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Sample records for ecuador reforma constitucional

  1. Ecuador.

    PubMed

    1991-06-01

    Background notes and statistics on Ecuador are provided in the document. 271,000 sq. km. of jungle are encompassed by the country, with a 1990 population of 11 million growing at the annual rate of 2.4%. The work force total 3.4 million. Ecuador claims a population comprised of 4 ethnic groups, predominantly Roman Catholic, and speaking Spanish in addition to Indian languages. 6 years of education are compulsory, with the country overall enjoying 88% literacy. The infant mortality rate is 51/1,000, while life expectancy is 66 years. 1990 GDP was $10.9 billion, and was growing at the rate of 1.5%. Per capita income was $1,043, while 1990 figures reported 50% inflation. Agriculture accounts for 17% of GNP, industry for 16%; 1990 international trade surplus totalled $0.7 billion. Additional data are provided on Ecuador's people, government, economy, international affiliations, history, political conditions, principal government officials, foreign relations, and bilateral relations with the United States. Structural reform brought economic improvement in 1989. Public sector spending was tightened, monetary growth slowed, and external accounts improved. While progress stalled in 1990, additional steps combined with higher oil prices were expected to reduce the deficit and moderate inflation. Further reductions in government control over the economy, movement toward free-market interest rates, privatization of selected companies, trade liberalization, labor law reform, and the promotion of domestic and foreign private investment are called for.

  2. Ecuador.

    PubMed

    1986-10-01

    In 1986, Ecuador's population stood at 9.6 million, with an annual growth rate of 2.8%. The infant mortality rate was 76.3/1000; life expectancy was 62 years. Of the work force of 2.9 million, 34% were engaged in agriculture, 35% were in the service sector, 12% were employed in industry, 12% were in sales, and 7% were in other occupations. Ecuador's 16 legal political parties represent a variety of views, none of which predominates. The gross domestic product was US$12.1 billion in 1985, with a per capita income of $1299 and an inflation rate of 24%. The economy's impressive performance in 1984 and 1985 is largely attributable to the trade sector's surplus and improvements in the balance of payments. Rescheduling the external debt has been a government priority. An agreement has been signed with the Overseas Private Investment Corporation to encourage new foreign investment and subsidies have been reduced and price control ceilings have been raised to reform the domestic economy. However, the economic outlook for 1986 remains uncertain because of sharply lower petroleum prices. PMID:12177922

  3. Ecuador.

    PubMed

    1986-10-01

    In 1986, Ecuador's population stood at 9.6 million, with an annual growth rate of 2.8%. The infant mortality rate was 76.3/1000; life expectancy was 62 years. Of the work force of 2.9 million, 34% were engaged in agriculture, 35% were in the service sector, 12% were employed in industry, 12% were in sales, and 7% were in other occupations. Ecuador's 16 legal political parties represent a variety of views, none of which predominates. The gross domestic product was US$12.1 billion in 1985, with a per capita income of $1299 and an inflation rate of 24%. The economy's impressive performance in 1984 and 1985 is largely attributable to the trade sector's surplus and improvements in the balance of payments. Rescheduling the external debt has been a government priority. An agreement has been signed with the Overseas Private Investment Corporation to encourage new foreign investment and subsidies have been reduced and price control ceilings have been raised to reform the domestic economy. However, the economic outlook for 1986 remains uncertain because of sharply lower petroleum prices.

  4. REFORMA Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    1996-01-01

    Reports on the first national conference of REFORMA, the National Association to Promote Library Services to the Spanish Speaking. Discusses REFORMA's activist history and describes conference programs geared toward promoting cultural awareness to help libraries build relationships with Hispanic and Latino communities. Attendees shared concerns…

  5. Spotlight: Ecuador.

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    This article describes the vital statistics and population growth in Ecuador as of mid-1997. Mid-1997 population numbered about 12 million. Fertility was 3.6 births/woman; deaths were 6/1000 population; and births were 29/1000 population. Ecuador was primarily an agricultural country, until oil was discovered in the early 1970s. The country has worked to increase per capita income and confront environmental consequences. The capital city of Quito is situated in a valley between two mountains and has very high air pollution levels due to cars and factories. In contrast, indigenous populations live in the Andean mountains and farm small plots. Land shortages have pushed these farmers onto higher slopes and more marginal land that is becoming eroded. 22% of Ecuador's forests were cleared for farming during 1980-90. The city of Guayaquil, on the Pacific coast, has serious water pollution problems, sewage problems, and industrial pollution. Shrimp farming relies on high levels of fertilizer, which is damaging coastlines. Oil exploration in the interior of Ecuador, has resulted in disruption of indigenous population, loss of forests, and pollution of rivers. Texaco Oil is accused of spilling about 17 million gallons of crude oil, or 50 times more than the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. Texaco argues that it met government environmental standards and agreed to a cleanup, which only partially meets the standards of its critics. Oil resources have funded improvements in education and health. About 90% of Ecuador's adult population is literate. Fertility has declined, but the population is still largely young and will be entering their reproductive years by 2025.

  6. Spotlight: Ecuador.

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    This article describes the vital statistics and population growth in Ecuador as of mid-1997. Mid-1997 population numbered about 12 million. Fertility was 3.6 births/woman; deaths were 6/1000 population; and births were 29/1000 population. Ecuador was primarily an agricultural country, until oil was discovered in the early 1970s. The country has worked to increase per capita income and confront environmental consequences. The capital city of Quito is situated in a valley between two mountains and has very high air pollution levels due to cars and factories. In contrast, indigenous populations live in the Andean mountains and farm small plots. Land shortages have pushed these farmers onto higher slopes and more marginal land that is becoming eroded. 22% of Ecuador's forests were cleared for farming during 1980-90. The city of Guayaquil, on the Pacific coast, has serious water pollution problems, sewage problems, and industrial pollution. Shrimp farming relies on high levels of fertilizer, which is damaging coastlines. Oil exploration in the interior of Ecuador, has resulted in disruption of indigenous population, loss of forests, and pollution of rivers. Texaco Oil is accused of spilling about 17 million gallons of crude oil, or 50 times more than the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. Texaco argues that it met government environmental standards and agreed to a cleanup, which only partially meets the standards of its critics. Oil resources have funded improvements in education and health. About 90% of Ecuador's adult population is literate. Fertility has declined, but the population is still largely young and will be entering their reproductive years by 2025. PMID:12293549

  7. Area Handbook for Ecuador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Thomas E.; And Others

    This volume on Ecuador is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of the American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of various countries. The emphasis is on…

  8. Ecuador. America = Las Americas [Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor; Doran, Sandra

    Designed for elementary teachers to use with migrant students, this bilingual English/Spanish social studies resource booklet provides an encyclopedia-style overview of Ecuador's history, geography, economy, and culture. Topics include the history of Ecuador's flag and coat of arms, geographic regions, food, Quito (the capital), recent wildlife…

  9. Ecuador's silent health reform.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Pierre; Echeverría Tapia, Ramiro; Aguilar Santacruz, Edison; Unger, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Health sector reform was implemented in many Latin American countries in the 1980s and 1990s, leading to reduced public expenditure on health, limitations on public provision for disease control, and a minimum package of services, with concomitant growth of the private sector. At first sight, Ecuador appeared to follow a different pattern: no formal reform was implemented, despite many plans to reform the Ministry of Health and social health insurance. The authors conducted an in-depth review and analysis of published and gray literature on the Ecuadorian health sector from 1990 onward. They found that although neoliberal reform of the health sector was not openly implemented, many of its typical elements are present: severe reduction of public budgets, "universal" health insurance with limited coverage for targeted groups, and contracting out to private providers. The health sector remains segmented and fragmented, explaining the population's poor health status. The leftist Correa government has prepared an excellent long-term plan to unite services of the Ministry of Health and social security, but implementation is extremely slow. In conclusion, the health sector in Ecuador suffered a "silent" neoliberal reform. President Correa's progressive government intends to reverse this, increasing public budgets for health, but hesitates to introduce needed radical changes.

  10. First MAGDAS Equipment in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, E.; Maeda, G.; Vicente, K.; Yumoto, K.; Vasquez, N.; Matsushita, H.; Shishime, A.; Vasconez, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) was installed in the protected Jerusalem Park in Malchingui- Ecuador in October of 2012, under the joint collabo ration between Kyushu University of Japan and the Quito Astronomical Observatory of the National Polytechnic School of Ecuador. In this paper, we describe the installation process and present the preliminary data obtained with the MAGDAS equip ment. The behavior of the four components, D, H, Z and F allow us to see the importance of having the Ecuador station where the magnetic field has not been systematically measured before, in valuable contribution to study the equatorial electrodynamics.

  11. Water quality assessment in Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Chudy, J.P.; Arniella, E.; Gil, E.

    1993-02-01

    The El Tor cholera pandemic arrived in Ecuador in March 1991, and through the course of the year caused 46,320 cases, of which 692 resulted in death. Most of the cases were confined to cities along Ecuador's coast. The Water and Sanitation for Health Project (WASH), which was asked to participate in the review of this request, suggested that a more comprehensive approach should be taken to cholera control and prevention. The approach was accepted, and a multidisciplinary team consisting of a sanitary engineer, a hygiene education specialist, and an institutional specialist was scheduled to carry out the assessment in late 1992 following the national elections.

  12. Migration and circulation in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Brea, J A

    1991-01-01

    "This study investigates labor mobility in Ecuador as a function of the socioeconomic structure of places and personal attributes of migrants and circulators (short-term movers).... Particular attention is given to the role of agrarian change in altering established migration and circulation patterns." The author finds that "circulation may significantly alter family organization and the role of women in many Ecuadorian communities."

  13. Shrimp Farms, Ecuador

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In many parts of the world, wetlands are being converted to shrimp ponds in order to farm these crustaceans for food and sale. One example is on the west coast of Ecuador, south of Guayaquil. The 1991 Landsat image on top shows a coastal area where 143 square kilometers of wetlands were converted to shrimp ponds. By the time ASTER acquired the bottom image in 2001, 243 square kilometers had been converted, eliminating 83% of the wetlands. These scenes cover an area of 30 x 31 km, and are centered near 3.4 degrees south latitude and 80.2 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 30 by 31 kilometers (18.6 by 19.2 miles) Location: 3.4 degrees South latitude, 80.2 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data

  14. Topography and Landforms of Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Warner, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    EXPLANATION The digital elevation model of Ecuador represented in this data set was produced from over 40 individual tiles of elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Each tile was downloaded, converted from its native Height file format (.hgt), and imported into a geographic information system (GIS) for additional processing. Processing of the data included data gap filling, mosaicking, and re-projection of the tiles to form one single seamless digital elevation model. For 11 days in February of 2000, NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), the German Aerospace Center (DLR), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) flew X-band and C-band radar interferometry onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor. The mission covered the Earth between 60?N and 57?S and will provide interferometric digital elevation models (DEMs) of approximately 80% of the Earth's land mass when processing is complete. The radar-pointing angle was approximately 55? at scene center. Ascending and descending orbital passes generated multiple interferometric data scenes for nearly all areas. Up to eight passes of data were merged to form the final processed SRTM DEMs. The effect of merging scenes averages elevation values recorded in coincident scenes and reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the amount of area with layover and terrain shadow effects. The most significant form of data processing for the Ecuador DEM was gap-filling areas where the SRTM data contained a data void. These void areas are a result of radar shadow, layover, standing water, and other effects of terrain, as well as technical radar interferometry phase unwrapping issues. To fill these gaps, topographic contours were digitized from 1:50,000 - scale topographic maps which date from the mid-late 1980's (Souris, 2001). Digital contours were gridded to form elevation models for void areas and subsequently were merged with the SRTM data through GIS and remote sensing image-processing techniques

  15. Language Planning and Policy in Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kendall A.; Haboud, Marleen

    2002-01-01

    This monograph presents up-to-date information concerning language planning and policy in Ecuador, highlighting the country's cultural and linguistic diversity, historical context, current sociolinguistic situation and possible directions for the future. Taking into account Ecuador's particular sociopolitical conditions, it aims to provide a…

  16. Developing Intercultural Science Education in Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroder, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This article traces the recent development of intercultural science education in Ecuador. It starts by situating this development within the context of a growing convergence between Western and indigenous sciences. It then situates it within the larger historical, political, cultural, and educational contexts of indigenous communities in Ecuador,…

  17. Malaria in Highlands of Ecuador since 1900

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Fiona F.

    2012-01-01

    A recent epidemic of malaria in the highlands of Bolivia and establishment of multiple Anopheles species mosquitoes in the highlands of Ecuador highlights the reemergence of malaria in the Andes Mountains in South America. Because malaria was endemic to many highland valleys at the beginning of the 20th century, this review outlines the 20th century history of malaria in the highlands of Ecuador, and focuses on its incidence (e.g., geographic distribution) and elimination from the northern highland valleys of Pichincha and Imbabura and the role of the Guayaquil to Quito railway in creating highland larval habitat and inadvertently promoting transportation of the vector and parasite. Involvement of control organizations in combating malaria in Ecuador is also outlined in a historical context. PMID:22469234

  18. Cockroaches (Blattaria) of Ecuador-checklist and history of research.

    PubMed

    Vidlička, Lubomír

    2013-01-09

    Cockroaches are an understudied group and the total number of described taxa increases every year. The last checklist of Ecuador species was published in 1926. The main aim of this study was to complete a new checklist of cockroach species recorded in Ecuador supplemented with a research history of cockroaches (Blattaria) on the territory of continental Ecuador. In addition, the checklist contains comments on Ecuadorian faunistic records, including the Galápagos Islands. A total of 114 species (105 in continental Ecuador and 18 in Galápagos Islands) belonging to 6 families and 44 genera are listed. Forty species (38.1 %) occur solely in continental Ecuador and five (27.8 %) are endemic on Galápagos Islands. The results indicate that further research on the cockroach fauna of Ecuador as well as determination of museum collections from this territory is needed.

  19. REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program: A Mentoring Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauler, Sandra

    Although mentoring dates back to Greek mythology, the concept continues to thrive in today's society. Mentoring is a strategy that successful people have known about for centuries. The REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program has made use of this strategy since its inception in November 1985 at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  20. Rabies Epidemiology and Control in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Prado, Esteban; Ponce-Zea, Jorge; Ramirez, Dario; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M.; Armijos, Luciana; Yockteng, Jaime; Cárdenas, Washington B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Describe the epidemiology and the control effort for rabies in Ecuador. Methods: This observational study included data from the Ecuadorian National Institute of Census and Statistics (INEC), and mortality and morbidity data reported by the Ministry of Public Health and the National Institute for Social Security. We conducted a phylogeny analyses to compare the N gene from the Challenge Virus Standard (CVS) vaccine strain used in Ecuador with published Cosmopolitan, Asian and Sylvatic strains. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to determine the significance of the data. Results: In 1996 Ecuador suffered the highest rate of rabies per capita in the Americas, with an incidence rate of 0.56 cases per 100 000 people per year. Human and canine rabies showed a sharp decline until 2012. Between 1994 and 2014, we found a correlation of 0.925 (p<0.01) between annual cases of dog and human rabies. In 2011, there was an epidemic of sylvatic rabies transmitted to people by vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) in the Amazon region, specifically in Morona Santiago, leading to 11 fatalities. Phylogenetic analyses of the CVS vaccine N gene showed an association with urban canine rabies strains (the Cosmopolitan lineage and Asian strains), whereas sylvatic rabies, like those reported in the Amazon region, were found to be grouped in a different clade represented mainly by bat-derived strains. Conclusions: This study presents the first compilation of epidemiological data on rabies in Ecuador. The incidence of human and canine rabies, also known as urban rabies, has clearly decreased due to massive canine vaccination campaigns. Phylogenetic analysis of the prevailing vaccine used in the country showed a clear separation from bat-derived rabies, the source of recent rabies outbreaks. Efforts are ongoing to develop rabies vaccines that are highly specific to the rabies virus genotype circulating in the region, including sylvatic rabies. These efforts include the

  1. Early Man Site Found in Highland Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Oakes, W J; Bell, R E

    1960-06-17

    Field investigations in Ecuador have produced archeological evidence for the occupation of the northern Andes by early nomadic hunters. Surface collections and test excavations have demonstrated a complex of stone tools with typological relationships to level I at Fell's Cave in southern Chile, and technological relationships to the late Pleistocene "fluted point" complexes of North America. The date of these materials is estimated at 7000 to 8000 B.C.

  2. Exploration and development at crossroads in Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    This paper reports that Ecuador's oil and gas sector has reached a pivotal point in its history. After several years of fairly brisk activity, foreign operators recently began scaling back exploration in Ecuador. They cited results that haven't met expectations and persistent delays in obtaining approval by state owned Petroecuador for development of reserves that have been discovered. Foreign oil companies had anticipated the pace of development would accelerate in Ecuador in early 1992, but major projects generally remained in limbo for most of this year. At presstime, however, there were signs of an encouraging follow-through in promised reforms in the permitting process. Petroecuador in April-May approved two of those projects and a third in June. Of the 13 oil companies or groups that had signed exploration contracts with the state oil company since 1985, several companies have terminated their operations in the country, and only one company, Oryx Energy Co., Dallas, is producing a small volume of oil. Two other companies have been negotiating exploration rights for about 2 years, with contracts yet to be signed.

  3. [Health systems and traditional medicine in Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Ortega, F

    1988-01-01

    2 systems of health care coexist in Ecuador. The traditional system combines elements of the indigenous system, the modifications brought by the Incas, and elements of medieval European medical theory and practice. The official medical system comprising both public and private institutions is inaccessible for large sectors of the population due to shortages of manpower and materials and high costs of services. The official system tends to address itself primarily to the relatively high income urban population. Ecuador's high infant mortality rate of 64/1000 attests to the limitations of its health care system. The traditional system provides care for much of the rural population and areas where western medical care is not available, but it is also represented in the city. According to traditional beliefs, illness is a social phenomenon indicating a problem in relations with one's peers, nature, or supernatural beings. Traditional disease classifications are different from those of western medicine and show strong regional variation. Improvements in health conditions in Ecuador should take into account the coexistence of multiple medical practices serving large numbers of people.

  4. Schooling, Blackness and National Identity in Esmeraldas, Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ethan

    2007-01-01

    In Esmeraldas, Ecuador, students of African descent make sense of racial identity and discrimination in multiple and contradictory ways as they negotiate the dominant discourse of national identity. In Ecuador two simultaneous processes shape the dominant discourse of national identity: racial mixture and the movement towards Whiteness. This study…

  5. 75 FR 22207 - Importation of Papayas From Colombia and Ecuador

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... published in the Federal Register (74 FR 18161-18166, Docket No. APHIS-2008-0050) a proposal\\1\\ to amend the... Colombia and Ecuador AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... importation of commercial shipments of fresh papayas from Colombia and Ecuador into the continental...

  6. A new species of Symplocos (Symplocaceae) from southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa Ulloa, Carmen; Ståhl, Bertil; Minga, Danilo; Ansaloni, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species from Ecuador, Symplocos limonensis, is here described and illustrated. It resembles Symplocos clethrifolia but differs by having larger leaves with evident (i.e., not concealed) areoles on lower surface, sessile inflorescences, smaller white corollas, and fewer stamens. The species is only known from three collections in the Andean forests of Morona-Santiago Province in southern Ecuador. PMID:26491385

  7. Stratigraphy of Reforma Caldera, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Sánchez, L.; Macias, J. L.; Osorio, L. S.; Pola, A.; Avellán, D. R.; Arce, J. L.; Saucedo, R.; Sánchez, J. M.; García-Tenorio, F.; Cisneros, G.; Reyes-Agustín, G.; Cardona, S.; Jimenez, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Reforma caldera is located at ~35 km to the northwest of Santa Rosalía in the central part of the Baja California peninsula. It has 10 km in diameter and a maximum height of 1200 masl in the center and between 100 and 500 masl in its slopes. Reforma is within a tectonic zone affected by two fault systems: A NW-SE normal fault system linked to the opening of the Gulf of California, and a NNW-SSE and NW-SE strike-slip fault system associated with an active Riedel system. Reforma was built upon Cretaceous granites that outcrop at the caldera center, Miocene to Pliocene volcano-sedimentary rocks of the Comondú group, and Miocene marine sediments of the Santa Rosalía basin. On top of these rocks outcrop at least four submarine to subaerial ignimbrites interbedded with marine fossiliferous beds and the lower Pleistocene deposits associated to the Reforma caldera. These deposits are formed by a ignimbrite that shifts to different lithofacies that change gradually their welding, here dubbed basal, transitional, intermediate, and upper (all of then enriched in black fiammes), followed by a pumice-rich, white fiammes, and vitrophyre lithofacies, which are distributed around the 9 km wide caldera and have been associated to the caldera formation episode. Deposits related to post-caldera volcanism are andesite-basaltic lava flows erupted along the caldera rim through localized feeding dikes and andesitic and rhyolitic domes, and scoria cinder cones exposed inside and outside the caldera. On top of these deposits rest the middle Pleistocene Aguajito caldera deposits.

  8. Butyltin compounds and imposex levels in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ítalo Braga; Arroyo, Maria Fernanda; Costa, Patrícia Gomes; Fillmann, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    The first appraisal of butyltins (BT) contamination linked with imposex incidence in the Pacific coast of South America was performed in the current study. Imposex occurrence was analyzed in three muricid species (Thais biserialis, T. brevidentata, and T. kiosquiformis) distributed along 14 sites from the coastal areas of Ecuador. All studied muricids species showed imposex, which was observed in 11 out of 14 sites. The highest imposex levels were observed in T. kiosquiformis collected inside the Gulf of Guayaquil [relative penis length index (RPLI) 9.0-40.7], whereas RPLI values for T. biserialis and T. brevidentata ranged from 4.0 to 26.1 and 0.0 to 1.9, respectively. Additionally, BT compounds [tributyltin (TBT), dibutylin (DBT), and monobutylin (MBT)] were determined in surface sediments collected in 6 of the sites (main harbor areas), and values ranged between 12.7 and 99.5 ng Sn g(-1) (dry weight) for TBT, 1.8 and 54.4 ng Sn g(-1) for DBT, and 44 and 340 ng Sn g(-1) for MBT. Although BT degradation indexes suggested an aged input of TBT, the high imposex levels detected in the current study suggest that international restrictions on TBT based antifouling paints were still not effective in Ecuador. Considering that the southern coast, especially nearby harbors inside the Gulf of Guayaquil, have shown to be contaminated by BTs, a combination of T. kiosquiformis and T. biserialis (the most sensitive species) can be used for future biomonitoring of Ecuador coastal areas.

  9. Craniofacial malformation among endemic cretins in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Israel, H; Johnson, G F; Fierro-Benitez, R

    1983-01-01

    Nearly 6% of the inhabitants of two villages in Ecuador are deaf-mute and mentally retarded cretins. These communities are situated in the Andean highlands where environmental and dietary stores of iodine are extremely scarce. Endemic goiter and cretinism are widespread, and 10% of the cretins are additionally burdened with dwarfism and facial dysmorphia. Those with obvious involvement of the skeletal system were selected in order to study the extent of craniofacial malformation. Their appearance is characterized by midface hypoplasia, a broad nose with a depressed bridge, and a conspicuous circumoral prominence. Radiographic evaluation demonstrates a vertical displacement of the cranial base with an associated upward tilt of the midface. The flattened frontal bone, reduced frontal sinus pneumatization, and diminutive nasal bones collectively create a backward sloping face. The defect in the craniofacial skeleton of these Ecuadorian cretins is characteristic, and it readily sets them apart from the dysmorphism of those cretins with myxedema. PMID:6874895

  10. Cutaneous leishmaniasis "chiclero's ulcer" in subtropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Martinez, Leonardo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2013-08-01

    An 18-year-old female presented with a severe ulcerative lesion on her right ear of 6 weeks duration. Her right ear was edematous and erythematous with a large, painless ulcerative lesion covering a third of the pinna and satellite papular lesions on the posterior. She was diagnosed with chiclero's ulcer. A skin smear stained with Diff-quik showed abundant Leishmania parasites. Chiclero's ulcer is a rare clinical presentation and is typically severe and difficult to treat. Physicians in Ecuador recommend administering prolonged intramuscular Glucantime. Side effects are common and can be severe resulting in low patient compliance. Because of preferences of the patient and the large volume needed for her weight, we recommended topical treatment with a lotion of Glucantime mixed half and half with white Merthiolate. After applying this lotion to the lesion 3 to 4 times a day for 6 weeks, the lesion healed.

  11. Critical Phenomena of Rainfall in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Sh.; Vasquez, N.; Jacome, P.; Basile, L.

    2014-02-01

    Self-organized criticality (SOC) is characterized by a power law behavior over complex systems like earthquakes and avalanches. We study rainfall using data of one day, 3 hours and 10 min temporal resolution from INAMHI (Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia e Hidrologia) station at Izobamba, DMQ (Metropolitan District of Quito), satellite data over Ecuador from Tropical Rainfall Measure Mission (TRMM,) and REMMAQ (Red Metropolitana de Monitoreo Atmosferico de Quito) meteorological stations over, respectively. Our results show a power law behavior of the number of rain events versus mm of rainfall measured for the high resolution case (10 min), and as the resolution decreases this behavior gets lost. This statistical property is the fingerprint of a self-organized critical process (Peter and Christensen, 2002) and may serve as a benchmark for models of precipitation based in phase transitions between water vapor and precipitation (Peter and Neeling, 2006).

  12. Autecology of microorganisms of typical Ecuador biotopes.

    PubMed

    Tashyrev, O B; Pidgorskyi, V S; Toro, Miguel Naranjo; Gualoto, Miguel; Gladka, G V; Tashyreva, H O; Rokitko, P V; Romanovskaya, V A

    2014-01-01

    34 strains of aerobic chemoorganotrophic microorganisms were isolated from 23 soil and plant samples selected from highland biotopes of Ecuador-Andes massif (Papallacta, 4020 m), ash at the foot of the volcano Tungurahua, mountainous jungle (La Favorita, 1600 m), as well as in humid tropic botanical garden (state Puyo, 950 m). In mountain jungle samples the high number of bacteria--10(5)-10(7) CFU/g of sample were represented by 2-5 morphotypes. In highland (4020 m) samples the bacterial counts made from 10(2) to 10(7) CFU/g of sample. The current study describes resistance of isolated strains to high salinity, UV radiation and toxic metal ions. The majority of isolated strains were halotolerant. Isolates from volcanic ash showed high resistance level to UV radiation--LD99,99 made 1000-1440 J/m2; resistance level for isolates from the soil of Puyo Botanical Garden and isolates from rock lichen (Papallacta) LD99,99 made 1160 and 800 J/m2 respectively. Strains isolated from mountain jungle (La Favorita) showed lower UV-resistance. In highland biotopes of Ecuador occurred bacteria resistant to toxic metal ions. The highest resistance to Hg2+ was shown by isolate of lichen from mountain jungle, the maximal growth concentration was 0.025 g/L; to Cr(VI)--by isolate from lichen rock massif--3,0 g/L. Correlation between metal-resistance, halotolerace and UV resistance for studied strains was not detected, probably because of different microbial cell damage/repair mechanisms under the action of these factors. PMID:25639037

  13. Autecology of microorganisms of typical Ecuador biotopes.

    PubMed

    Tashyrev, O B; Pidgorskyi, V S; Toro, Miguel Naranjo; Gualoto, Miguel; Gladka, G V; Tashyreva, H O; Rokitko, P V; Romanovskaya, V A

    2014-01-01

    34 strains of aerobic chemoorganotrophic microorganisms were isolated from 23 soil and plant samples selected from highland biotopes of Ecuador-Andes massif (Papallacta, 4020 m), ash at the foot of the volcano Tungurahua, mountainous jungle (La Favorita, 1600 m), as well as in humid tropic botanical garden (state Puyo, 950 m). In mountain jungle samples the high number of bacteria--10(5)-10(7) CFU/g of sample were represented by 2-5 morphotypes. In highland (4020 m) samples the bacterial counts made from 10(2) to 10(7) CFU/g of sample. The current study describes resistance of isolated strains to high salinity, UV radiation and toxic metal ions. The majority of isolated strains were halotolerant. Isolates from volcanic ash showed high resistance level to UV radiation--LD99,99 made 1000-1440 J/m2; resistance level for isolates from the soil of Puyo Botanical Garden and isolates from rock lichen (Papallacta) LD99,99 made 1160 and 800 J/m2 respectively. Strains isolated from mountain jungle (La Favorita) showed lower UV-resistance. In highland biotopes of Ecuador occurred bacteria resistant to toxic metal ions. The highest resistance to Hg2+ was shown by isolate of lichen from mountain jungle, the maximal growth concentration was 0.025 g/L; to Cr(VI)--by isolate from lichen rock massif--3,0 g/L. Correlation between metal-resistance, halotolerace and UV resistance for studied strains was not detected, probably because of different microbial cell damage/repair mechanisms under the action of these factors.

  14. 78 FR 13325 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigations, 78 FR 5416 (January 25, 2013) (Initiation Notice...-815] Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia... frozen warmwater shrimp from the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia,...

  15. 75 FR 22370 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, Ecuador, India, the People's Republic of China...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Canned Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador, 69 FR 76913 (December 23, 2004) (Ecuador Final Determination..., 70 FR 5156 (February 1, 2005) (Ecuador Amended Final Determination & Order); Notice of Amended Final... Value: Certain Frozen and Canned Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, 69 FR 76910 (December 23, 2004)...

  16. The cross politics of Ecuador's penal state.

    PubMed

    Garces, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines inmate "crucifixion protests" in Ecuador's largest prison during 2003-04. It shows how the preventively incarcerated-of whom there are thousands-managed to effectively denounce their extralegal confinement by embodying the violence of the Christian crucifixion story. This form of protest, I argue, simultaneously clarified and obscured the multiple layers of sovereign power that pressed down on urban crime suspects, who found themselves persecuted and forsaken both outside and within the space of the prison. Police enacting zero-tolerance policies in urban neighborhoods are thus a key part of the penal state, as are the politically threatened family members of the indicted, the sensationalized local media, distrustful neighbors, prison guards, and incarcerated mafia. The essay shows how the politico-theological performance of self-crucifixion responded to these internested forms of sovereign violence, and were briefly effective. The inmates' cross intervention hence provides a window into the way sovereignty works in the Ecuadorean penal state, drawing out how incarceration trends and new urban security measures interlink, and produce an array of victims. PMID:20662147

  17. The cross politics of Ecuador's penal state.

    PubMed

    Garces, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines inmate "crucifixion protests" in Ecuador's largest prison during 2003-04. It shows how the preventively incarcerated-of whom there are thousands-managed to effectively denounce their extralegal confinement by embodying the violence of the Christian crucifixion story. This form of protest, I argue, simultaneously clarified and obscured the multiple layers of sovereign power that pressed down on urban crime suspects, who found themselves persecuted and forsaken both outside and within the space of the prison. Police enacting zero-tolerance policies in urban neighborhoods are thus a key part of the penal state, as are the politically threatened family members of the indicted, the sensationalized local media, distrustful neighbors, prison guards, and incarcerated mafia. The essay shows how the politico-theological performance of self-crucifixion responded to these internested forms of sovereign violence, and were briefly effective. The inmates' cross intervention hence provides a window into the way sovereignty works in the Ecuadorean penal state, drawing out how incarceration trends and new urban security measures interlink, and produce an array of victims.

  18. New species of Solanum (Solanaceae) from Peru and Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of “non-spiny" Solanum are described from Peru and Ecuador, and a revised description for Solanum verecundum M. Nee is presented. Solanum kulliwaita S. Knapp, sp. nov. (Dulcamaroid clade) is endemic to the Department of Cuzco in southern Peru, and is most similar to the recently described Solanum sanchez-vegae S. Knapp of northern Peru. Solanum dillonii S. Knapp, sp. nov. (Brevantherum clade) is found in southern Ecuador and northern Peru in the Amotape-Huancabamba phytogeographic zone, and is morphologically similar to the widespread Solanum riparium Ruiz & Pav. Solanum oxapampense S. Knapp, sp. nov., (also of the Brevantherum clade) is endemic to the Oxapampa region (Department of Pasco) of central Peru, and is similar to and segregated from Solanum verecundum M. Nee of Peru and Ecuador. Complete descriptions, distributions and preliminary conservation assessments of all new species are given. PMID:22171167

  19. NEW RECORDS OF PHLEBOTOMINE SAND FLIES (DIPTERA: PSYCHODIDAE) FROM ECUADOR.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lynn A; Cohnstaedt, Lee W; Beati, Lorenza; Terán, Rommy; León, Renato; Munstermann, Leonard E

    2010-01-01

    The number of recorded phlebotomine sand fly species in Ecuador has nearly doubled during the past 20 years as a result of surveys. In 2005, a sand fly survey of two localities, Tiputini in the Amazon rain forest and Paraiso Escondido in the Pacific coastal lowland forest, resulted in the capture of 25 species. New records for Ecuador consisted of five species from the Amazonian region and one from Paraiso Escondido. The Amazonian species were Nyssomyia richardwardi (Ready and Fraiha), Psathyromyia dreisbachi (Causey and Damasceno), Psathyromyia runoides (Fairchild and Hertig), Trichophoromyia pabloi (Barretto, Burbano and Young), and Trichopygomyia witoto (Young and Morales). The Pacific coastal lowland species was Psathyromyia punctigeniculata (Floch and Abonnenc).

  20. Ecuador--Land of Contrasts. Kindergarten-Third Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsen, Mary Lou

    This primary social studies unit, designed to teach an awareness of the Americas, is appropriate for teaching kindergarten through third grade students about Ecuador. The activities could easily be adapted to fit Mexico and many other countries in Central and South America. Eleven basic concepts are developed in this unit. The concepts are: (1)…

  1. Regional selection of hybrid Nacional cacao genotypes in Coastal Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent international demand for “nacional” flavour cacao has increased the need for local cacao producers in Ecuador to use high-yielding “nacional” hybrid genotypes. The relative potential of cacao genotypes over various environments needs to be assessed prior to final selection of potential candid...

  2. The Foundation of Counseling in the Republic of Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Valarezo, Maria Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Counseling is at an early stage of development in the Republic of Ecuador. A turbulent history, poverty, and unemployment have affected the growth of mental health services and counselor preparation programs. Yet, this country experiences problems of addictions, domestic violence, depression, suicide, gender inequity, and drug trafficking. The…

  3. Voices of Contact: Politics of Language in Urban Amazonian Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wroblewski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a study of diverse linguistic resources and contentious identity politics among indigenous Amazonian Kichwas in the city of Tena, Ecuador. Tena is a rapidly developing Amazonian provincial capital city with a long history of interethnic and interlinguistic contact. In recent decades, the course of indigenous Kichwa identity…

  4. Study on the mortality in Ecuador related to dietary factors.

    PubMed

    Neira-Mosquera, Juan Alejandro; Pérez-Rodríguez, Fernando; Sánchez-Llaguno, Sungey; Moreno Rojas, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Diet is an important factor related to the development of numerous diseases. In developing countries like Ecuador, this aspect is not considered as priority however, the study of the incidence of certain diet-related diseases could help to assess consumption habits of a country from a Public Health perspective and support national nutrition policies and programs. The objective the present study is to investigate the mortality rate of certain diet-related diseases in Ecuador and its possible relationship with Ecuadorian consumption habits. For that, mortality rates (2001-2008) associated with five different disease groups related to dietary factors (cancer of colon, cerebrovascular diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and liver diseases) were collected, analyzed and compared to consumption patterns in Ecuador. According to results, Ecuador has a low level of cancer of colon in comparison with developed countries (e.g. Spain). The group with the highest number of deaths corresponded to cardiovascular diseases followed by cerebrovascular diseases. The mortality study per province revealed that Amazonian provinces showed few deaths in relation to other provinces in Ecuador. This could be due to different factors including fails in the disease surveillance information systems, environmental factors and consumption patterns. In this sense, further investigation on native products consumption such as "chontaduro" might help to find valuable foods contributing to healthier Ecuadorian diet. These results, though preliminary, evidence that a major effort should be made by national and international organisations to collect data on consumption patterns and nutritional aspects of the Ecuadorian population in order to better support the development of effective food security and nutrition policies. PMID:24160240

  5. Study on the mortality in Ecuador related to dietary factors.

    PubMed

    Neira-Mosquera, Juan Alejandro; Pérez-Rodríguez, Fernando; Sánchez-Llaguno, Sungey; Moreno Rojas, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Diet is an important factor related to the development of numerous diseases. In developing countries like Ecuador, this aspect is not considered as priority however, the study of the incidence of certain diet-related diseases could help to assess consumption habits of a country from a Public Health perspective and support national nutrition policies and programs. The objective the present study is to investigate the mortality rate of certain diet-related diseases in Ecuador and its possible relationship with Ecuadorian consumption habits. For that, mortality rates (2001-2008) associated with five different disease groups related to dietary factors (cancer of colon, cerebrovascular diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and liver diseases) were collected, analyzed and compared to consumption patterns in Ecuador. According to results, Ecuador has a low level of cancer of colon in comparison with developed countries (e.g. Spain). The group with the highest number of deaths corresponded to cardiovascular diseases followed by cerebrovascular diseases. The mortality study per province revealed that Amazonian provinces showed few deaths in relation to other provinces in Ecuador. This could be due to different factors including fails in the disease surveillance information systems, environmental factors and consumption patterns. In this sense, further investigation on native products consumption such as "chontaduro" might help to find valuable foods contributing to healthier Ecuadorian diet. These results, though preliminary, evidence that a major effort should be made by national and international organisations to collect data on consumption patterns and nutritional aspects of the Ecuadorian population in order to better support the development of effective food security and nutrition policies.

  6. Lahar Hazard Modeling at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, O. E.; Rose, W. I.; Jaya, D.

    2003-04-01

    lahar-hazard-zones using a digital elevation model (DEM), was used to construct a hazard map for the volcano. The 10 meter resolution DEM was constructed for Tungurahua Volcano using scanned topographic lines obtained from the GIS Department at the Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito, Ecuador. The steep topographic gradients and rapid downcutting of most rivers draining the edifice prevents the deposition of lahars on the lower flanks of Tungurahua. Modeling confirms the high degree of flow channelization in the deep Tungurahua canyons. Inundation zones observed and shown by LAHARZ at Baños yield identification of safe zones within the city which would provide safety from even the largest magnitude lahar expected.

  7. New species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) from Colombia and Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Monné, Marcela L; Monné, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of Hemilophini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae) are described: Chrysaperda mimica sp. nov. and Malacoscylus nearnsi sp. nov. from Ecuador, and Eulachnesia boteroi sp. nov. from Colombia.

  8. 78 FR 33347 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador: Preliminary Negative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... production or exportation of the subject merchandise in Ecuador. For companies not individually investigated... (Penaeus vannemei), banana prawn (Penaeus merguiensis), fleshy prawn (Penaeus chinensis), giant river...

  9. The current status of female physicists in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitarra, Silvana; Ayala, Paola

    2015-12-01

    Although the number of female physicists in Ecuador is still relatively low, many of them have already obtained a postgraduate degree abroad. The return of these women to the country has begun to have a positive effect on the discipline as whole. In particular, the fields of particle physics, biophysics, and condensed matter have experienced significant development in the last few years. The policies for networking and collaboration among local and international universities have changed radically in Ecuador, a country with limited resources. This paper provides the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics with an overview of the work of Ecuadorian female physicists and the changes in laws that aid the development of science in general.

  10. Unacceptable "occupational" exposure to toxic agents among children in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Harari, R; Forastiere, F; Axelson, O

    1997-09-01

    To document the problem of child labor as a health issue, we report here three case-studies in Ecuador: exposure to mercury among gold washers, exposure to organophosphates and carbamates in the fruit-growing industry, and exposure to solvents among shoe cleaners. We measured the relevant biological indicators of exposure (mercury in urine, urinary levels of phenols, and acetylcholine esterase in erythrocytes) among selected samples of 10 children for each working place. In all the case studies, the values of the biological indicators showed elevated exposure to well-known toxicants, which are now rare in developed countries, even among adult workers. The findings meld with a previously reported case study of intoxication from inorganic lead among children employed in the manufacture of roof tiles in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to properly evaluate and control the potential health effects due to exposure to toxic substances among children employed in different occupations in several parts of the world.

  11. NEW RECORDS OF PHLEBOTOMINE SAND FLIES (DIPTERA: PSYCHODIDAE) FROM ECUADOR

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lynn A.; Cohnstaedt, Lee W.; Beati, Lorenza; Terán, Rommy; León, Renato; Munstermann, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    The number of recorded phlebotomine sand fly species in Ecuador has nearly doubled during the past 20 years as a result of surveys. In 2005, a sand fly survey of two localities, Tiputini in the Amazon rain forest and Paraiso Escondido in the Pacific coastal lowland forest, resulted in the capture of 25 species. New records for Ecuador consisted of five species from the Amazonian region and one from Paraiso Escondido. The Amazonian species were Nyssomyia richardwardi (Ready and Fraiha), Psathyromyia dreisbachi (Causey and Damasceno), Psathyromyia runoides (Fairchild and Hertig), Trichophoromyia pabloi (Barretto, Burbano and Young), and Trichopygomyia witoto (Young and Morales). The Pacific coastal lowland species was Psathyromyia punctigeniculata (Floch and Abonnenc). PMID:22628901

  12. A new species of Lonchophylla Thomas (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) from Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albuja V., Luis; Gardner, Alfred L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe Lonchophylla orcesi, sp. nov., from the Choco, a region of high biotic diversity, endemism, and rainfall along the western Andean slopes and Pacific lowlands of Colombia and Ecuador. One of the largest known Lonchophylla, it occurs sympatrically with at least two other species of Lonchophylla including the similar, but somewhat smaller L. robusta. We also recognize L. concava as a Middle American Province species distinct from L. mordax of Brazil and Bolivia on the basis of cranial and dental features.

  13. Systemic canine histoplasmosis: A case report from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Yépez, Julio R.; Ortega-Paredes, David A.; Barba, Pedro M.; Mafla-Endara, Paola M.; Zurita, Jeannete.

    2015-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a zoonotic systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum. We report a case of a female canine, 4 years old, presenting multifocal lymphadenitis and skin and gingival lesions, in Ecuador. Based on cytological, histopathological, histochemical analyses, fungal culture and DNA sequencing of the ITS region of the fungus, the diagnosis confirmed the presence of H. capsulatum as the agent of infection. The treatment plan included ketoconazole with a satisfactory outcome. PMID:26199868

  14. The PC/Ecuador biogas program: considerations for future development

    SciTech Connect

    Warpeha, P.R.

    1980-06-28

    Biogas, the production of methane fuel and fertilizer through the process of controlled anaerobic decomposition, has been one of the most controversial of the new renewable energy technologies. The integrated approach to fuel and fertilizer production, conservation and sanitation on a decentralized community level potentially holds great promise as a truly appropriate technology for rural development. The report presents the research, development, and demonstration of biogas technology conducted by the Peace Corps in Ecuador for the past six years.

  15. Current status of Paragonimus and paragonimiasis in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Romero, Daniel; Castañeda, Byron; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Sugiyama, Hiromu

    2014-01-01

    A review of national and international publications on paragonimiasis in Ecuador, epidemiological records from the Ministry of Public Health and unpublished research data was conducted to summarise the current status of the parasite/disease. The purpose of the review is to educate physicians, policy-makers and health providers on the status of the disease and to stimulate scientific investigators to conduct further research. Paragonimiasis was first diagnosed in Ecuador 94 years ago and it is endemic to both tropical and subtropical regions in 19 of 24 provinces in the Pacific Coast and Amazon regions. Paragonimus mexicanus is the only known species in the country, with the mollusc Aroapyrgus colombiensis and the crabs Moreirocarcinus emarginatus, Hypolobocera chilensis and Hypolobocera aequatorialis being the primary and secondary intermediate hosts, respectively. Recent studies found P. mexicanus metacercariae in Trichodactylus faxoni crabs of the northern Amazon. Chronic pulmonary paragonimiasis is commonly misdiagnosed and treated as tuberculosis and although studies have demonstrated the efficacy of praziquantel and triclabendazole for the treatment of human infections, neither drug is available in Ecuador. Official data recorded from 1978-2007 indicate an annual incidence of 85.5 cases throughout the 19 provinces, with an estimated 17.2% of the population at risk of infection. There are no current data on the incidence/prevalence of infection, nor is there a national control programme. PMID:25410987

  16. The complex influence of ENSO on droughts in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Serrano, S. M.; Aguilar, E.; Martínez, R.; Martín-Hernández, N.; Azorin-Molina, C.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.; El Kenawy, A.; Tomás-Burguera, M.; Moran-Tejeda, E.; López-Moreno, J. I.; Revuelto, J.; Beguería, S.; Nieto, J. J.; Drumond, A.; Gimeno, L.; Nieto, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we analyzed the influence of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the spatio-temporal variability of droughts in Ecuador for a 48-year period (1965-2012). Droughts were quantified from 22 high-quality and homogenized time series of precipitation and air temperature by means of the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index. In addition, the propagation of two different ENSO indices (El Niño 3.4 and El Niño 1 + 2 indices) and other atmospheric circulation processes (e.g., vertical velocity) on different time-scales of drought severity were investigated. The results showed a very complex influence of ENSO on drought behavior across Ecuador, with two regional patterns in the evolution of droughts: (1) the Andean chain with no changes in drought severity, and (2) the Western plains with less severe and frequent droughts. We also detected that drought variability in the Andes mountains is explained by the El Niño 3.4 index [sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the central Pacific], whereas the Western plains are much more driven by El Niño 1 + 2 index (SST anomalies in the eastern Pacific). Moreover, it was also observed that El Niño and La Niña phases enhance droughts in the Andes and Western plains regions, respectively. The results of this work could be crucial for predicting and monitoring drought variability and intensity in Ecuador.

  17. 75 FR 30776 - Exemption of Foreign Air Carriers From Excise Taxes; Review of Finding of Reciprocity (Ecuador...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Reciprocity (Ecuador), 26 U.S.C. 4221 AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce... registered in Ecuador from certain internal revenue taxes on the purchase of supplies in the United States... 4221 of the Internal Revenue Code, as amended (26 U.S.C. 4221), whether the Government of Ecuador...

  18. Environmental Education in Ecuador: Conceptions and Currents in Quito's Private Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viteri, Fátima; Clarebout, Geraldine; Crauwels, Marion

    2013-01-01

    While key conceptions and the status of environmental education (EE) have been reported at various international, regional, national and local levels, those in play in the schools of Quito (Ecuador) are still relatively unknown. Of particular interest to this study are private schools: they are considerable in number in Ecuador and elsewhere, yet…

  19. 78 FR 764 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam... the United States is materially retarded, by reason of imports from China, Ecuador, India,...

  20. Ecuador's Higher Education System in Times of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoof, Hubert B.; Estrella, Mateo; Eljuri, Marie-Isabel; León, Leonardo Torres

    2013-01-01

    Ecuador's higher education system is undergoing dramatic changes. The National Constitution of 2008 and the Higher Education Law of 2010 have changed the way Ecuador's universities are funded, administered, and accredited. The importance of research was elevated and drastic changes were made to the academic qualifications and employment…

  1. Population genetics of Phaedranassa cuencana Minga, C. Ulloa & Oleas (Amaryllidaceae), an endemic species of Southern Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phaedranassa is a genus of Amaryllidaceae mostly endemic to the Northern Andes. Six out of the eight species described in Ecuador are endangered or vulnerable to extinction. Phaedranassa cuencana was first described in 2015. This species is restricted to the southern part of Ecuador, around the city...

  2. Population genetics of Phaedranassa cuencana Minga, C. Ulloa & Oleas (Amaryllidaceae), an endemic species of southern Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phaedranassa is a genus of Amaryllidaceae mostly endemic to the Northern Andes. Six out of the eight species described in Ecuador are endangered or vulnerable to extinction. Phaedranassa cuencana was first described in 2015. This species is restricted to the southern part of Ecuador, around the city...

  3. New GNSS velocity field and preliminary velocity model for Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Ludeña, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new preliminary velocity model of Ecuador based on the GNSS data of the REGME network (continuous monitoring GNSS network). To date, there is no velocity model available for the country. The only existing model in the zone is the regional model VEMOS2009 for South America and Caribbean (Drewes and Heidbach, 2012). This model was developed from the SIRGAS station positions, the velocities of the SIRGAS-CON stations, and several geodynamics projects performed in the region. Just two continuous GNSS (cGNSS) stations of Ecuador were taking into account in the VEMOS2009 model. The first continuous station of the REGME network was established in 2008. At present, it is composed by 32 continuous GNSS stations, covering the country. All the stations provided data during at least two years. We processed the data of the 32 GNSS stations of REGME for the 2008-2014 period, as well as 20 IGS stations in order to link to the global reference frame IGb08 (ITRF2008). GPS data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software (Dach et al., 2007). We obtained and analyzed the GNSS coordinate time series of the 32 REGME stations and we calculated the GPS-derived horizontal velocity field of the country. Velocities in ITRF2008 were transformed into a South American fixed reference frame, using the Euler pole calculated from 8 cGNSS stations throughout this plate. Our velocity field is consistent with the tectonics of the country and contributes to a better understanding of it. From the horizontal velocity field, we determined a preliminary model using the kriging geostatistical technique. To check the results we use the cross-validation method. The differences between the observed and estimated values range from ± 5 mm. This is a new velocity model obtained from GNSS data for Ecuador.

  4. CYP1A1 genetic polymorphisms in Ecuador, South America.

    PubMed

    Paz-y-Miño, César; Arévalo, Melissa; Muñoz G, María José; Leone, Paola E

    2005-01-01

    A total of 108 individuals from the Ecuadorian population from rural and urban places were analyzed for two CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms. The frequency of the val allele at codon 462 was 0.50, while the frequency of the Msp I restriction site, m2 allele at the T6235C position was 0.70. These polymorphisms in Ecuador have higher frequencies if we compare with others around the world, with the exception of some South American population in Brazil and Chile.

  5. Agrarian change and labour migration in the Sierra of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Peek, P

    1980-01-01

    "Among the effects produced in the Sierra of Ecuador by the programme of land reforms launched in 1964 was a reduction in the incomes from small-scale farming. At the same time, the growth of productive employment in urban areas was insufficient to provide round-the-year work to the fast growing army of jobseekers. Analysis of the agrarian structure and migration patterns before and after 1964 suggests that it was primarily this combination of circumstances that produced a pronounced shift towards short-term rather than permanent migration, thereby providing industry and services with the labour they needed while avoiding the disadvantages of severe urban overpopulation." PMID:12339019

  6. Mosquitoes of eastern Amazonian Ecuador: biodiversity, bionomics and barcodes.

    PubMed

    Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Pecor, James E; Porter, Charles H; Mitchell, Luke Brett; Garzón-Moreno, Andrés; Foley, Desmond H; Pecor, David Brooks; Wilkerson, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Two snapshot surveys to establish the diversity and ecological preferences of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the terra firme primary rain forest surrounding the Tiputini Biodiversity Station in the UNESCO Yasuní Biosphere Reserve of eastern Amazonian Ecuador were carried out in November 1998 and May 1999. The mosquito fauna of this region is poorly known; the focus of this study was to obtain high quality link-reared specimens that could be used to unequivocally confirm species level diversity through integrated systematic study of all life stages and DNA sequences. A total of 2,284 specimens were preserved; 1,671 specimens were link-reared with associated immature exuviae, all but 108 of which are slide mounted. This study identified 68 unique taxa belonging to 17 genera and 27 subgenera. Of these, 12 are new to science and 37 comprise new country records. DNA barcodes [658-bp of the mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase (COI) I gene] are presented for 58 individuals representing 20 species and nine genera. DNA barcoding proved useful in uncovering and confirming new species and we advocate an integrated systematics approach to biodiversity studies in future. Associated bionomics of all species collected are discussed. An updated systematic checklist of the mosquitoes of Ecuador (n=179) is presented for the first time in 60 years.

  7. Mass wasting triggered by the 5 March 1987 Ecuador earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, R.L.; Nieto, A.S.; O'Rourke, T. D.; Crespo, E.; Plaza-Nieto, G.

    1996-01-01

    On 5 March 1987, two earthquakes (Ms=6.1 and Ms=6.9) occurred about 25 km north of Reventador Volcano, along the eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in northeastern Ecuador. Although the shaking damaged structures in towns and villages near the epicentral area, the economic and social losses directly due to earthquake shaking were small compared to the effects of catastrophic earthquake-triggered mass wasting and flooding. About 600 mm of rain fell in the region in the month preceding the earthquakes; thus, the surficial soils had high moisture contents. Slope failures commonly started as thin slides, which rapidly turned into fluid debris avalanches and debris flows. The surficial soils and thick vegetation covering them flowed down the slopes into minor tributaries and then were carried into major rivers. Rock and earth slides, debris avalanches, debris and mud flows, and resulting floods destroyed about 40 km of the Trans-Ecuadorian oil pipeline and the only highway from Quito to Ecuador's northeastern rain forests and oil fields. Estimates of total volume of earthquake-induced mass wastage ranged from 75-110 million m3. Economic losses were about US$ 1 billion. Nearly all of the approximately 1000 deaths from the earthquakes were a consequence of mass wasting and/ or flooding.

  8. Mosquitoes of eastern Amazonian Ecuador: biodiversity, bionomics and barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Pecor, James E; Porter, Charles H; Mitchell, Luke Brett; Garzón-Moreno, Andrés; Foley, Desmond H; Pecor, David Brooks; Wilkerson, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Two snapshot surveys to establish the diversity and ecological preferences of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the terra firme primary rain forest surrounding the Tiputini Biodiversity Station in the UNESCO Yasuní Biosphere Reserve of eastern Amazonian Ecuador were carried out in November 1998 and May 1999. The mosquito fauna of this region is poorly known; the focus of this study was to obtain high quality link-reared specimens that could be used to unequivocally confirm species level diversity through integrated systematic study of all life stages and DNA sequences. A total of 2,284 specimens were preserved; 1,671 specimens were link-reared with associated immature exuviae, all but 108 of which are slide mounted. This study identified 68 unique taxa belonging to 17 genera and 27 subgenera. Of these, 12 are new to science and 37 comprise new country records. DNA barcodes [658-bp of the mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase ( COI ) I gene] are presented for 58 individuals representing 20 species and nine genera. DNA barcoding proved useful in uncovering and confirming new species and we advocate an integrated systematics approach to biodiversity studies in future. Associated bionomics of all species collected are discussed. An updated systematic checklist of the mosquitoes of Ecuador (n = 179) is presented for the first time in 60 years. PMID:24473809

  9. Probabilistic seismic hazard estimates for two cities in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauval, C.; Yepes, H.; Monelli, D.; Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.

    2013-05-01

    The whole territory of Ecuador is exposed to seismic hazard. Great earthquakes can occur in the subduction zone (e.g. Esmeraldas, 1906, Mw 8.8), whereas lower magnitude but shallower and potentially more destructive earthquakes can occur in the highlands. This study focuses on the estimation of probabilistic seismic hazard for two cities: the capital Quito (˜2.5 millions inhabitants) in the Interandean Valley, and the city of Esmeraldas on the coast close to the subduction trench (location of the oil refineries and export facilities which are key for Ecuador economy). The analysis relies on a seismotectonic model developed for the Ecuadorian territory and borders (Alvarado, 2012; Yepes et al. in prep). Seismic parameters are determined using a recently published unified earthquake catalog extending over five centuries in the Cordillera region, and over 110 years in the subduction zone (Beauval, Yepes, et al. 2010, 2013). Uncertainties are explored through a simple logic tree. All uncertainties identified in the process are taken into account: source zone limits, recurrence time of large earthquakes, equivalent moment magnitude of historical events, maximum magnitudes, declustering algorithm, decisions for homogenizing magnitudes, seismic parameters, ground-motion prediction equations. The aim is to quantify the resulting uncertainty on the hazard curves and to identify the controlling parameters. Mean hazard estimates for the PGA at 475 years reach around 0.4-0.45g in Quito and 0.9-1.0g in Esmeraldas.

  10. Does economic inequality affect child malnutrition? The case of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Larrea, Carlos; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    Economic inequality has been hypothesized to be a determinant of population health, independent of poverty and household income. We examined the association between economic inequality and child malnutrition in Ecuador. Economic inequality was measured by the Gini coefficient of household per capita consumption, estimated from the 1990 Census. Childhood stunting, assessed from height-for-age z scores, was obtained from the 1998 Living Standards Measurement Survey (LSMS). We controlled for a range of individual and household covariates, including per capita food consumption, education, housing, ethnicity, fertility, access to health services, diarrhea morbidity, child care, mother's age and diet composition. Stunting still affects 26% of children under five in Ecuador, with higher prevalence in the rural Highlands and among indigenous peoples. Maternal education, basic housing conditions, access to health services, ethnicity, fertility, maternal age and diet composition were independently associated with stunting. However, after controlling for relevant covariates, economic inequality at the provincial scale had a statistically significant deleterious effect on stunting. At municipal or local levels, inequality was not associated with stunting.

  11. A new species of Metagovea Rosas Costa, 1950 from Napo Province, Ecuador (Opiliones, Cyphophthalmi, Neogoveidae).

    PubMed

    Giupponi, Alessandro P L; Kury, Adriano Brilhante

    2015-01-01

    As a result of an expedition to Ecuador in 2014, a new species of mite harvestman was discovered. This new species belonging to the genus Metagovea Rosas Costa, 1950 - Metagovealigiae sp. n. - is described, based on male and female specimens from Napo Province, Ecuador. This is the fourth species described for the genus and the second from Ecuador. A simple terminology is proposed for the microtrichiae of the spermatopositor and genital characters in the family are discussed. The genus Brasiliogovea Martens, 1969 is consistently misspelled in the literature as Brasilogovea. The description of Metagovealigiae offered opportunity to discuss some aspects of systematics of the family.

  12. First record of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in Ecuador infesting urban citrus and orange jasmine trees.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, J F; Chica, E J

    2014-01-01

    Adults and nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were collected in the Guayaquil, Samborondón, and Durán cantons in coastal Ecuador. Psyllids were found in high numbers in citrus (Citrus spp., Sapindales: Rutaceae) and orange jasmine (Murraya exotica [L.] Jack, Sapindales: Rutaceae) trees within the Guayaquil-Samborondon-Duran conurbation; however, none was found during scoutings in the main citrus producing areas in coastal Ecuador. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of D. citri in Ecuador and the Pacific coastal plain of South America.

  13. First record of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in Ecuador infesting urban citrus and orange jasmine trees.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, J F; Chica, E J

    2014-01-01

    Adults and nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were collected in the Guayaquil, Samborondón, and Durán cantons in coastal Ecuador. Psyllids were found in high numbers in citrus (Citrus spp., Sapindales: Rutaceae) and orange jasmine (Murraya exotica [L.] Jack, Sapindales: Rutaceae) trees within the Guayaquil-Samborondon-Duran conurbation; however, none was found during scoutings in the main citrus producing areas in coastal Ecuador. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of D. citri in Ecuador and the Pacific coastal plain of South America. PMID:25527601

  14. A new species of Metagovea Rosas Costa, 1950 from Napo Province, Ecuador (Opiliones, Cyphophthalmi, Neogoveidae)

    PubMed Central

    Giupponi, Alessandro P. L.; Kury, Adriano Brilhante

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As a result of an expedition to Ecuador in 2014, a new species of mite harvestman was discovered. This new species belonging to the genus Metagovea Rosas Costa, 1950 – Metagovea ligiae sp. n. – is described, based on male and female specimens from Napo Province, Ecuador. This is the fourth species described for the genus and the second from Ecuador. A simple terminology is proposed for the microtrichiae of the spermatopositor and genital characters in the family are discussed. The genus Brasiliogovea Martens, 1969 is consistently misspelled in the literature as Brasilogovea. The description of Metagovea ligiae offered opportunity to discuss some aspects of systematics of the family. PMID:25685003

  15. Fungi associated with food and feed commodities from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Pacin, A M; González, H H L; Etcheverry, M; Resnik, S L; Vivas, L; Espin, S

    2003-01-01

    Freshly harvested soybean, rice and corn from farms and corn-based pelleted feeds were collected from ranches from the coastal and mountain regions in Ecuador during 1998, and assessed for fungal contamination. The most prevalent fungi on pelleted feed were Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium graminearum. The prevalent fungi recovered from soybean were F. verticillioides, F. semitectum, Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus. In rice, F. oxysporum was the most prevalent toxigenic fungal species recorded, followed by F. verticillioides and A. flavus. In corn, F. verticillioides was the most prevalent fungus isolated in both the coastal and mountain regions, with high isolation frequencies of A. flavus and A. parasiticus at the coast. Based on the toxigenic species recovered, ochratoxin A may pose a contamination risk for soybean. A higher probability of aflatoxin contamination of corn was found in the coastal samples compared to those of the mountain region, while a risk of fumonisin contamination of corn exists in both regions. PMID:12733629

  16. A new species of Pristimantis from southern Ecuador (Anura, Craugastoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Székely, Paul; Cogălniceanu, Dan; Székely, Diana; Páez, Nadia; Ron, Santiago R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Pristimantis is described from Reserva Buenaventura, southern Ecuador, at elevations between 878 and 1082 m. A molecular phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial genes shows that the new species is closely related to Pristimantis phoxocephalus, Pristimantis riveti, and Pristimantis versicolor. The new species differs from them and other morphologically similar congeners in having a low W-shaped dermal ridge in the scapular region, a large conical tubercle on the upper eyelid and on the heel, a thin mid dorsal fold, and a longitudinal lateral fold starting behind the tympanic fold and extending along the anterior two thirds of the flank. The new species inhabits cloud forests in the Pacific slopes of the Andes. PMID:27551223

  17. A new species of Pristimantis from southern Ecuador (Anura, Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Székely, Paul; Cogălniceanu, Dan; Székely, Diana; Páez, Nadia; Ron, Santiago R

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Pristimantis is described from Reserva Buenaventura, southern Ecuador, at elevations between 878 and 1082 m. A molecular phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial genes shows that the new species is closely related to Pristimantis phoxocephalus, Pristimantis riveti, and Pristimantis versicolor. The new species differs from them and other morphologically similar congeners in having a low W-shaped dermal ridge in the scapular region, a large conical tubercle on the upper eyelid and on the heel, a thin mid dorsal fold, and a longitudinal lateral fold starting behind the tympanic fold and extending along the anterior two thirds of the flank. The new species inhabits cloud forests in the Pacific slopes of the Andes.

  18. A new species of Pristimantis from southern Ecuador (Anura, Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Székely, Paul; Cogălniceanu, Dan; Székely, Diana; Páez, Nadia; Ron, Santiago R

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Pristimantis is described from Reserva Buenaventura, southern Ecuador, at elevations between 878 and 1082 m. A molecular phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial genes shows that the new species is closely related to Pristimantis phoxocephalus, Pristimantis riveti, and Pristimantis versicolor. The new species differs from them and other morphologically similar congeners in having a low W-shaped dermal ridge in the scapular region, a large conical tubercle on the upper eyelid and on the heel, a thin mid dorsal fold, and a longitudinal lateral fold starting behind the tympanic fold and extending along the anterior two thirds of the flank. The new species inhabits cloud forests in the Pacific slopes of the Andes. PMID:27551223

  19. Acoustic engineering at Universidad de las Americas, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Luis A.; Naranjo, Jaime O.; Tassara, Alberto

    2001-05-01

    Acoustics, like science, an instrument to develop new technologies, comfortable atmospheres, and pleasant sounds, has not had a sufficient push in Ecuador. The shortage of professionals in the area, and the social ignorance of the advances and benefits of acoustics have been part of the problem. The University of the Americas has taken the initiative to develop an undergraduate program-only in the country-of sound and acoustics engineering, to contribute to the formation of professional futures that fortify the recent labor market in the areas of audio, professional, and acoustic engineering. This work presents/displays the results of the studies made for the creation of the race, the curricular mesh, and its projections.

  20. Epidemiology of Tropical Neglected Diseases in Ecuador in the Last 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Cartelle Gestal, Monica; Holban, Alina Maria; Escalante, Santiago; Cevallos, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Background Tropical and zoonotic diseases are major problems in developing countries like Ecuador. Poorly designed houses, the high proportion of isolated indigenous population and under developed infrastructure represent a fertile environment for vectors to proliferate. Control campaigns in Ecuador over the years have had varying success, depending on the disease and vectors targeted. Aims In our study we analyse the current situation of some neglected diseases in Ecuador and the efficiency of the control campaigns (by measuring changes in numbers of cases reported) that the Ecuadorian government has been running to limit the spread of these infectious and parasitic diseases. Results Our study reveals that Brucellosis, Chagas Disease, Rabies and Onchocerciasis have been controlled, but small outbreaks are still detected in endemic areas. Leptospirosis and Echinococcosis have been increasing steadily in recent years in Ecuador since the first records. The same increase has been reported world-wide also. Better diagnosis has resulted in a higher number of cases being identified, particularly with regard to the linking of outdoor activities and contact with farm animals as contributing vectors. Improvements in diagnosis are due to regular professional training, implementation of automatized systems, establishing diagnosis protocols and the creation of an epidemiological vigilance network that acts as soon as a case is reported. Conclusion Control campaigns performed in Ecuador have been successful in recent years, although natural phenomena limit their efficiency. Leptospirosis and Echinococcosis infections remain a growing problem in Ecuador as it is worldwide. PMID:26394405

  1. Neogene stratigraphy and Andean geodynamics of southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungerbühler, Dominik; Steinmann, Michael; Winkler, Wilfried; Seward, Diane; Egüez, Arturo; Peterson, Dawn E.; Helg, Urs; Hammer, Cliff

    2002-01-01

    The present paper reviews Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary formations in the Inter-Andean region of southern Ecuador (between 2°S and 4°20'S) in order to develop a geodynamic model of the region. The formations occur in the southern shallow prolongation of the Inter-Andean Valley between the Cordillera Real to the east, and the Cordillera Occidental and Amotape-Tahuı´n Provinces to the west. One hundred fifty zircon fission-track analyses has established a detailed chronostratigraphy for the sedimentary and volcanic formations and several small intrusions. The Paleogene to early Miocene formations are dominated by intermediate and acidic volcanic and pyroclastic rocks. In addition, relics of Eocene continental sedimentary series have been identified. The Neogene sedimentary series lie unconformably on deformed and eroded metamorphic, sedimentary and volcanic formations. They were deposited in two stages, which are separated by a major unconformity dated at ≈10-9 Ma. (1) During the middle and early late Miocene (≈15-10 Ma) marginal marine deltaic, lagoonal, lacustrine and fluvial environments prevailed, which we group under the heading "Pacific Coastal sequences". They presumably covered a greater surface area in southern Ecuador than their present occurrence in small topographic depressions. We suggest that they were deposited in the shallow marine Cuenca and Loja Embayments. Deposition in a marginal marine environment is also supported by the occurrence of brackish water ostracods and other fauna. (2) Above the regional (angular) unconformity, the coastal facies are overlain by late Miocene (≈9-5 Ma) continental alluvial fan and fluvial facies which are in turn covered by mainly airborne volcanic material. They represent the "Intermontane sequences" of the basins of Cuenca, Girón-Santa Isabel, Nabón, Loja and Malacatos-Vilcabamba. Sedimentologic and stratigraphic results are used to discuss the tectonic setting of Neogene sedimentation in the forearc

  2. Global Conservation Significance of Ecuador's Yasuní National Park

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Margot S.; Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Kreft, Holger; Cisneros-Heredia, Diego F.; McCracken, Shawn F.; Pitman, Nigel C. A.; English, Peter H.; Swing, Kelly; Villa, Gorky; Di Fiore, Anthony; Voigt, Christian C.; Kunz, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Background The threats facing Ecuador's Yasuní National Park are emblematic of those confronting the greater western Amazon, one of the world's last high-biodiversity wilderness areas. Notably, the country's second largest untapped oil reserves—called “ITT”—lie beneath an intact, remote section of the park. The conservation significance of Yasuní may weigh heavily in upcoming state-level and international decisions, including whether to develop the oil or invest in alternatives. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted the first comprehensive synthesis of biodiversity data for Yasuní. Mapping amphibian, bird, mammal, and plant distributions, we found eastern Ecuador and northern Peru to be the only regions in South America where species richness centers for all four taxonomic groups overlap. This quadruple richness center has only one viable strict protected area (IUCN levels I–IV): Yasuní. The park covers just 14% of the quadruple richness center's area, whereas active or proposed oil concessions cover 79%. Using field inventory data, we compared Yasuní's local (alpha) and landscape (gamma) diversity to other sites, in the western Amazon and globally. These analyses further suggest that Yasuní is among the most biodiverse places on Earth, with apparent world richness records for amphibians, reptiles, bats, and trees. Yasuní also protects a considerable number of threatened species and regional endemics. Conclusions/Significance Yasuní has outstanding global conservation significance due to its extraordinary biodiversity and potential to sustain this biodiversity in the long term because of its 1) large size and wilderness character, 2) intact large-vertebrate assemblage, 3) IUCN level-II protection status in a region lacking other strict protected areas, and 4) likelihood of maintaining wet, rainforest conditions while anticipated climate change-induced drought intensifies in the eastern Amazon. However, further oil development in Yasun

  3. Emergency Department of a Rural Hospital in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tara; Gaus, David; Herrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a paucity of data studying patients and complaints presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in low- and middle-income countries. The town of Pedro Vicente Maldonado (PVM) is located in the northwestern highlands of Ecuador. Hospital PVM (HPVM) is a rural teaching hospital providing family medicine residency training. These physicians provide around-the-clock acute medical care in HPVM’s ED. This study provides a first look at a functioning ED in rural Latin America by reviewing one year of ED visits to HPVM. Methods All ED visits between April 14, 2013, and April 13, 2014, were included and analyzed, totaling 1,239 patient visits. Data were collected from their electronic medical record and exported into a de-identified Excel® database where it was sorted and categorized. Variables included age, gender, mode of arrival, insurance type, month and day of the week of the service, chief complaint, laboratory and imaging requests, and disposition. We performed descriptive statistics, and where possible, comparisons using Student’s T or chi-square, as appropriate. Results Of the 1239 total ED visits, 48% were males and 52% females; 93% of the visits were ambulatory, and 7% came by ambulance. Sixty-three percent of the patients had social security insurance. The top three chief complaints were abdominal pain (25.5%), fever (15.1%) and trauma (10.8%). Healthcare providers requested labs on 71.3% of patients and imaging on 43.2%. The most frequently requested imaging studies were chest radiograph (14.9%), upper extremity radiograph (9.4%), and electrocardiogram (9.0%). There was no seasonal or day-of-week variability to number of ED patients. The chief complaint of human or animal bite made it more likely the patient would be admitted, and the chief complaint of traumatic injury made it more likely the patient would be transferred. Conclusion Analysis of patients presenting to a rural ED in Ecuador contributes to the global study of acute care in

  4. Tephra fallout hazards at Quito International Airport (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volentik, Alain C. M.; Houghton, Bruce F.

    2015-06-01

    Tephra fallout is the most widespread hazard posed by explosive volcanic eruptions. The 2010 explosive eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland significantly exposed the vulnerability of aviation operations to volcanic ash. The presence of fine ash in the atmosphere forced authorities to close most of European airspace for almost a week. A worldwide study of airport operations disrupted by volcanic eruptions (Guffanti et al., Nat Hazards 51:287-302, 2009) showed significant past exposure to tephra fall of the old international airport (OUIO) in Quito, Ecuador. A new international airport, Mariscal Sucre International Airport (UIO), located 15 km due east to OUIO, started operations on February 20, 2013. Given its location close to the old airport, UIO is also at risk for tephra fallout in the future. We identified five volcanoes capable of producing tephra hazard at UIO. Three (Guagua Pichincha, Reventador, and Tungurahua) are currently active and have recently disrupted aviation operations in Ecuador. The other two (Cotopaxi and Pululagua) are not currently active, but any future eruption from these two volcanoes would probably be explosive, hence capable of producing tephra hazard to UIO. As eruption parameters and wind profiles cannot be forecast in advance, we used a probabilistic approach to quantify the probability of tephra accumulation exceeding 1 mm and 1 cm (regarded as non-conservative and conservative bounds for airport disruption) following an explosive eruption from each volcano. Each eruptive parameter was randomly sampled within a predefined distribution, and wind profiles are randomly sampled within a 5-year dataset. The probability of tephra accumulation reaching 1 mm and 1 cm at UIO is 14.3-19.9 and 2.5-5.8 %, respectively, for Cotopaxi; 17.5-19.9 and 7-7.7 %, respectively, for Guagua Pichincha; and 44.3-44.8 and 18.8-24.9 %, respectively, for Pululagua. According to our results, Reventador and Tungurahua are not likely to yield tephra

  5. Information and Communication Technologies and Social Mobilization: The Case of the Indigenous Movement in Ecuador, 2007-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green-Barber, Lindsay N.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades Indigenous people in Ecuador have faced government policies threatening their internationally recognized Indigenous human rights. Although a national social movement emerged in Ecuador in 1990, the level of mobilization has since varied. This dissertation project proposes to address the question, under what conditions…

  6. Detection and occurrence of Melon yellow spot virus in Ecuador: an emergent threat to melon and watermelon production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, more than fifty viruses have been reported in cucurbit crops. In Ecuador, approximately 3000 Ha of watermelon, melon and cucumbers are cultivated annually. However, very few studies have been conducted to identify viruses responsible for important epidemics in this crop in Ecuador. During...

