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Sample records for ed frcs eng

  1. Inductive Flux Build-Up of RMF Formed FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Alan; Milroy, Richard

    2004-11-01

    Slow formation of high beta plasmas, such as FRCs, is difficult due to the need to build up plasma pressure rapidly enough to balance the dominant poloidal field pressure. Slow formation was attempted in the Coaxial Slow Source (CSS) device where 4-turn inner and outer coils were used to explore slower formation options, but it was not possible to operate at low enough densities to avoid radiative collapse.^1 FRCs have also been formed slowly at relatively low pressures and magnetic fields using Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF), but it has also been difficult to overcome radiation barriers and achieve high temperatures due to relatively low power inputs.^2 We have performed calculations that show FRCs could be formed using RMF, and then augmented in flux and energy using the inductive input from a CSS type internal coil. With correct tailoring of the coil current profiles, the FRC could then be translated off the central coil. This methodology should be capable of producing hot, high flux FRCs using slow, low voltage technology. ^1 Z.A. Pietrzyk, et. al., Nuclear Fusion 27, 1478 (1987). ^2 H.Y. Guo, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 185 (2002).

  2. Internal magnetic probe for use in high temperature FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Slough, John; Miller, Ken

    1998-11-01

    In the TCS and STX experiments a Rotating Magnetic Field is used to drive the FRC current. An internal magnetic probe has been built to measure both Bθ and Bz along the plasma radius. The probe has 24 multi-turn coils which are made of 0.0015" dia copper wire. The coils are enclosed in a 0.08 cm ID, 0.20 cm OD, 24 cm long berillum oxide (BeO) tube chosen for its high thermal conductivity, high melting point and low contamination potential. Measurements made on high temperature FRCs will be presented. (www.aa.washington.edu/AERP/RPPL) Supported by USDOE.

  3. Resistivity scaling of rotating magnetic field current drive in FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Guo, H. Y.; Milroy, R. D.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.

    2003-10-01

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) have been used to both form and sustain low density, prolate FRCs in the translation confinement and sustainment (TCS) facility. The two most important factors governing performance are the plasma resistivity, which sets the maximum density for which toroidal current can be maintained, and the energy loss rate, which sets the plasma temperature. The plasma resistivity has been determined by carefully measuring the amount of RMF power absorbed by the FRC. When the ratio of RMF magnitude, Bohgr, to external poloidal confinement field, Be, is high, this resistivity is very adversely affected by the RMF drive process. However, when Bohgr/Be falls below about 0.3, the resistivity returns to values typical of non-driven FRCs. The observed scaling leads to a density dependence of ne ~ Bohgr/rsohgr1/2 where rs is the FRC separatrix radius and ohgr is the RMF frequency. Since the FRC contains little or no toroidal field, Be is proportional to (neTt)1/2 where Tt = Te + Ti is the sum of the electron and ion temperatures. In the present experiments, except for the initial start-up phase where Tt can exceed 100 eV, the plasma temperature is limited to about 40 eV by high oxygen impurity levels. Thus, low Bohgr/Be, low resistivity operation was only realized by operating at low values of Bohgr. The RMF drive sustains particles as well as flux, and resistive input powers can be in the MW range at higher values of Bohgr, so that high temperature, steady-state operation should be possible once impurity levels are reduced. Changes are being made to the present 'O-ring' sealed, quartz chambered TCS to provide bakable metal walls and wall conditioning as in other quasi-steady fusion facilities.

  4. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  5. Flux buildup in FRCs using rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Alan L.

    1999-11-01

    FRCs have a purely diamagnetic current with a line density magnitude I' = Δ B/μo just sufficient to reverse the external confinement field. This results in an average electron rotational velocity ωr ≈ j_e/ner. A rotating magnetic field (RMF) causes the electrons to oscillate along the axial field lines and creates an azimuthal EMF equal to . This EMF will act to overcome the η_⊥j_θ resistive loss and result in flux buildup if the RMF frequency ω exceeds ω_r. The RMF penetration is approximately δ = (2η_allel/μ_o\\varpi)^1/2 where \\varpi = ω-ωr is the effective frequency seen in the electron frame of reference, and the resultant total electron drive is strongly peaked at small \\varpi where δ^* = r_s, the FRC separatrix radius. As the FRC expands due to flux buildup ωr will change and strongly affect the RMF drive. This interplay between RMF drive and FRC equilibrium has been studied using the type of analytic solutions first derived by Hugrass^1 for rigid rotor rotations. Results are compared with flux buildup and sustainment measurements in the STX device, and the implications for larger devices are discussed. Support by USDOE. ^1W.N. Hugrass, Aust. J. Phys. 39, 513 (1986).

  6. Stochasticity and orbit types in advanced beam-driven FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Francesco; Galeotti, Laura; Barnes, Dan; Dettrick, Sean; Monkhorst, Henk; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Advanced beam-driven FRCs (Field Reversed Configurations) represent a plasma configuration which is aimed to reach steady state through external sustainment. In an advanced beam-driven FRC the plasma has a very rich selection of orbit types, namely, drift, betatron, figure-8 and type-I. How much each type contributes to the total quantity of orbits strongly depends on both plasma and external field parameters and it may include regular and stochastic orbits with very different ratios. We study the orbit type distribution as well as the fractions of regular and stochastic orbits for a set of realistic advanced beam-driven FRC equilibria in very different plasma regimes. In particular, we investigate the dependences of the orbit type distribution on the equilibrium parameters and we discuss the relevant role of the FRC parameter s in providing a good estimate of the total quantity of stochastic orbits. A first investigation of the possible role of stochastic orbits in thermalizing processes induced by magnetic pumping techniques is presented.

  7. HIFLUX: OBLATE FRCS, DOUBLE HELICES,SPHEROMAKS AND RFPS IN ONE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFFER,MJ; BOEDO,JA

    2003-07-01

    OAK-B135 High magnetic flux is required for thermonuclear FRC reactors and, more immediately, to advance the FRC experimental program in general. Oblate FRCs are of special interest because they are predicted to have certain improved MHD stability over elongated FRCs, and oblate FRCs may yield the most compact, magnetically confined fusion reactors. Neither oblate nor high-flux FRCs have been investigated experimentally to date. Our presently proposed technique is to make two high-flux, oppositely-handed plasmas by a pair of large, external, reversed-field pinch (RFP) sources. The plasmas would propagate as two Taylor-relaxed double-helix plasmas, to an oblate main plasma chamber, where they would relax further to a counter-helicity pair of spheromaks, which would finally merge into a single high-flux FRC. A concept for a new experimental facility, HIFLUX, to make and study high-magnetic-flux oblate Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas, is described. Similar principles might also enable high flux non-inductive startup of other plasma devices.

  8. Sustainment of Elongated FRCs with localized Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.

    2003-10-01

    Effects of RMF antenna lengths on the sustainment of RMF driven FRCs have been investigated in the TCS facility. FRCs could be sustained with axial lengths well beyond the RMF antenna, presumably due to induced axial outflow. The FRC length ls was weekly dependent on the antenna length la with ls ˜ 2la being achieved for the shortest antenna employed. Reducing antenna length led to more stable operation with FRCs less prone to rotational instabilities. Shorter antenna lengths also resulted in increases in plasma temperature. At larger ratios of l_s/la the RMF had to supply a greater torque per unit length, and it did this by increasing its penetration into the FRC, brought about automatically by a slight decrease in plasma density. In contrast, operation with the RMF antenna covering the full TCS confinement chamber (la > l_s) led to non-steady behavior with the FRC length decreasing during the discharge. This was most likely due to inhibition of the swirling flow at the ends needed to sustain the configuration. Consequently, the particle confinement was degraded, hence enhancing energy losses in the recycling related processes.

  9. Inductive Sustainment of Oblate FRCs with the Assistance of Magnetic Diffusion, Shaping and Finite-Lamor Radius Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S.; Belova, E. V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Inomoto, M.; Jacobson, C. M.; Maqueda, R.; McGeehan, B.; Y., Ren

    2008-07-31

    Oblate field-reversed configurations FRCs have been sustained for >300 µs, or >15 magnetic diffusion times, through the use of an inductive solenoid. These argon FRCs can have their poloidal flux sustained or increased, depending on the timing and strength of the induction. An inward pinch is observed during sustainment, leading to a peaking of the pressure profile and maintenance of the FRC equilibrium. The good stability observed in argon (and krypton) does not transfer to lighter gases, which develop terminal co-interchange instabilities. The stability in argon and krypton is attributed to a combination of external field shaping, magnetic diffusion, and finite-Larmor radius effects.

  10. Calculations of tangential neutral beam injection current drive efficiency for present moderate flux FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, A. F.; Farengo, R.; Hoffman, A. L.

    2004-09-01

    A Monte Carlo code is employed to study tangential neutral beam injection into moderate flux field reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs). The dimensions of the FRC are similar to those obtained in the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment (TCS) experiment. Two injection geometries are considered. In one case the beam is injected through the ends, at a small angle to the FRC axis while in the other the beam is injected almost perpendicularly, at some point along the separatrix. The current drive efficiency and the deposited power are calculated employing plasma parameters that can be expected in future experiments on TCS. It is shown that, although the RMF degrades beam confinement, relatively high efficiencies can be obtained provided the RMF does not penetrate too deeply into the plasma. Since the torque deposited by the neutral beam can balance the torque deposited by the RMF, the simultaneous use of both methods appears to be a very attractive option.

  11. FPIC: A Key Next Step for Stability Studies of Advanced Beam Driven FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettrick, Sean; Barnes, Dan; Ceccherini, Francesco; Galeotti, Laura; Guerrero, Victor; Hendrix, Doug; Hubbard, Kevin; Milroy, Richard; Necas, Ales; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the C-2U experiment is to use neutral beam heating and edge biasing to sustain an advanced beam-driven FRC for many milliseconds, longer than the growth times of known instabilities and the resistive wall time. To guide the experiment further into unexplored parameter regimes, it is desirable to have a stability code suitable for beam-driven FRC plasmas, in which the bulk of ion orbits are not Larmor-like and hence gyrokinetic approximations are inapplicable. Fully kinetic ions are required for stability simulations of beam driven FRCs, as are multiple ion species, end boundary conditions, and a resistive boundary. To meet these challenges a new 3D quasineutral hybrid code, FPIC, is being developed. FPIC has a choice of zero electron mass and finite electron mass Ohm's law solvers. Uniform staggered grids, finite differencing, and cut cell boundaries are used to simplify and optimize the PIC while allowing arbitrary boundary shapes. Finite resistivity of the boundary is implemented by coupling free-space exterior solutions to the cut-cell edges. The code is MPI parallelized and the particle push is GPU accelerated. Code benchmarks will be presented including the stability of the FRC tilt mode.

  12. Multipolar Electrode and Preamplifier Design for ENG-Signal Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulier, Fabien; Gouyet, Lionel; Cathébras, Guy; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Bertrand, Yves

    Cuff electrodes have several advantages for in situ recording ENG signal. They are easy to implant and not very invasive for the patient. Nevertheless, they are subject to background parasitic noise, especially the EMG generated by the muscles. We show that the use of cuff electrodes with large numbers of poles can increase their sensitivity and their selectivity with respect to an efficient noise rejection. We investigate several configurations and compare the performances of a tripolar cuff electrode versus a multipolar one in numerical simulation.

  13. Closed-loop, non-linear feedback control simulations of beam-driven field-reversed configurations (FRCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, N.; Onofri, M.; Barnes, D.; Romero, J.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The C-2U device has recently demonstrated sustainment of an advanced, beam-driven FRC over time scales longer than the characteristic times for confinement, fast ion slow-down, and wall current decay. In anticipation of further advances in plasma lifetime, we are developing feedback control techniques for major FRC parameters and resistive instabilities. The LamyRidge code solves the time-dependent extended MHD equations in axisymmetric geometry. In the Q2D code, LamyRidge is combined with a 3-D kinetic code that tracks fast ions and runs in parallel with LamyRidge. Periodically, the background fields in the kinetic code are updated from the MHD simulation and the averaged fast particle distribution is integrated into the fluid equations. Recently, we have added the capability to run Q2D simulations as subordinate processes in Simulink, giving us the ability to run non-linear, closed-loop simulations using control algorithms developed in Simulink. The same Simulink models can be exported to real-time targets (CPU or FPGA) to perform feedback control in experiments. We present closed-loop simulations of beam-driven FRCs under magnetically-actuated feedback control. Results for positionally unstable FRCs are compared with the predictions of a linearized rigid-plasma model. Plasmas predicted to be passively stabilized by the linear model are found to exhibit Alfvenic growth in several cases. Feedback gains predicted to be stabilizing in the linear model are generally found to be insufficient in non-linear simulations, and vice versa. Control of separatrix geometry is demonstrated.

