content (21.4%), and the absence of asymmetric base distribution between the two strands suggest that this genome is more similar to those of some protostomes than to deuterostomes.

  18. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of whipworm nematodes inferred from DNA sequences of cox1 mtDNA and 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Nadler, Steven; De Rojas, Manuel; Zurita, Antonio; Petrášová, Jana; Cutillas, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for the genus Trichuris based on sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) and ribosomal 18S genes. The taxa consisted of different described species and several host-associated isolates (undescribed taxa) of Trichuris collected from hosts from Spain. Sequence data from mitochondrial cox1 (partial gene) and nuclear 18S near-complete gene were analyzed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods, as separate and combined datasets, to evaluate phylogenetic relationships among taxa. Phylogenetic results based on 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were robust for relationships among species; cox1 sequences delimited species and revealed phylogeographic variation, but most relationships among Trichuris species were poorly resolved by mitochondrial sequences. The phylogenetic hypotheses for both genes strongly supported monophyly of Trichuris, and distinct genetic lineages corresponding to described species or nematodes associated with certain hosts were recognized based on cox1 sequences. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on concatenated sequences of the two loci, cox1 (mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)) and 18S rDNA, were congruent with the overall topology inferred from 18S and previously published results based on internal transcribed spacer sequences. Our results demonstrate that the 18S rDNA and cox1 mtDNA genes provide resolution at different levels, but together resolve relationships among geographic populations and species in the genus Trichuris.

  19. Occurrence of Deformed wing virus, Chronic bee paralysis virus and mtDNA variants in haplotype K of Varroa destructor mites in Syrian apiaries.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Daher-Hjaij, Nouraldin; Ismaeil, Faiz; Mando, Jamal; Khaled, Bassem Solaiman; Kubaa, Raied Abou

    2016-05-01

    A small-scale survey was conducted on 64 beehives located in four governorates of Syria in order to assess for the first time the presence of honeybee-infecting viruses and of Varroa destructor mites in the country. RT-PCR assays conducted on 192 honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) using virus-specific primers showed that Deformed wing virus (DWV) was present in 49 (25.5%) of the tested samples and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) in 2 (1.04%), whereas Acute bee paralysis virus, Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus were absent. Nucleotide sequences of PCR amplicons obtained from DWV and CBPV genomes shared 95-97 and 100% identity with isolates reported in the GenBank, respectively. The phylogenetic tree grouped the Syrian DWV isolates in one cluster, distinct from all those of different origins reported in the database. Furthermore, 19 adult V. destructor females were genetically analyzed by amplifying and sequencing four fragments in cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), ATP synthase 6 (atp6), cox3 and cytochrome b (cytb) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. Sequences of concatenated V. destructor mtDNA genes (2696 bp) from Syria were similar to the Korean (K) haplotype and were found recurrently in all governorates. In addition, two genetic lineages of haplotype K with slight variations (0.2-0.3%) were present only in Tartous and Al-Qunaitra governorates.

  20. An mtDNA mutation in the initiation codon of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit II gene results in lower levels of the protein and a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, K M; Taylor, R W; Johnson, M A; Chinnery, P F; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Z M; Andrews, R M; Nelson, I P; Wood, N W; Lamont, P J; Hanna, M G; Lightowlers, R N; Turnbull, D M

    1999-01-01

    A novel heteroplasmic 7587T-->C mutation in the mitochondrial genome which changes the initiation codon of the gene encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX II), was found in a family with mitochondrial disease. This T-->C transition is predicted to change the initiating methionine to threonine. The mutation load was present at 67% in muscle from the index case and at 91% in muscle from the patient's clinically affected son. Muscle biopsy samples revealed isolated COX deficiency and mitochondrial proliferation. Single-muscle-fiber analysis revealed that the 7587C copy was at much higher load in COX-negative fibers than in COX-positive fibers. After microphotometric enzyme analysis, the mutation was shown to cause a decrease in COX activity when the mutant load was >55%-65%. In fibroblasts from one family member, which contained >95% mutated mtDNA, there was no detectable synthesis or any steady-state level of COX II. This new mutation constitutes a new mechanism by which mtDNA mutations can cause disease-defective initiation of translation. PMID:10205264

  1. Severe manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to 11778G>A mtDNA mutation in a female with hypoestrogenism due to Perrault syndrome.

    PubMed

    Badura-Stronka, Magdalena; Wawrocka, Anna; Zawieja, Krzysztof; Silska, Sylwia; Krawczyński, Maciej Robert

    2013-11-01

    Perrault syndrome (PS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition with ovarian dysgenesis, hearing deficit and neurological abnormalities in female patients. The molecular basis of the syndrome is heterogeneous, mutations in the HSD17B4 gene have been identified in one family and mutations in the HARS2 gene have been found in another one. We have excluded pathogenic changes in the HSD17B4 gene and in the HARS2 gene by a direct sequencing of all coding exons in a female with clinical hallmarks of PS, ataxia and mild mental retardation. In addition, the patient suffers from severe Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) due to 11778G>A mtDNA mutation. This case is the first reported patient with PS and LHON. Possible influence of hypoestrogenism on the manifestation of optic neuropathy in this patient is discussed in the context of recent findings concerning the crucial role of estrogens in supporting the vision capacity in LHON-related mtDNA mutation carriers.

  2. Early population differentiation in extinct aborigines from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia: ancient mtDNA sequences and Y-chromosome STR characterization.

    PubMed

    García-Bour, Jaume; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Alvarez, Sara; Fernández, Eva; López-Parra, Ana María; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Turbón, Daniel

    2004-04-01

    Ancient mtDNA was successfully recovered from 24 skeletal samples of a total of 60 ancient individuals from Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego, dated to 100-400 years BP, for which consistent amplifications and two-strand sequences were obtained. Y-chromosome STRs (DYS434, DYS437, DYS439, DYS393, DYS391, DYS390, DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, and DYS388) and the biallelic system DYS199 were also amplified, Y-STR alleles could be characterized in nine cases, with an average of 4.1 loci per sample correctly typed. In two samples of the same ethnic group (Aonikenk), an identical and complete eight-loci haplotype was recovered. The DYS199 biallelic system was used as a control of contamination by modern DNA and, along with DYS19, as a marker of American origin. The analysis of both mtDNA and Y-STRs revealed DNA from Amerindian ancestry. The observed polymorphisms are consistent with the hypothesis that the ancient Fuegians are close to populations from south-central Chile and Argentina, but their high nucleotide diversity and the frequency of single lineages strongly support early genetic differentiation of the Fuegians through combined processes of population bottleneck, isolation, and/or migration, followed by strong genetic drift. This suggests an early genetic diversification of the Fuegians right after their arrival at the southernmost extreme of South America.

  3. Less Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow for More Signatures of Glacial Lineages: Congruent Evidence from Balsam Fir cpDNA and mtDNA for Multiple Refugia in Eastern and Central North America

    PubMed Central

    Cinget, Benjamin; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeographic structure and postglacial history of balsam fir (Abies balsamea), a transcontinental North American boreal conifer, was inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers. Genetic structure among 107 populations (mtDNA data) and 75 populations (cpDNA data) was analyzed using Bayesian and genetic distance approaches. Population differentiation was high for mtDNA (dispersed by seeds only), but also for cpDNA (dispersed by seeds and pollen), indicating that pollen gene flow is more restricted in balsam fir than in other boreal conifers. Low cpDNA gene flow in balsam fir may relate to low pollen production due to the inherent biology of the species and populations being decimated by recurrent spruce budworm epidemics, and/or to low dispersal of pollen grains due to their peculiar structural properties. Accordingly, a phylogeographic structure was detected using both mtDNA and cpDNA markers and population structure analyses supported the existence of at least five genetically distinct glacial lineages in central and eastern North America. Four of these would originate from glacial refugia located south of the Laurentide ice sheet, while the last one would have persisted in the northern Labrador region. As expected due to reduced pollen-mediated gene flow, congruence between the geographic distribution of mtDNA and cpDNA lineages was higher than in other North American conifers. However, concordance was not complete, reflecting that restricted but nonetheless detectable cpDNA gene flow among glacial lineages occurred during the Holocene. As a result, new cpDNA and mtDNA genome combinations indicative of cytoplasmic genome capture were observed. PMID:25849816

  4. MitBASE : a comprehensive and integrated mitochondrial DNA database. The present status

    PubMed Central

    Attimonelli, M.; Altamura, N.; Benne, R.; Brennicke, A.; Cooper, J. M.; D’Elia, D.; Montalvo, A. de; Pinto, B. de; De Robertis, M.; Golik, P.; Knoop, V.; Lanave, C.; Lazowska, J.; Licciulli, F.; Malladi, B. S.; Memeo, F.; Monnerot, M.; Pasimeni, R.; Pilbout, S.; Schapira, A. H. V.; Sloof, P.; Saccone, C.

    2000-01-01

    MitBASE is an integrated and comprehensive database of mitochondrial DNA data which collects, under a single interface, databases for Plant, Vertebrate, Invertebrate, Human, Protist and Fungal mtDNA and a Pilot database on nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MitBASE reports all available information from different organisms and from intraspecies variants and mutants. Data have been drawn from the primary databases and from the literature; value adding information has been structured, e.g., editing information on protist mtDNA genomes, pathological information for human mtDNA variants, etc. The different databases, some of which are structured using commercial packages (Microsoft Access, File Maker Pro) while others use a flat-file format, have been integrated under ORACLE. Ad hoc retrieval systems have been devised for some of the above listed databases keeping into account their peculiarities. The database is resident at the EBI and is available at the following site: http://www3.ebi.ac.uk/Research/Mitbase/mitbase.pl . The impact of this project is intended for both basic and applied research. The study of mitochondrial genetic diseases and mitochondrial DNA intraspecies diversity are key topics in several biotechnological fields. The database has been funded within the EU Biotechnology programme. PMID:10592207

  5. [Polymorphism of the mtDNA control region in wild reindeer Rangifer tarandus (Mammalia: Artiodactyla) from the European part of Russia].

    PubMed

    Baranova, A I; Kholodova, M V; Davydov, A V; Rozhkov, Iu I

    2012-09-01

    Genetic diversity ofwild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) inhabiting the European part of Russia, including Komi Republic, Arkhangelsk oblast, Murmansk oblast, and the Republic of Karelia was characterized using sequence polymorphism of the mtDNA control region. Despite of currently low population number of wild reindeer, they were characterized by a high level of genetic diversity (pi = 0.018; H= 0.872 to 0.914). Phylogenetic analysis showed close relationships between European reindeer and wild reindeer of Siberia. In reindeer from Murmansk oblast a haplotype in common with the wild reindeer form Southwestern Norway was described. The reindeer sample examined contained no haplotypes earlier described for the reindeer of Central Norway. It is suggested that in recent past wild reindeer from the European north of Russia formed one population with the reindeer from the north of the Asian part of Eurasia.

  6. Comparability of multiple data types from the Bering Strait region: cranial and dental metrics and nonmetrics, mtDNA, and Y-chromosome DNA.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Brianne; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Godde, Kanya

    2014-07-01

    Different data types have previously been shown to have the same microevolutionary patterns in worldwide data sets. However, peopling of the New World studies have shown a difference in migration paths and timings using multiple types of data, spurring research to understand why this is the case. This study was designed to test the degree of similarity in evolutionary patterns by using cranial and dental metric and nonmetric data, along with Y-chromosome DNA and mtDNA. The populations used included Inuits from Alaska, Canada, Siberia, Greenland, and the Aleutian Islands. For comparability, the populations used for the cranial and molecular data were from similar geographic regions or had a shared population history. Distance, R and kinship matrices were generated for use in running Mantel tests, PROTEST analyses, and Procrustes analyses. A clear patterning was seen, with the craniometric data being most highly correlated to the mtDNA data and the cranial nonmetric data being most highly correlated with the Y-chromosome data, while the phenotypic data were also linked. This patterning is suggestive of a possible male or female inheritance, or the correlated data types are affected by the same or similar evolutionary forces. The results of this study indicate cranial traits have some degree of heritability. Moreover, combining data types leads to a richer knowledge of biological affinity. This understanding is important for bioarchaeological contexts, in particular, peopling of the New World studies where focusing on reconciling the results from comparing multiple data types is necessary to move forward. PMID:24643445

  7. MtDNA Haplogroup A10 Lineages in Bronze Age Samples Suggest That Ancient Autochthonous Human Groups Contributed to the Specificity of the Indigenous West Siberian Population

    PubMed Central

    Pilipenko, Aleksandr S.; Trapezov, Rostislav O.; Zhuravlev, Anton A.; Molodin, Vyacheslav I.; Romaschenko, Aida G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The craniometric specificity of the indigenous West Siberian human populations cannot be completely explained by the genetic interactions of the western and eastern Eurasian groups recorded in the archaeology of the area from the beginning of the 2nd millennium BC. Anthropologists have proposed another probable explanation: contribution to the genetic structure of West Siberian indigenous populations by ancient human groups, which separated from western and eastern Eurasian populations before the final formation of their phenotypic and genetic features and evolved independently in the region over a long period of time. This hypothesis remains untested. From the genetic point of view, it could be confirmed by the presence in the gene pool of indigenous populations of autochthonous components that evolved in the region over long time periods. The detection of such components, particularly in the mtDNA gene pool, is crucial for further clarification of early regional genetic history. Results and Conclusion We present the results of analysis of mtDNA samples (n = 10) belonging to the A10 haplogroup, from Bronze Age populations of West Siberian forest-steppe (V—I millennium BC), that were identified in a screening study of a large diachronic sample (n = 96). A10 lineages, which are very rare in modern Eurasian populations, were found in all the Bronze Age groups under study. Data on the A10 lineages’ phylogeny and phylogeography in ancient West Siberian and modern Eurasian populations suggest that A10 haplogroup underwent a long-term evolution in West Siberia or arose there autochthonously; thus, the presence of A10 lineages indicates the possible contribution of early autochthonous human groups to the genetic specificity of modern populations, in addition to contributions of later interactions of western and eastern Eurasian populations. PMID:25950581

  8. mtDNA diversity in Chukchi and Siberian Eskimos: implications for the genetic history of Ancient Beringia and the peopling of the New World.