  7. Partial Characterization of Maize Rayado Fino Virus Isolates From Ecuador: Phylogenetic Analysis Supports A Central American Origin of the Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV) infects maize and appears to be restricted to, yet widespread in, the Americas. MRFV was previously unreported from Ecuador. Maize plants exhibiting symptoms of MRFV infection were collected at the Santa Catalina experiment station in Quito, Ecuador. RT-PCR reactions ...

  8. Environmental Influences on Human Migration in Rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Clark; Bilsborrow, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether environmental conditions influence human migration has recently gained considerable attention, driven by claims that global environmental change will displace large populations. Despite this high level of interest, few quantitative studies have investigated the potential effects of environmental factors on migration, particularly in the developing world and for gradual but pervasive forms of environmental change. To address this, a retrospective migration survey was conducted in rural Ecuador and linked to data on topography, climate, and weather shocks. These data were used to estimate multivariate event history models of alternative forms of mobility (local mobility, internal migration, and international migration), controlling for a large number of covariates. This approach is generalizable to other study areas and responds to calls for the development of more rigorous methods in this field. The results indicate that adverse environmental conditions do not consistently increase rural out-migration and, in some cases, reduce migration. Instead, households respond to environmental factors in diverse ways, resulting in complex migratory responses. Overall, the results support an alternative narrative of environmentally induced migration that recognizes the adaptability of rural households in responding to environmental change. PMID:23319207

  9. Aging, health, and identity in Ecuador's indigenous communities.

    PubMed

    Waters, William F; Gallegos, Carlos A

    2014-12-01

    Middle-income countries like Ecuador are in the process of demographic and epidemiological transitions, and their populations are aging. The challenges associated with providing services to growing numbers of citizens who experience the inevitable deterioration associated with aging are mirrored by the manner in which aging is perceived in a culturally heterogeneous society. This paper presents the results of qualitative research conducted among older men and women in indigenous communities in the Ecuadorian highlands in order to investigate the perceptions regarding the ability of family and community networks to provide adequate and appropriate support for older persons in the context of their perceptions of health, health care, and aging. The principal findings are that: (i) perceptions of aging are shaped by chronic illness, fatigue, deteriorating sensory capacities, and vulnerability to accidents; (ii) barriers to health care are exacerbated among aging members of indigenous communities, although in some cases they can be addressed through traditional alternatives; (iii) the sense of identity shifts as aging people are increasingly unable to work the land and participate in community activities; and (iv) family and community support networks for older adults are not as strong as is generally thought. These findings represent the context within which issues related aging in a culturally heterogeneous society can be best understood and addressed.

  10. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in subtropical Ecuador: popular perceptions, knowledge, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Weigel, M M; Armijos, R X; Racines, R J; Zurita, C; Izurieta, R; Herrera, E; Hinojsa, E

    1994-06-01

    Popular perceptions and knowledge about cutaneous leishmaniasis and its treatment were studied in an endemic area of subtropical Northwest Ecuador. Although most of the adults surveyed were familiar with the disease, the vector, and traditional treatments, many showed a lack of knowledge about transmission of the disease, ulcer healing, and conventional treatment. Gender was found to have a significant impact on disease risk, perceptions, and treatment knowledge. Males experienced a risk of contracting cutaneous leishmaniasis that was almost triple that of women. Men were also more likely to perceive that the disease seriously diminished the victim's capacity to work. Women, on the other hand, were more prone to perceive that cutaneous leishmaniasis was a serious disease that significantly decreased self-esteem. Although 80% of the subjects knew at least one method of treating the disease, women tended to know more methods than men. Most of 150 different therapies reported involved the use of indigenous plants, chemicals, acids, antibiotics, heat treatments, or petroleum by-products. Some of these treatments could have clinical value. However, only 7% of the subjects knew about pentavalent antimonials. Almost 70% of the subjects with a past or present infection history were treated solely by traditional methods; only 12% received a full course of Glucantime, while 7.5% got an incomplete course. The findings indicate that it will be important to consider the identified gaps in knowledge and gender perceptions regarding the disease and its treatment when planning future control programs.

  11. Oil, power, and rural change in Ecuador: 1972-1979

    SciTech Connect

    Zevallos, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    This study explores the role of the State in Ecuador's agriculture during the period of oil boom and military rule (1972-1979). It focuses on: (1) how the availability of oil revenues affected formation and implementation of agricultural policies; (2) the impact of oil-financed policies on agrarian structure, agricultural production, and rural inequality. Historical analysis is based on interviews with policy makers, newspaper chronology, and government documents. Policy impact assessment is based on macroeconomic evidence and microlevel studies. Although agrarian reform was central to the military's development plan, the 1973 Agrarian Reform Law imposed no farm size limits and postponed enforcement of efficiency requirements until 1976. Oil revenues eliminated some political and economic incentives for reform. State action shifted away from land redistribution towards colonization and promotion of agricultural production. The oil boom had an overall negative impact on rural income distribution. It removed incentives for reform. Increased state spending benefitted primarily medium and large landowners. Macroeconomic trends favored adoption of capital intensive methods in livestock and industrial crop production and decapitalization of food and export agriculture, harming wage-dependent laborers.

  12. The implementation of language policy: The case of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossío, Consuelo Yánez

    1991-03-01

    Ecuador is implementing a programme of indigenous bilingual intercultural education. Work began systematically in 1978 through a research centre of the Catholic University, and throughout the 1980s the government has become increasingly committed to the principle of indigenous education. In 1980 agreement was reached on a common alphabet for all indigenous languages. In the same year the government accepted that vernacular languages might be used for education, and the "Macac" educational model was devised by the Catholic University's research centre. By 1984 there were 300 bilingual primary schools, but the government then suspended its experiment. This was restored four years later, with the addition of secondary education and teacher training colleges. What is stressed by NGOs active in promoting indigenous education is not only its use of vernacular languages, but the need for intercultural exchange, recognizing in a modified curriculum the cultural values of the indigenous population and their socioeconomic reality. This change has not been understood by all government agencies, although a new Directorate for Bilingual Intercultural Education was established in 1988 to provide education for people of all ages in indigenous communities. The traditional Spanish-language formal education system has exercised a restricting influence on innovation, and the response of the dominant Spanish-speaking majority has generally been indifference.

  13. Brucellosis in Dairy Cattle and Goats in Northern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Keith P.; Hutchins, Frank T.; McNulty, Chase M.; Tremblay, Marlène; Zabala, Carmen; Barragan, Veronica; Lopez, Luis; Trueba, Gabriel; Bethel, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a convenience study for brucellosis prevalence in dairy-producing animals in northern Ecuador. In total, 2,561 cows and 301 goats were tested. Cattle sera were tested using the Rose Bengal card antigen test (RBCT), yielding an overall apparent prevalence of 5.5% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 4.7–6.5%) and true prevalence of 7.2% (95% CI = 6.0–8.5%). Prevalence varied by herd size and was highest in larger commercial herds. Polymerase chain reaction was used to test goat milk and lymph nodes, resulting in 9% and 8% positivity, respectively. The RBCTs from goat sera yielded an adjusted true prevalence of 17.8% (95% CI = 6.2–44.2%). Our findings are similar to other overall prevalence estimates for dairy herds but show higher prevalence in commercial herds compared with small groups (less than five animals). We also identify urban milking goats living in metropolitan Quito as a potential source of zoonosis. PMID:24591429

  14. Challenges for an Active Role of Women in Physics in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Paola; Guaño, Sonia; Apolo, Alberto Celi

    2009-04-01

    The social reality of Ecuador is not far from the experience of most countries of the Andean region in South America. Many factors contribute to a preference for short-learning-curve or business-oriented careers, and also make traditional and time-demanding careers less appealing. Physics is one of the least attractive professions in a country like Ecuador. However, in the last few years, the number of bachelor's-degree candidates in physics has increased significantly. This result, together with the new postgraduate courses offered inland, show promising changes for the future of this career. Developed countries face challenges that involve mainly gender issues in the scientific daily routine, whereas in Ecuador the challenge is still to attract students to this scientific path regardless of their gender.

  15. The use of magical plants by curanderos in the Ecuador highlands

    PubMed Central

    Cavender, Anthony P; Albán, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Although the use of plants for treating supernaturally caused illnesses (e.g., soul loss, evil wind, witchcraft) has been documented in the Ecuador highlands, so-called magical plants have received much less focused attention than plants used for treating naturalistic disorders. Drawing on interviews done in 2002 and 2003 with 116 curanderos residing in the Ecuador highlands, this paper examines the characteristics of plants identified as magical, how they are used, and how the study of magical plants provides insights into the mindscape of residents of the highlands. PMID:19161618

  16. Minerals Yearbook, 1988 international review. The mineral industries of Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, I.E.; Gurmendi, A.C.; Velasco, P.

    1988-01-01

    All three countries in this Andean group have diversified mineral industries that play an important role in their respective domestic economies. Peru, as the largest country with a population of over 21 million, is the most diversified mineral producer with the highest value of total output. The values added by the mineral industries in 1988 were $2.78 billion for Peru, $1.98 billion for Ecuador, and $0.64 billion for Bolivia. Each value encompasses production of petroleum, natural gas, metals, and industrial minerals. During the period 1980-88, Ecuador's mineral output in terms of value expanded while that of Bolivia and Peru contracted.

  17. Shadows of the colonial past – diverging plant use in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Rainer W; Sharon, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the traditional use of medicinal plants in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador, with special focus on the Departments of Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Cajamarca, and San Martin, and in Loja province, with special focus on the development since the early colonial period. Northern Peru represents the locus of the old Central Andean "Health Axis." The roots of traditional healing practices in this region go as far back as the Cupisnique culture early in the first millennium BC. Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador share the same cultural context and flora but show striking differences in plant use and traditional knowledge. Two hundred fifteen plant species used for medicinal purposes in Ecuador and 510 plant species used for medicinal purposes in Peru were collected, identified,. and their vernacular names, traditional uses, and applications recorded. This number of species indicates that the healers, market vendors, and members of the public interviewed in Peru still have a very high knowledge of plants in their surroundings, which can be seen as a reflection of the knowledge of the population in general. In Ecuador much of the original plant knowledge has already been lost. In Peru, 433 (85%) were Dicotyledons, 46 (9%) Monocotyledons, 21 (4%) Pteridophytes, and 5 (1%) Gymnosperms. Three species of Giartina (Algae) and one species of the Lichen genus Siphula were used. The families best represented were Asteraceae with 69 species, Fabaceae (35), Lamiaceae (25), and Solanaceae (21). Euphorbiaceae had 12 species, and Poaceae and Apiaceae each accounted for 11 species. In Ecuador the families best represented were Asteraceae (32 species), Euphorbiaceae, Lamiaceae, and Solanaceae (11 species each), and Apiaceae, Fabaceae, Lycopodiaceae (9 species each). One hundred eighty-two (85%) of the species used were Dicotyledons, 20 Monocotyledons (9.3%), 12 ferns (5.5%), and one unidentified lichen was used. Most of the plants used (83%) were native to Peru

  18. Shadows of the colonial past--diverging plant use in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Rainer W; Sharon, Douglas

    2009-02-02

    This paper examines the traditional use of medicinal plants in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador, with special focus on the Departments of Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Cajamarca, and San Martin, and in Loja province, with special focus on the development since the early colonial period. Northern Peru represents the locus of the old Central Andean "Health Axis." The roots of traditional healing practices in this region go as far back as the Cupisnique culture early in the first millennium BC. Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador share the same cultural context and flora but show striking differences in plant use and traditional knowledge. Two hundred fifteen plant species used for medicinal purposes in Ecuador and 510 plant species used for medicinal purposes in Peru were collected, identified,. and their vernacular names, traditional uses, and applications recorded. This number of species indicates that the healers, market vendors, and members of the public interviewed in Peru still have a very high knowledge of plants in their surroundings, which can be seen as a reflection of the knowledge of the population in general. In Ecuador much of the original plant knowledge has already been lost. In Peru, 433 (85%) were Dicotyledons, 46 (9%) Monocotyledons, 21 (4%) Pteridophytes, and 5 (1%) Gymnosperms. Three species of Giartina (Algae) and one species of the Lichen genus Siphula were used. The families best represented were Asteraceae with 69 species, Fabaceae (35), Lamiaceae (25), and Solanaceae (21). Euphorbiaceae had 12 species, and Poaceae and Apiaceae each accounted for 11 species. In Ecuador the families best represented were Asteraceae (32 species), Euphorbiaceae, Lamiaceae, and Solanaceae (11 species each), and Apiaceae, Fabaceae, Lycopodiaceae (9 species each). One hundred eighty-two (85%) of the species used were Dicotyledons, 20 Monocotyledons (9.3%), 12 ferns (5.5%), and one unidentified lichen was used. Most of the plants used (83%) were native to Peru

  19. OSRP Source Repatriations-Case Studies: Brazil, Ecuador, Uruguay

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Ray Jr.; Abeyta, Cristy; Matzke, Jim; Wald-Hopkins, Mark; Streeper, Charles

    2012-07-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) began recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources (sources) in 1999. As of February 2012, the project had recovered over 30,000 sources totaling over 820,000 Ci. OSRP grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover disused excess Plutonium- 239 (Pu-239) sources that were distributed in the 1960's and 1970's under the Atoms for Peace Program. Source recovery was initially considered a waste management activity. However, after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the interagency community began to recognize that excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources pose a national security threat, particularly those that lack a disposition path. After OSRP's transfer to the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, its mission was expanded to include all disused sealed sources that might require national security consideration. Recognizing the transnational threat posed by porous borders and the ubiquitous nature of sources, GTRI/OSRP repatriates U.S. origin sources based on threat reduction prioritization criteria. For example, several recent challenging source repatriation missions have been conducted by GTRI/OSRP in South America. These include the repatriation of a significant amount of Cs-137 and other isotopes from Brazil; re-packaging of conditioned Ra-226 sources in Ecuador for future repatriation; and, multilateral cooperation in the consolidation and export of Canadian, US, and Indian Co-60/Cs-137 sources from Uruguay. In addition, cooperation with regulators and private source owners in other countries presents opportunities for GTRI/OSRP to exchange best practices for managing disused sources. These positive experiences often result in long-term cooperation and information sharing with key foreign counterparts. International source recovery operations are essential to the preservation of U.S. national security

  20. Viscosity measurements of crystallizing andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    PubMed Central

    Cimarelli, Corrado; deBiasi, Lea; Hanson, Jonathan B.; Lavallée, Yan; Arzilli, Fabio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Viscosity has been determined during isothermal crystallization of an andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador). Viscosity was continuously recorded using the concentric cylinder method and employing a Pt‐sheathed alumina spindle at 1 bar and from 1400°C to subliquidus temperatures to track rheological changes during crystallization. The disposable spindle was not extracted from the sample but rather left in the sample during quenching thus preserving an undisturbed textural configuration of the crystals. The inspection of products quenched during the crystallization process reveals evidence for heterogeneous crystal nucleation at the spindle and near the crucible wall, as well as crystal alignment in the flow field. At the end of the crystallization, defined when viscosity is constant, plagioclase is homogeneously distributed throughout the crucible (with the single exception of experiment performed at the lowest temperature). In this experiments, the crystallization kinetics appear to be strongly affected by the stirring conditions of the viscosity determinations. A TTT (Time‐Temperature‐Transformation) diagram illustrating the crystallization “nose” for this andesite under stirring conditions and at ambient pressure has been constructed. We further note that at a given crystal content and distribution, the high aspect ratio of the acicular plagioclase yields a shear‐thinning rheology at crystal contents as low as 13 vol %, and that the relative viscosity is higher than predicted from existing viscosity models. These viscosity experiments hold the potential for delivering insights into the relative influences of the cooling path, undercooling, and deformation on crystallization kinetics and resultant crystal morphologies, as well as their impact on magmatic viscosity.

  1. Viscosity measurements of crystallizing andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    PubMed Central

    Cimarelli, Corrado; deBiasi, Lea; Hanson, Jonathan B.; Lavallée, Yan; Arzilli, Fabio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Viscosity has been determined during isothermal crystallization of an andesite from Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador). Viscosity was continuously recorded using the concentric cylinder method and employing a Pt‐sheathed alumina spindle at 1 bar and from 1400°C to subliquidus temperatures to track rheological changes during crystallization. The disposable spindle was not extracted from the sample but rather left in the sample during quenching thus preserving an undisturbed textural configuration of the crystals. The inspection of products quenched during the crystallization process reveals evidence for heterogeneous crystal nucleation at the spindle and near the crucible wall, as well as crystal alignment in the flow field. At the end of the crystallization, defined when viscosity is constant, plagioclase is homogeneously distributed throughout the crucible (with the single exception of experiment performed at the lowest temperature). In this experiments, the crystallization kinetics appear to be strongly affected by the stirring conditions of the viscosity determinations. A TTT (Time‐Temperature‐Transformation) diagram illustrating the crystallization “nose” for this andesite under stirring conditions and at ambient pressure has been constructed. We further note that at a given crystal content and distribution, the high aspect ratio of the acicular plagioclase yields a shear‐thinning rheology at crystal contents as low as 13 vol %, and that the relative viscosity is higher than predicted from existing viscosity models. These viscosity experiments hold the potential for delivering insights into the relative influences of the cooling path, undercooling, and deformation on crystallization kinetics and resultant crystal morphologies, as well as their impact on magmatic viscosity. PMID:27656114

  2. High resolution precipitation climatology for the Andes of South Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachte, Katja; Bendix, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The climate of Ecuador is strongly dominated by the complex structure of the Andes Mountains. Due to their heights and north-south orientation they act like a barrier, which cause delineation between the western and eastern flanks, as well as the inner-Andean areas. Commonly the Ecuadorian climate is classified in three zones, Costa, Interandina and Oriente. Existing precipitation products such as the GPCC or TRMM data are enabled to represent these climate zones, but because of their spatial resolution, they pass to capture the different regimes within a zone. Especially the inner-Andean region (Interandina) with its characteristic complex terrain shows spatially high climate variability. Local circulation systems, e.g. mountain-valley breezes as well as effects of windward and lee-side, drive the climate conditions allowing for the differentiation of air temperature and rainfall distribution on relative small scales. These highly variable patterns are also reflected by the diversity of ecosystems, e.g. rainforest, dry forest and Paramo, in a relative small area. In order to represent the local systems a dynamical downscaling approach for the Ecuadorian region is applied. In doing so the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used. A suitable model setup was evaluated within a sensitivity study, where various parametrization schemes were tested. The most suitable physics combination was used for a 30 year hint cast simulation. The poster presents first results of the high resolution climate simulations. On the basis of the spatial distribution of rainfall patterns distinct precipitation regimes within the Interandina will be shown. The aim is to highlight and discuss the importance of the adequately representation of the terrain in mountainous regions like the Andean Mountains.

  3. Micrometeorology of a Shrimp Farm: a Case Study in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jose Luis

    A low cost micrometeorological data acquisition system (less than 10,000) was devised and deployed at a Shrimp Farm located along the coast of Ecuador in order to monitor environmental parameters important for the management of such ponds. The Surface Boundary Layer conditions on the Shrimp Farm were found to be more dependent on the size and density distribution of the ponds rather than on the climatic characteristics of the region. Fluxes and other micrometeorological quantities in the Surface Boundary Layer were estimated with an error of up to 25%, although this error is considerable larger than what is possible to obtain with state of the art sensors now commercially available, nevertheless it is accurate enough to be used as inputs to help predict the physical and chemical characteristics of the water in the pond and thus be used as a tool for improving the management of aquacultural sites. The Planetary Boundary Layer over the Shrimp Farm was found to be almost always under unstable conditions; Surface Energy Balance calculations indicated that the turbulent losses to the atmosphere were more as latent rather than sensible heat, with a day-time Bowen Ratio having an average value between 0.4 and 0.5. The development and evolution of Internal Boundary Layers due to changes in surface conditions in going from water to ground during the day was found to be more dependent to the step change in temperature, while at night the step change in surface roughness was found to be of equal importance.

  4. High local genetic diversity of canine parvovirus from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Aldaz, Jaime; García-Díaz, Juan; Calleros, Lucía; Sosa, Katia; Iraola, Gregorio; Marandino, Ana; Hernández, Martín; Panzera, Yanina; Pérez, Ruben

    2013-09-27

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) comprises three antigenic variants (2a, 2b, and 2c) that are distributed globally with different frequencies and levels of genetic variability. CPVs from central Ecuador were herein analyzed to characterize the strains and to provide new insights into local viral diversity, evolution, and pathogenicity. Variant prevalence was analyzed by PCR and partial sequencing for 53 CPV-positive samples collected during 2011 and 2012. The full-length VP2 gene was sequenced in 24 selected strains and a maximum-likelihood phylogenetic tree was constructed using both Ecuadorian and worldwide strains. Ecuadorian CPVs have a remarkable genetic diversity that includes the circulation of all three variants and the existence of different evolutionary groups or lineages. CPV-2c was the most prevalent variant (54.7%), confirming the spread of this variant in America. Ecuadorian CPV-2c strains clustered in two lineages, which represent the first evidence of polyphyletic CPV-2c circulating in South America. CPV-2a strains constituted 41.5% of the samples and clustered in a single lineage. The two detected CPV-2b strains (3.8%) were clearly polyphyletic and appeared related to Ecuadorian CPV-2a or foreign CPV-2b strains. Besides the substitution at residue 426 that is used to identify the variants, two amino acid changes occurred in Ecuadorian strains: Val139Iso and Thr440Ser. Ser(440) occurred in a biologically relevant domain of VP2 and is here described for the first time in CPV. The associations of Ecuadorian CPV-2c and CPV-2a with clinical symptoms indicate that dull mentation, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and hypothermia occurred more frequently in infection with CPV-2c than with CPV-2a.

  5. The measure, the problem: communication at work in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Pareja, R

    1985-01-01

    In developing countries, the use of oral rehydration salts (ORS), a simple form of therapy that can be administered at home to treat infants with diarrhea, is frequently hindered by the lack of a standard measuring device. The premeasured salts are provided in individual packets which must be mixed with the correct amount of water before they can be safely administered. Standardized packets of salts generally require the addition of 1 liter of water. In many countries measuring devices are not commonly available, and the population is often unfamiliar with the use of measuring devices. In several countries, commonly available containers have been used successfully as measuring devices. For example, in Honduras, mothers are instructed to use the commonly available standard liter Coca Cola bottle to measure the water. In Gambia a popular soft drink bottle is also used. If the bottle is filled 3 times it equals a liter. In some countries the amount of salts contained in each packet is altered in order to make it possible to use a commonly available container for measuring the water. In Ecuador, no commonly available or appropriate container could be identified; therefore, a plastic bag for measuring the water was designed. The bag is marked with a black line, and mothers are instructed to fill the bag with water to the black line. Instructions for mixing the solution and for administering it to the infant are also given on the bag, both in pictorial and written form. The bag, therefore, serves not only as a measuring device but as an effective communication device. The bags are given to mothers when they bring their children to the local health centers for diarrhea treatment, and the mothers are instructed in the proper use of the bag by center personnel. Radio messages, describing the symptoms of dehydration and diarrhea and the proper use of the ORS for treating diarrhea are broadcast frequently. The Ecuadorian solution to the measurement dilemma proved to be highly

  6. Evaluation of Environmental Quality Productive Ecosystem Guayas (Ecuador).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo, Wilson; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teófilo; Carrera, Gloria; Jordan, Manuel; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2015-04-01

    Natural resources are deteriorating very rapidly in the Gulf of Guayaquil and the area of influence in the Guayas Basin due to human activity. Specific problems are generated by the mismanagement of the aquaculture industry affecting the traditional agricultural sectors: rice, banana, sugarcane, cocoa, coffee, and soya also studied, and by human and industrial settlements. The development of industrial activities such as aquaculture (shrimp building for shrimp farming in ponds) and agriculture, have increasingly contributed to the generation of waste, degrading and potentially toxic elements in high concentrations, which can have adverse effects on organisms in the ecosystems, in the health of the population and damage the ecological and environmental balance. The productive Guayas ecosystem, consists of three interrelated ecosystems, the Gulf of Guayaquil, the Guayas River estuary and the Guayas Basin buffer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the environmental quality of the productive Guayas ecosystem (Ecuador), through operational and specific objectives: 1) Draw up the transition coastal zone in the Gulf of Guayaquil, 2) Set temporal spatial variability of soil salinity in wetlands rice, Lower Guayas Basin, 3) evaluate the heavy metals in wetland rice in the Lower Basin of Guayas. The physical and chemical parameters of the soils have been studied. These are indicators of environmental quality. The multivariate statistical method showed the relations of similarities and dissimilarities between variables and parameter studies as stable. Moreover, the boundaries of coastal transition areas, temporal spatial variability of soil salinity and heavy metals in rice cultivation in the Lower Basin of Guayas were researched. The sequential studies included and discussed represent a broad framework of fundamental issues that has been valued as a basic component of the productive Guayas ecosystem. They are determinants of the environmental quality of the Guayas

  7. [Mutant alleles associated to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethanime resistance in Plasmodium falciparum of the Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia borders].

    PubMed

    Arróspide, Nancy; Hijar-Guerra, Gisely; de Mora, Doménica; Diaz-Cortéz, César Eduardo; Veloz-Perez, Raúl; Gutierrez, Sonia; Cabezas-Sánchez, César

    2014-04-01

    The frequency of mutations in pfCRT and DHFR/DHPS genes of Plasmodium falciparum associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was evaluated in 83 strains from the districts of Esmeralda and Machala, located on the borders of Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia in 2002. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), conventional and its variants, was used. Mutations in the pfCRT gene were found in more than 90% of the samples from Esmeralda and Machala. For the DHFR gene, 90% of the strains were mutant samples from Esmeralda, 3 were double mutations and 1 was a triple mutation. In Machala, 25% were simple mutant forms and 75% mixed mutant forms (wild forms/mutant). In conclusion, resistance to chloroquine has been fixed in strains carrying K76T pfCRT mutation, whereas genetic imprinting for resistance to pyrimethamine is evolving, particularly in the district of Esmeralda.

  8. Globalization and local response to epidemiological overlap in 21st century Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Waters, William F

    2006-01-01

    Background Third World countries are confronted by a complex overlay of two sets of health problems. Traditional maladies, including communicable diseases, malnutrition, and environmental health hazards coexist with emerging health challenges, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and increasing levels of obesity. Using Ecuador as an example, this paper proposes a conceptual framework for linking epidemiologic overlap to emerging social structures and processes at the national and global levels. Discussion Epidemiologic trends can be seen as part of broader processes related to globalization, but this does not imply that globalization is a monolithic force that inevitably and uniformly affects nations, communities, and households in the same manner. Rather, characteristics and forms of social organization at the subnational level can shape the way that globalization takes place. Thus, globalization has affected Ecuador in specific ways and is, at the same time, intimately related to the form in which the epidemiologic transition has transpired in that country. Summary Ecuador is among neither the poorest nor the wealthiest countries and its situation may illuminate trends in other parts of the world. As in other countries, insertion into the global economy has not taken place in a vacuum; rather, Ecuador has experienced unprecedented social and demographic change in the past several decades, producing profound transformation in its social structure. Examples of local represent alternatives to centralized health systems that do not effectively address the complex overlay of traditional and emerging health problems. PMID:16712722

  9. Nonformal Education in Ecuador, 1971-1975. An Approach to Nonformal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Univ., Amherst. Center for International Education.

    This document summarizes the experiences and results of four years (1972-1975) of work in nonformal education in Ecuador. The project grew out of informal discussions in 1970 between several members of the Center for International Education at the University of Massachusetts and a group of Ecuadoreans and Americans in the USAID mission in Quito.…

  10. Two new emerald geometrid species of Telotheta Warren from Ecuador and Bolivia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae, Geometrinae, Lophochoristini).

    PubMed

    Lindt, Aare; Viidalepp, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of the lophochoristine genus Telotheta Warren found in Ecuador and Bolivia are described. The paper focuses on the morphological description and illustration of the wing pattern and genitalia structures of the typus generis Telothetamuscipunctata Dognin and the newly identified species Telothetaunoi and Telothetafresei. The distinguishing characters of the genera Telotheta and Paromphacodes are also briefly discussed. PMID:25349521

  11. Skills Development Training in the Consultancy Mode: An Experience in Ecuador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhola, H. S.

    A group of instructional planners from the United States was invited to help establish a vocational skills development project to help meet the need for adequately trained workers in Ecuador's small- and medium-sized enterprises in the industrial, service, commercial and agricultural sectors of the economy. A logicodialetical model called the CLER…

  12. 78 FR 64009 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Malaysia, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... determinations by Commerce with respect to frozen warmwater shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand (78 FR 50379-50394... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of June 13, 2013 (78 FR 35643). The hearing was held in... Governments of Ecuador or Indonesia (78 FR 33342-33351, June 4, 2013). However, in its final...

  13. 78 FR 11221 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... notice in the Federal Register of January 4, 2013 (76 FR 764). The conference was held in Washington, DC... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam..., Thailand, and Vietnam of frozen warmwater shrimp, provided for in subheadings 0306.17.00, 1605.21.10...

  14. Panniculitis caused by Mycobacterium monacense mimicking erythema induratum: a case in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Herrera, P; Cartelle, M; Barba, P; Tello, S; Zurita, J

    2016-03-01

    We report the first case of recently characterized species M. monacense associated with chronic nodular vasculitis, infecting a young woman. This case represents the first isolation of M. monacense from Ecuador. The isolate was identified by conventional and molecular techniques. PMID:26933504

  15. MODELING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHRIMP MARICULTURE AND WATER QUALITY IN THE RIO CHONE ESTUARY, ECUADOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Rio Chone estuary in Ecuador has been heavily altered by the conversion of over 90% of the original mangrove forest to shrimp ponds. We carried out computational experiments using both hydrodynamic and shrimp pond models to investigate factors leading to declines in estuarine...

  16. Elimination of User-Fees in Tertiary Education: A Distributive Analysis for Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Juan; Loayza, Yessenia

    2012-01-01

    This paper offers new evidence and methods for understanding the distributive effect of a universal government policy to eliminate user fees in public universities in Ecuador. The main argument to eliminate user fees in higher education is that it will increase enrollment among the poor. In this regard, eliminating tuition fees is supposed to be a…

  17. 78 FR 50110 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Commission Determination To Deny a Request To Hold a Portion of a Hearing In Camera AGENCY:...

  18. Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Ecuador: A Pilot Study in Quito

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekkers, Laura M.; Groot, Norbert A.; Díaz Mosquera, Elena N.; Andrade Zúñiga, Ivonne P.; Delfos, Martine F.

    2015-01-01

    This research presents the results of the first phase of the study on the prevalence of pupils with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in regular education in Quito, Ecuador. One-hundred-and-sixty-one regular schools in Quito were selected with a total of 51,453 pupils. Prevalence of ASD was assessed by an interview with the rector of the school or…

  19. Constitutional Reform and the Opportunity for Higher Education Access in Ecuador since 1950

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, David

    2011-01-01

    Ecuador's 2008 Constitution--and a subsequent law on higher education passed in its wake--effectively suspended student fees for public universities. The goal of this reform was to increase equality of opportunity. In this article I use newly-available individual-level retrospective information from the 2001 Census to explore gender and ethnic…

  20. Ecuador's Efforts to Raise Its Research Profile: The Prometeo Program Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoof, Hubert B.

    2015-01-01

    Ecuador's government understands that capable research universities can help in solving the country's pressing socio-economic problems. However, research capabilities and research productivity in its national universities have historically been low, as professors primarily teach and often do not have the inclination, the ability, or the…

  1. Encountering Culture through Gender Norms in International Education: The Case of Volunteers in Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivern, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrating how international education programs can be used to study theoretical issues relevant to comparative education, this article reports on a scholarly analysis of 83 handover letters written by US participants in a volunteer program in Ecuador to their incoming counterparts between 2006 and 2010. It applies Swidler's notion of…

  2. Cognitive Development among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health, and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxson, Christina; Schady, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    We examine the relationship between early cognitive development, socioeconomic status (SES), child health, and parenting quality in a developing country. We use a sample of more than 3,000 predominantly poor preschool-aged children from Ecuador, and analyze determinants of their scores on a widely used test of language ability. We find that…

  3. The Early Stages of Pedaliodes poesia (Hewitson, 1862) in Eastern Ecuador (Lepidoptera: Satyrinae: Pronophilina)

    PubMed Central

    Greeney, Harold F.; Pyrcz, Tomasz W.; DeVries, Philip J.; Dyer, Lee A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the immature stages Pedaliodes poesia Hewitson, 1862 from northeastern Ecuador. Chusquea scandens (Poaceae, Bambusoidea) is the larval food plant. Eggs are laid singly or in pairs on the bottom side of host plant leaves. The duration of the egg, larval, and pupal stages, combined, is 99–107 days. PMID:19619029

  4. First report of Pineapple mealybug wilt associated virus-1 in Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Ecuador, where pineapple represents one of the most important export commodities, virus testing has been neglected. In July 2014, a total of twenty MD2 hybrid pineapple plants showing virus-like symptoms (Fig. 1) were collected from a commercial planting located at the border of Santo Domingo and...

  5. School Attendance and Child Labor in Ecuador. Policy Research Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Acevedo, Gloria

    Data from Ecuador's Living Standard and Measurement Surveys were used to analyze the characteristics and determinants of child labor and schooling. Of particular interest was the influence of adult wages on child labor. Survey data on children aged 10-17 included sex, age, rural or urban residence, monthly wages, whether or not attending school,…

  6. Transition in the cause of fever from malaria to dengue, Northwestern Ecuador, 1990-2011.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Sara G; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Milbrath, Meghan; Baldeón, Manuel E; Coloma, Josefina; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2013-10-01

    In tropical areas, the predominant cause of fever has historically been malaria. However by 2011, among febrile patients in northwestern Ecuador, dengue was identified in 42% and malaria in none. This finding suggests a transition in the cause of fever from malaria to other illnesses, such as dengue.

  7. Metabolic syndrome in elderly living in marginal peri-urban communities in Quito, Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proportion of the population in Latin America above the age of 60 is expected to double during the next few decades. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, little is known about MetS in Latin America in general, and in Ecuador in particular....

  8. A new species of Miconia (Melastomataceae, Miconieae) from the Ecuador-Peru border.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Carmen Ulloa; Neill, David A; Dudek, Olivia A

    2012-01-01

    Miconia machinazana C.Ulloa & D.A. Neill, sp. nov.,a new species of Melastomataceae from the Ecuador-Peru border is described and illustrated. It is characterized by the narrow, decussate leaves, dense reddish brown indument, small flowers in short panicles, pale yellow petals, and anthers opening by two large terminal pores. PMID:22645412

  9. A Look at Early Childhood Writing in English and Spanish in a Bilingual School in Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, JoEllen M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examines 20 writing samples in English and Spanish selected from portfolios of first grade children at a bilingual school in Ecuador. Based on earlier findings that paragraphs composed in English and Spanish by children, adolescents and adults are different (Lux & Grabe, 1991; Montano-Harmon, 1991; Reid, 1990; Reppen & Grabe,…

  10. First report of Raspberry bushy dwarf virus in blackberry in Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the past two decades, several viruses have been identified from Rubus (blackberry and raspberry) in wild and commercial plantings around the world (1) In Ecuador; approximately 14 tons of blackberries (Rubus glaucus) are produced each year in an estimated area of 5,500 hectares. This crop pro...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the First Pathogenic Leptospira Isolates from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Barragan, Veronica; Sahl, Jason W; Wiggins, Kristin; Chiriboga, Jorge; Salinas, Ana; Cantos, Nancy E; Loor, Mariana N; Intriago, Bertha I; Morales, Melba; Trueba, Gabriel; Pearson, Talima

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. cause leptospirosis upon contact with mucosa through wounds or ingestion, leading to headaches, fever, jaundice, kidney or liver failure, or death in about 1.3 million people each year. Here, we present the draft genomes of one L. santarosai isolate and two L. interrogans isolates from Ecuador. PMID:27151788

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the First Pathogenic Leptospira Isolates from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Barragan, Veronica; Sahl, Jason W.; Wiggins, Kristin; Chiriboga, Jorge; Salinas, Ana; Cantos, Nancy E.; Loor, Mariana N.; Intriago, Bertha I.; Morales, Melba; Trueba, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. cause leptospirosis upon contact with mucosa through wounds or ingestion, leading to headaches, fever, jaundice, kidney or liver failure, or death in about 1.3 million people each year. Here, we present the draft genomes of one L. santarosai isolate and two L. interrogans isolates from Ecuador. PMID:27151788

  13. Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador: Geographic Distribution, Population Size and Extinction Risk.

    PubMed

    Naveda-Rodríguez, Adrián; Vargas, Félix Hernán; Kohn, Sebastián; Zapata-Ríos, Galo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador is classified as Critically Endangered. Before 2015, standardized and systematic estimates of geographic distribution, population size and structure were not available for this species, hampering the assessment of its current status and hindering the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. In this study, we performed the first quantitative assessment of geographic distribution, population size and population viability of Andean Condor in Ecuador. We used a methodological approach that included an ecological niche model to study geographic distribution, a simultaneous survey of 70 roosting sites to estimate population size and a population viability analysis (PVA) for the next 100 years. Geographic distribution in the form of extent of occurrence was 49 725 km2. During a two-day census, 93 Andean Condors were recorded and a population of 94 to 102 individuals was estimated. In this population, adult-to-immature ratio was 1:0.5. In the modeled PVA scenarios, the probability of extinction, mean time to extinction and minimum population size varied from zero to 100%, 63 years and 193 individuals, respectively. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to the conservation of Andean Condor populations in Ecuador. Population size reduction in scenarios that included habitat loss began within the first 15 years of this threat. Population reinforcement had no effects on the recovery of Andean Condor populations given the current status of the species in Ecuador. The population size estimate presented in this study is the lower than those reported previously in other countries where the species occur. The inferences derived from the population viability analysis have implications for Condor management in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to redirect efforts from captive breeding and population reinforcement to habitat conservation. PMID:26986004

  14. Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador: Geographic Distribution, Population Size and Extinction Risk

    PubMed Central

    Naveda-Rodríguez, Adrián; Vargas, Félix Hernán; Kohn, Sebastián; Zapata-Ríos, Galo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador is classified as Critically Endangered. Before 2015, standardized and systematic estimates of geographic distribution, population size and structure were not available for this species, hampering the assessment of its current status and hindering the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. In this study, we performed the first quantitative assessment of geographic distribution, population size and population viability of Andean Condor in Ecuador. We used a methodological approach that included an ecological niche model to study geographic distribution, a simultaneous survey of 70 roosting sites to estimate population size and a population viability analysis (PVA) for the next 100 years. Geographic distribution in the form of extent of occurrence was 49 725 km2. During a two-day census, 93 Andean Condors were recorded and a population of 94 to 102 individuals was estimated. In this population, adult-to-immature ratio was 1:0.5. In the modeled PVA scenarios, the probability of extinction, mean time to extinction and minimum population size varied from zero to 100%, 63 years and 193 individuals, respectively. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to the conservation of Andean Condor populations in Ecuador. Population size reduction in scenarios that included habitat loss began within the first 15 years of this threat. Population reinforcement had no effects on the recovery of Andean Condor populations given the current status of the species in Ecuador. The population size estimate presented in this study is the lower than those reported previously in other countries where the species occur. The inferences derived from the population viability analysis have implications for Condor management in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to redirect efforts from captive breeding and population reinforcement to habitat conservation. PMID:26986004

  15. Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador: Geographic Distribution, Population Size and Extinction Risk.

    PubMed

    Naveda-Rodríguez, Adrián; Vargas, Félix Hernán; Kohn, Sebastián; Zapata-Ríos, Galo

    2016-01-01

    The Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) in Ecuador is classified as Critically Endangered. Before 2015, standardized and systematic estimates of geographic distribution, population size and structure were not available for this species, hampering the assessment of its current status and hindering the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. In this study, we performed the first quantitative assessment of geographic distribution, population size and population viability of Andean Condor in Ecuador. We used a methodological approach that included an ecological niche model to study geographic distribution, a simultaneous survey of 70 roosting sites to estimate population size and a population viability analysis (PVA) for the next 100 years. Geographic distribution in the form of extent of occurrence was 49 725 km2. During a two-day census, 93 Andean Condors were recorded and a population of 94 to 102 individuals was estimated. In this population, adult-to-immature ratio was 1:0.5. In the modeled PVA scenarios, the probability of extinction, mean time to extinction and minimum population size varied from zero to 100%, 63 years and 193 individuals, respectively. Habitat loss is the greatest threat to the conservation of Andean Condor populations in Ecuador. Population size reduction in scenarios that included habitat loss began within the first 15 years of this threat. Population reinforcement had no effects on the recovery of Andean Condor populations given the current status of the species in Ecuador. The population size estimate presented in this study is the lower than those reported previously in other countries where the species occur. The inferences derived from the population viability analysis have implications for Condor management in Ecuador. This study highlights the need to redirect efforts from captive breeding and population reinforcement to habitat conservation.

  16. Rice crop risk map in Babahoyo canton (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde Arias, Omar; Tarquis, Ana; Garrido, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    It is widely known that extreme climatic phenomena occur with more intensity and frequency. This fact has put more pressure over farming, making agricultural and livestock production riskier. In order to reduce hazards and economic loses that could jeopardize farmer's incomes and even its business continuity, it is very important to implement agriculture risk management plans by governments and institutions. One of the main strategies is transfer risk by agriculture insurance. Agriculture insurance based in indexes has a significant growth in the last decade. And consist in a comparison between measured index values with a defined threshold that triggers damage losses. However, based index insurance could not be based on an isolated measurement. It is necessary to be integrated in a complete monitoring system that uses many sources of information and tools. For example, index influence areas, crop production risk maps, crop yields, claim statistics, and so on. Crop production risk is related with yield variation of crops and livestock, due to weather, pests, diseases, and other factors that affect both the quantity and quality of commodities produced. This is the risk which farmers invest more time managing, and it is completely under their control. The aim of this study is generate a crop risk map of rice that can provide risk manager important information about the status of crop facing production risks. Then, based on this information, it will be possible to make best decisions to deal with production risk. The rice crop risk map was generated qualifying a 1:25000 scale soil and climatic map of Babahoyo canton, which is located in coast region of Ecuador, where rice is one of the main crops. The methodology to obtain crop risk map starts by establishing rice crop requirements and indentifying the risks associated with this crop. A second step is to evaluate soil and climatic conditions of the study area related to optimal crop requirements. Based on it, we can

  17. Maternal Deaths Databases Analysis: Ecuador 2003-2013

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Antonio; Albán, María; Rivas, Alejandra; Rodríguez, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maternal mortality ratio in Ecuador is the only millennium goal on which national agencies are still making strong efforts to reach 2015 target. The purpose of the study was to process national maternal death databases to identify a specific association pattern of variable included in the death certificate. Design and methods: The study processed mortality databases published yearly by the National Census and Statistics Institute (INEC). Data analysed were exclusively maternal deaths. Data corresponds to the 2003-2013 period, accessible through INEC’s website. Comparisons are based on number of deaths and use an ecological approach for geographical coincidences. Results: The study identified variable association into the maternal mortality national databases showing that to die at home or in a different place than a hospital is closely related to women’s socioeconomic characteristics; there was an association with the absence of a public health facility. Also, to die in a different place than the usual residence could mean that women and families are searching for or were referred to a higher level of attention when they face complications. Conclusions: Ecuadorian maternal deaths showed Patterns of inequity in health status, health care provision and health risks. A predominant factor seems unclear to explain the variable association found processing national databases; perhaps every pattern of health systems development played a role in maternal mortality or factors different from those registered by the statistics system may remain hidden. Some random influences might not be even considered in an explanatory model yet. Significance for public health General agreement on maternal mortality reduction suggests that to reach the millennium target a health system must to be able to provide essential, and emergency obstetric care in a well allocate, geographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic distribution of resources. Patterns of inequity in health status

  18. Bimodal Seismic Anisotropy at Cotopaxi volcano (Ecuador): Possible implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Douillet, Guilhem; Ruiz, Mario; Robin, Claude

    2010-05-01

    A shear wave splitting analysis was performed on Cotopaxi volcano, one of Ecuador most active and hazardous volcanoes, in order to investigate the stress state under this volcano. Cotopaxi volcano is located in a highly populated area including the capital Quito. It's eruptive cycle is approximately 120 ±70 years and apart from possible minor eruptions in 1942 and 1903-1904, the last volcanic activity dates from 1878-1885. Moreover, 15 years of increasing seismicity with some major crisis during the 1995-2010 periods, lead to the current very high seismic level. Finally two years of gas monitoring suggest that the Cotopaxi's emissions are currently intermittent and passive, but non negligible. We analyzed 102 regional tectonic events recorded between 2006 and 2009 at a network of five broad-band three-component seismic stations. These stations are located on all flanks of Cotopaxi. The events used were from several seismic sources located inside a radius of 200 kilometers from the volcano and illuminate all space directions. Seismic events were manually chosen based on their clear shear wave component in regards to the compression wave and to the noise. The data were computed using Matlab software. Polarization directions and delay times of split shear waves were found using a method based on the cross correlation of displacement waveforms of shear-waves at all possible rotation angles. Our results show a bimodal anisotropic behavior. One of the fast-directions axes follows the regional Ecuadorian tectonic general strain with a ESE direction. The other trend was found to be perpendicular to the regional strain. Other studies have shown that a 90° flip may take place either prior, during, or just after the main eruptive phase, or during hydraulic injections. This 90° flip is probably relied to micro cracks filling and pressuring, creating a local reverse strain field. There is not clear trend on temporal evolution of anisotropy distribution on our data. Only one

  19. A new species of blunt-headed vine snake (Colubridae, Imantodes) from the Chocó region of Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H.; Quirola, Diego; Eric N. Smith; Almendáriz, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new species of Imantodes from the Chocó region of northwestern Ecuador. The new species differs most significantly from all other congeners in lacking a loreal scale. We analyze the phylogenetic relationships among species of Imantodes based on two mitochondrial genes, and postulate that the new species and Imantodes lentiferus are sister taxa. A key to the species of Imantodes from Ecuador is presented. PMID:23275746

  20. Sentinel Surveillance of Influenza-Like-Illness in Two Cities of the Tropical Country of Ecuador: 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Douce, Richard W.; Aleman, Washington; Chicaiza-Ayala, Wilson; Madrid, Cesar; Sovero, Merly; Delgado, Franklin; Rodas, Mireya; Ampuero, Julia; Chauca, Gloria; Perez, Juan; Garcia, Josefina; Kochel, Tadeusz; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Tropical countries are thought to play an important role in the global behavior of respiratory infections such as influenza. The tropical country of Ecuador has almost no documentation of the causes of acute respiratory infections. The objectives of this study were to identify the viral agents associated with influenza like illness (ILI) in Ecuador, describe what strains of influenza were circulating in the region along with their epidemiologic characteristics, and perform molecular characterization of those strains. Methodology/Findings This is a prospective surveillance study of the causes of ILI based on viral culture of oropharyngeal specimens and case report forms obtained in hospitals from two cities of Ecuador over 4 years. Out of 1,702 cases of ILI, nine viral agents were detected in 597 patients. During the time of the study, seven genetic variants of influenza circulated in Ecuador, causing six periods of increased activity. There appeared to be more heterogeneity in the cause of ILI in the tropical city of Guayaquil when compared with the Andean city of Quito. Conclusions/Significance This was the most extensive documentation of the viral causes of ILI in Ecuador to date. Influenza was a common cause of ILI in Ecuador, causing more than one outbreak per year. There was no well defined influenza season although there were periods of time when no influenza was detected alternating with epidemics of different variant strains. PMID:21887216

  1. High Prevalence of Intermediate Leptospira spp. DNA in Febrile Humans from Urban and Rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Chiriboga, Jorge; Barragan, Verónica; Arroyo, Gabriela; Sosa, Andrea; Birdsell, Dawn N.; España, Karool; Mora, Ana; Espín, Emilia; Mejía, María Eugenia; Morales, Melba; Pinargote, Carmina; Gonzalez, Manuel; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Keim, Paul; Bretas, Gustavo; Eisenberg, Joseph N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospira spp., which comprise 3 clusters (pathogenic, saprophytic, and intermediate) that vary in pathogenicity, infect >1 million persons worldwide each year. The disease burden of the intermediate leptospires is unclear. To increase knowledge of this cluster, we used new molecular approaches to characterize Leptospira spp. in 464 samples from febrile patients in rural, semiurban, and urban communities in Ecuador; in 20 samples from nonfebrile persons in the rural community; and in 206 samples from animals in the semiurban community. We observed a higher percentage of leptospiral DNA–positive samples from febrile persons in rural (64%) versus urban (21%) and semiurban (25%) communities; no leptospires were detected in nonfebrile persons. The percentage of intermediate cluster strains in humans (96%) was higher than that of pathogenic cluster strains (4%); strains in animal samples belonged to intermediate (49%) and pathogenic (51%) clusters. Intermediate cluster strains may be causing a substantial amount of fever in coastal Ecuador. PMID:26583534

  2. Geographic Distribution of Leishmania Species in Ecuador Based on the Cytochrome B Gene Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hirotomo; Gomez, Eduardo A.; Martini-Robles, Luiggi; Muzzio, Jenny; Velez, Lenin; Calvopiña, Manuel; Romero-Alvarez, Daniel; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Uezato, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    A countrywide epidemiological study was performed to elucidate the current geographic distribution of causative species of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Ecuador by using FTA card-spotted samples and smear slides as DNA sources. Putative Leishmania in 165 samples collected from patients with CL in 16 provinces of Ecuador were examined at the species level based on the cytochrome b gene sequence analysis. Of these, 125 samples were successfully identified as Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis, L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) naiffi, L. (V.) lainsoni, and L. (Leishmania) mexicana. Two dominant species, L. (V.) guyanensis and L. (V.) braziliensis, were widely distributed in Pacific coast subtropical and Amazonian tropical areas, respectively. Recently reported L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) lainsoni were identified in Amazonian areas, and L. (L.) mexicana was identified in an Andean highland area. Importantly, the present study demonstrated that cases of L. (V.) braziliensis infection are increasing in Pacific coast areas. PMID:27410039

  3. First report of orchitis in man caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1 in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Saegerman, Claude; Minda-Aluisa, Elizabeth; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Douce, Richard

    2012-09-01

    We present a 44-year-old man from a rural community in northern Ecuador who worked on a cattle farm where he was involved with primary veterinary care, including assistance during births (or calving) and placenta retention and artificial insemination, with minimal precautions. In September of 2009, quite abruptly, he developed asthenia and hypersomnia without any apparent cause or symptoms like fever, chills, or night sweats. On November 14, 2009, he suffered from pain and edema in the right testicle that coincided with pain in the abdomen. Clinical, serological, and bacteriological investigations confirmed the first case of unilateral orchitis in man in Ecuador caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1. Because brucellosis is a neglected disease, special attention should be given to it in the training of medical and veterinary students. PMID:22826490

  4. First Report of Orchitis in Man Caused by Brucella abortus Biovar 1 in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Saegerman, Claude; Minda-Aluisa, Elizabeth; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Douce, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We present a 44-year-old man from a rural community in northern Ecuador who worked on a cattle farm where he was involved with primary veterinary care, including assistance during births (or calving) and placenta retention and artificial insemination, with minimal precautions. In September of 2009, quite abruptly, he developed asthenia and hypersomnia without any apparent cause or symptoms like fever, chills, or night sweats. On November 14, 2009, he suffered from pain and edema in the right testicle that coincided with pain in the abdomen. Clinical, serological, and bacteriological investigations confirmed the first case of unilateral orchitis in man in Ecuador caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1. Because brucellosis is a neglected disease, special attention should be given to it in the training of medical and veterinary students. PMID:22826490

  5. Citizen empowerment in volcano monitoring, communication and decision-making at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, B. A.; Mothes, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Trained citizen volunteers called vigías have worked to help monitor and communicate warnings about Tungurahua volcano, in Ecuador, since the volcano reawoke in 1999. The network, organized by the scientists of Ecuador's Instituto Geofísico de la Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Geophysical Institute) and the personnel from the Secretaría Nacional de Gestión de Riesgos (Risk Management, initially the Civil Defense), has grown to more than 20 observers living around the volcano who communicate regularly via handheld two-way radios. Interviews with participants conducted in 2010 indicate that the network enables direct communication between communities and authorities; engenders trust in scientists and emergency response personnel; builds community; and empowers communities to make decisions in times of crisis.

  6. Fruit production of Attalea colenda (Arecaceae) in coastal Ecuador - an alternative oil resource?

    SciTech Connect

    Feil, J.P.

    1996-07-01

    Attalea colenda is a monoecious palm found in pastures in coastal Ecuador. In dry regions, it is a valuable source of oil in self-sufficiency farming or in combination with cattle in pastures. The palm was studied over a gradient of dry to humid environments during two fruiting seasons. Palm growth, production of leaves, inflorescences, and infructescences, number of fruits per infructescence, and seed weight of five populations were evaluated. The individual of average size is 15 m tall, which corresponds to approximately 30-40 years of age. No difference in fruit production was recorded between wet and dry regions of coastal Ecuador. The average production of one hectare of pasture, with 50 palms, was 0.9 t of oil per year. One population that was part of an agroforestry system produced 50% more fruits than the average of all populations in pasture. 18 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  7. New species of Triplocania Roesler (Psocodea, ‘Psocoptera’, Ptiloneuridae), from Brazil and Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva Neto, Alberto Moreira; Rafael, José Albertino; Aldrete, Alfonso N. García

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Four species of Triplocania, three with M3 simple, based on male specimens and one with forewing M3 forked, based on male and female specimens, are here described and illustrated, namely: Triplocania bravoi sp. n. (Napo: Ecuador), Triplocania erwini sp. n. (Napo: Ecuador), Triplocania trifida sp. n. (Mato Grosso and Rondônia: Brazil) and Triplocania lamasoides sp. n. (Rondônia: Brazil). They differ from all the other species in the genus, in which the males are known, by the hypandrium and phallosome structures. The female is first described for the M3 forked group. The identification key for males of the M3 forked group is updated. PMID:26052241

  8. Contrasting patterns of urban expansion in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia between 1992 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Berríos, Nora L; Parés-Ramos, Isabel K; Aide, T Mitchell

    2013-02-01

    The global urban population is increasing rapidly, but patterns of urban expansion differ greatly among countries. Urban transition theory predicts that the shift from low to high urbanization depends on a country's history and level of economic development. This study describes urban expansion in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia between 1992 and 2009. Urban dynamics were analyzed by combining nighttime lights and census data from 4032 municipalities. High-lit areas (>52-63 pixel values) were correlated with urban populations across municipalities and years (R (2) > 0.90). Analyses showed that between 1992 and 2009 Bolivia and Ecuador had rapid population growth and rapidly increasing high-lit areas, while Peru and Colombia had lower rates of population growth and urbanization (i.e., expansion of high-lit areas). We demonstrate how nighttime lights can be a useful tool, providing a homogeneous platform for multi-scale analyses of urban growth. PMID:23007897

  9. Y-STR variation among ethnic groups from Ecuador: Mestizos, Kichwas, Afro-Ecuadorians and Waoranis.

    PubMed

    González-Andrade, Fabricio; Roewer, Lutz; Willuweit, Sascha; Sánchez, Dora; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña

    2009-06-01

    Twelve Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 were studied in the three major ethnic groups from Ecuador: Mestizos, Native Amerindians (Kichwas, Quichuas) and Afro-Ecuadorians aiming to construct a representative database for this region in Latin America. All three populations exhibit high haplotypes diversities. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) reveals significant differentiation between the Mestizos, the Kichwas and the Afro-Ecuadorians. The analysis of a hunter-gatherer group of Native Amerindians from the Amazonian provinces of Ecuador, the Waoranis (Huaorani) revealed markedly reduced haplotypes variability and a large genetic distance to the major Ecuadorian populations. PMID:19414158

  10. Geographic Distribution of Leishmania Species in Ecuador Based on the Cytochrome B Gene Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hirotomo; Gomez, Eduardo A; Martini-Robles, Luiggi; Muzzio, Jenny; Velez, Lenin; Calvopiña, Manuel; Romero-Alvarez, Daniel; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Uezato, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2016-07-01

    A countrywide epidemiological study was performed to elucidate the current geographic distribution of causative species of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Ecuador by using FTA card-spotted samples and smear slides as DNA sources. Putative Leishmania in 165 samples collected from patients with CL in 16 provinces of Ecuador were examined at the species level based on the cytochrome b gene sequence analysis. Of these, 125 samples were successfully identified as Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis, L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) naiffi, L. (V.) lainsoni, and L. (Leishmania) mexicana. Two dominant species, L. (V.) guyanensis and L. (V.) braziliensis, were widely distributed in Pacific coast subtropical and Amazonian tropical areas, respectively. Recently reported L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) lainsoni were identified in Amazonian areas, and L. (L.) mexicana was identified in an Andean highland area. Importantly, the present study demonstrated that cases of L. (V.) braziliensis infection are increasing in Pacific coast areas. PMID:27410039

  11. Satellite change detection analysis of deforestation rates and patterns along the Colombia-Ecuador border.

    PubMed

    Viña, Andrés; Echavarria, Fernando R; Rundquist, Donald C

    2004-05-01

    This study uses Landsat satellite data to document the rates and patterns of land-cover change along a portion of the Colombia-Ecuador border during a 23-yr period (1973-1996). Human colonization has resulted in extensive deforestation in both countries. Satellite change detection analysis showed that the annual rates of deforestation were considerably higher for the Colombian side of the border. In addition, loss of forest cover on the Colombian side for the study period was almost 43%, while only 22% on the Ecuadorian side. The study found that there is no single factor driving deforestation on either side of the border, but concluded that the higher rates on the Colombian side may be due to higher colonization pressures and intensification of illegal coca cultivation. On the Ecuador side of the border the satellite images documented patterns of deforestation that reflected road networks associated with oil exploration and development.

  12. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Vibrio spp. in Retail and Farm Shrimps in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sperling, L; Alter, T; Huehn, S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Vibrio spp. in shrimp at retail and in shrimp farms in Ecuador and to determine the antimicrobial agent resistance patterns of farm isolates. The presence of genes linked to early mortality syndrome (EMS) or acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) also was evaluated. Vibrio spp. were isolated from retail shrimps in Cuenca, Ecuador, and farm shrimps originating from provinces El Oro and Guayas, Ecuador. A total of 229 shrimp samples were collected, of which 71 originated from retail markets in Cuenca and 158 came from shrimp farms. Overall, 219 (95.6%) samples tested positive for Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (80.8%) was the most common species detected, followed by Vibrio alginolyticus (50.2%), Vibrio cholerae (11.3%), and Vibrio vulnificus (3.5%). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the virulence-associated tdh and trh genes. In V. parahaemolyticus shrimp farm isolates, high resistance was found to ampicillin (92.2%), and intermediate resistance was found to tetracycline (51.3%) and amikacin (22.1%). Of the V. parahaemolyticus strains, 68 were resistant to at least three antimicrobial agents, and 2 were resistant to seven antimicrobial agents simultaneously. Up to 18 resistant isolates were found for V. alginolyticus, whereas V. vulnificus and V. cholerae isolates were more susceptible. None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the EMS-AHPND plasmid. The results of this study revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of Vibrio spp. in shrimps at retail and on shrimp farms in Ecuador.

  13. Two new emerald geometrid species of Telotheta Warren from Ecuador and Bolivia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae, Geometrinae, Lophochoristini)

    PubMed Central

    Lindt, Aare

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of the lophochoristine genus Telotheta Warren found in Ecuador and Bolivia are described. The paper focuses on the morphological description and illustration of the wing pattern and genitalia structures of the typus generis Telotheta muscipunctata Dognin and the newly identified species Telotheta unoi and Telotheta fresei. The distinguishing characters of the genera Telotheta and Paromphacodes are also briefly discussed. PMID:25349521

  14. THE WIDESPREAD OF Fe(III)-REDUCING BACTERIA IN NATURAL ECOSYSTEMS OF ECUADOR.

    PubMed

    Tashyrev, O B; Govorukha, V M

    2015-01-01

    The widespread of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in natural ecosystems of Ecuador of La Favorita, Tungurahua volcano and Papallacta areas was experimentally proved. High efficiency of microbial precipitation of soluble iron compounds was also demonstrated. Obtained results indicate the potential ability of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to influence the formation of carbon and iron vector fluxes in ecosystems, as well as development of effective biotechnologies of water purification from iron compounds.

  15. THE WIDESPREAD OF Fe(III)-REDUCING BACTERIA IN NATURAL ECOSYSTEMS OF ECUADOR.

    PubMed

    Tashyrev, O B; Govorukha, V M

    2015-01-01

    The widespread of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in natural ecosystems of Ecuador of La Favorita, Tungurahua volcano and Papallacta areas was experimentally proved. High efficiency of microbial precipitation of soluble iron compounds was also demonstrated. Obtained results indicate the potential ability of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to influence the formation of carbon and iron vector fluxes in ecosystems, as well as development of effective biotechnologies of water purification from iron compounds. PMID:26422925

  16. [The role of circular migration in urban dynamics: examples from Ecuador and India].

    PubMed

    Dupont, V; Dureau, F

    1994-01-01

    Using the examples of Ecuador and India, this article examines different forms of circular migration affecting the dynamics of urban populations, and considers their impact on how cities function. The authors look at the strategies of temporary migrants and commuters regarding how they fit into the geographic and occupational spaces available in cities, their residence characteristics, how they affect urban investment and infrastructure, and their contribution to the labor force.

  17. Human brucellosis in northwest Ecuador: typifying Brucella spp., seroprevalence, and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Ron-Garrido, Lenin; Abatih, Emmanuel; Celi-Erazo, Maritza; Vizcaíno-Ordóñez, Laura; Calva-Pacheco, Jaime; González-Andrade, Pablo; Berkvens, Dirk; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Fretin, David; Saegerman, Claude

    2014-02-01

    Human brucellosis in Ecuador is underreported and based only on passive surveillance. Since 2008, brucellosis was removed from the list of communicable diseases in the country. Until now, the true human brucellosis picture has not yet been determined. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of the disease, identify risk factors associated with brucellosis seropositivity in humans, and isolate circulating strains of Brucella spp. in the northwestern part of Ecuador. Between 2006 and 2008, a large transect survey was conducted, based on blood sampling of people from the northwestern part of Ecuador (n=3733) together with an epidemiological inquiry. On the basis of three diagnostic tests used in parallel, the overall seroprevalence was estimated as 1.88% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48-2.38). Based on a multivariable random effects logistic regression analysis, the main risk factors associated with human brucellosis seropositivity were contact with livestock (odds ratio [OR]=3.0; CI 1.25-7.08), consumption of fetus and placenta (OR=2.5; CI 1.18-5.22), and involvement in activities at risk for brucellosis infection (OR=1.8; CI 1.00-3.35). Noticeable variation in brucellosis seropositivity among humans within cantons was observed. The circulating strain was Brucella abortus biotype 4. This study emphasized that contact with livestock, consumption of fetus and placenta, and occupational hazard group were all significant risk factors for the transmission of brucellosis among individuals in the northwestern part of Ecuador. Alongside encouraging the launching of educational campaigns against brucellosis, especially in rural areas where 36% of the population lives, controlling this zoonotic disease in animals will directly benefit its prevention in humans, especially because there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against brucellosis in humans.

  18. El Niño-Southern Oscillation and dengue early warning in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, A. M.; Lowe, R.

    2012-04-01

    Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is one of the most important emerging tropical diseases. Dengue is hyper-endemic in coastal Ecuador, where all four serotypes co-circulate. The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences climate in Ecuador, with positive phase ENSO (El Niño) associated with wetter and warmer conditions over the southern coastal region. In turn, greater rainfall increases the availability of mosquito breeding sites for the dengue mosquito (Aedes aegypti), while warmer temperatures increase rates of larval development, mosquito biting, and viral replication in the mosquito. We report a statistical model for assessing the importance of climate as a driver for inter-annual variability in dengue fever in southern coastal Ecuador. Climate variables from a local meteorology station (precipitation, number of rainy days, minimum/maximum/mean air temperature), combined with gridded climate products, and anomalies of Pacific sea surface temperatures (Oceanic Niño Index, ONI) were used to predict monthly dengue standardized morbidity ratios (SMR) (1995-2010). Non-climatic confounding factors such as serotype introduction and vector control effort were also considered. Preliminary results indicated a statistically significant positive association between dengue risk and the number of rainy days during the previous month. Both the number of rainy days and dengue SMR were positively associated with the Pacific SST anomalies with a lead time of several months. Due to time lags involved in the climate-disease transmission system, monitoring El Niño / La Niña evolution in the Pacific Ocean could provide some predictive lead time for forecasting dengue epidemics. This is the first study of dengue fever and climate in this region. This research provides the foundation to develop a climate-driven early warning system for dengue fever in Ecuador.

  19. Geochronological control for the main tectonic-magmatic events of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Minard L.; Calle, Jorge

    1982-11-01

    A chronological outline of the principal tectonic-magmatic events of Ecuador is presented, based upon approximately 100 K/Ar and Rb/Sr age determinations. Eight magmatic episodes are recognized. In southwestern Ecuador evidence of plutonic and metamorphic activity in the Late Precambrian and in the Middle to Late Triassic is found. Large granitic batholiths of Middle to Late Jurassic age, associated with widespread acidic volcanism, are traceable along the eastern flank of the Andes into Colombia. Early Cretaceous volcanism and plutonism is recognized only in southern Ecuador, although apparently equivalent units continue southwards into the Coastal Cordillera of Peru. A great orogenic belt, characterized by metamorphism, plutonism, and volcanism, was established in the Late Cretaceous and continued through the Paleogene. It is traceable into Peru and Colombia. The Macuchi Fm. of the Western Cordillera along with the Pin˜ón Fm. and associated sediments of the coastal zone represent the remnants of an island arc and the adjacent oceanic floor, respectively, that collided with the South American Plate during the Eocene ( Feininger, 1981). In the Neogene, quartz dioritic intrusions were emplaced in the Western Cordillera as well as in the Cordillera de Muelleturo, although apparently at different times. In the Late Oligocene and Miocene acidic volcanism is noted in the southern Ecuadorian Andes, but not in the north. In the Quaternary, andesitic volcanism and large stratovolcanoes characterize the northern Andes, while widespread rhyolitic ashflow activity is noted in the southern Andes. In Ecuador, the post-Triassic magmatic episodes show a westerly migration, similar to that found in Colombia, but opposite to that noted in Peru.

  20. Ocular linguatuliasis in Ecuador: case report and morphometric study of the larva of Linguatula serrata.

    PubMed

    Lazo, R F; Hidalgo, E; Lazo, J E; Bermeo, A; Llaguno, M; Murillo, J; Teixeira, V P

    1999-03-01

    Linguatula serrata is a pentastomid, a cosmopolitan parasite belonging to the Phylum Pentastomida. Humans may act as an intermediate or accidental definitive host of this parasite, manifesting the nasopharyngeal or visceral form, with the latter having been described more frequently. The occurrence of ocular linguatuliasis is extremely rare, but it has been reported in the United States and Israel. The objective of the present paper was to report the first case of ocular linguatuliasis in Ecuador and to extend the morphologic study of L. serrata by morphometric analysis. The patient studied was a 34-year old woman from Guayaquil, Ecuador who complained of ocular pain with conjunctivitis and visual difficulties of two-months duration. Biomicroscopic examination revealed a mobile body in the anterior chamber of the eye. The mobile body was surgically removed. The specimen was fixed in alcohol, cleared using the technique of Loos, stained with acetic carmine, and mounted on balsam between a slide and a coverslip. It was observed with stereoscopic and common light microscopes in combination with an automatic system for image analysis and processing. The morphologic and morphometric characteristics corresponded to the third-instar larval form of L. serrata. To our knowledge, ocular linguatuliasis has not been previously described in South America, with this being the first report for Ecuador and South America. The present study shows that computer morphometry can adequately contribute both to the morphologic study and to the systematic classification of Pentastomids, and L. serrata in particular. PMID:10466969

  1. Sedimentary record of terminal Cretaceous accretions in Ecuador: The Yunguilla Group in the Cuenca area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaillard, Etienne; Bengtson, Peter; Ordoñez, Martha; Vaca, Wilmer; Dhondt, Annie; Suárez, Johnny; Toro, Jorge

    2008-03-01

    A reappraisal of the "Late Cretaceous Yunguilla Formation" of the Cuenca area enables the definition of four distinct formations, correlatable with those of southwestern Ecuador. A mid- to late-Campanian marine transgression (Jadán Formation) is overlain by quartz-rich conglomerates of fan-delta to turbiditic fan environment (Quimas Formation) of latest Campanian-earliest Maastrichtian age, which are interpreted as evidence of the accretion of a first oceanic terrane (San Juan). Disconformable, arkosic turbidites and cherts (Tabacay Formation) of early Maastrichtian age are thought to represent the erosion of the newly accreted oceanic terrane. A major unconformity of late Maastrichtian age, caused by the accretion of a second oceanic terrane (Guaranda), is followed by the deposition of quartz-rich micaceous shelf sandstones (Saquisilí Formation) of Paleocene age. A third accretion event (late Paleocene) is recorded in coastal Ecuador. Each accretion event correlates with the uplift and erosion of the Eastern Cordillera and with a sedimentary hiatus in the eastern areas. In Ecuador, accretion of oceanic terranes contributed to the build up of the Andes through tectonic underplating of low-density material, and the eastern areas did not behave as flexural foreland basins during late Cretaceous-Paleogene times.

  2. Deforestation and Forest Fragmentation in South Ecuador since the 1970s - Losing a Hotspot of Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Armijos, María Fernanda; Homeier, Jürgen; Espinosa, Carlos Iván; Leuschner, Christoph; de la Cruz, Marcelino

    2015-01-01

    Deforestation and fragmentation are major components of global change; both are contributing to the rapid loss of tropical forest area with important implications for ecosystem functioning and biodiversity conservation. The forests of South Ecuador are a biological 'hotspot' due to their high diversity and endemism levels. We examined the deforestation and fragmentation patterns in this area of high conservation value using aerial photographs and Aster satellite scenes. The registered annual deforestation rates of 0.75% (1976-1989) and 2.86% (1989-2008) for two consecutive survey periods, the decreasing mean patch size and the increasing isolation of the forest fragments show that the area is under severe threat. Approximately 46% of South Ecuador's original forest cover had been converted by 2008 into pastures and other anthropogenic land cover types. We found that deforestation is more intense at lower elevations (premontane evergreen forest and shrubland) and that the deforestation front currently moves in upslope direction. Improved awareness of the spatial extent, dynamics and patterns of deforestation and forest fragmentation is urgently needed in biologically diverse areas like South Ecuador.