  14. The Eng1 β-Glucanase Enhances Histoplasma Virulence by Reducing β-Glucan Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Garfoot, Andrew L.; Shen, Qian; Wüthrich, Marcel; Klein, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum parasitizes host phagocytes. To avoid antimicrobial immune responses, Histoplasma yeasts must minimize their detection by host receptors while simultaneously interacting with the phagocyte. Pathogenic Histoplasma yeast cells, but not avirulent mycelial cells, secrete the Eng1 protein, which is a member of the glycosylhydrolase 81 (GH81) family. We show that Histoplasma Eng1 is a glucanase that hydrolyzes β-(1,3)-glycosyl linkages but is not required for Histoplasma growth in vitro or for cell separation. However, Histoplasma yeasts lacking Eng1 function have attenuated virulence in vivo, particularly during the cell-mediated immunity stage. Histoplasma yeasts deficient for Eng1 show increased exposure of cell wall β-glucans, which results in enhanced binding to the Dectin-1 β-glucan receptor. Consistent with this, Eng1-deficient yeasts trigger increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine production from macrophages and dendritic cells. While not responsible for large-scale cell wall structure and function, the secreted Eng1 reduces levels of exposed β-glucans at the yeast cell wall, thereby diminishing potential recognition by Dectin-1 and proinflammatory cytokine production by phagocytes. In α-glucan-producing Histoplasma strains, Eng1 acts in concert with α-glucan to minimize β-glucan exposure: α-glucan provides a masking function by covering the β-glucan-rich cell wall, while Eng1 removes any remaining exposed β-glucans. Thus, Histoplasma Eng1 has evolved a specialized pathogenesis function to remove exposed β-glucans, thereby enhancing the ability of yeasts to escape detection by host phagocytes. PMID:27094334

  15. PREFACE: EDS2010 Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggie, Malcolm I.

    2011-03-01

    The biennial international conference on Extended Defects in Semiconductors started in 1978 with a meeting in Hünfeld, Germany. Subsequent meetings rotated between Poland, France, Great Britain, Germany, Russia and Italy, culminating in EDS2004 in Chernogolovka, EDS2006 in Halle and EDS2008 in Poitiers. EDS2010 was held at the University of Sussex at Brighton, UK from September 19th to 24th. An extension of the tabulation of this history, which first appeared on the EDS2006 website, is given in the attached PDF. It is with sadness that we note one of the founders of the series, Prof. Dr Helmut Alexander, passed away on 3 December 2009 and we were proud to dedicate EDS2010 to his memory. It has become a tradition to make an award in his name, and this year it was made to Ivan Isacov for his poster "Electrical levels of dislocation networks in p- and n-type silicon". A short and warm celebration of Prof. Dr Alexander's life by his friends and colleagues, Prof. Drs Helmut Gottschalk, Eicke Weber and Wolfgang Schröter, is included in this volume. The conference was a forum for the state-of-the-art of investigation and modelling of extended defects in semiconductors. Scientists from universities, research institutes and industry made contributions to a deeper understanding of extended defects, their interaction with point defects and their role in the development of semiconductor technology. The remit of the conference included extended defects, nanostructures, nanoparticles, quantum dots and interfaces within semiconducting materials ranging from narrow to wide band gaps, including graphene-derived materials and diamond. Scientific interests range from defect geometry, electronic structure, dynamics, spectroscopy, microscopy, reactions and chemistry to introduction mechanisms, such as implantation and strained layers and the operation of devices such as integrated circuits, heterostructures, and solar cells. The organisers were confronted with a long period between

  16. Restructuring Graduate Engineering Education: The M.Eng. Program at Cornell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, K. Bingham; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the restructuring of the graduate program to accommodate emerging fields in engineering. Notes half of the graduate degrees Cornell grants each year are M.Eng. degrees. Offers 12 specialties: aerospace, agriculture, chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical and nuclear engineering; computer science, engineering physics; geological…

  17. A&M. Jet enging test pad (TAN609) was used in 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Jet enging test pad (TAN-609) was used in 1968 for semiscale test apparatus. View of blowdown test with rollup door open. When break in pressurized coolant loop is simulated, steam is released suddenly. INEEL negative no. 68-3179 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 10. "ARCHITECTURAL, SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG043535572; Drawing No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "ARCHITECTURAL, SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 23 of 148; file no. 1320/74. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG043535572; Drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 25 of 148; file no. 1320/76. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 4. "ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANELEVATIONSSECTIONS, OBSERVATION BUNKERS." Specifications No. ENG (NASA)04353631; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLAN-ELEVATIONS-SECTIONS, OBSERVATION BUNKERS." Specifications No. ENG (NASA)04-353-63-1; Drawing No. 60-09-34; sheet 325. Ref. No. A-13. D.O. SERIES 1597/87. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunker 1-D-3, Test Area 1-125, northwest end of Altair Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 30. "CONSTRUCTION PHASING, STATION '50' AREA." Specifications No. ENG043535775, Drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. "CONSTRUCTION PHASING, STATION '50' AREA." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-57-75, Drawing No. AF-4502-19, sheet 4 of 5, D.O. Series No. AF 1439/26. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 5296, Date: 10 NOV. 59. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Instrumentation and control building, architectural, floor plans. Specifications no. Eng043535572; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Instrumentation and control building, architectural, floor plans. Specifications no. Eng-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12' sheet 64 of 148; file no. 1321/15. Stamped: record drawing - as constructed. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 7. "LAUNCH SILOS; SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG043535973; Drawing No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. "LAUNCH SILOS; SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-59-73; Drawing No. 5841-S-4; D.O. SERIES AW1525/26 Rev. A.; Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract No. 6601, Rev. A., Date 11 Sep 59. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Missile Silo Type, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. On the unusual characteristics of the diamonds from Letšeng-la-Terae kimberlites, Lesotho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Debbie C.; Ferraris, Ray D.; Palmer, Claire E.; Ward, John D.

    2009-11-01

    The Letšeng-la-Terae kimberlites are situated 3100 m above sea level in the Maloti Mountains of Lesotho, southern Africa. The principal economic bodies are two Late Cretaceous, low grade, 1-3.5 carats/hundred ton (cpht), kimberlite pipes that host high-value diamonds realising US 2000-2500/carat (/ct) in 2008 terms. Locally, the larger kimberlite body is referred to as the Main Pipe (17.2 ha) and the smaller one is called the Satellite Pipe (5.2 ha). These pipes, and their associated eluvial and proximal alluvial deposits, are renowned for yielding large, "D" colour, gem quality diamonds, including + 100 carat (ct) stones. Earlier artisanal effort (1959-1977) and formal mining (1977-1982) produced 335,000 carats (cts), including the 601 ct Lesotho Brown in 1968. In 2003, Letšeng Diamonds Limited re-commenced mining operations and had produced 265,000 cts by the end of July 2008, including 24 + 100 ct diamonds, the largest of which was the 603 ct Lesotho Promise. We report here on the unusual characteristics of the Letšeng diamond population that include: 75% gem quality that is more commonly associated with alluvial diamond deposits, large average stone size of ca. 1 carat/stone (ct/stn) that is also more typical of certain alluvial diamond placers, high-yielding, rounded to flattened irregular, resorbed dodecahedral shapes (Main Pipe 67% and Satellite Pipe 87%) with subordinate dodecahedral macle (Main Pipe 32% and Satellite Pipe 12%) and broken (ca. 1%) forms. In both pipes the octahedral component is virtually absent (< 0.1%), economically favourable colour mix (ca. 33% white colour diamonds in both pipes), abundance of nitrogen-free, "D" colour, Type IIa diamonds that dominate the internationally recognised "special" stone size fraction which covers all diamonds larger than + 10.8 cts (Main Pipe 32% and Satellite Pipe 51%). During 2008, these larger, "special" diamonds commanded prices in excess of US 15,000/ct, contributing ca. 75% of the revenue generated

  5. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  6. Structural insights into the function of a unique tandem GTPase EngA in bacterial ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Yan, Kaige; Zhang, Yixiao; Li, Ningning; Ma, Chengying; Li, Zhifei; Zhang, Yanqing; Feng, Boya; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yadong; Xu, Yanji; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Many ribosome-interacting GTPases, with proposed functions in ribosome biogenesis, are also implicated in the cellular regulatory coupling between ribosome assembly process and various growth control pathways. EngA is an essential GTPase in bacteria, and intriguingly, it contains two consecutive GTPase domains (GD), being one-of-a-kind among all known GTPases. EngA is required for the 50S subunit maturation. However, its molecular role remains elusive. Here, we present the structure of EngA bound to the 50S subunit. Our data show that EngA binds to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) and induces dramatic conformational changes on the 50S subunit, which virtually returns the 50S subunit to a state similar to that of the late-stage 50S assembly intermediates. Very interestingly, our data show that the two GDs exhibit a pseudo-two-fold symmetry in the 50S-bound conformation. Our results indicate that EngA recognizes certain forms of the 50S assembly intermediates, and likely facilitates the conformational maturation of the PTC of the 23S rRNA in a direct manner. Furthermore, in a broad context, our data also suggest that EngA might be a sensor of the cellular GTP/GDP ratio, endowed with multiple conformational states, in response to fluctuations in cellular nucleotide pool, to facilitate and regulate ribosome assembly. PMID:25389271

  7. Characterization of Aspergillus niger endo-1,4-β-glucanase ENG1 secreted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Taipakova, S M; Smekenov, I T; Saparbaev, M K; Bissenbaev, A K

    2015-06-11

    Heterologous expression of Aspergillus niger endo-1,4-β-glucanase (ENG1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was tested both with an episomal plasmid vector (YEGAp/eng1) and a yeast vector capable of integration into the HO locus of the S. cerevisiae chromosome (pHO-GAPDH-eng1-KanMX4-HO). In both cases, eng1 gene expression in yeast, with its native signal sequence for secretion, was under the control of the strong glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) promoter. We aimed to verify how each expression system affects protein expression, posttranslational modification, and biochemical properties. Expression of eng1 from the episomal plasmid vector YEGAp/eng1 significantly slowed the growth of a yeast cell culture. However, expression of eng1 from the vector integrated into the HO locus of the chromosome did not cause growth suppression, and the enzyme activity in a culture supernatant was maintained throughout the incubation time. ENG1 has optimum catalytic activity at pH 6.0, and is stable in the pH range 5.0-9.0. The enzyme's optimum temperature for catalytic activity at pH 6.0 is 70°C; importantly, more than 95% of the enzyme's initial activity remained after a 2-h incubation at 60°C. The biochemical characterization of ENG1 confirmed the correct expression of the protein and showed that ENG1 expressed by the pHO-GAPDH-eng1-KanMX4-HO vector, in addition to its N-linked sites, is overglycosylated at its O-glycosylation sites compared with ENG1 expressed by the YEGAp/eng1 vector. It is likely that the O-glycosylated form of the A. niger ENG1 retains more stable activity during continuous cultivation of recombinant yeasts than the form that is only N-glycosylated.

  8. Rebooting the EdD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Jon Wergin reminds readers of the philosophical and historical foundations of the doctor of education (EdD) degree. He argues that the EdD should be based, in large part, on John Dewey's progressive ideals of democratization and Paulo Freire's concepts of emancipatory education. Drawing on theories of reflective practice,…

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the β-1,4-endoglucanase gene Mj-eng-3 in the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lili; Cui, Ruqiang; Sun, Longhua; Lin, Borong; Zhuo, Kan; Liao, Jinling

    2013-09-01

    This study describes the molecular and biochemical characterization of the β-1,4-endoglucanase gene (Mj-eng-3) from the root knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica. A 2156-bp genomic DNA sequence of Mj-eng-3 containing six introns was obtained. Mj-eng-3 was localized in the subventral esophageal glands of M. javanica juveniles by in situ hybridization. Real-time RT-PCR assay showed that the highest transcriptional level of Mj-eng-3 occurred in pre-parasitic second-stage juveniles, and this high expression persisted in parasitic second-stage juveniles. Recombinant MJ-ENG-3 degraded carboxymethylcellulose and optimum enzyme activity at 40°C and pH 8.0. EDTA, Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), and Cu(2+) did not affect the activity of MJ-ENG-3; however, Zn(2+) and Fe(2+) inhibited MJ-ENG-3 enzyme activity. In planta Mj-eng-3 RNAi assay displayed a reduction in the number of nematodes and galls in transgenic tobacco roots. These results suggested that MJ-ENG-3 could be secreted by M. javanica to degrade the cellulose of plant cell walls to facilitate its entry and migration during the early stages of parasitism.

  10. Masculinities in Organizational Cultures in Engineering Education in Europe: Results of the European Union Project WomEng

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagebiel, F.; Dahmen, J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes elements of engineering organizational cultures and structures in higher engineering education from the European project WomEng. Hypotheses, based on state of the art, refer to: women friendly presentation, attractiveness of interdisciplinary teaching methods, single sex education, perceptions of minority status, feelings of…

  11. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linley, Judy; Mylne, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Ag-Ed, an agricultural education project for upper elementary students, was held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show in Queensland, Australia. Agriculture industry representatives provided 20 interactive agricultural presentations for class groups, which were supplemented with a teacher resource-package containing a directory and 13 sections of…

  12. Characterization of the CaENG1 gene encoding an endo-1,3-beta-glucanase involved in cell separation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Pedro Felipe; Ríos, Inmaculada; García, Raúl; Dueñas, Encarnación; Plá, Jesús; Sánchez, Miguel; de Aldana, Carlos R Vázquez; Del Rey, Francisco

    2005-12-01

    The Candida albicans CaENG1 gene encoding an endo-1,3-beta-glucanase was cloned by screening a genomic library with a DNA probe obtained by polymerase chain reaction using synthetic oligonucleotides designed according to conserved regions found between two Saccharomyces cerevisiae endo-1,3-beta-glucanases (Eng1p and Eng2p). The gene contains a 3435-bp open reading frame (ORF), capable of encoding a protein of 1145 amino acids (124,157 Da), that contains no introns. Comparison of the ScEng1p sequence with partial C. albicans genomic sequences revealed the presence of a second protein with sequence similarity (the product of the Ca20C1.22c ORF, which was named CaENG2). Disruption of the CaENG1 gene in C. albicans had no dramatic effects on the growth rate of the strains, but it resulted in the formation of chains of cells, suggesting that the protein is involved in cell separation. Expression of CaENG1 in S. cerevisiae cells afforded a 12-fold increase in the 1,3-beta-glucanase activity detected in culture supernatants, showing that the protein has similar enzymatic activity to that of the S. cerevisiae Eng1p. In addition, when the C. albicans protein was expressed under its native promoter in S. cerevisiae eng1 mutant cells, it was able to complement the separation defect of this mutant, indicating that these two proteins are true functional homologues.