    PubMed Central

    Starikovskaya, Y B; Sukernik, R I; Schurr, T G; Kogelnik, A M; Wallace, D C

    1998-01-01

    The mtDNAs of 145 individuals representing the aboriginal populations of Chukotka-the Chukchi and Siberian Eskimos-were subjected to RFLP analysis and control-region sequencing. This analysis showed that the core of the genetic makeup of the Chukchi and Siberian Eskimos consisted of three (A, C, and D) of the four primary mtDNA haplotype groups (haplogroups) (A-D) observed in Native Americans, with haplogroup A being the most prevalent in both Chukotkan populations. Two unique haplotypes belonging to haplogroup G (formerly called "other" mtDNAs) were also observed in a few Chukchi, and these have apparently been acquired through gene flow from adjacent Kamchatka, where haplogroup G is prevalent in the Koryak and Itel'men. In addition, a 16111C-->T transition appears to delineate an "American" enclave of haplogroup A mtDNAs in northeastern Siberia, whereas the 16192C-->T transition demarcates a "northern Pacific Rim" cluster within this haplogroup. Furthermore, the sequence-divergence estimates for haplogroups A, C, and D of Siberian and Native American populations indicate that the earliest inhabitants of Beringia possessed a limited number of founding mtDNA haplotypes and that the first humans expanded into the New World approximately 34,000 years before present (YBP). Subsequent migration 16,000-13,000 YBP apparently brought a restricted number of haplogroup B haplotypes to the Americas. For millennia, Beringia may have been the repository of the respective founding sequences that selectively penetrated into northern North America from western Alaska. PMID:9792876

  9. Female gene pools of Berber and Arab neighboring communities in central Tunisia: microstructure of mtDNA variation in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Cherni, Lotfi; Loueslati, Besma Yaacoubi; Pereira, Luísa; Ennafaâ, Hajer; Amorim, António; El Gaaied, Amel Ben Ammar

    2005-02-01

    North African populations are considered genetically closer to Eurasians than to sub-Saharans. However, they display a considerably high mtDNA heterogeneity among them, namely in the frequencies of the U6, East African, and sub-Saharan haplogroups. In this study, we describe and compare the female gene pools of two neighboring Tunisian populations, Kesra (Berber) and Zriba (non-Berber), which have contrasting historical backgrounds. Both populations presented lower diversity values than those observed for other North African populations, and they were the only populations not showing significant negative Fu's F(S) values. Kesra displayed a much higher proportion of typical sub-Saharan haplotypes (49%, including 4.2% of M1 haplogroup) than Zriba (8%). With respect to U6 sequences, frequencies were low (2% in Kesra and 8% in Zriba), and all belonged to the subhaplogroup U6a. An analysis of these data in the context of North Africa reveals that the emerging picture is complex, because Zriba would match the profile of a Berber Moroccan population, whereas Kesra, which shows twice the frequency of sub-Saharan lineages normally observed in northern coastal populations, would match a western Saharan population except for the low U6 frequency. The North African patchy mtDNA landscape has no parallel in other regions of the world and increasing the number of sampled populations has not been accompanied by any substantial increase in our understanding of its phylogeography. Available data up to now rely on sampling small, scattered populations, although they are carefully characterized in terms of their ethnic, linguistic, and historical backgrounds. It is therefore doubtful that this picture truly represents the complex historical demography of the region rather than being just the result of the type of samplings performed so far.

  10. Evolution of opercle bone shape along a macrohabitat gradient: species identification using mtDNA and geometric morphometric analyses in neotropical sea catfishes (Ariidae).

    PubMed

    Stange, Madlen; Aguirre-Fernández, Gabriel; Cooke, Richard G; Barros, Tito; Salzburger, Walter; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2016-08-01

    Transitions between the marine and freshwater macrohabitat have occurred repeatedly in the evolution of teleost fishes. For example, ariid catfishes have moved from freshwater to marine environments, and vice versa. Opercles, a skeletal feature that has been shown to change during such transitions, were subjected to 2D geometric morphometric analyses in order to investigate evolutionary shape changes during habitat transition in ariid catfishes and to test the influence of habitat on shape changes. A mtDNA marker, which proved useful in previous studies, was used to verify species identities. It greatly improved the assignment of specimens to a species, which are difficult to assign by morphology alone. The application of a mtDNA marker confirmed the occurrence of Notarius biffi in Central America, South of El Salvador. Molecular identification together with principal component analysis (PCA) and further morphological inspection of neurocrania indicated the existence of a cryptic species within Bagre pinnimaculatus. Principal component (PC) scores of individual specimens clustered in morphospace by genus rather than by habitat. Strong phylogenetic structure was detected using a permutation test of PC scores of species means on a phylogenetic tree. Calculation of Pagel's λ suggested that opercle shape evolved according to a Brownian model of evolution. Yet canonical variate analysis (CVA) conducted on the habitat groups showed significant differences in opercle shapes among freshwater and marine species. Overall, opercle shape in tropical American Ariidae appears to be phylogenetically constrained. This verifies the application of opercle shape as a taxonomic tool for species identification in fossil ariid catfishes. At the same time, adaptation to freshwater habitats shows characteristic opercle shape trajectories in ariid catfishes, which might be used to detect habitat preferences in fossils. PMID:27547357

  11. The Molecular Dissection of mtDNA Haplogroup H Confirms That the Franco-Cantabrian Glacial Refuge Was a Major Source for the European Gene Pool

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Magri, Chiara; Battaglia, Vincenza; Olivieri, Anna; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio; Zeviani, Massimo; Briem, Egill; Carelli, Valerio; Moral, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Roostalu, Urmas; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Kivisild, Toomas; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Richards, Martin; Villems, Richard; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Complete sequencing of 62 mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) belonging (or very closely related) to haplogroup H revealed that this mtDNA haplogroup—by far the most common in Europe—is subdivided into numerous subhaplogroups, with at least 15 of them (H1–H15) identifiable by characteristic mutations. All the haplogroup H mtDNAs found in 5,743 subjects from 43 populations were then screened for diagnostic markers of subhaplogroups H1 and H3. This survey showed that both subhaplogroups display frequency peaks, centered in Iberia and surrounding areas, with distributions declining toward the northeast and southeast—a pattern extremely similar to that previously reported for mtDNA haplogroup V. Furthermore, the coalescence ages of H1 and H3 (∼11,000 years) are close to that previously reported for V. These findings have major implications for the origin of Europeans, since they attest that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area was indeed the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe from ∼15,000 years ago. This has also some implications for disease studies. For instance, the high occurrence of H1 and H3 in Iberia led us to re-evaluate the haplogroup distribution in 50 Spanish families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation. The survey revealed that the previously reported excess of H among these families is caused entirely by H3 and is due to a major, probably nonrecent, founder event. PMID:15382008

  12. An mtDNA analysis in ancient Basque populations: implications for haplogroup V as a marker for a major paleolithic expansion from southwestern europe.

    PubMed Central

    Izagirre, N; de la Rúa, C

    1999-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was studied in 121 dental samples from four Basque prehistoric sites, by high-resolution RFLP analysis. The results of this study are corroborated by (1) parallel analysis of 92 bone samples, (2) the use of controls during extraction and amplification, and (3) typing by both positive and negative restriction of the linked sites that characterize each haplogroup. The absence of haplogroup V in the prehistoric samples analyzed conflicts with the hypothesis proposed by Torroni et al., in which haplogroup V is considered as an mtDNA marker for a major Paleolithic population expansion from southwestern Europe, occurring approximately 10,000-15,000 years before the present (YBP). Our samples from the Basque Country provide a valuable tool for checking the previous hypothesis, which is based on genetic data from present-day populations. In light of the available data, the most realistic scenario to explain the origin and distribution of haplogroup V suggests that the mutation defining that haplogroup (4577 NlaIII) appeared at a time when the effective population size was small enough to allow genetic drift to act-and that such drift is responsible for the heterogeneity observed in Basques, with regard to the frequency of haplogroup V (0%-20%). This is compatible with the attributed date for the origin of that mutation (10,000-15, 000 YBP), because during the postglacial period (the Mesolithic, approximately 11,000 YBP) there was a major demographic change in the Basque Country, which minimized the effect of genetic drift. This interpretation does not rely on migratory movements to explain the distribution of haplogroup V in present-day Indo-European populations. PMID:10364533

  13. The expanded mtDNA phylogeny of the Franco-Cantabrian region upholds the pre-neolithic genetic substrate of Basques.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sergio; Valverde, Laura; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Algorta, Jaime; Catarino, Susana; Arteta, David; Herrera, Rene J; Zarrabeitia, María Teresa; Peña, José A; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2013-01-01

    The European genetic landscape has been shaped by several human migrations occurred since Paleolithic times. The accumulation of archaeological records and the concordance of different lines of genetic evidence during the last two decades have triggered an interesting debate concerning the role of ancient settlers from the Franco-Cantabrian region in the postglacial resettlement of Europe. Among the Franco-Cantabrian populations, Basques are regarded as one of the oldest and more intriguing human groups of Europe. Recent data on complete mitochondrial DNA genomes focused on macrohaplogroup R0 revealed that Basques harbor some autochthonous lineages, suggesting a genetic continuity since pre-Neolithic times. However, excluding haplogroup H, the most representative lineage of macrohaplogroup R0, the majority of maternal lineages of this area remains virtually unexplored, so that further refinement of the mtDNA phylogeny based on analyses at the highest level of resolution is crucial for a better understanding of the European prehistory. We thus explored the maternal ancestry of 548 autochthonous individuals from various Franco-Cantabrian populations and sequenced 76 mitogenomes of the most representative lineages. Interestingly, we identified three mtDNA haplogroups, U5b1f, J1c5c1 and V22, that proved to be representative of Franco-Cantabria, notably of the Basque population. The seclusion and diversity of these female genetic lineages support a local origin in the Franco-Cantabrian area during the Mesolithic of southwestern Europe, ~10,000 years before present (YBP), with signals of expansions at ~3,500 YBP. These findings provide robust evidence of a partial genetic continuity between contemporary autochthonous populations from the Franco-Cantabrian region, specifically the Basques, and Paleolithic/Mesolithic hunter-gatherer groups. Furthermore, our results raise the current proportion (≈ 15%) of the Franco-Cantabrian maternal gene pool with a putative pre

  14. Infantile mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome associated with methylmalonic aciduria and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiencies in two unrelated patients: a new phenotype of mtDNA depletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Li, L; Le, T P; Moseley, K; Guedalia, A; Lee, J; Gonzalez, I; Boles, R G

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion refers to a quantitative defect in mtDNA and is heterogeneous with regard to causal genotypes and the associated clinical phenotypes. We report two unrelated infants with mtDNA depletion. A diagnosis of methylmalonic aciduria was initially raised in both on the basis of high urine methylmalonic acid and related organic acids and elevated propionylcarnitine and methylmalonylcarnitine. Carboxylase assay with skin fibroblasts revealed low propionyl-CoA and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and normal pyruvate carboxylase activities. Quantitative Southern blot analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA with muscle tissues revealed the patients' mtDNA to be depleted to 24% and 39% of normal controls. Our two patients showed multiple mitochondrial dysfunction including respiratory chain defects and deficiencies in the two nuclear DNA encoded carboxylases resulting in abnormal urine organic acids. To our knowledge, there is no obvious connection between the defective pathways other than their mitochondrial locations. These two cases may represent a new entity of mitochondrial disease that might be due to a defective common mechanism, such as assembly, maintenance and transport, affecting various mitochondrial enzymes and functions. Mitochondrial depletion should be considered in infants with atypical organic aciduria that may resemblemethylmalonicaciduria, propionicacidaemia, or 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency.

  15. Integration of cellular bioenergetics with mitochondrial quality control and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Ballinger, Scott; Dell’Italia, Lou; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergetic dysfunction is emerging as a cornerstone for establishing a framework for understanding the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and neurodegeneration. Recent advances in cellular bioenergetics have shown that many cells maintain a substantial bioenergetic reserve capacity, which is a prospective index of “healthy” mitochondrial populations. The bioenergetics of the cell are likely regulated by energy requirements and substrate availability. Additionally, the overall quality of the mitochondrial population and the relative abundance of mitochondria in cells and tissues also impinge on overall bioenergetic capacity and resistance to stress. Because mitochondria are susceptible to damage mediated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen and lipid species, maintaining a “healthy” population of mitochondria through quality control mechanisms appears to be essential for cell survival under conditions of pathological stress. Accumulating evidence suggest that mitophagy is particularly important for preventing amplification of initial oxidative insults, which otherwise would further impair the respiratory chain or promote mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The processes underlying the regulation of mitophagy depend on several factors including the integrity of mtDNA, electron transport chain activity, and the interaction and regulation of the autophagic machinery. The integration and interpretation of cellular bioenergetics in the context of mitochondrial quality control and genetics is the theme of this review. PMID:23092819

  16. Control of mitochondrial integrity in ageing and disease

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Radek; Nooteboom, Marco; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2014-01-01

    Various molecular and cellular pathways are active in eukaryotes to control the quality and integrity of mitochondria. These pathways are involved in keeping a ‘healthy’ population of this essential organelle during the lifetime of the organism. Quality control (QC) systems counteract processes that lead to organellar dysfunction manifesting as degenerative diseases and ageing. We discuss disease- and ageing-related pathways involved in mitochondrial QC: mtDNA repair and reorganization, regeneration of oxidized amino acids, refolding and degradation of severely damaged proteins, degradation of whole mitochondria by mitophagy and finally programmed cell death. The control of the integrity of mtDNA and regulation of its expression is essential to remodel single proteins as well as mitochondrial complexes that determine mitochondrial functions. The redundancy of components, such as proteases, and the hierarchies of the QC raise questions about crosstalk between systems and their precise regulation. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms on the genomic, proteomic, organellar and cellular levels holds the key for the development of interventions for mitochondrial dysfunctions, degenerative processes, ageing and age-related diseases resulting from impairments of mitochondria. PMID:24864310

  17. Integrated Means Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odegard, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the operation of the Cessna Pilot Center (CPC) flight training systems. The program is based on a series of integrated activities involving stimulus, response, reinforcement and association components. Results show that the program can significantly reduce in-flight training time. (CP)

  18. Integrating Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    These articles focus on art as a component of interdisciplinary integration. (1) "Integrated Curriculum and the Visual Arts" (Anna Kindler) considers various aspects of integration and implications for art education. (2) "Integration: The New Literacy" (Tim Varro) illustrates how the use of technology can facilitate cross-curricular integration.…

  19. Mitochondrial phylogenomics of the Bivalvia (Mollusca): searching for the origin and mitogenomic correlates of doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is an atypical system of animal mtDNA inheritance found only in some bivalves. Under DUI, maternally (F genome) and paternally (M genome) transmitted mtDNAs yield two distinct gender-associated mtDNA lineages. The oldest distinct M and F genomes are found in freshwater mussels (order Unionoida). Comparative analyses of unionoid mitochondrial genomes and a robust phylogenetic framework are necessary to elucidate the origin, function and molecular evolutionary consequences of DUI. Herein, F and M genomes from three unionoid species, Venustaconcha ellipsiformis, Pyganodon grandis and Quadrula quadrula have been sequenced. Comparative genomic analyses were carried out on these six genomes along with two F and one M unionoid genomes from GenBank (F and M genomes of Inversidens japanensis and F genome of Lampsilis ornata). Results Compared to their unionoid F counterparts, the M genomes contain some unique features including a novel localization of the trnH gene, an inversion of the atp8-trnD genes and a unique 3'coding extension of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene. One or more of these unique M genome features could be causally associated with paternal transmission. Unionoid bivalves are characterized by extreme intraspecific sequence divergences between gender-associated mtDNAs with an average of 50% for V. ellipsiformis, 50% for I. japanensis, 51% for P. grandis and 52% for Q. quadrula (uncorrected amino acid p-distances). Phylogenetic analyses of 12 protein-coding genes from 29 bivalve and five outgroup mt genomes robustly indicate bivalve monophyly and the following branching order within the autolamellibranch bivalves: ((Pteriomorphia, Veneroida) Unionoida). Conclusion The basal nature of the Unionoida within the autolamellibranch bivalves and the previously hypothesized single origin of DUI suggest that (1) DUI arose in the ancestral autolamellibranch bivalve lineage and was subsequently lost in multiple

  20. In search of the genetic footprints of Sumerians: a survey of Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation in the Marsh Arabs of Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background For millennia, the southern part of the Mesopotamia has been a wetland region generated by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers before flowing into the Gulf. This area has been occupied by human communities since ancient times and the present-day inhabitants, the Marsh Arabs, are considered the population with the strongest link to ancient Sumerians. Popular tradition, however, considers the Marsh Arabs as a foreign group, of unknown origin, which arrived in the marshlands when the rearing of water buffalo was introduced to the region. Results To shed some light on the paternal and maternal origin of this population, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation was surveyed in 143 Marsh Arabs and in a large sample of Iraqi controls. Analyses of the haplogroups and sub-haplogroups observed in the Marsh Arabs revealed a prevalent autochthonous Middle Eastern component for both male and female gene pools, with weak South-West Asian and African contributions, more evident in mtDNA. A higher male than female homogeneity is characteristic of the Marsh Arab gene pool, likely due to a strong male genetic drift determined by socio-cultural factors (patrilocality, polygamy, unequal male and female migration rates). Conclusions Evidence of genetic stratification ascribable to the Sumerian development was provided by the Y-chromosome data where the J1-Page08 branch reveals a local expansion, almost contemporary with the Sumerian City State period that characterized Southern Mesopotamia. On the other hand, a more ancient background shared with Northern Mesopotamia is revealed by the less represented Y-chromosome lineage J1-M267*. Overall our results indicate that the introduction of water buffalo breeding and rice farming, most likely from the Indian sub-continent, only marginally affected the gene pool of autochthonous people of the region. Furthermore, a prevalent Middle Eastern ancestry of the modern population of the marshes of southern Iraq implies that if

  1. The Expanded mtDNA Phylogeny of the Franco-Cantabrian Region Upholds the Pre-Neolithic Genetic Substrate of Basques

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Sergio; Valverde, Laura; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A.; Palencia-Madrid, Leire; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Algorta, Jaime; Catarino, Susana; Arteta, David; Herrera, Rene J.; Zarrabeitia, María Teresa; Peña, José A.; de Pancorbo, Marian M.