  3. Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions

    PubMed Central

    Lessmann, Janeth; Muñoz, Jesús; Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Ecuador has the largest number of species by area worldwide, but also a low representation of species within its protected areas. Here, we applied systematic conservation planning to identify potential areas for conservation in continental Ecuador, with the aim of increasing the representation of terrestrial species diversity in the protected area network. We selected 809 terrestrial species (amphibians, birds, mammals, and plants), for which distributions were estimated via species distribution models (SDMs), using Maxent. For each species we established conservation goals based on conservation priorities, and estimated new potential protected areas using Marxan conservation planning software. For each selected area, we determined their conservation priority and feasibility of establishment, two important aspects in the decision-making processes. We found that according to our conservation goals, the current protected area network contains large conservation gaps. Potential areas for conservation almost double the surface area of currently protected areas. Most of the newly proposed areas are located in the Coast, a region with large conservation gaps and irreversible changes in land use. The most feasible areas for conservation were found in the Amazon and Andes regions, which encompass more undisturbed habitats, and already harbor most of the current reserves. Our study allows defining a viable strategy for preserving Ecuador's biodiversity, by combining SDMs, GIS-based decision-support software, and priority and feasibility assessments of the selected areas. This approach is useful for complementing protected area networks in countries with great biodiversity, insufficient biological information, and limited resources for conservation. PMID:25360277

  4. Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions.

    PubMed

    Lessmann, Janeth; Muñoz, Jesús; Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2014-06-01

    Ecuador has the largest number of species by area worldwide, but also a low representation of species within its protected areas. Here, we applied systematic conservation planning to identify potential areas for conservation in continental Ecuador, with the aim of increasing the representation of terrestrial species diversity in the protected area network. We selected 809 terrestrial species (amphibians, birds, mammals, and plants), for which distributions were estimated via species distribution models (SDMs), using Maxent. For each species we established conservation goals based on conservation priorities, and estimated new potential protected areas using Marxan conservation planning software. For each selected area, we determined their conservation priority and feasibility of establishment, two important aspects in the decision-making processes. We found that according to our conservation goals, the current protected area network contains large conservation gaps. Potential areas for conservation almost double the surface area of currently protected areas. Most of the newly proposed areas are located in the Coast, a region with large conservation gaps and irreversible changes in land use. The most feasible areas for conservation were found in the Amazon and Andes regions, which encompass more undisturbed habitats, and already harbor most of the current reserves. Our study allows defining a viable strategy for preserving Ecuador's biodiversity, by combining SDMs, GIS-based decision-support software, and priority and feasibility assessments of the selected areas. This approach is useful for complementing protected area networks in countries with great biodiversity, insufficient biological information, and limited resources for conservation.

  5. New Proposal of Setal Homology in Schizomida and Revision of Surazomus (Hubbardiidae) from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The homology of three somatic systems in Schizomida is studied yielding the following results: (1) proposal of homology and chaetotaxy of abdominal setae in Surazomus; (2) revision of the cheliceral chaetotaxy in Schizomida, with suggestion of new homology scheme between Hubbardiidae and Protoschizomidae, description of a new group of setae in Hubbardiinae (G7), and division of setae group 5 in two subgroups, G5A and G5B; (3) proposal of segmental homology between trimerous and tetramerous female flagellum in Hubbardiinae with association of segment III of tri-segmented species to segments III + IV of tetra-segmented species. Considerations about the dorsal microsetae on the male flagellum are made. The genus Surazomus in Ecuador is revised. The sympatric species Surazomus palenque sp. nov. and S. kitu sp. nov. (Ecuador, Pichincha) are described and illustrated. The female of S. cuenca (Rowland and Reddell, 1979) is described, with two new distributional records for the species. Surazomus cumbalensis (Kraus, 1957) is recorded for the first time from Ecuador (Pichincha). PMID:26863017

  6. New Proposal of Setal Homology in Schizomida and Revision of Surazomus (Hubbardiidae) from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, Osvaldo Villarreal; de Miranda, Gustavo Silva; Giupponi, Alessandro Ponce de Leão

    2016-01-01

    The homology of three somatic systems in Schizomida is studied yielding the following results: (1) proposal of homology and chaetotaxy of abdominal setae in Surazomus; (2) revision of the cheliceral chaetotaxy in Schizomida, with suggestion of new homology scheme between Hubbardiidae and Protoschizomidae, description of a new group of setae in Hubbardiinae (G7), and division of setae group 5 in two subgroups, G5A and G5B; (3) proposal of segmental homology between trimerous and tetramerous female flagellum in Hubbardiinae with association of segment III of tri-segmented species to segments III + IV of tetra-segmented species. Considerations about the dorsal microsetae on the male flagellum are made. The genus Surazomus in Ecuador is revised. The sympatric species Surazomus palenque sp. nov. and S. kitu sp. nov. (Ecuador, Pichincha) are described and illustrated. The female of S. cuenca (Rowland and Reddell, 1979) is described, with two new distributional records for the species. Surazomus cumbalensis (Kraus, 1957) is recorded for the first time from Ecuador (Pichincha). PMID:26863017

  7. Prevalence of Marijuana Use among University Students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Marya; Demarco, Maria; Araneda, Juan Carlos; Cumsille, Francisco

    2015-05-15

    Young adults 18 to 25 years old show the highest prevalence of marijuana use in Latin America. This study analyzes the changes in prevalence of marijuana use among university students in the Andean Community (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru) from two studies carried out in 2009 and in 2012. Data were collected through representative two-stage samples of universities and students in the Andean Community. An online survey was administered using a standardized questionnaire. Prevalence was calculated for lifetime, past year, and past month. Marijuana was the most widely used illicit substance consumed among university students, in 2009 and in 2012. Past month prevalence among university students in 2009 in Colombia was 5.27%, in Peru 1.00%, in Ecuador 1.68%, and in Bolivia 0.76%. Past month prevalence in 2012 in Colombia was 7.14%, in Ecuador 3.67%, in Peru 1.62%, and in Bolivia 1.45% in 2012. Among university students in the Andean Community, past month prevalence increased among both males and females between 2009 and 2012 in most countries. Marijuana continues to be the most commonly used illicit drug in Latin American countries. Increases in prevalence among young adults could have important implications for national drug policy.

  8. Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions.

    PubMed

    Lessmann, Janeth; Muñoz, Jesús; Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2014-06-01

    Ecuador has the largest number of species by area worldwide, but also a low representation of species within its protected areas. Here, we applied systematic conservation planning to identify potential areas for conservation in continental Ecuador, with the aim of increasing the representation of terrestrial species diversity in the protected area network. We selected 809 terrestrial species (amphibians, birds, mammals, and plants), for which distributions were estimated via species distribution models (SDMs), using Maxent. For each species we established conservation goals based on conservation priorities, and estimated new potential protected areas using Marxan conservation planning software. For each selected area, we determined their conservation priority and feasibility of establishment, two important aspects in the decision-making processes. We found that according to our conservation goals, the current protected area network contains large conservation gaps. Potential areas for conservation almost double the surface area of currently protected areas. Most of the newly proposed areas are located in the Coast, a region with large conservation gaps and irreversible changes in land use. The most feasible areas for conservation were found in the Amazon and Andes regions, which encompass more undisturbed habitats, and already harbor most of the current reserves. Our study allows defining a viable strategy for preserving Ecuador's biodiversity, by combining SDMs, GIS-based decision-support software, and priority and feasibility assessments of the selected areas. This approach is useful for complementing protected area networks in countries with great biodiversity, insufficient biological information, and limited resources for conservation. PMID:25360277

  9. New Proposal of Setal Homology in Schizomida and Revision of Surazomus (Hubbardiidae) from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, Osvaldo Villarreal; de Miranda, Gustavo Silva; Giupponi, Alessandro Ponce de Leão

    2016-01-01

    The homology of three somatic systems in Schizomida is studied yielding the following results: (1) proposal of homology and chaetotaxy of abdominal setae in Surazomus; (2) revision of the cheliceral chaetotaxy in Schizomida, with suggestion of new homology scheme between Hubbardiidae and Protoschizomidae, description of a new group of setae in Hubbardiinae (G7), and division of setae group 5 in two subgroups, G5A and G5B; (3) proposal of segmental homology between trimerous and tetramerous female flagellum in Hubbardiinae with association of segment III of tri-segmented species to segments III + IV of tetra-segmented species. Considerations about the dorsal microsetae on the male flagellum are made. The genus Surazomus in Ecuador is revised. The sympatric species Surazomus palenque sp. nov. and S. kitu sp. nov. (Ecuador, Pichincha) are described and illustrated. The female of S. cuenca (Rowland and Reddell, 1979) is described, with two new distributional records for the species. Surazomus cumbalensis (Kraus, 1957) is recorded for the first time from Ecuador (Pichincha).

  10. Climatic variability related to El Niño in Ecuador - a historical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, K.; Tutasi, P.; Jiménez, R.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the chronology of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, during the period from the arrival of conquistadores in Ecuador in 1532 until the year 1900. A number of probable El Niño events and drought years can be dated from anecdotal reports of significant rainfall and drought in the equatorial region. The evidence of ENSO has been documented from early reports in the South America archives. A large number of books and articles have been reviewing from the Ecuadorian archives to obtain information on El Niño events that have occurred over the past centuries. This information is based on evidence obtained from the equatorial region, where strong and very strong El Niño events clearly separate the northern part of the Ecuadorian coast from the southern region, the normally rainy season specially from west-central to the south coast of Ecuador, as well as the drought years, reported in this region which is climatologically and oceanographically different from the moist Northern coast of Ecuador. Given the normal occurrence of rains in the southern coast of Ecuador, it is reasonable to expect that at least some of the major rainy seasons would be recorded in local chronicles and publications. This information has been compared with reports obtained from Peru. Relative strengths of events are based on such considerations as wind and current effects on travel times of ancient sailing ships, degree of physical damage and destruction, amounts of rainfall and flooding, human disease epidemic, mass mortality of endemic marine organism, rises in sea temperatures and sea levels, effects on coastal fisheries. This paper is the first survey of the historical sources concerned the rainfall and drought in Ecuador. In the course of this investigation we also noted some extended periods of time, near decadal or longer over the past records, when the amount and/or strength of El Niño and its resulting effects appeared to represent

  11. Acrolophyses, a new seed bug genus and two new species (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Rhyparochromidae: Myodochini) from forest-canopy fogging in Ecuador and Peru

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The new myodochine (Rhyparochromidae) genus Acrolophyses is described to accommodate the two new species A. aboricolous from Ecuador and Peru, designated as the type species, and A. hadros from Ecuador. The new species are diagnosed and described, and adult photographs, scanning electron photomicro...

  12. Prevalence and Determinants of Falls among Older Adults in Ecuador: An Analysis of the SABE I Survey

    PubMed Central

    Orces, Carlos H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study based on a nationally representative sample of older adults living in the Andes mountains and coastal region of the country indicates that 34.7% of older adults had fallen in the previous year in Ecuador. Among fallers, 30.6% reported a fall-related injury. The prevalence of falls was higher in women and among older adults residing in the rural Andes mountains. In the multivariate model, women, subjects with cognitive impairment, those reporting urinary incontinence, and those being physically active during the previous year were variables found independently associated with increased risk of falling among older adults in Ecuador. Moreover, a gradual and linear increase in the prevalence of falls was seen as the number of risk factors increased. Falls represent a major public health problem among older adults in Ecuador. The present findings may assist public health authorities to implement programs of awareness and fall prevention among older adults at higher risk of falls. PMID:23476643

  13. Genetic divergence in populations of Lutzomyia ayacuchensis, a vector of Andean-type cutaneous leishmaniasis, in Ecuador and Peru.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hirotomo; Cáceres, Abraham G; Gomez, Eduardo A; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Uezato, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Haplotype and gene network analyses were performed on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and cytochrome b gene sequences of Lutzomyia (Lu.) ayacuchensis populations from Andean areas of Ecuador and southern Peru where the sand fly species transmit Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana and Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana, respectively, and populations from the northern Peruvian Andes, for which transmission of Leishmania by Lu. ayacuchensis has not been reported. The haplotype analyses showed higher intrapopulation genetic divergence in northern Peruvian Andes populations and less divergence in the southern Peru and Ecuador populations, suggesting that a population bottleneck occurred in the latter populations, but not in former ones. Importantly, both haplotype and phylogenetic analyses showed that populations from Ecuador consisted of clearly distinct clusters from southern Peru, and the two populations were separated from those of northern Peru.

  14. THE EFFECT OF P-NITROCHLOROBENZENE ON HOMEOSTASIS QUANTITATIVE PARAMETERS OF KARST CAVE CLAYS AND ECUADOR SOILS MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES.

    PubMed

    Tashyrev, O B; Suslova, O S; Rokitko, P V

    2015-01-01

    In this paper it was given the effect of p-nitrochlorobenzene (NCB) on the homeostasis quantitative parameters of cave clays microbial communities from Western Ukraine and Abkhazia (Mushkarova Yama, Kuybushevskaya) and soils of Ecuador tropical ecosystems. For these microbial communities were determined maximum permissible concentrations and types of responses on xenobiotic. Microbial communities of Mushkarova Yama cave clays and rainforest soils of Ecuador were characterized by the first type of response. Microbial communities of Kuybushevskaya clays and mountain jungles of Ecuador were characterized by the second type of response. Maximum permissible concentration of NCB for Mushkarova Yama was 200 mg/l, for the other studied microbial communities--300 mg/l. It was shown, that microbial communities were not only highly resistant to NCB but also interacted with it by destroying this xenobiotic and decreasing its concentration in 4 times. PMID:26422923

  15. Genetic divergence in populations of Lutzomyia ayacuchensis, a vector of Andean-type cutaneous leishmaniasis, in Ecuador and Peru.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hirotomo; Cáceres, Abraham G; Gomez, Eduardo A; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Uezato, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Haplotype and gene network analyses were performed on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and cytochrome b gene sequences of Lutzomyia (Lu.) ayacuchensis populations from Andean areas of Ecuador and southern Peru where the sand fly species transmit Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana and Leishmania (Viannia) peruviana, respectively, and populations from the northern Peruvian Andes, for which transmission of Leishmania by Lu. ayacuchensis has not been reported. The haplotype analyses showed higher intrapopulation genetic divergence in northern Peruvian Andes populations and less divergence in the southern Peru and Ecuador populations, suggesting that a population bottleneck occurred in the latter populations, but not in former ones. Importantly, both haplotype and phylogenetic analyses showed that populations from Ecuador consisted of clearly distinct clusters from southern Peru, and the two populations were separated from those of northern Peru. PMID:25312337

  16. Ecuador Paraiso Escondido Virus, a New Flavivirus Isolated from New World Sand Flies in Ecuador, Is the First Representative of a Novel Clade in the Genus Flavivirus

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Sonia; Bichaud, Laurence; Moureau, Grégory; Lemey, Philippe; Firth, Andrew E.; Gritsun, Tamara S.; Gould, Ernest A.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Depaquit, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new flavivirus, Ecuador Paraiso Escondido virus (EPEV), named after the village where it was discovered, was isolated from sand flies (Psathyromyia abonnenci, formerly Lutzomyia abonnenci) that are unique to the New World. This represents the first sand fly-borne flavivirus identified in the New World. EPEV exhibited a typical flavivirus genome organization. Nevertheless, the maximum pairwise amino acid sequence identity with currently recognized flaviviruses was 52.8%. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete coding sequence showed that EPEV represents a distinct clade which diverged from a lineage that was ancestral to the nonvectored flaviviruses Entebbe bat virus, Yokose virus, and Sokoluk virus and also the Aedes-associated mosquito-borne flaviviruses, which include yellow fever virus, Sepik virus, Saboya virus, and others. EPEV replicated in C6/36 mosquito cells, yielding high infectious titers, but failed to reproduce either in vertebrate cell lines (Vero, BHK, SW13, and XTC cells) or in suckling mouse brains. This surprising result, which appears to eliminate an association with vertebrate hosts in the life cycle of EPEV, is discussed in the context of the evolutionary origins of EPEV in the New World. IMPORTANCE The flaviviruses are rarely (if ever) vectored by sand fly species, at least in the Old World. We have identified the first representative of a sand fly-associated flavivirus, Ecuador Paraiso Escondido virus (EPEV), in the New World. EPEV constitutes a novel clade according to current knowledge of the flaviviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the virus genome showed that EPEV roots the Aedes-associated mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including yellow fever virus. In light of this new discovery, the New World origin of EPEV is discussed together with that of the other flaviviruses. PMID:26355096

  17. Genetic and other diseases in the pottery of Tumaco-La Tolita culture in Colombia-Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bernal, J E; Briceno, I

    2006-09-01

    The people of Tumaco-La Tolita culture inhabited the borders of present-day Colombia and Ecuador. Already extinct by the time of the Spaniards arrival, they left a huge collection of pottery artifacts depicting everyday life; among these, disease representations were frequently crafted. In this article, we present the results of the personal examination of the largest collections of Tumaco-La Tolita pottery in Colombia and Ecuador; cases of Down syndrome, achondroplasia, mucopolysaccharidosis I H, mucopolysaccharidosis IV, a tumor of the face and a benign tumor in an old woman were found. We believe these to be among the earliest artistic representations of disease.

  18. Prevalence and Determinants of Fall-Related Injuries among Older Adults in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Orces, Carlos H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the prevalence and determinants of fall-related injuries in the previous year among adults aged 60 years or older in Ecuador. Methods. The prevalence of fall-related injuries was estimated using cross-sectional data from the first national survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging study. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between participants' demographic characteristics and fall-related injuries. Results. Of 5,227 participants with a mean age of 72.6 years, 11.4% (95% CI, 10.3%–12.7%) reported a fall-related injury in Ecuador, representing an estimated 136,000 adults aged 60 years or older. Fall-related injuries were more frequently reported among older adults residing in the most urbanized and populated provinces of the country. After controlling for potential confounders, self-reported race as Indigenous (OR 2.2; 95% CI, 2.11–2.31), drinking alcohol regularly (OR 2.54; 95% CI, 2.46–2.63), subjects with greater number of comorbid conditions (OR 2.03; 95% CI, 1.97–2.08), and urinary incontinence (OR 1.83; 95% CI, 1.79–1.87) were factors independently associated with increased odds of sustaining fall-related injuries. Conclusions. Fall-related injuries represent a considerable burden for older adults in Ecuador. The present findings may assist public health authorities to implement fall prevention programs among subjects at higher risk for this type of injury. PMID:25371674

  19. Vitamin D Status among Older Adults Residing in the Littoral and Andes Mountains in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Orces, Carlos H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and its determinants among older adults in Ecuador. Methods. 25(OH)D deficiency and insufficiency prevalence rates were examined among participants in the National Survey of Health, Wellbeing, and Aging. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate demographic characteristics associated with 25(OH)D deficiency. Results. Of 2,374 participants with a mean age of 71.0 (8.3) years, 25(OH)D insufficiency and deficiency were present in 67.8% (95% CI, 65.3–70.2) and 21.6% (95% CI, 19.5–23.7) of older adults in Ecuador, respectively. Women (OR, 3.19; 95% CI, 3.15–3.22), self-reported race as Indigenous (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.70–2.80), and residents in rural (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 4.40–4.58) and urban (OR, 2.74; 95% CI, 2.69–2.80) areas of the Andes Mountains region were variables significantly associated with 25(OH)D deficiency among older adults. Conclusions. Despite abundant sunlight throughout the year in Ecuador, 25(OH)D deficiency was significantly prevalent among older women, Indigenous subjects, and subjects residing in the Andes Mountains region of the country. The present findings may assist public health authorities to implement policies of vitamin D supplementation among older adults at risk for this condition. PMID:26301259

  20. Fish communities of a disturbed mangrove wetland and an adjacent tidal river in Palmar, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervette, V. R.; Aguirre, W. E.; Blacio, E.; Cevallos, Rodrigo; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Pozo, Francisco; Gelwick, F.

    2007-03-01

    Coastal Ecuador has lost 20-30% of mangrove wetlands over the past 30 years. Such habitat loss can impair the ecological functions of wetlands. A paucity of information exists concerning mangrove fish communities of Ecuador. In this study we identify the fish community of the remaining mangrove wetland in Palmar, Ecuador. Fish were sampled in the dry season of 2003 and the wet season of 2004 by seining in mangrove creeks and Main channel of Rio Palmar. For comparison, an adjacent tidal river without mangroves, Rio Javita, was also sampled. We collected a total of 12,231 individuals comprising 36 species in 16 families from Rios Palmar and Javita. Gobiidae (7 species) was the most diverse family for mangrove sites followed by Gerreidae (5 species) and Engraulidae (4 species). A total of 34 species were collected in the mangrove wetland, 21 of which were exclusive to the mangroves including three species of juvenile snook (Centropomidae), indicating that the mangrove habitat of Palmar may provide nursery habitat for these economically valued species. In Rio Javita, Carangidae (3 species) was the most diverse family followed by Engraulidae and Gerreidae (2 species each). A total of 14 species were collected in the tidal river, only two of which were exclusive to the river. Multivariate analyses of fish community data indicated significant differences in community composition between the mangrove creeks and the tidal river and between seasons in both. Juvenile white mullet, Mugil curema, were collected in high relative abundance in both Rios Palmar and Javita, as was the tropical silverside Atherinella serrivomer an ecologically important species. Although Rios Palmar and Javita are characterized by relatively low fish species richness compared to other tropical estuarine systems, they appear to provide an important habitat for several economically and ecologically valued species.

  1. Predicting monthly precipitation along coastal Ecuador: ENSO and transfer function models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guenni, Lelys B.; García, Mariangel; Muñoz, Ángel G.; Santos, José L.; Cedeño, Alexandra; Perugachi, Carlos; Castillo, José

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) modifies precipitation patterns in several parts of the world. One of the most impacted areas is the western coast of South America, where Ecuador is located. El Niño events that occurred in 1982-1983, 1987-1988, 1991-1992, and 1997-1998 produced important positive rainfall anomalies in the coastal zone of Ecuador, bringing considerable damage to livelihoods, agriculture, and infrastructure. Operational climate forecasts in the region provide only seasonal scale (e.g., 3-month averages) information, but during ENSO events it is key for decision-makers to use reliable sub-seasonal scale forecasts, which at the present time are still non-existent in most parts of the world. This study analyzes the potential predictability of coastal Ecuador rainfall at monthly scale. Instead of the discrete approach that considers training models using only particular seasons, continuous (i.e., all available months are used) transfer function models are built using standard ENSO indices to explore rainfall forecast skill along the Ecuadorian coast and Galápagos Islands. The modeling approach considers a large-scale contribution, represented by the role of a sea-surface temperature index, and a local-scale contribution represented here via the use of previous precipitation observed in the same station. The study found that the Niño3 index is the best ENSO predictor of monthly coastal rainfall, with a lagged response varying from 0 months (simultaneous) for Galápagos up to 3 months for the continental locations considered. Model validation indicates that the skill is similar to the one obtained using principal component regression models for the same kind of experiments. It is suggested that the proposed approach could provide skillful rainfall forecasts at monthly scale for up to a few months in advance.

  2. The effectiveness of market-based conservation in the tropics: forest certification in Ecuador and Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Johannes; Yasué, Maï

    2009-02-01

    During the last decade, forest certification has gained momentum as a market-based conservation strategy in tropical forest countries. Certification has been promoted to enhance forest management in countries where governance capacities are insufficient to adequately manage natural resources and enforce pertinent regulations, given that certification relies largely on non-governmental organisations and private businesses. However, at present there are few tropical countries with large areas of certified forests. In this study, we conducted semi-structured stakeholder interviews in Ecuador and Bolivia to identify key framework conditions that influence the costs and benefits for companies to switch from conventional to certified forestry operations. Bolivia has a much greater relative area under certified forest management than Ecuador and also significantly more certified producers. The difference in the success of certification between both countries is particularly notable because Bolivia is a poorer country with more widespread corruption, and is landlocked with less access to export routes. Despite these factors, several characteristics of the Bolivian forest industry contribute to lower additional costs of certified forest management compared to Ecuador. Bolivia has stronger government enforcement of forestry regulations a fact that increases the cost of illegal logging, management units are larger, and vertical integration in the process chain from timber extraction to markets is higher. Moreover, forestry laws in Bolivia are highly compatible with certification requirements, and the government provides significant tax benefits to certified producers. Results from this study suggest that certification can be successful in countries where governments have limited governance capacity. However, the economic incentives for certification do not only arise from favourable market conditions. Certification is likely to be more successful where governments enforce

  3. Hunting in the Rainforest and Mayaro Virus Infection: An emerging Alphavirus in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Izurieta, Ricardo O; Macaluso, Maurizio; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B; Guerra, Bolivar; Cruz, Ligia M; Galwankar, Sagar; Vermund, Sten H

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this report were to document the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and to examine potential risk factors for Mayaro virus infection among the personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of the personnel of a garrison located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews and seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to Mayaro virus infection was assessed by evaluating IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies using ELISA. Results: Of 338 subjects studied, 174 were from the Coastal zone of Ecuador, 73 from Andean zone, and 91 were native to the Amazonian rainforest. Seroprevalence of Mayaro virus infection was more than 20 times higher among Amazonian natives (46%) than among subjects born in other areas (2%). Conclusions: Age and hunting in the rainforest were significant predictors of Mayaro virus infection overall and among Amazonian natives. The results provide the first demonstration of the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and a systematic evaluation of risk factors for the transmission of this alphavirus. The large difference in prevalence rates between Amazonian natives and other groups and between older and younger natives suggest that Mayaro virus is endemic and enzootic in the rainforest, with sporadic outbreaks that determine differences in risk between birth cohorts of natives. Deep forest hunting may selectively expose native men, descendants of the Shuar and Huaronai ethnic groups, to the arthropod vectors of Mayaro virus in areas close to primate reservoirs. PMID:22223990

  4. Mechanisms for achieving adolescent-friendly services in Ecuador: a realist evaluation approach

    PubMed Central

    Goicolea, Isabel; Coe, Anna-Britt; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite evidence showing that adolescent-friendly health services (AFSs) increase young people's access to these services, health systems across the world are failing to integrate this approach. In Latin America, policies aimed at strengthening AFS abound. However, such services are offered only in a limited number of sites, and providers’ attitudes and respect for confidentiality have not been addressed to a sufficient extent. Methods The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms that triggered the transformation of an ‘ordinary’ health care facility into an AFS in Ecuador. For this purpose, a realist evaluation approach was used in order to analyse three well-functioning AFSs. Information was gathered at the national level and from each of the settings including: (i) statistical information and unpublished reports; (ii) in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with policy makers, health care providers, users and adolescents participating in youth organisations and (iii) observations at the health care facilities. Thematic analysis was carried out, driven by the realist evaluation approach, namely exploring the connections between mechanisms, contexts and outcomes. Results The results highlighted that the development of the AFSs was mediated by four mechanisms: grounded self-confidence in trying new things, legitimacy, a transformative process and an integral approach to adolescents. Along this process, contextual factors at the national and institutional levels were further explored. Conclusion The Ministry of Health of Ecuador, based on the New Guidelines for Comprehensive Care of Adolescent Health, has started the scaling up of AFSs. Our research points towards the need to recognise and incorporate these mechanisms as part of the implementation strategy from the very beginning of the process. Although contextually limited to Ecuador, many mechanisms and good practices in these AFS may be relevant to the Latin American setting and

  5. Re-awakening of a Volcano: The 3. November 2002 eruption of El Reventador, NE Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischmann, T.; Toulkeridis, T.; Aguillera, E.

    2003-04-01

    At 3 Nov 2002, 7.15 after a repose of 26 years "El Reventador" exploded unexpectedly forming a vulcanian type eruption with a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 4. Ecuador's easternmost and second most active continental volcano covered with a few million tons of ash a huge area of Ecuador, parts of Colombia, Peru and Brazil reaching even the islands of Galapagos. Reventador belongs to the few stratovolcanoes on the western edge of the Amazonian platform well east of the principal volcanic axis of the North Andean Volcanic Zone. The ca. 20.000 year old andesitic steep-sloping cone of the active volcano Reventador III is situated within the western end of an older steep-walled horse-shoe shaped caldera, which is open to the ESE. This caldera was formed by the previous volcanoes Reventador I and II, which reached an estimated height of ca. 600 m high above the actual edifice before their activities terminated in a sector collapse and lateral blast to the ESE. Lavas, pyroclastic flows, debris flows and lahars of Reventador III then filled the ca. 4 km wide caldera. In the morning of 3 Nov, unpredicted and within seconds, the volcano's WNW flank slided away in a large landslide against the western caldera wall, triggering a destructive, lateral blast of hot gas, steam, ash and rock debris that swept across the landscape. More than a third of the actual cone disappeared in Ecuador's biggest explosion of the last 120 years. Ongoing decompression of the magma caused the continuing eruption and the formation of an eruption column reaching 16 km height. A few hours later another ca. 12 km high eruption followed. Further minor eruptions generated lavas and pyroclasitic flows until the end of November while the emission of ash and gases (mainly H_2O and SO_2) continued until January. The porphyric volcanic rocks contain plag (An 40--70%), cpx, opx, occasionally amphibole and Fe-Ti oxides. Ash and rock fragments of the pyroclasitic flows have almost identical andesitic

  6. Transformation: A Model for Restructuring the Preparation of English Teachers in Ecuador (Un Modelo para Reestructurar la Formación de Profesores de Inglés en Ecuador)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, M. Elisabeth; Vizcaíno, Cristina G.; Cazco, Daniel; Kuhlman, Natalie A.

    2015-01-01

    As English has become the language of business, the economy and social media around the world, it is more and more necessary to start teaching English in schools. Countries such as Ecuador have seen the immediate need to review how they prepare teachers of English to meet this new demand. This article shares a reflection on the process of moving…

  7. Parents’ Education, Mothers’ Vocabulary, and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: Longitudinal Evidence From Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. I estimated the association between parents’ education, mothers’ vocabulary, and early child cognitive development in a sample of poor children in rural Ecuador. Methods. I used regression analysis to estimate the association between parents’ education, mothers’ vocabulary, and the vocabulary, memory, and visual integration skills of children at early ages, controlling for possible confounders. The study is based on a longitudinal cohort of children in rural Ecuador (n = 2118). Results. The schooling and vocabulary levels of mothers were strong predictors of the cognitive development of young children. Household wealth and child's height, weight, and hemoglobin levels explained only a modest fraction of the observed associations. The vocabulary levels of mothers and children were more strongly correlated among older children in the sample, suggesting that the effects of a richer maternal vocabulary are cumulative. Conclusions. Differences in children's cognitive outcomes start very early, which has important implications for the intergenerational transmission of poverty and inequality. Programs that seek to increase early stimulation for disadvantaged children, perhaps through parenting programs or high-quality center-based care, hold promise. PMID:22021308

  8. Directly dated starch residues document early formative maize (Zea mays L.) in tropical Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Zarrillo, Sonia; Pearsall, Deborah M; Raymond, J Scott; Tisdale, Mary Ann; Quon, Dugane J

    2008-04-01

    The study of maize (Zea mays L.) domestication has advanced from questions of its origins to the study-and debate-of its dietary role and the timing of its dispersal from Mexico. Because the investigation of maize's spread is hampered by poor preservation of macrobotanical remains in the Neotropics, research has focused on microbotanical remains whose contexts are often dated by association, leading some to question the dates assigned. Furthermore, some scholars have argued that maize was not introduced to southwestern Ecuador until approximately 4150-3850 calendar years before the present (cal B.P.), that it was used first and foremost as a fermented beverage in ceremonial contexts, and that it was not important in everyday subsistence, challenging previous studies based on maize starch and phytoliths. To further investigate these questions, we analyzed every-day cooking vessels, food-processing implements, and sediments for starch and phytoliths from an archaeological site in southwestern Ecuador constituting a small Early Formative village. Employing a new technique to recover starch granules from charred cooking-pot residues we show that maize was present, cultivated, and consumed here in domestic contexts by at least 5300-4950 cal B.P. Directly dating the residues by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon measurement, our results represent the earliest direct dates for maize in Early Formative Ecuadorian sites and provide further support that, once domesticated approximately 9000 calendar years ago, maize spread rapidly from southwestern Mexico to northwestern South America.

  9. Ecuador's Yasuní Biosphere Reserve: a brief modern history and conservation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finer, Matt; Vijay, Varsha; Ponce, Fernando; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Kahn, Ted R.

    2009-07-01

    Ecuador's Yasuní Man and the Biosphere Reserve—located at the intersection of the Amazon, the Andes mountains, and the equator—is home to extraordinary biodiversity and a recently contacted Amazonian indigenous group known as the Waorani (or Huaorani). Relatives of the Waorani, the Tagaeri and Taromenane, still live in voluntary isolation deep in the reserve, with no peaceful contact with the outside world. The Yasuní Biosphere Reserve also sits atop large reserves of crude oil, Ecuador's chief export, and contains an abundance of valuable timber species. This volatile combination has led to intense conflicts, and subsequently, increased international interest and concern. To make the issues confronting Yasuní more accessible to a growing audience of interested parties, we synthesized information on the biological, social, and political issues of the region, providing a concise overview of its modern history and conservation challenges. We constructed a chronology of key events in the Yasuní region over the past century and a series of maps designed to guide readers to a better understanding of the area's complicated array of overlapping designations. Main topics of analysis and discussion include: the Waorani and their ancestors living in voluntary isolation, Yasuní National Park, illegal logging, missionary impacts, oil-development-related impacts and conflicts, and the Ecuadorian government's innovative Yasuní-ITT Initiative (ITT: Ishpingo-Tiputini-Tambococha).

  10. First records of chewing lice (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae) in Pacific migratory shorebirds wintering in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Haase, Ben; Alava, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Chewing lice were collected from small shorebirds (Charadriformes: Scolopacidae) overwintering in foraging grounds of coastal Ecuador. On 27 occasions at least one louse (3.7%) was collected from six host species. Based on external morphological characters, at least two species of chewing lice could be preliminary identified (family: Menoponidae), including Actornithophilus umbrinus (Burmeister, 1842) and Austromenopon sp. A. umbrinus was found in the Western Sandpiper (Calidris mauri), Least Sandpiper (C. minutilla), Stilt Sandpiper (C. himantopus), Semipalmated Plover (Charadrius semipalmatus) and Wilson's phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor), while Austromenopon sp. is presumably the first record collected from the Surfbird (Aphriza virgata). These findings indicate that the distribution of these chewing lice species covers at least the regions around the equator (latitude 0°) until the Arctic in the north, but probably also includes the entire winter distribution area of the host species. This is the first study of chewing lice from Ecuador's mainland coast and more research is required to understand the host-parasite ecology and ectoparasitic infection in shorebirds stopping over the region.

  11. Competing sovereignties: Oil extraction, corporate social responsibility, and indigenous subjectivity in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billo, Emily Ruth

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs developed in recent years as the business response to social and environmental criticism of corporate operations, and are most debated in those societies where neoliberalism emerged most prominently, the United States and the United Kingdom. My dissertation expands these debates investigating the CSR programs of a Spanish-owned multinational oil company, Repsol-YPF operating in the Ecuadorian Amazon region. It explores CSR programs as institutions that can facilitate ongoing resource extraction, and particular technologies of rule that serve to discipline indigenous peoples at the point of extraction. I conducted an institutional ethnography to examine the social relationships produced through CSR programs, and contend that the relationships formed within CSR programs enable ongoing resource extraction. This dissertation argues that CSR programs produce entanglements between state, corporate and indigenous actors that lead to competing and conflicting spaces of governance in Ecuador. These entanglements reflect the Ecuadorian state's attempts to 'erase' indigenous difference in the name of securing wealth and membership in the nation-state. In turn, CSR programs can both contain indigenous mobilization and resistance in Ecuador, but also highlight indigenous difference and rights and access to resources, predicated on membership in the nation-state. To that end, the dissertation is attentive to the ambivalence and uncertainty of indigenous actors produced through engagement with corporate capital, and suggests that ambivalence can also be a productive space.

  12. Consequences of Out-Migration for Land Use in Rural Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gray, Clark L; Bilsborrow, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    In rural Ecuador and elsewhere in Latin America, the departure of migrants and the receipt of migrant remittances have led to declining rural populations and increasing cash incomes. It is commonly assumed that these processes will lead to agricultural abandonment and the regrowth of native vegetation, thus undermining traditional livelihoods and providing a boon for biodiversity conservation. However, an increasing number of household-level studies have found mixed and complex effects of out-migration and remittances on agriculture. We advance this literature by using household survey data and satellite imagery from three study areas in rural Ecuador to investigate the effects of migration and remittances on agricultural land use. Multivariate methods are used to disaggregate the effects of migration and remittances, to account for other influences on land use and to correct for the potential endogeneity of migration and remittances. Contrary to common assumptions but consistent with previous studies, we find that migrant departure has a positive effect on agricultural activities that is offset by migrant remittances. These results suggest that rural out-migration alone is not likely to lead to a forest transition in the study areas.

  13. Exposures and cancer incidence near oil fields in the Amazon basin of Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    San, S; Armstrong, B; Cordoba, J; Stephens, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine environmental exposure and incidence and mortality of cancer in the village of San Carlos surrounded by oil fields in the Amazon basin of Ecuador.
METHODS—Water samples of the local streams were analyzed for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). A preliminary list of potential cancer cases from 1989 to 1998 was prepared. Cases were compared with expected numbers of cancer morbidity and mortality registrations from a Quito reference population.
RESULTS—Water analysis showed severe exposure to TPHs by the residents. Ten patients with cancer were diagnosed while resident in the village of San Carlos. An overall excess for all types of cancer was found in the male population (8 observed v 3.5 expected) with a risk 2.26 times higher than expected (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.97 to 4.46). There was an overall excess of deaths for all types of cancer (6 v 1.6 expected) among the male population 3.6 times higher than the reference population (95% CI 1.31 to 7.81).
CONCLUSIONS—The observed excess of cancer might be associated with the pollution of the environment by toxic contaminants coming from the oil production.


Keywords: cancer; oil; Amazon; Ecuador PMID:11452046

  14. Directly dated starch residues document early formative maize (Zea mays L.) in tropical Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Zarrillo, Sonia; Pearsall, Deborah M.; Raymond, J. Scott; Tisdale, Mary Ann; Quon, Dugane J.

    2008-01-01

    The study of maize (Zea mays L.) domestication has advanced from questions of its origins to the study—and debate—of its dietary role and the timing of its dispersal from Mexico. Because the investigation of maize's spread is hampered by poor preservation of macrobotanical remains in the Neotropics, research has focused on microbotanical remains whose contexts are often dated by association, leading some to question the dates assigned. Furthermore, some scholars have argued that maize was not introduced to southwestern Ecuador until ≈4150–3850 calendar years before the present (cal B.P.), that it was used first and foremost as a fermented beverage in ceremonial contexts, and that it was not important in everyday subsistence, challenging previous studies based on maize starch and phytoliths. To further investigate these questions, we analyzed every-day cooking vessels, food-processing implements, and sediments for starch and phytoliths from an archaeological site in southwestern Ecuador constituting a small Early Formative village. Employing a new technique to recover starch granules from charred cooking-pot residues we show that maize was present, cultivated, and consumed here in domestic contexts by at least 5300–4950 cal B.P. Directly dating the residues by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon measurement, our results represent the earliest direct dates for maize in Early Formative Ecuadorian sites and provide further support that, once domesticated ≈9000 calendar years ago, maize spread rapidly from southwestern Mexico to northwestern South America. PMID:18362336

  15. New remains of Eremotherium laurillardi (Lund, 1842) (Megatheriidae, Xenarthra) from the coastal region of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tito, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    New remains of Eremotherium were recovered from the Pacific coast of Ecuador's Manabi province. The Machalilla fossiliferous locality records the northernmost presence of Eremotherium along the Pacific coast of South America. Most of the fossil remains belong to the same individual, mainly its posterior half, but other individuals are represented. Among the better-preserved specimens are skull fragments, most of the hind limb bones and a number of trunk and caudal centra. These remains were compared with samples collected during the 20th century along the southern coastal regions of Ecuador and northern Peru. Many characters of the long bones and tarsals testify to a possibly different lineage despite the closeness of other Eremotherium populations. Some metric and morphological aspects suggest a different space-temporal southern Caribbean provenance. Other Eremotherium specimens, coming from other Ecuadorian localities, were studied and compared with classic Eremotherium samples. Interesting morpho-functional aspects are pointed out with regard to the tail and its importance in the bipedal stance.

  16. Coxiella burnetii seroprevalence and associated risk factors in dairy and mixed cattle farms from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Carbonero, Alfonso; Guzmán, Lucía T; Montaño, Karen; Torralbo, Alicia; Arenas-Montes, Antonio; Saa, Luis R

    2015-03-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a bacterial agent for which ruminants are the main reservoir. An extensive cross-sectional study to determine the seroprevalence of and associated risk factors for Q fever was performed in dairy and mixed (dairy-beef) cattle herds in Ecuador. A total of 2668 serum samples from 386 herds were analyzed using an ELISA. In addition, a questionnaire with 57 variables related to management, feeding, facilities, biosecurity and animal health was completed for every cattle farm. A Generalized Estimating Equations model was used to determine the factors associated with C. burnetii seropositivity. The true prevalence of C. burnetii seropositivity in dairy and mixed cattle from Ecuador reached 12.6% (CI95%: 11.3-13.9%). The herd prevalence was 46.9% (181/386) (CI95%: 41.9-51.9%), and the within herd prevalence ranged between 8% and 100% (mean: 25.0%; Q1: 12.5%, Q2: 25.0%, Q3: 37.5%). Four factors were included in the GEE model for C. burnetii seropositivity: age of the cattle (OR: 1.01; CI95%: 1.006-1.014), feeding of calves with milk replacers (OR: 1.94; CI95%: 1.1-3.3), bovine respiratory syncytial virus seropositivity (OR: 1.54; CI95%: 1.1-2.3), and disinfection of the umbilical cord (OR: 0.60; CI95%: 0.4-0.9).

  17. Prophylaxis and treatment of endemic goiter with iodized oil in rural Ecuador and Peru.

    PubMed

    Kevany, J; Fierro-Benitez, R; Pretell, E A; Stanbury, J B

    1969-12-01

    Endemic goiter is a health problem in many areas of the world; in some areas the disease is so severe that cretinism and other defects are found. In many areas geographic, economic, and other factors prevent the use of iodized salt as a preventive measure. Field studies were begun in 1966 to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of parenteral administration of iodized oil in goiter prevention. Studies were carried out in Ecuador and Peru. In Ecuador 2 villages were chosen in which the prevalence of goiter was about 60%; in Peru 3 villages were chosen where incidence was about 50%. Prevalence of goiter decreased for 20 months during the study but then began to rise again with the maximum reduction seen up to age 18 and minimal reduction after 40 years of age. The control groups in the study experienced only slight decreases in rate of incidence. Cretinism has not yet appeared among the progeny of the population injected with iodized oil but several instances have appeared in control groups. The use of iodized oil as a public health procedure for the prevention of endemic goiter and its associated defects is an acceptable measure in regions where salt iodization cannot be done.

  18. Consequences of Out-Migration for Land Use in Rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Clark L.; Bilsborrow, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    In rural Ecuador and elsewhere in Latin America, the departure of migrants and the receipt of migrant remittances have led to declining rural populations and increasing cash incomes. It is commonly assumed that these processes will lead to agricultural abandonment and the regrowth of native vegetation, thus undermining traditional livelihoods and providing a boon for biodiversity conservation. However, an increasing number of household-level studies have found mixed and complex effects of out-migration and remittances on agriculture. We advance this literature by using household survey data and satellite imagery from three study areas in rural Ecuador to investigate the effects of migration and remittances on agricultural land use. Multivariate methods are used to disaggregate the effects of migration and remittances, to account for other influences on land use and to correct for the potential endogeneity of migration and remittances. Contrary to common assumptions but consistent with previous studies, we find that migrant departure has a positive effect on agricultural activities that is offset by migrant remittances. These results suggest that rural out-migration alone is not likely to lead to a forest transition in the study areas. PMID:24187416

  19. The Life History and Shelter Building Behavior of Vettius Coryna Coryna Hewitson, 1866 in Eastern Ecuador (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae)

    PubMed Central

    Greeney, Harold F.; Warren, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    We describe all life-stages of Vettius coryna coryna Hewitson, 1866 in eastern Ecuador. The details of larval shelter structure and associated shelter building behavior are described and illustrated, as observed on two grass species (Poaceae). We provide brief observations on V. coryna adult behavior and a review of known life history information for other species of Vettius Godman, 1901. PMID:19613868

  20. Scorpionism in Ecuador: First report of severe and fatal envenoming cases from northern Manabí by Tityus asthenes Pocock.

    PubMed

    Borges, Adolfo; Morales, Melva; Loor, Wilmer; Delgado, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    The presence in rural areas of western Ecuador of scorpions in the genus Tityus capable of producing pediatric mortality is hereby evidenced. The medical significance of scorpions in Ecuador has been underestimated partly because of the clinically unimportant stings delivered by Centruroides margaritatus and Teuthraustes atramentarius, which have venom with low toxicity to vertebrates. Five intra-domiciliary cases of scorpion envenoming in victims aged between 1.9 and 16 years old, including one fatality, are reported from rural settings in forest areas of Chone (n = 2) and Flavio Alfaro (n = 3) counties, northern Manabí province, western Ecuador. Three cases were graded as Class II (moderate) and two in Class III (severe) envenoming. Manifestations showed characteristic autonomic nervous system hyper-stimulation and the fatality (a 1.9-year-old boy from Flavio Alfaro) was due to cardio-respiratory failure. Marked leukocytosis in four of the cases (21,800-31,800 cells/mm(3)), with notable neutrophilia (58-82%), suggests induction of a venom-mediated systemic inflammatory response-like syndrome. Specimens responsible for cases in Flavio Alfaro County, including the fatality, were classified as Tityus asthenes Pocock, accountable for severe scorpionism in Colombia. These findings demand implementation of control and therapeutic measures in affected areas in Ecuador, including evaluation of available scorpion antivenoms.

  1. EFL Teaching in the Amazon Region of Ecuador: A Focus on Activities and Resources for Teaching Listening and Speaking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Paul F.; Ochoa, Cesar A.; Cabrera, Paola A.; Castillo, Luz M.; Quinonez, Ana L.; Solano, Lida M.; Espinosa, Franklin O.; Ulehlova, Eva; Arias, Maria O.

    2015-01-01

    Research on teaching listening and speaking skills has been conducted at many levels. The purpose of this study was to analyze the current implementation of classroom and extracurricular activities, as well as the use of educational resources for teaching both skills in public senior high schools in the Amazon region of Ecuador, particularly in…

  2. Development of an Educational Video to Improve HIV-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Prevention among Company Workers in Ecuador

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Carmen Cabezas, María; Fornasini, Marco; Barmettler, David; Ortuño, Diego; Borja, Teresa; Albert, Adelin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess an innovative educational video package for improving HIV knowledge, attitudes and practices among company workers in Ecuador. Methods: The design and development of the HIV prevention educational video was based on the results of a large-scale survey conducted in 115 companies (commerce, manufacturing and real…

  3. Situation Report--Algeria, Ecuador, New Zealand, Peru, Rhodesia, St. Lucia, and U.A.R. (Egypt).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in seven foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Algeria, Ecuador, New Zealand, Peru, Rhodesia, St. Lucia and U. A. R. (Egypt). Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two topics, general background and family planning situation.…

  4. Identification of cocoa trees combining high yield potential and resistance to diseases in segregating progenies In Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseases and low yielding planting material are the main factors limiting production of “fine” or “flavour” cocoa in Ecuador. This makes it necessary to develop modern varieties capable of overcoming these limitations. During the 1960s and 1970s INIAP tested several progenies from selected crosses...

  5. First report of Potato virus V and Peru tomato mosaic virus on tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) orchards of Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Ecuador, tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) represents an important cash crop for hundreds of small farmers. In 2013, leaves from tamarillo plants showing severe virus-like symptoms (mosaic, mottling and leaf deformation) were collected from old orchards in Pichincha and Tungurahua. Double-stranded RN...

  6. Scorpionism in Ecuador: First report of severe and fatal envenoming cases from northern Manabí by Tityus asthenes Pocock.

    PubMed

    Borges, Adolfo; Morales, Melva; Loor, Wilmer; Delgado, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    The presence in rural areas of western Ecuador of scorpions in the genus Tityus capable of producing pediatric mortality is hereby evidenced. The medical significance of scorpions in Ecuador has been underestimated partly because of the clinically unimportant stings delivered by Centruroides margaritatus and Teuthraustes atramentarius, which have venom with low toxicity to vertebrates. Five intra-domiciliary cases of scorpion envenoming in victims aged between 1.9 and 16 years old, including one fatality, are reported from rural settings in forest areas of Chone (n = 2) and Flavio Alfaro (n = 3) counties, northern Manabí province, western Ecuador. Three cases were graded as Class II (moderate) and two in Class III (severe) envenoming. Manifestations showed characteristic autonomic nervous system hyper-stimulation and the fatality (a 1.9-year-old boy from Flavio Alfaro) was due to cardio-respiratory failure. Marked leukocytosis in four of the cases (21,800-31,800 cells/mm(3)), with notable neutrophilia (58-82%), suggests induction of a venom-mediated systemic inflammatory response-like syndrome. Specimens responsible for cases in Flavio Alfaro County, including the fatality, were classified as Tityus asthenes Pocock, accountable for severe scorpionism in Colombia. These findings demand implementation of control and therapeutic measures in affected areas in Ecuador, including evaluation of available scorpion antivenoms. PMID:26344916

  7. Collective Memory: The African Presence in Latin America. A Study Guide on the Maroon Community of Esmeraldas, Ecuador.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkin, Allen; And Others

    In this brief study guide, the focus is on the "maroons," those Africans who bravely threw off the chains of slavery and established independent communities within colonial Latin America. The specific study is of the history and culture of Esmeraldas, a province in northwestern Ecuador and home to one of the most interesting maroon communities,…

  8. Investigations of subsurface flow constructed wetlands and associated geomaterial resources in the Akumal and Reforma regions, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krekeler, Mark P. S.; Probst, Pete; Samsonov, Misha; Tselepis, Cynthia M.; Bates, William; Kearns, Lance E.; Maynard, J. Barry

    2007-12-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands in the village of Akumal, Quintana Roo, Mexico were surveyed to determine the general status of the wetland systems and provide baseline information for long term monitoring and further study. Twenty subsurface flow wetlands were surveyed and common problems observed in the systems were overloading, poor plant cover, odor, and no secondary containment. Bulk mineral composition of aggregate from two subsurface flow constructed wetlands was determined to consist solely of calcite using bulk powder X-ray diffraction. Some soil structure is developed in the aggregate and aggregate levels in wetlands drop at an estimated rate between 3 and 10 cm/year for overloaded wetlands owing to dissolution. Mineral composition from fresh aggregate samples commonly is a mixture of calcite and aragonite. Trace amounts of Pb, Zn, Co, and Cr were observed in fresh aggregate. Coefficients of permeability ( k) varied from 0.006 to 0.027 cm/s with an average values being 0.016 cm/s. Grain size analysis of fresh aggregate samples indicates there are unimodal and multimodal size distributions in the samples with modes in the coarse and fine sand being common. Investigations of other geologic media from the Reforma region indicate that a dolomite with minor amounts of Fe-oxide and palygorskite is abundant and may be a better aggregate source that the current materials used. A Ca-montmorillonite bed was identified in the Reforma region as well and this unit is suitable to serve as a clay liner to prevent leaks for new and existing wetland systems. These newly discovered geologic resources should aid in the improvement of subsurface flow constructed wetlands in the region. Although problems do exist in these wetlands with respect to design, these systems represent a successful implementation of constructed wetlands at a community level in developing regions.

  9. Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenning, Alexander; Muenchow, Jannes

    2016-04-01

    Modelling increased landslide susceptibility near highways in the Andes of southern Ecuador A. Brenning (1), J. Muenchow (1) (1) Department of Geography, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany Mountain roads are affected by and also affect themselves landslide suceptibility. Especially in developing countries, inadequate drainage systems and mechanical destabilization of hillslopes by undercutting and overloading are known processes through which road construction and maintenance can enhance landslide activity within the immediate surroundings of road infrastructure. In the Andes of southern Ecuador, strong precipitation gradients as well as lithological differences provide an excellent study site in which the relationship between highways and landslide susceptibility and its regional differentiation can be studied. This study uses Generalized Additive Models (GAM) to investigate patterns of landslide susceptibility along two paved interurban highways in the tropical Andes of southern Ecuador. The relationship of landslides to distance from road is modeled while accounting for topographic, climatic and lithological predictors as possible confounders and modifiers, focusing on the odds ratio of landslide occurrence at 25 m versus 200 m distance from the highway. Spatial attention is given to uncertainties in estimated odds ratios of landslide occurrence using spatial block bootstrap techniques. The GAM is able to represent nonlinear additive terms as well as bivariate smooth interaction terms, providing a good tradeoff between model complexity and interpretability. The estimated odds of landslide occurrence were 18-21 times higher near the highway than at 200 m distance, based on different analyses, with lower 95% confidence limits always >13. (Semi-) parametric estimates confirmed this general range of values but suggests slightly higher odds ratios (95% confidence interval: 15.5-25.3). Highway-related effects were observed to

  10. A model for the Holocene extinction of the mammal megafauna in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficcarelli, G.; Coltorti, M.; Moreno-Espinosa, M.; Pieruccini, P. L.; Rook, L.; Torre, D.

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents the results of multidisciplinary research in the Ecuadorian coastal regions, with particular emphasis on the Santa Elena Peninsula. The new evidence, together with previous data gathered on the Ecuadorian cordillera during the last 12 years, allows us to formulate a model that accounts for most of the mammal megafauna extinction at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition. After the illustration of geomorphological and paleontological evidences of the area of the Santa Elena Peninsula (and other sites), and of a summary of the paleoclimatic data, the main results and conclusions of this work are: (1) Late Pleistocene mammal assemblages survived in the Ecuadorian coast until the Early Holocene sea level rise; (2) Prior to the extinction of most of the megafauna elements (mastodons, ground sloths, equids, sabre-tooth felids), the mammal communities at Santa Elena Peninsula comprise elements with differing habitat requirements, attesting conditions of high biological pressure; (3) At the El Cautivo site (Santa Elena Peninsula), we have discovered Holocene sediments containing the first known occurrences in Ecuador of lithic artifacts that are associated with mammal megafauna remains; (4) During the last 10,000 years, the coastal region of Ecuador underwent significant changes in vegetation cover. At the Pleistocene/Holocene transition the climate changed from very arid conditions to humid conditions. Our data indicates that the megafauna definitively abandoned the Cordillera areas around 12,000 yr BP due to t he increasing aridity, and subsequently migrated to coastal areas where ecological conditions still were suitable, Santa Elena Peninsula and mainly Amazonian areas being typical. We conclude that the unusual high faunal concentrations and the change to dense vegetation cover (due to a rapid increase in precipitation in the lower Holocene) at 8000-6000 yr BP, caused the final collapse and extinction of most elements of the mammal megafauna

  11. K-Ar geochronology of basement rocks on the northern flank of the Huancabama deflection, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feininger, Tomas; Silberman, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Huancabamba deflection, a major Andean orocline located at the Ecuador-Peru border, constitutes an important geologic boundary on the Pacific coast of South America. Crust to the north of the deflection is oceanic and the basement is composed of basic igneous rocks of Cretaceous age, whereas crust to the south is continental and felsic rocks of Precambrian to Cretaceous age make up the basement. The northern flank of the Huancabamba Deflection in El Oro Province, Ecuador, is underlain by Precambrian polymetamorphic basic rocks of the Piedras Group; shale, siltstone, sandstone, and their metamorphosed equivalents in the Tahuin Group (in part of Devonian age); concordant syntectonic granitic rocks; quartz diorite and alaskite of the Maroabeli pluton; a protrusion of serpentinized harzburgite that contains a large inclusion of blueschist-facies metamorphic rocks, the Raspas Formation, and metamorphic rocks north of the La Palma fault. Biotite from gneiss of the Tahuin Group yields a Late Triassic K-Ar age (210 ? 8 m.y.). This is interpreted as an uplift age and is consistent with a regional metamorphism of Paleozoic age. A nearby sample from the Piedras Group that yielded a hornblende K-Ar age of 196 ? 8 m.y. was affected by the same metamorphic event. Biotite from quartz diorite of the mesozonal Maroabeli pluton yields a Late Triassic age (214 ? 6 m.y.) which is interpreted as an uplift age which may be only slightly younger than the age of magmatic crystallization. Emplacement of the pluton may postdate regional metamorphism of the Tahuin Group. Phengite from politic schist of the Raspas Formation yields an Early Cretaceous K-Ar age (132 ? 5 m.y.). This age is believed to date the isostatic rise of the encasing serpentinized harzburgite as movement along a subjacent subduction zone ceased, and it is synchronous with the age of the youngest lavas of a coeval volcanic arc in eastern Ecuador. A Late Cretaceous K-Ar age (74.4 ? 1.1 m.y.) from hornblende in

  12. Ecological factors related to the widespread distribution of sylvatic Rhodnius ecuadoriensis populations in southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease transmission risk is a function of the presence of triatomines in domestic habitats. Rhodnius ecuadoriensis is one of the main vectors implicated in transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Ecuador. This triatomine species is present in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic habitats in the country. To determine the distribution of sylvatic populations of R. ecuadoriensis and the factors related to this distribution, triatomine searches were conducted between 2005 and 2009 in southern Ecuador. Methods Manual triatomine searches were conducted by skilled bug collectors in 23 communities. Sylvatic searched sites were selected by a) directed sampling, where microhabitats were selected by the searchers and b) random sampling, where sampling points where randomly generated. Domiciliary triatomine searches were conducted using the one man-hour method. Natural trypanosome infection was determined by microscopic examination and PCR. Generalized linear models were used to test the effect of environmental factors on the presence of sylvatic triatomines. Results In total, 1,923 sylvatic individuals were collected representing a sampling effort of 751 man-hours. Collected sylvatic triatomines were associated with mammal and bird nests. The 1,219 sampled nests presented an infestation index of 11.9%, a crowding of 13 bugs per infested nest, and a colonization of 80% of the nests. Triatomine abundance was significantly higher in squirrel (Sciurus stramineus) nests located above five meters from ground level and close to the houses. In addition, 8.5% of the 820 examined houses in the same localities were infested with triatomines. There was a significant correlation between R. ecuadoriensis infestation rates found in sylvatic and synanthropic environments within communities (p = 0.012). Parasitological analysis revealed that 64.7% and 15.7% of the sylvatic bugs examined (n = 300) were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli respectively, and 8% of the

  13. Sumakuru, a deeply-diverging new genus of lyssomanine jumping spiders from Ecuador (Araneae: Salticidae).

    PubMed

    Maddison, Wayne P

    2016-01-01

    The lyssomanine jumping spider genus Sumakuru gen. n. is here described for Sumakuru bigal sp. n., from the Bigal River Biological Reserve in Ecuador. Known from a single male, the embolus of the palp takes the form of a smoothly arching curve, and appears fully mobile, being connected to the tegulum by a thin sclerite and a twisted hematodocha. Data from four gene regions (28S, 16SND1, CO1, wingless) indicate that Sumakuru is the sister group to all other sampled lyssomanines, diverging deeply on the stem lineage of the clade of other known lyssomanines. Unlike previous molecular results, the sampled species of Lyssomanes Hentz, 1845 are supported as monophyletic, with Chinoscopus Simon, 1900 as the sister to Lyssomanes. PMID:27667933

  14. Marine debris: Implications for conservation of rocky reefs in Manabi, Ecuador (Se Pacific Coast).

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Pico, Juan; Valle, David Mero-Del; Castillo-Ruperti, Ricardo; Macías-Mayorga, Dayanara

    2016-08-15

    Marine debris (MD) pollution is a problem of global concern because of its impact on marine ecosystems. The current extent of this problem and its implications concerning reef conservation are unknown in Ecuador. The composition and distribution of submerged MD was assessed on two reefs using underwater surveys of geomorphological areas: crest, slope and bottom. MD items were classified according to source and use. Plastic-derived debris represents >90% of total MD found on the reefs, principally composed by plastic containers and nets. 63% of the MD was associated to fishing activities. The composition showed differences between sites and geomorphological areas, monofilament nets were found on the crests, multifilament lines on the slopes and plastic containers on the bottom. MD disposal might be a result of the influx of visitors and fishing activities. Distribution is related to bottom type, level of boating/fishing activity and benthic features. PMID:27263979

  15. 3D tomographic structure of the north andean subduction zone at the Colombia-Ecuador border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cano, L. C.; Galve, A.; de La Torre, G.; Charvis, P.; Pontoise, B.; Hello, Y.; Anglade, A.; Yates, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    At the latitude of Ecuador - southern Colombia, the Nazca plate converges toward the South American plate along an ~E-W direction at a rate of about 6 cm/yr. Several large subduction earthquakes affected this area during the last century. Near the Ecuador-Colombia border the 500 km long rupture zone of the 1906 event (M = 8.8) was partially reactivated, from south to north, by a sequence of 3 thrust events in 1942 (Mw = 7.8), 1958 (Mw = 7.7) and 1979 (Mw = 8.2). From 1998 to 2005, this zone was the target of five marine geophysical campaigns in order to determine the shallow and deep structure of the margin, its deformation and the possible relation with the rupture zone of the major earthquakes. Bathymetric data, passive and active seismic data were collected off South-Colombia and Ecuador. The data suggest that the interplate earthquakes and the extension of their rupture zone are at least partly controlled by structures on the downgoing and upper plates. To the south the subduction of the buoyant Carnegie Ridge, with a up to 19 km thick crust, is inferred to partially lock the plate interface along central Ecuador. This is illustrated by the rupture zones during the 1942 and 1906 earthquakes that terminated against the subducted northern flank of the ridge. The margin wedge is segmented by transverse crustal faults that correlate with the limits of the earthquake coseismic slip zones at the limit between the 1942 and 1958 rupture zones as well as at the limit between the 1958 and 1979 rupture zones. Furthermore, seaward of the 1958 rupture zone, a 2D profile from the SALIERI experiment (2001) highlights that the margin seems to overthrust a low velocity outer basement high along a splay fault that would decouple the bulk of the margin basement from its frontal part during great earthquake rupture. During, the 3D Esmeraldas experiment, conducted from February to June 2005, 34 3-components portable stations were installed on land and 26 3-components Ocean Bottom

  16. Spatio-temporal clusters of incident human brucellosis cases in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ron, Lenin; Benitez, Washington; Speybroeck, Niko; Ron, Jorge; Saegerman, Claude; Berkvens, Dirk; Abatih, Emmanuel

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to determine whether variations in the incidence of reported cases of human brucellosis in Ecuador were clustered in space and time. In addition, the effects of cattle and small ruminant population density and other socio-economic factors on the incidence were investigated. Significant space-time clusters were found in the northern and southern highlands and parts of Ecuadorian Amazonia. Customs of people, cattle, goat and sheep population density appeared to influence the incidence of brucellosis. In this study, the incidence of reported cases of human brucellosis was found to be higher in the highlands (sierra) and in municipalities near Peru and Colombia. The results of this study highlight the need for prevention and control measures aimed at abating the incidence of brucellosis among livestock and humans. PMID:23725883

  17. Ethnicity, development and gender: Tsáchila indigenous women in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Sarah; Pequeño, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, indigenous populations have become the subjects and agents of development in national and international multicultural policy that acknowledges poverty among indigenous peoples and their historic marginalization from power over development. Although the impact of these legal and programmatic efforts is growing, one persistent axis of disadvantage, male–female difference, is rarely taken into account in ethno-development policy and practice. This article argues that assumptions that inform policy related to indigenous women fail to engage with indigenous women's development concerns. The institutional separation between gender and development policy (GAD) and multiculturalism means that provisions for gender in multicultural policies are inadequate, and ethnic rights in GAD policies are invisible. Drawing on post-colonial feminism, the paper examines ethnicity and gender as interlocking systems that structure indigenous women's development experiences. These arguments are illustrated in relation to the case of the Tsáchila ethno-cultural group in the South American country of Ecuador.

  18. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador.

  19. Incremental health system reform policy: Ecuador's law for the provision of free maternity and child care.

    PubMed

    Chiriboga, Sonia Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the impact that the Ley de Maternidad Gratuita y Atencion a la Infancia (LMGAI) [Law for the Provision of Free Maternity and Child Care] in Ecuador has had on health services utilization and infant mortality. These outcomes were also examined by socioeconomic status. This retrospective study used demographic and health surveys, ENDEMAIN 1999 and 2004, with multivariate logistic regression to assess the impact post-LMGAI, controlling for mother's socioeconomic status, maternal and birth history, and demographic characteristics. Primary healthcare services utilization outcomes significantly improved post-LMGAI. Neonatal mortality decreased post-LMGAI. Further evaluation is needed as implementation continues to understand the expansion of primary healthcare services in future health system reforms.

  20. Ethnicity, development and gender: Tsáchila indigenous women in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Sarah; Pequeño, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, indigenous populations have become the subjects and agents of development in national and international multicultural policy that acknowledges poverty among indigenous peoples and their historic marginalization from power over development. Although the impact of these legal and programmatic efforts is growing, one persistent axis of disadvantage, male–female difference, is rarely taken into account in ethno-development policy and practice. This article argues that assumptions that inform policy related to indigenous women fail to engage with indigenous women's development concerns. The institutional separation between gender and development policy (GAD) and multiculturalism means that provisions for gender in multicultural policies are inadequate, and ethnic rights in GAD policies are invisible. Drawing on post-colonial feminism, the paper examines ethnicity and gender as interlocking systems that structure indigenous women's development experiences. These arguments are illustrated in relation to the case of the Tsáchila ethno-cultural group in the South American country of Ecuador. PMID:21125766

  1. Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Ecuador: A Pilot Study in Quito.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Laura M S; Groot, Norbert A; Díaz Mosquera, Elena N; Andrade Zúñiga, Ivonne P; Delfos, Martine F

    2015-12-01

    This research presents the results of the first phase of the study on the prevalence of pupils with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in regular education in Quito, Ecuador. One-hundred-and-sixty-one regular schools in Quito were selected with a total of 51,453 pupils. Prevalence of ASD was assessed by an interview with the rector of the school or its delegate. Results show an extremely low prevalence of 0.11 % of pupils with any ASD diagnosis; another 0.21 % were suspected to have ASD, but were without a diagnosis. This low prevalence suggests that children and adolescents with ASD are not included in regular education in Quito. These results are discussed in the light of low diagnostic identification of ASD and low inclusion tolerance.

  2. Spatio-temporal clusters of incident human brucellosis cases in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ron, Lenin; Benitez, Washington; Speybroeck, Niko; Ron, Jorge; Saegerman, Claude; Berkvens, Dirk; Abatih, Emmanuel

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to determine whether variations in the incidence of reported cases of human brucellosis in Ecuador were clustered in space and time. In addition, the effects of cattle and small ruminant population density and other socio-economic factors on the incidence were investigated. Significant space-time clusters were found in the northern and southern highlands and parts of Ecuadorian Amazonia. Customs of people, cattle, goat and sheep population density appeared to influence the incidence of brucellosis. In this study, the incidence of reported cases of human brucellosis was found to be higher in the highlands (sierra) and in municipalities near Peru and Colombia. The results of this study highlight the need for prevention and control measures aimed at abating the incidence of brucellosis among livestock and humans.

  3. Citizen Empowerment in Volcano Monitoring, Communication and Decision-Making at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, B.; Mothes, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Trained citizen volunteers called vigías have worked to help monitor and communicate warnings about Tungurahua volcano, in Ecuador, since the volcano reawoke in 1999. The network, organized by the scientists of Ecuacor's Instituto Geofísico de la Escuela Politécnica Nacional (Geophysical Institute) and the personnel from the Secretaría Nacional de Gestión de Riesgos (Risk Management, initially the Civil Defense), has grown to well over 20 observers living around the volcano who communicate regularly via handheld two-way radios. Interviews with participants in 2010 indicate that the network enables direct communication between communities and authorities, engenders trust in scientists and emergency response personnel, builds community, and empowers communities to make decisions in times of crisis.

  4. Neurocysticercosis and performance on neuropsychologic tests: a family study in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Levav, M; Mirsky, A F; Cruz, M E; Cruz, I

    1995-11-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a common neurologic disorder in developing countries, where it may pose a major public health challenge. Recently, the disorder has become more commonly diagnosed in developed countries as a result of the influx of migrants from countries where the disease is endemic. The clinical syndrome associated with NCC includes neurologic, physical, and functional problems. Since the locus of the infection is mainly the central nervous system, there is a risk of neuropsychologic dysfunction. This study was conducted in Ecuador in a group of 123 subjects (49 males and 74 females, 9-62 years of age) from a community sample that was part of a larger neuroepidemiologic inquiry. A discriminant function procedure was used to select the tests that would be most sensitive at distinguishing between affected and nonaffected individuals. The results suggest that behavioral functions that include aspects of inhibitory control, motor, and visual-motor output are impaired in adolescent and adult subjects with NCC.

  5. Does money matter? The effects of cash transfers on child development in rural Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Paxson, Christina; Schady, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    A large body of research indicates that child development is sensitive to early-life environments, so that poor children are at higher risk for poor cognitive and behavioral outcomes. These developmental outcomes are important determinants of success in adulthood. Yet, remarkably little is known about whether poverty-alleviation programs improve children's developmental outcomes. We examine how a government-run cash transfer program for poor mothers in rural Ecuador influenced the development of young children. Random assignment at the parish level is used to identify program effects. Our data include a set of measures of cognitive ability that are not typically included in experimental or quasi-experimental studies of the impact of cash transfers on child well-being, as well as a set of physical health measures that may be related to developmental outcomes. The cash transfer program had positive, although modest, effects on the physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development of the poorest children in our sample. PMID:20821896

  6. Sumakuru, a deeply-diverging new genus of lyssomanine jumping spiders from Ecuador (Araneae: Salticidae)

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, Wayne P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The lyssomanine jumping spider genus Sumakuru gen. n. is here described for Sumakuru bigal sp. n., from the Bigal River Biological Reserve in Ecuador. Known from a single male, the embolus of the palp takes the form of a smoothly arching curve, and appears fully mobile, being connected to the tegulum by a thin sclerite and a twisted hematodocha. Data from four gene regions (28S, 16SND1, CO1, wingless) indicate that Sumakuru is the sister group to all other sampled lyssomanines, diverging deeply on the stem lineage of the clade of other known lyssomanines. Unlike previous molecular results, the sampled species of Lyssomanes Hentz, 1845 are supported as monophyletic, with Chinoscopus Simon, 1900 as the sister to Lyssomanes. PMID:27667933

  7. Sumakuru, a deeply-diverging new genus of lyssomanine jumping spiders from Ecuador (Araneae: Salticidae)

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, Wayne P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The lyssomanine jumping spider genus Sumakuru gen. n. is here described for Sumakuru bigal sp. n., from the Bigal River Biological Reserve in Ecuador. Known from a single male, the embolus of the palp takes the form of a smoothly arching curve, and appears fully mobile, being connected to the tegulum by a thin sclerite and a twisted hematodocha. Data from four gene regions (28S, 16SND1, CO1, wingless) indicate that Sumakuru is the sister group to all other sampled lyssomanines, diverging deeply on the stem lineage of the clade of other known lyssomanines. Unlike previous molecular results, the sampled species of Lyssomanes Hentz, 1845 are supported as monophyletic, with Chinoscopus Simon, 1900 as the sister to Lyssomanes.

  8. Saturnispora quitensis sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from the Maquipucuna cloud forest reserve in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Cadet, Geneviève M; Barriga, Enrique Javier Carvajal; Barahona, Patricia Portero; Cross, Kathryn; Bond, Christopher J; Roberts, Ian N

    2011-12-01

    A single strain, CLQCA-10-114(T), representing a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Saturnispora was isolated from the fruit of an unidentified species of bramble (Rubus sp.), collected from the Maquipucuna cloud forest reserve, near Quito, in Ecuador. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region indicated that the novel species is most closely related to the recently described species Saturnispora gosingensis, isolated from the fruiting body of a mushroom collected in Taiwan, and Saturnispora hagleri, a Drosophila-associated yeast found in Brazil. The name Saturnispora quitensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate this strain; the type strain is CLQCA-10-114(T) (=CBS 12184(T)=NCYC 3744(T)). PMID:21335499

  9. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. PMID:26262065

  10. The increasing number of women with postgraduate qualifications in physics in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitarra, Silvana; Niebeskikwiat, Dario; Paredes, Cecilia; Ayala, Paola

    2013-03-01

    Although the social reality in Ecuador is similar to that in most Latin American countries, support for research in fundamental and applied sciences has gained in importance in the last few years. An Ecuadorian team participated for the first time in the IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics in 2005, when no woman in the country had yet earned a postgraduate degree. By the 2011 ICWIP Conference, the number of women with PhD degrees had increased five times, whereas the trend for men remained the same. This paper gives an overview on how the Ecuadorian research community has started to work together on a national initiative to improve the human and infrastructure capacity to develop science and technology, with support from the government and the science-related ministries.