  13. Overview of Deployed EDS Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C

    2009-09-24

    The term explosive detection system (EDS) is used by the TSA to describe equipment that is certified to detect explosives in checked bags. The EDS, as certified, by the TSL must consist of device for interrogating a bag and an automated detection algorithm (ATD) for evaluating the results of the interrogation. We only consider CT as the interrogation device in this report. A schematic drawing of a CT-based EDS is shown in Figure 2. The output of the ATD is the binary decision of alarm or non-alarm. Alarms may true- or false-positives. Non-alarms may be true- or false-negatives. False positives are also denoted false alarms. The true detection means that the ATD reports an alarm when a threat is present in the scanned bag. The probability of detecting a threat given that a threat is present is denoted the probability of detection (PD). The probability of false alarm (PFA) is the case when an alarm is reported when a threat is not present in a bag. Certification in this context means passing tests for PD and PFA at the TSL. The results of the EDS include CT cross-sectional images of the bag and specifics about the alarmed objects generated by ATD. These results are presented on a display so that a person may override the decision of ATD and declare the alarm to be a non-alarm. This process is denoted clearing. Bags that are not cleared by the person are sent to a secondary inspection process. Here the bags may be opened or assessed with explosive trace detection (ETD) in order to clear the bags. Bags that are not cleared at this point are evaluated by an ordinance disposal team. The CT scanner along with ATD is denoted Level 1 screening. The process of clearing on a display is denoted Level 2 screening. Secondary inspection is denoted Level 3 screening. Vendors of the deployed EDSs supply the TSA with equipment for all three levels. Therefore, the term EDS may include the equipment provided for Levels 1, 2 and 3. A schematic diagram of an EDS and the levels of

  14. Disruption of the Eng18B ENGase gene in the fungal biocontrol agent Trichoderma atroviride affects growth, conidiation and antagonistic ability.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Mukesh K; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Sandgren, Mats; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    The recently identified phylogenetic subgroup B5 of fungal glycoside hydrolase family 18 genes encodes enzymes with mannosyl glycoprotein endo-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (ENGase)-type activity. Intracellular ENGase activity is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway (ERAD) of misfolded glycoproteins, although the biological relevance in filamentous fungi is not known. Trichoderma atroviride is a mycoparasitic fungus that is used for biological control of plant pathogenic fungi. The present work is a functional study of the T. atroviride B5-group gene Eng18B, with emphasis on its role in fungal growth and antagonism. A homology model of T. atroviride Eng18B structure predicts a typical glycoside hydrolase family 18 (αβ)(8) barrel architecture. Gene expression analysis shows that Eng18B is induced in dual cultures with the fungal plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani, although a basal expression is observed in all growth conditions tested. Eng18B disruption strains had significantly reduced growth rates but higher conidiation rates compared to the wild-type strain. However, growth rates on abiotic stress media were significantly higher in Eng18B disruption strains compared to the wild-type strain. No difference in spore germination, germ-tube morphology or in hyphal branching was detected. Disruption strains produced less biomass in liquid cultures than the wild-type strain when grown with chitin as the sole carbon source. In addition, we determined that Eng18B is required for the antagonistic ability of T. atroviride against the grey mould fungus B. cinerea in dual cultures and that this reduction in antagonistic ability is partly connected to a secreted factor. The phenotypes were recovered by re-introduction of an intact Eng18B gene fragment in mutant strains. A putative role of Eng18B ENGase activity in the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway of endogenous glycoproteins in T

  15. Real time analysis under EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    The analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described. Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis.

  16. Instability of EDS maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1993-09-01

    Instabilities of an EDS maglev suspension system with 3 D.O.F. and 5 D.O.F. vehicles traveling on a double L-shaped set of guideway conductors have been investigated with various experimentally measured magnetical force data incorporated into the theoretical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained from both analytical and numerical solutions for coupled vibration of the 3 D.O.F. maglev vehicle model. Instabilities of five direction motions (heave, slip, rill, pitch and yaw) are observed for the 4 D.O.F. vehicle model. It demonstrates that system parameters, such as, system damping, vehicle geometry and coupling effects among five different motions play very important roles in the occurrence of dynamic instabilities of maglev vehicles.

  17. ED security: a national telephone survey.

    PubMed

    Ellis, G L; Dehart, D A; Black, C; Gula, M J; Owens, A

    1994-03-01

    To determine current practices regarding security measures in the emergency department (ED), a random sample of 250 hospitals with EDs was surveyed by telephone. Security issues addressed included personnel (in-house security, contract guards, or police), hours of staffing in the ED, how security is armed, whether ED doors are locked at off-hours, and whether alarm buttons, direct phone lines, a paging code, closed circuit surveillance, metal detectors, and seclusion rooms are used. This information was stratified according to hospital size, ED census, rural/suburban/urban setting, teaching/nonteaching status, and region. Generally, on-site security presence increases with increasing hospital size and ED census, suburban and urban locations, and teaching status. Small, rural hospitals are more likely to lock the ED doors at off-hours, whereas the use of security codes does not clearly follow demographic trends. Larger hospitals in suburban and urban settings and having a teaching status are more likely to have secure/detention rooms and closed circuit surveillance. The use of alarm buttons and/or direct telephone lines varies widely, but is generally more common in larger, teaching hospitals, located in urban and suburban settings.

  18. Building a Community on the Fast Track: ENG. 09/111 at Central Virginia Community College (CVCC) as a Tier C Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velez, Lana

    2012-01-01

    This author organized and taught the new ENG 09/111 classes at her college, as well as authoring the course text and workbook. English 09/111 offers a unique opportunity for students who are not quite ready for freshmen composition, but more than likely do not need an entire semester of developmental English. In this article, she details the…

  19. 78 FR 55684 - ConnectED Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... stakeholders from the education, technology, and government sectors to share ideas, discuss policies, and... convene stakeholders from the education, technology, and government sectors to share ideas, discuss... National Telecommunications and Information Administration ConnectED Workshop AGENCY:...

  20. MicroED data collection and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; Cruz, M. Jason de la; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    The collection and processing of MicroED data are presented. MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges.

  1. Non–Emergency Department (ED) Interventions to Reduce ED Utilization: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sofie Rahman; Chang, Anna Marie; Alqatari, Mahfood; Pines, Jesse M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recent health policy changes have focused efforts on reducing emergency department (ED) visits as a way to reduce costs and improve quality of care. This was a systematic review of interventions based outside the ED aimed at reducing ED use. Methods This study was designed as a systematic review. We reviewed the literature on interventions in five categories: patient education, creation of additional non-ED capacity, managed care, prehospital diversion, and patient financial incentives. Studies written in English, with interventions administered outside of the ED, and a comparison group where ED use was an outcome, were included. Two independent reviewers screened search results using MEDLINE, Cochrane, OAIster, or Scopus. The following data were abstracted from included studies: type of intervention, study design, population, details of intervention, effect on ED use, effect on non-ED health care use, and other health and financial outcomes. Quality of individual articles was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. Results Of 39 included studies, 34 were observational and five were randomized controlled trials. Two of five studies on patient education found reductions in ED use ranging from 21% to 80%. Out of 10 studies of additional non-ED capacity, four showed decreases of 9% to 54%, and one a 21% increase. Both studies on prehospital diversion found reductions of 3% to 7%. Of 12 studies on managed care, 10 had decreases ranging from 1% to 46%. Nine out of 10 studies on patient financial incentives found decreases of 3% to 50%, and one a 34% increase. Nineteen studies reported effect on non-ED use with mixed results. Seventeen studies included data on health outcomes, but 13 of these only included data on hospitalizations rather than morbidity and mortality. Seven studies included data on cost outcomes. According to the GRADE guidelines, all studies had at least some risk of bias, with four

  2. Plant immunity: the EDS1 regulatory node.

    PubMed

    Wiermer, Marcel; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E

    2005-08-01

    ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1) and its interacting partner, PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4), constitute a regulatory hub that is essential for basal resistance to invasive biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens. EDS1 and PAD4 are also recruited by Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-type nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins to signal isolate-specific pathogen recognition. Recent work points to a fundamental role of EDS1 and PAD4 in transducing redox signals in response to certain biotic and abiotic stresses. These intracellular proteins are important activators of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and also mediate antagonism between the jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) defense response pathways. EDS1 forms several molecularly and spatially distinct complexes with PAD4 and a newly discovered in vivo signaling partner, SENESCENCE ASSOCIATED GENE 101 (SAG101). Together, EDS1, PAD4 and SAG101 provide a major barrier to infection by both host-adapted and non-host pathogens.

  3. ED Patients with Prolonged Complaints and Repeat ED Visits Have an Increased Risk of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Kristopher R.; Bahl, Rajiv; Marcinkowski, Nathan F.; Ammons, Katelyn R.; Akpunonu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to explore associations between presenting chief complaints of prolonged symptomatology, patient usage of the emergency department (ED), and underlying depression so that emergency physicians may better target patients for depression screening. Methods A convenience sample of ED patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) to assess for depression. We correlated completed BDI-II surveys to patient information including demographics, pertinent history of present illness information, and past medical history. Results Out of 425 participants screened, we identified complaints of two weeks or longer in 92 patients (22%). Of these patients, mild to severe depression was recognized in over half of the population (47), yet only nine patients reported a prior depression diagnosis. These 92 patients also visited the ED three times as frequently as those patients with more acute complaints (p<0.001). Finally, our study showed that patients with mild to severe depression had three times as many ED visits compared to patients with minimal or no depression (p<0.001). Conclusion Patients with complaints of symptomatology two weeks or longer are more likely to have underlying depression when presenting to the ED. Patients with three or more ED visits within the past year also have a greater incidence of underlying depression. We found a strong correlation between complaints with symptomatology of two weeks or longer and multiple ED visits, in which underlying depression may have contributed to these patients’ ED visits. PMID:27625727

  4. A Quantitative Content Analysis of Mercer University MEd, EdS, and Doctoral Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.; Gaiek, Lura S.; White, Torian A.; Slappey, Lisa A.; Chastain, Andrea; Harris, Rose Prejean

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative content analysis of a body of research not only helps budding researchers understand the culture, language, and expectations of scholarship, it helps identify deficiencies and inform policy and practice. Because of these benefits, an analysis of a census of 980 Mercer University MEd, EdS, and doctoral theses was conducted. Each thesis…

  5. 34 CFR 85.942 - ED Deciding Official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false ED Deciding Official. 85.942 Section 85.942 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.942 ED Deciding Official. The ED Deciding Official is an ED officer who has...

  6. MicroED data collection and processing.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M Jason; Leslie, Andrew G W; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges. PMID:26131894

  7. MicroED data collection and processing

    PubMed Central

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M. Jason; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges. PMID:26131894

  8. Improving ED efficiency to capture additional revenue.

    PubMed

    Mandavia, Sujal; Samaniego, Loretta

    2016-06-01

    An increase in the number of patients visiting emergency departments (EDs) presents an opportunity for additional revenue if hospitals take four steps to optimize resources: Streamline the patient pathway and reduce the amount of time each patient occupies a bed in the ED. Schedule staff according to the busy and light times for patient arrivals. Perform registration and triage bedside, reducing initial wait times. Create an area for patients to wait for test results so beds can be freed up for new arrivals. PMID:27451568

  9. Canadian EdGEO National Workshop Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, L. A.; Haidl, F. M.; Hymers, L. A.; van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Established in the early 1970s, EdGEO supports locally driven geosciences workshops for Canadian teachers. Workshops are organized by geoscientists and teachers, and typically have field, laboratory and classroom components. Grants of up to $3000 per workshop are available from the National EdGEO Program. By providing educational opportunities for today's teachers and, through them, their students, EdGEO seeks to cultivate a heightened awareness of our planet. EdGEO workshops provide teachers with potential fieldtrip sites for their students and the knowledge, enthusiasm and materials to inspire their students to engage in geoscience. Networking opportunities with local experts promote the importance of the geoscience profession. The expected result is an improved capacity on the part of Canadians to understand the Earth and to make informed decisions, especially with regard to the use of mineral and energy resources, the maintenance and remediation of the environment, and response to geological hazards. There exists a critical need to provide teachers with training and resources to tackle their Earth science curricula. In 2008, EdGEO supported fourteen workshops, with an unprecedented 521 teachers attending. These teachers then used our resources to reach an estimated 14,000 students during that single academic year. EdGEO workshops are locally driven and are therefore very diverse. Workshops are strongly tied to the provincial curriculum, focus on a specific geoscience topic, or may be largely field-based to demonstrate and practice how field activities could be incorporated into Earth science teaching. Many strive to include all of these important components. Geoscientists and teachers work collaboratively to develop and deliver EdGEO workshops to ensure that the activities can be effectively used in the classroom. The length of these professional development opportunities range from two-hour sessions to several days, and can generally accommodate up to twenty

  10. The Trouble with the Ed.D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessa, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This article review examines Arthur Levine's 2005 "Educating School Leaders," a report that recommended the elimination of the Ed.D. and the establishment of a new degree, the Master's in Educational Administration. The article review draws attention to the central irony of Levine's report: after chronicling the many ways that schools of education…

  11. Precipitator rehabilitation ComEd Waukegan station

    SciTech Connect

    Sanda, L.; Hermanas, G.