    2013-01-01

    The European genetic landscape has been shaped by several human migrations occurred since Paleolithic times. The accumulation of archaeological records and the concordance of different lines of genetic evidence during the last two decades have triggered an interesting debate concerning the role of ancient settlers from the Franco-Cantabrian region in the postglacial resettlement of Europe. Among the Franco-Cantabrian populations, Basques are regarded as one of the oldest and more intriguing human groups of Europe. Recent data on complete mitochondrial DNA genomes focused on macrohaplogroup R0 revealed that Basques harbor some autochthonous lineages, suggesting a genetic continuity since pre-Neolithic times. However, excluding haplogroup H, the most representative lineage of macrohaplogroup R0, the majority of maternal lineages of this area remains virtually unexplored, so that further refinement of the mtDNA phylogeny based on analyses at the highest level of resolution is crucial for a better understanding of the European prehistory. We thus explored the maternal ancestry of 548 autochthonous individuals from various Franco-Cantabrian populations and sequenced 76 mitogenomes of the most representative lineages. Interestingly, we identified three mtDNA haplogroups, U5b1f, J1c5c1 and V22, that proved to be representative of Franco-Cantabria, notably of the Basque population. The seclusion and diversity of these female genetic lineages support a local origin in the Franco-Cantabrian area during the Mesolithic of southwestern Europe, ∼10,000 years before present (YBP), with signals of expansions at ∼3,500 YBP. These findings provide robust evidence of a partial genetic continuity between contemporary autochthonous populations from the Franco-Cantabrian region, specifically the Basques, and Paleolithic/Mesolithic hunter-gatherer groups. Furthermore, our results raise the current proportion (≈15%) of the Franco-Cantabrian maternal gene pool with a putative pre

  2. Evolutionary analysis of a large mtDNA translocation (numt) into the nuclear genome of the Panthera genus species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Heup; Antunes, Agostinho; Luo, Shu-Jin; Menninger, Joan; Nash, William G; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E

    2006-02-01

    Translocation of cymtDNA into the nuclear genome, also referred to as numt, has been reported in many species, including several closely related to the domestic cat (Felis catus). We describe the recent transposition of 12,536 bp of the 17 kb mitochondrial genome into the nucleus of the common ancestor of the five Panthera genus species: tiger, P. tigris; snow leopard, P. uncia; jaguar, P. onca; leopard, P. pardus; and lion, P. leo. This nuclear integration, representing 74% of the mitochondrial genome, is one of the largest to be reported in eukaryotes. The Panthera genus numt differs from the numt previously described in the Felis genus in: (1) chromosomal location (F2-telomeric region vs. D2-centromeric region), (2) gene make up (from the ND5 to the ATP8 vs. from the CR to the COII), (3) size (12.5 vs. 7.9 kb), and (4) structure (single monomer vs. tandemly repeated in Felis). These distinctions indicate that the origin of this large numt fragment in the nuclear genome of the Panthera species is an independent insertion from that of the domestic cat lineage, which has been further supported by phylogenetic analyses. The tiger cymtDNA shared around 90% sequence identity with the homologous numt sequence, suggesting an origin for the Panthera numt at around 3.5 million years ago, prior to the radiation of the five extant Panthera species.

  3. Evolutionary analysis of a large mtDNA translocation (numt) into the nuclear genome of the Panthera genus species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Heup; Antunes, Agostinho; Luo, Shu-Jin; Menninger, Joan; Nash, William G; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E

    2006-02-01

    Translocation of cymtDNA into the nuclear genome, also referred to as numt, has been reported in many species, including several closely related to the domestic cat (Felis catus). We describe the recent transposition of 12,536 bp of the 17 kb mitochondrial genome into the nucleus of the common ancestor of the five Panthera genus species: tiger, P. tigris; snow leopard, P. uncia; jaguar, P. onca; leopard, P. pardus; and lion, P. leo. This nuclear integration, representing 74% of the mitochondrial genome, is one of the largest to be reported in eukaryotes. The Panthera genus numt differs from the numt previously described in the Felis genus in: (1) chromosomal location (F2-telomeric region vs. D2-centromeric region), (2) gene make up (from the ND5 to the ATP8 vs. from the CR to the COII), (3) size (12.5 vs. 7.9 kb), and (4) structure (single monomer vs. tandemly repeated in Felis). These distinctions indicate that the origin of this large numt fragment in the nuclear genome of the Panthera species is an independent insertion from that of the domestic cat lineage, which has been further supported by phylogenetic analyses. The tiger cymtDNA shared around 90% sequence identity with the homologous numt sequence, suggesting an origin for the Panthera numt at around 3.5 million years ago, prior to the radiation of the five extant Panthera species. PMID:16380222

  4. Preliminary insight into the age and origin of the Labeobarbus fish species flock from Lake Tana (Ethiopia) using the mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Martin; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Samallo, Johannis; Sibbing, Ferdinand

    2010-02-01

    The high diversity of Cyprinid fish in Ethiopia's Lake Tana appears to be an example of ecological differentiation and assortative mating leading to rapid sympatric speciation. Lake Tana's Labeobarbus species flock consists of 15 morphological and ecological distinct species. This is the first attempt to determine the age and origin and inter-species relationships of Lake Tana's Labeobarbus species using the mtDNA cytochrome b gene. Analysis of cytchrome b sequences shows that Lake Tana's species flock appears to be young but the present dataset did not unequivocally support monophyly of Lake Tana's species. Additional markers are needed to determine whether Lake Tana's labeobarbs originated from a single or multiple incursion(s) of ancestral L. intermedius in the Lake Tana drainage basin, or the disruption of an ancient continuous riverine population by the emergence of the Tissisat waterfalls. Adaptive radiation and speciation within Lake Tana's Labeobarbus species flock may have occurred in the last 10,000-25,000years, following the desiccation of Lake Tana around 17,000years ago, at the same time as Lake Victoria, however, obtaining more data using other (nuclear) markers is urgently required. PMID:19878730

  5. Identification of ataxia-associated mtDNA mutations (m.4052T>C and m.9035T>C) and evaluation of their pathogenicity in transmitochondrial cybrids.

    PubMed

    Sikorska, Marianna; Sandhu, Jagdeep K; Simon, David K; Pathiraja, Vimukthi; Sodja, Caroline; Li, Yan; Ribecco-Lutkiewicz, Maria; Lanthier, Patricia; Borowy-Borowski, Henryk; Upton, Adrian; Raha, Sandeep; Pulst, Stefan M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2009-09-01

    The potential pathogenicity of two homoplasmic mtDNA point mutations, 9035T>C and 4452T>C, found in a family afflicted with maternally transmitted cognitive developmental delay, learning disability, and progressive ataxia was evaluated using transmitochondrial cybrids. We confirmed that the 4452T>C transition in tRNA(Met) represented a polymorphism; however, 9035T>C conversion in the ATP6 gene was responsible for a defective F(0)-ATPase. Accordingly, mutant cybrids had a reduced oligomycin-sensitive ATP hydrolyzing activity. They had less than half of the steady-state content of ATP and nearly an 8-fold higher basal level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mutant cybrids were unable to cope with additional insults, i.e., glucose deprivation or tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide, and they succumbed to either apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Both of these outcomes were prevented by the antioxidants CoQ(10) and vitamin E, suggesting that the abnormally high levels of ROS were the triggers of cell death. In conclusion, the principal metabolic defects, i.e., energy deficiency and ROS burden, resulted from the 9035T>C mutation and could be responsible for the development of clinical symptoms in this family. Furthermore, antioxidant therapy might prove helpful in the management of this disease.

  6. Preliminary insight into the age and origin of the Labeobarbus fish species flock from Lake Tana (Ethiopia) using the mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Martin; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Samallo, Johannis; Sibbing, Ferdinand

    2010-02-01

    The high diversity of Cyprinid fish in Ethiopia's Lake Tana appears to be an example of ecological differentiation and assortative mating leading to rapid sympatric speciation. Lake Tana's Labeobarbus species flock consists of 15 morphological and ecological distinct species. This is the first attempt to determine the age and origin and inter-species relationships of Lake Tana's Labeobarbus species using the mtDNA cytochrome b gene. Analysis of cytchrome b sequences shows that Lake Tana's species flock appears to be young but the present dataset did not unequivocally support monophyly of Lake Tana's species. Additional markers are needed to determine whether Lake Tana's labeobarbs originated from a single or multiple incursion(s) of ancestral L. intermedius in the Lake Tana drainage basin, or the disruption of an ancient continuous riverine population by the emergence of the Tissisat waterfalls. Adaptive radiation and speciation within Lake Tana's Labeobarbus species flock may have occurred in the last 10,000-25,000years, following the desiccation of Lake Tana around 17,000years ago, at the same time as Lake Victoria, however, obtaining more data using other (nuclear) markers is urgently required.

  7. Heteroplasmy, length and sequence variation in the mtDNA control regions of three percid fish species (Perca fluviatilis, Acerina cernua, Stizostedion lucioperca).

    PubMed Central

    Nesbø, C L; Arab, M O; Jakobsen, K S

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the control region and flanking tRNA genes of perch (Perca fluviatilis) mtDNA was determined. The organization of this region is similar to that of other vertebrates. A tandem array of 10-bp repeats, associated with length variation and heteroplasmy was observed in the 5' end. While the location of the array corresponds to that reported in other species, the length of the repeated unit is shorter than previously observed for tandem repeats in this region. The repeated sequence was highly similar to the Mt5 element which has been shown to specifically bind a putative D-loop DNA termination protein. Of 149 perch analyzed, 74% showed length variation heteroplasmy. Single-cell PCR on oocytes suggested that the high level of heteroplasmy is passively maintained by maternal transmission. The array was also observed in the two other percid species, ruffe (Acerina cernua) and zander (Stizostedion lucioperca). The array and the associated length variation heteroplasmy are therefore likely to be general features of percid mtDNAs. Among the perch repeats, the mutation pattern is consistent with unidirectional slippage, and statistical analyses supported the notion that the various haplotypes are associated with different levels of heteroplasmy. The variation in array length among and within species is ascribed to differences in predicted stability of secondary structures made between repeat units. PMID:9560404

  8. Population Structure of mtDNA Variation due to Pleistocene Fluctuations in the South American Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger, 1815): Management Units for Conservation.

    PubMed

    González, Susana; Cosse, Mariana; Franco, María del Rosario; Emmons, Louise; Vynne, Carly; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti; Beccacesi, Marcelo D; Maldonado, Jesús E

    2015-01-01

    The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is one of the largest South American canids, and conservation across this charismatic carnivore's large range is presently hampered by a lack of knowledge about possible natural subdivisions which could influence the population's viability. To elucidate the phylogeographic patterns and demographic history of the species, we used 2 mtDNA markers (D-loop and cytochrome b) from 87 individuals collected throughout their range, in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Uruguay. We found moderate levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity, and the 14 D-loop haplotypes were closely related. Genetic structure results revealed 4 groups, and when coupled with model inferences from a coalescent analysis, suggested that maned wolves have undergone demographic fluctuations due to changes in climate and habitat during the Pleistocene glaciation period approximately 24000 years before present (YBP). This genetic signature points to an event that occurred within the timing estimated for the start of the contraction of the Cerrado around 50000 YBP. Our results reveal a genetic signature of population size expansion followed by contraction during Pleistocene interglaciations, which had similar impacts on other South American mammals. The 4 groups should for now be considered management units, within which future monitoring efforts should be conducted independently.

  9. New ideas about genetic differentiation of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) populations in China based on the mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Tian; Zheng, Fu-Shan; Lu, Ming-Xing; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is an important pest of rice in China and other parts of the world. To further explore the population genetic structure and genetic differentiation of C. suppressalis populations found on rice in China, we amplified 432 bp fragments of the cytochrome b (cyt b) gene for 44 C. suppressalis populations. Nineteen variable sites in the mtDNA gene were observed, and 16 haplotypes were identified. Nucleotide diversity (π) and haplotype diversity (h) ranged from 0.00274 to 0.00786 and 0.72297 to 0.87604, respectively, while genetic structure analysis found significant genetic differentiation to be present among the five regions in China - northern China (NC), northeastern China (NEC), central China (CC), southern China (SC) and southwestern China (SWC) - where C. suppresalis was collected. In addition, molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that a relatively high proportion (57.6%) of the total genetic variance was attributable to variation within the populations. N(m) and F(ST) analyses suggested that the differentiation was not significantly different between NEC and NC, CC and SC, and SC and SWC regions, but was significant between NEC and CC, SC and SWC regions, corresponding well with the geographical distribution of the sampled populations. Phylogenetic analysis divided the populations into two indistinct clades: a NEC-NC-CC clade and a CC-SC-SWC clade, while CC region acted as a transition zone between north and south China, a finding different from previous work.