  11. Condemning violence without rejecting sexism? Exploring how young men understand intimate partner violence in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Goicolea, Isabel; Öhman, Ann; Salazar Torres, Mariano; Morrás, Ione; Edin, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aims to explore young men’s understanding of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Ecuador, examining similarities and differences between how ordinary and activist young men conceptualize IPV against women. Methods We conducted individual interviews and focus group discussions (FGDs) with 35 young men – five FGDs and five interviews with ordinary young men, and 11 interviews with activists – and analysed the data generated using qualitative content analysis. Results Among the ordinary young men the theme ‘too much gender equality leads to IPV’ emerged, while among the activists the theme ‘gender inequality is the root of IPV’. Although both groups in our study rejected IPV, their positions differed, and we claim that this is relevant. While activists considered IPV as rooted in gender inequality, ordinary young men understood it as a response to the conflicts generated by increasing gender equality and women’s attempts to gain autonomy. PMID:22723767

  12. [Macrophytes from some high Andean lakes of Ecuador and their low potential as bioindicators of eutrophication].

    PubMed

    Kiersch, Benjamin; Mühleck, Ralf; Gunkel, Günter

    2004-12-01

    The occurrence of macrophyte in three high Andean lakes of Ecuador, Lago San Pablo, Laguna La Mica and Lago Cuicocha was recorded in 5-9 transects per lake. The first two lakes are eutrophic, the third is an extremely oligotrophic caldera lake. The dominant species in eutrophic lakes are Ceratophyllum demersum, Myriophyllum quitense, Polamogeton illinoensis, P. striatus and Elodea matthewsii. In the oligotrophic lake P. pectinatus, P. illinoensis, and the Characeae Chara rusbyana, Ch. globularis and Nitella acuminata occur. The maximum depth of the macrophyte's presence can be used as an indicator of the trophic state, ranging from about 5 m in Mica to 35 m in Cuicocha. The bioindication value of the macrophyte species in these high Andean lakes is low, because few species occur and because some of them are not specific to environmental conditions.

  13. Participatory evaluation of primary health care programmes: an experience with four Indian populations in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, A

    1982-01-01

    A seminar with primary health care workers from four Indian groups in Ecuador serves as an example for the participatory evaluation of primary health care (PHC) programmes. Discussions in small groups, interpretation of visual aids, derived from research data on health care utilization, and practical evaluation exercises helped participants understand the opportunities and limitations which exist in the PHC schemes. The main topics of discussion were: health impacts of sociocultural change, community support of health workers, links with the hierarchy of the health care system, differential use of traditional and modern medicine and planning of future programmes. The final discussion with health officials was important for the mutual respect and understanding. The need for the involvement of communities and PHC workers in the evaluation of their own programmes is stressed.

  14. [State of food and nutritional care in public hospitals of Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Gallegos Espinosa, Sylvia; Nicolalde Cifuentes, Marcelo; Santana Porbén, Sergio

    2014-10-03

    Justificación: El Estudio ELAN Ecuatoriano de Desnutrición Hospitalaria en los hospitales públicos del Ecuador devolvió una tasa de desnutrición del 37.1% [Gallegos Espinosa S, Nicolalde Cifuentes M, Santana Porbén S; para el Grupo Ecuatoriano de Estudio de la Desnutrición Hospitalaria. Estado de la desnutrición en los hospitales del Ecuador. Nutr Hosp (España) 2014;30:425-35]. La desnutrición hospitalaria podría ser la resultante de prácticas culturales institucionales que afectan el estado nutricional del enfermo. Objetivos: Presentar el estado corriente de los cuidados alimentarios y nutricionales que se le ofrecen al enfermo atendido en los hospitales públicos del Ecuador. Material y Método: El estado de los cuidados alimentarios y nutricionales provistos a 5,355 enfermos atendidos en 36 hospitales de 23 provincias del país se documentó mediante la Encuesta de Nutrición Hospitalaria (ENH), conducida dentro del Estudio ELAN. La ENH registró el completamiento de los ejercicios de evaluación nutricional, el estado del uso de la vía oral, el tiempo de ayuno, el uso de suplementos dietéticos orales, y la implementación y conducción de esquemas de Nutrición artificial (Enteral/ Parenteral); respectivamente. Resultados: Menos del 0.1% de las historias clínicas tenía un diagnóstico de desnutrición dentro de las listas de problemas de salud del paciente. Menos de la mitad de los pacientes había sido tallado y pesado al ingreso. La Albúmina sérica y los Conteos Totales de Linfocitos estaban registrados en el momento del ingreso en solo el 13.5% y el 59.2% de las instancias, respectivamente. El valor corriente del Peso solo se anotó en el 59.4% de los pacientes con una estadía³ 15 días. Se indicó algún tipo de suplemento dietético en solo el 3.5% de los pacientes no desnutridos en los que concurrían estrés metabólico significativo y/o ingresos dietéticos disminuidos. A pesar de que se identificaron hasta 10 indicaciones diferentes

  15. Urbanisation is associated with prevalence of childhood asthma in diverse, small rural communities in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Maritza; Oviedo, Gisela; Erazo, Silvia; Chico, Martha E; Teles, Carlos; Barreto, Mauricio L; Rodrigues, Laura C; Cooper, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies conducted in transitional communities from Africa and Asia have pointed to the process of urbanisation as being responsible for the increase in asthma prevalence in developing regions. In Latin America, there are few published data available on the potential impact of urbanisation on asthma prevalence. The aim of the present study was to explore how the process of urbanisation may explain differences in asthma prevalence in transitional communities in north-eastern Ecuador. Methodology/principal findings An ecological study was conducted in 59 communities in Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Indicators of urbanisation were grouped into three indices representing the processes associated with urbanisation: socioeconomic, lifestyle and urban infrastructure. Categorical principal components analysis was used to generate scores for each index and a fourth index—a summary urbanisation index—was derived from the most representative variables in each of the three indices. The authors analysed the associations between community asthma prevalence and the indices, as well as with each indicator variable of every group. The overall prevalence of asthma was 10.1% (range 0–31.4% between communities). Three of the four indices presented significant associations with community asthma prevalence: socioeconomic (r=0.295, p=0.023), lifestyle (r=0.342, p=0.008) and summary urbanisation index (r=0.355, p=0.006). Variables reflecting better socioeconomic status and a more urban lifestyle were associated with greater asthma prevalence. Conclusions These data provide evidence that the prevalence of asthma increases with increasing levels of urbanisation in transitional communities, and factors associated with greater socioeconomic level and changes towards a more urban lifestyle may be particularly important. PMID:21825085

  16. Drinking Water Quality Governance: A Comparative Case Study of Brazil, Ecuador, and Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Georgia L.; Amjad, Urooj; Dalcanale, Fernanda; Bartram, Jamie; Bentley, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Human health is greatly affected by inadequate access to sufficient and safe drinking water, especially in low and middle-income countries. Drinking water governance improvements may be one way to better drinking water quality. Over the past decade, many projects and international organizations have been dedicated to water governance; however, water governance in the drinking water sector is understudied and how to improve water governance remains unclear. We analyze drinking water governance challenges in three countries—Brazil, Ecuador, and Malawi—as perceived by government, service providers, and civil society organizations. A mixed methods approach was used: a clustering model was used for country selection and qualitative semi-structured interviews were used with direct observation in data collection. The clustering model integrated political, economic, social and environmental variables that impact water sector performance, to group countries. Brazil, Ecuador and Malawi were selected with the model so as to enhance the generalizability of the results. This comparative case study is important because similar challenges are identified in the drinking water sectors of each country; while, the countries represent diverse socio-economic and political contexts, and the selection process provides generalizability to our results. We find that access to safe water could be improved if certain water governance challenges were addressed: coordination and data sharing between ministries that deal with drinking water services; monitoring and enforcement of water quality laws; and sufficient technical capacity to improve administrative and technical management of water services at the local level. From an analysis of our field research, we also developed a conceptual framework that identifies policy levers that could be used to influence governance of drinking water quality on national and sub-national levels, and the relationships between these levers. PMID:25798068

  17. Comprehensive Survey of Domiciliary Triatomine Species Capable of Transmitting Chagas Disease in Southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Mario J.; Villacis, Anita G.; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Yumiseva, Cesar A.; Moncayo, Ana L.; Baus, Esteban G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is endemic to the southern Andean region of Ecuador, an area with one of the highest poverty rates in the country. However, few studies have looked into the epidemiology, vectors and transmission risks in this region. In this study we describe the triatomine household infestation in Loja province, determine the rate of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in triatomines and study the risk factors associated with infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings An entomological survey found four triatomine species (Rhodnius ecuadoriensis, Triatoma carrioni, Panstrongylus chinai, and P. rufotuberculatus) infesting domiciles in 68% of the 92 rural communities examined. Nine percent of domiciles were infested, and nymphs were observed in 80% of the infested domiciles. Triatomines were found in all ecological regions below 2,200 masl. We found R. ecuadoriensis (275 to 1948 masl) and T. carrioni (831 to 2242 masl) mostly in bedrooms within the domicile, and they were abundant in chicken coops near the domicile. Established colonies of P. chinai (175 to 2003 masl) and P. rufotuberculatus (404 to 1613 masl) also were found in the domicile. Triatomine infestation was associated with surrogate poverty indicators, such as poor sanitary infrastructure (lack of latrine/toilet [w = 0.95], sewage to environment [w = 1.0]). Vegetation type was a determinant of infestation [w = 1.0] and vector control program insecticide spraying was a protective factor [w = 1.0]. Of the 754 triatomines analyzed, 11% were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and 2% were infected with T. rangeli. Conclusions/Significance To date, only limited vector control efforts have been implemented. Together with recent reports of widespread sylvatic triatomine infestation and frequent post-intervention reinfestation, these results show that an estimated 100,000 people living in rural areas of southern Ecuador are at high risk for T. cruzi infection. Therefore, there is a need for a systematic, sustained

  18. Sending-country violence and receiving-country discrimination: effects on the health of Colombian refugees in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Shedlin, Michele G; Decena, Carlos U; Noboa, Hugo; Betancourt, Óscar

    2014-02-01

    This study explored factors affecting the health and well being of recent refugees from Colombia in Ecuador. Data collection focused on how sending-country violence and structural violence in a new environment affect immigrant health vulnerability and risk behaviors. A qualitative approach included ethnographic observation, media content analysis, focus groups, and individual interviews with refugees (N = 137). The focus groups (5) provided perspectives on the research domains by sex workers; drug users; male and female refugees; and service providers. Social and economic marginalization are impacting the health and well being of this growing refugee population. Data illustrate how stigma and discrimination affect food and housing security, employment and health services, and shape vulnerabilities and health risks in a new receiving environment. Widespread discrimination in Ecuador reflects fears, misunderstanding, and stereotypes about Colombian refugees. For this displaced population, the sequelae of violence, combined with survival needs and lack of support and protections, shape new risks to health and well-being. PMID:23377565

  19. Sending-country violence and receiving-country discrimination: effects on the health of Colombian refugees in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Shedlin, Michele G; Decena, Carlos U; Noboa, Hugo; Betancourt, Óscar

    2014-02-01

    This study explored factors affecting the health and well being of recent refugees from Colombia in Ecuador. Data collection focused on how sending-country violence and structural violence in a new environment affect immigrant health vulnerability and risk behaviors. A qualitative approach included ethnographic observation, media content analysis, focus groups, and individual interviews with refugees (N = 137). The focus groups (5) provided perspectives on the research domains by sex workers; drug users; male and female refugees; and service providers. Social and economic marginalization are impacting the health and well being of this growing refugee population. Data illustrate how stigma and discrimination affect food and housing security, employment and health services, and shape vulnerabilities and health risks in a new receiving environment. Widespread discrimination in Ecuador reflects fears, misunderstanding, and stereotypes about Colombian refugees. For this displaced population, the sequelae of violence, combined with survival needs and lack of support and protections, shape new risks to health and well-being.

  20. A new species of solitary Meteorus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) reared from caterpillars of toxic butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Scott R; Jones, Guinevere Z

    2009-01-01

    A new species of parasitoid wasp, Meteorus rugonasus Shaw and Jones (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), is described from the Yanayacu Biological Station, Napo Province, Ecuador. The new species is diagnosed and compared to other species in the genus. It was reared from larvae of Pteronymia zerlina (Hewitson, 1855) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae) found feeding on leaves of Solanum (Solanaceae). The parasitoid is solitary. This is the first record of a Meteorus species attacking ithomiine Nymphalidae. A new species of parasitoid wasp, Meteorus rugonasus Shaw and Jones (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), is described from the Yanayacu Biological Station, Napo Province, Ecuador. The new species is diagnosed and compared to other species in the genus. It was reared from larvae of Pteronymia zerlina (Hewitson, 1855) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae) found feeding on leaves of Solanum (Solanaceae). The parasitoid is solitary. This is the first record of a Meteorus species attacking ithomiine Nymphalidae.

  1. A new view for the geodynamics of Ecuador: Implication in seismogenic source definition and seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, Hugo; Audin, Laurence; Alvarado, Alexandra; Beauval, Céline; Aguilar, Jorge; Font, Yvonne; Cotton, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    A new view of Ecuador's complex geodynamics has been developed in the course of modeling seismic source zones for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. This study focuses on two aspects of the plates' interaction at a continental scale: (a) age-related differences in rheology between Farallon and Nazca plates—marked by the Grijalva rifted margin and its inland projection—as they subduct underneath central Ecuador, and (b) the rapidly changing convergence obliquity resulting from the convex shape of the South American northwestern continental margin. Both conditions satisfactorily explain several characteristics of the observed seismicity and of the interseismic coupling. Intermediate-depth seismicity reveals a severe flexure in the Farallon slab as it dips and contorts at depth, originating the El Puyo seismic cluster. The two slabs position and geometry below continental Ecuador also correlate with surface expressions observable in the local and regional geology and tectonics. The interseismic coupling is weak and shallow south of the Grijalva rifted margin and increases northward, with a heterogeneous pattern locally associated to the Carnegie ridge subduction. High convergence obliquity is responsible for the North Andean Block northeastward movement along localized fault systems. The Cosanga and Pallatanga fault segments of the North Andean Block-South American boundary concentrate most of the seismic moment release in continental Ecuador. Other inner block faults located along the western border of the inter-Andean Depression also show a high rate of moderate-size earthquake production. Finally, a total of 19 seismic source zones were modeled in accordance with the proposed geodynamic and neotectonic scheme.

  2. Insight into the wild origin, migration and domestication history of the fine flavour Nacional Theobroma cacao L. variety from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Loor Solorzano, Rey Gaston; Fouet, Olivier; Lemainque, Arnaud; Pavek, Sylvana; Boccara, Michel; Argout, Xavier; Amores, Freddy; Courtois, Brigitte; Risterucci, Ange Marie; Lanaud, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Ecuador's economic history has been closely linked to Theobroma cacao L cultivation, and specifically to the native fine flavour Nacional cocoa variety. The original Nacional cocoa trees are presently in danger of extinction due to foreign germplasm introductions. In a previous work, a few non-introgressed Nacional types were identified as potential founders of the modern Ecuadorian cocoa population, but so far their origin could not be formally identified. In order to determine the putative centre of origin of Nacional and trace its domestication history, we used 80 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to analyse the relationships between these potential Nacional founders and 169 wild and cultivated cocoa accessions from South and Central America. The highest genetic similarity was observed between the Nacional pool and some wild genotypes from the southern Amazonian region of Ecuador, sampled along the Yacuambi, Nangaritza and Zamora rivers in Zamora Chinchipe province. This result was confirmed by a parentage analysis. Based on our results and on data about pre-Columbian civilization and Spanish colonization history of Ecuador, we determined, for the first time, the possible centre of origin and migration events of the Nacional variety from the Amazonian area until its arrival in the coastal provinces. As large unexplored forest areas still exist in the southern part of the Ecuadorian Amazonian region, our findings could provide clues as to where precious new genetic resources could be collected, and subsequently used to improve the flavour and disease resistance of modern Ecuadorian cocoa varieties.

  3. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E; Lobos, Simón E; Zurita, Alejandra P; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Grijalva, Mario J; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats-Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite.

  4. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y.; Venegas, Pablo J.; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000–1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543–1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122–1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported. PMID:26798310

  5. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y; Venegas, Pablo J; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000-1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543-1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122-1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported.

  6. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, C. Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E.; Lobos, Simón E.; Zurita, Alejandra P.; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G.; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M. G.; Grijalva, Mario J.; Perkins, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats—Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  7. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E; Lobos, Simón E; Zurita, Alejandra P; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Grijalva, Mario J; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats-Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite. PMID:26465748

  8. Description and phylogeny of three new species of Synophis (Colubridae, Dipsadinae) from the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru.

    PubMed

    Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Echevarría, Lourdes Y; Venegas, Pablo J; Germán Chávez; Camper, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of three new species of Synophis snakes from the eastern slopes of the tropical Andes in Ecuador and Peru is reported. All previous records of Synophis bicolor from eastern Ecuador correspond to Synophis bogerti sp. n., which occurs between 1000-1750 m along a large part of the Amazonian slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes. In contrast, Synophis zamora sp. n. is restricted to southeastern Ecuador, including Cordillera del Cóndor, between 1543-1843 m. Synophis insulomontanus sp. n. is from the eastern slopes of the Andes in central and northern Peru, between 1122-1798 m, and represents the first record of Synophis from this country. All three new species share in common a large lateral spine at the base of the hemipenial body. A molecular phylogenetic tree based on three mitochondrial genes is presented, including samples of Diaphorolepis wagneri. Our tree strongly supports Synophis and Diaphorolepis as sister taxa, as well as monophyly of the three new species described here and Synophis calamitus. Inclusion of Synophis and Diaphorolepis within Dipsadinae as sister to a clade containing Imantodes, Dipsas, Ninia, Hypsiglena and Pseudoleptodeira is also supported. PMID:26798310

  9. Impact of long-term treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin in Ecuador: potential for elimination of infection

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Juan Carlos; Cooper, Philip J; Lovato, Raquel; Mancero, Tamara; Rivera, Jorge; Proaño, Roberto; López, Andrea A; Guderian, Ronald H; Guzmán, José Rumbea

    2007-01-01

    Background Onchocerciasis is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, hence elimination of the infection is an important health priority. Community-based treatment programs with ivermectin form the basis of control programs for the disease in Latin America. The long-term administration of ivermectin could eliminate Onchocerca volvulus infection from endemic areas in Latin America. Methods A strategy of annual to twice-annual treatments with ivermectin has been used for onchocerciasis in endemic communities in Ecuador for up to 14 years. The impact of ivermectin treatment on ocular morbidity, and O. volvulus infection and transmission was monitored in seven sentinel communities. Results Over the period 1990–2003, high rates of treatment coverage of the eligible population were maintained in endemic communities (mean 85.2% per treatment round). Ivermectin reduced the prevalence of anterior segment disease of the eye to 0% in sentinel communities and had a major impact on the prevalence and transmission of infection, with possible elimination of infection in some foci. Conclusion The distribution of ivermectin in endemic communities in Ecuador might have eliminated ocular morbidity and significant progress has been made towards elimination of the infection. A strategy of more frequent treatments with ivermectin may be required in communities where the infection persists to achieve the objective of elimination of the infection from Ecuador. The elimination of the infection from an endemic country in Latin America would be a major public health achievement and could stimulate the implementation of elimination strategies in other endemic countries. PMID:17521449

  10. Taking the pulse of the Ecuador subduction zone near a locked patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, M.; Font, Y.; Regnier, M. M.; Charvis, P.; Galve, A.; Hello, Y. M.; Jarrín, P.; Oge, A.; Pazmiño, A.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    In Central Ecuador the Nazca Plate, with a major topographic feature, the Carnegie Ridge, is subducting beneath the North Andean Margin at a rate of about 5 cm/yr along a ~N80°E direction. Intense seismic swarms have been regularly observed in 1977, 1998, 2002, and 2005 but no large megathrust earthquake is known in this segment of the margin, south of the rupture zone of the great 1906 Mag 8.8 Ecuador-Colombia earthquake. In 2010, a week-long slow slip event (SSE) was documented beneath La Plata Island, located 40 km east of the trench, at about 8 km depth within a locked patch of the subduction interface. The equivalent moment magnitude (Mw) released during this SSE was in the range of 6.0-6.3. This event unleashed an intense microseismic activity along the plate interface located beneath La Plata Island. The focal mechanisms and the space-time occurrence of these earthquakes suggest that the stress perturbations related to the slow slip event trigger the seismicity (Vallée et al., 2013). This study suggests a posteriori that recurrent seismic swarms, like the 2005 sequence may have been triggered by large-magnitude slow slip events with equivalent magnitude up to 7.5. In order to better observe this microseismic activity associated with SSE we deployed a temporary seismic network (OSISEC for Observación SISmica en ECuador) for a 2 years period (from November 2011 to October 2013). Six broadband land seismometers equipped with Trillium compact sensors and 5 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (3 components Guralp CMG-40T and 1 High-Tech Inc. wideband hydrophone) complement the 3 permanent seismological stations of the national seismic network with an average distance between stations of about 25 km. Automatic and manual analyses of continuous data of the first year yielded 2800 earthquake locations. Hypocentral determinations were computed with the complete network including readings from OBS data. Specific velocity models for the OBS stations were derived from vertical

  11. Modelling and monitoring vegetation and evapotranspiration on an anthropogenic grassland succession in the Andes of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, B.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Andes of southern Ecuador the infestation of pasture (mostly C4-grass Setaria sphacelata) by the aggressive bracken fern (Pteridium sp.) still is an unsolved problem. Environmental and exogenous factors and direct plant competition have been hypothesized to drive bracken occurrence. Special attention is given to pasture burning, which stimulates bracken growth, and is common in the relative dry season (Oct-Dec). However, no knowledge is available for a quantitative hypothesis investigation on bracken occurrence under current and future local climate. In this work a modeling approach is presented, in which initial investigations support the application of a two-big-leaf model, and parameterization and model forcing are made with extensive data on physiological traits and on the physical environment. Our main aims here are (i) to show field investigations on a plant scale, which are the basis for a proper model parameterization; and (ii) to provide initialization data, which is based on estimation of green leaf area index from very-high and high resolution optical remote sensing (air-photos and Quickbird images); (iii) to simulate vegetation succession after burn on an experimental site, using in situ climate data and future climate-change scenarios. The modeling approach is based in the main on the vegetation dynamic model called Southern Bracken Competition Model (SoBraCoMo), which has been coupled to a hydrological model written on the catchment model framework (CMF), to simulate soil-vegetation dynamics. Main initialization variables are biochemical parameters (quantum and carboxylation efficiency) and the green leaf area index (green-LAI). Forcing data include soil, leaf and air temperature, soil and air humidity and radiation. The model has been developed and tested on the experimental site (2100 m asl) in the Rio San Francisco Valley, Ecuador. Simulation results on the burn experiment of 2009 showed that stimulation by fire could not boost fern

  12. Crustal structure at the Gulf of Guayaquil active margin (Ecuador), from multichannel seismic reflection data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorrano, A.; Collot, J.-Y.; Sage, F.; Ranero, C.

    2003-04-01

    During the SISTEUR cruise, multichannel seismic reflection lines were shot across the Ecuador trench-margin system, off the Gulf of Guayaquil. Line SIS-72, which cuts through the margin, immediately north of the Ecuador-Peru border, has been fully processed through pre-stack depth migration to reveal the inter-plate contact geometry, sediment subduction/underplating processes, and a thick fore-arc basin. Strong reflectors allow to identify the top of the Nazca plate oceanic crust (TOC), the inter-plate décollement (ID) and the top of the margin basement (TB). The TOC is imaged by a continuous, low frequency reflector, and shows a rough surface that dips ~4° landward for 24 km from the trench axis. Further to the East, the TOC reflector becomes discontinuous and shows a slope break from 4° to 10°, at a 10-km-depth. West of the trench, the TOC is overlain by a 200-m-thick, transparent unit of pelagic deposits, and 600 m of horizontally stratified trench turbidites. The ID reflector is relatively continuous and roughly reflects the TOC geometry. ID and TOC reflectors define a ~600-m-thick subduction channel, which terminates some 24 km landward from the trench, where the ID reflector steps down to join the TOC. Some reflections from the subduction channel appear to be shaped as the casing reflectors, while others have sigmoid shapes with landward dips associated with small oceanic highs of TOC. The ID crops out at the front of a 8-km-wide accretionary wedge, which encompasses ~4 trusts. The accretionary wedge has developed recently against a sharp-pointed buttress formed by the margin's rock framework as indicated by its reflection characteristics. The TB reflector is discontinuous and separates the basement from overlaying stratified sequences. The TB reflector extends from the toe of the margin to ~75 km landward, where it abruptly drops from a depth of 4 to 11 km, at the base of a 10-km-thick forearc basin. This basin, bounded by doming structures interpreted

  13. Concentration of cadmium in cacao beans and its relationship with soil cadmium in southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Chavez, E; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Mylavarapu, R S; Li, Y C; Moyano, B; Baligar, V C

    2015-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) content in cacao beans above a critical level (0.6 mg kg(-1)) has raised concerns in the consumption of cacao-based chocolate. Little is available regarding Cd concentration in soil and cacao in Ecuador. The aim of this study was to determine the status of Cd in both, soils and cacao plants, in southern Ecuador. Soil samples were collected from 19 farms at 0-5, 5-15, 15-30, and 30-50 cm depths, whereas plant samples were taken from four nearby trees. Total recoverable and extractable Cd were measured at the different soil depths. Total recoverable Cd ranged from 0.88 to 2.45 and 0.06 to 2.59, averaged 1.54 and 0.85 mg kg(-1), respectively in the surface and subsurface soils whereas the corresponding values for M3-extractable Cd were 0.08 to 1.27 and 0.02 to 0.33 with mean values of 0.40 and 0.10 mg kg(-1). Surface soil in all sampling sites had total recoverable Cd above the USEPA critical level for agricultural soils (0.43 mg kg(-1)), indicating that Cd pollution occurs. Since both total recoverable and M3-extractable Cd significantly decreased depth wise, anthropogenic activities are more likely the source of contamination. Cadmium in cacao tissues decreased in the order of beans>shell>leaves. Cadmium content in cacao beans ranged from 0.02 to 3.00, averaged 0.94 mg kg(-1), and 12 out of 19 sites had bean Cd content above the critical level. Bean Cd concentration was highly correlated with M3- or HCl-extractable Cd at both the 0-5 and 5-15 cm depths (r=0.80 and 0.82 for M3, and r=0.78 and 0.82 for HCl; P<0.01). These results indicate that accumulation of Cd in surface layers results in excessive Cd in cacao beans and M3- or HCl-extractable Cd are suitable methods for predicting available Cd in the studied soils. PMID:26172587

  14. Concentration of cadmium in cacao beans and its relationship with soil cadmium in southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Chavez, E; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Mylavarapu, R S; Li, Y C; Moyano, B; Baligar, V C

    2015-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) content in cacao beans above a critical level (0.6 mg kg(-1)) has raised concerns in the consumption of cacao-based chocolate. Little is available regarding Cd concentration in soil and cacao in Ecuador. The aim of this study was to determine the status of Cd in both, soils and cacao plants, in southern Ecuador. Soil samples were collected from 19 farms at 0-5, 5-15, 15-30, and 30-50 cm depths, whereas plant samples were taken from four nearby trees. Total recoverable and extractable Cd were measured at the different soil depths. Total recoverable Cd ranged from 0.88 to 2.45 and 0.06 to 2.59, averaged 1.54 and 0.85 mg kg(-1), respectively in the surface and subsurface soils whereas the corresponding values for M3-extractable Cd were 0.08 to 1.27 and 0.02 to 0.33 with mean values of 0.40 and 0.10 mg kg(-1). Surface soil in all sampling sites had total recoverable Cd above the USEPA critical level for agricultural soils (0.43 mg kg(-1)), indicating that Cd pollution occurs. Since both total recoverable and M3-extractable Cd significantly decreased depth wise, anthropogenic activities are more likely the source of contamination. Cadmium in cacao tissues decreased in the order of beans>shell>leaves. Cadmium content in cacao beans ranged from 0.02 to 3.00, averaged 0.94 mg kg(-1), and 12 out of 19 sites had bean Cd content above the critical level. Bean Cd concentration was highly correlated with M3- or HCl-extractable Cd at both the 0-5 and 5-15 cm depths (r=0.80 and 0.82 for M3, and r=0.78 and 0.82 for HCl; P<0.01). These results indicate that accumulation of Cd in surface layers results in excessive Cd in cacao beans and M3- or HCl-extractable Cd are suitable methods for predicting available Cd in the studied soils.

  15. Volcanic Ashes Intercalated with Cultural Vestiges at Archaeological Sites from the Piedmont to the Amazon, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Viviana; Mothes, Patricia; Andrade, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A mineralogical analysis was done on 70 volcanic ashes; 9 corresponding to proximal samples of seven volcanoes: Cotopaxi (4500 yBP), Guagua Pichincha (3300 yBP, 1000 yBP and 1660 yAD), Cuicocha (3100 yBP), Pululahua (2400 yBP), Ninahuilca (2350 yBP and 4600 yBP) and 61 to distal ashes collected at eight archaeological sites in the Coastal, Sierra and Amazon regions of Ecuador. Cultural vestiges are from Pre-ceramic, Formative, Regional Development and Integration periods, with the exception of a site denominated Hacienda Malqui, which also has Inca vestiges. The sampling process was done in collaboration with various archaeologists in 2011-2013. The volcanic ashes were washed, dried and divided in order to obtain a representative fraction and their later analysis with binocular microscope. The microscope analysis allowed determination of the characteristics of each component of volcanic ash. These main elements are: pumice fragments, minerals, volcanic glass, lithics and exogenous material (non volcanic). The petrographic analysis of distal volcanic ash layers at each archaeological site was correlated by their components and characteristics with proximal volcanic ashes of source volcanoes. Some correlations permitted obtaining a relative age for the layers of distal volcanic ash in the archaeological sites. The petrographic analysis showed a correlation between the archaeological sites of Las Mercedes - Los Naranjos, Rumipamba and El Condado (located west of Quito) with the eruptive activity of Guagua Pichincha volcano (3300 yBP, 1000 yBP and 1660 yAD) and Pululahua volcano (2400 yBP). Also, a correlation with eruptive activity of Ninahuilca (2350 yBP), Cotopaxi (4500 yBP) and Quilotoa (800 yBP) volcanoes at Hda. Malqui (60 km west of Latacunga) was provided by mineralogy of the respective ashes expulsed by these volcanoes. The ash layers at Cuyuja (50 km east of Quito) are mostly superficial; they are associated with Quilotoa's 800 yBP plinian. Finally at the

  16. Limitations of selective deltamethrin application for triatomine control in central coastal Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This year-long study evaluated the effectiveness of a strategy involving selective deltamethrin spraying and community education for control of Chagas disease vectors in domestic units located in rural communities of coastal Ecuador. Results Surveys for triatomines revealed peridomestic infestation with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Panstrongylus howardi, with infestation indices remaining high during the study (13%, 17%, and 10%, at initial, 6-month, and 12-month visits, respectively), which indicates a limitation of this strategy for triatomine population control. Infestation was found 6 and 12 months after spraying with deltamethrin. In addition, a large number of previously vector-free domestic units also were found infested at the 6- and 12-month surveys, which indicates new infestations by sylvatic triatomines. The predominance of young nymphs and adults suggests new infestation events, likely from sylvatic foci. In addition, infection with Trypanosoma cruzi was found in 65%, 21% and 29% at initial, 6-month and 12-month visits, respectively. All parasites isolated (n = 20) were identified as TcI. Conclusion New vector control strategies need to be devised and evaluated for reduction of T. cruzi transmission in this region. PMID:21332985

  17. Distribution of Enteroinvasive and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Across Space and Time in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Darlene; Bayas, Rosa de los Ángeles; Lopez, Velma K; Zhang, Lixin; Trueba, Gabriel; Foxman, Betsy; Marrs, Carl; Cevallos, William; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2016-02-01

    Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). At its peak, the regional prevalence of EIEC was 8.3 infections/100 persons but this decreased to 1 infection/1,000 persons. The regional prevalence of ETEC ranged from 8 infections/1,000 persons to 3.7 infections/100 persons. The prevalence pattern of EIEC resembled that of a large epidemic whereas the prevalence of ETEC was more stable over time. Here, we provide community-based evidence for temporal shifts in the dominant E. coli pathotype from EIEC to ETEC over a multi-year time period. Furthermore, genotype analysis suggests that a given strain of EIEC and ETEC can persist in this region for long periods, up to 24 and 55 months, respectively.

  18. Air mercury contamination in the gold mining town of Portovelo, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    González-Carrasco, Víctor; Velasquez-Lopez, Patricio C; Olivero-Verbel, Jesús; Pájaro-Castro, Nerlis

    2011-09-01

    Portovelo is one of the oldest gold mining towns in Ecuador. Artisanal gold mining still uses mercury in the process of gold recovery. In this study, mercury concentrations in the air of Portovelo were evaluated. High mercury levels in the ambient were found in El Pache sector, where most gold mining processing plants are located. These varied between 2,356.7 ± 1,807.6 and 3,699.5 ± 1,225.3 ng/m(3) during the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Lower levels were detected in the urban (central) area of Portovelo, with 214.6 ± 43.7 ng/m(3) in the rainy season and 574.2 ± 72.8 ng/m(3) in the dry season, exceeding the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry minimum risk level of 200 ng/m(3). Average mercury concentrations in exhaled air from miners, measured before and after amalgam burning ranged between 179-1,352 and 2,007-3,389 ng/m(3), respectively. These data suggest Portovelo air is polluted with mercury and humans are being dangerously exposed. Therefore, strong actions must be undertaken to protect human and environmental health, including changing gold recovery systems.

  19. HLA class II linkage disequilibrium and haplotype evolution in the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador.

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, E A; Erlich, H A; Rickards, O; DeStefano, G F; Klitz, W

    1995-01-01

    DNA-based typing of the HLA class II loci in a sample of the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador reveals several lines of evidence that selection has operated to maintain and to diversify the existing level of polymorphism in the class II region. As has been noticed for other Native American groups, the overall level of polymorphism at the DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 loci is reduced relative to that found in other human populations. Nonetheless, the relative evenness in the distribution of allele frequencies at each of the four loci points to the role of balancing selection in the maintenance of the polymorphism. The DQA1 and DQB1 loci, in particular, have near-maximum departures from the neutrality model, which suggests that balancing selection has been especially strong in these cases. Several novel DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes and the discovery of a new DRB1 allele demonstrate an evolutionary tendency favoring the diversification of class II alleles and haplotypes. The recombination interval between the centromeric DPB1 locus and the other class II loci will, in the absence of other forces such as selection, reduce disequilibrium across this region. However, nearly all common alleles were found to be part of DR-DP haplotypes in strong disequilibrium, consistent with the recent action of selection acting on these haplotypes in the Cayapa. PMID:7668268

  20. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Sanchez, Claudia; Baus, Esteban G; Guerrero, Darwin; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012). Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs). They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region. PMID:25807468

  1. Spatial and temporal variations and mobile source emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Quito, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Brachtl, Megan V.; Durant, John L.; Perez, Carlos Paez; Oviedo, Jorge; Sempertegui, Fernando; Naumova, Elena N.; Griffiths, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    Motor vehicles are a major source of air pollution in Quito, Ecuador; however, little work has been done to characterize spatial and temporal variations in traffic-related pollutants, or to measure pollutants in vehicle emissions. We measured PAH continuously for one year at two residential sites in Quito, and PAH and traffic patterns for one week near a busy roadway. Morning rush-hour traffic and temperature inversions caused daily PAH maxima between 06:00 and 08:00. SO2, NOx, CO, and PM2.5 behaved similarly. At the residential sites PAH levels during inversions were 2–3-fold higher than during the afternoon, and 10–16-fold higher than 02:00–03:00 when levels were lowest. In contrast, at the near-roadway site, PAH concentrations were 3–6-fold higher than at the residential sites, and the effects of inversions were less pronounced. Cars and buses accounted for >95% of PAH at the near-roadway site. Near-roadway PAH concentrations were comparable to other polluted cities. PMID:19004535

  2. From protest to productivity: the evolution of indigenous federations in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bebbington, A; Carrasco, H; Peralbo, L; Ramon, G; Torres, V H; Trujillo, J

    1992-01-01

    A broad grassroots movement of Native American organizations has banded together in Ecuador around the struggle for land, civil rights, and cultural identity. Examples of success include the titling of communal land claims, proliferation of bilingual education and literacy programs, reclamation of native musical and art forms, and a generally stronger determination of indigenous peoples to exercise their citizens' rights. Evidence of this latter achievement was most pronounced in June 1990, when the National Confederation of Indigenous Ecuadorians called for a nonviolent rural mobilization to publicize the government's failure to fulfill its commitments to Indian communities. The protest shut down major transportation arteries throughout the countryside and received broad media coverage. Even though few tangible results were immediately forthcoming, the action voiced loudly and clearly the disgruntlement and power of these peoples. Having tasted the potential for change and their own nascent power, members now want their organizations to go beyond efforts to revitalize culture and leverage better services from the state. They want help in earning and maintaining a secure family income in a time of national economic crisis, structural adjustment, and declining public sector support. These indigenous organizations are effectively being asked to become development organizations. The central question, however, is whether they can make the shift to generating income-producing projects. In an attempt to determine which economic roles these organizations are best suited to play, the authors review how existing federations have evolved.

  3. Mass budget partitioning during explosive eruptions: insights from the 2006 paroxysm of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Julien; Eychenne, Julia; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Narváez, Diego

    2016-08-01

    How and how much the mass of juvenile magma is split between vent-derived tephra, PDC deposits and lavas (i.e., mass partition) is related to eruption dynamics and style. Estimating such mass partitioning budgets may reveal important for hazard evaluation purposes. We calculated the volume of each product emplaced during the August 2006 paroxysmal eruption of Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) and converted it into masses using high-resolution grainsize, componentry and density data. This data set is one of the first complete descriptions of mass partitioning associated with a VEI 3 andesitic event. The scoria fall deposit, near-vent agglutinate and lava flow include 28, 16 and 12 wt. % of the erupted juvenile mass, respectively. Much (44 wt. %) of the juvenile material fed Pyroclastic Density Currents (i.e., dense flows, dilute surges and co-PDC plumes), highlighting that tephra fall deposits do not depict adequately the size and fragmentation processes of moderate PDC-forming event. The main parameters controlling the mass partitioning are the type of magmatic fragmentation, conditions of magma ascent, and crater area topography. Comparisons of our data set with other PDC-forming eruptions of different style and magma composition suggest that moderate andesitic eruptions are more prone to produce PDCs, in proportions, than any other eruption type. This finding may be explained by the relatively low magmatic fragmentation efficiency of moderate andesitic eruptions. These mass partitioning data reveal important trends that may be critical for hazard assessment, notably at frequently active andesitic edifices.

  4. DETERMINING OSTEOPOROSIS RISK IN OLDER COLONO ADULTS FROM RURAL AMAZONIAN ECUADOR USING CALCANEAL ULTRASONOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    MADIMENOS, FELICIA C.; LIEBERT, MELISSA A.; CEPON-ROBINS, TARA J.; SNODGRASS, J. JOSH; SUGIYAMA, LAWRENCE S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Low bone density and osteoporosis prevalence, while well-documented in wealthy nations, are poorly studied in rural, non-clinical contexts in economically-developing regions such as Latin America. This study contributes preliminary osteoporosis risk data for a rural Colono (mestizo) population from Amazonian Ecuador. Methods Anthropometrics were collected for 119 adult participants (74 females, 45 males [50–90 years old]). Heel bone density and T-scores were recorded using calcaneal ultrasonometry Results Approximately 33.6% of the participants had low bone density and were at high-risk for osteoporosis. Four times as many females as males were considered high-risk. Consistent with epidemiological literature, advancing age was significantly associated with lower bone density values (p=0.001). Conclusions Low bone density and osteoporosis prevalence are expected to increase in this and other economically-transitioning populations, yet infrastructure to monitor this changing epidemiological landscape is almost non-existent. Human biologists are uniquely positioned to contribute data from remote populations, a critical step towards initiating increased resource allocation for diagnosis and prevention. PMID:25242164

  5. From protest to productivity: the evolution of indigenous federations in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bebbington, A; Carrasco, H; Peralbo, L; Ramon, G; Torres, V H; Trujillo, J

    1992-01-01

    A broad grassroots movement of Native American organizations has banded together in Ecuador around the struggle for land, civil rights, and cultural identity. Examples of success include the titling of communal land claims, proliferation of bilingual education and literacy programs, reclamation of native musical and art forms, and a generally stronger determination of indigenous peoples to exercise their citizens' rights. Evidence of this latter achievement was most pronounced in June 1990, when the National Confederation of Indigenous Ecuadorians called for a nonviolent rural mobilization to publicize the government's failure to fulfill its commitments to Indian communities. The protest shut down major transportation arteries throughout the countryside and received broad media coverage. Even though few tangible results were immediately forthcoming, the action voiced loudly and clearly the disgruntlement and power of these peoples. Having tasted the potential for change and their own nascent power, members now want their organizations to go beyond efforts to revitalize culture and leverage better services from the state. They want help in earning and maintaining a secure family income in a time of national economic crisis, structural adjustment, and declining public sector support. These indigenous organizations are effectively being asked to become development organizations. The central question, however, is whether they can make the shift to generating income-producing projects. In an attempt to determine which economic roles these organizations are best suited to play, the authors review how existing federations have evolved. PMID:12344835

  6. Reconstruction of the Páramo Paleoclimate Record in Tres Lagunas, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, L.; Morrison, M.; Brunelle, A.; Johnson, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    Tres Lagunas, Ecuador is both a unique and poorly understood ecosystem. Characterized as a volcanic Páramo, these lakes (elevation ~3800 meters) contain a pristine Holocene climatic history. A previous study by Jantz and Behling [Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 21, 169 (2012)] reported a 5000 year hiatus in a bog core collected from the Tres Lagunas region. This gap in sedimentation indicates a period where the bog was completely dry, suggesting a very severe drought event. However, it is still undetermined if this event represents a widespread climate record since bog cores are prone to reflect localized anomalies. In order to obtain a widespread climate record, two lake sediment cores totaling 120 cm, were collected from Tres Lagunas during the summer of 2014. The samples were obtained using a Gravity Corer and a Livingston Modified Piston Corer. Sediment from the cores were subsampled and analyzed for magnetic susceptibility and charcoal in order to reconstruct natural range and variability of Páramo fire regimes. Pollen analysis and radiocarbon dating on pollen isolates will also be completed for the subsampled sediment. Additionally, X-ray fluorescence will be used to reconstruct the paleo geochemical environment. The goal of this study is to provide a widespread paleoclimate record of the region and extend upon the results of Jantz and Behling to determine if severe drought events occurred in the region.

  7. Spatial Variability of Escherichia coli in Rivers of Northern Coastal Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Gouthami; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Kleinbaum, David G.; Cevallos, William; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The use of contaminated surface water continues to be a pressing issue in areas of the world where people lack improved drinking water sources. In northern coastal Ecuador, many communities rely on untreated surface water as their primary source of drinking water. We undertook a study to explore how microscale river hydrodynamics affect microbial water quality at community water collection locations at three rivers with varying stream velocity and turbidity profiles. To examine how the distance from river shore and physiochemical water quality variables affect microbial contamination levels in the rivers; we collected a total of 355 water samples within six villages on three rivers; and tested for Escherichia coli concentrations using the IDEXX Quanti-tray method. We found that log10 E. coli concentrations decreased with increasing distance from shore (β = −0.017; p = 0.003). Water in the main channel had E. coli concentrations on average 0.12 log10 lower than within eddies along the river shore and 0.27 log10 lower between the sample closest to shore and any sample >6 m from the shore. Higher E. coli concentrations were also significantly associated with increased turbidity (β = 0.003; p < 0.0001) and decreased dissolved oxygen levels (β = −0.310; p < 0.0001). The results of this study can help inform community members about the safest locations to collect drinking water and also provide information on watershed scale transport of microbial contaminants between villages. PMID:25995956

  8. Carbon footprint of premium quality export bananas: case study in Ecuador, the world's largest exporter.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Alfredo; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Villalobos, Pablo

    2014-02-15

    Nowadays, the new international market demands challenge the food producing countries to include the measurement of the environmental impact generated along the production process for their products. In order to comply with the environmentally responsible market requests the measurement of the greenhouse gas emissions of Ecuadorian agricultural goods has been promoted employing the carbon footprint concept. Ecuador is the largest exporter of bananas in the world. Within this context, this study is a first assessment of the carbon footprint of the Ecuadorian premium export banana (Musa AAA) using a considerable amount of field data. The system boundaries considered from agricultural production to delivery in a European destination port. The data collected over three years permitted identifying the hot spot stages. For the calculation, the CCaLC V3.0 software developed by the University of Manchester is used. The carbon footprint of the Ecuadorian export banana ranged from 0.45 to 1.04 kg CO2-equivalent/kg banana depending on the international overseas transport employed. The principal contributors to the carbon footprint are the on farm production and overseas transport stages. Mitigation and reduction strategies were suggested for the main emission sources in order to achieve sustainable banana production. PMID:24361571

  9. HLA class II linkage disequilibrium and haplotype evolution in the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Trachtenberg, E.A.; Erlich, H.A.; Klitz, W.

    1995-08-01

    DNA-based typing of the HLA class II loci in a sample of the Cayapa Indians of Ecuador reveals several lines of evidence that selection has operated to maintain and to diversify the existing level of polymorphism in the class II region. As has been noticed for other Native American groups, the overall level of polymorphism at the DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 loci is reduced relative to that found in other human populations. Nonetheless, the relative eveness in the distribution of allele frequencies at each of the four loci points to the role of balancing selection in the maintenance of the polymorphism. The DQA1 and DQB1 loci, in particular, have near-maximum departures from the neutrality model, which suggests that balancing selection has been especially strong in these cases. Several novel DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes and the discovery of a new DRB1 allele demonstrate an evolutionary tendency favoring the diversification of class II alleles and haplotypes. The recombination interval between the centromeric DPB1 locus and the other class II loci will, in the absence of other forces such as selection, reduce disequilibrium across this region. However, nearly all common alleles were found to be part of DR-DP haplotypes in strong disequilibrium, consistent with the recent action of selection acting on these haplotypes in the Cayapa. 50 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Air mercury contamination in the gold mining town of Portovelo, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    González-Carrasco, Víctor; Velasquez-Lopez, Patricio C; Olivero-Verbel, Jesús; Pájaro-Castro, Nerlis

    2011-09-01

    Portovelo is one of the oldest gold mining towns in Ecuador. Artisanal gold mining still uses mercury in the process of gold recovery. In this study, mercury concentrations in the air of Portovelo were evaluated. High mercury levels in the ambient were found in El Pache sector, where most gold mining processing plants are located. These varied between 2,356.7 ± 1,807.6 and 3,699.5 ± 1,225.3 ng/m(3) during the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Lower levels were detected in the urban (central) area of Portovelo, with 214.6 ± 43.7 ng/m(3) in the rainy season and 574.2 ± 72.8 ng/m(3) in the dry season, exceeding the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry minimum risk level of 200 ng/m(3). Average mercury concentrations in exhaled air from miners, measured before and after amalgam burning ranged between 179-1,352 and 2,007-3,389 ng/m(3), respectively. These data suggest Portovelo air is polluted with mercury and humans are being dangerously exposed. Therefore, strong actions must be undertaken to protect human and environmental health, including changing gold recovery systems. PMID:21769613

  11. Climate and non-climate drivers of dengue epidemics in southern coastal ecuador.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M; Lowe, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    We report a statistical mixed model for assessing the importance of climate and non-climate drivers of interannual variability in dengue fever in southern coastal Ecuador. Local climate data and Pacific sea surface temperatures (Oceanic Niño Index [ONI]) were used to predict dengue standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs; 1995-2010). Unobserved confounding factors were accounted for using non-structured yearly random effects. We found that ONI, rainfall, and minimum temperature were positively associated with dengue, with more cases of dengue during El Niño events. We assessed the influence of non-climatic factors on dengue SMR using a subset of data (2001-2010) and found that the percent of households with Aedes aegypti immatures was also a significant predictor. Our results indicate that monitoring the climate and non-climate drivers identified in this study could provide some predictive lead for forecasting dengue epidemics, showing the potential to develop a dengue early-warning system in this region.

  12. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sanchez, Claudia; Baus, Esteban G; Guerrero, Darwin; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012). Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs). They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region. PMID:25807468

  13. Carbon footprint of premium quality export bananas: case study in Ecuador, the world's largest exporter.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Alfredo; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Villalobos, Pablo

    2014-02-15

    Nowadays, the new international market demands challenge the food producing countries to include the measurement of the environmental impact generated along the production process for their products. In order to comply with the environmentally responsible market requests the measurement of the greenhouse gas emissions of Ecuadorian agricultural goods has been promoted employing the carbon footprint concept. Ecuador is the largest exporter of bananas in the world. Within this context, this study is a first assessment of the carbon footprint of the Ecuadorian premium export banana (Musa AAA) using a considerable amount of field data. The system boundaries considered from agricultural production to delivery in a European destination port. The data collected over three years permitted identifying the hot spot stages. For the calculation, the CCaLC V3.0 software developed by the University of Manchester is used. The carbon footprint of the Ecuadorian export banana ranged from 0.45 to 1.04 kg CO2-equivalent/kg banana depending on the international overseas transport employed. The principal contributors to the carbon footprint are the on farm production and overseas transport stages. Mitigation and reduction strategies were suggested for the main emission sources in order to achieve sustainable banana production.

  14. Cytogenetic monitoring in a population occupationally exposed to pesticides in Ecuador.

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño, César; Bustamante, Gabriela; Sánchez, María Eugenia; Leone, Paola E

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed the incidence of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in workers of a plantation of flowers located in Quito, Ecuador, in South America. This study included 41 individuals occupationally exposed to 27 pesticides, some of which are restricted in many countries and are classified as extremely toxic by the World Health Organization; among these are aldicarb and fenamiphos. The same number of individuals of the same age, sex, and geographic area were selected as controls. Workers exposed to these pesticides showed an increased frequency of CA compared with control group (20.59% vs. 2.73%; p < 0.001). We conclude that screening for CA is an adequate biomarker for evaluating and detecting genotoxicity resulting from exposure to pesticides. Levels of erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase were also determined as a complementary metabolic study. Levels below the optimal (> 28 U/mL blood) were found in 88% of exposed individuals; this clearly shows the effect of organophosphate pesticides. When comparing the levels of acetylcholinesterase and structural CA frequencies, there was a negative linear correlation (r = 0.416; p < 0.01). We conclude that by using both analyses it may be possible to estimate damage produced by exposure to organophosphate pesticides. PMID:12417477

  15. Systematics of the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex (Anura, Hylidae) from Ecuador and Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Santiago R.; Venegas, Pablo J.; Toral, Eduardo; Morley Read; Diego A. Ortiz; Manzano, Andrea L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present a new phylogeny, based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, for frogs of the genus Osteocephalus with emphasis in the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex. Genetic, morphologic, and advertisement call data are combined to define species boundaries and describe new species. The phylogeny shows strong support for: (1) a basal position of Osteocephalus taurinus + Osteocephalus oophagus, (2) a clade containing phytotelmata breeding species, and (3) a clade that corresponds to the Osteocephalus buckleyi species complex. Our results document a large proportion of hidden diversity within a set of populations that were previously treated as a single, widely distributed species, Osteocephalus buckleyi. Individuals assignable to Osteocephalus buckleyi formed a paraphyletic group relative to Osteocephalus verruciger and Osteocephalus cabrerai and contained four species, one of which is Osteocephalus buckleyi sensu stricto and three are new. Two of the new species are shared between Ecuador and Peru (Osteocephalus vilmae sp. n. and Osteocephalus cannatellai sp. n.) and one is distributed in the Amazon region of southern Peru (Osteocephalus germani sp. n.) We discuss the difficulties of using morphological characters to define species boundaries and propose a hypothesis to explain them. PMID:23166473

  16. [Relationships between biomarkers of oxidative stress and nutritional status in adults, Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Salazar-Lugo, Raquel; Barahona, Amparito; Santamaria, Manuel; Salas, Hilda; Oleas, Mariana; Bermeo, Bélgica

    2014-12-01

    In this work it was evaluated the relationship between oxidative stress biomarkers (uric acid, bilirubin and C-reactive protein) with nutritional status in 321 adults of Ecuador, belonging to administrative staff of of the Universidad Tècnica del Norte, aged 43 ± 10 years old (46 30% female and 53.61% male). Socio demographic and epidemiological information and lifestyle were obtained through a survey; The Body Mass Index (BMI) and body fat and body water percentages were calculated; waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure was measured. Determinations of uric acid, bilirubin, and serum C-reactive protein (PCR) were performed. 17.9% of the populations were obese and 51.72% overweight. The highest values of uric acid were found in obese, hypertensive and physical activity groups. The total direct and indirect bilirubin were found in upper limits in abdominal obesity and physical activity groups. The CRP level was influenced by % fat and % water in the low body fat group and in females. In male, BMI and WC were associated with CRP. Uric acid showed relationship with % fat and WC in overweight, high body fat and PHT groups, uric acid was associated with the % water and BMI in obese. Finally, uric acid was associated with % water and the WC in the abdominal obesity, and HT groups'. The body water percentage is an important indicator to development of oxidative stress in this population. PMID:26336722

  17. Incidence of childhood leukemia and oil exploitation in the Amazon basin of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastián, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether there was any difference in childhood leukemia incidence rates between populations living in the proximity to oil fields and those living in areas free from oil exploitation in the Amazon basin of Ecuador, 91 cancer cases among children (0-14 years) from the provinces of Sucumbios, Orellana, Napo, and Pastaza during the period 1985-2000 were studied. The relative risks for all leukemias indicated significantly elevated levels in the youngest age group (0-4 years), both genders combined (RR 3.48, 95% CI 1.25-9.67), and in all age groups (0-14 years) combined for females (RR 2.60, 95% CI 1.11-6.08) and both genders combined (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.35-4.86). There was no significant difference between the two groups in all other cancer sites combined. Study results are compatible with a relationship between childhood leukemia incidence and living in the proximity of oil fields in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

  18. Major concerns in developing countries: applications of the Precautionary Principle in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Harari, Raúl; Freire Morales, Rocío; Harari, Homero

    2004-01-01

    Ecuador is a Latin American country with one of the biggest biodiversities. At the same time, social and environmental problems are also big. Poverty, political and social problems as well as questions like old transport systems, imported hazards from industrialized countries and lack of information and weak health care systems are the framework of this situation. The most common problems are the use of heavy metals in many activities without safety and health protection, a low technological oil production during two decades, intensive use of pesticides in agriculture, and some other chemical risks. A limited capacity to develop prevention strategies, reduced technical and scientific skills, and the absence of a reliable information and control system, lead to a weak response mechanism. The Precautionary Principle could help to stimulate prevention, protection and to have a new tool to improve the interest in environment and health problems. Reinforcing the presence of international organizations like the World Health Organization or the International Labour Organization, establishing bridges among scientific organizations from developed and developing countries and introducing the Precautionary Principle in the legislation and daily practices of industry and agriculture could lead to an improvement in our environment and health.

  19. Helminthiasis and culture change among the Cofán of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Fitton, Lori J.

    2000-07-01

    Blood and fecal samples and lifestyle interviews were obtained in August 1996 from two Cofán villages in Ecuador, Dureno and Zabalo, that are experiencing different degrees of acculturation. Dureno's territory has been divided by roads and encroached upon by oil companies and colonists, whereas Zabalo, 95 km downriver from Dureno, is located in the Cuyabeno Fauna Reserve, a protected area. This study examines how culture change affects the prevalence of parasitic infections. Fecal samples were examined for helminth eggs to determine helminthiasis in each village sample. Seventy-four samples were collected (Dureno n = 50; Zabalo n = 24), representing 20% of the population in each village. Hemoglobin (Hb) levels and eosinophil counts were determined for all adult participants (Dureno n = 39; Zabalo n = 13). Microscopic examination of prepared samples revealed ova from two parasitic nematodes: roundworm (Ascaris lumbercoides) and hookworm (Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus). Roundworm and hookworm infections were higher in Dureno (44% positive) compared to Zabalo (17% positive), with infected adults from both villages showing eosinophilia. Hb levels were not significantly correlated with the prevalence of helminth infections. It appears that the transmission and prevalence of parasitic infections within each community is associated with the interaction of biological, cultural, and environmental factors. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 12:465-477, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. [Risk factors for arterial hypertension in the adult population of an urban region of Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Benavides, Rina Elizabeth; Torres-Valdez, Maritza; Sigüencia-Cruz, Wilson; Añez-Ramos, Roberto; Salazar-Vílchez, Juan; Rojas-Quintero, Joselyn; Bermúdez-Pirela, Valmore

    2016-06-01

    Objectives . To determine the risk factors for arterial hypertension (HTN) in the adult resident population of the city of Cuenca, Ecuador Materials and methods A cross-sectional analytical study of adults selected via multistage random sampling who underwent clinical, anthropometric, and laboratory evaluations. The diagnosis of HTN was defined according to the JNC-7 criteria. A multiple logistic regression model was performed Results A total of 318 persons were included. The prevalence of HTN was 25.8% (males: 27.2% vs. females: 24.7%; p = 0.617). In the multiple logistic regression model, the risk factors for HTN were age > 60 years (OR, 8.68; 95% CI, 3.56-21.14; p < 0.001), obesity according to body mass index (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.04-5.70; p = 0.042), high caloric intake (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.01- 4.53; p = 0.044), and family history of HTN (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.02-2.90; p = 0.040) Conclusions The presence of HTN in this population is associated with both intrinsic and environmental factors, which should be considered in routine evaluations to ensure its early identification and control. PMID:27656923

  1. Windrow composting as horticultural waste management strategy - A case study in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gavilanes-Terán, Irene; Jara-Samaniego, Janneth; Idrovo-Novillo, Julio; Bustamante, Ma Angeles; Moral, Raúl; Paredes, Concepción

    2016-02-01

    In Ecuador, enormous quantities of vegetable wastes are produced annually from the horticultural industries. Composting can be a feasible treatment to stabilise horticultural wastes and, thus, to improve their properties for use as organic fertilisers. In this study, two different piles were prepared, using laying hen manure and sawdust mixed with broccoli or tomato waste, respectively, and composted by the turned windrow composting system. Throughout the composting process, the temperature of the mixtures was monitored and physico-chemical and chemical properties and the degree of maturity were determined. Also, principal component analysis was used to interpret the data set of compost characteristics. In both piles, the temperature exceeded 55°C for more than 2weeks, which ensured maximum pathogen reduction. Organic matter (OM) losses followed a first-order kinetic equation in both piles. The final composts showed a suitable degree of stability and maturity and an absence of phytotoxins, as observed in the evolution and final values of the total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratio (Corg/NT<20), water-soluble organic carbon (Cw<1.7%), germination index (GI>50%) and cation exchange capacity (CEC>67meq (100g OM)(-1)). As well, the evolution of different humification indexes during composting was a good indicator of the OM humification process. The type of vegetable waste used influenced OM and NT mineralisation and the final properties of the composts, showing the mixture with tomato waste a higher fertilising capacity and less environmental problems.

  2. A new species of the genus Centrolene (Amphibia : Anura : Centrolenidae) from Ecuador with comments on the taxonomy and biogeography of Glassfrogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cisneros-Heredia, D.F.; McDiarmid, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a new species of Glassfrog, Centrolene mariaelenae n. sp., from the Contrafuerte de Tzunantza, southeastern Ecuador. The new species is assigned to the Centrolene gorzulai species group, a clade previously known only from the Guayana Shield region, because the parietal peritoneum is transparent and the hepatic peritoneum is covered by guanophores. We analyze the diversity patterns of Glassfrogs from eastern Ecuador. The distribution of the new species herein described supports previous hypothesis of a biogeographical connection between the Andes and the Guayana Shield for various groups of plants and animals; particularly a relationship between the Guayana Shield and the sandstone outcrops mountain ranges of southeastern Ecuador and northeastern Peru. We also comment on the infrageneric and generic classification of Glassfrogs, and propose the new combinations Centrolene balionotum n. comb., Cochranella antisthenesi n. comb., and Cochranella pulverata n. comb.

  3. Are recent graduates enough prepared to perform obstetric skills in their rural and compulsory year? A study from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez del Hierro, Galo; Remmen, Roy; Verhoeven, Veronique; Van Royen, Paul; Hendrickx, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the possible mismatch of obstetrical skills between the training offered in Ecuadorian medical schools and the tasks required for compulsory rural service. Setting Primary care, rural health centres in Southern Ecuador. Participants A total of 92 recent graduated medical doctors during their compulsory rural year. Primary and secondary outcomes measures A web-based survey was developed with 21 obstetrical skills. The questionnaire was sent to all rural doctors who work in Loja province, Southern Ecuador, at the Ministry of Health (n=92). We measured two categories ‘importance of skills in rural practice’ with a five-point Likert-type scale (1= strongly disagree; 5= strongly agree); and ‘clerkship experience’ using a nominal scale divided in five levels: level 1 (not seen, not performed) to level 5 (performed 10 times or more). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) was used to observe associations. Results A negative correlation was found in the skills: ‘episiotomy and repair’, ‘umbilical vein catheterisation’, ‘speculum examination’, ‘evaluation of cervical dilation during active labour’, ‘neonatal resuscitation’ and ‘vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery’. For instance ‘Episiotomy and repair’ is important (strongly agree and agree) to 100% of respondents, but in practice, only 38.9% of rural doctors performed the task three times and 8.3% only once during the internship, similar pattern is seen in the others. Conclusions In this study we have noted the gap between the medical needs of populations in rural areas and training provided during the clerkship experiences of physicians during their rural service year. It is imperative to ensure that rural doctors are appropriately trained and skilled in the performance of routine obstetrical duties. This will help to decrease perinatal morbidity and mortality in rural Ecuador. PMID:25082424

  4. Stratigraphic And Lithofacies Study Of Distal Rain-Triggered Lahars: The Case Of West Coast Of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, M.; Chunga, K.; Peña Carpio, E.; Falquez Torres, D. A.; Alcivar, R., Sr.; Lopez Coronel, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The central zone of the coast of Ecuador at the north of Manabí Province, on the area comprised between Salango and Jama communities, is characterized by the presence of whitish to grey, centimeters to meters thick, consolidated to loose distal ash deposits. Recent archeological studies on Valdivia (3500 BC) and Manteña (800-1500 AC - Harris et al. 2004) civilizations remains link this deposits with the intense eruptive phases that afflicted Ecuador 700-900 years ago (Usselman, 2006). Stratigraphic evidences and bibliographic datations of paleosols (Estrada, 1962; Mothes and Hall, 2008), allowed to estimate that these deposits are linked with the 800 BP eruption of Quilotoa and the following eruptions of Cotopaxi. According to the Smith and Lowe classification (1991), the deposits outcropping on the coast (located at a distance greater than 160 km from the volcanic vents), varied from whitish to grey, loose to weakly consolidated, massive to weakly stratified, centimeters to meters thick, coarse to fine ash matrix layers (diluite streamflow facies) to massive, large angular to sub-rounded siltitic blocks-rich and coarse to medium ash matrix deposits (debris flow facies). These types of lithofacies are associated to a rain-triggered lahar (De Belizal et al., 2013). The presence in some stratigraphic sections of sharp contacts, laminated layers of very fine ash, and also cm-thick sand and silt layers between the ash beds of the same deposits permit to understand that the different pulses were generated in short periods and after a long period. Structures like water pipes imply that the lahar went into the sea (Schneider, 2004), and allow the reconstruction of the paleotopographic condition during the emplacement of these deposits. This study focuses on the characterization of these types of deposits, permit to understand the kind of risk that may affect the towns located on the coast of Ecuador after VEI 4 to 6 eruptions on short time and within years.

  5. A new species of Amphoropsyche (Trichoptera, Leptoceridae) from Ecuador, with a key to the species in the genus

    PubMed Central

    Holzenthal, Ralph W.; Rázuri-Gonzales, Luis Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Amphoropsyche Holzenthal is described from Ecuador. It is similar to a group of species with dorsomesal processes on the preanal appendages (i.e., Amphoropsyche woodruffi Flint & Sykora, Amphoropsyche refugia Holzenthal, and Amphoropsyche aragua Holzenthal), but can be distinguished from these and other members of the genus by the short, digitate dorsomesal processes on the preanal appendages and the broad lateral processes of tergum X of the male genitalia. A key to males of the 14 species now known in the genus is presented based on characters of the genitalia. PMID:21852940

  6. Viruses isolated from Aedeomyia squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Panama, Ecuador, and Argentina: establishment of the Gamboa serogroup.

    PubMed

    Calisher, C H; Lazuick, J S; Justines, G; Francy, D B; Monath, T P; Gutierrez, E; Sabattini, M S; Bowen, G S; Jakob, W L

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-four virus strains were isolated from Aedeomyia squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Ecuador. One additional strain each was isolated from this species from Panama and ARgentina. All 26 isolates were shown to be related serologically to prototype Gamboa virus, originally isolated from Ad. squamipennis mosquitoes collected in Panama. Antigenic comparisons of eight strains, including prototype Gamboa virus, indicated the existence of four distinct viruses. Neutralization tests with sera from a variety of mammalian and avian species from Argentina provided further evidence that Gamboa serogroup viruses are transmitted between Ad. squamipennis and birds. PMID:6111232

  7. The Putumayo-Oriente-Maranon Province of Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru; Mesozoic-Cenozoic and Paleozoic petroleum systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of oil and gas resources for petroleum systems of the Putumayo-Oriente-Maranon province of Columbia, Ecuador, and Peru. This assessment is a product of the World Energy Project of the U.S. Geological Survey, under the direction of Thomas Ahlbrandt. Described in this explanation of the petroleum geology of the Putumayo-Oriente-Maranon province are thermal maturation of hydrocarbon source rocks, primary reservoir formations, areas and volumes of oil and (or) gas production, and the history of exploration. Complete oil and gas resource assessment results are planned for a later publication, although some data and results are contained in this report.

  8. Piper kelleyi, a hotspot of ecological interactions and a new species from Ecuador and Peru

    PubMed Central

    Tepe, Eric. J.; Rodríguez-Castañeda, Genoveva; Glassmire, Andrea E.; Dyer, Lee A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe Piper kelleyi sp. nov., a new species from the eastern Andes of Ecuador and Peru, named in honor of Dr. Walter Almond Kelley. Piper kelleyi is a member of the Macrostachys clade of the genus Piper and supports a rich community of generalist and specialist herbivores, their predators and parasitoids, as well as commensalistic earwigs, and mutualistic ants. This new species was recognized as part of an ecological study of phytochemically mediated relationships between plants, herbivores, predators, and parasitoids. Compared to over 100 other Piper species surveyed, Piper kelleyi supports the largest community of specialist herbivores and parasitoids observed to date. PMID:24596490

  9. Atmospheric salt deposition in a tropical mountain rainforest at the eastern Andean slopes of south Ecuador - Pacific or Atlantic origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski Giannoni, Sandro; Trachte, Katja; Rollenbeck, Ruetger; Lehnert, Lukas; Fuchs, Julia; Bendix, Joerg

    2016-08-01

    Sea salt (NaCl) has recently been proven to be of the utmost importance for ecosystem functioning in Amazon lowland forests because of its impact on herbivory, litter decomposition and, thus, carbon cycling. Sea salt deposition should generally decline as distance from its marine source increases. For the Amazon, a negative east-west gradient of sea salt availability is assumed as a consequence of the barrier effect of the Andes Mountains for Pacific air masses. However, this generalized pattern may not hold for the tropical mountain rainforest in the Andes of southern Ecuador. To analyse sea salt availability, we investigated the deposition of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-), which are good proxies of sea spray aerosol. Because of the complexity of the terrain and related cloud and rain formation processes, sea salt deposition was analysed from both, rain and occult precipitation (OP) along an altitudinal gradient over a period between 2004 and 2009. To assess the influence of easterly and westerly air masses on the deposition of sodium and chloride over southern Ecuador, sea salt aerosol concentration data from the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis data set and back-trajectory statistical methods were combined. Our results, based on deposition time series, show a clear difference in the temporal variation of sodium and chloride concentration and Na+ / Cl- ratio in relation to height and exposure to winds. At higher elevations, sodium and chloride present a higher seasonality and the Na+ / Cl- ratio is closer to that of sea salt. Medium- to long-range sea salt transport exhibited a similar seasonality, which shows the link between our measurements at high elevations and the sea salt synoptic transport. Although the influence of the easterlies was predominant regarding the atmospheric circulation, the statistical analysis of trajectories and hybrid receptor models revealed a stronger impact of the north equatorial Atlantic, Caribbean

  10. Piper kelleyi, a hotspot of ecological interactions and a new species from Ecuador and Peru.

    PubMed

    Tepe, Eric J; Rodríguez-Castañeda, Genoveva; Glassmire, Andrea E; Dyer, Lee A

    2014-01-01

    We describe Piper kelleyi sp. nov., a new species from the eastern Andes of Ecuador and Peru, named in honor of Dr. Walter Almond Kelley. Piper kelleyi is a member of the Macrostachys clade of the genus Piper and supports a rich community of generalist and specialist herbivores, their predators and parasitoids, as well as commensalistic earwigs, and mutualistic ants. This new species was recognized as part of an ecological study of phytochemically mediated relationships between plants, herbivores, predators, and parasitoids. Compared to over 100 other Piper species surveyed, Piper kelleyi supports the largest community of specialist herbivores and parasitoids observed to date.

  11. Protection induced by a commercial bivalent vaccine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease 2010 field virus from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Duque, Hernando; Naranjo, Jose; Carrillo, Consuelo; Burbano, Alexandra; Vargas, Javier; Pauszek, Lisa; Olesen, Ian; Sanchez-Vazquez, Manuel J; Cosivi, Ottorino; Allende, Rossana M

    2016-07-29

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease serotype O circulated endemically in Ecuador for many years, with an upsurge occurring in 2009. This manuscript describes retrospectively in vitro and in vivo laboratory studies to predict the field effectiveness of a commercial FMD vaccine to protect against the field strain, and explains the key actions and epidemiological strategies followed by the country to control the disease. The results established that the use of a good quality oil vaccine, manufactured with strains that were isolated long ago: O1 Campos Br/58 and A24 Cruzeiro Br/55; combined with the correct epidemiological strategies, are useful to control field strains when used in periodic biannual vaccination campaigns.