    1996-12-31

    ComEd`s Waukegan Station successfully completed a total rehabilitation of its Unit 8 electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and recovered 66 MW that has been lost due to burning Western Coal. This practice began in the 1970`s for emission`s compliance. The unit now operates at it maximum continuous rating (MCR) with increased fuel flexibility.

  12. The Consequences of edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    States and teacher preparation programs across the country are increasingly using a teacher candidate assessment called edTPA. The purpose? To make sure that teacher candidates are ready and able to teach before they begin their careers. The teacher performance assessment requires candidates to compile a portfolio that consists of lesson plans,…

  13. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  14. Terrorism drill shows ED response plan flaws.

    PubMed

    2005-07-01

    Valuable lessons can be learned by paying attention to your processes and communication equipment during a disaster drill. Did your radios and pagers work adequately? If not, it may be time for a new vendor. Going through the drill helps remind the entire ED staff to funnel all communications and key decisions through the disaster response leader. Make sure to update your disaster response handbook to reflect important lessons learned during the drill.

  15. Alfred Gardiner Brown (1838-1882) M.R.C.S.Eng., F.R.C.S.(Ed.). His contribution to the history of the development of the tuning fork.

    PubMed

    Booth, J B

    1999-04-01

    Alfred Gardiner Brown was the first designated Aural Surgeon to be appointed to the consultant staff of The London Hospital, at the age of 38. In July 1880 he published the paper showing his adaptation of the way in which the tuning fork was applied to the head and its use in measuring hearing power by comparing it with the sense of touch. Had he been blessed with a longer life it is highly probable that he would have made a significant contribution as he was of an innovative and inventive mind. He died at the age of 44.

  16. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  17. EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development. Phase V. Laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of EDS Illinois bottoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, T C; Levasseur, A A

    1984-02-01

    This interim report documents work carried out by Combustion Engineering, Inc. under a contract to Exxon Research and Engineering Company to develop a conceptual Hybrid Boiler design fueled by the vacuum distillation residue (vacuum bottoms) derived from Illinois No. 6 coal in the EDS Coal Liquefaction Process. This report was prepared by Combustion Engineering, Inc., and is the first of two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler program. This report covers the results of a laboratory investigation to assess the fuel and ash properties of EDS vacuum bottoms. The results of the laboratory testing reported here were used in conjunction with Combustion Engineering's design experience to predict fuel performance and to develop appropriate boiler design parameters. These boiler design parameters were used to prepare the engineering design study reported in EDS Interim Report FE-2893-113, the second of the two reports on the predevelopment phase of the Hybrid Boiler Program. 46 figures, 29 tables.

  18. 9q33.3q34.11 microdeletion: new contiguous gene syndrome encompassing STXBP1, LMX1B and ENG genes assessed using reverse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Nambot, Sophie; Masurel, Alice; El Chehadeh, Salima; Mosca-Boidron, Anne-Laure; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Marle, Nathalie; Thevenon, Julien; Perez-Martin, Stéphanie; Dulieu, Véronique; Huet, Frédéric; Plessis, Ghislaine; Andrieux, Joris; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Billy-Lopez, Gipsy; Coutton, Charles; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Heron, Delphine; Rooryck, Caroline; Goldenberg, Alice; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Joly-Hélas, Géraldine; Calenda, Patricia; Kuentz, Paul; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Callier, Patrick; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    The increasing use of array-CGH in malformation syndromes with intellectual disability could lead to the description of new contiguous gene syndrome by the analysis of the gene content of the microdeletion and reverse phenotyping. Thanks to a national and international call for collaboration by Achropuce and Decipher, we recruited four patients carrying de novo overlapping deletions of chromosome 9q33.3q34.11, including the STXBP1, the LMX1B and the ENG genes. We restrained the selection to these three genes because the effects of their haploinsufficency are well described in the literature and easily recognizable clinically. All deletions were detected by array-CGH and confirmed by FISH. The patients display common clinical features, including intellectual disability with epilepsy, owing to the presence of STXBP1 within the deletion, nail dysplasia and bone malformations, in particular patellar abnormalities attributed to LMX1B deletion, epistaxis and cutaneous-mucous telangiectasias explained by ENG haploinsufficiency and common facial dysmorphism. This systematic analysis of the genes comprised in the deletion allowed us to identify genes whose haploinsufficiency is expected to lead to disease manifestations and complications that require personalized follow-up, in particular for renal, eye, ear, vascular and neurological manifestations. PMID:26395556

  19. Passive damping in EDS maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D. M.

    2002-05-03

    There continues to be strong interest in the subjects of damping and drag forces associated with electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems. While electromagnetic drag forces resist the forward motion of a vehicle and therefore consume energy, damping forces control, at least in part, the response of the vehicle to disturbances. Ideally, one would like to reduce the drag forces as much as possible while retaining adequate damping forces to insure dynamic stability and satisfactory ride quality. These two goals turn out to be difficult to achieve in practice. It is well known that maglev systems tend to be intrinsically under damped. Consequently it is often necessary in a practical system design to enhance the damping passively or actively. For reasons of cost and simplicity, it is desirable to rely as much as possible on passive damping mechanisms. In this paper, rough estimates are made of the passive damping and drag forces caused by various mechanisms in EDS systems. No attention will be given to active control systems or secondary suspension systems which are obvious ways to augment passive damping mechanisms if the latter prove to be inadequate.

  20. Text message program improves outcomes, decreases ED utilization among ED patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic patients who lack access to primary care tend to frequent the ED, often with complications from their disease that could have been prevented with proper management and education. To get around the problem of access, researchers tested an automated program that continuously delivered educational messaging via text to a group of patients who presented to the ED with poorly controlled diabetes. After six months, researchers noted improvements in Hb A1c levels, self-reported medication adherence, and ED utilization when compared with a control group. And the impact was particularly noteworthy among Latinos, according to the researchers. The text messaging program, dubbed TExT-Med, was developed by four physicians and two diabetes educators. The messages were delivered daily, and contained educational as well motivational content derived from the National Diabetes Education Program.There were also medication reminders, healthy living challenges, and trivia questions about diabetes. At six months, Hb A1c levels decreased by 1.05% in the intervention group, compared to 0.60% in the control group, and self-reported medication adherence improved from 4.5 to 5.4 (as measured on an 8 point scale) in the intervention group versus a decrease of 0.1 in the control group. During the six-month study period, 35.9% of patients in the intervention group presented to the ED for care, as compared to 51.6% of patients in the control group.

  1. Capillary Study - Skylab Student Experiment ED-72

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment ED-72, Capillary Study, proposed by Roger G. Johnson of St. Paul, Mirnesota. Johnson theorized that capillary rise might continue to infinity in Skylab's zero-gravity environment. The behavior of fluids, particularly their flow properties in a low-gravity environment, had been important from the time that Robert H. Goddard launched his liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's to the more sophisticated space systems of the day. It was necessary to design fluid-flow systems that would not only overcome the lack of gravity but also overcome, or take advantage of, the effect of surface tension. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  2. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services.

  3. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services. PMID:11781909

  4. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  5. Teaching Elementary School Social Studies Methods under edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a self-study that analyzes my experience as a teacher educator navigating a turbulent educational landscape with the advent of edTPA. The data consist of my journal entries, the syllabi, handouts, work submitted by my students, and course evaluations. Data were analyzed by using an inductive process to describe how the edTPA…

  6. Web Formation - Skylab Student Experiment ED-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Judith S. Miles of Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts, proposed skylab student experiment ED-52, Web Formation. This experiment was a study of a spider's behavior in a weightless environment. The geometrical structure of the web of the orb-weaving spider provides a good measure of the condition of its central nervous system. Since the spider senses its own weight to determine the required thickness of web material and uses both the wind and gravity to initiate construction of its web, the lack of gravitational force in Skylab provided a new and different stimulus to the spider's behavioral response. Two common cross spiders, Arabella and Anita, were used for the experiment aboard the Skylab-3 mission. After initial disoriented attempts, both spiders produced almost Earth-like webs once they had adapted to weightlessness. This photograph is of Arabella, a cross spider, in her initial attempt at spirning a web. This picture was taken by the crew of the Skylab 3 mission before Arabella adapted to her new environment.

  7. TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series Fact Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murbach, Marcus; Martinez, Andres; Guarneros Luna, Ali

    2014-01-01

    TechEdSat-3p is the second generation in the TechEdSat-X series. The TechEdSat Series uses the CubeSat standards established by the California Polytechnic State University Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo. With typical blocks being constructed from 1-unit (1U 10x10x10 cm) increments, the TechEdSat-3p has a 3U volume with a 30 cm length. The project uniquely pairs advanced university students with NASA researchers in a rapid design-to-flight experience lasting 1-2 semesters.The TechEdSat Nano-Satellite Series provides a rapid platform for testing technologies for future NASA Earth and planetary missions, as well as providing students with an early exposure to flight hardware development and management.

  8. ED's nonemergent patients must pay first or be referred.

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Patients presenting to your ED with complaints that should be seen by a primary care physician can exacerbate overcrowding and tie up staff unnecessarily. The ED at Metro Health Medical Center in Cleveland has addressed this problem with a two-pronged approach: Nonemergent patients who are uninsured but wish to be treated in the ED must pay $75 before treatment can begin. Patients also are offered the option of being referred to one of the system's neighborhood clinics. Referred patients are guaranteed they will be seen within 72 hours. PMID:18807396

  9. Com Ed's fuel buying probed by Illinois Commerce Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, C.

    1982-06-07

    The Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) challenged Commonwealth Edison Company's oversupply of coal, which could damage the utility's credit rating and raise rates, after an earlier move to prevent the utility from collecting fuel-adjustment charges. Com Ed also purchased an oversupply of high-priced oil. A loss of credit will worsen Com Ed's financial problems and its nuclear-construction program. Regulators object to poor utility procurement practices following an accepted rate increase. Com Ed testified that the surplus inventory is due to poor planning, but the company is taking corrective steps to adjust its coal contracts despite a glut of coal and a sluggish economy. (DCK)

  10. Many Teens Give Sex Ed a Failing Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160906.html Many Teens Give Sex Ed a Failing Grade International study finds courses ... HealthDay News) -- Teens around the world are getting sex education in schools that fail to address their ...

  11. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED

    PubMed Central

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03600.001 PMID:25303172

  12. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED.

    PubMed

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. PMID:25303172

  13. Elephants or Dinosaurs? A Call to Action for Ed Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jerome T.

    2006-01-01

    To conclude this special section, guest editor Murphy examines why Ed Schools should redesign their leadership education programs, explores what it will take to foster change, and presents a model program to stimulate debate and action. (Contains 21 endnotes.)

  14. Ice storm puts staff in ED to the test.

    PubMed

    2005-11-01

    Creativity, planning ahead can help offset the problems severe winter weather can create for your ED. "Super-size" your wintertime staff to help deal with the inevitable patient surge during cold-weather months. Make sure your ED is fully stocked with blanket warmers and intravenous fluid warmers year-round, so you're always prepared for first winter storm. Optimize staff health by stressing re-education in procedures such as hand washing. PMID:16749577

  15. Redefining the EdD: Seeking a Separate Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Barbara Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to discuss the recommendations and guidelines of the Carnegie Group's 2007 effort to "Reclaim the EdD" as well as to outline the work completed at the University of Virginia related to their re-design of the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree. In order to address the re-envision and re-formulation of the Doctor of…

  16. Bacteria and Spores - Skylab Student Experiment ED-31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Pictures 1 and 2 show samples of Bacillus Subtillus grown during the first performance of Robert Staehle's experiment (ED-31) aboard Skylab. Pictures 3 and 4 show colonies of the same bacteria that developed during the second performance of the experiment. The experiment ED-31 was proposed by Robert L. Staehle of Rochester, New York to determine the effect of the Skylab environment (particularly weightlessness) on the survival, growth rates, and mutations of certain bacteria and spores.

  17. Shared decision making in the ED: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Chadd K; Marco, Catherine A

    2016-08-01

    The process of shared decision making (SDM) is an ethical imperative in the physician-patient relationship, especially in the emergency department (ED), where SDM can present unique challenges because patients and emergency physicians often have no established relationship and decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and disposition are time dependent. SDM should be guided by the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice and the related principle of stewardship of finite resources. The objective of this article is to outline the ethical considerations of SDM in the ED in the context of diagnostic evaluations, therapeutic interventions, disposition decisions, and conflict resolution and to explore strategies for reaching decision consensus. Several cases are presented to highlight the ethical principles in SDM in the ED. SDM is an important approach to diagnostic testing in the ED. Achieving agreement regarding diagnostic evaluations requires a balance of respect for patient autonomy and stewardship of resources. SDM regarding ED therapeutic interventions is an important component of the balance of respect for patient autonomy and beneficence. While respecting patient autonomy, emergency physicians also recognize the importance of the application of professional judgment to achieve the best possible outcome for patients. SDM as an ethical imperative in the context of ED disposition is especially important because of the frequent ambiguity of equipoise in these situations. Unique clinical situations such as pediatric patients or patients who lack decisional capacity merit special consideration. PMID:27260552

  18. Chick embryo proliferation studies using EdU labeling

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Michelle; Puskarczyk, Karolina; Chapman, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    Cell proliferation studies are an important experimental tool. The most commonly used thymidine analogues, tritiated thymidine and BrdU label cells during S-phase. Both methods have significant drawbacks; low sensitivity in the case of tritiated thymidine and a denaturation step during BrdU detection that destroys most cellular epitopes, requiring careful optimization. The antibody against BrdU is also large and tissue penetration can be difficult. EdU is a closely chemically related to BrdU, with detection achieved by a copper catalyzed reaction requiring a small fluorescently conjugated azide. Cell cultures, flow cytometry and high throughput studies using EdU labeled cells is exceptionally fast and does not require denaturation or antibodies. We have developed a tissue labeling technique in chick embryos using EdU. Following EdU chemistry to detect proliferating cells the tissue can undergo immunolabeling. We demonstrate fluorescent EdU chemistry followed by Tuj1 antibody staining resulting in multiplex fluorescent tissues. PMID:19253396

  19. Solar power-desalination PV*ED system

    SciTech Connect

    Kvajic, G.