  10. Mitogenomic analysis of a 50-generation chicken pedigree reveals a rapid rate of mitochondrial evolution and evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Michelle; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Molak, Martyna; Barnett, Ross; Carlborg, Örjan; Dorshorst, Ben; Honaker, Christa; Besnier, Francois; Wahlberg, Per; Dobney, Keith; Siegel, Paul; Andersson, Leif; Larson, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes represent a valuable source of data for evolutionary research, but studies of their short-term evolution have typically been limited to invertebrates, humans and laboratory organisms. Here we present a detailed study of 12 mitochondrial genomes that span a total of 385 transmissions in a well-documented 50-generation pedigree in which two lineages of chickens were selected for low and high juvenile body weight. These data allowed us to test the hypothesis of time-dependent evolutionary rates and the assumption of strict maternal mitochondrial transmission, and to investigate the role of mitochondrial mutations in determining phenotype. The identification of a non-synonymous mutation in ND4L and a synonymous mutation in CYTB, both novel mutations in Gallus, allowed us to estimate a molecular rate of 3.13 × 10−7 mutations/site/year (95% confidence interval 3.75 × 10−8–1.12 × 10−6). This is substantially higher than avian rate estimates based upon fossil calibrations. Ascertaining which of the two novel mutations was present in an additional 49 individuals also revealed an instance of paternal inheritance of mtDNA. Lastly, an association analysis demonstrated that neither of the point mutations was strongly associated with the phenotypic differences between the two selection lines. Together, these observations reveal the highly dynamic nature of mitochondrial evolution over short time periods. PMID:26510672

  11. Microsatellite and mtDNA analysis of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, from Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories: impacts of historical and contemporary evolutionary forces on Arctic ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Les N; Howland, Kimberly L; Kowalchuk, Matthew W; Bajno, Robert; Lindsay, Melissa M; Taylor, Eric B

    2013-01-01

    Resolving the genetic population structure of species inhabiting pristine, high latitude ecosystems can provide novel insights into the post-glacial, evolutionary processes shaping the distribution of contemporary genetic variation. In this study, we assayed genetic variation in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Great Bear Lake (GBL), NT and one population outside of this lake (Sandy Lake, NT) at 11 microsatellite loci and the mtDNA control region (d-loop). Overall, population subdivision was low, but significant (global FST θ = 0.025), and pairwise comparisons indicated that significance was heavily influenced by comparisons between GBL localities and Sandy Lake. Our data indicate that there is no obvious genetic structure among the various basins within GBL (global FST = 0.002) despite the large geographic distances between sampling areas. We found evidence of low levels of contemporary gene flow among arms within GBL, but not between Sandy Lake and GBL. Coalescent analyses suggested that some historical gene flow occurred among arms within GBL and between GBL and Sandy Lake. It appears, therefore, that contemporary (ongoing dispersal and gene flow) and historical (historical gene flow and large founding and present-day effective population sizes) factors contribute to the lack of neutral genetic structure in GBL. Overall, our results illustrate the importance of history (e.g., post-glacial colonization) and contemporary dispersal ecology in shaping genetic population structure of Arctic faunas and provide a better understanding of the evolutionary ecology of long-lived salmonids in pristine, interconnected habitats. PMID:23404390

  12. Restricted gene flow at the micro- and macro-geographical scale in marble trout based on mtDNA and microsatellite polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic structure of the marble trout Salmo trutta marmoratus, an endemic salmonid of northern Italy and the Balkan peninsula, was explored at the macro- and micro-scale level using a combination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite data. Results Sequence variation in the mitochondrial control region showed the presence of nonindigenous haplotypes indicative of introgression from brown trout into marble trout. This was confirmed using microsatellite markers, which showed a higher introgression at nuclear level. Microsatellite loci revealed a strong genetic differentiation across the geographical range of marble trout, which suggests restricted gene flow both at the micro-geographic (within rivers) and macro-geographic (among river systems) scale. A pattern of Isolation-by-Distance was found, in which genetic samples were correlated with hydrographic distances. A general West-to-East partition of the microsatellite polymorphism was observed, which was supported by the geographic distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes. Conclusion While introgression at both mitochondrial and nuclear level is unlikely to result from natural migration and might be the consequence of current restocking practices, the pattern of genetic substructuring found at microsatellites has been likely shaped by historical colonization patterns determined by the geological evolution of the hydrographic networks. PMID:21489312

  13. Persistent heteroplasmy of a mutation in the human mtDNA control region: hypermutation as an apparent consequence of simple-repeat expansion/contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N; Smejkal, C B

    2000-01-01

    In the genealogical and phylogenetic analyses that are reported here, we obtained evidence for an unusual pattern of mutation/reversion in the human mitochondrial genome. The cumulative results indicate that, when there is a T-->C polymorphism at nt 16189 and a C-->T substitution at nt 16192, there is an extremely high rate of reversion (hypermutation) at the latter site. The apparent reversion rate is sufficiently high that there is persistent heteroplasmy at nt 16192 in maternal lineages and at the phylogenetic level, a situation that is similar to that observed for the rapid expansion/contraction of simple repeats within the control region. This is the first specific instance in which the mutation frequency at one site in the D-loop is markedly influenced by the local sequence "context." The 16189 T-->C polymorphism lengthens a (C:G)n simple repeat, which then undergoes expansion and contraction, probably through replication slippage. This proclivity toward expansion/contraction is more pronounced when there is a C residue, rather than a T, at nt 16192. The high T-->C reversion frequency at nt 16192 apparently is the result of polymerase misincorporation or slippage during replication, the same mechanism that also causes the expansion/contraction of this simple-repeat sequence. In addition to the first analysis of this mitochondrial hypermutation process, these results also yield mechanistic insights into the expansion/contraction of simple-repeat sequences in mtDNA. PMID:10762545

  14. Population Structure of mtDNA Variation due to Pleistocene Fluctuations in the South American Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger, 1815): Management Units for Conservation.

    PubMed

    González, Susana; Cosse, Mariana; Franco, María del Rosario; Emmons, Louise; Vynne, Carly; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti; Beccacesi, Marcelo D; Maldonado, Jesús E

    2015-01-01

    The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is one of the largest South American canids, and conservation across this charismatic carnivore's large range is presently hampered by a lack of knowledge about possible natural subdivisions which could influence the population's viability. To elucidate the phylogeographic patterns and demographic history of the species, we used 2 mtDNA markers (D-loop and cytochrome b) from 87 individuals collected throughout their range, in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Uruguay. We found moderate levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity, and the 14 D-loop haplotypes were closely related. Genetic structure results revealed 4 groups, and when coupled with model inferences from a coalescent analysis, suggested that maned wolves have undergone demographic fluctuations due to changes in climate and habitat during the Pleistocene glaciation period approximately 24000 years before present (YBP). This genetic signature points to an event that occurred within the timing estimated for the start of the contraction of the Cerrado around 50000 YBP. Our results reveal a genetic signature of population size expansion followed by contraction during Pleistocene interglaciations, which had similar impacts on other South American mammals. The 4 groups should for now be considered management units, within which future monitoring efforts should be conducted independently. PMID:26245781

  15. mtDNA from the early Bronze Age to the Roman period suggests a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian cradle of civilization.

    PubMed

    Witas, Henryk W; Tomczyk, Jacek; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Płoszaj, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the period between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today's Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ΔF508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or Δ32 CCR5.

  16. mtDNA from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman Period Suggests a Genetic Link between the Indian Subcontinent and Mesopotamian Cradle of Civilization

    PubMed Central

    Witas, Henryk W.; Tomczyk, Jacek; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Płoszaj, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the period between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today’s Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ΔF508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or Δ32 CCR5. PMID:24040024

  17. Diversity and distribution of white-tailed deer mtDNA lineages in chronic wasting disease (CWD) outbreak areas in southern Wisconsin, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kip G; Robinson, Stacie J; Samuel, Michael D; Grear, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. Because it is uniformly fatal, the disease is a major concern in the management of white-tailed deer populations. Management programs to control CWD require improved knowledge of deer interaction, movement, and population connectivity that could influence disease transmission and spread. Genetic methods were employed to evaluate connectivity among populations in the CWD management zone of southern Wisconsin. A 576-base-pair region of the mitochondrial DNA of 359 white-tailed deer from 12 sample populations was analyzed. Fifty-eight variable sites were detected within the sequence, defining 43 haplotypes. While most sample populations displayed similar levels of haplotype diversity, individual haplotypes were clustered on the landscape. Spatial clusters of different haplotypes were apparent in distinct ecoregions surrounding CWD outbreak areas. The spatial distribution of mtDNA haplotypes suggests that clustering of the deer matrilineal groups and population connectivity are associated with broad-scale geographic landscape features. These landscape characteristics may also influence the contact rates between groups and therefore the potential spread of CWD; this may be especially true of local disease spread between female social groups. Our results suggest that optimal CWD management needs to be tailored to fit gender-specific dispersal behaviors and regional differences in deer population connectivity. This information will help wildlife managers design surveillance and monitoring efforts based on population interactions and potential deer movement among CWD-affected and unaffected areas.

  18. mtDNA from the early Bronze Age to the Roman period suggests a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian cradle of civilization.

    PubMed

    Witas, Henryk W; Tomczyk, Jacek; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Płoszaj, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the period between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today's Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ΔF508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or Δ32 CCR5. PMID:24040024

  19. Visual recovery in a man with the rare combination of mtDNA 11778 LHON mutation and a MS-like disease after mitoxantrone therapy.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, C; Gbadamosi, J; Heesen, C

    2002-10-01

    We describe a young man with prognostic unfavourable homoplasmatic mitochondrial DNA(mt DNA) 11778 Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) point mutation and confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS). This combination of LHON and MS-like disease is rare in both sexes, and in men has been described in only a few case reports. In a 4-year follow-up during immunosuppressive therapy with mitoxantrone, we found a remarkable time delayed visual recovery 12 months after acute onset of rapid sequential bilateral subtotal visual loss followed by episodes of isolated acute demyelinative optic neuropathy. Visual recovery to such extent after this latency is uncommon in both mtDNA 11778 LHON mutation and optic neuritis (ON) in MS. Relapses in visual deterioration must be considered as extremely rare in LHON. This case might support the hypothesis of an immunological pathogenetic factor in combined LHON and MS, and possibly in LHON alone. We suggest a search for the LHON mutation in MS patients with predominant visual impairment, independent of patients' gender.

  20. Personal identification of cold case remains through combined contribution from anthropological, mtDNA and bomb–pulse dating analyses*†

    PubMed Central

    Speller, Camilla F.; Spalding, Kirsty L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Hildebrand, Dean; Moore, Jason; Mathewes, Rolf; Skinner, Mark F.; Yang, Dongya Y.

    2013-01-01

    In 1968, a child’s cranium was recovered from the banks of a northern Canadian river, and held in trust until the ‘cold case’ was re-opened in 2005. The cranium underwent re-analysis at the Centre for Forensic Research, Simon Fraser University, using recently developed anthropological, ‘bomb-pulse’ radiocarbon analysis and forensic DNA techniques. Craniometrics, skeletal ossification and dental formation indicated an age-at-death of 4.4 ±1 years. Radiocarbon analysis of enamel from two teeth indicated a year of birth between 1958–1962. Forensic DNA analysis indicated the child was male, and the obtained mitochondrial profile matched a living maternal relative of the presumed missing child. These multi-disciplinary analyses resulted in a legal identification 41 years after the discovery of the remains, highlighting the enormous potential of combining radiocarbon analysis with anthropological and mtDNA analyses in producing confident personal identifications for forensic cold cases dating to within the last 60 years. PMID:22804335

  1. Diversity and distribution of white-tailed deer mtdna lineages in chronic wasting disease (cwd) outbreak areas in southern wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, K.G.; Robinson, S.J.; Samuel, M.D.; Grear, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. Because it is uniformly fatal, the disease is a major concern in the management of white-tailed deer populations. Management programs to control CWD require improved knowledge of deer interaction, movement, and population connectivity that could influence disease transmission and spread. Genetic methods were employed to evaluate connectivity among populations in the CWD management zone of southern Wisconsin. A 576-base-pair region of the mitochondrial DNA of 359 white-tailed deer from 12 sample populations was analyzed. Fifty-eight variable sites were detected within the sequence, defining 43 haplotypes. While most sample populations displayed similar levels of haplotype diversity, individual haplotypes were clustered on the landscape. Spatial clusters of different haplotypes were apparent in distinct ecoregions surrounding CWD outbreak areas. The spatial distribution of mtDNA haplotypes suggests that clustering of the deer matrilineal groups and population connectivity are associated with broad-scale geographic landscape features. These landscape characteristics may also influence the contact rates between groups and therefore the potential spread of CWD; this may be especially true of local disease spread between female social groups. Our results suggest that optimal CWD management needs to be tailored to fit gender-specific dispersal behaviors and regional differences in deer population connectivity. This information will help wildlife managers design surveillance and monitoring efforts based on population interactions and potential deer movement among CWD-affected and unaffected areas. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  2. Mitogenomic analysis of a 50-generation chicken pedigree reveals a rapid rate of mitochondrial evolution and evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Michelle; Ho, Simon Y W; Molak, Martyna; Barnett, Ross; Carlborg, Örjan; Dorshorst, Ben; Honaker, Christa; Besnier, Francois; Wahlberg, Per; Dobney, Keith; Siegel, Paul; Andersson, Leif; Larson, Greger

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial genomes represent a valuable source of data for evolutionary research, but studies of their short-term evolution have typically been limited to invertebrates, humans and laboratory organisms. Here we present a detailed study of 12 mitochondrial genomes that span a total of 385 transmissions in a well-documented 50-generation pedigree in which two lineages of chickens were selected for low and high juvenile body weight. These data allowed us to test the hypothesis of time-dependent evolutionary rates and the assumption of strict maternal mitochondrial transmission, and to investigate the role of mitochondrial mutations in determining phenotype. The identification of a non-synonymous mutation in ND4L and a synonymous mutation in CYTB, both novel mutations in Gallus, allowed us to estimate a molecular rate of 3.13 × 10(-7) mutations/site/year (95% confidence interval 3.75 × 10(-8)-1.12 × 10(-6)). This is substantially higher than avian rate estimates based upon fossil calibrations. Ascertaining which of the two novel mutations was present in an additional 49 individuals also revealed an instance of paternal inheritance of mtDNA. Lastly, an association analysis demonstrated that neither of the point mutations was strongly associated with the phenotypic differences between the two selection lines. Together, these observations reveal the highly dynamic nature of mitochondrial evolution over short time periods.

  3. Evolutionary relationships and reproductive isolating mechanisms in the rice frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) species complex from Sri Lanka, Thailand, Taiwan and Japan, inferred from mtDNA gene sequences, allozymes, and crossing experiments.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Masayuki; Kotaki, Manabu; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Djong, Tjong Hon; Igawa, Takeshi; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Matsui, Masafumi; Anslem, De Silva; Khonsue, Wichase; Nishioka, Midori

    2007-06-01

    The rice frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) species complex is widely distributed, from India to Japan, and most prevalently in Southeast Asia. Conspicuous morphological variation has been reported for this species complex throughout its distribution range. In the present study, we used mtDNA gene sequence and allozyme analyses to infer evolutionary affinities within this species complex using eight populations (Sri Lanka; Bangkok and Ranong in Thailand; Taiwan; and Hiroshima, Okinawa, Ishigaki and Iriomote in Japan). We also conducted crossing experiments among four populations from Japan, Thailand, and Sri Lanka in order to find out more about the reproductive isolating mechanisms that might exist among the East, Southeast, and South Asian populations of this species complex. The crossing experiments revealed that the Sri Lanka population is reproductively isolated from the Hiroshima, Bangkok, and Ranong populations by complete hybrid inviability, and that the Bangkok population may be reproductively isolated from the Hiroshima population by partial hybrid inviability. Thus, it is not unreasonable to regard the Sri Lanka population as a species separated from F. limnocharis. The mtDNA and allozyme data showed that the Ranong population is most closely related to the Bangkok population in nuclear genome, but more similar to the Okinawa and Taiwan populations in mtDNA genome. The present, preliminary survey may raise questions about the species status of these particular populations and also about the nature of the biological species concept.

  4. Strikingly different penetrance of LHON in two Chinese families with primary mutation G11778A is independent of mtDNA haplogroup background and secondary mutation G13708A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Wei; Jia, Xiaoyun; Ji, Yanli; Kong, Qing-Peng; Zhang, Qingjiong; Yao, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2008-08-25

    The penetrance of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in families with primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is very complex. Matrilineal and nuclear genetic background, as well as environmental factors, have been reported to be involved in different affected pedigrees. Here we describe two large Chinese families that show a striking difference in the penetrance of LHON, in which 53.3% and 15.0% of members were affected (P<0.02), respectively. Analysis of the complete mtDNA genome of the two families revealed the presence of the primary mutation G11778A and several other variants suggesting the same haplogroup status G2a. The family with higher penetrance contained a previously described secondary mutation G13708A, which presents a polymorphism in normal Chinese samples and does not affect in vivo mitochondrial oxidative metabolism as described in a previous study. Evolutionary analysis failed to indicate any putatively pathogenic mutation that cosegregated with G11778A in these two pedigrees. Our results suggest that the variable penetrance of LHON in the two Chinese families is independent of both their mtDNA haplotype background and a secondary mutation G13708A. As a result, it is likely that unknown nuclear gene involvement and/or other factors contribute to the strikingly different penetrance of LHON.