  12. Evaluating the Impact of Glacier Shrinkage on Water Supply at Volcán Chimborazo, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Frenierre, J.; Mark, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciers play a critical hydrologic role in mountain watersheds worldwide, and the potential effect of persistent glacier shrinkage on water supply is justly regarded as one of the key climate change impacts that the scientific and development communities must endeavor to understand. The relationship between glaciers and water supply is particularly acute in the tropical Andes, where irrigation is often essential for the sustainability of agricultural livelihoods. In Ecuador, the glaciers of Volcán Chimborazo (6267 m.a.s.l.) are a highly-visible component of the local hydrologic system and irrigators in the communities that surround the mountain are concerned about their potential vulnerability in the face of noticeable recent glacier retreat on the mountain. Here, I present results from an integrated study that quantifies the rate of glacier retreat at Chimborazo since the mid-1980s, estimates the present-day contribution of glacier melt to total discharge in the mountain's most glacierized watershed, and assays the implications of changing hydrologic conditions on water users in the region. Methods employed include direct hydrologic and glaciologic measurements, analysis of hydrologic tracers, remote sensing techniques, and social research activities such as household surveys and focus groups. Over the past quarter-century, increased water stress has been a key driver of shifting livelihood patterns in the agrarian communities below the mountain, with persistent glacier retreat one of multiple biophysical and socio-economic forcing mechanisms. Since 1986, Chimborazo has lost 20.5% of its glacier surface area (0.8%/yr). While station records indicate patterns of climate change consistent with those reported elsewhere in the tropical Andes (temperature increase of 1.1°C/decade; no statistically-significant changes in precipitation since 1985), there is a very strong local perception that surface water sources are diminishing and that rainfall patterns are

  13. Rostraureum tropicale gen. sp. nov. (Diaporthales) associated with dying Terminalia ivorensis in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gryzenhout, Marieka; Myburg, Henrietta; Wingfield, Brenda D; Montenegro, Fernando; Wingfield, Michael J

    2005-09-01

    Terminalia ivorensis, a tree of central African origin, is planted in several tropical countries for timber and veneer production. During the course of a recent disease survey, an unknown fungus was found associated with basal cankers on dying T. ivorensis in Ecuador. The fungus has orange fruiting structures and septate, fusoid ascospores, similar to those of Cryphonectria, a well-known genus of canker pathogens. The aim of this study was to identify the fungus and to assess its pathogenicity. Identification was based on morphological characteristics as well as DNA sequence data. DNA sequence data from the ITS regions of the rDNA operon and two regions of the beta-tubulin gene, were compared with published sequences of Cryphonectria species and the closely related genera Endothia and Chrysoporthe. Pathogenicity tests were conducted on T. superba saplings. Morphological characterisations revealed that the conidiomata of the fungus from T. ivorensis, differed from those typical of Cryphonectria in being superficial and rostrate. Only Cryphonectria longirostris was similar to the fungus from T. ivorensis, but could be distinguished from it based on conidial size. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the fungus from T. ivorensis grouped closely with species of Cryphonectria, Chrysoporthe and Endothia, yet formed a distinct clade. Pathogenicity tests on T. superba provided evidence that the fungus is able to cause distinct stem cankers. We conclude that the pathogenic fungus from T. ivorensis represents a new genus and new species in the Diaporthales and we provide the name Rostraureum tropicale for it. The genus is typified by R. tropicale. Furthermore, C. longirostris is transferred to Rostraureum. PMID:16209308

  14. Epidemic cholera in Ecuador: multidrug-resistance and transmission by water and seafood

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J. T.; Mintz, E. D.; Cañizares, R.; Semiglia, A.; Gomez, I.; Sempértegui, R.; Dávila, A.; Greene, K. D.; Puhr, N. D.; Cameron, D. N.; Tenover, F. C.; Barrett, T. J.; Bean, N. H.; Ivey, C.; Tauxe, R. V.; Blake, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    To determine risk factors for cholera in an epidemic-disease area in South America, a case—control investigation was performed in Guayaquil, Ecuador, in July 1991. Residents > 5 years old who were hospitalized for treatment of acute, watery diarrhoea and two matched controls for each were interviewed regarding sources of water and food, and eating, drinking, and hygienic habits. Interviewers inspected homes of case-patients and controls to document water treatment, food-handling, and hygienic practices. Faecal specimens and shellfish were cultured for Vibrio cholerae O 1. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to a variety of antimicrobial agents. Drinking unboiled water (odds ratio [OR] = 4·0, confidence interval [CI] = 1·8—7·5), drinking a beverage from a street vendor (OR = 2·8, CI = 1·3—5·9), eating raw seafood (OR = 3·4, CI = 1·4—11·5), and eating cooked crab (OR = 5·1, CI = 1·4—19·2) were associated with illness. Always boiling drinking water at home (OR = 0·5, CI = 0·2—0·9) was protective against illness. The presence of soap in either the kitchen (OR = 0·3, CI = 0·2—0·8) or bathroom (OR = 0·4, CI = 0·2—0·9) at home was also protective. V. cholerae O 1 was recovered from a pooled sample of a bivalve mollusc and from 68% of stool samples from case-patients. Thirty-six percent of the isolates from stool specimens were resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. Specific prevention measures may prevent transmission through these vehicles in the future. The appearance of antimicrobial resistance suggests the need for changes in current methods of prevention and treatment. PMID:8119348

  15. ¿Qué es racismo?: awareness of racism and discrimination in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Beck, Scott H; Mijeski, Kenneth J; Stark, Meagan M

    2011-01-01

    In the national consciousness, Ecuador is a mestizo nation. However, it is also an ethnically diverse nation with sizable minorities of indigenous and Afrodescended peoples. In national surveys, there is also a considerable minority who self-identify as blanco (white). Although there is strong evidence of continuing discrimination and prejudice toward both indigenous and Afro-descended peoples, there is little public discussion or political action addressing such issues. The emergence of a powerful and resilient indigenous movement in the late 1980s gained international interest and acclaim in the 1990s, in part because of the peaceful mobilization efforts and effective bargaining tactics of the movement. However, indigenous leaders usually have not engaged in a discourse of racismo and/or discriminación. There has been much less social movement solidarity and activism among Afro-Ecuadorians, but their leaders commonly employ a discourse of racismo and discriminación. In August and September 2004, a survey of more than eight thousand adult Ecuadorians was conducted in regard to racism and related topics. In this research, we use several measures from this survey that focus on awareness of and sensitivity to issues of racism, prejudice, and discrimination. Self-identification of respondents enables us to contrast the responses of whites, mestizos, Indians, and Afro-Ecuadorians to the measures. Other independent variables of interest are level of education, the region in which the respondent resides, and whether the respondent lives in an urban or rural area. Regression results show differences among the ethnic groups in levels of awareness of racism, but more powerful predictors are level of education and rural residence. PMID:21751475

  16. [Access to drugs and the situation of the pharmaceutical market in Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Prado, Esteban; Galarza, Claudio; León, Fernando Cornejo; Ponce, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    In the area of public health, it is fundamental to understand the structure and dynamics of the Ecuadorian pharmaceutical market, its segmentation between the public and private sectors, and its relationship with supply and demand, both for generic and brand-name drugs. To achieve this, an observational descriptive study was conducted with information obtained from the available scientific, institutional, technical-administrative, and economic databases. Furthermore, the scientific information concerning the Ecuadorian and regional pharmaceutical market was reviewed through the PubMed and Ovid search engines. In Ecuador, 69.6% of dispensed drugs are brand-name and 30.4% are generics. Of all registered drugs in the country, 1,829 (13.6%) are considered over-the-counter and 11,622 (86.4%) are for sale under medical prescription. In terms of sales, 93.15% correspond to brand-name drugs and only 6.85% to generics. Ninety percent of the pharmacies are located in urban areas and only 10% in rural areas. In the last five years, prices have increased by 12.5% for brand-name drugs and 0.86% for generics. Brand-name drugs are dispensed and consumed 2.3 times more than generics. The majority of pharmacies are located in urban areas, showing that there is a relationship between purchasing power and access to drugs. Although the regulatory authority stipulates that 13% of drugs should be over-the-counter, approximately 60% of the population acquires drugs without a medical prescription. PMID:25211679

  17. Low Herbivory among Targeted Reforestation Sites in the Andean Highlands of Southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marc-Oliver; Fiedler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivory constitutes an important constraint in the viability and management of targeted reforestation sites. Focusing on young experimental stands at about 2000 m elevation in southern Ecuador, we examined foliar damage over one season as a function of tree species and habitat. Native tree species (Successional hardwood: Cedrela montana and Tabebuia chrysantha; fast-growing pioneer: Heliocarpus americanus) have been planted among prevailing local landcover types (abandoned pasture, secondary shrub vegetation, and a Pinus patula plantation) in 2003/4. Plantation trees were compared to conspecifics in the spontaneous undergrowth of adjacent undisturbed rainforest matched for height and foliar volume. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that H. americanus as a pioneer species suffers more herbivory compared to the two successional tree species, and that damage is inversely related to habitat complexity. Overall leaf damage caused by folivorous insects (excluding leafcutter ants) was low. Average leaf loss was highest among T. chrysantha (7.50% ± 0.19 SE of leaf area), followed by H. americanus (4.67% ± 0.18 SE) and C. montana (3.18% ± 0.15 SE). Contrary to expectations, leaf area loss was highest among trees in closed-canopy natural rainforest, followed by pine plantation, pasture, and secondary shrub sites. Harvesting activity of leafcutter ants (Acromyrmex sp.) was strongly biased towards T. chrysantha growing in open habitat (mean pasture: 2.5%; shrub: 10.5%) where it could result in considerable damage (> 90.0%). Insect folivory is unlikely to pose a barrier for reforestation in the tropical Andean mountain forest zone at present, but leafcutter ants may become problematic if local temperatures increase in the wake of global warming. PMID:26963395

  18. Gender, migration and the organisation of work under economic devolution: Ecuador, 1982-90.

    PubMed

    Brown, L A; Pavri, F; Lawson, V A

    1998-09-01

    This study examined the impact of economic deficits due to structural adjustment processes on shifts in the organization of work by gender and migration status in Ecuador. Work is organized according to Lawson's social hierarchy scheme: ownership; authority and control over employees; autonomy in one's own work; and the nature and range of skills used in production. After a brief review of the related empirical literature, the author describes the concepts, categories of, and study area of work and then begins the empirical analysis. Data were obtained from 1,884,816 individual records of economically active persons in 1982 and 2,946,547 persons in 1990, from the censuses of 1982 and 1990 for the entire nation, and from fieldwork observations by Lawson. Structural adjustment policies (SAPs) associated with devolution tend to further aggravate inequities, especially among the disadvantaged. Findings are presented for male and female nonmigrants, migrants, and female migrants. During the 1980s, female migrants experienced primary economic activity, especially as self-employed, family, or low skilled employees; and declines in high skilled public sector employment and service activity, especially in wage labor. The economic impact was greater by gender than by migration status. The shifts only improved the relative position of women in self-employed and ownership jobs. Females lost public-sector employment to males; overall wage declines were more severe in the informal sector. Down-sizing in the public sector and shifts toward capital-intensive production marginalized female migrants. Fieldwork operationalizes losses among females/female migrants.

  19. Ecological factors predictive of wild spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth) foraging decisions in Yasuní, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    Because fruiting trees are uncommon in tropical forests, frugivorous primates experience selective pressure to incorporate knowledge of where to find feeding trees, what to expect when they arrive there, and when they can return after depleting a tree. I investigated these abilities in wild spider monkeys (Ateles belzebuth) in Yasuní, Ecuador, by analyzing the characteristics of feeding trees that drive foraging decisions. Foraging data were derived from four 2-week follows of focal adult females, conducted between May and December 1999, during which I measured and mapped all trees in which the focal subject fed, feeding bout duration, and the number of conspecifics feeding simultaneously with the focal. Taking into account the order in which feeding trees were visited across each follow, I analyzed each foraging decision from the second week of a follow, treating all previously visited trees as options for visits. I scored each option tree in terms of nine ecological variables, including the distance from the decision to each location tree, DBH, recent feeding time and mean feeding times for the focal and other monkeys present, and the interval in hours between the foraging decision and the most recent visit to each option tree. I then examined the predictive strength of the model using logistic regression analysis, comparing characteristics of selected trees to those not selected. The overall model successfully predicted trees selected by focal monkeys (r(2)  = 0.27). Monkeys preferentially moved to nearby, large canopy trees, in which previous feeding success was high, and which were visited after an interval of 3.5 days. Interval mattered most for medium and large trees, but did not predict selection for trees <10 cm DBH. Despite the large home range and large numbers of trees, Yasuní spider monkeys appeared to integrate spatial, value, and temporal information when deciding where to feed. PMID:24865445

  20. ¿Qué es racismo?: awareness of racism and discrimination in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Beck, Scott H; Mijeski, Kenneth J; Stark, Meagan M

    2011-01-01

    In the national consciousness, Ecuador is a mestizo nation. However, it is also an ethnically diverse nation with sizable minorities of indigenous and Afrodescended peoples. In national surveys, there is also a considerable minority who self-identify as blanco (white). Although there is strong evidence of continuing discrimination and prejudice toward both indigenous and Afro-descended peoples, there is little public discussion or political action addressing such issues. The emergence of a powerful and resilient indigenous movement in the late 1980s gained international interest and acclaim in the 1990s, in part because of the peaceful mobilization efforts and effective bargaining tactics of the movement. However, indigenous leaders usually have not engaged in a discourse of racismo and/or discriminación. There has been much less social movement solidarity and activism among Afro-Ecuadorians, but their leaders commonly employ a discourse of racismo and discriminación. In August and September 2004, a survey of more than eight thousand adult Ecuadorians was conducted in regard to racism and related topics. In this research, we use several measures from this survey that focus on awareness of and sensitivity to issues of racism, prejudice, and discrimination. Self-identification of respondents enables us to contrast the responses of whites, mestizos, Indians, and Afro-Ecuadorians to the measures. Other independent variables of interest are level of education, the region in which the respondent resides, and whether the respondent lives in an urban or rural area. Regression results show differences among the ethnic groups in levels of awareness of racism, but more powerful predictors are level of education and rural residence.

  1. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in Cuenca, Ecuador: a WHO-ILAR COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Pacheco, Sergio; Feicán-Alvarado, Astrid; Sanín, Luz Helena; Vintimilla-Ugalde, Jaime; Vintimilla-Moscoso, Fernando; Delgado-Pauta, Jorge; Lliguisaca-Segarra, Angelita; Dután-Erráez, Holger; Guevara-Mosquera, Daniel; Ochoa-Robles, Verónica; Cardiel, Mario H; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases in subjects over 18 years of age from the canton of Cuenca, Ecuador. Cross-sectional analytical community-based study was conducted in subjects over 18 years of age using the validated Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) questionnaire. Random sampling was used. The questionnaire was administered by standardized health workers. Subjects were visited house by house. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life were assessed by rheumatologists to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 4877 subjects participated, with an average age of 42.8 (SD 18.8) years of age; 59.7 % were women; 69.7 % lived in urban areas. 32.5 % reported MSK pain in the last 7 days and 45.7 % at some point in life. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 7.4 %, hand osteoarthritis 5.3 %, low back pain 9.3 %, rheumatoid arthritis 0.8 %, fibromyalgia 2 %, gout 0.4 %, and lupus 0.06 %. Subjects from rural areas reported experiencing more MSK pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life, lower income, poorer health-care coverage, and increased physical activity involving repetitive tasks such as lifting weights or cooking with firewood. MSK pain prevalence was high. Osteoarthritis and low back pain were the most common diseases. Age, sex, physical activity, repetitive tasks, living in a rural area, and lack of health-care coverage were found to be associated with MSK pain.

  2. Interseismic deformations along Ecuador active fault systems: Contribution of space-borne SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champenois, J.; Audin, L.; Baize, S.; Nocquet, J.; Alvarado, A.

    2013-05-01

    Located in the Northern Andes along the active subduction zone of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continent, Ecuador is highly exposed to seismic hazard. Up to now, numerous multidisciplinary studies for the last ten years focused on the seismicity related to the subduction, whereas few investigations concentrated on the crustal seismicity in the upper plate (through few strong events like the 1797 Riobamba earthquake, ML 8.3, 12.000 deaths). The faults that are responsible of these earthquakes are poorly known in term of slip rate and in some cases are even not identified yet. To address this issue and compare the interseismic data to the geomorphological long term signature of active faulting we propose to use multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) methods.Using these cost-effective techniques, we are able to investigate surface interseismic deformation with an unprecedented spatial density of measurements (highly superior to Global Positioning System network density). This study presents preliminary results of tectonic surface deformation using ERS (1993-2000) and Envisat (2002-2010) SAR data in the Inter Andean Valley and along the eastern border of the North Andean Block, where is accommodated the relative displacement between the North Andean Block and South America plate (~ 8 mm/yr). We generated average velocity maps and consistent time-series of displacements with values measured along the line of sight of the radar. Resulting maps of ground displacements are calibrated by GPS data in order to provide a homogeneous database. These preliminary results show large scale deformation localized on some major fault systems in the Inter Andean Valley (from Quito to north of Cuenca) and allow an updating of the active faults map. Moreover, these InSAR results permit detecting and quantifying ground deformation due to volcanic unrest.

  3. A Wireless Seismoacoustic Sensor Network for Monitoring Activity at Volcano Reventador, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, M.; Werner-Allen, G.; Lorincz, K.; Marcillo, O.; Ruiz, M.; Johnson, J.; Lees, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    We developed a wireless sensor network for monitoring seismoacoustic activity at Volcano Reventador, Ecuador. Wireless sensor networks are a new technology and our group is among the first to apply them to monitoring volcanoes. The small size, low power, and wireless communication capabilities can greatly simplify deployments of large sensor arrays. The network consisted of 16 wireless sensor nodes, each outfitted with an 8 MHz CPU (TI MSP430) and a 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.15.4 radio (Chipcon CC2420) with data rates up to 80 Kbps. Each node acquired acoustic and seismic data at 24-bit resolution, with a microphone and either a single-axis geophone or triaxial short-period seismometer. Each node is powered by two D-cell batteries with a lifetime of about 1 week, and measures 18 x 10 x 8 cm. Nodes were distributed radially from the vent over a 3 km aperture. Control and data messages are relayed via radio to a base station node, with inter-node distances of up to 420 m. The base station transmits data using a FreeWave radio modem, via a repeater, to a laptop located 4 km from the deployment site. Each node samples continuous sensor data and a simple event-detection algorithm is used to trigger data collection. When a sensor detects an event, it relays a short message to the base station via radio. If several nodes report an event within a short time interval, the last 60 seconds of data is downloaded from each node in turn. One of the sensor nodes is programmed to transmit continuous data; due to limited radio bandwidth, it is not possible to collect continuous data from all nodes in the array. A GPS receiver and time synchronization protocol is used to establish a global timebase across all sensor nodes.

  4. Low Herbivory among Targeted Reforestation Sites in the Andean Highlands of Southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Marc-Oliver; Fiedler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivory constitutes an important constraint in the viability and management of targeted reforestation sites. Focusing on young experimental stands at about 2000 m elevation in southern Ecuador, we examined foliar damage over one season as a function of tree species and habitat. Native tree species (Successional hardwood: Cedrela montana and Tabebuia chrysantha; fast-growing pioneer: Heliocarpus americanus) have been planted among prevailing local landcover types (abandoned pasture, secondary shrub vegetation, and a Pinus patula plantation) in 2003/4. Plantation trees were compared to conspecifics in the spontaneous undergrowth of adjacent undisturbed rainforest matched for height and foliar volume. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that H. americanus as a pioneer species suffers more herbivory compared to the two successional tree species, and that damage is inversely related to habitat complexity. Overall leaf damage caused by folivorous insects (excluding leafcutter ants) was low. Average leaf loss was highest among T. chrysantha (7.50% ± 0.19 SE of leaf area), followed by H. americanus (4.67% ± 0.18 SE) and C. montana (3.18% ± 0.15 SE). Contrary to expectations, leaf area loss was highest among trees in closed-canopy natural rainforest, followed by pine plantation, pasture, and secondary shrub sites. Harvesting activity of leafcutter ants (Acromyrmex sp.) was strongly biased towards T. chrysantha growing in open habitat (mean pasture: 2.5%; shrub: 10.5%) where it could result in considerable damage (> 90.0%). Insect folivory is unlikely to pose a barrier for reforestation in the tropical Andean mountain forest zone at present, but leafcutter ants may become problematic if local temperatures increase in the wake of global warming. PMID:26963395

  5. Satellite Measurements of Lava Extrusion Rate at Volcán Reventador, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D. W. D.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Vallejo Vargas, S.; Naranjo, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    The extrusion rate of lava at active volcanoes provides a principle control on the style of eruptive behavior and the extent of lava flows, while also providing information about magma supply to the volcano. Measurements of extrusion rate at active volcanoes are therefore important for assessing hazard, and improving understanding of volcanic systems. Volcán Reventador is an asymmetric stratovolcano in the Cordillera Real of Ecuador. The largest historically observed eruption at Reventador in 2002 has been followed by several periods of eruptive activity. Eruptions are characterised by effusion of andesitic to basaltic-andesitic lava flows, and Vulcanian explosions. The ongoing eruption at Reventador therefor provides an excellent target for investigating the link between effusion rate, explosivity, and lava flow behaviour. Satellite InSAR provides regular observations of the volcano, even during night or periods of cloud cover. We use a dataset of Radarsat-2 and TanDEM-X imagery, with intervals of 11 to 192 days, over the period 2011 to 2014 to measure the extent, thickness and volume of new lava flows at Reventador. We use radar amplitude and inteferometric coherence to map 25 individual lava flows, as well as pyroclastic deposits and changes in lava dome morphology. We observe 43 Mm3 of deposits over a three year period, giving an average effusion rate of 0.5 m3s-1. We do not observe any ground deformation due to magmatic sources at Reventador, therefore variations in lava effusion rate can be interpreted as changes in the magma supply to the volcano. We investigate the link between variations in effusion rate and the length, area, thickness, and aspect ratio of lava flows, and the explosive-effusive transition. We also characterise the relationship between lava flow age, thickness, and subsidence rate.

  6. [Access to drugs and the situation of the pharmaceutical market in Ecuador].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Prado, Esteban; Galarza, Claudio; León, Fernando Cornejo; Ponce, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    In the area of public health, it is fundamental to understand the structure and dynamics of the Ecuadorian pharmaceutical market, its segmentation between the public and private sectors, and its relationship with supply and demand, both for generic and brand-name drugs. To achieve this, an observational descriptive study was conducted with information obtained from the available scientific, institutional, technical-administrative, and economic databases. Furthermore, the scientific information concerning the Ecuadorian and regional pharmaceutical market was reviewed through the PubMed and Ovid search engines. In Ecuador, 69.6% of dispensed drugs are brand-name and 30.4% are generics. Of all registered drugs in the country, 1,829 (13.6%) are considered over-the-counter and 11,622 (86.4%) are for sale under medical prescription. In terms of sales, 93.15% correspond to brand-name drugs and only 6.85% to generics. Ninety percent of the pharmacies are located in urban areas and only 10% in rural areas. In the last five years, prices have increased by 12.5% for brand-name drugs and 0.86% for generics. Brand-name drugs are dispensed and consumed 2.3 times more than generics. The majority of pharmacies are located in urban areas, showing that there is a relationship between purchasing power and access to drugs. Although the regulatory authority stipulates that 13% of drugs should be over-the-counter, approximately 60% of the population acquires drugs without a medical prescription.

  7. Biotransformations of Bile Acids with Bacteria from Cayambe Slaughterhouse (Ecuador): Synthesis of Bendigoles.

    PubMed

    Costa, Stefania; Maldonado Rodriguez, Maria Elena; Rugiero, Irene; De Bastiani, Morena; Medici, Alessandro; Tamburini, Elena; Pedrini, Paola

    2016-08-01

    The biotransformations of cholic acid (1a), deoxycholic acid (1b), and hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to bendigoles and other metabolites with bacteria isolated from the rural slaughterhouse of Cayambe (Pichincha Province, Ecuador) were reported. The more active strains were characterized, and belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus. Various biotransformation products were obtained depending on bacteria and substrates. Cholic acid (1a) afforded the 3-oxo and 3-oxo-4-ene derivatives 2a and 3a (45% and 45%, resp.) with P. mendocina ECS10, 3,12-dioxo-4-ene derivative 4a (60%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS25, and 9,10-secosteroid 6 (15%) with Rh. erythropolis ECS12. Bendigole F (5a) was obtained in 20% with P. fragi ECS22. Deoxycholic acid (1b) gave 3-oxo derivative 2b with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS25 (20% and 61%, resp.), while 3-oxo-4-ene derivative 3b was obtained with P. prosekii ECS1 and P. mendocina ECS10 (22% and 95%, resp.). Moreover, P. fragi ECS9 afforded bendigole A (8b; 80%). Finally, P. mendocina ECS10 biotransformed hyodeoxycholic acid (1c) to 3-oxo derivative 2c (50%) and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 to 6α-hydroxy-3-oxo-23,24-dinor-5β-cholan-22-oic acid (9c, 66%). Bendigole G (5c; 13%) with P. prosekii ECS1 and bendigole H (8c) with P. prosekii ECS1 and Rh. erythropolis ECS12 (20% and 16%, resp.) were obtained. PMID:27358241

  8. A large-scale study of epilepsy in Ecuador: methodological aspects.

    PubMed

    Placencia, M; Suarez, J; Crespo, F; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Ellison, R H; Cascante, S M

    1992-01-01

    The methodology is presented of a large-scale study of epilepsy carried out in a highland area in northern Ecuador, South America, covering a population of 72,121 people; The study was carried out in two phases, the first, a cross-sectional phase, consisted of a house-to-house survey of all persons in this population, screening for epileptic seizures using a specially designed questionnaire. Possible cases identified in screening were assessed in a cascade diagnostic procedure applied by general doctors and neurologists. Its objectives were: to establish a comprehensive epidemiological profile of epileptic seizures; to describe the clinical phenomenology of this condition in the community; to validate methods for diagnosis and classification of epileptic seizures by a non-specialised team; and to ascertain the community's knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding epilepsy. A sample was selected in this phase in order to study the social aspects of epilepsy in this community. The second phase, which was longitudinal, assessed the ability of non-specialist care in the treatment of epilepsy. It consisted of a prospective clinical trial of antiepileptic therapy in untreated patients using two standard anti-epileptic drugs. Patients were followed for 12 months by a multidisciplinary team consisting of a primary health worker, rural doctor, neurologist, anthropologist, and psychologist. Standardised, reproducible instruments and methods were used. This study was carried out through co-operation between the medical profession, political agencies and the pharmaceutical industry, at an international level. We consider this a model for further large-scale studies of this type.

  9. Epidemic cholera in Ecuador: multidrug-resistance and transmission by water and seafood.

    PubMed

    Weber, J T; Mintz, E D; Cañizares, R; Semiglia, A; Gomez, I; Sempértegui, R; Dávila, A; Greene, K D; Puhr, N D; Cameron, D N

    1994-02-01

    To determine risk factors for cholera in an epidemic-disease area in South America, a case-control investigation was performed in Guayaquil, Ecuador, in July 1991. Residents > 5 years old who were hospitalized for treatment of acute, watery diarrhoea and two matched controls for each were interviewed regarding sources of water and food, and eating, drinking, and hygienic habits. Interviewers inspected homes of case-patients and controls to document water treatment, food-handling, and hygienic practices. Faecal specimens and shellfish were cultured for Vibrio cholerae O 1. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to a variety of antimicrobial agents. Drinking unboiled water (odds ratio [OR] = 4.0, confidence interval [CI] = 1.8-7.5), drinking a beverage from a street vendor (OR = 2.8, CI = 1.3-5.9), eating raw seafood (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.4-11.5), and eating cooked crab (OR = 5.1, CI = 1.4-19.2) were associated with illness. Always boiling drinking water at home (OR = 0.5, CI = 0.2-0.9) was protective against illness. The presence of soap in either the kitchen (OR = 0.3, CI = 0.2-0.8) or bathroom (OR = 0.4, CI = 0.2-0.9) at home was also protective. V. cholerae O 1 was recovered from a pooled sample of a bivalve mollusc and from 68% of stool samples from case-patients. Thirty-six percent of the isolates from stool specimens were resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents. Specific prevention measures may prevent transmission through these vehicles in the future. The appearance of antimicrobial resistance suggests the need for changes in current methods of prevention and treatment. PMID:8119348

  10. Species Diversity and Distribution Patterns of the Ants of Amazonian Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ryder Wilkie, Kari T.; Mertl, Amy L.; Traniello, James F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth. Although their species richness appears to be greatest in the New World tropics, global patterns of ant diversity and distribution are not well understood. We comprehensively surveyed ant diversity in a lowland primary rainforest in Western Amazonia, Ecuador using canopy fogging, pitfall traps, baits, hand collecting, mini-Winkler devices and subterranean probes to sample ants. A total of 489 ant species comprising 64 genera in nine subfamilies were identified from samples collected in only 0.16 square kilometers. The most species-rich genera were Camponotus, Pheidole, Pseudomyrmex, Pachycondyla, Brachymyrmex, and Crematogaster. Camponotus and Pseudomyrmex were most diverse in the canopy, while Pheidole was most diverse on the ground. The three most abundant ground-dwelling ant genera were Pheidole, Solenopsis and Pyramica. Crematogaster carinata was the most abundant ant species in the canopy; Wasmannia auropunctata was most abundant on the ground, and the army ant Labidus coecus was the most abundant subterranean species. Ant species composition among strata was significantly different: 80% of species were found in only one stratum, 17% in two strata, and 3% in all three strata. Elevation and the number of logs and twigs available as nest sites were significant predictors of ground-dwelling ant species richness. Canopy species richness was not correlated with any ecological variable measured. Subterranean species richness was negatively correlated with depth in the soil. When ant species were categorized using a functional group matrix based on diet, nest-site preference and foraging ecology, the greatest diversity was found in Omnivorous Canopy Nesters. Our study indicates ant species richness is exceptionally high at Tiputini. We project 647–736 ant species in this global hotspot of biodiversity. Considering the relatively small area surveyed, this region of western

  11. Emissions Of Forest Fires In The Amazon: Impact On The Tropical Mountain Forest In Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, P.; Rollenbeck, R.; Thiemens, M. H.; Brothers, L.

    2006-12-01

    Biomass burning is a source of carbon, sulphur, and nitrogen compounds which, along with their photochemically generated reaction products, can be transported over very large distances, even traversing oceans. Four years of regular rain and fog-water measurements in the tropical mountain forest at the eastern slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes, along an altitude profile between 1800 m and 3185 m, have been carried out. The ion composition of rain and fog-water samples shows frequent episodes of significantly enhanced nitrogen and sulphur, resulting in annual deposition rates of about 5 kg N/ha and 10 kg S/ha into this ecosystem, which are comparable to those of polluted central Europe. By relating back trajectories calculated by means of the FLEXTRA model to the distributions of satellite derived forest fire pixels, it can be shown that most episodes of enhanced ion concentration, with pH values as low as 4.0, can be attributed to biomass burning in the Amazon. First analyses of oxygen isotopes 16O, 17O, and 18O of nitrate in fogwater samples show mass independent fractionation values ranging between 15 and 20 per mille, clearly indicating that nitrate in the samples is a product of atmospheric conversion of precursors, while the isotope data of river samples taken downstream of the research area are grouped in the region of microbial nitrate. This strongly supports the aforementioned trajectory results and shows that the tropical mountain forest in Ecuador, with local pollution sources missing,is "fertilized" by long-range transport of substances originating from forest fires in Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, and Peru, far upwind of the research site.

  12. Bananas, pesticides and health in southwestern Ecuador: A scalar narrative approach to targeting public health responses.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Public health responses to agricultural pesticide exposure are often informed by ethnographic or other qualitative studies of pesticide risk perception. In addition to highlighting the importance of structural determinants of exposure, such studies can identify the specific scales at which pesticide-exposed individuals locate responsibility for their health issues, with implications for study and intervention design. In this study, an ethnographic approach was employed to map scalar features within explanatory narratives of pesticides and health in Ecuador's banana-producing El Oro province. Unstructured observation, 14 key informant interviews and 15 in-depth semi-structured interviews were carried out during 8 months of fieldwork in 2011-2013. Analysis of interview data was informed by human geographic literature on the social construction of scale. Individual-focused narratives of some participants highlighted characteristics such as carelessness and ignorance, leading to suggestions for educational interventions. More structural explanations invoked farm-scale processes, such as uncontrolled aerial fumigations on plantations owned by elites. Organization into cooperatives helped to protect small-scale farmers from 'deadly' banana markets, which in turn were linked to the Ecuadorian nation-state and actors in the banana-consuming world. These scalar elements interacted in complex ways that appear linked to social class, as more well-off individuals frequently attributed the health problems of other (poorer) people to individual behaviours, while providing more structural explanations of their own difficulties. Such individualizing narratives may help to stabilize inequitable social structures. Research implications of this study include the possibility of using scale-focused qualitative research to generate theory and candidate levels for multi-level models. Equity implications include a need for public health researchers planning interventions to engage with

  13. Seasonality, Water Quality Variability and Diarrheal Disease in Northern Coastal Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, K.; Hubbard, A. E.; Nelson, K. L.; Eisenberg, J. N.

    2008-12-01

    Objective Seasonality plays a key role in determining incidence of infectious diseases. Diarrheal diseases in particular show seasonal trends, with bacterial pathogens usually peaking in warmer months and viral pathogens peaking in cooler, dryer months. However, studies of the impacts of water quality on diarrheal disease are usually undertaken cross-sectionally, over a short period of time. In this study, we explore how seasonality affects diarrheal disease incidence in a rural area of northern coastal Ecuador, using longer-term datasets. Materials and Methods We use water quality data (as measured by E.coli counts) for both source and in-home water samples collected on a weekly basis over the course of one year in one village. We test the relationship between weekly variability in water quality and diarrheal disease incidence, water treatment and water storage practices in the home. Results We find that peaks in geometric mean values of microbial contamination of source waters often correspond to peaks in weekly village diarrhea incidence in the wet season, but not in the dry season. We also find that perceptions of villagers about water cleanliness do not correspond to levels of microbial contamination; people are more likely to treat their water in the dry season, whereas microbial contamination of source waters peaks in the wet season. We relate these findings to a broader analysis of the relationship between weekly rainfall and diarrheal disease incidence in 21 villages across a larger region over the course of five years. Conclusions Our findings suggest that seasonal variability plays a role in the relationship between water quality and waterborne disease. A consideration of seasonality can help guide public health interventions, by targeting messages about water treatment at times when people are most at risk for waterborne disease. These data can also help inform projections of the impact of climate change on waterborne disease.

  14. Shallow earthquake inhibits unrest near Chiles-Cerro Negro volcanoes, Ecuador-Colombian border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, Susanna K.; Elliott, John R.; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Biggs, Juliet; Mothes, Patricia; Jarrín, Paúl; Yépez, Marco; Aguaiza, Santiago; Lundgren, Paul; Samsonov, Sergey V.

    2016-09-01

    Magma movement or reservoir pressurisation can drive swarms of low-magnitude volcano-tectonic earthquakes, as well as occasional larger earthquakes (>M5) on local tectonic faults. Earthquakes >M5 near volcanoes are challenging to interpret in terms of evolving volcanic hazard, but are often associated with eruptions, and in some cases enhance the ascent of magma. We present geodetic observations from the first episode of unrest known to have occurred near Chiles and Cerro Negro de Mayasquer volcanoes on the Ecuador-Colombian border. A swarm of volcano-tectonic seismicity in October 2014 culminated in a Mw 5.6 earthquake south of the volcanoes. Satellite radar data spanning this earthquake detect displacements that are consistent with dextral oblique slip on a reverse fault at depths of 1.4-3.4 km within a SSW-NNE trending fault zone that last ruptured in 1886. GPS station measurements capture ∼20 days of uplift before the earthquake, probably originating from a pressure source ∼10-15 km south of Volcán Chiles, at depths exceeding 13 km. After the Mw 5.6 earthquake, uplift ceased and the rate of seismicity began to decrease. Potential mechanisms for this decline in activity include a decrease in the rate of movement of magma into the shallow crust, possibly caused by the restriction of fluid pathways. Our observations demonstrate that an earthquake triggered during volcanic unrest can inhibit magmatic processes, and have implications for the hazard interpretation of the interactions between earthquakes and volcanoes.

  15. Exposure and toxic effects of elemental mercury in gold-mining activities in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Harari, Raúl; Harari, Florencia; Gerhardsson, Lars; Lundh, Thomas; Skerfving, Staffan; Strömberg, Ulf; Broberg, Karin

    2012-08-13

    Traditional gold mining, using metallic mercury (Hg(0)) to form gold amalgam, followed by burning to remove the Hg(0), is widely used in South America, Africa and Asia. The gold is sold to merchants who burn it again to eliminate remaining Hg(0). In Ecuador, 200 gold miners, 37 gold merchants and 72 referents were studied. The median Hg concentrations in urine (U-Hg) were 3.3 (range 0.23-170), 37 (3.2-420), and 1.6 (0.2-13)μg/g creatinine, respectively, and in whole blood (B-Hg) were 5.2, 30, and 5.0 μg/L, respectively. Biomarker concentrations among merchants were statistically significantly higher than among miners and referents; also the miners differed from the referents. Burning of gold amalgam among miners was intermittent; U-Hg decreased in the burning-free period. In computerized neuromotor examinations, B-Hg and U-Hg concentrations were associated with increases in the centre frequency of the tremor, as well as in reaction time and postural stability.Retention of Hg (B-Hg), and the elimination rate (U-Hg) appears to be modified by polymorphism in a gene of an enzyme in the glutathione synthesis (GCLM), but there were no significant genetic modifications for the associations between exposure and neurotoxicity.Thus, the gold merchants have a much higher exposure and risk than the miners, in whom the exposure varies over time. The metabolism of Hg is modified by genetic traits. The present exposure to Hg had limited neurotoxic effects.

  16. Natural or anthropogenic? On the origin of atmospheric sulfate deposition in the Andes of southeastern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski Giannoni, S.; Rollenbeck, R.; Trachte, K.; Bendix, J.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric sulfur deposition above certain limits can represent a threat to tropical forests, causing nutrient imbalances and mobilizing toxic elements that impact biodiversity and forest productivity. Atmospheric sources of sulfur deposited by precipitation have been roughly identified in only a few lowland tropical forests. Even scarcer are studies of this type in tropical mountain forests, many of them mega-diversity hotspots and especially vulnerable to acidic deposition. In these places, the topographic complexity and related streamflow conditions affect the origin, type, and intensity of deposition. Furthermore, in regions with a variety of natural and anthropogenic sulfur sources, like active volcanoes and biomass burning, no source emission data has been used for determining the contribution of each source to the deposition. The main goal of the current study is to evaluate sulfate (SO4- deposition by rain and occult precipitation at two topographic locations in a tropical mountain forest of southern Ecuador, and to trace back the deposition to possible emission sources applying back-trajectory modeling. To link upwind natural (volcanic) and anthropogenic (urban/industrial and biomass-burning) sulfur emissions and observed sulfate deposition, we employed state-of-the-art inventory and satellite data, including volcanic passive degassing as well. We conclude that biomass-burning sources generally dominate sulfate deposition at the evaluated sites. Minor sulfate transport occurs during the shifting of the predominant winds to the north and west. Occult precipitation sulfate deposition and likely rain sulfate deposition are mainly linked to biomass-burning emissions from the Amazon lowlands. Volcanic and anthropogenic emissions from the north and west contribute to occult precipitation sulfate deposition at the mountain crest Cerro del Consuelo meteorological station and to rain-deposited sulfate at the upriver mountain pass El Tiro meteorological station.

  17. Natural or anthropogenic? On the origin of atmospheric sulfate deposition in the Andes of southeastern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski Giannoni, S.; Rollenbeck, R.; Trachte, K.; Bendix, J.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric sulfur deposition above certain limits can represent a threat to tropical forests, causing nutrient imbalances and mobilizing toxic elements that impact biodiversity and forest productivity. Atmospheric sources of sulfur deposited by precipitation have being roughly identified in only a few lowland tropical forests. Even scarcer are these type of studies in tropical mountain forests, many of them megadiversity hotspots and especially vulnerable to acidic deposition. Here, the topographic complexity and related streamflow condition the origin, type, and intensity of deposition. Furthermore, in regions with a variety of natural and anthropogenic sulfur sources, like active volcanoes and biomass-burning, no source-emission data has been used for determining the contribution of each of them to the deposition. The main goal of the current study is to evaluate sulfate (SO4-) deposition by rain and occult precipitation at two topographic locations in a tropical mountain forest of southern Ecuador, and to trace back the deposition to possible emission sources applying back trajectory modeling. To link upwind natural (volcanic) and anthropogenic (urban/industrial and biomass-burning) sulfur emissions and observed sulfate deposition, we employed state of the art inventory and satellite data, including volcanic passive degassing as well. We conclude that biomass-burning sources generally dominate sulfate deposition at the evaluated sites. Minor sulfate transport occurs during the shifting of the predominant winds to the north and west. Occult precipitation sulfate deposition and likely rain sulfate deposition are mainly linked to biomass-burning emissions from the Amazon lowlands. Volcanic and anthropogenic emissions from the north and west contribute to occult precipitation sulfate deposition at the mountain crest Cerro del Consuelo meteorological station and to rain-deposited sulfate at the upriver mountain-pass El Tiro meteorological station.

  18. Bananas, pesticides and health in southwestern Ecuador: A scalar narrative approach to targeting public health responses.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Public health responses to agricultural pesticide exposure are often informed by ethnographic or other qualitative studies of pesticide risk perception. In addition to highlighting the importance of structural determinants of exposure, such studies can identify the specific scales at which pesticide-exposed individuals locate responsibility for their health issues, with implications for study and intervention design. In this study, an ethnographic approach was employed to map scalar features within explanatory narratives of pesticides and health in Ecuador's banana-producing El Oro province. Unstructured observation, 14 key informant interviews and 15 in-depth semi-structured interviews were carried out during 8 months of fieldwork in 2011-2013. Analysis of interview data was informed by human geographic literature on the social construction of scale. Individual-focused narratives of some participants highlighted characteristics such as carelessness and ignorance, leading to suggestions for educational interventions. More structural explanations invoked farm-scale processes, such as uncontrolled aerial fumigations on plantations owned by elites. Organization into cooperatives helped to protect small-scale farmers from 'deadly' banana markets, which in turn were linked to the Ecuadorian nation-state and actors in the banana-consuming world. These scalar elements interacted in complex ways that appear linked to social class, as more well-off individuals frequently attributed the health problems of other (poorer) people to individual behaviours, while providing more structural explanations of their own difficulties. Such individualizing narratives may help to stabilize inequitable social structures. Research implications of this study include the possibility of using scale-focused qualitative research to generate theory and candidate levels for multi-level models. Equity implications include a need for public health researchers planning interventions to engage with

  19. Dynamics of Sylvatic Chagas Disease Vectors in Coastal Ecuador Is Driven by Changes in Land Cover

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Mario J.; Terán, David; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a serious public health problem in Latin America where about ten million individuals show Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite significant success in controlling domiciliated triatomines, sylvatic populations frequently infest houses after insecticide treatment which hampers long term control prospects in vast geographical areas where vectorial transmission is endemic. As a key issue, the spatio-temporal dynamics of sylvatic populations is likely influenced by landscape yet evidence showing this effect is rare. The aim of this work is to examine the role of land cover changes in sylvatic triatomine ecology, based on an exhaustive field survey of pathogens, vectors, hosts, and microhabitat characteristics' dynamics. Methodology and Principal Findings The study was performed in agricultural landscapes of coastal Ecuador as a study model. Over one year, a spatially-randomized sampling design (490 collection points) allowed quantifying triatomine densities in natural, cultivated and domestic habitats. We also assessed infection of the bugs with trypanosomes, documented their microhabitats and potential hosts, and recorded changes in landscape characteristics. In total we collected 886 individuals, mainly represented by nymphal stages of one triatomine species Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. As main results, we found that 1) sylvatic triatomines had very high T. cruzi infection rates (71%) and 2) densities of T. cruzi-infected sylvatic triatomines varied predictably over time due to changes in land cover and occurrence of associated rodent hosts. Conclusion We propose a framework for identifying the factors affecting the yearly distribution of sylvatic T. cruzi vectors. Beyond providing key basic information for the control of human habitat colonization by sylvatic vector populations, our framework highlights the importance of both environmental and sociological factors in shaping the spatio-temporal population dynamics of triatomines. A better

  20. Hyperimmunoglobulinemia E in the absence of atopy and filarial infection: the Huaorani of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Kron, M A; Ammunariz, M; Pandey, J; Guzman, J R

    2000-01-01

    Hyperimmunoglobulinemia E (HIGE) is associated with various conditions such as atopy, dermatitis, hypersensitivity reactions, and certain parasitic infections. In the course of vaccination initiatives in the province of Napo, eastern Ecuador, blood samples were collected from one of the two remaining rural subgroups of Huaorani Indians who in 1979 were reported to have the world's highest concentrations of IgE. One subgroup of Huaorani, the Dicaron, lives in a protected Amazonian region which has reportedly suffered from extensive pollution after petroleum industry exploration. Plasma was collected from 31 members of the Dicaron (age range 15-75 years), eight non-Dicaron Huaorani, and 16 Quichua Indians from the same province, and tested for IgE, IgG, IgM, IgA, and immunoglobulin allotypes. Subjects were examined for evidence of filariasis, a group of parasitic diseases associated with HIGE. Mean IgE concentration in the Dicaron was measured by CAP ELISA at 11,850 IU/mL (range 5000-33,000) while IgA and IgM concentrations were within normal limits compared to North American controls. IgG levels were slightly elevated and there was no evidence of filariasis. Compared to the Quichua and non-Dicaron Huaorani, two other Amerindian tribes in the Ecuadorian Amazon, the highest concentrations of IgE were recorded from the Dicaron who live within the allegedly polluted section of the Amazon. We conclude that an unexplained HIGE syndrome exists among only one subgroup of Huaorani, the Dicaron. Other eastern Ecuadorian Amerindians, such as the Quichua and resettled Huaorani, have IgE concentrations expected in a population with intestinal helminthiasis. Environmental factors cannot be excluded as the cause of HIGE in the Dicaron. PMID:11191097

  1. Composition and Comprehensive Antioxidant Activity of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Essential Oil from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Höferl, Martina; Stoilova, Ivanka; Wanner, Juergen; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold; Trifonova, Dora; Stanchev, Veselin; Krastanov, Albert

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the chemical composition and antioxidant potential of an essential oil of ginger rhizomes from Ecuador was elucidated. The analysis of the essential oil by GC/FID/MS resulted in identification of 71 compounds, of which the main are citral (geranial 10.5% and neral 9.1%), α-zingiberene (17.4%), camphene (7.8%), α-farnesene (6.8%) and β-sesquiphellandrene (6.7%). The in vitro antioxidant activity of the essential oil expressed by IC50 in descending order is: hydroxyl radical (OH*) scavenging (0.0065 μg/mL) > chelating capacity (0.822 μg/mL) > 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical cation (ABTS*+) scavenging (3.94 μg/mL) > xanthine oxidase inhibition (138.0 μg/mL) > oxygen radical (O2*) scavenging (404.0 μg/mL) > 2,2- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH*) scavenging (675 μg/mL). Lipid peroxidation inhibition of the essential oil was less efficient than butylhydroxytoluol (BHT) in both stages, i.e. hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde formation. In vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase in antioxidant marker enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), blocking the oxidation processes in yeast cells. Moreover, ginger essential oil in concentrations of 1.6 mg/mL increases the viability of cells to oxidative stress induced by H2O2.

  2. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and rheumatic diseases in Cuenca, Ecuador: a WHO-ILAR COPCORD study.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Pacheco, Sergio; Feicán-Alvarado, Astrid; Sanín, Luz Helena; Vintimilla-Ugalde, Jaime; Vintimilla-Moscoso, Fernando; Delgado-Pauta, Jorge; Lliguisaca-Segarra, Angelita; Dután-Erráez, Holger; Guevara-Mosquera, Daniel; Ochoa-Robles, Verónica; Cardiel, Mario H; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and rheumatic diseases in subjects over 18 years of age from the canton of Cuenca, Ecuador. Cross-sectional analytical community-based study was conducted in subjects over 18 years of age using the validated Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) questionnaire. Random sampling was used. The questionnaire was administered by standardized health workers. Subjects were visited house by house. Subjects positive for musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life were assessed by rheumatologists to confirm the diagnosis. A total of 4877 subjects participated, with an average age of 42.8 (SD 18.8) years of age; 59.7 % were women; 69.7 % lived in urban areas. 32.5 % reported MSK pain in the last 7 days and 45.7 % at some point in life. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis was 7.4 %, hand osteoarthritis 5.3 %, low back pain 9.3 %, rheumatoid arthritis 0.8 %, fibromyalgia 2 %, gout 0.4 %, and lupus 0.06 %. Subjects from rural areas reported experiencing more MSK pain in the last 7 days and at some point in life, lower income, poorer health-care coverage, and increased physical activity involving repetitive tasks such as lifting weights or cooking with firewood. MSK pain prevalence was high. Osteoarthritis and low back pain were the most common diseases. Age, sex, physical activity, repetitive tasks, living in a rural area, and lack of health-care coverage were found to be associated with MSK pain. PMID:27023004

  3. Composition and Comprehensive Antioxidant Activity of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) Essential Oil from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Höferl, Martina; Stoilova, Ivanka; Wanner, Juergen; Schmidt, Erich; Jirovetz, Leopold; Trifonova, Dora; Stanchev, Veselin; Krastanov, Albert

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the chemical composition and antioxidant potential of an essential oil of ginger rhizomes from Ecuador was elucidated. The analysis of the essential oil by GC/FID/MS resulted in identification of 71 compounds, of which the main are citral (geranial 10.5% and neral 9.1%), α-zingiberene (17.4%), camphene (7.8%), α-farnesene (6.8%) and β-sesquiphellandrene (6.7%). The in vitro antioxidant activity of the essential oil expressed by IC50 in descending order is: hydroxyl radical (OH*) scavenging (0.0065 μg/mL) > chelating capacity (0.822 μg/mL) > 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical cation (ABTS*+) scavenging (3.94 μg/mL) > xanthine oxidase inhibition (138.0 μg/mL) > oxygen radical (O2*) scavenging (404.0 μg/mL) > 2,2- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH*) scavenging (675 μg/mL). Lipid peroxidation inhibition of the essential oil was less efficient than butylhydroxytoluol (BHT) in both stages, i.e. hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde formation. In vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase in antioxidant marker enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), blocking the oxidation processes in yeast cells. Moreover, ginger essential oil in concentrations of 1.6 mg/mL increases the viability of cells to oxidative stress induced by H2O2. PMID:26197557

  4. Hydrological connectivity of alluvial Andean valleys: a groundwater/surface-water interaction case study in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Pablo; Anibas, Christian; Batelaan, Okke; Huysmans, Marijke; Wyseure, Guido

    2016-06-01

    The Andean region is characterized by important intramontane alluvial and glacial valleys; a typical example is the Tarqui alluvial plain, Ecuador. Such valley plains are densely populated and/or very attractive for urban and infrastructural development. Their aquifers offer opportunities for the required water resources. Groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction generally entails recharge to or discharge from the aquifer, dependent on the hydraulic connection between surface water and groundwater. Since GW-SW interaction in Andean catchments has hardly been addressed, the objectives of this study are to investigate GW-SW interaction in the Tarqui alluvial plain and to understand the role of the morphology of the alluvial valley in the hydrological response and in the hydrological connection between hillslopes and the aquifers in the valley floor. This study is based on extensive field measurements, groundwater-flow modelling and the application of temperature as a groundwater tracer. Results show that the morphological conditions of a valley influence GW-SW interaction. Gaining and losing river sections are observed in narrow and wide alluvial valley sections, respectively. Modelling shows a strong hydrological connectivity between the hillslopes and the alluvial valley; up to 92 % of recharge of the alluvial deposits originates from lateral flow from the hillslopes. The alluvial plain forms a buffer or transition zone for the river as it sustains a gradual flow from the hills to the river. Future land-use planning and development should include concepts discussed in this study, such as hydrological connectivity, in order to better evaluate impact assessments on water resources and aquatic ecosystems.

  5. Strong Acid Mixture and Sequential Geochemical Arsenic Extractions in Surface Sediments from the Santa Maria La Reforma Coastal Lagoon, Mexico: A Bioavailability Assessment.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, José R; Green-Ruiz, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Thirty-three sediment samples were collected from the Santa Maria La Reforma coastal lagoon and digested by way of a strong acid mixture and sequential arsenic (As)-extraction method to determine the arsenic (As) content and bioavailability. The As content was determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. In addition, grain-size analyses were performed, and organic carbon, carbonate, and iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) concentrations were determined. Fe and Mn determination was performed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A Pearson correlation matrix and As enrichment factors were calculated. Sediment concentrations from Santa Maria La Reforma ranged from 3.6 to 25 µg As g(-1) with an average of 13.4 ± 7.6 µg As g(-1). The highest values were observed in the northern (Playa Colorada), north-central (Mocorito River discharge zone), and southern zones ("El Tule" agricultural drain). Most samples were classified as exhibiting no or minor As enrichment and were lower than the threshold effect level (TEL; 7.24 µg g(-1)) for biota (MacDonald et al. in Ecotoxicology 5:253-278, 1996). Low bioavailable As values (<3 %) were measured in the majority of the sediment. The highest As percentages were associated with the oxyhydroxide fraction (F5). The results indicate that As bioavailability is negligible. PMID:26743199

  6. Strong Acid Mixture and Sequential Geochemical Arsenic Extractions in Surface Sediments from the Santa Maria La Reforma Coastal Lagoon, Mexico: A Bioavailability Assessment.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, José R; Green-Ruiz, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Thirty-three sediment samples were collected from the Santa Maria La Reforma coastal lagoon and digested by way of a strong acid mixture and sequential arsenic (As)-extraction method to determine the arsenic (As) content and bioavailability. The As content was determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. In addition, grain-size analyses were performed, and organic carbon, carbonate, and iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) concentrations were determined. Fe and Mn determination was performed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A Pearson correlation matrix and As enrichment factors were calculated. Sediment concentrations from Santa Maria La Reforma ranged from 3.6 to 25 µg As g(-1) with an average of 13.4 ± 7.6 µg As g(-1). The highest values were observed in the northern (Playa Colorada), north-central (Mocorito River discharge zone), and southern zones ("El Tule" agricultural drain). Most samples were classified as exhibiting no or minor As enrichment and were lower than the threshold effect level (TEL; 7.24 µg g(-1)) for biota (MacDonald et al. in Ecotoxicology 5:253-278, 1996). Low bioavailable As values (<3 %) were measured in the majority of the sediment. The highest As percentages were associated with the oxyhydroxide fraction (F5). The results indicate that As bioavailability is negligible.

  7. Efficiency of Indigenous Filamentous Fungi for Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Medium and Soil: Laboratory Study from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Maddela, N R; Scalvenzi, L; Pérez, M; Montero, C; Gooty, J M

    2015-09-01

    The competence of two fungal isolates for degrading petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated. The filamentous fungi were isolated from a crude oil-contaminated soil in northeastern Ecuador, and were 99 %-100 % similar in 18S rDNA sequence to the genus Geomyces. Their efficiencies of degradation were tested in vitro for 30 days, using medium and soil microcosm. Residual hydrocarbons were tracked by gas liquid chromatography with a flame ionization detector. The maximum removal percentages of total petroleum hydrocarbons were 77.3 % and 79.9 % for experiments in the medium and soil microcosm, respectively. The percent germination of cow pea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds was increased from 20 % to 100 % upon bioremediation. Isolates sporulated optimally on minimal salts agar medium at pH 5, 25°C temperature, 1 %-1.5 % substrate (crude oil) and 4-6 g L(-1) N-P-K. These findings suggest that these fungal isolates are potential degraders for bioremediation in crude oil-contaminated areas in Ecuador.

  8. A Comparison of Willingness to Pay to Prevent Child Maltreatment Deaths in Ecuador and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Phaedra S.; Ingels, Justin B.; Roldos, M. Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the benefits of preventing child maltreatment (CM) is essential for policy makers to determine whether there are significant returns on investment from interventions to prevent CM. The aim of this study was to estimate the benefits of preventing CM deaths in an Ecuadorian population, and to compare the results to a similar study in a US population. The study used the contingent valuation method to elicit respondents’ willingness to pay (WTP) for a 1 in 100,000 reduction in the risk of CM mortality. After adjusting for differences in purchasing power, the WTP to prevent the CM mortality risk reduction in the Ecuador population was $237 and the WTP for the same risk reduction in the US population was $175. In the pooled analysis, WTP for a reduction in CM mortality was significantly impacted by country (p = 0.03), history of CM (p = 0.007), payment mechanism (p < 0.001), confidence in response (p = 0.014), and appropriateness of the payment mechanism (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that estimating benefits from one culture may not be transferable to another, and that low- and middle-income countries, such as Ecuador, may be better served by developing their own benefits estimates for use in future benefit-cost analyses of interventions designed to prevent CM. PMID:23538730

  9. Perceptions and uses of plants for reproductive health among traditional midwives in Ecuador: moving towards intercultural pharmacological practices.

    PubMed

    Torri, Maria Costanza

    2013-07-01

    Despite the fact that plants have played an important role in midwifery in many cultures, there are very few in-depth studies on the plants traditionally used by midwives. The aim of this study is to analyse the perceptions and the uses of medicinal plants for reproductive health among indigenous midwives in the city of Otavalo, Ecuador. The article also aims to analyse the perceptions of traditional midwives regarding allopathic drugs for reproductive health and their possible overlapping uses of medicinal plants and allopathic drugs. The data are drawn from an ethnographic study carried out in Ecuador. In total, 20 traditional midwives have been interviewed. Individual and in-depth interviews also took place with a sample of 35 women as well as with five nurses and two doctors working at San Luis Hospital in Otavalo. The study shows that cultural health management and the incorporation of the beliefs and practices relating to women's reproductive health can represent a starting point towards the search for more successful strategies in reproductive health. PMID:22877763

  10. Deforestation and Forest Fragmentation in South Ecuador since the 1970s – Losing a Hotspot of Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Tapia-Armijos, María Fernanda; Homeier, Jürgen; Espinosa, Carlos Iván; Leuschner, Christoph; de la Cruz, Marcelino

    2015-01-01

    Deforestation and fragmentation are major components of global change; both are contributing to the rapid loss of tropical forest area with important implications for ecosystem functioning and biodiversity conservation. The forests of South Ecuador are a biological ‘hotspot’ due to their high diversity and endemism levels. We examined the deforestation and fragmentation patterns in this area of high conservation value using aerial photographs and Aster satellite scenes. The registered annual deforestation rates of 0.75% (1976–1989) and 2.86% (1989–2008) for two consecutive survey periods, the decreasing mean patch size and the increasing isolation of the forest fragments show that the area is under severe threat. Approximately 46% of South Ecuador’s original forest cover had been converted by 2008 into pastures and other anthropogenic land cover types. We found that deforestation is more intense at lower elevations (premontane evergreen forest and shrubland) and that the deforestation front currently moves in upslope direction. Improved awareness of the spatial extent, dynamics and patterns of deforestation and forest fragmentation is urgently needed in biologically diverse areas like South Ecuador. PMID:26332681

  11. Petroleum resources of South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program series

    SciTech Connect

    Dietzman, W.D.; Rafidi, N.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report is an analysis of discovered crude oil reserves, undiscovered recoverable crude oil resources, and estimated annual oil field production. The countries analyzed are Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. All of the countries in this report have a history of petroleum exploration and development. Also, they maintain policies which support the search for, and exploitation of, petroleum resources. This systematic assessment provides estimates of the quantities of remaining known petroleum reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources. The future feasible production rates from the respective countries are also discussed. The FESAP assessments are limited to petroleum resources recoverable by conventional primary and secondary extraction technology. It is estimated that over 29.4 billion barrels of recoverable oil (both discovered and undiscovered) originally existed within the sedimentary basins of these countries, as follows: Argentina (9.4 billion barrels); Brazil (6.5 billion barrels); Colombia (5.0 billion barrels); Peru (3.6 billion barrels); Ecuador (over 3.0 billion barrels); Chile (1.1 billion barrels); and Bolivia (over 0.8 billion barrels). Through 1982, about 10.2 billion barrels of the oil had been produced. Thus, some 19.2 billion barrels constitute the remaining recoverable petroleum resource base. It is estimated that the most likely volume of crude oil remaining to be found in the seven countries is 12 billion barrels. 91 refs., 59 figs., 82 tabs.

  12. A space-time point process model for analyzing and predicting case patterns of diarrheal disease in northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jaeil; Johnson, Timothy D; Bhavnani, Darlene; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2014-06-01

    We consider modeling case-patterns under a complex spatial and longitudinal sampling design as conducted via a serial case-control study of diarrheal disease in northwestern Ecuador. We build a two-stage space-time model to understand the role of spatially and temporally referenced covariates that reflect social and natural environments in the sampled region, after accounting for unmeasured residual heterogeneities. All diarrheal case events are collected from 21 sampled communities in Esmeraldes province in Ecuador, during seven sampling cycles from 2003 to 2008. The region of interest comprises 158 communities along a river basin. Prediction of case counts at unsampled communities at a future time is of interest along with estimation of risk-related parameters. We propose a computationally feasible two-stage Bayesian approach to estimate the risk-related parameters and conduct predictive inference. We first apply the log Gaussian Cox process (LGCP), commonly used to model spatial clustering of point patterns, to accommodate temporal variation within the sampled communities. Prediction of the number of cases at unsampled communities at a future time is obtained by a disease mapping model conditional on the expected case counts from Stage I.

  13. A new rainfrog of the Pristimantis myersi Group (Amphibia, Craugastoridae) from Volcán Pichincha, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Runjaic, Fernando J M; C, J Amanda Delgado; Guayasamin, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    A new frog of the Pristimantis myersi Group is described from a bamboo patch within the Reserva Ecológica Verdecocha (0°5'46.9"S, 78°36'15.3"W; 2851 m), located at northwestern flank of the Volcán Pichincha, in the vicinities of Quito, Ecuador. The new species is known from eight adult males, whereas the females remain unknown; it can be readily distinguished from all species of the P. myersi Group that inhabit the highlands of the Ecuadorian Andes by the unique combination of the following characters: body small (adult male SVL 14.9-19.7 mm; females unknown); dorsal skin shagreen, with a barely visible middorsal raphe, scapular and dorsolateral folds; tympanum small but well-defined; upper eyelid with one enlarged tubercle; males with prominent vocal slits, but without nuptial pads on thumbs; fold-like tarsal tubercles. With this new species, the number of Pristimantis assigned to the P. myersi Group raises to 16, of which, 12 are in Ecuador. We provide notes on morphology and color variation, advertisement call, and natural history of the new species. PMID:24871827

  14. First Human Cases of Leishmania (Viannia) lainsoni Infection and a Search for the Vector Sand Flies in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hirotomo; Bone, Abdon E.; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Hashiguchi, Kazue; Shiguango, Gonzalo F.; Gonzales, Silvio V.; Velez, Lenin N.; Guevara, Angel G.; Gomez, Eduardo A.; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    An epidemiological study of leishmaniasis was performed in Amazonian areas of Ecuador since little information on the prevalent Leishmania and sand fly species responsible for the transmission is available. Of 33 clinical specimens from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), causative parasites were identified in 25 samples based on cytochrome b gene analysis. As reported previously, Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis and L. (V.) braziliensis were among the causative agents identified. In addition, L. (V.) lainsoni, for which infection is reported in Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Suriname, and French Guiana, was identified in patients with CL from geographically separate areas in the Ecuadorian Amazon, corroborating the notion that L. (V.) lainsoni is widely distributed in South America. Sand flies were surveyed around the area where a patient with L. (V.) lainsoni was suspected to have been infected. However, natural infection of sand flies by L. (V.) lainsoni was not detected. Further extensive vector searches are necessary to define the transmission cycle of L. (V.) lainsoni in Ecuador. PMID:27191391

  15. A new rainfrog of the Pristimantis myersi Group (Amphibia, Craugastoridae) from Volcán Pichincha, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Runjaic, Fernando J M; C, J Amanda Delgado; Guayasamin, Juan M

    2014-03-20

    A new frog of the Pristimantis myersi Group is described from a bamboo patch within the Reserva Ecológica Verdecocha (0°5'46.9"S, 78°36'15.3"W; 2851 m), located at northwestern flank of the Volcán Pichincha, in the vicinities of Quito, Ecuador. The new species is known from eight adult males, whereas the females remain unknown; it can be readily distinguished from all species of the P. myersi Group that inhabit the highlands of the Ecuadorian Andes by the unique combination of the following characters: body small (adult male SVL 14.9-19.7 mm; females unknown); dorsal skin shagreen, with a barely visible middorsal raphe, scapular and dorsolateral folds; tympanum small but well-defined; upper eyelid with one enlarged tubercle; males with prominent vocal slits, but without nuptial pads on thumbs; fold-like tarsal tubercles. With this new species, the number of Pristimantis assigned to the P. myersi Group raises to 16, of which, 12 are in Ecuador. We provide notes on morphology and color variation, advertisement call, and natural history of the new species.

  16. Modelling of Coulomb stress changes during the great (Mw = 8.8) 1906 Colombia-Ecuador earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga, Edwin F.; Sánchez, John J.

    2016-10-01

    Six alternative models of slip distribution during the 1906 Esmeraldas (Mw = 8.8) megathrust earthquake are used to compute Coulomb stress changes on two types of specific faults and onto optimal strike-slipe faults along the Colombia-Ecuador Pacific region. Coulomb stress changes are in the range -0.5-0.5 MPa projected on specific faults varies spatially depending on target fault configuration (dip and sense of motion): Slip along low-angle reverse faults would be inhibited whereas slip along near-vertical strike-slip faults would be facilitated in the southern rupture region and inhibited in the northern rupture region. The patterns of Coulomb stress changes on optimal strike-slip faults located on the landward side of the 1906 rupture is not strongly dependent on the regional stress tensor, suggests that motion along many faults and fault segments might be facilitated, and exhibits good spatial correlation with shallow seismicity. The modelled 1906 Esmeraldas rupture is compared to the recent 2010 Mw = 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake and the results may aid in improving current hazard estimates and degree of preparedness in the Colombia-Ecuador Pacific region.

  17. Insight into the Wild Origin, Migration and Domestication History of the Fine Flavour Nacional Theobroma cacao L. Variety from Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Loor Solorzano, Rey Gaston; Fouet, Olivier; Lemainque, Arnaud; Pavek, Sylvana; Boccara, Michel; Argout, Xavier; Amores, Freddy; Courtois, Brigitte; Risterucci, Ange Marie; Lanaud, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Ecuador’s economic history has been closely linked to Theobroma cacao L cultivation, and specifically to the native fine flavour Nacional cocoa variety. The original Nacional cocoa trees are presently in danger of extinction due to foreign germplasm introductions. In a previous work, a few non-introgressed Nacional types were identified as potential founders of the modern Ecuadorian cocoa population, but so far their origin could not be formally identified. In order to determine the putative centre of origin of Nacional and trace its domestication history, we used 80 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to analyse the relationships between these potential Nacional founders and 169 wild and cultivated cocoa accessions from South and Central America. The highest genetic similarity was observed between the Nacional pool and some wild genotypes from the southern Amazonian region of Ecuador, sampled along the Yacuambi, Nangaritza and Zamora rivers in Zamora Chinchipe province. This result was confirmed by a parentage analysis. Based on our results and on data about pre-Columbian civilization and Spanish colonization history of Ecuador, we determined, for the first time, the possible centre of origin and migration events of the Nacional variety from the Amazonian area until its arrival in the coastal provinces. As large unexplored forest areas still exist in the southern part of the Ecuadorian Amazonian region, our findings could provide clues as to where precious new genetic resources could be collected, and subsequently used to improve the flavour and disease resistance of modern Ecuadorian cocoa varieties. PMID:23144883

  18. Efficiency of Indigenous Filamentous Fungi for Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Medium and Soil: Laboratory Study from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Maddela, N R; Scalvenzi, L; Pérez, M; Montero, C; Gooty, J M

    2015-09-01

    The competence of two fungal isolates for degrading petroleum hydrocarbons was evaluated. The filamentous fungi were isolated from a crude oil-contaminated soil in northeastern Ecuador, and were 99 %-100 % similar in 18S rDNA sequence to the genus Geomyces. Their efficiencies of degradation were tested in vitro for 30 days, using medium and soil microcosm. Residual hydrocarbons were tracked by gas liquid chromatography with a flame ionization detector. The maximum removal percentages of total petroleum hydrocarbons were 77.3 % and 79.9 % for experiments in the medium and soil microcosm, respectively. The percent germination of cow pea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds was increased from 20 % to 100 % upon bioremediation. Isolates sporulated optimally on minimal salts agar medium at pH 5, 25°C temperature, 1 %-1.5 % substrate (crude oil) and 4-6 g L(-1) N-P-K. These findings suggest that these fungal isolates are potential degraders for bioremediation in crude oil-contaminated areas in Ecuador. PMID:26215457

  19. Sending-Country Violence & Receiving-Country Discrimination: Effects on the Health of Colombian Refugees in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Shedlin, Michele G.; Decena, Carlos U.; Noboa, Hugo; Betancourt, Óscar

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study explored factors affecting the health and well being of recent refugees from Colombia in Ecuador. Data collection focused on how sending-country violence and structural violence in a new environment affect immigrant health vulnerability and risk behaviors. METHODS A qualitative approach included ethnographic observation, media content analysis, focus groups, and individual interviews with refugees (N=137). The focus groups (5) provided perspectives on the research domains by sex workers; drug users; male and female refugees; and service providers. RESULTS Social and economic marginalization are impacting the health and well being of this growing refugee population. Data illustrate how stigma and discrimination affect food and housing security, employment and health services, and shape vulnerabilities and health risks in a new receiving environment. DISCUSSION Widespread discrimination in Ecuador reflects fears, misunderstanding, and stereotypes about Colombian refugees. For this displaced population, the sequelae of violence, combined with survival needs and lack of support and protections, shape new risks to health and well-being. PMID:23377565

  20. Consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year nursing students at the University of Guayaquil, school of nursing, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Nivia Pinos; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year students from a nursing school of a public University in Ecuador. This is a descriptive, transversal and explanatory study with a quantitative approach. A questionnaire was used for data collection. The population studied was of 181 students. The results showed that 10.5% of the students had consumed benzodiazepine without prescription once in their lives. Of these, 6.1% consumed benzodiazepine in the last year, and 3.9% are currently consuming it. The diazepam was the most consumed BZD without prescription and pharmacies, were the place of higher access. The main reasons for the benzodiazepine consumption were: insomnia, anxiety, stress, depression, family and economical problems. The use of benzodiazepines with non-medicinal purposes is related to problems such as memory loss, retirement syndrome and sedation. When benzodiazepines are consumed jointly with alcohol or other drugs they can lead to coma or death. This study shows the serious consequences benzodiazepines cause when used by nursing students in Ecuador.

  1. Primary healthcare providers’ views on improving sexual and reproductive healthcare for adolescents in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Orozco, Miguel; Ibarra, Marcia; Ossio, Freddy Cordova; Vega, Bernardo; Auquilla, Nancy; Medina, Joel; Gorter, Anna C.; Decat, Peter; De Meyer, Sara; Temmerman, Marleen; Edmonds, Alexander B.; Valius, Leonas; Lazarus, Jeffrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To elicit the views of primary healthcare providers from Bolivia, Ecuador, and Nicaragua on how adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) care in their communities can be improved. Methods Overall, 126 healthcare providers (46 from Bolivia, 39 from Ecuador, and 41 from Nicaragua) took part in this qualitative study. During a series of moderated discussions, they provided written opinions about the accessibility and appropriateness of ASRH services and suggestions for its improvement. The data were analyzed by employing a content analysis methodology. Results Study participants emphasized managerial issues such as the prioritization of adolescents as a patient group and increased healthcare providers’ awareness about adolescent-friendly approaches. They noted that such an approach needs to be extended beyond primary healthcare centers. Schools, parents, and the community in general should be encouraged to integrate issues related to ASRH in the everyday life of adolescents and become ‘gate-openers’ to ASRH services. To ensure the success of such measures, action at the policy level would be required. For example, decision-makers could call for developing clinical guidelines for this population group and coordinate multisectoral efforts. Conclusions To improve ASRH services within primary healthcare institutions in three Latin American countries, primary healthcare providers call for focusing on improving the youth-friendliness of health settings. To facilitate this, they suggested engaging with key stakeholders, such as parents, schools, and decision-makers at the policy level. PMID:23680267

  2. Begomovirus diversity in tomato crops and weeds in Ecuador and the detection of a recombinant isolate of rhynchosia golden mosaic Yucatan virus infecting tomato.