    1980-12-01

    Photovoltaic-electrodialysis, PV*ED, power-desalination system is studied in which the seawater feed is heated in the PV-cells. Under simplified assumptions of a constancy of thermal PV efficiency and conversion factor of 0.5 for ED brakish water system, it is found that maximum potable water production per unit of insolation depends strongly on the temperature of seawater feed and the concentration factor of the optical collector. By varying these two parameters of the PV*ED system, it seems possible that one could control the ratio of power to water production within a large range so that various potential demands for power and water could be met.

  20. Multivariate statistical analysis of low-voltage EDS spectrum images

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.

    1998-03-01

    Whereas energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) has been used for compositional analysis in the scanning electron microscope for 30 years, the benefits of using low operating voltages for such analyses have been explored only during the last few years. This paper couples low-voltage EDS with two other emerging areas of characterization: spectrum imaging and multivariate statistical analysis. The specimen analyzed for this study was a finished Intel Pentium processor, with the polyimide protective coating stripped off to expose the final active layers.

  1. Characterization of pyrotechnic reaction residue particles by SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Ken L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie

    2003-05-01

    Today the method commonly used for detecting gunshot residue is through the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In recent years, this same methodology began to find use in detecting and characterizing pyrotechnic reaction residue (PRR) particles whether produced by explosion or burning. This is accomplished by collecting particulate samples from a surface in the immediate area of the pyrotechnic reaction. Suspect PRR particles are identified by their morphology (typically 1 to 20 microm spheroidal particles) using an SEM; then they are analyzed for the elements they contain using X-ray EDS. This can help to identify the general type of pyrotechnic composition involved.

  2. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-23

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  3. An unusual syncope cause in the ED: favism.

    PubMed

    Soyuncu, Secgin; Bektas, Firat; Isik, Soner; Yigit, Ozlem

    2011-04-01

    Favism is an acute hemolytic syndrome occurring in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals after the consumption of fava beans. The highest incidence is in boys aged 2-6 years. We report a 56-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with recurrent syncope attacks due to favism. In our knowledge, this is the first report of favism-caused syncope in an adult patient without a G6PD deficiency diagnosis in the past and diagnosed in ED. PMID:20930025

  4. Microbiologic Methods Utilized in the MAL-ED Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Houpt, Eric; Gratz, Jean; Kosek, Margaret; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Qureshi, Shahida; Kang, Gagandeep; Babji, Sudhir; Mason, Carl; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Samie, Amidou; Bessong, Pascal; Barrett, Leah; Lima, Aldo; Havt, Alexandre; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Taniuchi, Mami; Stroup, Suzanne; McGrath, Monica; Lang, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    A central hypothesis of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study is that enteropathogens contribute to growth faltering. To examine this question, the MAL-ED network of investigators set out to achieve 3 goals: (1) develop harmonized protocols to test for a diverse range of enteropathogens, (2) provide quality-assured and comparable results from 8 global sites, and (3) achieve maximum laboratory throughput and minimum cost. This paper describes the rationale for the microbiologic assays chosen and methodologies used to accomplish the 3 goals. PMID:25305291

  5. ED becomes 'lean' and cuts LBTC, LOS times.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    Lean manufacturing techniques, first developed by Toyota, can be successfully adapted to help improve processes in your ED. St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has used Lean to reduce median length of stay, frequency of diversions, and the percentage of patients who left before treatment was complete (LBTC). Here's why "Lean" can help improve the performance of your ED: It enables you and your staff to see things from the patient's point of view. Lean tools enable you to view the status of your department in real-time and to compare that status with your performance goals. Exercises help identify areas where your processes break down and determine the most likely solutions.

  6. Microbiologic methods utilized in the MAL-ED cohort study.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Eric; Gratz, Jean; Kosek, Margaret; Zaidi, Anita K M; Qureshi, Shahida; Kang, Gagandeep; Babji, Sudhir; Mason, Carl; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Samie, Amidou; Bessong, Pascal; Barrett, Leah; Lima, Aldo; Havt, Alexandre; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Taniuchi, Mami; Stroup, Suzanne; McGrath, Monica; Lang, Dennis

    2014-11-01

    A central hypothesis of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study is that enteropathogens contribute to growth faltering. To examine this question, the MAL-ED network of investigators set out to achieve 3 goals: (1) develop harmonized protocols to test for a diverse range of enteropathogens, (2) provide quality-assured and comparable results from 8 global sites, and (3) achieve maximum laboratory throughput and minimum cost. This paper describes the rationale for the microbiologic assays chosen and methodologies used to accomplish the 3 goals. PMID:25305291

  7. FETC, TCEA Commemorate 25 Years of Serving Ed Tech Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    There's only one way to prepare for all of the exciting things that the ed tech market has in store for 2005-- by attending a conference. That's why T.H.E. Journal hopes readers will join them at this year's FETC (Booth 1505) and TCEA (Booth 1934) conferences to help celebrate their 25th anniversaries. Overviews are provided for both conferences…

  8. Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Abby; Barno, Trina Adler; Sherman, Shelley; Lovett, Kathleen; Hurtado, G. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an essential tool for understanding program effectiveness. This article describes the pilot test of a statewide evaluation tool for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). A computer algorithm helped Community Nutrition Educators (CNEs) build surveys specific to their varied educational settings…

  9. Three Ways edTPA Prepared Me for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    edTPA, a capstone assessment designed to assess whether new teachers are ready for the job by evaluating their teaching and their analysis of their teaching, helped prepare the author for the classroom in three ways. First, he became accountable to his students. Second, he learned to analyze his teaching. Third, he discovered how to relate…

  10. Engaging the public through writing an op-ed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labosier, Chris; Zhu, Laiyin; Quiring, Steven

    2012-10-01

    In May, prior to the start of the 2012 hurricane season, AGU asked us to write an op-ed for the Houston Chronicle on the importance of funding hurricane research. We were excited to be asked and pleased that AGU facilitated the process by providing us with some guidance on writing the op-ed. Given the impact that Hurricane Ike had in Texas just a few years ago, we felt it was important to remind the citizens of the greater Houston metropolitan area of the societal benefits of funding hurricane research. Thanks to the assistance of AGU staff, writing the article required only a few hours of time. Our op-ed was published in the print edition of the Houston Chronicle on 1 June 2012, the official start of the hurricane season (http://www.chron.com/default/article/Tight-budgets-posing-threat-to-Texas-hurricane-3600363.php). It was picked up by the media relations office in the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University and featured on the college's Web site in the dean's biweekly briefing and on its Facebook page. As a result, the op-ed reached a large and diverse audience.

  11. Candidate Success and edTPA: Looking at the Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Lesley A.; Kelly, Mary K.; Baldwin, Joni L.; Arnold, Jackie M.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study looks at the correlations between Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) data and numerous program data points, including GPA, major GPA, and benchmark assignment scores, gathered in an Early Childhood Education (ECE) program. Previous studies have looked to correlate grade point average (GPA) with pre-service teacher…

  12. EdMOO: One Approach to a Multimedia Collaborative Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holkner, Bernard

    The nature of the multiuser object oriented (MOO) environment lends itself to flexible and rich interactive collaboration space providing interactive discussion, mail, mailing list, and news features to its virtual denizens. EdMOO (HREF1) was created in mid-1995 as an environment for teachers to experience the text based virtual reality…

  13. Inside the Sex Ed Studio: An Interview with Peggy Brick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taverner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    "Inside the Sex Ed Studio" profiles leaders in the field of sexuality education. Peggy Brick, former director of Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey's Center for Family Life Education (CFLE) and author of numerous sexuality education resources used worldwide, is the subject of this interview. Ms. Brick was interviewed by William J.…

  14. Air pollution and ED visits for chest pain.

    PubMed

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw

    2009-02-01

    This was a study of 157,028 emergency department (ED)-diagnosed visits for chest pain (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9]: 786) in 6 cities in Canada. The generalized linear mixed methods technique was applied to analyze the relations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain on the levels of ambient air pollutants after adjusting for meteorological variables. The daily counts of visits were analyzed separately for the whole period (January-December), warm (April-September), and cold (October-March). The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the mean values of the pollutant concentrations. The highest increase was obtained for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure in the warm period as follows: 5.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.3-5.8) for mean value equals to 20.1 ppb. The associations of ED visits for chest pain with air pollution are very similar to the associations of ED visits related to cardiac problems. PMID:19371523

  15. 5 Ways That edX Could Change Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Since MIT and Harvard started edX, their joint experiment with free online courses, the venture has attracted enormous attention for opening the ivory tower to the world. But in the process, the world will become part of an expensive and ambitious experiment testing some of the most interesting--and difficult--questions in digital education. Can…

  16. HAZ-ED Classroom Activities for Understanding Hazardous Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Federal Superfund Program investigates and cleans up hazardous waste sites throughout the United States. Part of this program is devoted to informing the public and involving people in the process of cleaning up hazardous waste sites from beginning to end. The Haz-Ed program was developed to assist the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)…

  17. Teaching Russian Via Distance Learning, the EdNet Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsiray, Stephen W., Jr.; And Others

    In Utah, the statewide distance education network (EdNet) enables students from five rural and suburban high schools to learn Russian and earn college credits. Courses in Russian are offered through a partnership involving the Cache County School District, Utah State University, and the Utah State Office of Education. Classes are taught on one…

  18. Self-Instructional Workbook for the ED Form 799.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, Washington DC. Student Financial Assistance Programs.

    To assist in making funds available for student higher education loans and to keep their interest rates as low as possible, the Department of Education compensates participating lending institutions using a combination of interest subsidies and special allowance payments. Lenders use ED Form 799, Lender's Interest and Special Allowance Request and…

  19. CCR5 is a receptor for Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin ED

    PubMed Central

    III, Francis Alonzo; Kozhaya, Lina; Rawlings, Stephen A.; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; DuMont, Ashley L.; Myszka, David G.; Landau, Nathaniel; Unutmaz, Derya; Torres, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens and are central to Staphylococcus aureus-mediated killing of host cells. S. aureus encodes pore-forming bi-component leukotoxins that are toxic toward neutrophils, but also specifically target other immune cells. Despite decades since the first description of Staphylococcal leukocidal activity, the host factors responsible for the selectivity of leukotoxins toward different immune cells remain unknown. Here we identified the HIV co-receptor, CCR5, as a cellular determinant required for cytotoxic targeting of subsets of myeloid cells and T lymphocytes by the S. aureus leukotoxin ED (LukED). We further demonstrate that LukED-dependent cell killing is blocked by CCR5 receptor antagonists, including the HIV drug maraviroc. Remarkably, CCR5-deficient mice are largely resistant to lethal S. aureus infection, highlighting the importance of CCR5 targeting in S. aureus pathogenesis. Thus, depletion of CCR5+ leukocytes by LukED suggests a novel S. aureus immune evasion mechanism that can be therapeutically targeted. PMID:23235831

  20. About Issues Facing High Schools. EdFact Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EdSource, Inc., Palo Alto, CA.

    The list of resources printed in this guide were taken from the EdSource report, "High Schools in the Hot Seat," an overview of the challenges facing California's high schools. The information is divided into three sections: students, standards, and high-school reform. The topics covered include peer culture, disengagement, and motivation; the…

  1. Violence prevention in the ED: linkage of the ED to a social service agency.

    PubMed

    Zun, Leslie S; Downey, La Vonne; Rosen, Jodi

    2003-10-01

    was a strong positive correlation of using services and case management (Pearson coefficient = 0.728, significance =.00). The referral of young victims of violence from the ED to psychosocial services could be successful using a case management model and an alliance between a healthcare system and a social service agency. PMID:14574650

  2. Discussion of "The Case for the Median Fragment Size as a Better Fragment Size Descriptor than the Mean" by Finn Ouchterlony, Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2015. doi:10.1007/s00603-015-0722-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spathis, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Ouchterlony (The Case for the Median Fragment Size as a Better Fragment Size Descriptor than the Mean, Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2015. doi: 10.1007/s00603-015-0722-1) argues that the median is preferred over the mean as a measure of central tendency of the rock fragmentation size distribution produced by blasting. This discussion suggests that neither is favoured over the other. Indeed, for distributions where both exist, they may be found in terms of each other, either by an analytical expression or by numerical calculation.

  3. Factors affecting ED length-of-stay in surgical critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, B; Sullivan, S; Levine, A; Dallara, J

    1995-09-01

    To determine what patient characteristics are associated with prolonged emergency department (ED) length-of-stay (LOS) for surgical critical care patients, the charts of 169 patients admitted from the ED directly to the operating room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU) during a 6-week period in 1993 were reviewed. The ED record was reviewed for documentation of factors that might be associated with prolonged ED LOS, such as use of computed tomographic (CT), radiology special procedures, and the number of plain radiographs and consultants. ED LOS was considered to be the time from triage until a decision was made to admit the patient. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, use of CT and special procedures were the strongest independent predictors of prolonged ED length-of-stay. The number of plain radiographs and consultants had only a minimal effect. Use of a protocol-driven trauma evaluation system was associated with a shorter ED LOS. In addition to external factors that affect ED overcrowding, ED patient management decisions may also be associated with prolonged ED length-of-stay. Such ED-based factors may be more important in surgical critical care patients, whose overall ED LOS is affected more by the length of the ED work-up rather than the time spent waiting for a ICU bed or operating suite.