  5. Molecular identification of Hysterothylacium aduncum specimens isolated from commercially important fish species of Eastern Mediterranean Sea using mtDNA cox1 and ITS rDNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Emre; Koyuncu, Cafer Erkin; Genc, Ercument

    2015-04-01

    The presence of a Raphidascarid parasitic nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802) in two sparid fish (Sparus aurata and Diplodus vulgaris) and one soleid fish (Solea solea) was investigated in this study. A total of 868 individuals; 385 S. aurata, 437 D. vulgaris and 46 S. solea were collected from the Mersin Bay between February 2013 and January 2014 and examined. Variations in the prevalence, mean intensity, and mean abundance of the parasite were 14.55%, 2.05, and 0.30 for S. aurata, 4.12%, 2.44, and 0.10 for D. vulgaris, and 15.22%, 3.29, and 0.50 for S. sole respectively. Nucleotide sequences of 1398 base pair long fragment of 18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA region and 641 base pair long fragment of mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase I (cox1) gene were used in molecular identification of isolated parasites at species level. All the parasite samples were identified as H. aduncum based on nucleotide sequence comparisons. Both ITS rDNA and mtDNA cox1 sequences revealed a genetic variation among H. aduncum specimens isolated from different fish species, while only mtDNA cox1 sequences were indicating a mean genetic distance of 0.010 among H. aduncum specimens of the same host species. PMID:25543079

  6. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level. PMID:26091838

  7. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level.

  8. New polymorphic mtDNA restriction site in the 12S rRNA gene detected in Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna Tlili, Abdelaziz; Masmoudi, Saber; Charfeddine, Ilhem; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2008-05-09

    The 12S rRNA gene was shown to be a hot spot for aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss since several deafness-associated mtDNA mutations were identified in this gene. Among them, we distinguished the A1555G, the C1494T and the T1095C mutations and C-insertion or deletion at position 961. One hundred Tunisian patients with non-syndromic hearing loss and 100 hearing individuals were analysed in this study. A PCR-RFLP analysis with HaeIII restriction enzyme showed the presence of the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene in only one out of the 100 patients. In addition, PCR-RFLP and radioactive PCR revealed the presence of a new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site in the same gene of 12S rRNA site in 4 patients with non-syndromic hearing loss. UVIDOC-008-XD analyses showed the presence of this new polymorphic restriction site with a variable heteroplasmic rates at position +1517 of the human mitochondrial genome. On the other hand, direct sequencing of the entire mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in the 100 patients and in 100 hearing individuals revealed the presence of the A750G and A1438G polymorphisms and the absence of the C1494T, T1095C and 961insC mutations in all the tested individuals. Sequencing of the whole mitochondrial genome in the 4 patients showing the new HaeIII polymorphic restriction site revealed only the presence of the A8860G transition in the MT-ATP6 gene and the A4769G polymorphism in the ND2 gene.

  9. Single Nucleotides in the mtDNA Sequence Modify Mitochondrial Molecular Function and Are Associated with Sex-Specific Effects on Fertility and Aging.

    PubMed

    Camus, M Florencia; Wolf, Jochen B W; Morrow, Edward H; Dowling, Damian K

    2015-10-19

    Mitochondria underpin energy conversion in eukaryotes. Their small genomes have been the subject of increasing attention, and there is evidence that mitochondrial genetic variation can affect evolutionary trajectories and shape the expression of life-history traits considered to be key human health indicators [1, 2]. However, it is not understood how genetic variation across a diminutive genome, which in most species harbors only about a dozen protein-coding genes, can exert broad-scale effects on the organismal phenotype [2, 3]. Such effects are particularly puzzling given that the mitochondrial genes involved are under strong evolutionary constraint and that mitochondrial gene expression is highly conserved across diverse taxa [4]. We used replicated genetic lines in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, each characterized by a distinct and naturally occurring mitochondrial haplotype placed alongside an isogenic nuclear background. We demonstrate that sequence variation within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) affects both the copy number of mitochondrial genomes and patterns of gene expression across key mitochondrial protein-coding genes. In several cases, haplotype-mediated patterns of gene expression were gene-specific, even for genes from within the same transcriptional units. This invokes post-transcriptional processing of RNA in the regulation of mitochondrial genetic effects on organismal phenotypes. Notably, the haplotype-mediated effects on gene expression could be traced backward to the level of individual nucleotides and forward to sex-specific effects on fertility and longevity. Our study thus elucidates how small-scale sequence changes in the mitochondrial genome can achieve broad-scale regulation of health-related phenotypes and even contribute to sex-related differences in longevity.

  10. Neither philopatric nor panmictic: microsatellite and mtDNA evidence suggests lack of natal homing but limits to dispersal in Pacific lamprey.

    PubMed

    Spice, Erin K; Goodman, Damon H; Reid, Stewart B; Docker, Margaret F

    2012-06-01

    Most species with lengthy migrations display some degree of natal homing; some (e.g. migratory birds and anadromous salmonids) show spectacular feats of homing. However, studies of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) indicate that this anadromous species locates spawning habitat based on pheromonal cues from larvae rather than through philopatry. Previous genetic studies in the anadromous Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) have both supported and rejected the hypothesis of natal homing. To resolve this, we used nine microsatellite loci to examine the population structure in 965 Pacific lamprey from 20 locations from central British Columbia to southern California and supplemented this analysis with mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on a subset of 530 lamprey. Microsatellite analysis revealed (i) relatively low but often statistically significant genetic differentiation among locations (97% pairwise F(ST) values were <0.04 but 73.7% were significant); and (ii) weak but significant isolation by distance (r(2) = 0.0565, P = 0.0450) but no geographic clustering of samples. The few moderate F(ST) values involved comparisons with sites that were geographically distant or far upstream. The mtDNA analysis--although providing less resolution among sites (only 4.7%F(ST) values were significant)--was broadly consistent with the microsatellite results: (i) the southernmost site and some sites tributary to the Salish Sea were genetically distinct; and (ii) southern sites showed higher haplotype and private haplotype richness. These results are inconsistent with philopatry, suggesting that anadromous lampreys are unusual among species with long migrations, but suggest that limited dispersal at sea precludes panmixia in this species.

  11. Neither philopatric nor panmictic: microsatellite and mtDNA evidence suggests lack of natal homing but limits to dispersal in Pacific lamprey.

    PubMed

    Spice, Erin K; Goodman, Damon H; Reid, Stewart B; Docker, Margaret F

    2012-06-01

    Most species with lengthy migrations display some degree of natal homing; some (e.g. migratory birds and anadromous salmonids) show spectacular feats of homing. However, studies of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) indicate that this anadromous species locates spawning habitat based on pheromonal cues from larvae rather than through philopatry. Previous genetic studies in the anadromous Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) have both supported and rejected the hypothesis of natal homing. To resolve this, we used nine microsatellite loci to examine the population structure in 965 Pacific lamprey from 20 locations from central British Columbia to southern California and supplemented this analysis with mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on a subset of 530 lamprey. Microsatellite analysis revealed (i) relatively low but often statistically significant genetic differentiation among locations (97% pairwise F(ST) values were <0.04 but 73.7% were significant); and (ii) weak but significant isolation by distance (r(2) = 0.0565, P = 0.0450) but no geographic clustering of samples. The few moderate F(ST) values involved comparisons with sites that were geographically distant or far upstream. The mtDNA analysis--although providing less resolution among sites (only 4.7%F(ST) values were significant)--was broadly consistent with the microsatellite results: (i) the southernmost site and some sites tributary to the Salish Sea were genetically distinct; and (ii) southern sites showed higher haplotype and private haplotype richness. These results are inconsistent with philopatry, suggesting that anadromous lampreys are unusual among species with long migrations, but suggest that limited dispersal at sea precludes panmixia in this species. PMID:22564149

  12. Incongruence between mtDNA and nuclear data in the freshwater mussel genus Cyprogenia (Bivalvia: Unionidae) and its impact on species delineation.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jer Pin; Harris, John L; Roe, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    Accurately identifying species is a crucial step for developing conservation strategies for freshwater mussels, one of the most imperiled faunas in North America. This study uses genetic data to re-examine species delineation in the genus Cyprogenia. Historically, Cyprogenia found west of the Mississippi River have been ascribed to Cyprogenia aberti (Conrad 1850), and those east of the Mississippi River were classified as Cyprogenia stegaria (Rafinesque 1820). Previous studies using mitochondrial DNA sequences indicated that C. aberti and C. stegaria were not reciprocally monophyletic groups, suggesting the need for systematic revision. We generated a novel dataset consisting of 10 microsatellite loci and combined it with sequence data from the mitochondrial ND1 gene for 223 Cyprogenia specimens. Bayesian analysis of the ND1 nucleotide sequences identified two divergent clades that differ by 15.9%. Members of these two clades occur sympatrically across most sampling locations. In contrast, microsatellite genotypes support recognition of three allopatric clusters defined by major hydrologic basins. The divergent mitochondrial lineages are highly correlated with the color of the conglutinate lures used by mussels to attract and infest host fishes, and tests for selection at the ND1 locus were positive. We infer that the incongruence between mtDNA and microsatellite data in Cyprogenia may be the result of a combination of incomplete lineage sorting and balancing selection on lure color. Our results provide further evidence that mitochondrial markers are not always neutral with respect to selection, and highlight the potential problems of relying on a single-locus-marker for delineating species. PMID:27066233

  13. Origin and speciation of haplochromine fishes in East African crater lakes investigated by the analysis of their mtDNA, Mhc genes, and SINEs.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akie; Takezaki, Naoko; Tichy, Herbert; Figueroa, Felipe; Mayer, Werner E; Klein, Jan

    2003-09-01

    The Western Branch of the East African Great Rift Valley is pocketed with craters of extinct or dormant volcanoes. Many of the craters are filled with water, and the lakes are inhabited by fishes. The objective of the present study was to determine the amount and nature of genetic variation in haplochromine fishes inhabiting two of these crater lakes, Lake Lutoto and Lake Nshere, and to use this information to infer the origin and history of the two populations. To this end, sequences of mitochondrial (mt) DNA control region, exon 2 of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II B genes, and short interspersed elements (SINEs) were analyzed. The results indicate that the Lake Nshere and Lake Lutoto fishes originated from different but related large founding populations derived from the Kazinga Channel, which connects Lake Edward and Lake George. Some of the genetic polymorphism that existed in the ancestral populations was lost in the populations of the two lakes. The polymorphism that has been retained has persisted for some 50000 generations (years). During this time, new mutations arose and became fixed in each of the two populations in the mtDNA, giving rise to sets of diagnostic substitutions. Each population evolved in isolation after the colonization of the lakes less than 50000 years ago. There appears to be no population structure within the crater lake fishes, and their present effective population sizes are in the order of 104 to 105 individuals. Comparisons with the endemic haplochromine species of Lake Victoria reveal interesting parallels, as well as differences, which may help to understand the nature of the speciation process.

  14. Development, characterisation, inheritance, and cross-species utility of American lobster (Homarus americanus) microsatellite and mtDNA PCR-RFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew W; O'Reilly, Patrick T; McPherson, Arran A; McParland, Tara L; Armstrong, Dawn E; Cox, Andrea J; Spence, Koren R; Kenchington, Ellen L; Taggart, Chris T; Bentzen, Paul

    2003-02-01

    Effective management of exploited species demands contemporary knowledge of population structure and mating patterns. Genetic markers can prove useful in providing this knowledge. Despite its commercial importance, genetic markers for American lobster (Homarus americanus) are limited. We developed 12 tetra- and 1 trinucleotide microsatellite loci for American lobster that exhibit little stuttering after PCR amplification. Gene diversity of these loci ranged from 0.516 to 0.929. A four-locus multiplex permits rapid genotyping of progeny in parentage experiments with a paternity exclusion probability over the four loci of 97.8%. We examined the loci for conformity to Hardy-Weinberg expectations (HWE) and linkage using individuals from one location and found that four loci deviated from HWE. We also tested inheritance and pairwise linkage using 48 embryos from each of two females. With the exception of two loci that were derived from the same clone and separated by 72 bp, no evidence of linkage was found. We, for the first time, demonstrate the occurrence of multiple paternity in American lobster. We also observed an apparent occurrence of dispermic androgenesis, possibly the first documentation of such an event within a species. Ten of the loci amplified in European lobster (Homarus gammarus), although two were monomorphic and one deviated significantly from HWE. We quantified mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation through the use of PCR amplification of two DNA fragments, followed by digestion with restriction enzymes; eight haplotypes were detected. One of the two fragments amplified in European lobster. Both sets of markers should prove useful for population discrimination purposes, and the microsatellites, in particular the four-locus multiplex, should prove highly amenable to rapidly addressing questions about mating patterns. PMID:12669797

  15. Molecular evolution in space and through time: mtDNA phylogeography of the Olive Sunbird (Nectarinia olivacea/obscura) throughout continental Africa.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rauri C K; Fjeldså, Jon; Hackett, Shannon J; Crowe, Timothy M

    2004-10-01

    This study constitutes the first investigation of the phylogeographic structure of a forest bird distributed throughout the montane and lowland forest biomes of Africa. The key objective was to investigate the importance of Pleistocene climatic cycles on avian diversification across Africa. The Olive Sunbird is a relatively large polytypic sunbird widely distributed throughout evergreen, montane and coastal forests in Africa. Recently, it was split into two species, the Eastern Olive Sunbird (Nectarinia olivacea) and the Western Olive Sunbird (Nectarinia obscura), based on morphological grounds. Analyses of a 395bp fragment of the mtDNA NADH subunit 3 gene with flanking tRNA sequences, from 196 individuals of N. olivacea and 86 from N. obscura indicate that genetic divergence levels are low (1.0-2.4%) across some 9000km, from Ghana in the northwest of Africa to KwaZulu-Natal in eastern South Africa. Neither currently recognized Olive Sunbird species were monophyletic using either parsimony or likelihood tree-building methods. Phi(ST) values suggested that there was less variation partitioned among species than between most neighboring regions. Genetic diversity within the N. olivacea/obscura complex was dominated by three star-like phylogenies linked to each other by a single mutational step and two subnetworks (IV and V) separated from the core star-like phylogenies (subnetworks I, II, and III) by five to six mutational steps. The dominant evolutionary mechanism shaping genetic variation within the N. olivacea/obscura complex as identified by nested-clade analyses, appears to be one of range expansion possibly out of East Africa associated with a period of forest expansion during the mid-Pleistocene, some 1.1-0.7 million years ago. Mismatch profiles suggested that secondary contact has occurred between eastern and western lineages within the Ufipa Escarpment and possibly Zimbabwe, as well as between eastern lineages in the Kenyan Highlands and northern Eastern Arc

  16. Phylogeography of the flathead mullet Mugil cephalus in the north-west Pacific as inferred from the mtDNA control region.

    PubMed

    Jamandre, B W; Durand, J-D; Tzeng, W N

    2009-08-01

    The population genetic structure and historical demography of the flathead mullet Mugil cephalus were investigated using the mtDNA control region (CR) sequences (909-1015 bp) of 126 individuals collected from seven locations in the north-west Pacific between 2005 and 2007. Haplotype diversity (h = 0.9333-1.000) and nucleotide diversity (pi = 0.0046-0.1467) varied greatly among the sampling locations. Phylogenetic analysis of the CR sequences indicated that M. cephalus in the north-west Pacific belongs to two highly divergent lineages (lineages 1 and 2), with the inferred population structure being closely associated with the distribution of both lineages. Two populations were identified, one from the East China Sea and the other from the South China Sea. The former samples were obtained from Taiwan and Qingdao of north China and associated with lineage 1 haplotypes. The latter samples were collected from the Philippines, Pearl River of South China and two samples from Japan, all of which were associated with lineage 2. Japanese samples from Okinawa and Yokosuka had different degrees of mixing between lineages 1 and 2. Historical demographic variables in both populations indicated that Pleistocene glaciations had a strong impact on M. cephalus in the north-west Pacific, resulting in a recent demographic decline of the East China Sea population but in demographic equilibrium for the South China Sea population. Japan appears to be a contact zone between lineages 1 and 2, but it may also be indicative of coexistence between resident and migratory populations. Further global studies are required to clarify the taxonomic status of this cosmopolitan species.