    PubMed

    Paz-Carrasco, Lenin C; Castillo-Urquiza, Gloria P; Lima, Alison T M; Xavier, Cesar A D; Vivas-Vivas, Leticia M; Mizubuti, Eduardo S G; Zerbini, F Murilo

    2014-08-01

    Viral diseases caused by begomoviruses are of economic importance due to their adverse effects on the production of tropical and subtropical crops. In Ecuador, despite reports of significant infestations of Bemisia tabaci in the late 1990s, only very recently has a begomovirus, tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV, also present in Peru), been reported in tomato. ToLDeV is the first monopartite begomovirus discovered that originated in the Americas, and its presence in Ecuador highlights the need for a wider survey of tomato-infecting begomoviruses in this country. Tomato and weed samples were collected in 2010 and 2011 in six provinces of Ecuador, and begomovirus genomes were cloned and sequenced using a rolling-circle-amplification-based approach. Most tomato samples from the provinces of Guayas, Loja, Manabi and Santa Elena were infected with tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV). One sample from Manabi had a triple infection with ToLDeV, rhynchosia golden mosaic Yucatan virus (RhGMYuV) and an isolate that was a recombinant between the two. A new begomovirus was detected in another tomato sample from Manabi. Samples of Rhynchosia sp. from the provinces of Guayas and Manabi were infected by RhGMYuV. These results indicate not only the prevalence of ToLDeV in tomato in Ecuador but also the presence of other viruses, albeit at a much lower frequency.

  3. Establishing the Validity of TOEIC Bridge™ Test Scores for Students in Colombia, Chile, and Ecuador. Research Report. ETS RR-08-58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Feng, Ying; Saldivia, Luis; Powers, Donald E.; Ginuta, Anthony; Simpson, Annabelle; Weng, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The validity of TOEIC Bridge™ scores as a measure of English language skill was examined from the standpoint of a unified concept of test validity. In this study, more than 6,000 test takers in 3 Latin American countries (Chile, Colombia, and Ecuador) took 1 form of the TOEIC Bridge test, and their scores were compared to additional information…

  4. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and Gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Trinidad and Tobago)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This 7-part set includes separate reports on market possibilities for field production equipment, drilling equipment, refinery equipment, and auxiliary equipment in the following countries: Argentina, Brazil (2 reports), Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(-)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru. PMID:26645579

  6. Metallogenic features of Miocene porphyry Cu and porphyry-related mineral deposits in Ecuador revealed by Re-Os, 40Ar/39Ar, and U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Philip; Chiaradia, Massimo; Barra, Fernando; Villagómez, Diego; Beate, Bernardo

    2012-04-01

    Mineralization and alteration events at ten Miocene porphyry Cu and porphyry-related epithermal mineral deposits in southern, central, and northern Ecuador were dated by means of molybdenite Re-Os, biotite and alunite 40Ar/39Ar, and titanite U-Pb geochronology. Most of these hydrothermal events show a spatio-temporal correlation with porphyry intrusion emplacement as constrained by zircon U-Pb ages. The total age range for these events spans the 23.5-6.1 Ma period, without displaying systematic along- or across-arc age distribution trends. While epithermal deposits tend to be spatially associated with volcanic rocks of a similar age, porphyry Cu deposits in Ecuador are frequently spatially associated with deeper-seated basement units and batholith-scale precursor intrusive systems assembled over ≥5 m.y. time periods. In most cases, formation of the porphyry Cu deposits is related to the youngest magmatic (-hydrothermal) event in a given area, postdating batholith construction at a regional scale. The majority of Miocene deposits occurs in southern Ecuador where areally extensive, post-mineralization (late Miocene to recent) volcanic sequences with the potential to conceal mineralization at depth are lacking. Only few Miocene deposits occur in northern-central Ecuador, where they mainly crop out in the Western Cordillera, west of the productive present-day volcanic arc. The surface distribution of post-mineralization arc volcanism reflects along-arc variations in subducting slab geometry. Porphyry Cu and epithermal deposits in Ecuador define a Miocene metallogenic belt broadly continuous with its coeval counterpart in northern-central Peru. Although both belt segments were formed in an overall similar tectonomagmatic and metallogenic setting, their respective metal endowments differ significantly.

  7. Orographic enhancement of rainfalls in the Rio San Francisco valley in southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachte, K.; Rollenbeck, R.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In a tropical mountain rain forest in southern Ecuador diurnal dynamics of cloud development and precipitation behavior is investigated in the framework of the DFG research unit 816. With automatic climate stations and rain radar rainfalls in the Rio San Francisco valley are recorded. The observations showed the typical tropical late afternoon convective precipitation as well as local events such as mountain valley breezes and luv-lee effects. Additionally, the data revealed an unusually early morning peak that could be recognized as convective rainfalls. On the basis of GOES-E satellite imagery these rainfalls could be traced back to nocturnal convective clouds at the eastern Andes Mountains. There are some explanations for the occurrence of the clouds: One already examined mechanism is a katabatic induced cold front at the foothills of the Andes in the Peruvian Amazon basin. In this region the mountains form a quasi-concave configuration that contributes to a convergence of cold air drainage with subsequent convective activities. Another explanation for the events is the orographic enhancement by a local seeder-feeder mechanism. Mesoscale convective systems from the Amazon basin are transported to the west via the trade winds. At the Andes Mountains the complex and massive orography acts like a barrier to the clouds. The result is a disconnection of the upper part of the cloud from the lower part. The latter rains out at the eastern slopes and the upper cloud is transported further to the west. There it acts like a seeder to lower level clouds, i. e. the feeder. With the numerical model ARPS (Advanced Regional Prediction System) this procedure is investigated on the basis of two case studies. The events are detected and selected through the analysis of GOES-E brightness temperatures. They are also used to compare and validate the results of the model. Finally, the orographic enhancement of the clouds is examined. By using a vertically pointing radar the

  8. Quilotoa volcano — Ecuador: An overview of young dacitic volcanism in a lake-filled caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Minard L.; Mothes, Patricia A.

    2008-09-01

    Quilotoa volcano, an example of young dacitic volcanism in a lake-filled caldera, is found at the southwest end of the Ecuador's volcanic front. It has had a long series of powerful plinian eruptions of moderate to large size (VEI = 4-6), at repetitive intervals of roughly 10-15 thousand years. At least eight eruptive cycles (labeled Q-I to Q-VIII with increasing age) over the past 200 ka are recognized, often beginning with a phreatomagmatic onset and followed by a pumice-rich lapilli fall, and then a sequence of pumice, crystal, and lithic-rich deposits belonging to surges and ash flows. These unwelded pyroclastic flows left veneers on hillsides as well as very thick accumulations in the surrounding valleys, the farthest ash flow having traveled about 17 km down the Toachi valley. The bulk volumes of the youngest flow deposits are on the order of 5 km 3, but that of Q-I's 800 yr BP ash-fall unit is about 18 km 3. In the last two eruption cycles water has had a more important role. Upon Quilotoa's low-relief volcanic edifice, three calderas are recognized; the formation of the oldest one predates the Q-IV cycle and the others occurred during the Q-II and Q-I cycles. Dacite lava domes are common along the present caldera rim and most were emplaced at the end of the Q-II cycle; older domes of dark dacite belong to the Q-III and IV cycles. The explosive onset of the Q-I cycle expulsed as much as 250 million m 3 of the lake's water, resulting in large debris flows that scoured the eastern flanks of the edifice and descended the Toachi river. Little variation in the mineralogy and chemistry of Quilotoa's eruptive products is observed, suggesting that the source is a homogeneous magma body at shallow depth. Both the pyroclastic material and the domes are composed chiefly of gray porphyritic dacites carrying large phenocrysts of plagioclase, amphibole, biotite, and occasionally quartz.

  9. Intense Seismic Activity at Chiles and Cerro Negro Volcanoes on the Colombia-Ecuador Border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, R. A.; Cadena, O.; Gomez, D.; Ruiz, M. C.; Prejean, S. G.; Lyons, J. J.; White, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The region of Chiles and Cerro Negro volcanoes, located on the Colombian-Ecuadorian border, has experienced an ongoing seismic swarm beginning in Aug. 2013. Based on concern for local residents and authorities, a cooperative broadband monitoring network was installed by the Servicio Geológico Colombiano in Colombia and the Instituto Geofísico of the Escuela Politécnica Nacional in Ecuador. Since November 2013 more than 538,000 earthquakes were recorded; although since May 2015 the seismicity has decreased significantly to an average of 70 events per day. Three large earthquake swarms with increasing energy occurred in Aug.-Oct. 2013, March-May 2014, and Sept.-Dec. 2014. By the end of 2014, roughly 400 earthquakes greater than M 3 had occurred with a maximum rate of 8000 earthquakes per day. The largest earthquake was a 5.6 ML on Oct. 20, 2014. This event produced an InSAR coseismic deformation of ~23 cm (S. Ebmeier, personal communication). Most events are typical brittle failure volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes that are located in a cluster beneath the southern flank of Chiles volcano, with depths between 1.5 and 10 km. Although the great majority of earthquakes are VT, some low-frequency (LF, ~0.5 Hz) and very-low-frequency (VLF) events have occurred. Particle motion analysis suggests that the VLF source migrated with time. While a VLF on Oct. 15, 2014 was located south of Chiles volcano, near the InSAR source, the VLF registered on Feb. 14, 2015 was likely located very close to Chiles Volcano. We infer that magma intrusion and resulting fluid exsolution at depths greater than 5 km are driving seismicity in the Chiles-Cerro Negro region. However earthquakes are failing in a manner consistent with regional tectonics. Relative relocations reveal a structure consistent with mapped regional faults. Thus seismicity is likely controlled by an interaction of magmatic and tectonic processes. Because the regional stress field is highly compressional and the volcanoes

  10. Rainfall interception in a lower montane forest in Ecuador: effects of canopy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischbein, Katrin; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Goller, Rainer; Boy, Jens; Valarezo, Carlos; Zech, Wolfgang; Knoblich, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    Rainfall interception in forests is influenced by properties of the canopy that tend to vary over small distances. Our objectives were: (i) to determine the variables needed to model the interception loss of the canopy of a lower montane forest in south Ecuador, i.e. the storage capacity of the leaves S and of the trunks and branches St, and the fractions of direct throughfall p and stemflow pt; (ii) to assess the influence of canopy density and epiphyte coverage of trees on the interception of rainfall and subsequent evaporation losses.The study site was located on the eastern slope of the eastern cordillera in the south Ecuadorian Andes at 1900-2000 m above sea level. We monitored incident rainfall, throughfall, and stemflow between April 1998 and April 2001. In 2001, the leaf area index (LAI), inferred from light transmission, and epiphyte coverage was determined.The mean annual incident rainfall at three gauging stations ranged between 2319 and 2561 mm. The mean annual interception loss at five study transects in the forest varied between 591 and 1321 mm, i.e. between 25 and 52% of the incident rainfall. Mean S was estimated at 1.91 mm for relatively dry weeks with a regression model and at 2.46 mm for all weeks with the analytical Gash model; the respective estimates of mean St were 0.04 mm and 0.09 mm, of mean p were 0.42 and 0.63, and of mean pt were 0.003 and 0.012. The LAI ranged from 5.19 to 9.32. Epiphytes, mostly bryophytes, covered up to 80% of the trunk and branch surfaces. The fraction of direct throughfall p and the LAI correlated significantly with interception loss (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = -0.77 and 0.35 respectively, n = 40). Bryophyte and lichen coverage tended to decrease St and vascular epiphytes tended to increase it, although there was no significant correlation between epiphyte coverage and interception loss. Our results demonstrate that

  11. Reservoir optimisation using El Niño information. Case study of Daule Peripa (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelati, Emiliano; Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2010-05-01

    The optimisation of water resources systems requires the ability to produce runoff scenarios that are consistent with available climatic information. We approach stochastic runoff modelling with a Markov-modulated autoregressive model with exogenous input, which belongs to the class of Markov-switching models. The model assumes runoff parameterisation to be conditioned on a hidden climatic state following a Markov chain, whose state transition probabilities depend on climatic information. This approach allows stochastic modeling of non-stationary runoff, as runoff anomalies are described by a mixture of autoregressive models with exogenous input, each one corresponding to a climate state. We calibrate the model on the inflows of the Daule Peripa reservoir located in western Ecuador, where the occurrence of El Niño leads to anomalously heavy rainfall caused by positive sea surface temperature anomalies along the coast. El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) information is used to condition the runoff parameterisation. Inflow predictions are realistic, especially at the occurrence of El Niño events. The Daule Peripa reservoir serves a hydropower plant and a downstream water supply facility. Using historical ENSO records, synthetic monthly inflow scenarios are generated for the period 1950-2007. These scenarios are used as input to perform stochastic optimisation of the reservoir rule curves with a multi-objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA). The optimised rule curves are assumed to be the reservoir base policy. ENSO standard indices are currently forecasted at monthly time scale with nine-month lead time. These forecasts are used to perform stochastic optimisation of reservoir releases at each monthly time step according to the following procedure: (i) nine-month inflow forecast scenarios are generated using ENSO forecasts; (ii) a MOGA is set up to optimise the upcoming nine monthly releases; (iii) the optimisation is carried out by simulating the releases on the

  12. Hydrodynamic properties of the basal aquifer of Santa Cruz Island using seismic refraction, Galapagos - Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, S.; Fortin, J.; Adelinet, M.; Guéguen, Y.; Violette, S.

    2012-04-01

    Santa Cruz Island is the most inhabited of the Galapagos archipelago, Ecuador. It faces important water resource problems which might lead to a major impact on their unique and pristine ecosystem, Endangered World Heritage list (2007). The scarcity of geological and hydrological data combined with the difficulty of access for field measurements lead to a poor understanding of the island hydrogeology. The Island is formed by series of thick fractured basaltic lava flows dissected by faults. The low-lying, extensive "basal" aquifer is the unique groundwater body identified on the island. This basal aquifer is subjected to sea-water intrusion, which has been mapped from electrical resistivity imaging with an airborne electromagnetic SkyTEM survey (D'Ozouville et al. 2008). In order to better understand the hydrodynamic properties of the basal aquifer, we acquired, in summer 2011, geophysical data based on seismic refraction. The experiment was conducted on three study sites located at different altitudes above the see level (Beagle site altitude +7m , Mirador +20m, and Villacis +393m). The P-wave refraction data were obtained using 24 geophones (1 component) and an acquisition system Daklink III. A hammer was used as an energy source. This source was the most environmentally friendly source that could be obtained and used in the Galapagos Island. Geophone spacing for the spreads was 1.2 or 5 m depending on the site. From our geophysical data, we could identify the different geological layers that constitute this basal aquifer and to estimate the thickness of these layers. We could as well clearly see the water level in the aquifer. More interesting, we found a P-wave velocity of ~1600 m/s in the dry fractured basalt lava flow, and a P-wave velocity of ~2700 m/s in the water saturated fractured basalt lava flow. The same velocity values were obtained in the different sites. This tends to show that the elastic properties of the aquifer are homogeneous and isotropic (at

  13. Emplacement temperatures of boiling-over pyroclastic density currents from Tungurahua and Cotopaxi volcanoes, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, E. L.; Geist, D.; Geissman, J. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDC) can be sourced by collapsing columns, dome collapse, and boiling-over fountains. Although there are innumerable studies of the deposits produced by the first 2 mechanisms, pyroclastic deposits from boiling-over have not been well characterized. We are studying several pyroclastic flow deposits from two boiling over eruptions in Ecuador, Tungurahua, 2006 and Cotopaxi, 1877. These eruptions produced abundant cauliflower-textured, large (up to 1 m in diameter), fragile scoria clasts. Some evidence points to relatively low temperatures during transport. For example, some flows at Cotopaxi are unusually long and sinuous and probably influenced by melt water from the glacier that caps the cone. Additionally, un-charred vegetation and eyewitness reports of un-melted plastic in the path of pyroclastic flows at Tungurahua also support cool emplacement temperatures. On the other hand, some scoria clasts were ductile when deposited as evidenced by draped clasts. We cut 5 to 9 cm transects from rim to core of 36 lithic and juvenile samples, which were then thermally demagnetized and measured. Lithic samples from Tungurahua indicate only one flow was fully remagnetized above ~580°C, while another flow was only partially remagnetized below 210°C. All other lithics from both volcanoes were never heated to above 90°C. Juvenile clasts from Cotopaxi indicate three types of flows: currents that begin hot (above 580°C) but cool quickly (juveniles emplaced hot, but lithics emplaced cold); currents that deposit at ~330°C (two components of magnetization that intersect at 330°C in the juvenile clasts), and cold currents such as lahars. The majority of currents from Tungurahua are of the 2nd type, having emplacement temperatures of ~380°C-280°C, with the deformable juvenile clasts being hotter than the rest of the flow. Despite the intact nature of the fragile bombs, emplacement temperatures indicate that the majority of flow deposits at

  14. High mountain soil sequence at the Páramos of Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Francelino, Marcio; Muselli Barbosa, Alexandre; Adnet Moura, Pedro; Adent Moura, Tom; Correia, Guilherme; Cunha Anjos, Lúcia Helena; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto

    2015-04-01

    Very little is known about high-mountain cryopedogenesis under Páramo vegetation in the Andes. We studied soils along a typical topossequence at the periglacial zone on the northern flank of Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador, emphasizing the cryopedogenesis process and altitudinal soil climatic regime, in soils ranging from 3980 to 4885m, above the tree line and below the snow line. At each site, a complete set of instruments (sensors and datalogger) were installed to monitoring air and soil temperatures and moisture, at five soil depths, in three different elevation points; in addition we selected, described and sampled six representative soil profiles, according to local variations in vegetation cover, topography, presence of snow and elevation; soils were studied concerning the petrographic composition, mineralogical, physical and chemical properties of different soil fractions. The geology of the Cotopaxi volcano is complex due to recent volcanic activity. Petrographically, the most recent ejected material is of Andesite-rhyolitic composition, with large deposits of tephra, and solifluxion lobes forming a mixed debris mantle. The landforms are characteristic of a stratovolcano, with conical and symmetric formations, with a dissected, broad base with gentle slopes, changing to steep slopes and eroded, rugged peaks, displaying periglacial erosional features. Also, we find cumulative sedimentary materials of periglacial origin in the lower parts of the landscape. Soil monitoring temperatures for one year showed that the surface soil is warmer than the air temperature for the three elevations, even under snow cover, indicating a strong thermal insulation of these volcanic soils. No permafrost was detected at the 200 cm section. The volcanic soils are stratified, with alternating layers of ash and lapilli, with pumices, with predominantly coarse textures and low clay content, features that may contribute to the observed insulation. Mineralogical analyzes indicated the

  15. Lead isotope constraints on the origin of andesite and dacite magmas at Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauret, Francois; Ancellin, Marie-Anne; Vlastelic, Ivan; Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Samaniego, Pablo; Le Pennec, Jean Luc; Gannoun, Mouhcine; Hidalgo, Silvana; Schiano, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the occurrence of large explosive eruptions involving silica-rich magmas at mostly andesitic volcanoes is crucial for volcanic hazard assessment Here we focus on the well-known active Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador), specifically its eruptive sequence for the last 3000 years BP, which are characterized by VEI 3 explosive events involving mostly homogeneous andesitic compositions (56-59 wt.% SiO2). However, some large eruptions (VEI ≥ 4) involving andesitic and dacitic magmas (up to 66 wt.% SiO2) also occur at 3000 BP, 1250 BP and 1886 AD. An additional outburst of siliceous magmas occurred during the last eruptive eruption of this volcano in 2006 [1]. Volcanic products at Tungurahua are described as been generated by a binary mixing between a silica-rich and a silica-poor end-member, but the origin of these components was not discussed [2]. Major, trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes were used to investigate the genesis of the andesites and dacites. Andesites are heterogeneous in terms of Pb isotopes (206Pb/204Pb: 18.189-19.154, 207Pb/204Pb:15.658-15.696, 208Pb/204Pb: 38.752-38.918, 207Pb/206Pb: 0.8240-0.8275) but homogeneous in terms of major-trace element. Dacite are characterized by homogenous and low 207Pb/206Pb (0.8235±0.0001), very low Nb/U (1.97 to 4.49) and Ce/Pb (2.52-2.99) and high Th/La ratios (0.24 to 0.49). Triangular distribution of data in major element or trace element ratio vs. Pb isotopes plots suggests that at least three components control geochemical variability at Tungurahua. We interpret andesite compositions as reflecting mainly a deep mixture of two mantle components, with small addition of crustal material. We suggest that dacite results from a mixing between various andesite compositions and a larger amount of a contaminant derived from the volcanic basement of the Tungurahua made of late Cretaceous to Palaeogene oceanic plateau basalts and volcano-sedimentary rocks volcanic. Since andesite and dacite occur during the same

  16. Environmentally-mediated ash aggregate formation: example from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Benjamin; Delmelle, Pierre; Douillet, Guilhem A.; Lavallée, Yan; Mueller, Sebastian B.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Dobson, Kate J.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash is generated during explosive eruptions through an array of different processes; it can be produced in large quantities and can, in some circumstances, have the potential for far-reaching impacts beyond the flanks of the volcano. Aggregation of ash particles can significantly impact the dispersal within the atmosphere, and its subsequent deposition into terrestrial or aquatic environments. However, our understanding of the complex interplay of the boundary conditions which permit aggregation to occur remain incomplete. Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, has been intermittently active since 1999. In August 2006, a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDC) were generated during a series of dry, Vulcanian explosions and travelled down the western and northern flanks of the volcano. In some locations, the related PDC deposits temporarily dammed the Chambo river, and the residual heat within those deposits produced vigorous steam plumes. During several field campaigns (2009-2015), we mapped, sampled, and analysed the related deposits. At the base of the Rea ravine, a large delta fan of PDC deposits had dammed the river over a length of several hundred metres. In several outcrops adjacent to the river and in small erosional gullies we found a peculiar stratigraphic layer (up to ten centimetres thick) at the top of the PDC deposits. As this layer is capped by a thin fall unit of coarse ash that we also find elsewhere at the top of the August 2006 deposits, the primary nature is without doubt. In this unit, we observed abundant ash aggregates up to eight millimetres in diameter within a poorly sorted, ash-depleted lapilli tuff, primarily comprised of rounded pumiceous and scoriaceous clasts of similar size. Leaching experiments have shown that these aggregates contain several hundred ppm of soluble sulphate and chloride salts. Recent laboratory experiments (Mueller et al. 2015) have suggested that in order for accretionary lapilli to be preserved within ash

  17. Delineating priority habitat areas for the conservation of Andean bears in northern Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peralvo, M.F.; Cuesta, F.; Van Manen, F.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to identify priority areas for the conservation of Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) habitat in the northern portion of the eastern Andean cordillera in Ecuador. The study area included pa??ramo and montane forest habitats within the Antisana and Cayambe-Coca ecological reserves, and unprotected areas north of these reserves with elevations ranging from 1,800 to 4,300 m. We collected data on bear occurrence along 53 transects during 2000-01 in the Oyacachi River basin, an area of indigenous communities within the Cayambe-Coca Ecological Reserve. We used those data and a set of 7 environmental variables to predict suitability of Andean bear habitat using Mahalanobis distance, a multivariate measure of dissimilarity. The Mahalanobis distance values were classified into 5 classes of habitat suitability and generalized to a resolution of 1,650-m ?? 1,650-m grid cells. Clusters of grid cells with high suitability values were delineated from the generalized model and denned as important habitat areas (IHAs) for conservation. The IHAs were ranked using a weighted index that included factors of elevation range, influence from disturbed areas, and current conservation status. We identified 12 IHAs, which were mainly associated with pa??ramo and cloud forest habitats; 2 of these areas have high conservation priorities because they are outside existing reserves and close to areas of human pressure. The distribution of the IHAs highlighted the role of human land use as the main source of fragmentation of Andean bear habitat in this region, emphasizing the importance of preserving habitat connectivity to allow the seasonal movements among habitat types that we documented for this species. Furthermore, the existence of areas with high habitat suitability close to areas of intense human use indicates the importance of bear-human conflict management as a critical Andean bear conservation strategy. We suggest that a promising conservation opportunity for this species is

  18. Infrasonic Monitoring of Eruptions at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador using a Wireless Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner-Allen, G.; Johnson, J.; Ruiz, M.; Lees, J. M.; Welsh, M.

    2004-12-01

    Wireless sensor networks, consisting of small, low-power devices integrating a modest amount of CPU, memory, and wireless communication, could play an important role in volcanic monitoring applications. Wireless sensor nodes have lower power requirements, are easier to deploy, can can support a larger number of sensors distributed over a wider area than wired arrays currently used in many campaign studies. Using long-distance wireless links, data could be monitored in real time, avoiding the need for manual data collection from remote stations. We developed and deployed a wireless infrasonic sensor array at Volcán Tungurahua, Ecuador, in July 2004. This network consisted of three wireless sensor nodes that digitized infrasonic signals, transmitting data to a remote base station. The sensors are based on the Mica2 mote platform, which integrates a 7.3 MHz Atmel Atmega128L embedded controller with 4 KB of RAM and 128 KB of ROM. The Mica2 uses a low-power, single-chip radio, the Chipcon CC1000, capable of transmitting data at 22.5 kbps with an outdoor range of approximately 100 m. The node measures 5.7 cm x 3.2 cm x 2.2 cm and is operated on 2 AA batteries, with a lifetime of about 157 hours without duty-cycling the radio or CPU. These nodes run a specialized operating system called TinyOS that is specifically designed for wireless embedded devices. Each sensor node sampled infrasonic signals continuously at 102 Hz, transmitting data over a short-range radio link to a local aggregator node. The aggregator relayed the data over a 9 km wireless link to a laptop station at the volcano observatory, using a pair of spread-spectrum FreeWave modems and 9 dBi Yagi antennas. Nodes were time-synchronized using a separate GPS receiver that transmitted periodic timestamp messages, allowing our data to be later correlated with signals acquired at a nearby wired seismoacoustic sensor array. During the deployment, we collected over 54 hours of continuous data which included at

  19. Transnational opposition and negotiation: Challenges to an oil pipeline in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widener, Patricia

    The literature on transnational networks portrays transnational collaborations as advantageous to domestic stakeholders. Yet, the gains of transnational engagement may be accompanied by hardship for domestic groups. This dissertation examines how domestic stakeholders experienced the benefits and burdens of transnational collaboration in challenging the construction of the oil pipeline, the Oleoducto de Crudos Pesados, in Ecuador. Four community cases along the pipeline's route were selected for analysis. Each case varied by the experienced externalities of the oil industry and distributive struggle with the industry and the state. Lago Agrio, an oil town on the edge of the Amazon, represented a community with 30 years of oil saturation that engaged the state to determine just compensation. The capital Quito represented the nation's environmental organizations that sought a role in directing oil-funded conservation efforts. The third site, the eco-tourism community of Mindo, mobilized to reject the pipeline's route near their private reserves and to promote eco-tourism as an economic alternative to oil extraction. The final site was Esmeraldas, a coastal community experienced in tanker loading and oil refining that achieved a collective dignity in pressing for community-determined compensation. To better understand the impacts of transnational activities, this dissertation synthesizes theories of social movements, environmental justice and development. In its longitudinal and case study design, the examination of one project at four sites of contention offers insight into how transnational mobilization drives or hinders environmental justice and how grassroots groups gain or lose a forum for participation. My findings indicate that transnational campaigns benefited locals by providing expert assessments, facilitating international access and influencing international financing policies. However, the unintended consequences included a focus on international concerns

  20. Variations of the BrO/SO2 ratios from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnach, Simon; Lübcke, Peter; Dinger, Florian; Bobrowski, Nicole; Hidalgo, Silvana; Arellano, Santiago; Battaglia, Jean; Galle, Bo; Hörmann, Christoph; Ruiz, Mario; Vogel, Leif; Wagner, Thomas; Platt, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The amount and composition of volcanic gas emissions can yield information about magmatic processes. Apart from the SO2 emission rate, which is used as a widespread tool in monitoring volcanoes, the molar ratio of BrO/SO2 in a volcanic plume has shown the potential for interpreting volcanic activity. The evaluation of long-term spectral data collected with UV-scanning spectrometers through the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) using the DOAS technique can help to obtain a better understanding of the BrO/SO2 molar ratio and its correlation to magmatic processes. BrO and SO2 emissions as well as the BrO/SO2 ratio have been successfully retrieved from NOVAC data at Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia), where a decrease of the BrO/SO2 ratio was observed prior to a large eruption. We apply this evaluation algorithm to determine the plume composition of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, which is part of NOVAC since 2007. Different from Nevado del Ruiz the retrieved column densities of SO2 and BrO at Tungurahua are typically more than a factor of two lower during the respective period of observation. In addition, changes in the volcanic activity appear on a smaller timescale, as Tungurahua displays a succession of activity and quiescence phases. In order to still obtain robust BrO/SO2 ratios at Tungurahua, it is necessary to improve the data evaluation as well as applying a more sophisticated scheme to calculate the BrO/SO2 ratio. By combining both methods we create a time series of the BrO/SO2 ratio for several eruptive phases between 2007 and 2014. The ratio shows values between 2 and 8 × 10-5. The variation of the BrO/SO2 ratio during these eruptive phases is compared to seismic data and volcanological phenomenological observations as well as satellite and ground based SO2 measurements. During several eruptive phases we observe an increase in the BrO/SO2 ratio on the transition from high explosive activity to low explosive activity. During the

  1. Little walking leaves from southeast Ecuador: biology and taxonomy of Typophyllum species (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae, Pterochrozinae).

    PubMed

    Braun, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Eight katydid species of the leaf-mimicking specialist genus Typophyllum were found in the southeast of Ecuador in an area comprising part of the eastern Andean cordillera and foothills toward the Cordillera del Cóndor in elevations between 850 and 3000 m. They are described along with the peculiar calling songs and other interesting aspects of their biology. Three of these species are new: T. morrisi sp. nov., T. onkiosternum sp. nov. and T. vignoni sp. nov. A fourth species represented by a single male is possibly new as well. In males and females of a species considered as identical with T. egregium Hebard 1924, which was previously known from a unique female specimen, was found a remarkable variation of coloration, in addition to the striking sexual dimorphism typical for the genus, with the females being twice as large as the small males. The latter is related to the curious mating behaviour, which is documented for this species and T. erosifolium Walker 1870. The two other species found in the region are T. bolivari Vignon 1925 and T. mortuifolium Walker 1870. The calling songs of four species were recorded. In T. erosifolium and T. morrisi sp. nov. the sounds are almost pure sine waves at the lower boundary of ultrasound. In T. egregium and T. onkiosternum sp. nov. the spectrum of the carrier frequency is broader, which might be related to lower and denser vegetation at higher elevation. Based on the intraspecific variety found in T. egregium and T. erosifolium, which includes variation in tegmina shape and venation pattern, are established several syonymies among Typophyllum species from western South America. T. erosifolium is found to be identical with T. peruvianum Pictet 1888 syn. nov. Additionally are considered identical T. inflatum Vignon 1925 and T. gibbosusm Vignon 1925 syn. nov., T. trigonum Vignon 1925 and T. quadriincisum Vignon 1925 syn. nov., and finally T. lacinipenne Enderlein 1917 and T. acutum Vignon 1925 syn. nov. and T. undulatum

  2. An integrated study of SO2 degassing from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, B. T.; Yang, J.; Edmonds, M.; Mather, T. A.; Carn, S. A.; Hidalgo, S.; Langmann, B.; Herzog, M.

    2012-12-01

    Tungurahua is a 5023 m-high stratovolcano in Ecuador, with an estimated long-term mean SO2 output of 1458 ± 2026 t/day. Since 2006, gas emissions from Tungurahua have been continuously monitored by UV DOAS spectrometers installed as part of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) programme. The SO2 emissions from the volcano have also been observed and characterised by the satellite-based UV spectrometer OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument). Tungurahua is therefore an ideal location for comparing ground- and satellite-based estimates of volcanic SO2 emissions. Although OMI SO2 retrievals for continuous tropospheric degassing are not yet validated, the dataset represents a large and mostly untapped resource for volcano monitoring, particularly in remote or inaccessible regions. This novel study seeks to improve agreement between the DOAS and OMI datasets for Tungurahua, and gain new understanding of why differences in the two estimates of SO2 degassing arise. Uncertainties affecting comparison between the datasets include: the different natures of the quantities measured (flux vs column concentration); the impact of local atmospheric and meteorological conditions (e.g. clouds masking volcanic plumes; humidity and temperature promoting rapid loss of SO2 via oxidation to sulphate or by various wet/dry deposition processes; wind dispersal of plumes); and differences in the spatial and temporal resolution of measurements. We present a novel numerical modelling-based study of volcanic SO2 emissions from Tungurahua using the atmospheric chemistry/transport model REMOTE, which has already been successfully applied to modelling post-emission SO2 dispersion from volcanoes in Nicaragua and Indonesia. Model input is high time resolution SO2 flux data from the Tungurahua DOAS datasets. The model output is spatial maps of SO2 column concentration for comparison with those produced from OMI data. We calculate total daily atmospheric SO2 burdens for

  3. An integrated study of SO2 degassing from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Brendan; Herzog, Michael; Yang, Jian; Edmonds, Marie; Mather, Tamsin; Carn, Simon; Hidalgo, Silvana; Langmann, Baerbel

    2013-04-01

    Tungurahua is a 5023 m-high stratovolcano in Ecuador, with an estimated long-term mean SO2 output of 1458 ± 2026 t/day. Since 2006, gas emissions from Tungurahua have been continuously monitored by UV DOAS spectrometers installed as part of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) programme. The SO2 emissions from the volcano have also been observed and characterised by the satellite-based UV spectrometer OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument). Tungurahua is therefore an ideal location for comparing ground- and satellite-based estimates of volcanic SO2 emissions. Although OMI SO2 retrievals for continuous tropospheric degassing are not yet validated, the dataset represents a large and mostly untapped resource for volcano monitoring, particularly in remote or inaccessible regions. This novel study seeks to improve agreement between the DOAS and OMI datasets for Tungurahua, and gain new understanding of why differences in the two estimates of SO2 degassing arise. Uncertainties affecting comparison between the datasets include: the different natures of the quantities measured (flux vs column concentration); the impact of local atmospheric and meteorological conditions (e.g. clouds masking volcanic plumes; humidity and temperature promoting rapid loss of SO2 via oxidation to sulphate or by various wet/dry deposition processes; wind dispersal of plumes); and differences in the spatial and temporal resolution of measurements. We present a novel numerical modelling-based study of volcanic SO2 emissions from Tungurahua using the atmospheric chemistry/transport model REMOTE, which has already been successfully applied to modelling post-emission SO2 dispersion from volcanoes in Nicaragua and Indonesia. We also investigate the use of derived fluxes from instantaneous satellite scenes to provide better agreement with ground-based gas emission measurements. Total daily atmospheric SO2 burdens for the REMOTE and OMI datasets are compared, and we use

  4. Locations and magnitudes of historical earthquakes in the Sierra of Ecuador (1587-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauval, Céline; Yepes, Hugo; Bakun, William H.; Egred, José; Alvarado, Alexandra; Singaucho, Juan-Carlos

    2010-06-01

    The whole territory of Ecuador is exposed to seismic hazard. Great earthquakes can occur in the subduction zone (e.g. Esmeraldas, 1906, Mw 8.8), whereas lower magnitude but shallower and potentially more destructive earthquakes can occur in the highlands. This study focuses on the historical crustal earthquakes of the Andean Cordillera. Several large cities are located in the Interandean Valley, among them Quito, the capital (~2.5 millions inhabitants). A total population of ~6 millions inhabitants currently live in the highlands, raising the seismic risk. At present, precise instrumental data for the Ecuadorian territory is not available for periods earlier than 1990 (beginning date of the revised instrumental Ecuadorian seismic catalogue); therefore historical data are of utmost importance for assessing seismic hazard. In this study, the Bakun & Wentworth method is applied in order to determine magnitudes, locations, and associated uncertainties for historical earthquakes of the Sierra over the period 1587-1976. An intensity-magnitude equation is derived from the four most reliable instrumental earthquakes (Mw between 5.3 and 7.1). Intensity data available per historical earthquake vary between 10 (Quito, 1587, Intensity >=VI) and 117 (Riobamba, 1797, Intensity >=III). The bootstrap resampling technique is coupled to the B&W method for deriving geographical confidence contours for the intensity centre depending on the data set of each earthquake, as well as confidence intervals for the magnitude. The extension of the area delineating the intensity centre location at the 67 per cent confidence level (+/-1σ) depends on the amount of intensity data, on their internal coherence, on the number of intensity degrees available, and on their spatial distribution. Special attention is dedicated to the few earthquakes described by intensities reaching IX, X and XI degrees. Twenty-five events are studied, and nineteen new epicentral locations are obtained, yielding

  5. RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS FOR GASTRIC METAPLASIA AND CANCER: A HOSPITAL-BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY IN ECUADOR.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Iván; Mercado, Andrés; Bravo, Gabriela Liliana; Baldeón, Manuel; Fornasini, Marco

    2015-09-01

    Introducción: el cáncer de estómago ocupa la quinta posición entre los cánceres más frecuentes en el mundo, con 952.000 casos diagnosticados en el 2012. El Ecuador ocupa el 15º lugar entre los países con la incidencia más alta de cáncer gástrico en ambos sexos. Objetivo: el objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar los factores de protección y de riesgo para cáncer/metaplasia gástrico. Métodos: se realizó un estudio hospitalario de casos y controles en la ciudad de Quito, Ecuador. Se definieron como casos a los pacientes con diagnóstico histológico confirmado de cáncer gástrico (N = 60) o con metaplasia gástrica incompleta (N = 53). Se definieron como controles a los pacientes sin cáncer gástrico o lesiones premalignas (N = 144). A todos los pacientes se les realizó una entrevista personalizada utilizando un cuestionario estructurado para recoger datos sobre hábitos dietéticos, estilo de vida e historia clínica. Resultados: los factores de riesgo asociados significativamente con el diagnóstico de cáncer gástrico/metaplasia fueron el consumo de alimentos recalentados al menos tres veces a la semana, (AOR: 4,57; CI: 2,2 – 9,5) y añadir sal a más del 50% de las comidas (AOR: 1,32; CI: 1,04 – 1,67). Los factores de protección asociados significativamente para no desarrollar cáncer/metaplasia gástrico fueron el uso de antiinflamatorios no esteroideos (AOR: 0,39; CI 0,19 – 0,83), edad menor a 58 años (AOR: 0,38; CI: 0,18 – 0,79) y haber recibido tratamiento para la infección por H. Pylori (AOR: 0,33; CI: 0,16 – 0,71). Conclusiones: este estudio reporta por primera vez los factores de riesgo y de protección asociados con el cáncer/ metaplasia gástrico en Ecuador.

  6. Tracking volcanic unrest at Cotopaxi, Ecuador: - the use of the BET_EF tool during an unrest simulation exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, Robert; Rouwet, Dmitri; Gottsmann, Joachim; Sandri, Laura; Tonini, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    As part of the EC-FP7 VUELCO project (#282759), a volcanic unrest simulation exercise for Cotopaxi volcano (5872 m.a.s.l.) has been performed on November 13th 2014 in Quito, Ecuador. The ice-capped stratovolcano, with an andesitic to rhyolitic composition, is one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in Ecuador. Historic eruptions at Cotopaxi produced large lithic-rich pyroclastic flows, ash flows, lava flows as well as large lahars. Some lahars reached the Pacific Ocean at >200km distance. Recent unrest periods at Cotopaxi occurred in 1975-1976 and 2001 - 2002 and were characterized by increased fumarolic activity, elevated seismicity and edifice deformation that continues today. Fumarolic activity is a concern due to the heat transfer that may affect the ice cover resulting in non-eruptive debris flows. Here we report on the application of the BET_EF (Bayesian Event Tree for Eruption Forecasting) tool in the simulation exercise. The purpose of its application was to test its value in decision support by providing near-real time probabilities of i) the occurrence of unrest, ii) the origin and nature of unrest and iii) eruptive activity within a time frame of one month. Unlike traditional BET applications where the computational framework is established by expert elicitation long before its application, in Ecuador the tool was run based on an 'ad-hoc' and on the spot set-up of the code. We present the probabilities obtained at each computational node (i.e. unrest - origin of unrest - outcome of the unrest) based on information provided in 5 scientific bulletins provided successively during the simulation exercise. The simulated unrest covered a 4-year period. According to each scientific bulletin provided during the exercise, we have obtained the following results: i) Bulletin 1 - increase seismic activity comparing to background level - Punrest = 0.023; Peruption = 0.003; ii) Bulletin 2 - drastic increase in seismicity, increasing SO2 emission (5 x background

  7. PROVING SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW: A PROGRESS REPORT ON U.S. EPA'S DRINKING WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATIONS IN ECUADOR, MEXICO AND CHINA (EPA/600/F-98/008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication describes the progress of USEPA's Drinking Water Treatment Demonstration projects currently underway in Ecuador, Mexico and China. Material includes descriptions of problems faced and approaches used to improve water quality.

  8. Quantifying entrainment in pyroclastic density currents from the Tungurahua eruption, Ecuador: Integrating field proxies with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.; Mothes, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The entrainment of air into pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) impacts the dynamics and thermal history of these highly mobile currents. However, direct measurement of entrainment in PDCs is hampered due to hazardous conditions and opaqueness of these flows. We combine three-dimensional multiphase Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations with proxies of thermal conditions preserved in deposits to quantify air entrainment in PDCs at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We conclude that small-volume PDCs develop a particle concentration gradient that results in disparate thermal characteristics for the concentrated bed load (>600 to ~800 K) and the overlying dilute suspended load (~300-600 K). The dilute suspended load has effective entrainment coefficients 2-3 times larger than the bed load. This investigation reveals a dichotomy in entrainment and thermal history between two regions in the current and provides a mechanism to interpret the depositional thermal characteristics of small-volume but frequently occurring PDCs.

  9. A new species of nectar-feeding bat, genus Lonchophylla, from western Colombia and western Ecuador (Mammalia: Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodman, N.

    2007-01-01

    The twelve recognized species of nectar-feeding bats of the genus Lonchophylla occur in low- and middle-elevation, humid, Neotropical forests. Morphological and morphometrical analyses of specimens formerly lumped with Lonchophylla mordax O. Thomas (1903) support recognition of Lonchophylla concava Goldman (1914) as a separate species and reveal a third species from the western Pacific lowlands of Colombia and Ecuador that I describe herein as Lonchophylla jornicata. This new species is morphologically similar to Lonchophylla concava but is distinctively larger than that species. Tests for sexual dimorphism within these and other species of Lonchophyllini suggest a tendency for females to have slightly longer, narrower skulls, higher coronoid processes of the mandible, and longer forearms than males.

  10. Making sense of agrobiodiversity, diet, and intensification of smallholder family farming in the Highland Andes of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Oyarzun, Pedro J; Borja, Ross Mary; Sherwood, Stephen; Parra, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Methods are needed for helping researchers and farmers to interactively describe and analyze local practices in search of opportunities for improving health, environment, and economy. The authors worked with smallholder family farmers in five Andean villages in Ecuador to apply participatory four-cell analysis (PFCA) in characterizing agrobiodiversity. Margelef and Shannon indices examined ecological richness and evenness, and a simplified 24-hour dietary recall characterized food consumption. Cross-analysis tested interactions among agrobiodiversity, farm size, and diet. Overall trends appeared to work against sustainable intensification, with notable heterogeneity and positive deviance found in the practices of relatively smaller enterprises, representing a potential resource for sustainable intensification. The suite of methods was determined useful for initiating researcher-farmer explorations of promising innovation pathways.

  11. The real identity of Leptodiranycthemera Werner, 1901 from Ecuador: a junior synonym of Oxyrhopuspetolarius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Serpentes, Dipsadidae).

    PubMed

    Costa, João Carlos Lopes; Kucharzewski, Christoph; Prudente, Ana Lúcia da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Leptodiranycthemera Werner, 1901, was described from a specimen collected in Ecuador. No information on the holotype was published after its description. In the most recent review of Leptodeira, Leptodiranycthemera was considered to be a synonym of Leptodeiraannulataannulata, although the author emphasized that the holotype was lost and did not include the pholidotic data from the original description in his account of Leptodeiraannulataannulata. Since this review, a number of authors have accepted this synonymy. Recently, analyzing specimens of Leptodeira in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, Germany, we discovered the holotype of Leptodiranycthemera. This holotype is re-described here, and its correct identity is determined. Based on the analysis of meristic characters and the color of the holotype, we recognize Leptodiranycthemera as a junior synonym of Oxyrhopuspetolarius.

  12. A new species of small tree frog, genus Dendropsophus (Anura: Hylidae) from the eastern Amazon lowlands of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Andrade, H Mauricio; Ron, Santiago R

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new species of the hylid frog genus Dendropsophus from Amazonian Ecuador. The new species, Dendropsophus shiwiarum sp. nov., appears to be part of the D. microcephalus species group. Dendropsophus shiwiarum differs from its congeners by a combination of: (1) tympanic membrane non-differentiated and annulus evident only ventrally, (2) disc of Finger III and Toe IV with pointed tip, (3) dorsal surfaces of digital discs with a conical tubercle as result of projection of distal phalanx, and (4) small size (SVL < 19 mm). The new species is morphologically most similar to Dendropsophus riveroi. Examination of the type material of the latter suggests that some Ecuadorian populations reported as D. riveroi were misidentified and in fact belong to D. shiwiarum sp. nov. PMID:26269823

  13. Protection induced by a commercial bivalent vaccine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease 2010 field virus from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Duque, Hernando; Naranjo, Jose; Carrillo, Consuelo; Burbano, Alexandra; Vargas, Javier; Pauszek, Lisa; Olesen, Ian; Sanchez-Vazquez, Manuel J; Cosivi, Ottorino; Allende, Rossana M

    2016-07-29

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease serotype O circulated endemically in Ecuador for many years, with an upsurge occurring in 2009. This manuscript describes retrospectively in vitro and in vivo laboratory studies to predict the field effectiveness of a commercial FMD vaccine to protect against the field strain, and explains the key actions and epidemiological strategies followed by the country to control the disease. The results established that the use of a good quality oil vaccine, manufactured with strains that were isolated long ago: O1 Campos Br/58 and A24 Cruzeiro Br/55; combined with the correct epidemiological strategies, are useful to control field strains when used in periodic biannual vaccination campaigns. PMID:27395565

  14. A new species of small tree frog, genus Dendropsophus (Anura: Hylidae) from the eastern Amazon lowlands of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Andrade, H Mauricio; Ron, Santiago R

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new species of the hylid frog genus Dendropsophus from Amazonian Ecuador. The new species, Dendropsophus shiwiarum sp. nov., appears to be part of the D. microcephalus species group. Dendropsophus shiwiarum differs from its congeners by a combination of: (1) tympanic membrane non-differentiated and annulus evident only ventrally, (2) disc of Finger III and Toe IV with pointed tip, (3) dorsal surfaces of digital discs with a conical tubercle as result of projection of distal phalanx, and (4) small size (SVL < 19 mm). The new species is morphologically most similar to Dendropsophus riveroi. Examination of the type material of the latter suggests that some Ecuadorian populations reported as D. riveroi were misidentified and in fact belong to D. shiwiarum sp. nov.

  15. A new species of the Pristimantis orestes group (Amphibia: Strabomantidae) from the high Andes of Ecuador, Reserva Mazar.

    PubMed

    Guayasamin, Juan M; Arteaga, Alejandro F

    2013-02-21

    We describe a new Pristimantis from La Libertad and Rumiloma, Reserva Mazar, Andes of Southeastern Ecuador, at elevations between 2895-3415 m. This species is assigned to the P. orestes group, from whose members it differs by its small body size (adult males ≤ 18.1 mm; adult females ≤ 23.7 mm), usually reticulated ventral pattern, and visible tympanum. The vocalization of the new species consists of a series of calls; each call is composed by a pulsed, non-modulated note in frequency, and with a dominant frequency of 3122-3171 Hz. A molecular phylogeny based on a fragment of the mitochondrial gene 12S shows that the new species is sister to Pristimantis simonbolivari.

  16. A new species of dactyloid anole (Iguanidae, Polychrotinae, Anolis) from the southeastern slopes of the Andes of Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Varela, Fernando P.; Omar, Torres-Carvajal

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new species of Anolis from the southeastern slopes of the Andes of Ecuador, province of Zamora-Chinchipe, Parque Nacional Podocarpus. It belongs to (1) the aequatorialis species-group by being of moderate to large size with narrow toe lamellae, and (2) the eulaemus sub-group by having a typical Anolis digit, in which the distal lamellae of phalanx II distinctly overlap the proximal scales of phalanx I. The new species is most similar morphologically to Anolis fitchi but differs from it mainly by having a dewlap with longitudinal rows of 2−5 granular, minute scales separated by naked skin (longitudinal rows of one or two keeled, large scales separated by naked skin in Anolis fitchi) and a vertically shorter dewlap (longer dewlap in Anolis fitchi). PMID:21594133

  17. The potential for malaria control with the biological larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) in Peru and Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, A; Horstick, O; Riedl, C; Kaiser, A; Becker, N

    1995-09-01

    A study on the efficacy of Bti spraying in mosquito breeding places was undertaken in the Pacific coast of Peru and Ecuador and in the Amazon area of Peru. It was shown that Bti is a powerful larvicide for Anopheles larvae, although it sinks quickly, whereas Anopheles larvae feed at the water surface. The duration of its effect was less than 7 days with the exception of the Amazon area of Peru, where it was approximately 10 days. In two study areas, Bti was sprayed weekly over periods of 10 and 7 weeks, respectively, and the adult mosquito densities were monitored. The Anopheles adult density (bites per person per hour on human baits) was reduced by an average of 70% in one area and by up to 50% in the other. This means that Bti spraying can potentially be an important component of a modified malaria control strategy.

  18. Interruption of Infection Transmission in the Onchocerciasis Focus of Ecuador Leading to the Cessation of Ivermectin Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Lovato, Raquel; Guevara, Angel; Guderian, Ronald; Proaño, Roberto; Unnasch, Thomas; Criollo, Hipatia; Hassan, Hassan K.; Mackenzie, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A clinically significant endemic focus of onchocerciasis existing in Esmeraldas Province, coastal Ecuador has been under an ivermectin mass drug administration program since 1991. The main transmitting vector in this area is the voracious blackfly, Simulium exiguum. This paper describes the assessments made that support the decision to cease mass treatment. Methodology and Principle Findings: Thirty-five rounds of ivermectin treatment occurred between 1991–2009 with 29 of these carrying >85% coverage. Following the guidelines set by WHO for ceasing ivermectin distribution the impact on parasite transmission was measured in the two vector species by an O-150 PCR technique standard for assessing for the presence of Onchocerca volvulus. Up to seven collection sites in three major river systems were tested on four occasions between 1995 and 2008. The infectivity rates of 65.0 (CI 39–101) and 72.7 (CI 42–116) in 1995 dropped to zero at all seven collection sites by 2008. Assessment for the presence of antibodies against O. volvulus was made in 2001, 2006, 2007 and 2008 using standard ELISA assays for detecting anti-Ov16 antibodies. None of total of 1810 children aged 1–15 years (between 82 and 98% of children present in the surveyed villages) tested in the above years were found to be carrying antibodies to this antigen. These findings were the basis for the cessation of mass drug treatment with ivermectin in 2009. Significance: This fulfillment of the criteria for cessation of mass distribution of ivermectin in the only known endemic zone of onchocerciasis in Ecuador moves the country into the surveillance phase of official verification for national elimination of transmission of infection. These findings indicate that ivermectin given twice a year with greater than 85% of the community can move a program to the final stages of verification of transmission interruption. PMID:24853587

  19. [Primary health care in Ecuador: services provided by the Ministry of Health and Rural Social security Services].

    PubMed

    Robertson, R L; Castro, C E; Gómez, L C; Gwynne, G; Tinajero Baca, C L; Zschock, D K

    1991-10-01

    The present study will examine three common premises in the field of international public health: that the primary care services offered by agencies of the Ministries of Health (MH) are less costly than those offered by Social Security institutions, that the former services are inferior to the latter, and that funds are distributed more equitably by the MH centers among their various recipient populations. The 1986 study compared the costs, quality, and equity of the services in 15 primary care centers in Ecuador--eight Ministry of Health centers and seven rural Social Security (RSS) centers--examining budgetary data from 1985 and obtaining information through a questionnaire and interviews with the personnel at those centers. Average costs were calculated by standardized accounting techniques, and it was confirmed that for several important services, especially medical consultations, these costs were much lower in the Ministry centers than in the Social Security centers. However, no differences in the cost of dental care were detected. The evaluation of quality, based on an analysis of the production structure and process, did not yield uniform results. On the one hand, the distribution of personnel and the allocation of funds for drugs and other supplies indicated that the RSS agencies provided better quality services. On the other hand, a questionnaire revealed that the MH health workers' knowledge of various principles of primary care was superior to that of the RSS workers. Upon comparing the per capita budget of the two types of entities, it was confirmed that the Ministry of Health had more equitable per capita coverage than rural Social Security. The implications of these findings for Ecuador and other developing countries are discussed and several recommendations made.

  20. Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Nitrate and Sulfate in Fog and River water in Podocarpus National Forest, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, L. A.; Fabian, P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    The eastern slopes of the Andean rainforests of Ecuador possess some of the highest plant biodiversity found on the planet; however, these ecosystems are in jeopardy because region is experiences one of the highest deforestation rates in South America. This rainforest characterized by high acidity and low nutrient soils and experiences natural process which are both destabilizing and stabilizing to biodiversity rendering this a unique, though sensitive environment. There is increased concern that anthropogenic activities are affecting rainforests and could lead to higher extinction rates, changes in the biodiversity and far reaching effects on the global troposphere. Measurements of nitrate and sulfate in rain and fog water have shown periods of elevated concentrations in the Podocarpus National Park near Loja, Ecuador. These high episodes contribute to annual deposition rates that are comparable to polluted central Europe. Significant anthropogenic sources near this region are lacking and it is believed that the majority of the nitrate and sulfate pollution can be attributed to biomass burning in the Amazon basin. Concentration measurements do not elucidate the source of high nitrate and sulfate pollution; however, by measuring all three stable isotopes of oxygen in nitrate and sulfate from fog and river water provides a new way to examine the impacts of biomass burning on the region. By using stable isotope techniques atmospheric nitrate and sulfate can be resolved from terrestrial sources. This provides an unique way to trace the contributions from the biomass burning and farming sources. Current research at the field station monitors sulfate and nitrate concentrations in rain and fog water by standard methods to investigate water and nutrient pathways along with data from satellite and ground based remote sensing, in-situ observations and numerical models.

  1. Mineral zoning and gold occurrence in the Fortuna skarn mine, Nambija district, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowski, Agnès; Vallance, Jean; Chiaradia, Massimo; Fontboté, Lluìs

    2006-07-01

    The Fortuna oxidized gold skarn deposit is located in the northern part of the Nambija gold district, southern Ecuador. It has been subdivided into four mineralized sites, covering a distance of 1 km, which are named from north to south: Cuerpo 3, Mine 1, Mine 2, and Southern Sector. Massive skarn bodies occur in K-Na metasomatized volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Triassic Piuntza unit. They appear to result from selective replacement of volcaniclastic rocks. Very minor presence of bioclast relicts suggests the presence of subordinate limestone. Endoskarn type alteration with development of Na-rich plagioclase, K-feldspar, epidote, actinolite, anhedral pyroxene, and titanite affects a quartz-diorite porphyritic intrusion which crops out below the skarn bodies in Mine 2 and the Southern Sector. Endoskarn alteration in the intrusion grades into a K-feldspar ± biotite ± magnetite assemblage (K-alteration), suggesting that skarn formation is directly related to the quartz-diorite porphyritic intrusion, the latter being probably emplaced between 141 and 146 Ma. The massive skarn bodies were subdivided into a dominant brown garnet skarn, a distal green pyroxene-epidote skarn, and two quartz-rich varieties, a blue-green garnet skarn and light green pyroxene-garnet skarn, which occur as patches and small bodies within the former skarn types. The proximal massive brown garnet skarn zone is centered on two 060° trending faults in Mine 2, where the highest gold grades (5-10 g/t) were observed. It grades into a distal green pyroxene-epidote skarn zone to the North (Cuerpo 3). Granditic garnet shows iron enrichment from the proximal to the distal zone. Diopsidic pyroxene exhibits iron and manganese enrichment from proximal to distal zones. The retrograde stage is weakly developed and consists mainly of mineral phases filling centimeter-wide veins, vugs, and interstices between garnet and pyroxene grains. The main filling mineral is quartz, followed by K

  2. Vent Processes and Deposits of a Hiatus in a Violent Eruption: Quilotoa Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J. A.; Bustillos, J.; Ort, M. H.; Cashman, K. V.; Mothes, P. A.; di Muro, A.; Rosi, M.

    2010-12-01

    The 800 BP eruption of Quilotoa volcano, Ecuador, produced two plinian eruptions separated by a short (days-weeks) hiatus. Units 1 and 3 (U1 and U3) of the eruption correspond to the first and second Plinian eruptions, respectively, and produced fallout and pyroclastic density currents. Unit 2 (U2) records processes during the hiatus and consists of three subunits: U2a, U2b, and U2c. 147 tephra samples of U1, U2, and U3 were collected from 25 sites from around the volcano. Thickness and grain-size features were described, with particular attention paid to U2, in order to characterize the processes that occurred during the eruptive hiatus. Grain-size and componentry analysis of a subset of these samples reveals a number of trends. The upper part of U1 is massive and normally graded at its top, 32-45 % dominantly vitric ash ≤ 3.0 φ, and likely represents the clearing of the air at the end of the first plinian eruption. U2a, present out to a maximum of 7 km from the vent, has a polymodal distribution with a large fraction of 4.0 φ and finer vitric material. Dune forms occur in this unit, which are interpreted to be the product of surges. The areal distribution of U2a is constrained by topography, whereas U2b is not. U2b is coarser overall with alternating fine- (2-3φ) and coarse- (1-2φ) grained layers. The beds, both coarse and fine, have a near-bimodal grain-size distribution and normal grading. U2b is interpreted as a fall deposit. The U2a/U2b contact is gradational in that 0-2 beds of U2b material occur within the uppermost U2a beds at proximal localities, indicating vent conditions for both briefly coexisted. U2c is a <2-cm-thick vitric ash bed with sparse dense juvenile vitric lapilli. These lapilli also occur in the overlying basal U3 fallout, which has a polymodal grain-size distribution. U2b is characteristically orange in color due to the dust that loosely covers the grains. Hydrothermal activity within the vent is likely the source of this staining

  3. Vent Processes and Deposits of a Hiatus in a Violent Eruption: Quilotoa Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J. A.; Bustillos, J.; Ort, M. H.; Cashman, K. V.; Mothes, P. A.; di Muro, A.; Rosi, M.

    2009-12-01

    The 800 BP eruption of Quilotoa volcano, Ecuador, produced two plinian eruptions separated by a short (days-weeks) hiatus. We examine the tephra produced both during this hiatus and erupted at the onset of the second Plinian eruption. Units 1 and 3 (U1 and U3) of the eruption correspond to the first and second Plinian eruptions, respectively, and produced fallout and pyroclastic density currents. Unit 2 (U2) records processes during the hiatus and consists of two subunits: U2a, a vitric ashfall, and U2b, a crystal and lithic-rich fallout. 130 individual tephra samples of U1, U2, and U3 were collected from 24 sites along three radial transects from the volcano in January 2009. Thickness and grain-size features were described, with particular attention paid to U2. Grain-size and componentry analysis of a subset of these samples reveals a number of trends. The upper part of U1 is massive and normally graded at its top. This part of U1 is dominantly vitric ash smaller than 3.0 φ and likely represents the clearing of the air at the end of the first plinian eruption. U2a has a polymodal distribution with a large fraction of 4.0 φ and finer vitric material. Dune forms occur in this unit, which is interpreted to be the product of surges. U2b is coarser overall with alternating fine- (2-3φ) and coarse- (1-2φ) grained layers. The beds have a unimodal grain-size distribution and normal grading. U2b is interpreted as a fall deposit. The U2a/U2b contact is gradational in that 0-2 beds of U2b material occur within the uppermost U2a beds, indicating vent conditions for both briefly coexisted. U2c is a <2-cm-thick vitric ash with sparse crystal-rich lava lapilli. These lapilli also occur in the overlying basal U3 fallout, which has a polymodal grain-size distribution. Some U2b pumice fragments and crystals are stained orange, which gives U2b its characteristic color. Stained grains are also present but rare in other units and may have been sourced from the conduit walls. The

  4. Petrographic and geochemical characterization of the Triassic and Jurassic magmatic and volcanic rocks of southeastern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villares, Fabián; Eguez, Arturo; Yanez, Ernesto

    2014-05-01

    Formely, the subandean zone in the southeastern Ecuador involved large volcanic and magmatic rocks included in the Misahualli Formation and Zamora batholith, both as expression of the Jurassic cal-alcaline volcanic arc. The aim of the project carried out by the INIGEMM (Instituto Nacional de Investigación Geológico Minero Metalúrgico) was discriminate the volcanic products including a continuous set going from basalts to ryolithes and volcanoclastic rocks. Geochemical characterization was done using representative 16 whole - rock chemical analysis. The oldest rocks of the investigated area called Pachicutza Unit, include greenish to black, massive basalts and basaltic andesites, locally showing pillows structures. The texture is aphanitic to microporphyritic with slight crystal growth of plagioclase and pyroxenes. The Unit include also local pyroclastic breccias and tuffs showing variable skarnification related to the intrusion of the jurassic Zamora Batholith. Two samples of basalts show tholeiitic affinity, corresponding to an N- MORB, probably representing an early stage in opening of a regional Triassic rift reported since Colombia to Peru in the Andes. These geochemical characteristics are similar to the amphibolites of Monte Olivo Unit in the Real Cordillera. The Jurassic large volcanic assembly of the Misahualli Formation was also differenciated. Basal volcanics include green, subporphyritic andesites and volcanic breccias possibly generated at an early stage of the volcanic arc, caused by a change of extensive to compressive regime. Continental volcano sedimentary and sedimentary rock were discriminate as Nueva Esperanza and Suarez Units, respectively. The volcanosedimentary sequence include massive to laminate tuffs and tuffites of intermediate composition. The sediments of the Suarez Unit include dominant conglomerats and sandstones of fluvial domain. The regional volcanic sequence is completed by the Las Peñas Unit that includes aphanitic to

  5. The Summer 2006 Volcanic Crisis of Tungurahua, Ecuador: No Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulkeridis, T.

    2007-05-01

    a month later, the strongest eruption since the reactivation of Tungurahua in 1999, with a VEI of 3, produced some 20 pyroclastic flows, which covered a big part of the western volcanic flank, killing seven persons in a previously stated safe zone and devastating at least five small villages, destroying some 20,000 hectars of cultivated land. This eruption of the 16th to the 17th of August of 2006, which had a very high social and economic impact, covered a huge area of Ecuador of which ash and gas clouds reached a length of at least 800 km and a width of some 200 km mainly towards the western side of the volcano. Since 1999 as result of the volcanic activity, authorities changed frequently the alert levels between yellow, moderate orange and orange, which leaded to one evacuation of some 26,000 persons from the foothill-situated, but due natural barriers protected city of Banios and some other nearby minor villages in the volcano area in October 1999. Due to the failed prediction of a major event, people went back violently three months later despite the orders of the authorities. Later in 2006 due to the presence of the first pyroclastic flows, a few hundred people fled from their homes situated in the western flank of the volcano and after the eruption of the 16th to the 17th of August 2006, some 5,000 people of the same area fled or were evacuated into refuge camps in the surrounding of the volcano. Promised and assured financial assistance by different ministries for the relocation of the public, never reached the affected families. New previously unpublished photographic and video material as well as statistics of the interviewed, affected public will be shown within this presentation.

  6. Three new species of Hagnagora Druce, 1885 (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Larentiinae) from Ecuador and Costa Rica and a concise revision of the genus.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Three new Hagnagora Druce species (Geometridae, Larentiinae) are described: Hagnagora richardi Brehm, sp. n. from Ecuador, Hagnagora hedwigae Brehm, sp. n. from Ecuador, and Hagnagora mirandahenrichae Brehm, sp. n. from Costa Rica. A checklist of taxa assigned to Hagnagora is provided. Hagnagora is provisionally divided into six clades: the anicata clade (6 species), the buckleyi clade (3 species), the croceitincta clade (3 species), the ephestris clade (3 species), the mortipax clade (4 species) and Hagnagora subrosea (1 species). Two taxa are revived from synonymy: Hagnagora catagrammina Druce, stat. rev. and Hagnagora luteoradiata Thierry-Mieg, stat. rev. Two taxa are reinstated from subspecies to species level: Hagnagora acothysta Schaus, stat. rev. and Hagnagora jamaicensis Schaus, stat. rev. Four taxa are provisionally removed from Hagnagora: "Hagnagora" ignipennis, "Hagnagora" mesenata, "Hagnagora" vittata, and "Hagnagora" ceraria. After these changes, the genus Hagnagora now comprises 20 valid species. PMID:26798242

  7. Three new species of Hagnagora Druce, 1885 (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Larentiinae) from Ecuador and Costa Rica and a concise revision of the genus

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three new Hagnagora Druce species (Geometridae, Larentiinae) are described: Hagnagora richardi Brehm, sp. n. from Ecuador, Hagnagora hedwigae Brehm, sp. n. from Ecuador, and Hagnagora mirandahenrichae Brehm, sp. n. from Costa Rica. A checklist of taxa assigned to Hagnagora is provided. Hagnagora is provisionally divided into six clades: the anicata clade (6 species), the buckleyi clade (3 species), the croceitincta clade (3 species), the ephestris clade (3 species), the mortipax clade (4 species) and Hagnagora subrosea (1 species). Two taxa are revived from synonymy: Hagnagora catagrammina Druce, stat. rev. and Hagnagora luteoradiata Thierry-Mieg, stat. rev. Two taxa are reinstated from subspecies to species level: Hagnagora acothysta Schaus, stat. rev. and Hagnagora jamaicensis Schaus, stat. rev. Four taxa are provisionally removed from Hagnagora: “Hagnagora” ignipennis, “Hagnagora” mesenata, “Hagnagora” vittata, and “Hagnagora” ceraria. After these changes, the genus Hagnagora now comprises 20 valid species. PMID:26798242

  8. Hydrogeochemical analysis of volcanic and geothermal fluids in the Andes from Ecuador using hydrochemical plots (Stiff, Piper and Schoeller-Berkaloff diagrams)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Villacrés, D.; Hidalgo, A.; Guevara-García, P.; Vivero, M. T.; Delgado-Rodríguez, V.

    2016-08-01

    The formation of several sources of hot springs in the Andes from Ecuador was the result of intense volcanic activity due to the subduction of the Nazca oceanic plate under the South American continental plate. The aims of this study include the presentation of chemical analysis in graphical form in order to describe the hidrogeochemistry water geothermal origins, their chemical classification and their relationship to the complex geology of Ecuador using different hydro chemical plots such as Stiff's polygonal diagram, Piper's trilinear diagram and Schoeller-Berkaloff's logarithmic vertical columns diagram. Geothermal waters can be divided into two groups. The first group was associated with an extinct volcanic activity produced in the Cenozoic and were qualified based on the type of water Na+-Cl-, while the second group was associated with young Quaternary volcanic activity, and the types of water were Mg2+- HCO3 -, Na+-HCO3 -, Na+-SO4 2-,Mg2+-SO4 2-.

  9. Molecular typing of sand fly species (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae) from areas endemic for Leishmaniasis in Ecuador by PCR-RFLP of 18S ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Yoshimi; Kato, Hirotomo; Gomez, Eduardo A; Uezato, Hiroshi; Calvopiña, Manuel; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2008-09-01

    Surveillance of the distribution of sand fly species is important for prediction of the risk and expansion of Leishmania infection in endemic and surrounding areas. In the present study, a simple and reliable method of typing New World Lutzomyia species circulating in endemic areas in Ecuador was established by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique. PCR-RFLP of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes with the restriction enzyme AfaI and subsequently HinfI successfully identified seven sand fly species in nine endemic areas in Ecuador. Although intraspecific genetic-diversity affecting the RFLP-patterns was detected in a species, the patterns were species specific. The method promises to be a powerful tool for the classification of New World Lutzomyia species.

  10. Two new species of yellow-shouldered bats, genus Sturnira Gray, 1842 (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) from Costa Rica, Panama and western Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Velazco, Paúl M.; Patterson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of yellow-shouldered bats Sturnira Gray, 1842 (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) from Central America and western South America are described using molecular and morphological data. The two new species, which occur in Costa Rica and Panama and in western Ecuador, were previously confused with S. ludovici, and S. lilium and S. luisi, respectively. Sturnira now includes 22 described species, making it the most speciose genus in the Neotropical family Phyllostomidae. PMID:24843262

  11. Blood-meal identification in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from Valle Hermoso, a high prevalence zone for cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Anaguano, David F; Ponce, Patricio; Baldeón, Manuel E; Santander, Stephanie; Cevallos, Varsovia

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand flies of the genus Lutzomyia. In South America, cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic in the majority of countries. There are no previous reports of phlebotomine sand fly host feeding sources in Ecuador. We identified blood meal sources for phlebotomine sand fly species in Valle Hermoso, a hyper endemic area for leishmaniasis in Ecuador. Phlebotomine sand fly collections were carried out during the dry and rainy seasons. PCR and multiplex PCR were performed from DNA extracted from the abdomens of blood-fed females to specifically identify the avian and mammalian blood meal sources. Avian-blood (77%), mammalian-blood (16%) and mixed avian-mammalian blood (7%) were found in the samples. At the species level, blood from chickens (35.5%), humans (2.8%), cows (2.8%) and dogs (1.9%) was specifically detected. Nyssomyia trapidoi was the most common species of Lutzomyia found that fed on birds. The present results may aid the development of effective strategies to control leishmaniasis in Ecuador. PMID:26361709

  12. Blood-meal identification in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from Valle Hermoso, a high prevalence zone for cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Anaguano, David F; Ponce, Patricio; Baldeón, Manuel E; Santander, Stephanie; Cevallos, Varsovia

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand flies of the genus Lutzomyia. In South America, cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic in the majority of countries. There are no previous reports of phlebotomine sand fly host feeding sources in Ecuador. We identified blood meal sources for phlebotomine sand fly species in Valle Hermoso, a hyper endemic area for leishmaniasis in Ecuador. Phlebotomine sand fly collections were carried out during the dry and rainy seasons. PCR and multiplex PCR were performed from DNA extracted from the abdomens of blood-fed females to specifically identify the avian and mammalian blood meal sources. Avian-blood (77%), mammalian-blood (16%) and mixed avian-mammalian blood (7%) were found in the samples. At the species level, blood from chickens (35.5%), humans (2.8%), cows (2.8%) and dogs (1.9%) was specifically detected. Nyssomyia trapidoi was the most common species of Lutzomyia found that fed on birds. The present results may aid the development of effective strategies to control leishmaniasis in Ecuador.

  13. The range of the golden-mantle tamarin, Saguinus tripartitus (Milne-Edwards, 1878): distributions and sympatry of four tamarins in Colombia, Ecuador, and northern Peru [corrected].

    PubMed

    Rylands, Anthony B; Matauschek, Christian; Aquino, Rolando; Encarnación, Filomeno; Heymann, Eckhard W; de la Torre, Stella; Mittermeier, Russell A

    2011-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the range of the golden-mantle tamarin, Saguinus tripartitus (Milne Edwards, 1878), in Amazonian Peru and Ecuador is of particular relevance, not only because it is poorly known but also because it was on the basis of its supposed sympatry with the saddleback tamarin (S. fuscicollis lagonotus) that Thorington (Am J Primatol 15:367-371, 1988) argued that it is a distinct species rather than a saddleback tamarin subspecies, as was believed by Hershkovitz (Living new world monkeys, vol I. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1977). A number of surveys have been carried out since 1988 in the supposed range of S. tripartitus, in both Ecuador and Peru. Here we summarize and discuss these issues and provide a new suggestion for the geographic range of this species; that is, between the ríos Napo and Curaray in Peru and extending east into Ecuador. We also review current evidence for the distributions of Spix's black-mantle tamarin (S. nigricollis nigricollis), Graells' black-mantle tamarin (S. n. graellsi), and the saddleback tamarin (S. fuscicollis lagonotus), which are also poorly known, and examine the evidence regarding sympatry between them. We conclude that despite the existence of a number of specimens with collecting localities that indicate overlap in their geographic ranges, the fact that the four tamarins are [corrected] of similar size and undoubtedly very similar in their feeding habits militates strongly against the occurrence of sympatry among them.