  4. Direct interaction between the Arabidopsis disease resistance signaling proteins, EDS1 and PAD4.

    PubMed

    Feys, B J; Moisan, L J; Newman, M A; Parker, J E

    2001-10-01

    The Arabidopsis EDS1 and PAD4 genes encode lipase-like proteins that function in resistance (R) gene-mediated and basal plant disease resistance. Phenotypic analysis of eds1 and pad4 null mutants shows that EDS1 and PAD4 are required for resistance conditioned by the same spectrum of R genes but fulfil distinct roles within the defence pathway. EDS1 is essential for elaboration of the plant hypersensitive response, whereas EDS1 and PAD4 are both required for accumulation of the plant defence-potentiating molecule, salicylic acid. EDS1 is necessary for pathogen-induced PAD4 mRNA accumulation, whereas mutations in PAD4 or depletion of salicylic acid only partially compromise EDS1 expression. Yeast two-hybrid analysis reveals that EDS1 can dimerize and interact with PAD4. However, EDS1 dimerization is mediated by different domains to those involved in EDS1-PAD4 association. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that EDS1 and PAD4 proteins interact in healthy and pathogen-challenged plant cells. We propose two functions for EDS1. The first is required early in plant defence, independently of PAD4. The second recruits PAD4 in the amplification of defences, possibly by direct EDS1-PAD4 association.

  5. Patient's jewelry stolen as she rests in the ED.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    In a hospital ED in Rhode Island, a 96-year-old patient was robbed of her jewelry while she rested in her room. The thief was dressed in scrubs. Identification badges are only one way of keeping unwanted intruders out and your patients' belongings safe. Other suggestions: Have different groups of staff members, i.e., ED doctors and nurses, wear color-coded scrubs that distinguish them from other hospital personnel. If your staff see a strangely dressed person or someone who looks lost or like they don't fit in, they should question them about their identity. Create protocols for the removal and safekeeping of patients' jewelry that cover several different scenarios.

  6. ED Utilization Trends in Sports-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Wendy J.; Gittelman, Mike

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency department (ED) visits for sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) have risen. This study evaluated how the number and severity of admissions have changed as ED visits for sports-related TBIs have increased. METHODS: A retrospective study of children aged 0 to 19 years at a level 1 trauma center was performed. Patients from 2002 to 2011 with a primary or secondary diagnosis of TBI were identified from the hospital’s inpatient and outpatient trauma registries. Frequencies were used to characterize the population, χ2 analysis was performed to determine differences between groups, and regression analysis looked at relationship between year and injury severity score or length of stay. RESULTS: Sport was responsible for injury in 3878 (15.4%) cases during the study period; 3506 (90.4%) were discharged from the hospital, and 372 (9.6%) were admitted. Seventy-three percent were male patients and 78% Caucasian; mean age was 13 ± 3.5 years. ED visits for sports-related TBIs increased 92% over the study period, yet there was no significant change (χ2 = 9.8, df = 9, P = .37) in the percentage of children admitted. Mean injury severity score for those admitted decreased from 7.8 to 4.8 (β = –0.46; P = .006); length of stay trended downward (β = –0.05; P = .05). CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of children being admitted from the ED with sports-related TBI has not changed over the past 10 years. The severity of admitted sports-related TBI is decreasing. Additional research is needed to correlate these trends with other TBI mechanisms. PMID:24081999

  7. ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed3A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-12

    ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed3A Project Title:  CERES Discipline:  ... Order Data Guide Documents:  GEO Description/Abstract Detailed CERES ISCCP-D2like Product ... Data Products Catalog:  DPC_ISCCP-D2like-GEO_R5V3  (PDF) Readme Files:  Readme GEO R5-987 ...

  8. ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed2A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-24

    ISCCP-D2like-GEO Ed2A Project Title:  CERES Discipline:  ... Order Data Guide Documents:  GEO Description/Abstract Detailed CERES ISCCP-D2like Product ... Data Products Catalog:  DPC_ISCCP-D2like-GEO_R5V3  (PDF) Readme Files:  Readme GEO R5-909 ...

  9. States leverage telepsychiatry solutions to ease ED crowding, accelerate care.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Many states are having success turning to telepsychiatry-based solutions to connect mental health patients with needed care while also decompressing crowded EDs. Just one year into a statewide telepsychiatry initiative in North Carolina (NC-STeP), administrators say the approach has saved as much as $7 million, and hospital demand for the service is higher than anticipated. In Texas, mental health emergency centers (MHEC) that use telepsychiatry to connect patients in rural areas with needed psychiatric care are freeing up EDs to focus on medical care. In just 11 months, 91 North Carolina hospitals have at least started the process to engage in NC-STeP. Much of the savings from NC-STeP come from involuntary commitment orders being overturned as a result of the telepsychiatry consults, reducing the need for expensive inpatient care. Implementing NC-STeP has involved multiple hurdles including credentialing difficulties and technical/firewall challenges. The Texas model provides 24/7 availability of psychiatrists via telemedicine through a network of MHECs. In-person staff at the MHECs perform basic screening tests and blood draws so that medical clearance can be achieved without the need for an ED visit in most cases. Funding for the MHECs comes from the state, hospitals in the region, and local governmental authorities that reap savings or benefits from the initiative. PMID:25688413

  10. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider preparing for an F-104 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Scheider is shown standing in the cockpit of a two-seat F-104. He is wearing a full pressure suit, which is required on all flights above 50,000 feet. Ed served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and graduated in 1973. He was then assigned as an engineering test pilot, and as an instructor at the Naval Test Pilot School. He first arrived at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) as a Navy Liaison Officer on July 5, 1982. He joined NASA as a research pilot a year later. Ed was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA-operated SR-71 Blackbirds. Ed retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  11. Teachers are students in ZPG program called 'Pop Ed.'.

    PubMed

    Schline, S

    1977-01-01

    Zero Population Growth's Population Education (Pop Ed) program began in 1975 as an ongoing effort to bring the "real world" into the classroom by demonstrating the relationships among population trends, food and energy resources, and environmental and economic problems. The training workshops which last for a day or 2 have the following goals: 1) to offer a brief demographic overview for teachers, 2) to provide lesson plans and techniques readily usable in the classroom, 3) to alert teachers to the best written and audiovisual materials available, 4) to identify local resources for teaching Pop Ed, and 5) to provide sample materials. In the 1st year of program operation 10 workshops were held. These workshops are credited, at least partly, with the subsequent population instruction that reached over 10,400 students and 1600 teachers. Another 15 workshops were held in the 2nd year of operation. Obstacles to the program are the assumption on the part of some teachers that Pop Ed belongs in disciplines other than their own and the belief on the part of many teachers that they will require extensive training. PMID:12308748

  12. Fresh policies and procedures, transparency fuel ED turnaround.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The ED at Banner Payson Medical Center in Payson, AZ, has charted dramatic improvements on key metrics through a range of staff and policy changes. In just a few months, the ED has halved wait times, patient satisfaction has improved, and daily volume is up. Administrators say the secret to the success of the effort is a move to be transparent by posting key metrics regarding patient flow, a tactic that has helped the team pull together and feel a sense of accomplishment when performance goals are achieved. Administrators adjusted staff schedules to better match patient volume patterns in the ED, and they added staff to help nurses during peak hours. A new provider group enlisted the assistance of scribes during peak hours to manage the documentation workload while also enabling physicians to focus more patient interaction. Physicians hold end-of-shift huddles to review successes and challenges, and to improve physician/nurse communication. The tactic also helps develop the staff from an educational standpoint. PMID:27266001

  13. States leverage telepsychiatry solutions to ease ED crowding, accelerate care.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Many states are having success turning to telepsychiatry-based solutions to connect mental health patients with needed care while also decompressing crowded EDs. Just one year into a statewide telepsychiatry initiative in North Carolina (NC-STeP), administrators say the approach has saved as much as $7 million, and hospital demand for the service is higher than anticipated. In Texas, mental health emergency centers (MHEC) that use telepsychiatry to connect patients in rural areas with needed psychiatric care are freeing up EDs to focus on medical care. In just 11 months, 91 North Carolina hospitals have at least started the process to engage in NC-STeP. Much of the savings from NC-STeP come from involuntary commitment orders being overturned as a result of the telepsychiatry consults, reducing the need for expensive inpatient care. Implementing NC-STeP has involved multiple hurdles including credentialing difficulties and technical/firewall challenges. The Texas model provides 24/7 availability of psychiatrists via telemedicine through a network of MHECs. In-person staff at the MHECs perform basic screening tests and blood draws so that medical clearance can be achieved without the need for an ED visit in most cases. Funding for the MHECs comes from the state, hospitals in the region, and local governmental authorities that reap savings or benefits from the initiative.

  14. Does the Op-Ed Page Have a Chance to Become a Public Forum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciofalo, Andrew; Traverso, Kim

    1994-01-01

    Surveys op-ed page editors, finding that fewer than half of the responding papers have op-ed pages; that professional journalists, public figures, and propagandists dominate the pages; and that editors firmly control the agenda. (SR)

  15. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: Factors Associated with ED Revisits

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Brian R.; Sharp, Kristen M.; Patterson, Brian; Dooley-Hash, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) is a condition that commonly affects women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Despite frequently leading to emergency department (ED) visits, little evidence exists to characterize the nature of ED visits or to guide its treatment in the ED. Our objectives were to evaluate the treatment of NVP in the ED and to identify factors that predict return visits to the ED for NVP. Methods We conducted a retrospective database analysis using the electronic medical record from a single, large academic hospital. Demographic and treatment variables were collected using a chart review of 113 ED patient visits with a billing diagnosis of “nausea and vomiting in pregnancy” or “hyperemesis gravidarum.” Logistic regression analysis was used with a primary outcome of return visit to the ED for the same diagnoses. Results There was wide treatment variability of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy patients in the ED. Of the 113 patient visits, 38 (33.6%) had a return ED visit for NVP. High gravidity (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.06–1.61]), high parity (OR 1.50 95% CI [1.12–2.00]), and early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.60–0.90]) were associated with an increase in return ED visits in univariate logistic regression models, while only early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.59–0.91]) was associated with increased return ED visits in a multiple regression model. Admission to the hospital was found to decrease the likelihood of return ED visits (p=0.002). Conclusion NVP can be difficult to manage and has a high ED return visit rate. Optimizing care with aggressive, standardized treatment in the ED and upon discharge, particularly if factors predictive of return ED visits are present, may improve quality of care and reduce ED utilization for this condition. PMID:27625723

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) from Gossypium barbadense.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaofeng; Qi, Xiliang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Arabidopsis enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) plays an important role in plant defense against biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. The necrotrophic pathogen Verticillium dahliae infection of Gossypium barbadense could lead to Verticillium wilt which seriously reduces the cotton production. Here, we cloned and characterized a G. barbadense homolog of EDS1, designated as GbEDS1. The full-length cDNA of the GbEDS1 gene was obtained by the technique of rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame of the GbEDS1 gene was 1,647 bp long and encoded a protein of 548 amino acids residues. Comparison of the cDNA and genomic DNA sequence of GbEDS1 indicated that this gene contained a single intron and two exons. Like other EDS1s, GbEDS1 contained a conserved N-terminal lipase domain and an EDS1-specific KNEDT motif. Subcellular localization assay revealed that GbEDS1-green fluorescence protein fusion protein was localized in both cytosol and nucleus. Interestingly, the transcript levels of GbEDS1 were dramatically increased in response to pathogen V. dahliae infection. To investigate the role of GbEDS1 in plant resistance against V. dahliae, a conserved fragment derived from GbEDS1 was used to knockdown the endogenous EDS1 in Nicotiana benthamiana by heterologous virus-induced gene silencing. Our data showed that silencing of NbEDS1 resulted in increased susceptibility to V. dahliae infection in N. benthamiana, suggesting a possible involvement of the novelly isolated GbEDS1 in the regulation of plant defense against V. dahliae.

  17. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: Factors Associated with ED Revisits

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Brian R.; Sharp, Kristen M.; Patterson, Brian; Dooley-Hash, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) is a condition that commonly affects women in the first trimester of pregnancy. Despite frequently leading to emergency department (ED) visits, little evidence exists to characterize the nature of ED visits or to guide its treatment in the ED. Our objectives were to evaluate the treatment of NVP in the ED and to identify factors that predict return visits to the ED for NVP. Methods We conducted a retrospective database analysis using the electronic medical record from a single, large academic hospital. Demographic and treatment variables were collected using a chart review of 113 ED patient visits with a billing diagnosis of “nausea and vomiting in pregnancy” or “hyperemesis gravidarum.” Logistic regression analysis was used with a primary outcome of return visit to the ED for the same diagnoses. Results There was wide treatment variability of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy patients in the ED. Of the 113 patient visits, 38 (33.6%) had a return ED visit for NVP. High gravidity (OR 1.31, 95% CI [1.06–1.61]), high parity (OR 1.50 95% CI [1.12–2.00]), and early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.60–0.90]) were associated with an increase in return ED visits in univariate logistic regression models, while only early gestational age (OR 0.74 95% CI [0.59–0.91]) was associated with increased return ED visits in a multiple regression model. Admission to the hospital was found to decrease the likelihood of return ED visits (p=0.002). Conclusion NVP can be difficult to manage and has a high ED return visit rate. Optimizing care with aggressive, standardized treatment in the ED and upon discharge, particularly if factors predictive of return ED visits are present, may improve quality of care and reduce ED utilization for this condition.