  17. Teaching Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Sue; Butts, Jennifer Lease

    2011-01-01

    Integrity is one of those essential yet highly ambiguous concepts. For the purpose of this chapter, integrity is defined as that combination of both attributes and actions that makes entities appear to be whole and ethical, as well as consistent. Like the concepts of leadership or wisdom or community or collaboration, integrity is a key element of…

  18. The mtDNA nt7778 G/T polymorphism augments formation of lymphocytic foci but does not aggravate cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sarah; Krüger, Burkhard; Lange, Falko; Bock, Cristin N; Nizze, Horst; Glass, Änne; Ibrahim, Saleh M; Jaster, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A polymorphism in the ATP synthase 8 (ATP8) gene of the murine mitochondrial genome, G-to-T transversion at position 7778, has been suggested to increase susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The polymorphism also induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, secretory dysfunction and β-cell mass adaptation. Here, we have used two conplastic mouse strains, C57BL/6N-mtAKR/J (B6-mtAKR; nt7778 G; control) and C57BL/6N-mtFVB/N (B6-mtFVB; nt7778 T), to address the question if the polymorphism also affects the course of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Therefore, two age groups of mice (3 and 12-month-old, respectively) were subjected to up to 7 injections of the secretagogue cerulein (50 µg/kg body weight) at hourly intervals. Disease severity was assessed at time points from 3 hours to 7 days based on pancreatic histopathology, serum levels of α-amylase and activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lung tissue. A comparison of cerulein-induced pancreatic tissue damage and increases of α-amylase and MPO activities showed no differences between the age-matched groups of both strains. Interestingly, histological evaluation of pancreatic tissue of both untreated and cerulein-treated B6-mtAKR and B6-mtFVB mice also revealed the presence of infiltrates of immune cells surrounding ducts and vessels; a finding that is compatible with an early stage of AIP. After recovery from cerulein-induced pancreatitis (day 7 after the injections), 12-month-old B6-mtFVB mice but not B6-mtAKR mice displayed aggravated lymphocytic lesions. A comparison of 12-month-old mice with other age groups of both strains revealed that lymphocytic foci were largely absent in 3-month-old mice, while 24-month-old mice were more affected. Together, our data suggest that the mtDNA nt7778 G/T polymorphism does not aggravate cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Autoimmune-like lesions, however, may progress faster if additional tissue

  19. Genomic instability at the 13q31 locus and somatic mtDNA mutation in the D-loop site correlate with tumor aggressiveness in sporadic Brazilian breast cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Gilson Costa; de Souza Góes, Andréa Carla; de Vitto, Humberto; Moreira, Carla Cristina; Avvad, Elizabeth; Rumjanek, Franklin David; de Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitoria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genomic instability is a hallmark of malignant tissues. In this work, we aimed to characterize nuclear and mitochondrial instabilities by determining short tandem repeats and somatic mitochondrial mutations, respectively, in a cohort of Brazilian sporadic breast cancer cases. Furthermore, we performed an association analysis of the molecular findings and the clinical pathological data. METHODS: We analyzed 64 matched pairs of breast cancer and adjacent non-cancerous breast samples by genotyping 13 nuclear short tandem repeat loci (namely, D2S123, TPOX, D3S1358, D3S1611, FGA, D7S820, TH01, D13S317, D13S790, D16S539, D17S796, intron 12 BRCA1 and intron 1 TP53) that were amplified with the fluorescent AmpFlSTR Identifiler Genotyping system (Applied Biosystems, USA) and by silver nitrate staining following 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Somatic mtDNA mutations in the D-loop site were assessed with direct sequencing of the hypervariable HVI and HVII mitochondrial regions. RESULTS: Half of the cancer tissues presented some nuclear instability. Interestingly, the D13S790 locus was the most frequently affected (36%), while the D2S123 locus presented no alterations. Forty-two percent of the cases showed somatic mitochondrial mutations, the majority at region 303-315 poly-C. We identified associations between Elston grade III, instabilities at 13q31 region (p = 0.0264) and mtDNA mutations (p = 0.0041). Furthermore, instabilities at 13q31 region were also associated with TP53 mutations in the invasive ductal carcinoma cases (p = 0.0207). CONCLUSION: Instabilities at 13q31 region and the presence of somatic mtDNA mutations in a D-loop site correlated with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:23070345

  20. Increased p66Shc in the Inner Ear of D-Galactose-Induced Aging Mice with Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA 3873-bp Deletion: p66Shc and mtDNA Damage in the Inner Ear during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Juan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Ling-Li; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Xiang; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2012-01-01

    Aging has been associated with mitochondrial DNA damage. P66Shc is an age-related adaptor protein that has a substantial impact on mitochondrial metabolism through regulation of the cellular response to oxidative stress. Our study aimed to establish a D-galactose (D-gal)-induced inner ear aging mouse model and to investigate the potential role of p66Shc and its serine 36-phosphorylated form in the inner ear during aging by using this model. Real-time PCR was performed to detect the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion and the level of p66Shc mRNA in the cochlear lateral wall. Western blot analysis was performed to analyze the total and mitochondrial protein levels of p66Shc and the level of Ser36-P-p66Shc in the cochlear lateral wall. Immunofluoresence was performed to detect the location of the Ser36-P-p66Shc expression in the cochlear lateral wall. The results showed that the accumulation of the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion, total and mitochondrial protein levels of p66Shc and level of Ser36-P-p66Shc were significantly increased in the cochlear lateral wall of the D-gal-treated group when compared to the control group and that Ser36-P-p66Shc was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of the cells in the stria vascularis. During aging, the oxidative stress-related increase of p66Shc and Ser36-P-p66Shc might be associated with the accumulation of the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion in the inner ear. PMID:23209752

  1. Impact of a novel homozygous mutation in nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase on mitochondrial DNA integrity in a case of familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Yasuko; Napoli, Eleonora; Wong, Sarah; Song, Gyu; Yamaguchi, Rie; Matsui, Toshiharu; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Ogata, Tsutomu; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by isolated glucocorticoid deficiency. Recently, mutations in the gene encoding for the mitochondrial nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) have been identified as a causative gene for FGD; however, no NNT activities have been reported in FGD patients carrying NNT mutations. Methods Clinical, biochemical and molecular analyses of lymphocytes from FDG homozygous and heterozygous carriers for the F215S NNT mutation were performed. Results In this study, we described an FGD-affected Japanese patient carrying a novel NNT homozygous mutation (c.644T>C; F215S) with a significant loss-of-function (NNT activity = 31% of healthy controls) in peripheral blood cells' mitochondria. The NNT activities of the parents, heterozygous for the mutation, were 61% of the controls. Conclusions Our results indicated that (i) mitochondrial biogenesis (citrate synthase activity) and/or mtDNA replication (mtDNA copy number) were affected at ≤ 60% NNT activity because these parameters were affected in individuals carrying either one or both mutated alleles; and (ii) other outcomes (mtDNA deletions, protein tyrosine nitration, OXPHOS capacity) were affected at ≤ 30% NNT activity as also observed in murine cerebellar mitochondria from C57BL/6J (NNT−/−) vs. C57BL/6JN (NNT+/+) substrains. General significance By studying a family affected with a novel point mutation in the NNT gene, a gene–dose response was found for various mitochondrial outcomes providing for novel insights into the role of NNT in the maintenance of mtDNA integrity beyond that described for preventing oxidative stress. PMID:26309815

  2. Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnanakan, Ken

    2012-01-01

    This book upholds the idea of learning and education as a means to individual development and social empowerment. It presents a holistic picture, looking at learning as an integral part of one's social and physical life. Strongly differing from existing classroom perspectives, the book analyses integrated learning at its broadest possible…

  3. Integrated Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Integrated Science program that integrates biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics over a three-year, spiraling sequence arranged around broad themes such as cycles, changes, patterns, and waves. Includes weekly telecasts via public television and satellite, teacher manuals, student handbooks, e-mail connections, staff…

  4. Integrative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Dean

    1995-01-01

    In contrast with subject-bound education, integrative education promotes the construction of broad "mental programs" that require students to use skills and information in new, realistic contexts. Early childhood education has long been a model of integrative education, emphasizing the whole child and offering a wide range of experiences that…

  5. Integrated care

    PubMed Central

    Gröne, Oliver; Garcia-Barbero, Mila

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The WHO European Office for Integrated Health Care Services in Barcelona is an integral part of the World Health Organizations' Regional Office for Europe. The main purpose of the Barcelona office is within the integration of services to encourage and facilitate changes in health care services in order to promote health and improve management and patient satisfaction by working for quality, accessibility, cost-effectiveness and participation. This position paper outlines the need for Integrated Care from a European perspective, provides a theoretical framework for the meaning of Integrated Care and its strategies and summarizes the programmes of the office that will support countries in the WHO European Region to improve health services. PMID:16896400

  6. Integrative psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2008-09-01

    The main purposes of the article are to present the history of integration in psychotherapy, the reasons of the development integrative approaches, and the approaches to integration in psychotherapy. Three approaches to integration in psychotherapy exist: theoretical integration, theoretical eclecticism, and common factors in different psychotherapeutic trends. In integrative psychotherapy, the basic epistemology, theory, and clinical practice are based on the phenomenology, field theory, holism, dialogue, and co-creation of dialogue in the therapeutic relationship. The main criticism is that integrative psychotherapy suffers from confusion and many unresolved controversies. It is difficult to theoretically and methodologically define the clinically applied model that is based on such a different epistemological and theoretical presumptions. Integrative psychotherapy is a synthesis of humanistic psychotherapy, object relations theory, and psychoanalytical self psychology. It focuses on the dynamics and potentials of human relationships, with a goal of changing the relations and understanding internal and external resistances. The process of integrative psychotherapy is primarily focused on the developmental-relational model and co-creation of psychotherapeutic relationship as a single interactive event, which is not unilateral, but rather a joint endeavor by both the therapist and the patient/client. The need for a relationship is an important human need and represents a process of attunement that occurs as a response to the need for a relationship, a unique interpersonal contact between two people. If this need is not met, it manifests with the different feelings and various defenses. To meet this need, we need to have another person with whom we can establish a sensitive, attuned relationship. Thus, the therapist becomes this person who tries to supplement what the person did not receive. Neuroscience can be a source of integration through different therapies. We

  7. Genetic differences between the endangered San Clemente Island loggerhead shrike Lanius ludovicianus mearnsi and two neighbouring subspecies demonstrated by mtDNA control region and cytochrome b sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Mundy, N I; Winchell, C S; Woodruff, D S

    1997-01-01

    We investigated mtDNA sequence variation in five populations of the loggerhead shrike Lanius ludovicianus, representing four subspecies, including the San Clemente logger-head shrike L. l. mearnsi, a critically endangered California Channel Island endemic. Variability in 200 bp of control region and 200 bp of cytochrome b was extremely low, and defined four haplotypes. Strong structure was apparent among all three southern California subspecies, including L. l. mearnsi, with one haplotype predominating in each subspecies. Although potential levels of gene flow between L. l. mearnsi and neighbouring populations are low, mtDNA data support field observations that some shrikes visit the island during winter but do not stay to breed, and suggest that these birds come from the mainland. The similarity in haplotypes between populations from Saskatchewan, Canada and those in southern California suggests post-glacial northern range expansion of the species. Our results confirm the evolutionary distinctiveness of L. l. mearnsi and justify continuing efforts for its conservation.

  8. [The Dynamics of the Composition of mtDNA Haplotypes of the Ancient Population of the Altai Mountains from the Early Bronze Age (3rd Millennium BC) to the Iron Age (2nd-1st Centuries BC)].

    PubMed

    Gubina, M A; Kulikov, I V; Babenko, V N; Chikisheva, T A; Romaschenko, A G; Voevoda, M I; Molodin, V I

    2016-01-01

    The mtDNA polymorphism in representatives of various archaeological cultures of the Developed Bronze Age, Early Scythian, and Hunnish-Sarmatian periods was analyzed (N = 34). It detected the dominance of Western-Eurasian haplotypes (70.6%) in mtDNA samples from the representatives of the ancient population of the Early Bronze Age--Iron Age on the territory of Altai Mountains. Since the 8th to the 7th centuries BC, a sharp increase was revealed in the Eastern-Eurasian haplogroups A, D, C, andZ (43.75%) as compared to previous cultures (16.7%). The presence of haplotype 223-242-290-319 of haplogroup A8 in Dolgans, Itelmens, Evens, Koryaks, and Yakuts indicates the possible long-term presence of its carriers in areas inhabited by these populations. The prevalence of Western-Eurasian haplotypes is observed not only in the Altai Mountains but also in Central Asia (Kazakhstan) and the South of the Krasnoyarsk Krai. All of the three studied samples from the Western-Eurasian haplogroups were revealed to contain U, H, T, and HV. The ubiquitous presence of haplotypes of haplogroup H and some haplogroups of cluster U (U5al, U4, U2e, and K) in the vast territory from the Yenisei River basin to the Atlantic Ocean may indicate the direction of human settlement, which most likely occurred in the Paleolithic Period from Central Asia. PMID:27183799

  9. Functional Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, Pierre; DeWitt-Morette, Cecile

    2010-06-01

    Acknowledgements; List symbols, conventions, and formulary; Part I. The Physical and Mathematical Environment: 1. The physical and mathematical environment; Part II. Quantum Mechanics: 2. First lesson: gaussian integrals; 3. Selected examples; 4. Semiclassical expansion: WKB; 5. Semiclassical expansion: beyond WKB; 6. Quantum dynamics: path integrals and operator formalism; Part III. Methods from Differential Geometry: 7. Symmetries; 8. Homotopy; 9. Grassmann analysis: basics; 10. Grassmann analysis: applications; 11. Volume elements, divergences, gradients; Part IV. Non-Gaussian Applications: 12. Poisson processes in physics; 13. A mathematical theory of Poisson processes; 14. First exit time: energy problems; Part V. Problems in Quantum Field Theory: 15. Renormalization 1: an introduction; 16. Renormalization 2: scaling; 17. Renormalization 3: combinatorics; 18. Volume elements in quantum field theory Bryce DeWitt; Part VI. Projects: 19. Projects; Appendix A. Forward and backward integrals: spaces of pointed paths; Appendix B. Product integrals; Appendix C. A compendium of gaussian integrals; Appendix D. Wick calculus Alexander Wurm; Appendix E. The Jacobi operator; Appendix F. Change of variables of integration; Appendix G. Analytic properties of covariances; Appendix H. Feynman's checkerboard; Bibliography; Index.