  14. The range of the golden-mantle tamarin, Saguinus tripartitus (Milne Edwards, 1878): distributions and sympatry of four tamarin species in Colombia, Ecuador, and northern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Matauschek, Christian; Aquino, Rolando; Encarnación, Filomeno; Heymann, Eckhard W.; de la Torre, Stella; Mittermeier, Russell A.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the range of the golden-mantle tamarin, Saguinus tripartitus (Milne Edwards, 1878), in Amazonian Peru and Ecuador is of particular relevance, not only because it is poorly known but also because it was on the basis of its supposed sympatry with the saddleback tamarin (S. fuscicollis lagonotus) that Thorington (Am J Primatol 15:367–371, 1988) argued that it is a distinct species rather than a saddleback tamarin subspecies, as was believed by Hershkovitz (Living new world monkeys, vol I. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1977). A number of surveys have been carried out since 1988 in the supposed range of S. tripartitus, in both Ecuador and Peru. Here we summarize and discuss these issues and provide a new suggestion for the geographic range of this species; that is, between the ríos Napo and Curaray in Peru and extending east into Ecuador. We also review current evidence for the distributions of Spix’s black-mantle tamarin (S. nigricollis nigricollis), Graells’ black-mantle tamarin (S. n. graellsi), and the saddleback tamarin (S. fuscicollis lagonotus), which are also poorly known, and examine the evidence regarding sympatry between them. We conclude that despite the existence of a number of specimens with collecting localities that indicate overlap in their geographic ranges, the fact that the four tamarin species are of similar size and undoubtedly very similar in their feeding habits militates strongly against the occurrence of sympatry among them. PMID:20878203

  15. Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador (South America)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga Torres, Tannia

    2014-05-01

    Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador (South America) 1. INTRODUCTION Monitoring landslides is a mandatory task in charge on the National Institute of Geological Research (INIGEMM) in Ecuador. It is a small country, supposedly will be faster doing monitoring, but what about its geographic characteristics? Lamentably, due to human and financial resources is not possible to put monitoring systems in unstable terrain areas. However, getting ALOS data to accessible price and using open source software to produce interferograms, could be a first step to know steep areas covered by vegetation and where mass movements are not visible. Under this statement, this study is part of the final research in a master study developed at CONAE during 2009-2011, with oral defense in August 2013. As a new technique used in Ecuador, the study processed radar data from ERS-1/2 and ALOS sensor PALSAR for getting differential interferograms, using ROI_PAC software. Stacking DInSAR is applied to get an average of displacement that indicates uplift and subsidence in the whole radar scene that covers two provinces in the Andes region. 2. PROBLEM Mass movements are present in the whole territory, independently of their magnitude and dynamic (slow or fast), they are a latent threat in winter season specially. There are registers of monitoring, such as two GPS's campaigns and artisanal extensometers, which are used to contrast with DInSAR results. However, the campaigns are shorter and extensometers are no trust on all. 3. METHODOLOGY Methodology has four phases of development: (1) Pre-processing of RAW data; (2) Processing of RAW data in ROI_PAC; (3) Post-processing for getting interferograms in units of cm per year; (4) Analysis of the results and comparison with ground truth. Sandwell & Price (1998) proposed Stacking technique to increase the fringes and decrease errors due to the atmosphere, to average several interferograms. L band penetrates

  16. Tanque Loma, a new late-Pleistocene megafaunal tar seep locality from southwest Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Emily L.; Lopez R., Eric X.

    2015-01-01

    Fossil deposits in the petroleum-rich sediments of the Santa Elena Peninsula in southwestern Ecuador contain some of the largest and best-preserved assemblages of Pleistocene megafaunal remains known from the neotropics, and thus represent an opportunity to greatly expand our knowledge of Pleistocene paleoecology and the extinction of Quaternary megafauna in this region. This paper reports data from excavations at Tanque Loma, a late-Pleistocene locality on the Santa Elena Peninsula that preserves a dense assemblage of megafaunal remains in hydrocarbon-saturated sediments along with microfaunal and paleobotanical material. The megafauna bones are concentrated in and just above a ˜0.5 m thick asphaltic layer, but occur sparsely and with poorer preservation up to 1 m above this deposit. Several meters of presumed-Holocene sediments overlying the megafauna-bearing strata are rich in bones of microvertebrates including birds, squamates, and rodents. These are interpreted as raptor assemblages. While over 1000 megafaunal bones have been identified from the Pleistocene strata at Tanque Loma, more than 85% of these remains pertain to a single species, the giant ground sloth Eremotherium laurillardi. Only five other megafauna taxa have been identified from this site, including Glossotherium cf. tropicorum, Holmesina occidentalis, cf. Notiomastodon platensis, Equus (Amerhippus) c.f. santaeelenae, and a cervid tentatively assigned to cf. Odocoileus salinae based on body size and geography. No carnivores have yet been identified from Tanque Loma, and microvertebrate remains are extremely rare in the Pleistocene deposits, although terrestrial snail shells and fragmented remains of marine invertebrates are occasionally encountered. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dates on Eremotherium and cf. Notiomaston bones from within and just above the asphaltic layer yielded dates of ˜17,000 - 23,500 radiocarbon years BP. Taken together, the taxonomic composition, taphonomy

  17. Tanque Loma, a new late-Pleistocene megafaunal tar seep locality from southwest Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Emily L.; Lopez R., Eric X.

    2015-01-01

    Fossil deposits in the petroleum-rich sediments of the Santa Elena Peninsula in southwestern Ecuador contain some of the largest and best-preserved assemblages of Pleistocene megafaunal remains known from the neotropics, and thus represent an opportunity to greatly expand our knowledge of Pleistocene paleoecology and the extinction of Quaternary megafauna in this region. This paper reports data from excavations at Tanque Loma, a late-Pleistocene locality on the Santa Elena Peninsula that preserves a dense assemblage of megafaunal remains in hydrocarbon-saturated sediments along with microfaunal and paleobotanical material. The megafauna bones are concentrated in and just above a ˜0.5 m thick asphaltic layer, but occur sparsely and with poorer preservation up to 1 m above this deposit. Several meters of presumed-Holocene sediments overlying the megafauna-bearing strata are rich in bones of microvertebrates including birds, squamates, and rodents. These are interpreted as raptor assemblages. While over 1000 megafaunal bones have been identified from the Pleistocene strata at Tanque Loma, more than 85% of these remains pertain to a single species, the giant ground sloth Eremotherium laurillardi. Only five other megafauna taxa have been identified from this site, including Glossotherium cf. tropicorum, Holmesina occidentalis, cf. Notiomastodon platensis, Equus (Amerhippus) c.f. santaeelenae, and a cervid tentatively assigned to cf. Odocoileus salinae based on body size and geography. No carnivores have yet been identified from Tanque Loma, and microvertebrate remains are extremely rare in the Pleistocene deposits, although terrestrial snail shells and fragmented remains of marine invertebrates are occasionally encountered. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dates on Eremotherium and cf. Notiomaston bones from within and just above the asphaltic layer yielded dates of ˜17,000 - 23,500 radiocarbon years BP. Taken together, the taxonomic composition, taphonomy

  18. Response of soil microbial activity and community structure to land use changes in a mountain rainforest region of Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute; Makeschin, Franz

    2010-05-01

    Over the past several decades the mountain rainforest region of Southern Ecuador, a hotspot of biodiversity, is undergoing a rapid conversion to pastureland through slash and burn practice. Frequently this pastureland is invaded by the tropical bracken fern. When the bracken becomes dominant on the pasture sites the productivity decreases and the sites are abandoned. To assess the effect of these land use changes on nutrient turnover and on ecosystem functioning, a study was conducted in the area of the German research station Estación Científica San Francisco (ECSF) in Southern Ecuador. At 2000 m above sea level three adjacent sites were selected: a mountain rainforest site, an active pasture site dominated by the grass species Setaria sphacelata and an abandoned pasture site overgrown by bracken. Mineral soil samples of all three sites (0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm) as well as samples from the organic layer (Oi and Oa) of the natural forest site were taken to analyze biogeochemical properties. Besides pH-value, total organic C and N contents, the amounts of microbial biomass (CFE-method), microbial activity (basal respiration, net N mineralization (KCl-extraction); gross N mineralization (15N dilution technique) rates) and microbial community structure (PLFA-analysis) were determined. 17 years after pasture establishment, twofold higher stocks of soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) as well as significant lower C:N ratios were determined compared to the natural forest including the 11 cm thick organic layer. 10 years after bracken invasion and pasture abandonment the microbial biomass (Cmic) decreased and the C:N ratio increased again to forest levels. Generally, land use change from forest to pasture and from pasture to abandoned pasture induced shifts in the soil microbial community structure. The relative abundance of the fast growing copiotrophic Gram(-) bacteria was positively correlated with the amounts of readily available organic carbon

  19. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Braykov, Nikolay P; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 "production birds" (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 "household birds" (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P < 0.01 for all antibiotics tested except tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Farming status did not impact AR in domestic environments at the household or village level. Our results suggest that AR associated with small-scale poultry farming is present in the immediate production environment and likely originates from sources outside the study area. These outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices. IMPORTANCE In developing countries, small-scale poultry farming employing antibiotics as growth promoters is being advanced as an inexpensive source of

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Braykov, Nikolay P; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 "production birds" (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 "household birds" (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P < 0.01 for all antibiotics tested except tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Farming status did not impact AR in domestic environments at the household or village level. Our results suggest that AR associated with small-scale poultry farming is present in the immediate production environment and likely originates from sources outside the study area. These outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices. IMPORTANCE In developing countries, small-scale poultry farming employing antibiotics as growth promoters is being advanced as an inexpensive source of

  1. Attributes of quality programs in universities in developing countries: Case studies of two private universities in Ecuador and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uriguen, Monica I.

    This study sought to identify the key attributes of high-quality programs with an eye toward helping developing countries such as Ecuador advance program quality. The dissertation is divided into five chapters: (1) introduction to high-quality programs; (2) literature review of attributes of high-quality programs; (3) grounded theory method (including interviews with 60 individuals) used to identify program attributes that enhance student learning; (4) findings; and (5) conclusions and recommendations. Following are the five clusters and thirteen attributes of high-quality programs that I identified: Cluster One: Highly Qualified Participants: (1) Highly Qualified Faculty, and (2) Highly Qualified Students; Cluster Two: Learning-Centered Cultures: (3) Shared Program Direction Focused on Learning, (4) Real-World Learning Experiences, (5) Reading-Centered Culture, and (6) Supportive and Risk-Taking Environment; Cluster Three: Interactive Teaching and Learning: (7) Integrative learning: Theory with Practice, Self with Subject, and (8) Exclusive Tutoring and Mentoring; Cluster Four: Connected Program Requirements: (9) Planned Breadth and Depth Course Work, and (10) Tangible Products; and Cluster Five: Adequate Resources: (11) Support for Students, (12) Support for Faculty, and (13) Support for Campus Infrastructure. The study was guided by Haworth and Conrad's (1997) "Engagement Theory of High-Quality Programs." Eleven of the attributes of high-quality programs are closely connected to Haworth and Conrad's theory and the other two attributes---real-world learning experiences and a reading-centered culture---make the signature theoretical contributions of the study. Real-world learning experiences encourage the active involvement of stakeholders in designing curricula with real-world learning experiences. The second attribute---a reading-centered culture---has never before been identified in the literature. There are four key differences between Haworth and Conrad

  2. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Braykov, Nikolay P.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A.; Marrs, Carl F.; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 “production birds” (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 “household birds” (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P < 0.01 for all antibiotics tested except tetracycline, sulfisoxazole, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Farming status did not impact AR in domestic environments at the household or village level. Our results suggest that AR associated with small-scale poultry farming is present in the immediate production environment and likely originates from sources outside the study area. These outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices. IMPORTANCE In developing countries, small-scale poultry farming employing antibiotics as growth promoters is being advanced as an

  3. Preliminary nutritional assessment of the Ecuadorian diet based on a 24-h food recall survey in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Llaguno, S N; Neira-Mosquera, J A; Pérez-Rodríguez, F; Moreno Rojas, R

    2013-01-01

    Objetivos: Realizar una evaluación nutricional de la dieta ecuatoriana y determinar el porcentaje de contribución de la ingesta de diferentes nutrientes en función del tipo de comida (desayuno, almuerzo, comida, merienda, y cena) y de la Referencia de Ingesta Dietética (RID). Métodos: Se realizó una encuesta piloto basada en el método del recordatorio de alimentación de 24 h en tres regiones concretas de Ecuador y se procesó la información recogida, se analizó y se comparó con las RID establecidas para la población latinoamericana. Resultados: El estudio encontró diferencias significativas para energía y ciertas vitaminas en hombres y en mujeres, además de determinar que la mayor contribución energética se obtenía en la comida, seguida de la merienda y el desayuno. Las comidas intermedias (almuerzo, merienda y cena) contribuían de una manera significativamente menor en la dieta diaria en comparación con otros tipos de comidas. Además, se observó que las ingestas analizadas no alcanzaban las RID para hidratos de carbono, algunas vitaminas (tiamina, ácido pantoténico, biotina, folato, vitamina D y vitamina E) y minerales (Ca, K, Cu, Mn, I y Fe). La ingesta de NA estaba bastante por encima de las RID y el Límite Superior Tolerable proporcionado por la USDA, lo que indica un problema de salud pública en relación con este electrolito. Conclusiones: Esta encuesta piloto puede considerarse como un punto de partida para obtener una visión más profunda de la dieta ecuatoriana. Esto permitirá determinar los patrones de consumo que afectan al bienestar de la población y establecer efectos positivos y efectos adversos del patrón de consumo en Ecuador.

  4. Monitoring of Three Case Studies of Creeping Landslides in Ecuador using L-band SAR Interferometry (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga Torres, T. M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tannia Mayorga Torres1,21 Universidad Central del Ecuador. Faculty of Geology, Mining, Oil, and Environment 2 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship 2015-16 IntroductionLandslides lead to human and economic losses across the country, mainly in the winter season. On the other hand, satellite radar data has cost-effective benefits due to open-source software and free availability of data. With the purpose of establishing an early warning system of landslide-related surface deformation, three case studies were designed in the Coast, Sierra (Andean), and Oriente (jungle) regions. The objective of this work was to assess the capability of L-band InSAR to get phase information. For the calculation of the interferograms in Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage, the displacement was detected as the error and was corrected. The coherence images (Figure 1) determined that L-band is suitable for InSAR processing. Under this frame, as a first approach, the stacking DInSAR technique [1] was applied in the case studies [2]; however, due to lush vegetation and steep topography, it is necessary to apply advanced InSAR techniques [3]. The purpose of the research is to determine a pattern of data acquisition and successful results to understand the spatial and temporal ground movements associated with landslides. The further work consists of establishing landslide inventories to combine phases of SAR images to generate maps of surface deformation in Tumba-San Francisco and Guarumales to compare the results with ground-based measurements to determine the maps' accuracy. References[1] Sandwell D., Price E. (1998). Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, N. B12, pp. 30,183-30,204. [2] Mayorga T., Platzeck G. (2014). Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador. NH3.5-Blue Poster B298, Vol. 16, EGU2014-16203. Austria. [3] Wasowski J., Bovenga F. (2014). Investigating landslides and unstable slopes with

  5. The evolution of periodic seismicity, waveform similarity, and conduit processes during unrest episodes at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew; Hernandez, Stephen; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Mothes, Patricia; Hidalgo, Silvana; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Tungurahua is a large andesitic stratovolcano located in the Andes of Ecuador. The current eruptive phase at Tungurahua began in 1999, and has been characterised by episodes of vulcanian and strombolian activity, interspersed by periods of relative quiescence. Despite showing only modest eruptive activity in 2015, seismic data revealed a pronounced change in the behaviour of the magma-conduit system compared to the preceding 15 years of activity. The change is most notable in the periodicity of interevent-times of volcanic earthquakes. Previous seismicity at Tungurahua is characterised by interevent-time periodicities typical of a Poisson process, or modestly clustered, with slightly elevated (anti-clustered) periodicities observed only rarely during vulcanian episodes. However, activity in 2015 saw a series of unrest episodes characterised by highly-periodic interevent-times, and including several notable episodes of 'drumbeat' earthquakes. Here we report seismic and associated geophysical signals recorded at Tungurahua in 2015 by the monitoring network of the Instituto Geofisico of Ecuador, their relation to conduit processes, and implications for the origins of unrest and likely future activity. Although the nature of the low-frequency seismic signals change both within and between unrest episodes, the underlying periodicity is more consistent and gradually evolving. Waveform similarity is high within phases, resulting from the repeated activation of persistent sources, but low between different episodes, suggesting the emergence of new sources and locations. The strength of periodicity is correlated with the average waveform similarity for all unrest episodes, with the relatively low waveform similarities observed for the highly periodic drumbeat earthquakes in April due to contamination from coexisting continuous tremor. Eruptive activity consisted of a few minor explosions and ash emission events. Notably, a short-lived episode of Strombolian activity in

  6. The November 2002 Pyroclastic Flows at El Reventador, Ecuador: Computer Simulations Using the TITAN Thin-layer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, B.; Sheridan, M. F.

    2007-05-01

    On November 3, 2002, El Reventador volcano, located on the eastern flank of the Ecuadorian Andes, produced a sudden, violent eruption culminating in a 17km high column containing mostly steam and ash. Explosions in the initial phase created a summit crater while generating four lithic-rich andesitic pyroclastic flows. The longest of these flows traveled ESE out of the breached caldera, obliquely overriding the 200-400m southern caldera wall, reaching the Quijos River 8km distant. This flow crossed the major oil pipelines of Ecuador, displacing a pressurized crude oil pipeline more than 100m. The flows contained mostly lithic fragments with only minor juvenile pumice. The accompanying ash-cloud surge deposited a thin layer on top of the PF deposit, indicating an abundance of gas within the flow. The eruption came with practically no warning and yet had a large socio- economic impact for Ecuador. While the flows themselves resulted in no loss of life, the lack of significant precursor activity underscores the necessity for detailed pre-eruption knowledge of the potential hazards and risk zones around a particular volcano so as to be prepared in the event of such "surprise" eruptions. In conjunction with field mapping, computer models of volcanogenic flows can be used not only to identify risk zones but to understand the evolution of these flows. A new set of computer simulations using the TITAN (www.gmfg.buffalo.edu) thin-layer code allows a more complete exploration of important flow properties associated with this type of eruption. Realizations of this code simulate the path, extent, flow thickness, velocity, and momentum of the flows given the set of initial conditions (volume, starting location, flux hydrograph, internal friction, and basal friction). The TITAN code was used to simulate the four lithic-rich pyroclastic flows generated at the beginning of the 2002 eruption. Using field estimated volumes and starting positions of the PFs, simulations of the two

  7. Hyperendemic Campylobacter jejuni in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) raised for food in a semi-rural community of Quito, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jay P.; Vasco, Karla; Trueba, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Domestic animals and animal products are the source of pathogenic Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli in industrialized countries, yet little is known about the transmission of these bacteria in developing countries. Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) are commonly raised for food in the Andean region of South America, however, limited research has characterized this rodent as a reservoir of zoonotic enteric pathogens. In this study, we examined the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in 203 fecal samples from domestic animals of 59 households in a semi-rural parish of Quito, Ecuador. Of the twelve animal species studied, guinea pigs showed the highest prevalence of C. jejuni (n = 39/40; 97.5%). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to characterize the genetic relationship of C. jejuni from domestic animals and 21 sequence types (STs) were identified. The majority of STs from guinea pigs appeared to form new clonal complexes that were not related to STs of C. jejuni isolated from other animal species and shared only a few alleles with other C. jejuni previously characterized. The study identifies guinea pigs as a major reservoir of C. jejuni and suggests that some C. jejuni strains are adapted to this animal species. PMID:27043446

  8. Systematics of Nothopsini (Serpentes, Dipsadidae), with a new species of Synophis from the Pacific Andean slopes of southwestern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Pyron, R. Alexander; Guayasamin, Juan M.; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Bustamante, Lucas; Arteaga, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Within Dipsadinae, some recent authors have recognized a tribe Nothopsini containing the genera Diaphorolepis, Emmochliophis, Nothopsis, Synophis, and Xenopholis, on the basis of a number of putative morphological synapomorphies. However, molecular results suggest that Nothopsis, Synophis, and Xenopholis do not form a monophyletic group, while the remaining taxa are unsampled in recent molecular phylogenies. Here, DNA-sequence data for some Diaphorolepis and Synophis species are provided for the first time, as well as additional new sequences for Nothopsis and some Synophis species. Including these and other existing data for nothopsine species, previous studies showing that Nothopsini is not a natural group are corroborated. Nothopsini Cope, 1871 is restricted to Nothopsis. Diaphorolepidini Jenner, 1981 is resurrected and re-delimited to include only Diaphorolepis, Emmochliophis, and Synophis. Finally, Xenopholis remains Dipsadinae incertae sedis. Known material of Diaphorolepidini is reviewed to generate revised and expanded descriptions and diagnoses at the tribe, genus, and species level. Numerous cryptic species are likely present in Synophis bicolor and Synophis lasallei. Finally, a new population from the low-elevation cloud forests of SW Ecuador is reported upon, which is genetically and morphologically distinct from all other species, that is here named Synophis zaheri sp. n. PMID:26798284

  9. Estimating rates of decompression from textures of erupted ash particles produced by 1999-2006 eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.N.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Mothes, Patricia A.; Hall, Minard L.; Ruiz, Andrés Gorki; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates may cause abrupt transitions in eruptive style. As direct measurement of magma supply is not possible, robust techniques for indirect measurements must be developed. Here we demonstrate that crystal textures of ash particles from 1999 to 2006 Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptions of Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, provide quantitative information about the dynamics of magma ascent and eruption that is difficult to obtain from other monitoring approaches. We show that the crystallinity of erupted ash particles is controlled by the magma supply rate (MSR); ash erupted during periods of high magma supply is substantially less crystalline than during periods of low magma supply. This correlation is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures (<<50 MPa) and degassing-driven crystallization controlled by the time available prior to eruption. Our data also suggest that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions at low MSR to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains at high MSR can be explained by the rise of bubbles through (Strombolian) or trapping of bubbles beneath (Vulcanian) vent-capping, variably viscous (and crystalline) magma.

  10. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Schoolchildren and in Pregnant Women from an Amazonian Region in Orellana Province, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Caty Carrera; Narváez, Alberto Orlando; Aroca, Jenny Muzzio; Shiguango, Gonzalo; Robles, Luiggi Martini; Herrera, Claudia; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and about 230,000 persons are estimated to be infected in Ecuador. However, limited studies have been performed in the Amazon region, on the eastern side of the country. We evaluated here the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 12 rural villages of the Loreto canton, Orellana Province in schoolchildren aged 5–15 years and in pregnant women. A total of 1,649 blood samples were tested for Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect hemaglutination, and discordant samples were tested by indirect immunofluorescence assay. We detected a seroprevalence of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies of 1.3% in schoolchildren aged 5–15 years, indicating the persistence of a constant and active vectorial transmission in the Loreto County and confirming the need of the implementation of nonconventional vector control. We also observed a seroprevalence of 3.8% in pregnant women, indicating a clear risk of congenital transmission. Further studies should help define this risk more precisely and implement current international guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and care of these cases. PMID:26283751

  11. Rethinking indicators of microbial drinking water quality for health studies in tropical developing countries: case study in northern coastal Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Levy, Karen; Nelson, Kara L; Hubbard, Alan; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2012-03-01

    To address the problem of the health impacts of unsafe drinking water, methods are needed to assess microbiologic contamination in water. However, indicators of water quality have provided mixed results. We evaluate five assays (three for Escherichia coli and one each for enterococci and somatic coliphage) of microbial contamination in villages in rural Ecuador that rely mostly on untreated drinking water. Only membrane filtration for E. coli using mI agar detected a significant association with household diarrheal disease outcome (odds ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.65 in household containers and odds ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.37) in source samples. Our analysis and other published research points to the need for further consideration of study design factors, such as sample size and variability in measurements, when using indicator organisms, especially when relating water quality exposure to health outcomes. Although indicator organisms are used extensively in health studies, we argue that their use requires a full understanding of their purposes and limitations.

  12. Diversity and distribution patterns of Pronophilina butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) along an altitudinal transect in north-western Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Pyrcz, Tomasz W; Wojtusiak, Janusz; Garlacz, Rafaa

    2009-01-01

    Samplings of Pronophilina, a species-rich group of neotropical montane butterflies, were carried out along an elevational transect in Ecuador to assess the effect of altitude on their distribution patterns, diversity and community structure. All diversity indices were significantly correlated with altitude. Maximum diversity expressed in species-richness, Shannon index and Fisher alpha was recorded at 2600 m. Two assemblages of species were identified in the lower (below 2100 m) and upper (above 2300 m) sections of the transect by means of correspondence (CA) and cluster analysis. A comparison of Sørensen similarity coefficients showed lower values, thus higher turnover in the intermediate elevational band. Several closely related morphologically and ecologically species were found to have mutually exclusive altitudinal distribution patterns. A comparison with similar studies in Venezuela, Colombia and Peru revealed far reaching congruency of the patterns of altitudinal diversity of Pronophilina in distant areas of the Andes. In particular, the Shannon index reaches its maximum values at 2600-2850 m, which invariably correspond to ca. 400-500 m below the upper limit of cloud forest. Increase of diversity of Pronophilina with altitude is marginally related to higher limited resource availability. The lower pressure of predators and parasites at higher elevation can contribute with higher abundance, but cannot be directly correlated with higher diversity. Higher diversity is related with intrisic characteristics of the group, such as aggregated diversity by overlapping of elevational faunal assemblages and higher speciation ratio towards high elevations, particularly near timberline.

  13. Enigmatic declines in bird numbers in lowland forest of eastern Ecuador may be a consequence of climate change.

    PubMed

    Blake, John G; Loiselle, Bette A

    2015-01-01

    Bird populations have declined in many parts of the world but most of those declines can be attributed to effects of human activities (e.g., habitat fragmentation); declines in areas unaffected by human activities are not common. We have been sampling bird populations at an undisturbed site in lowland forest of eastern Ecuador annually since 2001 using a combination of mist nets and direct observations on two 100-ha plots. Bird numbers fluctuated on both plots during the first 8 years but did not show a consistent pattern of change. Since about 2008, numbers of birds on both plots have declined; capture rates in 2014 were ∼40% less than at the start of the study and observation rates were ∼50% less. Both understory and canopy species declined in abundance. Overall, insectivores showed the most pronounced declines but declines varied among trophic groups. The period from 2008 onward also was a period of stronger La Niña events which, at this study site, are associated with increased rainfall. The mechanism for the declines is not known but likely reflects a combination of reduced reproductive success coupled with reduced survival associated with changing climate. PMID:26339554

  14. Circulating Strains of Brucella abortus in Cattle in Santo Domingo De Los Tsáchilas Province - Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar Ivan; Contreras-Zamora, Javier; Benitez Ortiz, Washington; Guerrero-Viracocha, Karina; Salcan-Guaman, Holger; Minda, Elizabeth; Ron Garrido, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    The Province of Santo Domingo de los Tsáchilas in Ecuador represents the largest informal cattle market. Because of its strategic position, cattle movement is very high and therefore we selected this region, to determine the strain variation of Brucella sp. Part of the study aimed at the isolation, biotyping, and genotyping of Brucella species from milk and supra-mammary lymph nodes of sero-positive bovines, using selective Farrell medium, biochemical assays, and IS711-PCR, AMOS-PCR, and HOOF-Prints techniques. In total, 656 animals from 12 sero-positive dairy herds and from the provincial slaughterhouse were diagnosed by Rose Bengal and Wright's Slow Agglutination test with EDTA. Amongst these animals, 50 animals were sero-positive for brucellosis. Twenty-five lymph nodes and 25 milk samples from each group of positive reactors were transferred to culture medium. Isolation was possible from 4 (16%) lymph nodes and 9 (36%) milk samples; out of these, 10 isolates were diagnosed as Brucella sp. All four isolates of lymphatic tissue corresponded to Brucella abortus biotype 1, confirmed as field strains by molecular analysis. Milk isolations, showed biochemically a more dispersed pattern in which B. abortus biotypes 1 and 4 were found; yet four samples gave a pattern similar to B. abortus biotype 2; however, only biotypes 1 and 4 were confirmed by molecular analysis. The concordance between biochemical and molecular diagnostic tests reached 76.9%.

  15. Adolescent pregnancies in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador: a rights and gender approach to adolescents' sexual and reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Goicolea, Isabel

    2010-06-24

    In the Andean region of Latin America over one million adolescent girls get pregnant every year. Adolescent pregnancy (AP) has been associated with adverse health and social outcomes, but it has also been favorably viewed as a pathway to adulthood. AP can also be conceptualized as a marker of inequity, since it disproportionately affects girls from the poorest households and those who have not been able to attend school.Using results from a study carried out in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador, this paper explores APs and adolescents' sexual and reproductive health from a rights and gender approach. The paper points out the main features of a rights and gender approach, and how it can be applied to explore APs. Afterward it describes the methodologies (quantitative and qualitative) and main results of the study, framing the findings within the rights and gender approach. Finally, some implications that could be generalizable to global reserach on APs are highlighted.The application of the rights and gender framework to explore APs contributes to a more integral view of the issue. The rights and gender framework stresses the importance of the interaction between rights-holders and duty-bearers on the realization of sexual and reproductive rights, and acknowledges the importance of gender-power relations on sexual and reproductive decisions. A rights and gender approach could lead to more integral and constructive interventions, and it could also be useful when exploring other sexual and reproductive health matters.

  16. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Pyron, R. Alexander; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Romero-Barreto, Paulina; Culebras, Jaime; Bustamante, Lucas; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H.; Guayasamin, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history. PMID:27120100

  17. Enigmatic declines in bird numbers in lowland forest of eastern Ecuador may be a consequence of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Bette A.

    2015-01-01

    Bird populations have declined in many parts of the world but most of those declines can be attributed to effects of human activities (e.g., habitat fragmentation); declines in areas unaffected by human activities are not common. We have been sampling bird populations at an undisturbed site in lowland forest of eastern Ecuador annually since 2001 using a combination of mist nets and direct observations on two 100-ha plots. Bird numbers fluctuated on both plots during the first 8 years but did not show a consistent pattern of change. Since about 2008, numbers of birds on both plots have declined; capture rates in 2014 were ∼40% less than at the start of the study and observation rates were ∼50% less. Both understory and canopy species declined in abundance. Overall, insectivores showed the most pronounced declines but declines varied among trophic groups. The period from 2008 onward also was a period of stronger La Niña events which, at this study site, are associated with increased rainfall. The mechanism for the declines is not known but likely reflects a combination of reduced reproductive success coupled with reduced survival associated with changing climate. PMID:26339554

  18. Decline of General Intelligence in Children Exposed to Manganese from Mining Contamination in Puyango River Basin, Southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Óscar; Tapia, Marlene; Méndez, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    Based on ecosystem approaches to health (Ecohealth), this study sought to identify neurobehavioral disorders in children exposed to several levels of toxic metal pollution from gold mining in the Puyango River Basin, Southern Ecuador. Ninety-three children born or living in the study area participated in the study. A neurobehavioral test battery consisting of 12 tests assessing various functions of the nervous system was applied as well as a questionnaire regarding events of exposure of children's mothers to contaminants during perinatal period. Hair samples were taken from children to determine manganese concentrations. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied in order to examine possible relationships between exposure events, hair manganese, and neurobehavioral disorders. Having controlled co-variables such as age and educational level, it was found that children with elevated levels of hair manganese (over 2 μg/g) had poor performance in the test of general intelligence (Raven's Progressive Color Matrices Scale PCM). The Ecohealth approach helped to identify that children in the lower Puyango Basin with very elevated levels of manganese in the river water (970 µg/L) are the ones who have the highest levels of hair manganese and the worst performance in the intelligence test. PMID:25851196

  19. Shared cultural norms for justice in water institutions: results from Fiji, Ecuador, Paraguay, New Zealand, and the U.S.

    PubMed

    Wutich, Amber; York, Abigail M; Brewis, Alexandra; Stotts, Rhian; Roberts, Christopher M

    2012-12-30

    It is widely agreed that current institutions are insufficient to meet global water challenges, and extensive institutional reforms are needed. To achieve effective local water management, institutional rules should be congruent with local cultural norms. Conversely, a major potential challenge is posed by tensions between institutional rules and local cultural norms for justice. We propose and demonstrate a new approach to cross-cultural analysis designed to investigate this tension, which can assess when local cultural norms are likely to facilitate or impede the acceptance of specific institutional rules. Using data from 238 respondents in five global sites (in Fiji, Ecuador, Paraguay, New Zealand, and the U.S.) analyzed using cultural consensus analysis, we find evidence of culturally-shared norms of justice in water institutions in at least six domains: a human right to water, water governance, water access, environmental stewardship, aspects of water markets, and aspects of water quality and health. Additionally, local cultural models across sites differed on only two topics: (1) ownership and allocation and (2) restrictions and enforcement. Indigenous heritage is the best single predictor of views on controversial institutional rules dealing with water restrictions/enforcement and ownership/allocation. This approach can help build effective water management solutions by identifying cases in which specific institutional reforms are congruent with local cultural norms (or not), and when those will matter most.

  20. Development of a conceptual model of the hydrologic response of tropical Andean micro-catchments in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, P.; Feyen, J.; Buytaert, W.; Célleri, R.; Frede, H.-G.; Ramírez, M.; Breuer, L.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a lumped conceptual model designed for simulating the rainfallrunoff response of mountain micro-catchments with natural vegetation located in the south of Ecuador. The conceptual model is mimicking the soil hydrology and consists of a maximum of three linear reservoirs in series. A two and three reservoir model structure were tested, respectively A GLUE uncertainty analysis was applied to assess the model performance. Simulation results of the discharge confirmed the applicability of the soil-based conceptual model structure for the selected study areas, during model calibration and validation. The three reservoir model best predicted the runoff, nevertheless the two reservoir model well captures the rainfall-runoff process of the micro-catchments with páramo vegetation. Although differences in climate regime, vegetation, and soil of the selected catchments runoff is strongly controlled by the precipitation and soil type, and the horizons contributing to runoff are defined by their antecedent wetness. Results confirm that the discharge is mainly controlled by lateral subsurface flow through the organic horizons, while during dry conditions the C-horizon and the bedrock mainly contribute to discharge. Lateral transport through the densely rooted top horizon and the litter layer occurs during storm events, being under those conditions the major discharge component. Overland flow is a local phenomenon, negligible in comparison to the other flow components.

  1. Adolescent pregnancies in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador: a rights and gender approach to adolescents' sexual and reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Goicolea, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    In the Andean region of Latin America over one million adolescent girls get pregnant every year. Adolescent pregnancy (AP) has been associated with adverse health and social outcomes, but it has also been favorably viewed as a pathway to adulthood. AP can also be conceptualized as a marker of inequity, since it disproportionately affects girls from the poorest households and those who have not been able to attend school. Using results from a study carried out in the Amazon Basin of Ecuador, this paper explores APs and adolescents' sexual and reproductive health from a rights and gender approach. The paper points out the main features of a rights and gender approach, and how it can be applied to explore APs. Afterward it describes the methodologies (quantitative and qualitative) and main results of the study, framing the findings within the rights and gender approach. Finally, some implications that could be generalizable to global reserach on APs are highlighted. The application of the rights and gender framework to explore APs contributes to a more integral view of the issue. The rights and gender framework stresses the importance of the interaction between rights-holders and duty-bearers on the realization of sexual and reproductive rights, and acknowledges the importance of gender–power relations on sexual and reproductive decisions. A rights and gender approach could lead to more integral and constructive interventions, and it could also be useful when exploring other sexual and reproductive health matters. PMID:20596248

  2. Family risk factors associated with adolescent pregnancy: study of a group of adolescent girls and their families in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, S; Naranjo, J; Padilla, M; Gutiérez, R; Lammers, C; Blum, R W

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents the study on the family risk factors associated with adolescent pregnancy among adolescent girls and their families in Quito, Ecuador. The study aimed to identify characteristics within the family associated with adolescent pregnancy. A total of 135 female adolescents (aged 12-19 years) and their families were separately interviewed. 47 were pregnant and attending prenatal care at an inner city hospital in Quito, and 88 were nonpregnant students from schools located within the same geographical area. Results showed that when compared to their pregnant peers, more nonpregnant adolescents lived with their biological parents (p 0.002); they showed higher school performance (p 0.001); and more values and religiosity (p 0.0001). Pregnant adolescents reported lower mother-daughter and father-daughter communication (p 0.02), lesser life satisfaction in general, and more school and economic difficulties (p 0.001). Moreover, they were less likely to find support for their problems in or outside the family (p 0.0001) and showed higher levels of depression (68.8%) and sexual abuse (14.9%). Parental education was higher in the families of nonpregnant adolescents and both parents worked to provide financial support for the family.

  3. Man-biting sand fly species and natural infection with the Leishmania promastigote in leishmaniasis-endemic areas of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eduardo A; Kato, Hirotomo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2014-12-01

    A countrywide surveillance of sand flies was performed to obtain information on their geographical distribution and natural infection by Leishmania protozoa in Ecuador. A total of 18,119 sand flies were collected by human landing collections during 32 years from 1982 to 2014, and 29 species were recognized. The most prevalent 10 species were Lutzomyia gomezi, Lu. robusta, Lu. hartmanni, Lu. shannoni, Lu. trapidoi, Lu. panamensis, Lu. maranonensis, Lu. ayacuchensis, Lu. tortura and Lu. yuilli yuilli, and their topographical and vertical distributions were identified. Among all the sand flies, only 197 (1.09%) flies of four Lutzomyia species, Lu. gomezi, Lu. trapidoi, Lu. tortura and Lu. ayacuchensis, were positive for Leishmania. Endotrypanum, a flagellate parasite not pathogenic to humans, were detected in five Lutzomyia species, Lu. robusta, Lu. hartmanni, Lu. trapidoi, Lu. panamensis and Lu. yuilli yuilli, suggesting wide vector-ranges of Endotrypanum species. These data on the genus Lutzomyia and their natural infections with Leishmania and Endotrypanum will be useful for transmission studies and surveillance of leishmaniasis.

  4. Decline of General Intelligence in Children Exposed to Manganese from Mining Contamination in Puyango River Basin, Southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Óscar; Tapia, Marlene; Méndez, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    Based on ecosystem approaches to health (Ecohealth), this study sought to identify neurobehavioral disorders in children exposed to several levels of toxic metal pollution from gold mining in the Puyango River Basin, Southern Ecuador. Ninety-three children born or living in the study area participated in the study. A neurobehavioral test battery consisting of 12 tests assessing various functions of the nervous system was applied as well as a questionnaire regarding events of exposure of children's mothers to contaminants during perinatal period. Hair samples were taken from children to determine manganese concentrations. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied in order to examine possible relationships between exposure events, hair manganese, and neurobehavioral disorders. Having controlled co-variables such as age and educational level, it was found that children with elevated levels of hair manganese (over 2 μg/g) had poor performance in the test of general intelligence (Raven's Progressive Color Matrices Scale PCM). The Ecohealth approach helped to identify that children in the lower Puyango Basin with very elevated levels of manganese in the river water (970 µg/L) are the ones who have the highest levels of hair manganese and the worst performance in the intelligence test.

  5. DNA typing from skeletal remains following an explosion in a military fort--first experience in Ecuador (South-America).

    PubMed

    González-Andrade, Fabricio; Sánchez, Dora

    2005-10-01

    We present individual body identification efforts, to identify skeletal remains and relatives of missing persons of an explosion took place inside one of the munitions recesses of the Armoured Brigade of the Galapagos Armoured Cavalry, in the city of Riobamba, Ecuador, on Wednesday, November 20, 2002. Nineteen samples of bone remains and two tissue samples (a blood stain on a piece of fabric) from the zero zone were analysed. DNA extraction was made by Isoamilic Phenol-Chloroform-Alcohol, and proteinase K. We increased PCR cycles to identify DNA from bones to 35 cycles in some cases. An ABI 310 sequencer was used. Determination of the fragment size and the allelic designation of the different loci was carried out by comparison with the allelic ladders of the PowerPlex 16 kit and Gene Scan Analysis Software programme. Five possible family groups were established and were compared with the profiles found. Classical Bayesian methods were used to calculate the Likelihood Ratio and it was possible to identify five different genetic profiles in our country. This paper is important because is a novel experience for our forensic services, because this was the first time DNA had been used as an identification method in disasters, and it was validated by Ecuadorian justice like a very effective method.

  6. Measuring the impact of health insurance with a correction for selection bias--a case study of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Waters, H R

    1999-08-01

    This article develops and uses methodologies to evaluate the impact of publicly-financed health insurance programmes on the use of health care. Using univariate and bivariate probit estimation techniques, the study tests and corrects for endogeneity resulting from selection bias. Potential endogeneity arises from the choice to be insured, eligibility for insurance, and differences in individuals' health status. The setting for the study is the country of Ecuador. The General Health Insurance (GHI) programme, which primarily covers workers in the formal sector of the economy, is found to have a strong positive association with the use of curative health care after correcting for selection bias, but no significant effect on the use of preventive care. Individuals with severe illnesses who are eligible for GHI have a preference for private health care, and self-select out of the GHI programme. The Seguro Campesino Social (SSC) programme, directed at farming populations, has positive but insignificant associations with both curative and preventive care. PMID:10470552

  7. Circulating Strains of Brucella abortus in Cattle in Santo Domingo De Los Tsáchilas Province – Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar Ivan; Contreras-Zamora, Javier; Benitez Ortiz, Washington; Guerrero-Viracocha, Karina; Salcan-Guaman, Holger; Minda, Elizabeth; Ron Garrido, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    The Province of Santo Domingo de los Tsáchilas in Ecuador represents the largest informal cattle market. Because of its strategic position, cattle movement is very high and therefore we selected this region, to determine the strain variation of Brucella sp. Part of the study aimed at the isolation, biotyping, and genotyping of Brucella species from milk and supra-mammary lymph nodes of sero-positive bovines, using selective Farrell medium, biochemical assays, and IS711-PCR, AMOS-PCR, and HOOF-Prints techniques. In total, 656 animals from 12 sero-positive dairy herds and from the provincial slaughterhouse were diagnosed by Rose Bengal and Wright’s Slow Agglutination test with EDTA. Amongst these animals, 50 animals were sero-positive for brucellosis. Twenty-five lymph nodes and 25 milk samples from each group of positive reactors were transferred to culture medium. Isolation was possible from 4 (16%) lymph nodes and 9 (36%) milk samples; out of these, 10 isolates were diagnosed as Brucella sp. All four isolates of lymphatic tissue corresponded to Brucella abortus biotype 1, confirmed as field strains by molecular analysis. Milk isolations, showed biochemically a more dispersed pattern in which B. abortus biotypes 1 and 4 were found; yet four samples gave a pattern similar to B. abortus biotype 2; however, only biotypes 1 and 4 were confirmed by molecular analysis. The concordance between biochemical and molecular diagnostic tests reached 76.9%. PMID:25806363

  8. Shared cultural norms for justice in water institutions: results from Fiji, Ecuador, Paraguay, New Zealand, and the U.S.

    PubMed

    Wutich, Amber; York, Abigail M; Brewis, Alexandra; Stotts, Rhian; Roberts, Christopher M

    2012-12-30

    It is widely agreed that current institutions are insufficient to meet global water challenges, and extensive institutional reforms are needed. To achieve effective local water management, institutional rules should be congruent with local cultural norms. Conversely, a major potential challenge is posed by tensions between institutional rules and local cultural norms for justice. We propose and demonstrate a new approach to cross-cultural analysis designed to investigate this tension, which can assess when local cultural norms are likely to facilitate or impede the acceptance of specific institutional rules. Using data from 238 respondents in five global sites (in Fiji, Ecuador, Paraguay, New Zealand, and the U.S.) analyzed using cultural consensus analysis, we find evidence of culturally-shared norms of justice in water institutions in at least six domains: a human right to water, water governance, water access, environmental stewardship, aspects of water markets, and aspects of water quality and health. Additionally, local cultural models across sites differed on only two topics: (1) ownership and allocation and (2) restrictions and enforcement. Indigenous heritage is the best single predictor of views on controversial institutional rules dealing with water restrictions/enforcement and ownership/allocation. This approach can help build effective water management solutions by identifying cases in which specific institutional reforms are congruent with local cultural norms (or not), and when those will matter most. PMID:23083693

  9. Neurotoxic envenoming by South American coral snake (Micrurus lemniscatus helleri): case report from eastern Ecuador and review.

    PubMed

    Manock, Stephen R; Suarez, German; Graham, David; Avila-Aguero, María L; Warrell, David A

    2008-11-01

    A man bitten by a large coral snake (Micrurus lemniscatus helleri) in the Amazon basin of Ecuador developed persistent excruciating pain in the bitten arm. On admission to hospital less than 30 min later, he had a polymorphonuclear leucocytosis, thrombocytopenia and mildly prolonged prothrombin time/partial thromboplastin time. Not until 14 h after the bite did he develop the first signs of neurotoxicity. Despite treatment with specific antivenom 50 h after the bite, he required oxygen for respiratory failure 60 h, and 6 h of mechanical ventilation 72 h, after the bite. Over the next 38 h, he required two further intubations and periods of assisted ventilation before being airlifted to a tertiary referral hospital. Complications included bacterial pneumonia, pneumothorax, bronchial obstruction by mucus plugs and mild rhabdomyolysis. He was discharged from hospital 15 days after the bite with persistent limb weakness and urinary incontinence but eventually recovered. The interesting and unusual features of this case (severe local pain, very slow evolution of neurotoxic envenoming, persistent thrombocytopenia and mild coagulopathy) are discussed in the context of what is known of the composition of Micrurus venoms and the small clinical literature on envenoming from their bites.

  10. Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov., an ascomycetous yeast species found in mainland Ecuador and on the Galápagos.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Portero Barahona, Patricia; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Cross, Kathryn; Bond, Christopher J; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-04-01

    Seven strains representing a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Kazachstania were found at several collection sites on both mainland Ecuador (Yasuní National Park) and the Galápagos (Santa Cruz Island). Two strains (CLQCA 20-132(T) and CLQCA 24SC-045) were isolated from rotten wood samples, two further strains (CLQCA 20-280 and CLQCA 20-348) were isolated from soil samples, and three strains (CLQCA 20-198, CLQCA 20-374 and CLQCA 20-431) were isolated from decaying fruits. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region indicated that the novel species is most closely related to Kazachstania servazzii and Kazachstania unispora. Although the strains could not be distinguished from one another based upon their differing geographical origins, they could be differentiated according to their isolation source (fruit, soil or wood) by ITS sequencing. The species name Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with CLQCA 20-132(T) ( = CBS 13946(T) = NCYC 4008(T)) designated the type strain. PMID:25644482

  11. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Alejandro; Pyron, R Alexander; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Romero-Barreto, Paulina; Culebras, Jaime; Bustamante, Lucas; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H; Guayasamin, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history. PMID:27120100

  12. Systematics of Nothopsini (Serpentes, Dipsadidae), with a new species of Synophis from the Pacific Andean slopes of southwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Pyron, R Alexander; Guayasamin, Juan M; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Bustamante, Lucas; Arteaga, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Within Dipsadinae, some recent authors have recognized a tribe Nothopsini containing the genera Diaphorolepis, Emmochliophis, Nothopsis, Synophis, and Xenopholis, on the basis of a number of putative morphological synapomorphies. However, molecular results suggest that Nothopsis, Synophis, and Xenopholis do not form a monophyletic group, while the remaining taxa are unsampled in recent molecular phylogenies. Here, DNA-sequence data for some Diaphorolepis and Synophis species are provided for the first time, as well as additional new sequences for Nothopsis and some Synophis species. Including these and other existing data for nothopsine species, previous studies showing that Nothopsini is not a natural group are corroborated. Nothopsini Cope, 1871 is restricted to Nothopsis. Diaphorolepidini Jenner, 1981 is resurrected and re-delimited to include only Diaphorolepis, Emmochliophis, and Synophis. Finally, Xenopholis remains Dipsadinae incertae sedis. Known material of Diaphorolepidini is reviewed to generate revised and expanded descriptions and diagnoses at the tribe, genus, and species level. Numerous cryptic species are likely present in Synophis bicolor and Synophis lasallei. Finally, a new population from the low-elevation cloud forests of SW Ecuador is reported upon, which is genetically and morphologically distinct from all other species, that is here named Synophis zaheri sp. n. PMID:26798284

  13. Man-biting sand fly species and natural infection with the Leishmania promastigote in leishmaniasis-endemic areas of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eduardo A; Kato, Hirotomo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2014-12-01

    A countrywide surveillance of sand flies was performed to obtain information on their geographical distribution and natural infection by Leishmania protozoa in Ecuador. A total of 18,119 sand flies were collected by human landing collections during 32 years from 1982 to 2014, and 29 species were recognized. The most prevalent 10 species were Lutzomyia gomezi, Lu. robusta, Lu. hartmanni, Lu. shannoni, Lu. trapidoi, Lu. panamensis, Lu. maranonensis, Lu. ayacuchensis, Lu. tortura and Lu. yuilli yuilli, and their topographical and vertical distributions were identified. Among all the sand flies, only 197 (1.09%) flies of four Lutzomyia species, Lu. gomezi, Lu. trapidoi, Lu. tortura and Lu. ayacuchensis, were positive for Leishmania. Endotrypanum, a flagellate parasite not pathogenic to humans, were detected in five Lutzomyia species, Lu. robusta, Lu. hartmanni, Lu. trapidoi, Lu. panamensis and Lu. yuilli yuilli, suggesting wide vector-ranges of Endotrypanum species. These data on the genus Lutzomyia and their natural infections with Leishmania and Endotrypanum will be useful for transmission studies and surveillance of leishmaniasis. PMID:25063388

  14. Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov., an ascomycetous yeast species found in mainland Ecuador and on the Galápagos.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; Carvajal Barriga, Enrique Javier; Portero Barahona, Patricia; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Cross, Kathryn; Bond, Christopher J; Roberts, Ian N

    2015-04-01

    Seven strains representing a novel yeast species belonging to the genus Kazachstania were found at several collection sites on both mainland Ecuador (Yasuní National Park) and the Galápagos (Santa Cruz Island). Two strains (CLQCA 20-132(T) and CLQCA 24SC-045) were isolated from rotten wood samples, two further strains (CLQCA 20-280 and CLQCA 20-348) were isolated from soil samples, and three strains (CLQCA 20-198, CLQCA 20-374 and CLQCA 20-431) were isolated from decaying fruits. Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region indicated that the novel species is most closely related to Kazachstania servazzii and Kazachstania unispora. Although the strains could not be distinguished from one another based upon their differing geographical origins, they could be differentiated according to their isolation source (fruit, soil or wood) by ITS sequencing. The species name Kazachstania yasuniensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with CLQCA 20-132(T) ( = CBS 13946(T) = NCYC 4008(T)) designated the type strain.

  15. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Alejandro; Pyron, R Alexander; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Romero-Barreto, Paulina; Culebras, Jaime; Bustamante, Lucas; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H; Guayasamin, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history.

  16. Systematics of Nothopsini (Serpentes, Dipsadidae), with a new species of Synophis from the Pacific Andean slopes of southwestern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Pyron, R Alexander; Guayasamin, Juan M; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Bustamante, Lucas; Arteaga, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Within Dipsadinae, some recent authors have recognized a tribe Nothopsini containing the genera Diaphorolepis, Emmochliophis, Nothopsis, Synophis, and Xenopholis, on the basis of a number of putative morphological synapomorphies. However, molecular results suggest that Nothopsis, Synophis, and Xenopholis do not form a monophyletic group, while the remaining taxa are unsampled in recent molecular phylogenies. Here, DNA-sequence data for some Diaphorolepis and Synophis species are provided for the first time, as well as additional new sequences for Nothopsis and some Synophis species. Including these and other existing data for nothopsine species, previous studies showing that Nothopsini is not a natural group are corroborated. Nothopsini Cope, 1871 is restricted to Nothopsis. Diaphorolepidini Jenner, 1981 is resurrected and re-delimited to include only Diaphorolepis, Emmochliophis, and Synophis. Finally, Xenopholis remains Dipsadinae incertae sedis. Known material of Diaphorolepidini is reviewed to generate revised and expanded descriptions and diagnoses at the tribe, genus, and species level. Numerous cryptic species are likely present in Synophis bicolor and Synophis lasallei. Finally, a new population from the low-elevation cloud forests of SW Ecuador is reported upon, which is genetically and morphologically distinct from all other species, that is here named Synophis zaheri sp. n.

  17. Insecticide-impregnated bed nets for malaria control: varying experiences from Ecuador, Colombia, and Peru concerning acceptability and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, A; Mancheno, M; Alarcon, J; Pesse, K

    1995-10-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, an intervention program with permethrin- and lambdacyhalothrin-impregnated bed nets was carried out over a period of nine months in each of five endemic, malarious areas of Ecuador, Peru, and Colombia. This program was evaluated through household surveys, blood sampling, in-depth longitudinal studies, and entomologic analysis. Eighty-four communities (including approximately 35,000 individuals) were paired according to malaria incidence, size, and coverage with bed nets and then randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. The results showed that peoples' acceptance of the measure was related to their perception of an immediate protective effect against insects. The effectiveness of the bed nets, measured as a reduction of malaria incidence in intervention communities as against control communities, showed large variations between and within the study areas. The protective efficacy varied between 0% and 70% when looking only at the postintervention differences between intervention and control groups. The average protection was 40.8% when considering a four-month incidence of clinical malaria attacks and 28.3% when considering a two-week malaria incidence. Important factors for the success of the bed net program were insect susceptibility to pyrethroids, high coverage with impregnated bed nets, high malaria incidence, good community participation, high mosquito densities when people go to bed, and a high proportion of Plasmodium falciparum. In one area, where DDT spraying in the control communities was executed, the effectiveness of bed net impregnation was slightly better than that of spraying.

  18. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Schoolchildren and in Pregnant Women from an Amazonian Region in Orellana Province, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Carrera Vargas, Caty; Narváez, Alberto Orlando; Muzzio Aroca, Jenny; Shiguango, Gonzalo; Robles, Luiggi Martini; Herrera, Claudia; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and about 230,000 persons are estimated to be infected in Ecuador. However, limited studies have been performed in the Amazon region, on the eastern side of the country. We evaluated here the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in 12 rural villages of the Loreto canton, Orellana Province in schoolchildren aged 5-15 years and in pregnant women. A total of 1,649 blood samples were tested for Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect hemaglutination, and discordant samples were tested by indirect immunofluorescence assay. We detected a seroprevalence of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies of 1.3% in schoolchildren aged 5-15 years, indicating the persistence of a constant and active vectorial transmission in the Loreto County and confirming the need of the implementation of nonconventional vector control. We also observed a seroprevalence of 3.8% in pregnant women, indicating a clear risk of congenital transmission. Further studies should help define this risk more precisely and implement current international guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and care of these cases.

  19. The second confirmed record of the scorpion genus Chactas Gervais, 1844 (Scorpiones, Chactidae) from Ecuador with description of a new species from the Amazonian Province of Sucumbíos

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Wilson R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Chactas moreti sp. n., is described from Ecuadorian Amazonia. It can be distinguished from Chactas mahnerti Lourenço, 1995, the other known species of this genus from Ecuador by its smaller body size, distinct morphometric values, overall darker blackish-brown coloration, totally smooth vesicle, and a concave anterior margin of carapace. This is the second confirmed record of the genus Chactas Gervais from Ecuador. The geographical pattern of distribution of the genus is also discussed. PMID:24493956

  20. Characterization of a New World Monopartite Begomovirus Causing Leaf Curl Disease of Tomato in Ecuador and Peru Reveals a New Direction in Geminivirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Melgarejo, Tomas A.; Kon, Tatsuya; Rojas, Maria R.; Paz-Carrasco, Lenin; Zerbini, F. Murilo

    2013-01-01

    All characterized whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses (begomoviruses) with origins in the New World (NW) have bipartite genomes composed of a DNA-A and DNA-B component. Recently, an NW begomovirus lacking a DNA-B component was associated with tomato leaf curl disease (ToLCD) in Peru, and it was named Tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV). Here, we show that isolates of ToLDeV associated with ToLCD in Ecuador and Peru have a single, genetically diverse genomic DNA that is most closely related to DNA-A components of NW bipartite begomoviruses. Agroinoculation of multimeric clones of the genomic DNA of three ToLDeV genotypes (two variants and a strain) resulted in the development of tomato leaf curl symptoms indistinguishable from those of ToLCD in Ecuador and Peru. Biological properties of these ToLDeV genotypes were similar to those of Old World (OW) monopartite tomato-infecting begomoviruses, including lack of sap transmissibility, phloem limitation, a resistance phenotype in tomato germplasm with the Ty-1 gene, and functional properties of the V1 (capsid protein) and C4 genes. Differences in symptom phenotypes induced by the ToLDeV genotypes in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana plants were associated with a highly divergent left intergenic region and C4 gene. Together, these results establish that ToLDeV is an emergent NW monopartite begomovirus that is causing ToLCD in Ecuador and Peru. This is the first report of an indigenous NW monopartite begomovirus, and evidence is presented that it emerged from the DNA-A component of a NW bipartite progenitor via convergent evolution and recombination. PMID:23468482

  1. A New Model for the Seismogenic Behavior of Subducted Seamounts Based on Multi-Channel Seismic Reflection and GPS Data Collected in Central Ecuador.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collot, J. Y.; Sanclemente, E.; Ribodetti, A.; Chlieh, M.; Jarrin, P.; Nocquet, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between subducted seamounts and earthquakes has remained controversial. Although seamounts are expected to subduct aseismically, they have also been considered to generate large earthquakes. Based on a remarkable case study in Central Ecuador, we show that a subducted seamount can lock the shallow megathrust along its trailing flank preparing for a possible shallow (<20 km), large magnitude (Mw ~7.0) tsunamogenic earthquake, while its leading flank keeps partially creeping along with frequent earthquake swarms and slow slip events (SSE). The erosive Ecuador convergent margin, which basement consists of high velocity (Vp=5 km/s) mafic rocks, is underthrust eastward at 4.7 cm/yr by the rugged Carnegie Ridge. As modeled by global positioning system (GPS) measurements acquired as close as 35 km from the trench axis at La Plata Island, the Central Ecuador margin figures a creeping subduction segment with the exception of a 50 km-diameter locked patch centered over the uplifted La Plata Island region. The 3D geometry of the plate-interface megathrust obtained from 2D-PreStack-Depth-Migration of a grid of multi-channel seismic reflection data collected near La Plata Island reveals a collection of closely spaced peaks that belong to a broad (55 X ~50 km) low-drag shape subducted seamount. The clear spatial correlation between the seamount and the highly coupled zone denotes the seamount as the main cause for both the locked patch and the island uplift. The absence of a seismically imaged subduction channel, the highly jagged seamount-trailing flank and the stiffness of the oceanic margin are found to be the principal long-term characteristics associated with shallow locking of the megathrust. Moreover, the combination of our structural interpretation and inter-seismic coupling map with 14-years of relocated seismicity, and the 2010 SSE and its associated microseismicity allow to propose a new model for the seismogenic behavior of subducting seamounts.

  2. Ecological and geographical analysis of the distribution of the mountain tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) in Ecuador: importance of protected areas in future scenarios of global warming.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Andrade, H Mauricio; Prieto-Torres, David A; Gómez-Lora, Ignacio; Lizcano, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    In Ecuador, Tapirus pinchaque is considered to be critically endangered. Although the species has been registered in several localities, its geographic distribution remains unclear, and the effects of climate change and current land uses on this species are largely unknown. We modeled the ecological niche of T. pinchaque using MaxEnt, in order to assess its potential adaptation to present and future climate change scenarios. We evaluated the effects of habitat loss due by current land use, the ecosystem availability and importance of Ecuadorian System of Protected Areas into the models. The model of environmental suitability estimated an extent of occurrence for species of 21,729 km2 in all of Ecuador, mainly occurring along the corridor of the eastern Ecuadorian Andes. A total of 10 Andean ecosystems encompassed ~98% of the area defined by the model, with herbaceous paramo, northeastern Andean montane evergreen forest and northeastern Andes upper montane evergreen forest being the most representative. When considering the effect of habitat loss, a significant reduction in model area (~17%) occurred, and the effect of climate change represented a net reduction up to 37.86%. However, the synergistic effect of both climate change and habitat loss, given current land use practices, could represent a greater risk in the short-term, leading to a net reduction of 19.90 to 44.65% in T. pinchaque's potential distribution. Even under such a scenarios, several Protected Areas harbor a portion (~36 to 48%) of the potential distribution defined by the models. However, the central and southern populations are highly threatened by habitat loss and climate change. Based on these results and due to the restricted home range of T. pinchaque, its preference for upland forests and paramos, and its small estimated population size in the Andes, we suggest to maintaining its current status as Critically Endangered in Ecuador.

  3. Ecological and geographical analysis of the distribution of the mountain tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) in Ecuador: importance of protected areas in future scenarios of global warming.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Andrade, H Mauricio; Prieto-Torres, David A; Gómez-Lora, Ignacio; Lizcano, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    In Ecuador, Tapirus pinchaque is considered to be critically endangered. Although the species has been registered in several localities, its geographic distribution remains unclear, and the effects of climate change and current land uses on this species are largely unknown. We modeled the ecological niche of T. pinchaque using MaxEnt, in order to assess its potential adaptation to present and future climate change scenarios. We evaluated the effects of habitat loss due by current land use, the ecosystem availability and importance of Ecuadorian System of Protected Areas into the models. The model of environmental suitability estimated an extent of occurrence for species of 21,729 km2 in all of Ecuador, mainly occurring along the corridor of the eastern Ecuadorian Andes. A total of 10 Andean ecosystems encompassed ~98% of the area defined by the model, with herbaceous paramo, northeastern Andean montane evergreen forest and northeastern Andes upper montane evergreen forest being the most representative. When considering the effect of habitat loss, a significant reduction in model area (~17%) occurred, and the effect of climate change represented a net reduction up to 37.86%. However, the synergistic effect of both climate change and habitat loss, given current land use practices, could represent a greater risk in the short-term, leading to a net reduction of 19.90 to 44.65% in T. pinchaque's potential distribution. Even under such a scenarios, several Protected Areas harbor a portion (~36 to 48%) of the potential distribution defined by the models. However, the central and southern populations are highly threatened by habitat loss and climate change. Based on these results and due to the restricted home range of T. pinchaque, its preference for upland forests and paramos, and its small estimated population size in the Andes, we suggest to maintaining its current status as Critically Endangered in Ecuador. PMID:25798851

  4. Ecological and Geographical Analysis of the Distribution of the Mountain Tapir (Tapirus pinchaque) in Ecuador: Importance of Protected Areas in Future Scenarios of Global Warming

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Andrade, H. Mauricio; Prieto-Torres, David A.; Gómez-Lora, Ignacio; Lizcano, Diego J.

    2015-01-01

    In Ecuador, Tapirus pinchaque is considered to be critically endangered. Although the species has been registered in several localities, its geographic distribution remains unclear, and the effects of climate change and current land uses on this species are largely unknown. We modeled the ecological niche of T. pinchaque using MaxEnt, in order to assess its potential adaptation to present and future climate change scenarios. We evaluated the effects of habitat loss due by current land use, the ecosystem availability and importance of Ecuadorian System of Protected Areas into the models. The model of environmental suitability estimated an extent of occurrence for species of 21,729 km2 in all of Ecuador, mainly occurring along the corridor of the eastern Ecuadorian Andes. A total of 10 Andean ecosystems encompassed ~98% of the area defined by the model, with herbaceous paramo, northeastern Andean montane evergreen forest and northeastern Andes upper montane evergreen forest being the most representative. When considering the effect of habitat loss, a significant reduction in model area (~17%) occurred, and the effect of climate change represented a net reduction up to 37.86%. However, the synergistic effect of both climate change and habitat loss, given current land use practices, could represent a greater risk in the short-term, leading to a net reduction of 19.90 to 44.65% in T. pinchaque’s potential distribution. Even under such a scenarios, several Protected Areas harbor a portion (~36 to 48%) of the potential distribution defined by the models. However, the central and southern populations are highly threatened by habitat loss and climate change. Based on these results and due to the restricted home range of T. pinchaque, its preference for upland forests and paramos, and its small estimated population size in the Andes, we suggest to maintaining its current status as Critically Endangered in Ecuador. PMID:25798851

  5. Under Cover of Darkness, Caterpillars Take Flight: The Immature Stages and Feeding Ecology of the Glasswinged Butterfly, Oleria baizana in Eastern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Walla, Thomas R.; Greeney, Harold F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the morphology and behavior of the immature stages of Oleria baizana (Haensch) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) from northeastern Ecuador. Brugmansia aurea Lagerh. (Solanales: Solanaceae) is the larval food plant. Eggs are laid singly, off of the host plant in the leaf litter. During the night, larvae climb a food plant seedling and sever a leaf petiole, parachuting with the leaf to the ground where they remain while feeding. Oleria baizana has five larval stadia, and individuals take 77 days to mature from oviposition to adult stage. PMID:23438050

  6. Environmental and economic development consequences of forest and agricultural sector policies in Latin America (a synthesis of case studies of Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Bolivia)

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.; Gibson, D.

    1994-04-15

    This paper draws heavily on the results of case studies in Bolivia, Costa Rica, and Ecuador to explain how sectoral policies have tilted land use decisions against forestry and in favor of agriculture, and to present estimates of the economic development effects of those decisions. The paper summarizes information on forests and forest industries of the three countries, and it describes the framework within which policies are designed. It presents the effects of sectoral policies on land use and forest management, and then quantifies and discusses economic costs of relevant sectoral policies. Conclusions and recommendations for policy reform are offered.

  7. Habronyx Förster (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Anomaloninae) in Peru and Ecuador: three new species, a range extension, and a new host record.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Mabel; Grados, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The ichneumonid genus Habronyx is recorded for the first time from Peru and Ecuador, and three new species are described and figured-Habronyx (Camposcopus) flavus Alvarado, new species, H. (Habronyx) nigrofasciata Alvarado, new species, and H. (H.) saqsaywaman Alvarado, new species. Hadronyx (H.) punensis is recorded for the first time in Peru. Habronyx (H.) nigrofasciata was reared from Paracles tapina (Dyar, 1913) (Erebidae: Arctiinae). In addition, the distribution of P. tapina is expanded and figures of its larvae, pupae, and adult female and male are provided. PMID:25947460

  8. Euglossa williamsi, a new species of orchid bee from the Amazon Basin of Ecuador and Peru, with notes on its taxonomic association and biogeography (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa-Díaz, Ismael A.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Euglossa williamsi sp. n. is here described from the lowland Amazonian region in Ecuador and Peru, and as part of a small species assemblage within Euglossa consisting of Euglossa dodsoni Moure and Euglossa obtusa Dressler. An identification key to the males of the group is provided plus detailed figures of the new species and representative illustrations for the others. A brief discussion of the taxonomic and biogeographical implications of the new species is provided. New records in Honduras and Nicaragua are provided for the related Euglossa dodsoni. PMID:22303114

  9. A new species of Platyrrhinus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) from western Colombia and Ecuador, with emended diagnoses of P. aquilus, P. dorsalis, and P. umbratus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velazco, Paúl M.; Gardner, Alfred L.

    2009-01-01

    The Neotropical bat genus Platyrrhinus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae: Stenodermatinae) currently comprises 15 species. Our morphological and morphometric analysis of large and medium-sized Platyrrhinus revealed a distinctive Undescribed species from western South America. We also recognize P. aquilus (Handley & Ferris 1972) and P. umbratus (Lyon 1902) as valid species. We describe P. nitelinea sp. nov. from western Colombia and Ecuador and provide emended diagnoses along with descriptions of P. aquilus, P.. dorsalis, and P. umbratus. Phylogenetic analysis of Platyrrhinus based on morphological characters indicates that P. aquilus is closely related to P. aurarius and P. nigellus, P. umbratus to P. chocoensis, and P. nitelinea to P. vittatus.

  10. Under cover of darkness, caterpillars take flight: the immature stages and feeding ecology of the glasswinged butterfly, Oleria baizana in eastern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Walla, Thomas R; Greeney, Harold F

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the morphology and behavior of the immature stages of Oleria baizana (Haensch) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) from northeastern Ecuador. Brugmansia aurea Lagerh. (Solanales: Solanaceae) is the larval food plant. Eggs are laid singly, off of the host plant in the leaf litter. During the night, larvae climb a food plant seedling and sever a leaf petiole, parachuting with the leaf to the ground where they remain while feeding. Oleria baizana has five larval stadia, and individuals take 77 days to mature from oviposition to adult stage.

  11. Identifying open and closed system behaviors at Tungurahua volcano (Ecuador) using SO2 and seismo-acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Silvana; Battaglia, Jean; Bernard, Benjamin; Steele, Alexander; Arellano, Santiago; Galle, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Tungurahua is one of the most active volcanoes in Ecuador. It is located in Central Ecuador, 160 km South of Quito and 8 km South of the touristic town of Baños. Tungurahua had one eruption every century since 1500, with an activity characterized by ash fallouts and pyroclastic and lava flows. The current eruptive period of Tungurahua began in 1999 with multiple episodes of explosive activity that have threatened the local population. The monitoring network is constituted by 5 short period and 5 broadband seismic stations, 4 DOAS permanent instruments, 4 tiltmeters, 2 permanent high resolution GPS, 4 digital cameras and 10 acoustic flow monitors. The correct interpretation of the different data acquired by this network allows a better understanding of the eruptive behavior of Tungurahua in order to provide early warning to the local population. Tungurahua changed its behavior from a continuously erupting volcano, as it was until 2008, to a sporadically erupting one, showing clear quiescence phases lasting from 40 to 184 days, and intense activity phases lasting from 15 to 70 days. Activity phases are characterized by Strombolian and Vulcanian eruptive styles, producing ash fallouts and in a few occasions pyroclastic flows. In terms of hazard to the local population, one of the goals of monitoring Tungurahura is to forecast the onset and evolution of eruptive phases. In particular the occurrence of large Vulcanian explosions which occur when the conduit is closed is a major issue. Since 2010 we focused our study on the relation between SO2 gas emissions, the seismic and acoustic energies of explosions and the tremor amplitudes. The first observation of comparing these different datasets is that the correlation between seismic and SO2 degassing is not straightforward, and actually the relation reflects the conditions at the vent: open or closed. The onset of eruptive phases in open conduit conditions can be identified which leads to an effective eruption forecasting

  12. Petrography and Geochemistry of the Zamora Batholith in the south of the sub-Andean zone (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villares, F. M.