  18. Analysis of microtraces in invasive traumas using SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, E J; Zoon, P D; Chang, S B C G; Keereweer, I; Pieterman, R; Gerretsen, R R R

    2012-01-10

    Scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a proven forensic tool and has been used to analyze several kinds of trace evidence. A forensic application of SEM/EDS is the examination of morphological characteristics of tool marks that tools and instruments leave on bone. The microtraces that are left behind by these tools and instruments on the bone are, however, often ignored or not noticed at all. In this paper we will describe the use of SEM/EDS for the analysis of microtraces in invasive sharp-force, blunt-force and bone-hacking traumas in bone. This research is part of a larger multi-disciplinary approach in which pathologists, forensic anthropologists, toolmark and microtrace experts work together to link observed injuries to a suspected weapon or, in case of an unknown weapon, to indicate a group of objects that could have been used as a weapon. Although there are a few difficulties one have to consider, the method itself is rather simple and straightforward to apply. A sample of dry and clean bone is placed into the SEM sample chamber and brightness and contrast are set such that bone appears grey, metal appears white and organic material appears black. The sample is then searched manually to find relevant features. Once features are found their elemental composition is measured by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). This method is illustrated using several cases. It is shown that SEM/EDS analysis of microtraces in bone is a valuable tool to get clues about an unknown weapon and can associate a specific weapon with injuries on the basis of appearance and elemental composition. In particular the separate results from the various disciplines are complementary and may be combined to reach a conclusion with a stronger probative value. This is not only useful in the courtroom but above all in criminal investigations when one have to know for what weapon or object to look for. PMID:21871744

  19. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS commercial plant study design update. Illinois coal. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of the Study Design Update (SDU) were to identify the technical issues facing a potential commercial-size EDS plant design; to provide a reliable basis for estimating the cost of EDS products; and to furnish research guidance to the EDS Project. The SDU consists of two distinct studies in which different processing schemes are used to produce the hydrogen and fuel gas required by the plant. These studies are referred to as the Base Case and the Market Flexibility Sensitivity Case. In the Base Case, hydrogen is generated by steam reforming of the light hydrocarbon gases produced in the plant. Fuel gas is generated by feeding the bottoms stream from the liquefaction section vacuum pipestill to a FLEXICOKING unit. In the FLEXICOKING unit reactor, the bottoms stream is converted to coke; additional liquid product is also recovered. The coke is converted to low-Btu fuel gas in the FLEXICOKING unit gasifier. In the Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case, the bottoms stream from the vacuum pipestill is split, and about half is sent to the FLEXICOKING unit for recovery of additional liquid product and production of fuel gas. The remainder of the bottoms stream is converted to hydrogen in a Partial Oxidation Unit. Hence the MFS Case does not consume light hydrocarbon gases produced and they are available for sale. The study of these two cases has demonstrated the importance of bottoms process selection to the economics and thermal efficiency of an EDS plant. Volume 1 - Main Report has been developed to be a stand-alone document. Both the Base Case and Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case are covered. This volume includes an overview and detailed case summaries. It also covers economics, product recovery factors, material and energy balances, cost estimates and enviromental considerations.

  20. A functional EDS1 ortholog is differentially regulated in powdery mildew resistant and susceptible grapevines and complements an Arabidopsis eds1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Shu, Xiaomei; Ali, Mohammad Babar; Howard, Susanne; Li, Nan; Winterhagen, Patrick; Qiu, Wenping; Gassmann, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Vitis vinifera (grapevine) is the most economically important deciduous fruit crop, but cultivated grapevine varieties lack adequate innate immunity to a range of devastating diseases. To identify genetic resources for grapevine innate immunity and understand pathogen defense pathways in a woody perennial plant, we focus in this study on orthologs of the central Arabidopsis thaliana defense regulator ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1). The family of EDS1-like genes is expanded in grapevine, and members of this family were previously found to be constitutively upregulated in the resistant variety 'Norton' of the North American grapevine species Vitis aestivalis, while they were induced by Erysiphe necator, the causal agent of grapevine powdery mildew (PM), in the susceptible V. vinifera variety 'Cabernet Sauvignon'. Here, we determine the responsiveness of individual EDS1-like genes in grapevine to PM and salicylic acid, and find that EDS1-like paralogs are differentially regulated in 'Cabernet Sauvignon', while two are constitutively upregulated in 'Norton'. Sequencing of VvEDS1 and VaEDS1 cDNA and genomic clones revealed high conservation in the protein-encoding sequence and some divergence of the promoter sequence in the two grapevine varieties. Complementation of the Arabidopsis eds1-1 mutant showed that the EDS1-like gene with highest predicted amino acid sequence similarity to AtEDS1 from either grapevine varieties is a functional ortholog of AtEDS1. Together, our analyses show that differential susceptibility to PM is correlated with differences in EDS1 expression, not differences in EDS1 function, between resistant 'Norton' and susceptible 'Cabernet Sauvignon'.

  1. EDS1 mediates pathogen resistance and virulence function of a bacterial effector in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) are well known regulators of both basal and resistance (R) protein-mediated plant defense. We identified two EDS1- (GmEDS1a/b) and one PAD4-like (GmPAD4) protein that are required for resistance signaling in soybean. Consist...

  2. Self-Esteem and Emotional Intelligence among B.Ed Trainees of Tsunami Affected Coastal Belt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babu M, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Through this study the author investigates the relationship between self-esteem and emotional intelligence among B.Ed trainees of Tsunami affected coastal belt of Alappey district of Kerala, India. Stream of study, marital status and age based comparisons were made among the B.Ed trainees. 92 B.Ed trainees were the participants in the study. It…

  3. Reading between the lines: building collaboration with ED clinicians can increase revenue.

    PubMed

    Edelberg, Caral

    2009-05-01

    Steps hospitals can take to enhance their ED billing, coding, and compliance include: Auditing records regularly to ensure ED nurses understand which procedures require specialized documentation. Determining whether assessment criteria would pass a compliance review. Ensuring ED documentation guidelines can be easily used by staff. Maintaining dated copies of revisions to these guidelines. PMID:19445397

  4. EMS transports patients to clinics--seeks to relieve ED crowding.

    PubMed

    2010-07-01

    With most EDs overcrowded and with no relief in sight, ED managers will take all the help they can get. In some areas of the country, the local EMS providers are looking to offer some relief by transporting less urgent patients to alternative sites such as urgent care clinics. EDs assist in the development of program protocols and processes. ED nurses are considered for consultation on whether a patient can appropriately be seen in a less urgent setting. EMS providers must be trained on the requirements patients must fulfill to be transported to an ED PMID:20608479

  5. Constitutive disease resistance requires EDS1 in the Arabidopsis mutants cpr1 and cpr6 and is partially EDS1-dependent in cpr5.

    PubMed

    Clarke, J D; Aarts, N; Feys, B J; Dong, X; Parker, J E

    2001-05-01

    The systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response in Arabidopsis is characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), expression of the pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, and enhanced resistance to virulent bacterial and oomycete pathogens. The cpr (constitutive expressor of PR genes) mutants express all three SAR phenotypes. In addition, cpr5 and cpr6 induce expression of PDF1.2, a defense-related gene associated with activation of the jasmonate/ethylene-mediated resistance pathways. cpr5 also forms spontaneous lesions. In contrast, the eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility) mutation abolishes race-specific resistance conferred by a major subclass of resistance (R) gene products in response to avirulent pathogens. eds1 plants also exhibit increased susceptibility to virulent pathogens. Epistasis experiments were designed to explore the relationship between the cpr- and EDS1-mediated resistance pathways. We found that a null eds1 mutation suppresses the disease resistance phenotypes of both cpr1 and cpr6. In contrast, eds1 only partially suppresses resistance in cpr5, leading us to conclude that cpr5 expresses both EDS1-dependent and EDS1-independent components of plant disease resistance. Although eds1 does not prevent lesion formation on cpr5 leaves, it alters their appearance and reduces their spread. This phenotypic difference is associated with increased pathogen colonization of cpr5 eds1 plants compared to cpr5. The data allow us to place EDS1 as a necessary downstream component of cpr1- and cpr6-mediated responses, but suggest a more complex relationship between EDS1 and cpr5 in plant defense.

  6. Statistical analysis of low-voltage EDS spectrum images

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.M.

    1998-03-01

    The benefits of using low ({le}5 kV) operating voltages for energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) of bulk specimens have been explored only during the last few years. This paper couples low-voltage EDS with two other emerging areas of characterization: spectrum imaging of a computer chip manufactured by a major semiconductor company. Data acquisition was performed with a Philips XL30-FEG SEM operated at 4 kV and equipped with an Oxford super-ATW detector and XP3 pulse processor. The specimen was normal to the electron beam and the take-off angle for acquisition was 35{degree}. The microscope was operated with a 150 {micro}m diameter final aperture at spot size 3, which yielded an X-ray count rate of {approximately}2,000 s{sup {minus}1}. EDS spectrum images were acquired as Adobe Photoshop files with the 4pi plug-in module. (The spectrum images could also be stored as NIH Image files, but the raw data are automatically rescaled as maximum-contrast (0--255) 8-bit TIFF images -- even at 16-bit resolution -- which poses an inconvenience for quantitative analysis.) The 4pi plug-in module is designed for EDS X-ray mapping and allows simultaneous acquisition of maps from 48 elements plus an SEM image. The spectrum image was acquired by re-defining the energy intervals of 48 elements to form a series of contiguous 20 eV windows from 1.25 kV to 2.19 kV. A spectrum image of 450 x 344 pixels was acquired from the specimen with a sampling density of 50 nm/pixel and a dwell time of 0.25 live seconds per pixel, for a total acquisition time of {approximately}14 h. The binary data files were imported into Mathematica for analysis with software developed by the author at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A 400 x 300 pixel section of the original image was analyzed. MSA required {approximately}185 Mbytes of memory and {approximately}18 h of CPU time on a 300 MHz Power Macintosh 9600.

  7. Designing concrete EDS maglev guideways: Power losses in metallic reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Beto, D.; Plotkin, D.

    1997-05-01

    Conventional reinforced concrete designs will have to be altered when designing a guideway for a maglev using an electrodynamically suspended (EDS) propulsion system. This type of propulsion system generates large magnetic fields that will develop magnetically induced, circulating eddy currents in any conventional steel reinforcement in close proximity to the magnets. These eddy currents, if large enough, may produce significant power losses that could adversely effect operation of the system. This paper presents a method and explanation for civil engineers to use for estimating the power losses due to the presence of metallic reinforcement. This procedure may be used to help guide future designs in the selection and placement of reinforcing material.

  8. Pilot explores organ donation in the ED--challenges raised.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    A pilot program for ED organ donation at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)--Presbyterian Hospital is seeking much-needed organs, while maintaining optimal medical care for the living and avoiding potential conflicts of interest. Separate teams are involved with organ donation and with patient care, creating a "firewall" to prevent conflicts of interest. After failed CPR, a minimum of two minutes of no-CPR time is allowed to pass after death is pronounced to be certain there is no occult cardiac activity. Infusions of cold fluids are used to give enough time for the transplant surgeon to arrive and determine if any organs can be procured. PMID:20535893

  9. SEM/EDS Characterization of Ambient PM during Agricultural Burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wall, S.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) samples were collected with UNC passive samplers during agricultural burns in Imperial Valley, California. Four Bermuda grass field burn events were sampled at 3-8 locations surrounding each burn. Sampling began at the start of each burn (30-60 min) and continued for 24-120 hours. During 3 of the 4 burn events, winds were calm and plumes were observed to travel straight up to the inversion layer. In one event, winds created a ground-level plume that enveloped two UNC samplers mounted on telephone poles very close to the field (0.2-0.3 miles away). Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy / energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM/EDS) was used to measure particle sizes and elemental composition, from which mass concentrations and size distributions were calculated. The median PM2.5 and PM10 levels measured in this study were 3.4 and 20 ug/m3, respectively. To determine quantitative accuracy, UNC sampler PM2.5 results (PM< 2.5 um) were compared to PM2.5 results from four co-located, continuous-reading beta-attenuation monitors (EBAMs). The median agreement (EBAM - UNC) was 3.8 ug/m3. Manual SEM/EDS detected various distinctive species in these samples, including sea salt, spores, plant fragments, and large soot agglomerates. During the ‘plume event’, 24-hour PM2.5 exposures downwind were up to 17 times higher than that measured upwind. Numerous submicron combustion particles with carbon and oxygen only were directly observed by manual SEM/EDS in the two plume-impacted samples, along with larger ash particles enriched in potassium, sulfur, chlorine, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. CCSEM/EDS data from this event was grouped into 5 particle classes to generate size-fraction-specific pie charts. Burn-related particle types contributed 95% of the PM2.5 in the location directly impacted by the ground-level plume, compared to only 12% in the upwind location. A sample of Imperial County Bermuda grass analyzed in bulk and

  10. Status of the Development of EDS Coal Liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Vick, G K; Epperly, W R

    1982-07-23

    This article traces the evolution and development of a modern coal liquefaction technology, the EDS (Exxon Donor Solvent) process, over a period of 15 years. During this time the technology has been advanced from laboratory experiments to a pilot plant with a coal feed rate of 250 tons per day, and findings from several areas of science and technology have been important. The process is now in the final stage of development to generate the data needed to design a plant of commercial size.