  10. Functional Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, Pierre; DeWitt-Morette, Cecile

    2006-11-01

    Acknowledgements; List symbols, conventions, and formulary; Part I. The Physical and Mathematical Environment: 1. The physical and mathematical environment; Part II. Quantum Mechanics: 2. First lesson: gaussian integrals; 3. Selected examples; 4. Semiclassical expansion: WKB; 5. Semiclassical expansion: beyond WKB; 6. Quantum dynamics: path integrals and operator formalism; Part III. Methods from Differential Geometry: 7. Symmetries; 8. Homotopy; 9. Grassmann analysis: basics; 10. Grassmann analysis: applications; 11. Volume elements, divergences, gradients; Part IV. Non-Gaussian Applications: 12. Poisson processes in physics; 13. A mathematical theory of Poisson processes; 14. First exit time: energy problems; Part V. Problems in Quantum Field Theory: 15. Renormalization 1: an introduction; 16. Renormalization 2: scaling; 17. Renormalization 3: combinatorics; 18. Volume elements in quantum field theory Bryce DeWitt; Part VI. Projects: 19. Projects; Appendix A. Forward and backward integrals: spaces of pointed paths; Appendix B. Product integrals; Appendix C. A compendium of gaussian integrals; Appendix D. Wick calculus Alexander Wurm; Appendix E. The Jacobi operator; Appendix F. Change of variables of integration; Appendix G. Analytic properties of covariances; Appendix H. Feynman's checkerboard; Bibliography; Index.

  11. Integrative neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Evian

    2003-07-01

    A fundamental impediment to an "Integrative Neuroscience" is the sense that scientists building models at one particular scale often see that scale as the epicentre of all brain function. This fragmentation has begun to change in a very distinctive way. Multidisciplinary efforts have provided the impetus to break down the boundaries and encourage a freer exchange of information across disciplines and scales. Despite huge deficits of knowledge, sufficient facts about the brain already exist, for an Integrative Neuroscience to begin to lift us clear of the jungle of detail, and shed light upon the workings of the brain as a system. Integrations of brain theory can be tested using judicious paradigm designs and measurement of temporospatial activity reflected in brain imaging technologies. However, to test realistically these new hypotheses requires consistent findings of the normative variability in very large numbers of control subjects, coupled with high sensitivity and specificity of findings in psychiatric disorders. Most importantly, these findings need to be analyzed and modeled with respect to the fundamental mechanisms underlying these measures. Without this convergence of theory, databases, and methodology (including across scale physiologically realistic numerical models), the clinical utility of brain imaging technologies in psychiatry will be significantly impeded. The examples provided in this paper of integration of theory, temporospatial integration of neuroimaging technologies, and a numerical simulation of brain function, bear testimony to the ongoing conversion of an Integrative Neuroscience from an exemplar status into reality.

  12. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin–Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand–Levitan–Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  13. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  14. The Integrated Hazard Analysis Integrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry; Massie, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Hazard analysis addresses hazards that arise in the design, development, manufacturing, construction, facilities, transportation, operations and disposal activities associated with hardware, software, maintenance, operations and environments. An integrated hazard is an event or condition that is caused by or controlled by multiple systems, elements, or subsystems. Integrated hazard analysis (IHA) is especially daunting and ambitious for large, complex systems such as NASA s Constellation program which incorporates program, systems and element components that impact others (International Space Station, public, International Partners, etc.). An appropriate IHA should identify all hazards, causes, controls and verifications used to mitigate the risk of catastrophic loss of crew, vehicle and/or mission. Unfortunately, in the current age of increased technology dependence, there is the tendency to sometimes overlook the necessary and sufficient qualifications of the integrator, that is, the person/team that identifies the parts, analyzes the architectural structure, aligns the analysis with the program plan and then communicates/coordinates with large and small components, each contributing necessary hardware, software and/or information to prevent catastrophic loss. As viewed from both Challenger and Columbia accidents, lack of appropriate communication, management errors and lack of resources dedicated to safety were cited as major contributors to these fatalities. From the accident reports, it would appear that the organizational impact of managers, integrators and safety personnel contributes more significantly to mission success and mission failure than purely technological components. If this is so, then organizations who sincerely desire mission success must put as much effort in selecting managers and integrators as they do when designing the hardware, writing the software code and analyzing competitive proposals. This paper will discuss the necessary and

  15. Information Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation introduces the concept of Information Integrity, which is the detection and possible correction of information manipulation by any intermediary node in a communication system. As networks continue to grow in complexity, information theoretic security has failed to keep pace. As a result many parties whom want to communicate,…

  16. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  17. Human maternal heritage in Andalusia (Spain): its composition reveals high internal complexity and distinctive influences of mtDNA haplogroups U6 and L in the western and eastern side of region

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The archeology and history of the ancient Mediterranean have shown that this sea has been a permeable obstacle to human migration. Multiple cultural exchanges around the Mediterranean have taken place with presumably population admixtures. A gravitational territory of those migrations has been the Iberian Peninsula. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the maternal gene pool, by means of control region sequencing and PCR-RFLP typing, of autochthonous Andalusians originating from the coastal provinces of Huelva and Granada, located respectively in the west and the east of the region. Results The mtDNA haplogroup composition of these two southern Spanish populations has revealed a wide spectrum of haplogroups from different geographical origins. The registered frequencies of Eurasian markers, together with the high incidence and diversification of African maternal lineages (15% of the total mitochondrial variability) among Huelva Andalusians when compared to its eastwards relatives of Granada and other Iberian populations, constitute relevant findings unknown up-to-date on the characteristics of mtDNA within Andalusia that testifies a female population substructure. Therefore, Andalusia must not be considered a single, unique population. Conclusions The maternal legacy among Andalusians reflects distinctive local histories, pointing out the role of the westernmost territory of Peninsular Spain as a noticeable recipient of multiple and diverse human migrations. The obtained results underline the necessity of further research on genetic relationships in both sides of the western Mediterranean, using carefully collected samples from autochthonous individuals. Many studies have focused on recent North African gene flow towards Iberia, yet scientific attention should be now directed to thoroughly study the introduction of European genes in northwest Africa across the sea, in order to determine its magnitude, timescale and methods, and to compare them to

  18. Integrating maps requires integrated data

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenbach, J.; Bentolila, S.

    1996-06-01

    The molecular genetics movement has proceeded admirably thanks to new technologies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing. However, the integration of mapping data has not yet been achieved. This article discussing several problem areas and serves as a reminder of the urgency of such concerns.

  19. RADIATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Glass, F.M.; Wilson, H.N.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation detecting and measuring systems, particularly a compact, integrating, background monitor, are discussed. One of the principal features of the system is the use of an electrometer tube where the input of the tube is directly connected to an electrode of the radiation detector and a capacitor is coupled to the tube input. When a predetermined quantity of radiation has been integrated, a trigger signal is fed to a recorder and a charge is delivered to the capacitor to render the tube inoperative. The capacitor is then recharged for the next period of operation. With this arrangement there is a substantial reduction in lead lengths and the principal components may be enclosed and hermetically sealed to insure low leakage.

  20. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  1. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  2. Nonplanar integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Warren; de Mello Koch, Robert; Lin, Hai

    2011-03-01

    In this article we study operators with a dimension Δ ˜ O( N) and show that simple analytic expressions for the action of the dilatation operator can be found. The operators we consider are restricted Schur polynomials. There are two distinct classes of operators that we consider: operators labeled by Young diagrams with two long columns or two long rows. The main complication in working with restricted Schur polynomials is in building a projector from a given S n+ m irreducible representation to an S n × S m irreducible representation (both specified by the labels of the restricted Schur polynomial). We give an explicit construction of these projectors by reducing it to the simple problem of addition of angular momentum in ordinary non-relativistic quantum mechanics. The diagonalization of the dilatation operator reduces to solving three term recursion relations. The fact that the recursion relations have only three terms is a direct consequence of the weak mixing at one loop of the restricted Schur polynomials. The recursion relations can be solved exactly in terms of symmetric Kravchuk polynomials or in terms of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. This proves that the dilatation operator reduces to a decoupled set of harmonic oscillators and therefore it is integrable.

  3. [Genetic variation and phylogeography of the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, Arvicolinae, Rodentia) in Russia with special reference to the introgression of the mtDNA of a closely related species, red-backed vole (C. rutilus)].

    PubMed

    Abramson, N I; Rodchenkova, E N; Kostygov, A Iu

    2009-05-01

    Totally, 294 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and 18 red-backed voles (C. rutilus) from 62 sites of European Russia were studied. Incomplete sequences (967 bp) of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for 93 C. glareolus individuals from 56 sites and 18 C. rutilus individuals from the same habitats. Analysis of the cytochrome b gene variation has demonstrated that practically the entire European part of Russia, Ural, and a considerable part of Western Europe are inhabited by bank voles of the same phylogroup, displaying an extremely low genetic differentiation. Our data suggest that C. glareolus very rapidly colonized over the presently occupied territory in the post-Pleistocene period from no more than two (central European and western European) refugia for ancestral populations with a small efficient size. PCR typing of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene allowed us to assess the scale of mtDNA introgression from a closely related species, C. rutilus, and to outline the geographical zone of this introgression. Comparison with the red-backed vole haplotypes in the habitats shared by both species favors the hypothesis of an ancient hybridization event (mid-Holocene) and a subsequent introgression. These results suggest that the hybridization took place in the southern and middle Pre-Ural region. PMID:19534420

  4. MRPS18CP2 alleles and DEFA3 absence as putative chromosome 8p23.1 modifiers of hearing loss due to mtDNA mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Ballana, Ester; Mercader, Josep Maria; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Estivill, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations account for at least 5% of cases of postlingual, nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Among them, mutation A1555G is frequently found associated with aminoglycoside-induced and/or nonsyndromic hearing loss in families presenting with extremely variable clinical phenotypes. Biochemical and genetic data have suggested that nuclear background is the main factor involved in modulating the phenotypic expression of mutation A1555G. However, although a major nuclear modifying locus was located on chromosome 8p23.1 and regardless intensive screening of the region, the gene involved has not been identified. Methods With the aim to gain insights into the factors that determine the phenotypic expression of A1555G mutation, we have analysed in detail different genetic and genomic elements on 8p23.1 region (DEFA3 gene absence, CLDN23 gene and MRPS18CP2 pseudogene) in a group of 213 A1555G carriers. Results Family based association studies identified a positive association for a polymorphism on MRPS18CP2 and an overrepresentation of DEFA3 gene absence in the deaf group of A1555G carriers. Conclusion Although none of the factors analysed seem to have a major contribution to the phenotype, our findings provide further evidences of the involvement of 8p23.1 region as a modifying locus for A1555G 12S rRNA gene mutation. PMID:18154640

  5. The Genetic Integrity of the Ex Situ Population of the European Wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) Is Seriously Threatened by Introgression from Domestic Cats (Felis silvestris catus)

    PubMed Central

    Witzenberger, Kathrin A.; Hochkirch, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the genetic diversity and relatedness of zoo populations are crucial for implementing successful breeding programmes. The European wildcat, Felis s. silvestris, is subject to intensive conservation measures, including captive breeding and reintroduction. We here present the first systematic genetic analysis of the captive population of Felis s. silvestris in comparison with a natural wild population. We used microsatellites and mtDNA sequencing to assess genetic diversity, structure and integrity of the ex situ population. Our results show that the ex situ population of the European wildcat is highly structured and that it has a higher genetic diversity than the studied wild population. Some genetic clusters matched the breeding lines of certain zoos or groups of zoos that often exchanged individuals. Two mitochondrial haplotype groups were detected in the in situ populations, one of which was closely related to the most common haplotype found in domestic cats, suggesting past introgression in the wild. Although native haplotypes were also found in the captive population, the majority (68%) of captive individuals shared a common mtDNA haplotype with the domestic cat (Felis s. catus). Only six captive individuals (7.7%) were assigned as wildcats in the STRUCTURE analysis (at K = 2), two of which had domestic cat mtDNA haplotypes and only two captive individuals were assigned as purebred wildcats by NewHybrids. These results suggest that the high genetic diversity of the captive population has been caused by admixture with domestic cats. Therefore, the captive population cannot be recommended for further breeding and reintroduction. PMID:25162450

  6. The genetic integrity of the ex situ population of the European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) is seriously threatened by introgression from domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus).

    PubMed

    Witzenberger, Kathrin A; Hochkirch, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the genetic diversity and relatedness of zoo populations are crucial for implementing successful breeding programmes. The European wildcat, Felis s. silvestris, is subject to intensive conservation measures, including captive breeding and reintroduction. We here present the first systematic genetic analysis of the captive population of Felis s. silvestris in comparison with a natural wild population. We used microsatellites and mtDNA sequencing to assess genetic diversity, structure and integrity of the ex situ population. Our results show that the ex situ population of the European wildcat is highly structured and that it has a higher genetic diversity than the studied wild population. Some genetic clusters matched the breeding lines of certain zoos or groups of zoos that often exchanged individuals. Two mitochondrial haplotype groups were detected in the in situ populations, one of which was closely related to the most common haplotype found in domestic cats, suggesting past introgression in the wild. Although native haplotypes were also found in the captive population, the majority (68%) of captive individuals shared a common mtDNA haplotype with the domestic cat (Felis s. catus). Only six captive individuals (7.7%) were assigned as wildcats in the STRUCTURE analysis (at K = 2), two of which had domestic cat mtDNA haplotypes and only two captive individuals were assigned as purebred wildcats by NewHybrids. These results suggest that the high genetic diversity of the captive population has been caused by admixture with domestic cats. Therefore, the captive population cannot be recommended for further breeding and reintroduction. PMID:25162450

  7. The genetic integrity of the ex situ population of the European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) is seriously threatened by introgression from domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus).

    PubMed

    Witzenberger, Kathrin A; Hochkirch, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the genetic diversity and relatedness of zoo populations are crucial for implementing successful breeding programmes. The European wildcat, Felis s. silvestris, is subject to intensive conservation measures, including captive breeding and reintroduction. We here present the first systematic genetic analysis of the captive population of Felis s. silvestris in comparison with a natural wild population. We used microsatellites and mtDNA sequencing to assess genetic diversity, structure and integrity of the ex situ population. Our results show that the ex situ population of the European wildcat is highly structured and that it has a higher genetic diversity than the studied wild population. Some genetic clusters matched the breeding lines of certain zoos or groups of zoos that often exchanged individuals. Two mitochondrial haplotype groups were detected in the in situ populations, one of which was closely related to the most common haplotype found in domestic cats, suggesting past introgression in the wild. Although native haplotypes were also found in the captive population, the majority (68%) of captive individuals shared a common mtDNA haplotype with the domestic cat (Felis s. catus). Only six captive individuals (7.7%) were assigned as wildcats in the STRUCTURE analysis (at K = 2), two of which had domestic cat mtDNA haplotypes and only two captive individuals were assigned as purebred wildcats by NewHybrids. These results suggest that the high genetic diversity of the captive population has been caused by admixture with domestic cats. Therefore, the captive population cannot be recommended for further breeding and reintroduction.

  8. Elliptic integrals: Symmetry and symbolic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.C. |

    1997-12-31

    Computation of elliptic integrals, whether numerical or symbolic, has been aided by the contributions of Italian mathematicians. Tricomi had a strong interest in iterative algorithms for computing elliptic integrals and other special functions, and his writings on elliptic functions and elliptic integrals have taught these subjects to many modern readers (including the author). The theory of elliptic integrals began with Fagnano`s duplication theorem, a generalization of which is now used iteratively for numerical computation in major software libraries. One of Lauricella`s multivariate hypergeometric functions has been found to contain all elliptic integrals as special cases and has led to the introduction of symmetric canonical forms. These forms provide major economies in new integral tables and offer a significant advantage also for symbolic integration of elliptic integrals. Although partly expository the present paper includes some new proofs and proposes a new procedure for symbolic integration.