    2013-05-01

    The Zamora Batholith is an intrusive complex that is located in the extreme south-east of Ecuador. It has dimensions of 200 x 50 km approximately. It is mainly located in the Zamora Chinchipe province from which it takes its name. This study consisted in the petrographic and geochemical characterization of the Zamora Batholith in the area covered by 1: 50,000 geological maps of Centro Shaime, Guayzimi, Paquisha, Los Encuentros and El Pangui. Fieldwork was done by the "Proyecto Mapeo Geológico escala 1:50.000 (zonas prospectivas mineras)" of the Instituto Nacional de Investigación Geológico, Minero, Metalúrgico of Ecuador. This research was performed with 59 thin sections and 10 whole - rock chemical analysis done in the C.I.C of the Granada University. The Zamora Batholith intrudes Triassic to Jurassic volcanic rocks. It is overlaid by sandstones of the Hollin Formation of the Upper Aptian age and shale and limestone from the Napo Formation. Post-cretaceous deposits of ash and lava flows of andesitic to rhyolitic compositions cover the batholith. The petrography of the Zamora Batholith ranges from tonalite to monzogranite with the same qualitative mineralogy. The rocks are composed by different proportions of plagioclase, amphibole, feldspar K, quartz, biotite, opaque, pyroxene and epidote, as accessory minerals has zircon, sphene and apatite. To the south of the Conguime and Guayzimi towns, the dominant petrography is medium to coarse grained amphibole granodiorite with tonalitic and monzogranitic subordinates. To the north monzogranites are dominant rocks and subordinate granodiorites. To the East of Santa Elena the sienogranites are associated with El Hito porphyritic granite that intrudes to Zamora Batholith. Frequently the batholith has propylitic alteration; which produces a primary association of chlorite, epidote, calcite and pyrite. The granitoids have dioritic to granitic compositions (60.09 to 73.6 wt.% SiO2) and are I - type, medium to high-K calc

  13. NOAA/APT Satellite Data for Online and Real Time Monitoring of Tungurahua Volcanic Eruption and Temperature Profile in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, G.; Nader, R.; Koudelka, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Ecuadorian Space Agency (EXA) has built HERMES, an online and real time ground station (GS) available to participating schools/universities for free access to NOAA and other remote sensing satellites. The GS is being used by students and scientists in Austria, USA, Japan and Ecuador to access NOAA satellites and spacecrafts online using only a computer and an internet connection with immediate access to satellite imaging and science data for their educational and research projects. The accuracy of analysed data can be used in research areas like forecasting, monitoring and damage assessment caused by eruptions. The HERMES internet-to-orbit gateway transforms a laptop into a full space-qualified GS on-the-move. The purpose of this paper is to present results of Andean mountain area in Ecuador being affected by high temperatures over 30 degree Celsius located over 3000 m high. From May 15 - 20, 2010, we received images from NOAA-18 and NOAA-19 using HERMS GS and applied Surface Temperature (ST), a remote sensing tool to process these images in real-time. Moreover, measured results have been validated by the records from the local meteorological stations network. Additionally, the visual observations revealed that due to high temperature, those glaciers were in fact receding and exposing terrain, never seen before. This paper also highlights the possible causes of this rapid thermal change. The second event dealt by this paper happened on May 28th; we captured a large ash cloud emanating from Tungurahua volcano eruption in the Andean region along with a large ash cloud from the Pacaya volcano in Guatemala using far infrared images from NOAA-18 satellite with overlaid geo-reference coordinates. Both events were analysed with remote sensing tools and image enhancement schemes like 'thermal', 'hvct' and 'fire', available in weather decoding software using free APT data. The aftermath correlation results of volcanic eruption with high temperature profile in the same

  14. The emergence of the vertical birth in Ecuador: an analysis of agenda setting and policy windows for intercultural health.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Ana; Mayhew, Susannah

    2016-07-01

    Maternal mortality continues to claim the lives of thousands of women in Latin America despite the availability of effective treatments to avert maternal death. In the past, efforts to acknowledge cultural diversity in birth practices had not been clearly integrated into policy. However, in Otavalo (Ecuador) a local hospital pioneered the implementation of the 'Vertical Birth'-a practical manifestation of an intercultural health policy aimed at increasing indigenous women's access to maternity care. Drawing on agenda-setting theory, this qualitative research explores how the vertical birth practice made it onto the local policy agenda and the processes that allowed actors to seize a window of opportunity allowing the vertical birth practice to emerge. Our results show that the processes that brought about the vertical birth practice took place over a prolonged period of time and resulted from the interplay between various factors. Firstly, a maternal health policy community involving indigenous actors played a key role in identifying maternal mortality as a policy problem, defining its causes and framing it as an indigenous rights issue. Secondly, previous initiatives to address maternal mortality provided a wealth of experience that gave these actors the knowledge and experience to formulate a feasible policy solution and consolidate support from powerful actors. Thirdly, the election of a new government that had incorporated the demands of the indigenous movement opened up a window of opportunity to push intercultural health policies such as the vertical birth. We conclude that the socioeconomic and political changes at both national and local level allowed the meaningful participation of indigenous actors that made a critical contribution to the emergence of the vertical birth practice. These findings can help us advance our knowledge of strategies to set the agenda for intercultural maternal health policy and inform future policy in similar settings. Our

  15. High Leptospira Diversity in Animals and Humans Complicates the Search for Common Reservoirs of Human Disease in Rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Chiriboga, Jorge; Miller, Erin; Olivas, Sonora; Birdsell, Dawn; Hepp, Crystal; Hornstra, Heidie; Schupp, James M.; Morales, Melba; Gonzalez, Manuel; Reyes, Soraya; de la Cruz, Carmen; Keim, Paul; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Trueba, Gabriel; Pearson, Talima

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease responsible for high morbidity around the world, especially in tropical and low income countries. Rats are thought to be the main vector of human leptospirosis in urban settings. However, differences between urban and low-income rural communities provide additional insights into the epidemiology of the disease. Methodology/Principal findings Our study was conducted in two low-income rural communities near the coast of Ecuador. We detected and characterized infectious leptospira DNA in a wide variety of samples using new real time quantitative PCR assays and amplicon sequencing. We detected infectious leptospira in a high percentage of febrile patients (14.7%). In contrast to previous studies on leptospirosis risk factors, higher positivity was not found in rats (3.0%) but rather in cows (35.8%) and pigs (21.1%). Six leptospira species were identified (L. borgpetersenii, L kirschnerii, L santarosai, L. interrogans, L noguchii, and an intermediate species within the L. licerasiae and L. wolffii clade) and no significant differences in the species of leptospira present in each animal species was detected (χ2 = 9.89, adj.p-value = 0.27). Conclusions/Significance A large portion of the world’s human population lives in low-income, rural communities, however, there is limited information about leptospirosis transmission dynamics in these settings. In these areas, exposure to peridomestic livestock is particularly common and high prevalence of infectious leptospira in cows and pigs suggest that they may be the most important reservoir for human transmission. Genotyping clinical samples show that multiple species of leptospira are involved in human disease. As these genotypes were also detected in samples from a variety of animals, genotype data must be used in conjunction with epidemiological data to provide evidence of transmission and the importance of different potential leptospirosis reservoirs. PMID:27622673

  16. Variation in the Presence of Anti-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Bacteria of Amphibians Across Life Stages and Elevations in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bresciano, J C; Salvador, C A; Paz-Y-Miño, C; Parody-Merino, A M; Bosch, J; Woodhams, D C

    2015-06-01

    Amphibian populations are decreasing worldwide due to a variety of factors. In South America, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is linked to many population declines. The pathogenic effect of Bd on amphibians can be inhibited by specific bacteria present on host skin. This symbiotic association allows some amphibians to resist the development of the disease chytridiomycosis. Here, we aimed (1) to determine for the first time if specific anti-Bd bacteria are present on amphibians in the Andes of Ecuador, (2) to monitor anti-Bd bacteria across developmental stages in a focal amphibian, the Andean marsupial tree frog, Gastrotheca riobambae, that deposits larvae in aquatic habitats, and (3) to compare the Bd presence associated with host assemblages including 10 species at sites ranging in biogeography from Amazonian rainforest (450 masl) to Andes montane rainforest (3200 masl). We sampled and identified skin-associated bacteria of frogs in the field using swabs and a novel methodology of aerobic counting plates, and a combination of morphological, biochemical, and molecular identification techniques. The following anti-Bd bacteria were identified and found to be shared among several hosts at high-elevation sites where Bd was present at a prevalence of 32.5%: Janthinobacterium lividum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Serratia sp. Bd were detected in Gastrotheca spp. and not detected in the lowlands (sites below 1000 masl). In G. riobambae, recognized Bd-resistant bacteria start to be present at the metamorphic stage. Overall bacterial abundance was significantly higher post-metamorphosis and on species sampled at lower elevations. Further metagenomic studies are needed to evaluate the roles of host identity, life-history stage, and biogeography of the microbiota and their function in disease resistance.

  17. Dengue Vector Dynamics (Aedes aegypti) Influenced by Climate and Social Factors in Ecuador: Implications for Targeted Control

    PubMed Central

    Stewart Ibarra, Anna M.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Beltrán, Efrain; Mejía, Raúl; Silva, Mercy; Muñoz, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti) population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. Methods/Principal findings We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011), conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. Conclusions These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in Spanish. PMID:24324542

  18. In-roads to the spread of antibiotic resistance: regional patterns of microbial transmission in northern coastal Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Goldstick, Jason; Cevallos, William; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen; Scott, James; Percha, Bethany; Segovia, Rosana; Ponce, Karina; Hubbard, Alan; Marrs, Carl; Foxman, Betsy; Smith, David L.; Trostle, James

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance (AR) increases treatment cost and probability of failure, threatening human health worldwide. The relative importance of individual antibiotic use, environmental transmission and rates of introduction of resistant bacteria in explaining community AR patterns is poorly understood. Evaluating their relative importance requires studying a region where they vary. The construction of a new road in a previously roadless area of northern coastal Ecuador provides a valuable natural experiment to study how changes in the social and natural environment affect the epidemiology of resistant Escherichia coli. We conducted seven bi-annual 15 day surveys of AR between 2003 and 2008 in 21 villages. Resistance to both ampicillin and sulphamethoxazole was the most frequently observed profile, based on antibiogram tests of seven antibiotics from 2210 samples. The prevalence of enteric bacteria with this resistance pair in the less remote communities was 80 per cent higher than in more remote communities (OR = 1.8 [1.3, 2.3]). This pattern could not be explained with data on individual antibiotic use. We used a transmission model to help explain this observed discrepancy. The model analysis suggests that both transmission and the rate of introduction of resistant bacteria into communities may contribute to the observed regional scale AR patterns, and that village-level antibiotic use rate determines which of these two factors predominate. While usually conceived as a main effect on individual risk, antibiotic use rate is revealed in this analysis as an effect modifier with regard to community-level risk of resistance. PMID:21957121

  19. Land-use and soil depth affect resource and microbial stoichiometry in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change, significantly affect elemental balances as well as the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the importance of shifts in soil nutrient stoichiometry for the regulation of belowground biota and soil food webs have not been intensively studied for tropical ecosystems. In the present account, we examine the effects of land-use change and soil depth on soil and microbial stoichiometry along a land-use sequence (natural forest, pastures of different ages, secondary succession) in the tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador. Furthermore, we analyzed (PLFA-method) whether shifts in the microbial community structure were related to alterations in soil and microbial stoichiometry. Soil and microbial stoichiometry were affected by both land-use change and soil depth. After forest disturbance, significant decreases of soil C:N:P ratios at the pastures were followed by increases during secondary succession. Microbial C:N ratios varied slightly in response to land-use change, whereas no fixed microbial C:P and N:P ratios were observed. Shifts in microbial community composition were associated with soil and microbial stoichiometry. Strong positive relationships between PLFA-markers 18:2n6,9c (saprotrophic fungi) and 20:4 (animals) and negative associations between 20:4 and microbial N:P point to land-use change affecting the structure of soil food webs. Significant deviations from global soil and microbial C:N:P ratios indicated a major force of land-use change to alter stoichiometric relationships and to structure biological systems. Our results support the idea that soil biotic communities are stoichiometrically flexible in order to adapt to alterations in resource stoichiometry.

  20. Mesozoic and cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Maranon Basin in Southeastern Columbia, Eastern Ecuador and Northeastern Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, A.M.; Marksteiner, M. )

    1993-02-01

    The Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in the Maranon was characterized by tectonic quiescence and carbonate shelf deposition. During Middle to Late Jurassic, a northeast-southwest extensional event occurred which is documented by the presence of northwest oriented grabens filled with red beds and volcaniclastic rocks. Cretaceous deposition commenced during the Aptian and continued to the Early Campanian within the vast South America Cretaceous Seaway (SACS) that extended from Venezuela to Central Peru. These strata comprised of shallow marine clastics sources from the Brazilian and Guyana cratons to the east. Retreat of the SACS resulted from the Late Cretaceous (Peruvian) phase of the Andean Orogeny. Deposition became largely continental with sediments derived from the west. The deformation was comtemporaneous with oblique collision and accretion of an allochthonous terrain present in Colombia and Ecuador, as well as uplift of the Putumayo, Napo, Cutucu and Cenepa (PNCC) Mountains, westward erosion of the Napo/Chonta Formations, widespread deposition of red beds, volcanic activity in the foreland and the subtle inversion of half grabens. The Middle Eocene (Inca) phase of the Andean Orogeny, correlated to a relative increase in convergence rates along the western margin of South America (SA). This orogeny was characterized by the development of folds and reverse faults within a narrow and elongated belt, the reactivation of the PNCC Uplifts, the deposition of varicolored fluviatile deposits, the renewed inversion of half grabens, and volcanic activity close to the hinterland. The three main pulses of the Late Miocene to Pliocene phase of the Andean Orogeny correlate with high rates of convergence along the SA margin. This orogenic phase was characterized by thick fluviatile deposition, reactivation of the PNCC uplifts, eastward propagation of the fold and thrust belt, renewed inversion of the half grabens and alkaline volcanism in the foreland.

  1. Variation in the Presence of Anti-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Bacteria of Amphibians Across Life Stages and Elevations in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Bresciano, J C; Salvador, C A; Paz-Y-Miño, C; Parody-Merino, A M; Bosch, J; Woodhams, D C

    2015-06-01

    Amphibian populations are decreasing worldwide due to a variety of factors. In South America, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is linked to many population declines. The pathogenic effect of Bd on amphibians can be inhibited by specific bacteria present on host skin. This symbiotic association allows some amphibians to resist the development of the disease chytridiomycosis. Here, we aimed (1) to determine for the first time if specific anti-Bd bacteria are present on amphibians in the Andes of Ecuador, (2) to monitor anti-Bd bacteria across developmental stages in a focal amphibian, the Andean marsupial tree frog, Gastrotheca riobambae, that deposits larvae in aquatic habitats, and (3) to compare the Bd presence associated with host assemblages including 10 species at sites ranging in biogeography from Amazonian rainforest (450 masl) to Andes montane rainforest (3200 masl). We sampled and identified skin-associated bacteria of frogs in the field using swabs and a novel methodology of aerobic counting plates, and a combination of morphological, biochemical, and molecular identification techniques. The following anti-Bd bacteria were identified and found to be shared among several hosts at high-elevation sites where Bd was present at a prevalence of 32.5%: Janthinobacterium lividum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Serratia sp. Bd were detected in Gastrotheca spp. and not detected in the lowlands (sites below 1000 masl). In G. riobambae, recognized Bd-resistant bacteria start to be present at the metamorphic stage. Overall bacterial abundance was significantly higher post-metamorphosis and on species sampled at lower elevations. Further metagenomic studies are needed to evaluate the roles of host identity, life-history stage, and biogeography of the microbiota and their function in disease resistance. PMID:25669915

  2. The emergence of the vertical birth in Ecuador: an analysis of agenda setting and policy windows for intercultural health.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Ana; Mayhew, Susannah

    2016-07-01

    Maternal mortality continues to claim the lives of thousands of women in Latin America despite the availability of effective treatments to avert maternal death. In the past, efforts to acknowledge cultural diversity in birth practices had not been clearly integrated into policy. However, in Otavalo (Ecuador) a local hospital pioneered the implementation of the 'Vertical Birth'-a practical manifestation of an intercultural health policy aimed at increasing indigenous women's access to maternity care. Drawing on agenda-setting theory, this qualitative research explores how the vertical birth practice made it onto the local policy agenda and the processes that allowed actors to seize a window of opportunity allowing the vertical birth practice to emerge. Our results show that the processes that brought about the vertical birth practice took place over a prolonged period of time and resulted from the interplay between various factors. Firstly, a maternal health policy community involving indigenous actors played a key role in identifying maternal mortality as a policy problem, defining its causes and framing it as an indigenous rights issue. Secondly, previous initiatives to address maternal mortality provided a wealth of experience that gave these actors the knowledge and experience to formulate a feasible policy solution and consolidate support from powerful actors. Thirdly, the election of a new government that had incorporated the demands of the indigenous movement opened up a window of opportunity to push intercultural health policies such as the vertical birth. We conclude that the socioeconomic and political changes at both national and local level allowed the meaningful participation of indigenous actors that made a critical contribution to the emergence of the vertical birth practice. These findings can help us advance our knowledge of strategies to set the agenda for intercultural maternal health policy and inform future policy in similar settings. Our

  3. Environmental change and infectious disease: how new roads affect the transmission of diarrheal pathogens in rural Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Cevallos, William; Ponce, Karina; Levy, Karen; Bates, Sarah J; Scott, James C; Hubbard, Alan; Vieira, Nadia; Endara, Pablo; Espinel, Mauricio; Trueba, Gabriel; Riley, Lee W; Trostle, James

    2006-12-19

    Environmental change plays a large role in the emergence of infectious disease. The construction of a new road in a previously roadless area of northern coastal Ecuador provides a valuable natural experiment to examine how changes in the social and natural environment, mediated by road construction, affect the epidemiology of diarrheal diseases. Twenty-one villages were randomly selected to capture the full distribution of village population size and distance from a main road (remoteness), and these were compared with the major population center of the region, Borbón, that lies on the road. Estimates of enteric pathogen infection rates were obtained from case-control studies at the village level. Higher rates of infection were found in nonremote vs. remote villages [pathogenic Escherichia coli: odds ratio (OR) = 8.4, confidence interval (CI) 1.6, 43.5; rotavirus: OR = 4.0, CI 1.3, 12.1; and Giardia: OR = 1.9, CI 1.3, 2.7]. Higher rates of all-cause diarrhea were found in Borbón compared with the 21 villages (RR = 2.0, CI 1.5, 2.8), as well as when comparing nonremote and remote villages (OR = 2.7, CI 1.5, 4.8). Social network data collected in parallel offered a causal link between remoteness and disease. The significant and consistent trends across viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens suggest the importance of considering a broad range of pathogens with differing epidemiological patterns when assessing the environmental impact of new roads. This study provides insight into the initial health impacts that roads have on communities and into the social and environmental processes that create these impacts.

  4. A comprehensive risk assessment for tephra accumulation using easily accessible data: the example of Cotopaxi volcano (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biass, Sébastien; Frischknecht, Corine; Dell'Oro, Luca; Senegas, Olivier; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2010-05-01

    In order to answer the needs of contingency planning, we present a GIS-based method for risk assessment of tephra deposits, which is flexible enough to work with datasets of variable precision and resolution depending on data availabilty. Due to the constant increase of population density around volcanoes and the large dispersal of tephra from volcanic plumes, a wide range of threats such as roof collapses, destruction of crops, blockage of vital lifelines and health problems concern even remote communities. In the field of disaster management, there is a general agreement that a global and incomplete method, subject to revision and improvements, is better than no information at all. In this framework, our method is able to provide fast and rough insights on possible eruptive scenarios and their potential consequences on surrounding populations with only few available data, which can easily be refined later. Therefore, the knowledge of both the expected hazard (frequency and magnitude) and the vulnerability of elements at risk are required by planners in order to produce efficient emergency planning prior to a crisis. The Cotopaxi volcano, one of Ecuador's most active volcanoes, was used to develop and test this method. Cotopaxi volcano is located 60 km south of Quito and threatens a highly populated valley. Based on field data, historical reports and the Smithsonian catalogue, our hazard assessment was carried out using the numerical model TEPHRA2. We first applied a deterministic approach that evolved towards a fully probabilistic method in order to account for the most likely eruptive scenarios as well as the variability of atmospheric conditions. In parallel, we carried out a vulnerability assessment of the physical (crops and roofs), social (populations) and systemic elements-at-risk by using mainly free and easily accessible data. Both hazard and vulnerability assessments were compiled with GIS tools to draw comprehensive and tangible thematic risk maps

  5. Distribution of Thelastomatoid Nematodes (Nematoda: Oxyurida) in Endemic and Introduced Cockroaches on the Galápagos Island Archipelago, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Devinn; Carreno, Ramon A; Herrera, Henri

    2015-08-01

    The thelastomatoid pinworm fauna (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) was surveyed in 3 endemic species and 6 introduced species of cockroach hosts (Insecta: Blattaria) in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. A total of 658 host specimens were examined from preserved collections that had been collected between 1966 and 2003 from 7 islands in the archipelago. Eight species of pinworms were identified from these cockroach hosts, including the dominant species Cephalobellus ovumglutinosus and a Severianoia sp. as well as Leidynema appendiculata, Hammerschmidtiella diesingi, an unidentified Cephalobellus species resembling Cephalobellus magalhaesi, an unidentified Protrellus species closely resembling Protrellus shamimi, and an undescribed Blattophila sp. Five new host records are identified for C. ovumglutinosus including the endemic Galápagos cockroaches Chorisoneura carpenteri, Ischnoptera snodgrassii, and Ischnoptera santacruzensis. These endemics were also infected with an undescribed Blatticola sp. Other species recorded resemble known pinworms from other hosts around the world. Prevalence between islands and between host species was variable, but total prevalence for individual pinworm species was consistently low (<10%). A single host specimen examined was infected with more than 1 pinworm species; otherwise only a single species was observed in each infected host. At least 1 introduced pinworm species carried to the islands via invasive cockroach hosts was present in endemic host species, but several globally widespread introduced pinworm species were absent from endemic cockroaches. Santa Cruz was inhabited by the greatest number of pinworm species, likely due to a higher rate of invasive host introduction. This survey, the first from this region, showed that the distribution and transmission of pinworms in the Galápagos Islands is complex and may provide future models of invertebrate dispersal and speciation in an ecosystem already rich with examples of

  6. Isotope Tracers as Tools for Identifying Water Sources in Developing Regions: Case of Study in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, G.; Lazo, P.; Crespo, P.; Célleri, R.

    2014-12-01

    Páramo ecosystems are widely recognized for their high water regulation capacity and as the main source of runoff generation in the Andean region. Understanding the hydrological functioning of the fragile wet Andean páramo ecosystems is critical in the mountainous regions of South America given their high susceptibility to global and local stressors such as land use change and climate change and variability . Despite this, most of the basins in the Andean mountain range are still ungauged, resulting in a currently hindered hydrologic analysis of the water sources contributing to runoff generation in the high-elevation páramo ecosystems. To improve this situation and provide a baseline for future tracer-based hydrologic studies, the isotopic signature of water samples collected within the Zhurucay River experimental basin (7.53 km2) was analyzed. The study area is located in the southern Ecuador and stretches over an altitudinal range of 3200 and 3900 m a.s.l. Water samples in rainfall, streamflow, and soils were collected between May 2011 and May 2013. Streamflow hydrometric and isotopic information within the study site was collected using a nested monitoring system. The main soils in the study site are the Andosols mainly located in the steep slopes, and the Histosols (Andean páramo wetlands) predominantly located at the bottom of the valley. Results reveal that the Andosols drain the infiltrated rainfall water to the Histosols. The Histosols on their turn feed creeks and small rivers. Pre-event water stored in the Histosols is the primary source of runoff generation throughout the year. Defining the water sources contributing to runoff generation is the first step towards the establishment of scientifically-based programs of management and conservation of water resources in the Andean region; and the monitoring of isotopic information has proven useful to improve the understanding of the ecosystem's hydrologic behavior.

  7. The thermal evolution of pyroclastic density currents: Exploring the thermal histories of juvenile clasts of Tungurahua and Cotopaxi, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.; Degruyter, W.

    2010-12-01

    The thermal history of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is critical in determining flow dynamics and deposit characteristics. The thermal history of these flows depends on the particles’ internal rate of heat transfer and heat exchange between discrete particles and a gas phase. We examine the thermal history of a class of dense PDC exemplified by the eruption of Tungurahua (2006) and Cotopaxi (1877) that have abundant breadcrust bombs segregated in levees and in flow snouts. An open question in this type of PDC is the amount of air entrainment (and cooling) during transport. To understand the entrainment and cooling history of these flows we use a multiphase numerical model coupled with a Lagrangian model (Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian [EEL]) that tracks the internal heat transfer and post-eruption bubble evolution in juvenile clasts. We combine the numerical study with the observation of the morphology and vesicularity of breadcrust bombs from dense pyroclastic density currents from Tungurahua and Cotopaxi. Breadcrust bombs are common in many deposits from mafic explosive eruptions, e.g. Montserrat, Cotopaxi, Guagua Pichincha, and Tungurahua volcanoes. At many locations these bombs have likely been transported as ballistics (interacting mostly with ambient air), although several instances of dense scoria bomb flows have been noted (e.g. Cotopaxi and Tungurahua, Ecuador). The dense flow deposits are generally rich in unabraided breadcrust bombs along the flow levee and occasionally along the entire transect of the flow. The breadcrust bombs range in size from tens of centimeters to meters. They can also be found draping around previous deposits suggesting a high temperature of deposition. We discuss the use of clast morphology with other thermal proxies to better understand the thermal evolution of individual PDC and the proportion of time clasts underwent transport in dense flows as compared to ballistic transport.

  8. Understanding and modeling the physical processes that govern the melting of snow cover in a tropical mountain environment in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagnon, P.; Lafaysse, M.; Lejeune, Y.; Maisincho, L.; Rojas, M.; Chazarin, J. P.

    2009-10-01

    The ISBA/CROCUS coupled ground-snow model developed for the Alps and subsequently adapted to the outer tropical conditions of Bolivia has been applied to a full set of meteorological data recorded at 4860 m above sea level on a moraine area in Ecuador (Antizana 15 glacier, 0°28'S; 78°09'W) between 16 June 2005 and 30 June 2006 to determine the physical processes involved in the melting and disappearance of transient snow cover in nonglaciated areas of the inner tropics. Although less accurate than in Bolivia, the model is still able to simulate snow behavior over nonglaciated natural surfaces, as long as the modeled turbulent fluxes over bare ground are reduced and a suitable function is included to represent the partitioning of the surface between bare soil and snow cover. The main difference between the two tropical sites is the wind velocity, which is more than 3 times higher at the Antizana site than at the Bolivian site, leading to a nonuniform spatial distribution of snow over nonglaciated areas that is hard to describe with a simple snow partitioning function. Net solar radiation dominates the surface energy balance and is responsible for the energy stored in snow-free areas (albedo = 0.05) and transferred horizontally to adjacent snow patches by conduction within the upper soil layers and by turbulent advection. These processes can prevent the snow cover from lasting more than a few hours or a few days. Sporadically, and at any time of the year, this inner tropical site, much wetter than the outer tropics, experiences heavy snowfalls, covering all the moraine area, and thus limiting horizontal transfers and inducing a significant time lag between precipitation events and runoff.

  9. Apparent Survival Rates of Forest Birds in Eastern Ecuador Revisited: Improvement in Precision but No Change in Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Blake, John G.; Loiselle, Bette A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of survival rates of Neotropical landbirds remains limited, with estimates of apparent survival available from relatively few sites and species. Previously, capture-mark-recapture models were used to estimate apparent survival of 31 species (30 passerines, 1 Trochilidae) from eastern Ecuador based on data collected from 2001 to 2006. Here, estimates are updated with data from 2001-2012 to determine how additional years of data affect estimates; estimates for six additional species are provided. Models assuming constant survival had highest support for 19 of 31 species when based on 12 years of data compared to 27 when based on six; models incorporating effects of transients had the highest support for 12 of 31 species compared to four when based on 12 and six years, respectively. Average apparent survival based on the most highly-supported model (based on model averaging, when appropriate) was 0.59 (± 0.02 SE) across 30 species of passerines when based on 12 years and 0.57 (± 0.02) when based on six. Standard errors of survival estimates based on 12 years were approximately half those based on six years. Of 31 species in both data sets, estimates of apparent survival were somewhat lower for 13, somewhat higher for 17, and remained unchanged for one; confidence intervals for estimates based on six and 12 years of data overlapped for all species. Results indicate that estimates of apparent survival are comparable but more precise when based on longer-term data sets; standard error of the estimates was negatively correlated with numbers of captures (rs = −0.72) and recaptures (rs = −0.93, P<0.001 in both cases). Thus, reasonable estimates of apparent survival may be obtained with relatively few years of data if sample sizes are sufficient. PMID:24312519

  10. Nutrient addition modifies phosphatase activities along an altitudinal gradient in a tropical montane forest in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Karla; Spoeri, Elena; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    Atmospheric nutrient deposition and climate change are expected to endanger the diversity of tropical forest ecosystems. Nitrogen (N) deposition might influence nutrient fluxes beyond the N cycle by a concomitant increased demand for other nutritional elements such as phosphorus (P). Organisms might respond to the increased P demand by enhanced activity of enzymes involved in releasing inorganic P from organic matter (OM). Our aims were to assess the effect of i) climate shifts (approximated by an altitudinal gradient), and ii) nutrient addition (N, P, N+P) on phosphatase activity (PA) in organic layer and mineral soil of a tropical montane rainforest in Southern Ecuador. A nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) was set up along an altitudinal gradient (1000, 2000, and 3000 m a.s.l.). We determined PA and inorganic and total P concentrations. PA at 1000 m was significantly lower (mean ± standard error: 48 ± 20 µmol p-NP g-1 dm h-1) as compared to 2000 m and 3000 m (119 ± 11 and 137 ± 19, respectively). One explanation might be that very rapid decomposition of OM at 1000 m results in very thin organic layers reducing the stabilization of enzymes and thus, resulting in leaching loss of enzymes under the humid tropical climate. We found no effect of N addition on PA neither in the organic layer nor in mineral soil, probably because of the low nutrient addition rates that showed ambiguous results so far on productivity measures as a proxy for P demand. In the organic layers of P and N+P treatments, we found decreased PA and increased concentrations of inorganic P. This indicates that the surplus of inorganic P reduced the biosynthesis of phosphatase enzymes. PA in megadiverse montane rainforests is likely to be unaffected by increased atmospheric N deposition but reduced upon atmospheric P deposition.

  11. The Progreso Basin Province of Northwestern Peru and Southwestern Ecuador: Neogene and Cretaceous-Paleogene Total Petroleum Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.

    2004-01-01

    The Progreso Basin province (6083) in northwestern Peru and southwestern Ecuador consists of the Paleogene Santa Elena block and Peru Bank, and the Neogene Tumbes-Progreso subbasin. The Santa Elena block and Peru Bank are part of the Cretaceous-Paleogene Total Petroleum System (TPS)(608302), which contains the Cretaceous-Paleogene Santa Elena Block Assessment Unit (60830201). The Tumbes- Progreso subbasin includes the Neogene TPS (608301) and associated Neogene Pull-Apart Basin Assessment Unit (60830101). The complex tectonic history of the Progreso Basin province influenced depositional and erosional patterns across the region, and also the location, timing, and types of seals, traps, possible source and reservoir rocks, and hydrocarbon generation and migration. Marine shales that are interbedded with and overlie reservoir intervals are the probable hydrocarbon source rocks. Timing of hydrocarbon generation and migration was probably Miocene and younger, following creation of the Tumbes-Progreso subbasin by movement along the Dolores-Guayaquil megashear. More than 220 million barrels of oil (MMBO) and 255 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG) have been produced from the Progreso Basin province. The means of estimated recoverable oil, gas, and natural gas liquids (NGL) resources from undiscovered fields in the province are 237 MMBO, 695 BCFG, and 32 MMB NGL, respectively. The means of estimated recoverable oil, gas, and NGL resources from undiscovered onshore fields are 45 MMBO, 113 BCFG, and 5 MMBNGL, and from undiscovered offshore fields are 192 BBO, 582 BCFG, and 27 MMBNGL. These are USGS grown undiscovered resources that were determined by using a minimum field size of 1 million barrels of oil equivalent.

  12. Upper Airways Microbiota in Antibiotic-Naïve Wheezing and Healthy Infants from the Tropics of Rural Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Paul Andres; Cooper, Philip J.; Cox, Michael J.; Chico, Martha; Arias, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Background Observations that the airway microbiome is disturbed in asthma may be confounded by the widespread use of antibiotics and inhaled steroids. We have therefore examined the oropharyngeal microbiome in early onset wheezing infants from a rural area of tropical Ecuador where antibiotic usage is minimal and glucocorticoid usage is absent. Materials and Methods We performed pyrosequencing of amplicons of the polymorphic bacterial 16S rRNA gene from oropharyngeal samples from 24 infants with non-infectious early onset wheezing and 24 healthy controls (average age 10.2 months). We analyzed microbial community structure and differences between cases and controls by QIIME software. Results We obtained 76,627 high quality sequences classified into 182 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Firmicutes was the most common and diverse phylum (71.22% of sequences) with Streptococcus being the most common genus (49.72%). Known pathogens were found significantly more often in cases of infantile wheeze compared to controls, exemplified by Haemophilus spp. (OR = 2.12, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.82–2.47; P = 5.46×10−23) and Staphylococcus spp. (OR = 124.1, 95%CI 59.0–261.2; P = 1.87×10−241). Other OTUs were less common in cases than controls, notably Veillonella spp. (OR = 0.59, 95%CI = 0.56–0.62; P = 8.06×10−86). Discussion The airway microbiota appeared to contain many more Streptococci than found in Western Europe and the USA. Comparisons between healthy and wheezing infants revealed a significant difference in several bacterial phylotypes that were not confounded by antibiotics or use of inhaled steroids. The increased prevalence of pathogens such as Haemophilus and Staphylococcus spp. in cases may contribute to wheezing illnesses in this age group. PMID:23071640

  13. New records of sea lice (Copepoda: Caligidae) from marine fishes in Jaramijó, an area with potential for sea-cage aquaculture in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Morales-Serna, Francisco Neptali; Caña-Bozada, Víctor; Mera-Loor, Geormery; Loor-Andrade, Peggy; Fajer-Ávila, Emma J; Ho, Ju-Shey

    2015-01-01

    Farming of finfish in sea cages is gaining popularity worldwide. These systems are a suitable environment for the emergence, establishment and transmission of parasites or pathogens, such as sea lice (Copepoda: Caligidae), known to cause serious diseases and economic losses in finfish aquaculture worldwide. In coastal waters of Jaramijó, Ecuador, there are plans to culture spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) and longfin yellowtail (Seriola rivoliana); however, the information about the occurrence of sea lice on fish from this country is scarce. To address this problem, a parasitological survey of economically important fish caught by artisanal fishermen was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014. A total of 608 fish belonging to 66 species were examined. Sea lice were found on 23 fish species. The diversity of these parasites consisted of 22 species of Caligus and 5 species of Lepeophtheirus. Most sea lice species (66%) occurred in a single fish species only, with low infection levels. The most frequently encountered species were Caligus asperimanus Pearse, 1951, Caligus mutabilis Wilson, 1905 and Caligus rufimaculatus Wilson, 1905. Taxonomic remarks are presented for some of the species recorded during this survey. All but two sea lice records are new to Ecuador, considerably expanding the geographical range of some species.

  14. Ecuador's mangrove forest carbon stocks: a spatiotemporal analysis of living carbon holdings and their depletion since the advent of commercial aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stuart E; Lovette, John

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the living carbon lost from Ecuador's mangrove forests since the advent of export-focused shrimp aquaculture. We use remote sensing techniques to delineate the extent of mangroves and aquaculture at approximately decadal periods since the arrival of aquaculture in each Ecuadorian estuary. We then spatiotemporally calculate the carbon values of the mangrove forests and estimate the amount of carbon lost due to direct displacement by aquaculture. Additionally, we calculate the new carbon stocks generated due to mangrove reforestation or afforestation. This research introduces time and LUCC (land use / land cover change) into the tropical forest carbon literature and examines forest carbon loss at a higher spatiotemporal resolution than in many earlier analyses. We find that 80 percent, or 7,014,517 t of the living carbon lost in Ecuadorian mangrove forests can be attributed to direct displacement of mangrove forests by shrimp aquaculture. We also find that IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) compliant carbon grids within Ecuador's estuaries overestimate living carbon levels in estuaries where substantial LUCC has occurred. By approaching the mangrove forest carbon loss question from a LUCC perspective, these findings allow for tropical nations and other intervention agents to prioritize and target a limited set of land transitions that likely drive the majority of carbon losses. This singular cause of transition has implications for programs that attempt to offset or limit future forest carbon losses and place value on forest carbon or other forest good and services. PMID:25738286

  15. A remarkable new species of the magnus species-group of Cryptocellus (Arachnida, Ricinulei) from Ecuador, with observations on the taxonomy of the New World genera.

    PubMed

    Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Valdez-Mondragón, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A new ricinuleid species, Cryptocellus chimaera sp. nov., is described based on a male specimen from Northwest Ecuador (Esmeraldas, Reserva Ecológica Mache-Chindul, Estación Biológica Bilsa). This species is unique among all Cryptocellus in having very large longitudinal carapacial translucent areas together with a markedly incrassate femur of leg II. Representing only the second species of the order described from Ecuador, C. chimaera sp. nov. is assigned to the magnus species-group of Cryptocellus Westwood, 1874. Cryptocellus chimaera sp. nov. is remarkable, for its morphology resembles that of Cryptocellus magnus Ewing, 1929, especially with regard to the male copulatory apparatus, although both resemble Pseudocellus Platnick, 1980, due to the presence of diffuse longitudinal carapacial translucent areas. Along with the new species description, a comparative diagnosis and supplementary images are provided for C. magnus. Based on direct observations of some species belonging to the five species-groups of Cryptocellus, we discuss on the occurrence of different morphologies of carapacial translucent areas within the genus. We deem it important to continue the survey of morphological characters, especially within Cryptocellus, in order to increase our understanding of the species-groups and to unravel their relationships. PMID:27394823

  16. New records of sea lice (Copepoda: Caligidae) from marine fishes in Jaramijó, an area with potential for sea-cage aquaculture in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Morales-Serna, Francisco Neptali; Caña-Bozada, Víctor; Mera-Loor, Geormery; Loor-Andrade, Peggy; Fajer-Ávila, Emma J; Ho, Ju-Shey

    2015-01-01

    Farming of finfish in sea cages is gaining popularity worldwide. These systems are a suitable environment for the emergence, establishment and transmission of parasites or pathogens, such as sea lice (Copepoda: Caligidae), known to cause serious diseases and economic losses in finfish aquaculture worldwide. In coastal waters of Jaramijó, Ecuador, there are plans to culture spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) and longfin yellowtail (Seriola rivoliana); however, the information about the occurrence of sea lice on fish from this country is scarce. To address this problem, a parasitological survey of economically important fish caught by artisanal fishermen was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014. A total of 608 fish belonging to 66 species were examined. Sea lice were found on 23 fish species. The diversity of these parasites consisted of 22 species of Caligus and 5 species of Lepeophtheirus. Most sea lice species (66%) occurred in a single fish species only, with low infection levels. The most frequently encountered species were Caligus asperimanus Pearse, 1951, Caligus mutabilis Wilson, 1905 and Caligus rufimaculatus Wilson, 1905. Taxonomic remarks are presented for some of the species recorded during this survey. All but two sea lice records are new to Ecuador, considerably expanding the geographical range of some species. PMID:25781254

  17. A remarkable new species of the magnus species-group of Cryptocellus (Arachnida, Ricinulei) from Ecuador, with observations on the taxonomy of the New World genera.

    PubMed

    Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Valdez-Mondragón, Alejandro

    2016-05-03

    A new ricinuleid species, Cryptocellus chimaera sp. nov., is described based on a male specimen from Northwest Ecuador (Esmeraldas, Reserva Ecológica Mache-Chindul, Estación Biológica Bilsa). This species is unique among all Cryptocellus in having very large longitudinal carapacial translucent areas together with a markedly incrassate femur of leg II. Representing only the second species of the order described from Ecuador, C. chimaera sp. nov. is assigned to the magnus species-group of Cryptocellus Westwood, 1874. Cryptocellus chimaera sp. nov. is remarkable, for its morphology resembles that of Cryptocellus magnus Ewing, 1929, especially with regard to the male copulatory apparatus, although both resemble Pseudocellus Platnick, 1980, due to the presence of diffuse longitudinal carapacial translucent areas. Along with the new species description, a comparative diagnosis and supplementary images are provided for C. magnus. Based on direct observations of some species belonging to the five species-groups of Cryptocellus, we discuss on the occurrence of different morphologies of carapacial translucent areas within the genus. We deem it important to continue the survey of morphological characters, especially within Cryptocellus, in order to increase our understanding of the species-groups and to unravel their relationships.

  18. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection in non-vaccinated dairy and dual purpose cattle herds in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Saa, Luis Rodrigo; Perea, Anselmo; García-Bocanegra, Ignacio; Arenas, Antonio José; Jara, Diego Vinicio; Ramos, Raul; Carbonero, Alfonso

    2012-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection in non-vaccinated dairy and dual-purpose cattle herds from Ecuador. A total of 2,367 serum samples from 346 herds were collected from June 2008 through February 2009. A questionnaire, which included variables related to cattle, health, management measures, and the environment, was filled out in each herd. A commercial indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test was used to determine the seropositivity. A logistic regression model was used to determine risk factors at herd level. The individual seroprevalence for BVDV in non-vaccinated herds in Ecuador was 36.2% (857/2,367; CI(95%), 34.3-38.1%). The herd prevalence was 74% (256/346; CI(95%), 69.4-78.6%) and the intra-herd prevalence ranged between 11.1% and 100% (mean = 51.6%). The logistic regression model showed that the density of cattle farms in the area (more than 70%; OR, 1.94; CI(95%), 1.21-3.2) and the altitude (higher than 2,338 m above sea level; 2.33; CI(95%), 1.4-3.9) are potential risk factors associated with BVDV infection.

  19. Ecuador's mangrove forest carbon stocks: a spatiotemporal analysis of living carbon holdings and their depletion since the advent of commercial aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stuart E; Lovette, John

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the living carbon lost from Ecuador's mangrove forests since the advent of export-focused shrimp aquaculture. We use remote sensing techniques to delineate the extent of mangroves and aquaculture at approximately decadal periods since the arrival of aquaculture in each Ecuadorian estuary. We then spatiotemporally calculate the carbon values of the mangrove forests and estimate the amount of carbon lost due to direct displacement by aquaculture. Additionally, we calculate the new carbon stocks generated due to mangrove reforestation or afforestation. This research introduces time and LUCC (land use / land cover change) into the tropical forest carbon literature and examines forest carbon loss at a higher spatiotemporal resolution than in many earlier analyses. We find that 80 percent, or 7,014,517 t of the living carbon lost in Ecuadorian mangrove forests can be attributed to direct displacement of mangrove forests by shrimp aquaculture. We also find that IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) compliant carbon grids within Ecuador's estuaries overestimate living carbon levels in estuaries where substantial LUCC has occurred. By approaching the mangrove forest carbon loss question from a LUCC perspective, these findings allow for tropical nations and other intervention agents to prioritize and target a limited set of land transitions that likely drive the majority of carbon losses. This singular cause of transition has implications for programs that attempt to offset or limit future forest carbon losses and place value on forest carbon or other forest good and services.

  20. A new species of Nicon Kinberg, 1866 (Polychaeta, Nereididae) from Ecuador, Eastern Pacific, with a key to all known species of the genus

    PubMed Central

    de León-González, Jesús Angel; Trovant, Berenice

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Nicon Kinberg, 1866 from the east Pacific coast of Ecuador is described. The new species is characterized by a long, thin dorsal ligule on median and posterior parapodia and infracicular sesquigomph falcigers in the neuropodia. A key to all species of Nicon is provided. PMID:23653526

  1. Women, Work and the Need for Child Care. Opportunities for Programmatic Collaboration: A Review of UNICEF-Supported Programmes in Nepal, Ecuador, and Ethiopia. Staff Working Papers, Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Cassie, Ed.; Leonard, Ann, Ed.

    This document examines programs in Nepal, Ecuador, and Ethiopia that address the many needs of working women in regard to providing high quality care for their children. The description of each program includes: (1) an account of the identification of the child care need; (2) program planning and implementation; (3) training of staff; (4) effects…

  2. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 17 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Bahrein, Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Iraq, Morocco, Paraguay, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Peru, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, St. Christopher/Nevis, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, and…

  3. Comments on Hynes et al. Prevalence of Marijuana Use among University Students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5233–5240

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Novack, Maria Claudia; Ortiz-Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Castañeda-Carbajal, Bruno; Alvarado, German F.

    2015-01-01

    We have read and analyzed the article entitled “Prevalence of marijuana use among university students in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru”. We propose some objective points which could enhance the internal validity of the study (i.e., we suggest to report participation proportions). PMID:26393629

  4. The housing, geography, and mobility of Latin American urban poor: the prevailing model and the case of Quito, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Klak, T; Holtzclaw, M

    1993-01-01

    In this study of the constraints of low-income migrants in securing decent housing in Quito, Ecuador (a rapidly growing city), there is a literature review of Latin American intraurban mobility and housing, the development of a theoretical model, and a bivariate analysis. John Turner's model of the three stages in the life cycle of migrants and the three concentric zones of urbanization provides the initial framework for examining Quito migration. Quito differs from other Third World and Latin American cities in that its origins are pre-Colombian, and physical barriers surround the city. Data were obtained from housing data collected independently in 1990 and 1991 and survey data on households living in 1000 inadequate housing units in 1989. 35.5% of Quito's population live in inadequate housing (poor building materials, poor construction, deterioration, or lack of basic services). Three concentric and elongated zones are constructed based on distance from the center city and periphery and are representative of shelter types (rented rooms, shanty, house, and apartment). Shelter improves with type of ownership status. The attitudes of local officials influences the proportion of the poor living in rental or self-help housing. 36% of Quito's low-income residents live in rented rooms, and 38% live in shanties and houses. Bridgeheaders (new migrants who are usually young single males) tend to live in rented rooms for under five years and to move over time to shanties and then houses. Colonial preservation in central Quito and landlords' incentives for encouraging migrants to stay in rental housing interferes with the third phase of the model. Mixed housing throughout the city fits the third phase. Local laws prevent squatters and self-help housing. Rented rooms are primarily in the central city. Occupant income increases with shifts from rented rooms, to shanties, to houses. Shelter, geographic, and mobility patterns that do not fit the model are identified. Urban

  5. Element export from a small catchment in the tropical montane forest of Ecuador responds to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Sophia; Willimann, Elias; Alaoui, Abdallah; Trachte, Katja; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    In a very remote tropical montane rain forest in the Ecuadorian Andes on the rim of the Amazon basin, increasing temperatures, longer dry spells, and an associated reduction in soil moisture were observed in the past 15 years. In the study ecosystem, element exports from a 9-ha large catchment with stream water are linked to the depth of water flow through soil because of vertical variations in soil chemical properties. The further increase in temperature and precipitation, as predicted by climate models, will have an impact on the water flow paths in soil and therefore alter element exports. Hence, we investigated how future element exports from this catchment in Ecuador will develop under the emission scenarios A1B and B1 for the decades 2050-2059 and 2090-2099 compared to current element exports. Discharge from the study catchment was measured in 1998-2013, partly in high resolution. Element concentrations in stream water (total organic carbon, NO3-N, NH4-N, dissolved organic nitrogen, PO4-P, total dissolved phosphorus, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Zn, Al, Mn) were measured in 1998-2012 in weekly resolution. Based on catchment properties, measured climate, and water flow data, discharge in 1998-2013 was simulated in daily resolution with the hydrological model WaSiM. From the hydrograph of surface flow, three flow classes (baseflow, intermediate, storm) were separated and linked with stream chemical properties. Element concentrations in stream water were grouped according to the flow classes and mean concentrations per flow class were calculated. Subsequently, the mean element concentration was multiplied with the mean of the annual discharge sums per flow class resulting in current element exports. For estimations of future element exports with stream water, discharge was simulated under the emission scenarios A1B and B1 for the decades 2050-2059 and 2090-2099 and separated into the three flow classes. Future element exports per scenario were calculated according to

  6. Response of dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations to moderate nutrient additions in a tropical montane forest of south Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velescu, Andre; Valarezo, Carlos; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    In the past two decades, the tropical montane rain forests in south Ecuador experienced increasing deposition of reactive nitrogen mainly originating from Amazonian forest fires, while Saharan dust inputs episodically increased deposition of base metals. Increasing air temperature and unevenly distributed rainfall have allowed for longer dry spells in a perhumid ecosystem. This might have favored mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by microorganisms and increased nutrient release from the organic layer. Environmental change is expected to impact the functioning of this ecosystem belonging to the biodiversity hotspots of the Earth. In 2007, we established a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) to understand the response of the ecosystem to moderately increased nutrient inputs. Since 2008, we have continuously applied 50 kg ha-1 a-1 of nitrogen (N), 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of phosphorus (P), 50 kg + 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of N and P and 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of calcium (Ca) in a randomized block design at 2000 m a.s.l. in a natural forest on the Amazonia-exposed slopes of the south Ecuadorian Andes. Nitrogen concentrations in throughfall increased following N+P additions, while separate N amendments only increased nitrate concentrations. Total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations showed high seasonal variations in litter leachate and decreased significantly in the P and N+P treatments, but not in the N treatment. Thus, P availability plays a key role in the mineralization of DOM. TOC/DON ratios were narrower in throughfall than in litter leachate but their temporal course did not respond to nutrient amendments. Our results revealed an initially fast, positive response of the C and N cycling to nutrient additions which declined with time. TOC and DON cycling only change if N and P supply are improved concurrently, while NO3-N leaching increases only if N is separately added. This indicates co-limitation of the microorganisms by N and P

  7. New high-definition thickness data obtained at tropical glaciers: preliminary results from Antisana volcano (Ecuador) using GPR prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Camilo; Andrade, Daniel; Córdova, Jorge; Maisincho, Luis; Carvajal, Juan; Calispa, Marlon; Villacís, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    The study of tropical glaciers has been a significant contribution to the understanding of glacier dynamics and climate change. Much of the data and results have been obtained by analyzing plan-view images obtained by air- and space-borne sensors, as well as depth data obtained by diverse methodologies at selected points on the glacier surface. However, the measurement of glacier thicknesses has remained an elusive task in tropical glaciers, often located in rough terrains where the application of geophysical surveys (i.e. seismic surveys) requires logistics sometimes hardly justified by the amount of obtained data. In the case of Ecuador, however, where most glaciers have developed on active volcanoes and represent sources/reservoirs of fresh water, the precise knowledge of such information is fundamental for scientific research but also in order to better assess key aspects for the society. The relatively recent but fast development of the GPR technology has helped to obtain new highdefinition thickness data at Antisana volcano that will be used to: 1) better understand the dynamics and fate of tropical glaciers; 2) better estimate the amount of fresh water stored in the glaciers; 3) better assess the hazards associated with the sudden widespread melting of glaciers during volcanic eruptions. The measurements have been obtained at glaciers 12 and 15 of Antisana volcano, with the help of a commercial GPR equipped with a 25 MHz antenna. A total of 30 transects have been obtained, covering a distance of more than 3 km, from the glacier ablation zone, located at ~ 4600 masl, up to the level of 5200 masl. The preliminary results show a positive correlation between altitude and glacier thickness, with maximum and minimum calculated values reaching up to 80 m, and down to 15 m, respectively. The experience gained at Antisana volcano will be used to prepare a more widespread GPR survey in the glaciers of Cotopaxi volcano, whose implications in terms of volcanic hazards

  8. Distribution and Potential Indicators of Hospitalized Cases of Neurocysticercosis and Epilepsy in Ecuador from 1996 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Gabriël, Sarah; Benitez-Ortiz, Washington; Saegerman, Claude; Dorny, Pierre; Berkvens, Dirk; Abatih, Emmanuel Nji

    2015-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is one of the most common signs of Neurocysticercosis (NCC). In this study, spatial and temporal variations in the incidence of hospitalized cases (IHC) of epilepsy and NCC in Ecuadorian municipalities were analyzed. Additionally, potential socio-economic and landscape indicators were evaluated in order to understand in part the macro-epidemiology of the Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis complex. Methodology Data on the number of hospitalized epilepsy and NCC cases by municipality of residence were obtained from morbidity-hospital systems in Ecuador. SatScan software was used to determine whether variations in the IHC of epilepsy and NCC in space and time. In addition, several socio-economic and landscape variables at municipality level were used to study factors intervening in the macro-epidemiology of these diseases. Negative Binomial regression models through stepwise selection and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) were used to explain the variations in the IHC of epilepsy and NCC. Principal findings Different clusters were identified through space and time. Traditional endemic zones for NCC and epilepsy, recognized in other studies were confirmed in our study. However, for both disorders more recent clusters were identified. Among municipalities, an increasing tendency for IHC of epilepsy, and a decreasing tendency for the IHC of NCC were observed over time. In contrast, within municipalities a positive linear relationship between both disorders was found. An increase in the implementation of systems for eliminating excrements would help to reduce the IHC of epilepsy by 1.00% (IC95%; 0.2%–1.8%) and by 5.12% (IC95%; 3.63%-6.59%) for the IHC of NCC. The presence of pig production was related to IHC of NCC. Conclusion/Significance Both disorders were related to the lack of an efficient system for eliminating excrements. Given the appearance of recent epilepsy clusters, these locations should be studied in depth to discriminate epilepsies due

  9. Color, phenolics, and antioxidant activity of blackberry (Rubus glaucus Benth.), blueberry (Vaccinium floribundum Kunth.), and apple wines from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Jacqueline; Marín-Arroyo, María-Remedios; Noriega-Domínguez, María-José; Navarro, Montserrat; Arozarena, Iñigo

    2013-07-01

    Seventy wines were produced in Ecuador under different processing conditions with local fruits: Andean blackberries (Rubus glaucus Benth.) and blueberries (Vaccinium floribundum Kunth.) and Golden Reinette apples. Wines were evaluated for antioxidant activity (AA) using the radical scavenging capacity (DPPH) method, total phenolic content (TPC) using the Folin-Ciocalteu method, total monomeric anthocyanins (TMAs) using the pH differential test, and color parameters using VIS-spectrophotometry. For blackberry wines, ellagitannins and anthocyanins were also analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD). Apples wines (n = 40) had the lowest TPC (608 ± 86 mg/L) and AA (2.1 ± 0.3 mM Trolox). Blueberry wines (n = 12) had high TPC (1086 ± 194 mg/L) and moderate AA (5.4 ± 0.8 mM) but very low TMA (8 ± 3 mg/L), with a color evolved toward yellow and blue shades. Blackberry wines (n = 10) had the highest TPC (1265 ± 91 mg/L) and AA (12 ± 1 mM). Ellagitannins were the major phenolics (1172 ± 115 mg/L) and correlated well with AA (r = 0.88). Within anthocyanins (TMA 73 ± 16 mg/L), cyanidin-3-rutinoside (62%) and cyanidin-3-glucoside (15%) were predominant. Wines obtained by cofermentation of apples and blackberries (n = 8) showed intermediate characteristics (TPC 999 ± 83 mg/L, AA 6.2 ± 0.7 mM, TMA 35 ± 22 mg/L) between the blackberry and blueberry wines. The results suggest that the Andean berries, particularly R. glaucus, are suitable raw materials to produce wines with an in vitro antioxidant capacity that is comparable to red grape wines.

  10. Vector control programs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador: successes and barriers to integrated vector management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and mosquito control programs (MCPs) diverge in settings and countries, and lead control specialists need to be aware of the most effective control strategies. Integrated Vector Management (IVM) strategies, once implemented in MCPs, aim to reduce cost and optimize protection of the populations against VBDs. This study presents a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis to compare IVM strategies used by MCPs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador. This research evaluates MCPs strategies to improve vector control activities. Methods Methods included descriptive findings of the MCP operations. Information was obtained from vector control specialists, directors, and residents through field trips, surveys, and questionnaires. Evaluations of the strategies and assets of the control programs where obtained through SWOT analysis and within an IVM approach. Results Organizationally, the Floridian MCP is a tax-based District able to make decisions independently from county government officials, with the oversight of an elected board of commissioners. The Guayas program is directed by the country government and assessed by non-governmental organizations like the World health Organization. Operationally, the Floridian MCP conducts entomological surveillance and the Ecuadorian MCP focuses on epidemiological monitoring of human disease cases. Strengths of both MCPs were their community participation and educational programs. Weaknesses for both MCPs included limitations in budgets and technical capabilities. Opportunities, for both MCPs, are additional funding and partnerships with private, non-governmental, and governmental organizations. Threats experienced by both MCPs included political constraints and changes in the social and ecological environment that affect mosquito densities and control efforts. IVM pillars for policy making were used to compare the information among the programs. Differences

  11. Late Jurassic Crustal Thickening in the Mesozoic Arc of Ecuador and Colombia: Implications on the Evolution of Continental Arcs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, J.; Cardona, A.; Blanco-Quintero, I.; Valencia, V.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of South America during the Jurassic is related to the subduction of the Farallon plate and the formation of a series of continental arcs. In the northern Andes such arcs have been considered as controlled by extensional dominated tectonics. Paleomagnetic constraints have also suggested that between the Early and Late Jurassic several crustal domains were translate along the continental margin in association with strain partitioning in the convergent margin. A review of the character of the Salado terrane in the Cordillera Real of Ecuador indicates that it includes extensively deformed and metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks that have achieved a greenschist to amphibolite facies event with chloritoid and garnet. This rocks are tightly associated with a ca. 143 Ma syn-tectonic granodiorite to monzogranite batholith that is also extensively milonitized.A similar Late Jurassic crustal thickening event that apparently affected volcano-sedimentary rocks have been also recently suspected in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes in association with Jurassic plutonic rocks (Blanco-Quintero et al., 2013) It is therefore suggested that during the Late Jurassic the Northern Andes experienced significant contractional tectonics. Such crustal thickening may be related to either the active subduction setting were the crustal slivers formed in relation to oblique convergence are transfered and re-accreted to the margin and triggered the deformational event or to a collisional event associated to the arrival of an allocthonous terrane. New geochronological constraints on the metamorphic evolution and precise understanding on the relations between magmatism and deformation are going to be obtain in the Salado Terrane to appropriately test this hypothesis and contribute to the understanding of the extensional to compressional tectonic switching in continental arcs. Blanco-Quintero, I. F., García-Casco, A., Ruíz, E. C., Toro, L. M., Moreno, M

  12. The emergence of the vertical birth in Ecuador: an analysis of agenda setting and policy windows for intercultural health

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, Ana; Mayhew, Susannah

    2016-01-01

    Maternal mortality continues to claim the lives of thousands of women in Latin America despite the availability of effective treatments to avert maternal death. In the past, efforts to acknowledge cultural diversity in birth practices had not been clearly integrated into policy. However, in Otavalo (Ecuador) a local hospital pioneered the implementation of the ‘Vertical Birth’—a practical manifestation of an intercultural health policy aimed at increasing indigenous women’s access to maternity care. Drawing on agenda-setting theory, this qualitative research explores how the vertical birth practice made it onto the local policy agenda and the processes that allowed actors to seize a window of opportunity allowing the vertical birth practice to emerge. Our results show that the processes that brought about the vertical birth practice took place over a prolonged period of time and resulted from the interplay between various factors. Firstly, a maternal health policy community involving indigenous actors played a key role in identifying maternal mortality as a policy problem, defining its causes and framing it as an indigenous rights issue. Secondly, previous initiatives to address maternal mortality provided a wealth of experience that gave these actors the knowledge and experience to formulate a feasible policy solution and consolidate support from powerful actors. Thirdly, the election of a new government that had incorporated the demands of the indigenous movement opened up a window of opportunity to push intercultural health policies such as the vertical birth. We conclude that the socioeconomic and political changes at both national and local level allowed the meaningful participation of indigenous actors that made a critical contribution to the emergence of the vertical birth practice. These findings can help us advance our knowledge of strategies to set the agenda for intercultural maternal health policy and inform future policy in similar settings

  13. Time-averaged paleomagnetic field at the equator: Complete data and results from the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gromme, Sherman; Mankinen, Edward A.; Prévot, Michel

    2010-01-01

    We present here the complete paleomagnetic laboratory results from a collection of approximately 1500 oriented cores from all 16 of the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, collected by Allan Cox in 1964–1965 but nearly all previously unpublished. The islands are located in the eastern Pacific Ocean within 1.4° of latitude from the equator and range in age from historically erupted to 3 Ma, mostly determined by published K-Ar and 3He isotopic dating. The number of sites collected on each island ranges from 1 to 28, for a total of 186. After combining duplicate site mean directions, 149 are used for an overall mean direction and 8 represent excursions and one reversal path. Divided by geomagnetic polarity chron, 110 site means are Brunhes or Jaramillo (normal polarity), 27 are Matuyama (reversed polarity), and 12 are Gauss (both polarities). We have completed the magnetic cleaning that was commenced in the late 1960s. Secondary (mostly viscous) magnetizations were nearly all removed by alternating field demagnetization at 10 mT. We have used the so-called blanket cleaning method, generally at 10 mT. All sites were in basalt flows and gave good paleomagnetic results; none was rejected in toto, and only a few core specimens were magnetically unsatisfactory. Nearly all sites had eight independently oriented cores, and within-site angular standard deviations of directions range from 1° to 8°. We used both Fisher and Bingham statistics to analyze the data and found that many of the direction populations are strongly elongate along the paleomagnetic meridian, while the corresponding virtual pole (VGP) populations are essentially circularly distributed. The paleomagnetic poles, calculated as the means of VGPs, are as follows: Brunhes and Jaramillo, north latitude = 86.9°, east longitude = 245.1°, and 95% confidence radius A95 = 1.9°; Matuyama, latitude = 87.2°, longitude = 158.2°, and A95 = 3.8°; Gauss, latitude = 83.0°, longitude = 204.7°, and A95 = 7.0°. These

  14. La preparacion en ciencia de los candidatos a maestros del nivel elemental primario segun la reforma de la educacion cientifica en Puerto Rico: Una propuesta de secuencia curricular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Plaza, Evelyn

    El proposito de esta investigacion fue identificar los componentes de la preparacion en ciencia que deben recibir los estudiantes del Bachillerato en Artes en Educacion Elemental, Nivel Primario, de acuerdo a los documentos que dirigen la reforma de la educacion cientifica en Puerto Rico. Tambien, se identificaron los componentes de los cursos que forman parte de la preparacion en ciencia de estos estudiantes. Se compararon los componentes de la preparacion en ciencia y los componentes de los cursos para determinar congruencias y discrepancias. Con los datos recopilados se identificaron los componentes de los cursos de una secuencia curricular para la preparacion en ciencia de los candidatos a maestros del nivel elemental primario. La secuencia curricular que se propone en esta investigacion incluye cursos de contenido cientifico y de metodologia en la ensenanza de la ciencia disenados para satisfacer las necesidades de los candidatos. Se recomienda que en los procesos para el diseno, la implantacion y la evaluacion de estos cursos participen profesores de ciencia, profesores de educacion y maestros del nivel elemental primario. Todos los cursos de la secuencia curricular deben tener un enfoque constructivista. Las experiencias educativas que se incluyan en los cursos deben aspirar a desarrollar en los candidatos los atributos de la cultura cientifica y actitudes positivas hacia la ciencia y hacia la ensenanza de esta disciplina. El modelaje por parte de los profesores que ensenen los cursos de la secuencia curricular es fundamental en el desarrollo profesional de los candidatos. Se recomienda que en los cursos de contenido cientifico se estudien los conceptos y los conocimientos cientificos que forman parte del curriculo de Kindergarten a tercer grado de forma integrada y con una profundidad universitaria. Estos cursos deben tener un enfoque interdisciplinario e incluir el estudio de la naturaleza de la ciencia y un componente de laboratorio para desarrollar los

  15. A cross-sectional study to assess knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention measures in company workers in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS was first reported in Ecuador in 1984 and its prevalence has been increasing ever since. In 2009, the National AIDS Program reported 21,810 HIV/AIDS cases and confirmed that the worker population was amongst the most affected groups. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention measures in company workers in Ecuador. Methods A cross-sectional survey based on a random sample of 115 companies (1,732 workers), stratified by three large provinces and working sectors (commerce, manufacturing and real estate) was conducted. A validated instrument developed by Family Health International was used to evaluate HIV prevention knowledge and common local misconceptions about HIV transmission. Descriptive statistics, chi square test and logistic regression analysis were performed using SAS. Results Incorrect knowledge about HIV/AIDS transmission were found in 49.1% (95% CI: 46.6–51.6) of subjects. Incorrect knowledge was higher among males (OR = 1.73 [1.39–2.15]), older subjects (OR = 1.35 [1.02–1.77]), subjects with lower education (OR = 3.72 [2.44–5.65]), manual labor workers (OR = 2.93 [1.82–4.73]) and subjects without previous exposure to HIV intervention programs (OR = 2.26 [1.79–2.86]). Incorrect knowledge about preventive measures was found among 32.9% (95%CI: 30.6–35.2) of respondents. This proportion was higher among subjects with lower education (OR = 2.28 [1.52–3.43]), married subjects (OR = 1.34 [1.07–1.68]), manual labor workers (OR = 1.80 [1.34–2.42]), and subjects not previously exposed to HIV intervention programs (OR = 1.44 [1.14–1.83]). Conclusions HIV intervention programs targeting company workers are urgently needed to improve knowledge and reduce HIV transmission in Ecuador. PMID:23410074

  16. Toxicity of Bothrops sp snake venoms from Ecuador and preclinical assessment of the neutralizing efficacy of a polyspecific antivenom from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Laines, Johana; Segura, Álvaro; Villalta, Mauren; Herrera, María; Vargas, Mariángela; Alvarez, Gladys; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo

    2014-09-01

    The toxicological profile of the venoms of the snakes Bothrops asper and Bothrops atrox from Ecuador was investigated, together with the venom of a population of B. asper formerly classified as 'Bothrops xanthogrammus'. The three venoms exerted lethal, hemorrhagic, myotoxic, coagulant and defibrinogenating effects, in agreement with the characteristic toxicological profile of Bothrops sp venoms. A polyspecific antivenom (bothropic-crotalic-lachesic) manufactured in Costa Rica was assessed for its preclinical efficacy against the toxic activities of these Ecuadorian venoms. Antivenom was effective in the neutralization of the five activities tested in the three venoms. These observations are in agreement with previous reports on the extensive cross-reactivity and paraspecific neutralization of antivenoms manufactured in Latin America against the venoms of Bothrops sp snakes. PMID:24950051

  17. The Effect of Price and Socio-Economic Level on the Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages (SSB): The Case of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Paraje, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to estimate the own-price, cross-price and income elasticities of demand for SSB in Ecuador, as an indispensable step for predicting a reduction in the consumption of said beverages caused by the potential implementation of taxes in Ecuador. In addition, the own-price, cross-price and income elasticities of sugar-free substitutes like mineral water and diet soft drinks and juices are also estimated. The data from the 2011-2012 ENIGHUR, which contains detailed information on household consumption and socioeconomic variables, was used. The estimates are done using Deaton's Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) which accounts for differences in the quality of goods purchased. This demand system is estimated for different socio-economic groups, according to total household expenditure. The results reveal own-price elasticities for SSB between -1.17 and -1.33 depending on the socio-economic group, in line with the existing evidence for developed countries. Own-price elasticity for non-SSB is between -1 and -1.24. Income elasticities reveal that both SSB and non-SSB are normal goods with elasticities decreasing for higher socio-economic groups. These results show that the consumption of SSB is sensitive to price changes, meaning that the implementation of taxes on said beverages could be effective in reducing their consumption. The fact that non-SSB are also sensitive to price changes would indicate that subsidies could be implemented for the production of some of them. PMID:27028608

  18. Effect of Ecuador's cash transfer program (Bono de Desarrollo Humano) on child development in infants and toddlers: a randomized effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Fernald, Lia C H; Hidrobo, Melissa

    2011-05-01

    We examined the effects of Ecuador's Bono de Desarrollo Humano (BDH)--an unconditional cash transfer program that was rolled-out using a randomized design--on health and development outcomes in very young children. Communities that were randomly assigned to the treatment group began receiving the BDH in 2004 and those randomly assigned to the comparison group began receiving benefits two years later. Families enrolled in the BDH received a monthly cash stipend ($15USD) representing an approximate 6-10% increase in household income. Participants analyzed in this study are children aged 12-35 months from treatment (n = 797) and comparison (n = 399) communities in rural and urban Ecuador. Main outcomes measured were language skills (the Fundación MacArthur Inventorio del Desarollo de Habilidades Comunicativas-Breve), height-for-age z-score, and hemoglobin concentration. Results indicate that in rural areas, being randomized to receive the BDH in very early childhood led to significantly better performance on the number of words a child was saying, and on the probability that the child was combining two or more words. There were no significant effects on language development for children in urban areas and there were no effects on height-for-age z-score or hemoglobin concentration in rural or urban areas. A limited number of potential pathways with respect to cognitive/language stimulation, health behaviors, and parenting quality were also explored. Findings indicate that compared to children in comparison areas, rural children in treatment areas were more likely to have received vitamin A or iron supplementation and have been bought a toy in the past six months. This study provides evidence for significant benefits of an unconditional cash transfer program for language development in very young children in rural areas.

  19. Unexpected distribution of the fluoroquinolone-resistance gene qnrB in Escherichia coli isolates from different human and poultry origins in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Armas-Freire, Paulina I; Trueba, Gabriel; Proaño-Bolaños, Carolina; Levy, Karen; Zhang, Lixin; Marrs, Carl F; Cevallos, William; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2015-06-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance can be conferred through chromosomal mutations or by the acquisition of plasmids carrying genes such as the quinolone resistance gene (qnr). In this study, 3,309 strains of commensal Escherichia coli were isolated in Ecuador from: (i) humans and chickens in a rural northern coastal area (n = 2368, 71.5%) and (ii) chickens from an industrial poultry operation (n = 827, 25%). In addition, 114 fluoroquinolone-resistant strains from patients with urinary tract infections who were treated at three urban hospitals in Quito, Ecuador were analyzed. All of the isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility screening. Fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates (FRIs) were then screened for the presence of qnrB genes. A significantly higher phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones was determined in E. coli strains from chickens in both the rural area (22%) and the industrial operation (10%) than in strains isolated from humans in the rural communities (3%). However, the rates of qnrB genes in E. coli isolates from healthy humans in the rural communities (11 of 35 isolates, 31%) was higher than in chickens from either the industrial operations (3 of 81 isolates, 6%) or the rural communities (7 of 251 isolates, 2.8%). The occurrence of qnrB genes in human FRIs obtained from urban hospitals was low (1 of 114 isolates, 0.9%). These results suggested that the qnrB gene is more widely distributed in rural settings, where antibiotic usage is low, than in urban hospitals and industrial poultry operations. The role of qnrB in clinical resistance to fluoroquinolones is thus far unknown.

  20. Integrating participatory community mobilization processes to improve dengue prevention: an eco-bio-social scaling up of local success in Machala, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell-Foster, Kendra; Ayala, Efraín Beltrán; Breilh, Jaime; Spiegel, Jerry; Wilches, Ana Arichabala; Leon, Tania Ordóñez; Delgado, Jefferson Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background This project investigates the effectiveness and feasibility of scaling-up an eco-bio-social approach for implementing an integrated community-based approach for dengue prevention in comparison with existing insecticide-based and emerging biolarvicide-based programs in an endemic setting in Machala, Ecuador. Methods An integrated intervention strategy (IIS) for dengue prevention (an elementary school-based dengue education program, and clean patio and safe container program) was implemented in 10 intervention clusters from November 2012 to November 2013 using a randomized controlled cluster trial design (20 clusters: 10 intervention, 10 control; 100 households per cluster with 1986 total households). Current existing dengue prevention programs served as the control treatment in comparison clusters. Pupa per person index (PPI) is used as the main outcome measure. Particular attention was paid to social mobilization and empowerment with IIS. Results Overall, IIS was successful in reducing PPI levels in intervention communities versus control clusters, with intervention clusters in the six paired clusters that followed the study design experiencing a greater reduction of PPI compared to controls (2.2 OR, 95% CI: 1.2 to 4.7). Analysis of individual cases demonstrates that consideration for contexualizing programs and strategies to local neighborhoods can be very effective in reducing PPI for dengue transmission risk reduction. Conclusions In the rapidly evolving political climate for dengue control in Ecuador, integration of successful social mobilization and empowerment strategies with existing and emerging biolarvicide-based government dengue prevention and control programs is promising in reducing PPI and dengue transmission risk in southern coastal communities like Machala. However, more profound analysis of social determination of health is called for to assess sustainability prospects. PMID:25604763