  9. Integrating mitochondriomics in children’s environmental health

    PubMed Central

    Brunst, Kelly J.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of scientific research linking environmental exposures and childhood health outcomes continues to grow; yet few studies have teased out the mechanisms involved in environmentally-induced diseases. Cells can respond to environmental stressors in many ways: inducing oxidative stress/inflammation, changes in energy production and epigenetic alterations. Mitochondria, tiny organelles that each retains their own DNA, are exquisitely sensitive to environmental insults and are thought to be central players in these pathways. While it is intuitive that mitochondria play an important role in disease processes, given that every cell of our body is dependent on energy metabolism, it is less clear how environmental exposures impact mitochondrial mechanisms that may lead to enhanced risk of disease. Many of the effects of the environment are initiated in utero and integrating mitochondriomics into children’s environmental health studies is a critical priority. This review will highlight (i) the importance of exploring environmental mitochondriomics in children’s environmental health, (ii) why environmental mitochondriomics is well suited to biomarker development in this context, and (iii) how molecular and epigenetic changes in mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may reflect exposures linked to childhood health outcomes. PMID:26046650

  10. Evaluating Simultaneous Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwong, Harris

    2012-01-01

    Many integrals require two successive applications of integration by parts. During the process, another integral of similar type is often invoked. We propose a method which can integrate these two integrals simultaneously. All we need is to solve a linear system of equations.

  11. Rapamycin reverses age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, oxidative stress, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, and lipofuscin level, and increases autophagy, in the liver of middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cisuelo, V; Gómez, J; García-Junceda, I; Naudí, A; Cabré, R; Mota-Martorell, N; López-Torres, M; González-Sánchez, M; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2016-10-01

    Rapamycin consistently increases longevity in mice although the mechanism of action of this drug is unknown. In the present investigation we studied the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial oxidative stress at the same dose that is known to increase longevity in mice (14mgofrapamycin/kg of diet). Middle aged mice (16months old) showed significant age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, mitochondrial protein lipoxidation, and lipofuscin accumulation compared to young animals (4months old) in the liver. After 7weeks of dietary treatment all those increases were totally or partially (lipofuscin) abolished by rapamycin, middle aged rapamycin-treated animals showing similar levels in those parameters to young animals. The decrease in mitochondrial ROS production was due to qualitative instead of quantitative changes in complex I. The decrease in mitochondrial protein lipoxidation was not due to decreases in the amount of highly oxidizable unsaturated fatty acids. Rapamycin also decreased the amount of RAPTOR (of mTOR complex) and increased the amounts of the PGC1-α and ATG13 proteins. The results are consistent with the possibility that rapamycin increases longevity in mice at least in part by lowering mitochondrial ROS production and increasing autophagy, decreasing the derived final forms of damage accumulated with age which are responsible for increased longevity. The decrease in lipofuscin accumulation induced by rapamycin adds to previous information suggesting that the increase in longevity induced by this drug can be due to a decrease in the rate of aging. PMID:27498120

  12. Rapamycin reverses age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, oxidative stress, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, and lipofuscin level, and increases autophagy, in the liver of middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cisuelo, V; Gómez, J; García-Junceda, I; Naudí, A; Cabré, R; Mota-Martorell, N; López-Torres, M; González-Sánchez, M; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2016-10-01

    Rapamycin consistently increases longevity in mice although the mechanism of action of this drug is unknown. In the present investigation we studied the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial oxidative stress at the same dose that is known to increase longevity in mice (14mgofrapamycin/kg of diet). Middle aged mice (16months old) showed significant age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, mitochondrial protein lipoxidation, and lipofuscin accumulation compared to young animals (4months old) in the liver. After 7weeks of dietary treatment all those increases were totally or partially (lipofuscin) abolished by rapamycin, middle aged rapamycin-treated animals showing similar levels in those parameters to young animals. The decrease in mitochondrial ROS production was due to qualitative instead of quantitative changes in complex I. The decrease in mitochondrial protein lipoxidation was not due to decreases in the amount of highly oxidizable unsaturated fatty acids. Rapamycin also decreased the amount of RAPTOR (of mTOR complex) and increased the amounts of the PGC1-α and ATG13 proteins. The results are consistent with the possibility that rapamycin increases longevity in mice at least in part by lowering mitochondrial ROS production and increasing autophagy, decreasing the derived final forms of damage accumulated with age which are responsible for increased longevity. The decrease in lipofuscin accumulation induced by rapamycin adds to previous information suggesting that the increase in longevity induced by this drug can be due to a decrease in the rate of aging.

  13. TIPs for Technology Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Susan; Sorge, Dennis H.; Russell, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of the teacher in effectively using technology in education based on the Technology Integration Project (TIP). Topics include why use technology; types of computer software; how to select software; software integration strategies; and effectively planning lessons that integrate the chosen software and integration strategy. (LRW)

  14. Slimplectic Integrators: Variational Integrators for Nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David

    2016-05-01

    Symplectic integrators are widely used for long-term integration of conservative astrophysical problems due to their ability to preserve the constants of motion; however, they cannot in general be applied in the presence of nonconservative interactions. Here we present the “slimplectic” integrator, a new type of numerical integrator that shares many of the benefits of traditional symplectic integrators yet is applicable to general nonconservative systems. We utilize a fixed-time-step variational integrator formalism applied to a newly developed principle of stationary nonconservative action (Galley, 2013, Galley et al 2014). As a result, the generalized momenta and energy (Noether current) evolutions are well-tracked. We discuss several example systems, including damped harmonic oscillators, Poynting–Robertson drag, and gravitational radiation reaction, by utilizing our new publicly available code to demonstrate the slimplectic integrator algorithm. Slimplectic integrators are well-suited for integrations of systems where nonconservative effects play an important role in the long-term dynamical evolution. As such they are particularly appropriate for cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g., gas interactions or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

  15. Slimplectic Integrators: Variational Integrators for Nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David

    2016-01-01

    Symplectic integrators are widely used for long-term integration of conservative astrophysical problems due to their ability to preserve the constants of motion; however, they cannot in general be applied in the presence of nonconservative interactions. In this Letter, we develop the "slimplectic" integrator, a new type of numerical integrator that shares many of the benefits of traditional symplectic integrators yet is applicable to general nonconservative systems. We utilize a fixed-time-step variational integrator formalism applied to the principle of stationary nonconservative action developed in Galley et al. As a result, the generalized momenta and energy (Noether current) evolutions are well-tracked. We discuss several example systems, including damped harmonic oscillators, Poynting-Robertson drag, and gravitational radiation reaction, by utilizing our new publicly available code to demonstrate the slimplectic integrator algorithm. Slimplectic integrators are well-suited for integrations of systems where nonconservative effects play an important role in the long-term dynamical evolution. As such they are particularly appropriate for cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g., gas interactions or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

  16. Two Related Parametric Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, T.

    2007-01-01

    Two related sequences of definite integrals are considered. By mixing hand-work, computer algebra system assistance and websurfing, fine connections can be studied between integrals and a couple of interesting sequences of integers. (Contains 4 tables.)

  17. Integration in action.

    PubMed

    Green, Sara; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2012-09-01

    The workshop on 'Integration in Biology and Biomedicine' was held in May 2012 at the University of Sydney. It brought together scientists and philosophers to discuss the need for, and practice of, integration in the life sciences.

  18. Quality Integrated Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazziel, William

    1978-01-01

    Integrated education as it exists in many communities is actually harmful to black children and works to devastate rather than develop black talent; proponents of school integration must put effort into improving the quality of all schools. (JD)

  19. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  20. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  1. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  2. Boolean integral calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.; Tapia, Moiez A.; Bennett, A. Wayne

    1988-01-01

    The concept of Boolean integration is developed, and different Boolean integral operators are introduced. Given the changes in a desired function in terms of the changes in its arguments, the ways of 'integrating' (i.e. realizing) such a function, if it exists, are presented. The necessary and sufficient conditions for integrating, in different senses, the expression specifying the changes are obtained. Boolean calculus has applications in the design of logic circuits and in fault analysis.

  3. Integrated Education. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Jennifer, Ed.; Vandercook, Terri, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This "feature issue" provides various perspectives on a number of integrated education topics, including successful integration practices and strategies, the changing roles of teachers, the appropriate role of research, the history and future of integrated education, and the realization of dreams of life in the mainstream for children with severe…

  4. Sledge-Hammer Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahner, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Integration (here visualized as a pounding process) is mathematically realized by simple transformations, successively smoothing the bounding curve into a straight line and the region-to-be-integrated into an area-equivalent rectangle. The relationship to Riemann sums, and to the trapezoid and midpoint methods of numerical integration, is…

  5. Social Integration and Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Longitudinal data on over 1,300 married persons suggest that divorce was deterred by absence of divorce in reference group (normative integration) and was deterred for shorter marriages by more friends and organizational affiliations (communicative integration). Sharing friends and organization affiliations with spouse (functional integration) may…

  6. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Krainak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  7. Genetics of healthy aging in Europe: the EU-integrated project GEHA (GEnetics of Healthy Aging).

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Claudio; Bezrukov, Vladyslav; Blanché, Hélène; Bolund, Lars; Christensen, Kaare; de Benedictis, Giovanna; Deiana, Luca; Gonos, Efsthatios; Hervonen, Antti; Yang, Huanning; Jeune, Bernard; Kirkwood, Tom B L; Kristensen, Peter; Leon, Alberta; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Peltonen, Leena; Poulain, Michel; Rea, Irene Maeve; Remacle, José; Robine, Jean Marie; Schreiber, Stefan; Sikora, Ewa; Slagboom, Pieternella Eline; Spazzafumo, Liana; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Toussaint, Olivier; Vaupel, James W

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the 5-year European Union (EU)-Integrated Project GEnetics of Healthy Aging (GEHA), constituted by 25 partners (24 from Europe plus the Beijing Genomics Institute from China), is to identify genes involved in healthy aging and longevity, which allow individuals to survive to advanced old age in good cognitive and physical function and in the absence of major age-related diseases. To achieve this aim a coherent, tightly integrated program of research that unites demographers, geriatricians, geneticists, genetic epidemiologists, molecular biologists, bioinfomaticians, and statisticians has been set up. The working plan is to: (a) collect DNA and information on the health status from an unprecedented number of long-lived 90+ sibpairs (n = 2650) and of younger ethnically matched controls (n = 2650) from 11 European countries; (b) perform a genome-wide linkage scannning in all the sibpairs (a total of 5300 individuals); this investigation will be followed by linkage disequilibrium mapping (LD mapping) of the candidate chromosomal regions; (c) study in cases (i.e., the 2650 probands of the sibpairs) and controls (2650 younger people), genomic regions (chromosome 4, D4S1564, chromosome 11, 11.p15.5) which were identified in previous studies as possible candidates to harbor longevity genes; (d) genotype all recruited subjects for apoE polymorphisms; and (e) genotype all recruited subjects for inherited as well as epigenetic variability of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The genetic analysis will be performed by 9 high-throughput platforms, within the framework of centralized databases for phenotypic, genetic, and mtDNA data. Additional advanced approaches (bioinformatics, advanced statistics, mathematical modeling, functional genomics and proteomics, molecular biology, molecular genetics) are envisaged to identify the gene variant(s) of interest. The experimental design will also allow (a) to identify gender-specific genes involved in healthy aging and longevity

  8. Misconceptions and Integration

    PubMed Central

    MORTAZ HEJRI, SARA; MIRZAZADEH, AZIM; JALILI, MOHAMMAD

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pervasive beliefs regarding curricular reform and integration have flourished among medical students, faculty members and medical school administrators. These concepts have extensively impacted the reform process, sometimes by resisting the reforms and sometimes by diverting the curriculum from its planned objectives. In the current paper, we have tried to address the challenges of integration in MD program by looking at the existing literature and the experience of the international universities. Methods We collected the questions frequently asked during the curricular reform process. We, then, evaluated them, and selected 5 main ideas. In order to find their answers, we searched the literature using these keywords: integration, reform, and undergraduate medical curriculum. Results The findings are discussed in five sections: 1) Reform is not equivalent to integration, 2) Integration can be implemented in both high school and graduate programs, 3) Organ-system based integration is not the only method available for integration, 4) Integration of two phases (basic sciences and physiopathology) can be considered but it is not mandatory, 5) Integration does not fade basic sciences in favor of clinical courses. Conclusion It seems that medical education literature and prior experience of the leading universities do not support most of the usual concepts about integration. Therefore, it is important to consider informed decision making based on best evidence rather than personal opinions during the curricular reform process. PMID:26457318

  9. Faces of integration

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul; Sullivan, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Theme Two central themes permeate this paper—the interplay between structure and agency in integration processes and the extent to which this is mediated through sensemaking by individual actors. Case study The empirical base for the paper is provided by case study research from Wales which draws on examples of different types of integration in health and social care. The individual case studies highlight different interpretations of integration set against a background of the resources involved, processes employed and outcomes achieved. Discussion A wide ranging discussion exposes the complex interplay and dynamics between structural factors and the manner in which they enable or constrain integration, and individual actors realising their potential agency through leadership, professionalism and boundary spanning to influence outcomes. The importance of structure and agency complementing each other to determine effective integration is emphasised, together with the scope that is available for interpretation and meaning by individual actors within the contested discourse of integration. PMID:20087420

  10. Integrated Marketing Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Integration has become a cliche in enrollment management and student services circles. The term is used to describe everything from integrated marketing to seamless services. Often, it defines organizational structures, processes, student information systems, and even communities. In Robert Sevier's article in this issue of "College and…

  11. Elementary Integrated Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Elementary Integrated Curriculum (EIC) Framework is the guiding curriculum document for the Elementary Integrated Curriculum and represents the elementary portion of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) Pre-K-12 Curriculum Frameworks. The EIC Framework contains the detailed indicators and objectives that describe what…

  12. System integration report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Korein, J. D.; Meyer, C.; Manoochehri, K.; Rovins, J.; Beale, J.; Barr, B.

    1985-01-01

    Several areas that arise from the system integration issue were examined. Intersystem analysis is discussed as it relates to software development, shared data bases and interfaces between TEMPUS and PLAID, shaded graphics rendering systems, object design (BUILD), the TEMPUS animation system, anthropometric lab integration, ongoing TEMPUS support and maintenance, and the impact of UNIX and local workstations on the OSDS environment.

  13. Integration in Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sworder, Steven C.

    This paper presents an application of integration to the field of hydraulics. An integral relation for the time required to drop the fluid contained in a cylindrical tank from one level to another using a hole in the tank wall is derived. Procedures for constructing the experimental equipment and procedures for determining the coefficient of…

  14. Academic Research Integration System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surugiu, Iula; Velicano, Manole

    2008-01-01

    This paper comprises results concluding the research activity done so far regarding enhanced web services and system integration. The objective of the paper is to define the software architecture for a coherent framework and methodology for enhancing existing web services into an integrated system. This document presents the research work that has…

  15. Integrated Assessments for ELL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armon, Joan; Morris, Linda J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the challenges posed by increased time, specialized vocabularies, and balance, integrating writing and drawing with science investigations is beneficial for teachers and students. This month's column explains why this integrated approach is beneficial, and illustrates how teachers can use it to meet the needs of students learning English…

  16. An Integrated Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Marie R.; Seiferth, Berniece B.

    This integrated teaching module provides elementary and junior high school teachers with a "hands-on" approach to studying the Anasazi Indian. Emphasis is on creative exploration that focuses on integrating art, music, poetry, writing, geography, dance, history, anthropology, sociology, and archaeology. Replicas of artifacts, contemporary Indian…

  17. The Fresnel Integrals Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    This note presents another elementary method to evaluate the Fresnel integrals. It is interesting to see that this technique is also strong enough to capture a number of pairs of parameter integrals. The main ingredients of the method are the consideration of some related derivatives and linear differential equations.

  18. Undulator Field Integral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-07

    The LCLS undulator field integrals must be very small so that the beam trajectory slope and offset stay within tolerance. In order to make accurate measurements of the small field integrals, a long coil will be used. This note desc