  11. Registered Nurses and Discharge Planning in a Taiwanese ED: A Neglected Issue?

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen; Goopy, Suzanne; Lin, Chun-Chih; Barnard, Alan; Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Han, Chin-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Published research on discharge planning is written from the perspective of hospital wards and community services. Limited research focuses on discharge planning in the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to identify ED nurses' perceptions of factors influencing the implementation of discharge planning. This qualitative study collected data from 25 ED nurses through in-depth interviews and a drawing task in which participants were asked to depict on paper the implementation of discharge planning in their practice. Factors influencing discharge planning were grouped into three categories: discharge planning as a neglected issue in the ED, heavy workload, and the negative attitudes of ED patients and their families. The study highlighted a need for effective discharge planning to be counted as an essential clinical competency for ED nurses and factored into their everyday workload. Nurses perceived that organizational culture, and parents' and relatives' attitudes were barriers to implementing discharge teaching in the ED.

  12. Secondary contamination of ED personnel from hazardous materials events, 1995-2001.

    PubMed

    Horton, D Kevin; Berkowitz, Zahava; Kaye, Wendy E

    2003-05-01

    Hazardous materials (hazmat) events pose a health threat not only for those individuals in the immediate vicinity of the release (ie, members of the general public, on-site first responders, employees), but also for ED personnel (ie, physicians and nurses) treating the chemically contaminated victims arriving at the hospital. Secondary contamination injuries to ED personnel result when exposed victims enter the ED without being properly decontaminated. Data from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance System were used to conduct a retrospective analysis on hazmat events occurring in 16 states from 1995 through 2001 that involved secondary injury to ED personnel. Six events were identified in which 15 ED personnel were secondarily injured while treating contaminated victims. The predominant injuries sustained were respiratory and eye irritation. Proper victim decontamination procedures, good field-to-hospital communication, and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) use can help prevent ED personnel injuries and contamination of the ED. PMID:12811712

  13. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  14. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  15. Micro Slot Generation by μ-ED Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, H. K.; Mayanak, M. K.; Rajpurohit, S. R.; Mathai, V. J.

    2016-08-01

    Micro electro discharge machining is one of the most widely used advanced micro machining technique owing to its capability to fabricate micro features on any electrically conductive materials irrespective of its material properties. Despite its wide acceptability, the process is always adversely affected by issues like wear that occurred on the tool electrode, which results into generation of inaccurate features. Micro ED milling, a process variant in which the tool electrode simultaneously rotated and scanned during machining, is reported to have high process efficiency for generation of 3D complicated shapes and features with relatively less electrode wear intensity. In the present study an attempt has been made to study the effect of two process parameters viz. capacitance and scanning speed of tool electrode on end wear that occurs on the tool electrode and overcut of micro slots generated by micro ED milling. The experiment has been conducted on Al 1100 alloy with tungsten electrode having diameter of 300 μm. Results suggest that wear on the tool electrode and overcut of the micro features generated are highly influenced by the level of the capacitance employed during machining. For the parameter usage employed for present study however, no significant effect of variation of scanning speed has been observed on both responses.

  16. The collection of MicroED data for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Nannenga, Brent L; de la Cruz, M Jason; Liu, Jinyang; Sawtelle, Steven; Calero, Guillermo; Reyes, Francis E; Hattne, Johan; Gonen, Tamir

    2016-05-01

    The formation of large, well-ordered crystals for crystallographic experiments remains a crucial bottleneck to the structural understanding of many important biological systems. To help alleviate this problem in crystallography, we have developed the MicroED method for the collection of electron diffraction data from 3D microcrystals and nanocrystals of radiation-sensitive biological material. In this approach, liquid solutions containing protein microcrystals are deposited on carbon-coated electron microscopy grids and are vitrified by plunging them into liquid ethane. MicroED data are collected for each selected crystal using cryo-electron microscopy, in which the crystal is diffracted using very few electrons as the stage is continuously rotated. This protocol gives advice on how to identify microcrystals by light microscopy or by negative-stain electron microscopy in samples obtained from standard protein crystallization experiments. The protocol also includes information about custom-designed equipment for controlling crystal rotation and software for recording experimental parameters in diffraction image metadata. Identifying microcrystals, preparing samples and setting up the microscope for diffraction data collection take approximately half an hour for each step. Screening microcrystals for quality diffraction takes roughly an hour, and the collection of a single data set is ∼10 min in duration. Complete data sets and resulting high-resolution structures can be obtained from a single crystal or by merging data from multiple crystals.

  17. The collection of MicroED data for macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Nannenga, Brent L; de la Cruz, M Jason; Liu, Jinyang; Sawtelle, Steven; Calero, Guillermo; Reyes, Francis E; Hattne, Johan; Gonen, Tamir

    2016-05-01

    The formation of large, well-ordered crystals for crystallographic experiments remains a crucial bottleneck to the structural understanding of many important biological systems. To help alleviate this problem in crystallography, we have developed the MicroED method for the collection of electron diffraction data from 3D microcrystals and nanocrystals of radiation-sensitive biological material. In this approach, liquid solutions containing protein microcrystals are deposited on carbon-coated electron microscopy grids and are vitrified by plunging them into liquid ethane. MicroED data are collected for each selected crystal using cryo-electron microscopy, in which the crystal is diffracted using very few electrons as the stage is continuously rotated. This protocol gives advice on how to identify microcrystals by light microscopy or by negative-stain electron microscopy in samples obtained from standard protein crystallization experiments. The protocol also includes information about custom-designed equipment for controlling crystal rotation and software for recording experimental parameters in diffraction image metadata. Identifying microcrystals, preparing samples and setting up the microscope for diffraction data collection take approximately half an hour for each step. Screening microcrystals for quality diffraction takes roughly an hour, and the collection of a single data set is ∼10 min in duration. Complete data sets and resulting high-resolution structures can be obtained from a single crystal or by merging data from multiple crystals. PMID:27077331

  18. Functions of EDS1-like and PAD4 genes in grapevine defenses against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Dai, Ru; Pike, Sharon M; Qiu, Wenping; Gassmann, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The molecular interactions between grapevine and the obligate biotrophic fungus Erysiphe necator are not understood in depth. One reason for this is the recalcitrance of grapevine to genetic modifications. Using defense-related Arabidopsis mutants that are susceptible to pathogens, we were able to analyze key components in grapevine defense responses. We have examined the functions of defense genes associated with the salicylic acid (SA) pathway, including ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), EDS1-LIKE 2 (EDL2), EDL5 and PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 (PAD4) of two grapevine species, Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon, which is susceptible to E. necator, and V. aestivalis cv. Norton, which is resistant. Both VaEDS1 and VvEDS1 were previously found to functionally complement the Arabidopsis eds1-1 mutant. Here we show that the promoters of both VaEDS1 and VvEDS1 were induced by SA, indicating that the heightened defense of Norton is related to its high SA level. Other than Va/VvEDS1, only VaEDL2 complemented Arabidopsis eds1-1, whereas Va/VvPAD4 did not complement Arabidopsis pad4-1. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation results indicated that Vitis EDS1 and EDL2 proteins interact with Vitis PAD4 and AtPAD4, suggesting that Vitis EDS1/EDL2 forms a complex with PAD4 to confer resistance, as is known from Arabidopsis. However, Vitis EDL5 and PAD4 did not interact with Arabidopsis EDS1 or PAD4, correlating with their inability to function in Arabidopsis. Together, our study suggests a more complicated EDS1/PAD4 module in grapevine and provides insight into molecular mechanisms that determine disease resistance levels in Vitis species native to the North American continent.

  19. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  20. FormEd: An X Window System application for managing first-order formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, T.L.; McCune, W.W.

    1990-11-01

    FormEd is a window-based program for constructing, displaying, and managing first-order logic formulas. The main motivation for constructing FormEd was the desire to have formulas displayed in a readable, two-dimensional format. Users of FormEd can make two kinds of transformation on formulas: logic transformations, such as negation normal form translation, which preserve the meaning of a formula, and edit transformations, which can be used to make arbitrary changes, such as adding a hypothesis to a subformula. FormEd was written by using the X Window System, Version 11, and code from the theorem prover OTTER. 4 refs.

  1. Formation of FRCs on the Pulsed High Density Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreason, Samuel; Slough, John

    2008-11-01

    The Pulsed High Density (PHD) experiment has been reassembled at a new facility with sufficient space to continue through the full acceleration and compression stages to reach breakeven. The intention here is to produce a large FRC, but remain in the kinetic regime where the FRC is stable and the transport sufficiently low that a Q > 1 plasma can be attained at moderate densities ˜ 10^23 m-3. During reassembly a more complete analysis of previous experimental results has been made. One of the issues in the early phase of the experiment was inefficient flux trapping during field reversal due to the large scale of the FRC source (0.4 m radius). The on-axis seed plasma was unable to diffuse out to the walls on a timescale commensurate with the introduction of bias fields. This resulted in more than half of the initial bias flux lost before sheath formation halted flux loss. An annular array of plasma sources has been constructed that solves this problem and greatly enhances the flux retention. Dynamic formation has been employed on PHD and analysis tools capable of interpreting the magnetic loop diagnostic array have been developed. Results with comparison to numerical models will be presented.

  2. Internal Magnetic Field Measurements in STX Generated FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreason, Samuel; Miller, Ken; Slough, John

    1999-11-01

    The internal magnetic field probes installed in the STX experiment at the Redmond Plasma Physics laboratory are designed to provide a one dimensional internal magnetic field profile of a 25 eV 10^19 m-3 FRC. The probe consists of 24 1cm × 1mm 8 turn coils interconnected like a chain to provide information on the RMF field components. This probe can be swept through the vacuum chamber to provide field information for different points throughout the FRC. The coils themselves are made with one mil magnet wire (half mil insulation). Structural and thermal support for the field coils is provided by a 53 mil ID × 78 mil OD berylium oxide tube capped with a boron nitride tip. Berylium oxide is an insulator with good thermal diffusivity/ablation properties. Calculations and test results indicate minimal perturbations to the plasma caused by the probe. Information on the construction methods employed as well as physical and external electrical design will be presented along with representative experimental results. This work is funded by the USDOE. www.aa.washington.edu/AERP/RPPL

  3. Transformation and Immobilization of Chromium by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Revealed by SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Su, Dan; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Baodong

    2015-12-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), ubiquitous soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the majority of terrestrial plants, are known to play an important role in plant tolerance to chromium (Cr) contamination. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially the direct influences of AMF on the translocation and transformation of Cr in the soil-plant continuum, are still unresolved. In a two-compartment root-organ cultivation system, the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of mycorrhizal roots was treated with 0.05 mmol L(-1) Cr(VI) for 12 days to investigate the uptake, translocation, and transformation of Cr(VI) by AMF using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) technologies. The results indicated that AMF can immobilize quantities of Cr via reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming Cr(III)-phosphate analogues, likely on the fungal surface. Besides this, we also confirmed that the extraradical mycelium (ERM) can actively take up Cr [either in the form of Cr(VI) or Cr(III)] and transport Cr [potentially in the form of Cr(III)-histidine analogues] to mycorrhizal roots but immobilize most of the Cr(III) in the fungal structures. Based on an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis of Cr(VI)-treated roots, we proposed that the intraradical fungal structures can also immobilize Cr within mycorrhizal roots. Our findings confirmed the immobilization of Cr by AMF, which plays an essential role in the Cr(VI) tolerance of AM symbioses.

  4. Transformation and Immobilization of Chromium by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Revealed by SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Su, Dan; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Baodong

    2015-12-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), ubiquitous soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the majority of terrestrial plants, are known to play an important role in plant tolerance to chromium (Cr) contamination. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially the direct influences of AMF on the translocation and transformation of Cr in the soil-plant continuum, are still unresolved. In a two-compartment root-organ cultivation system, the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of mycorrhizal roots was treated with 0.05 mmol L(-1) Cr(VI) for 12 days to investigate the uptake, translocation, and transformation of Cr(VI) by AMF using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) technologies. The results indicated that AMF can immobilize quantities of Cr via reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming Cr(III)-phosphate analogues, likely on the fungal surface. Besides this, we also confirmed that the extraradical mycelium (ERM) can actively take up Cr [either in the form of Cr(VI) or Cr(III)] and transport Cr [potentially in the form of Cr(III)-histidine analogues] to mycorrhizal roots but immobilize most of the Cr(III) in the fungal structures. Based on an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis of Cr(VI)-treated roots, we proposed that the intraradical fungal structures can also immobilize Cr within mycorrhizal roots. Our findings confirmed the immobilization of Cr by AMF, which plays an essential role in the Cr(VI) tolerance of AM symbioses. PMID:26551890

  5. A preliminary examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Matherne, Camden E; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M; Shank, Lisa M; Schvey, Natasha A; Brady, Sheila M; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-08-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6-12years with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29years±1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8% White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n=19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n=33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n=199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p=0.001) and adiposity (p=0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p=0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p=0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p=0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p<0.001) and BMIz (p=0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p=0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain.

  6. A Preliminary Examination of Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) in Middle Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Matherne, Camden E.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Altschul, Anne M.; Shank, Lisa M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Brady, Sheila M.; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew P.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Control Eating Disorder (LOC-ED) has been proposed as a diagnostic category for children 6–12y with binge-type eating. However, characteristics of youth with LOC-ED have not been examined. We tested the hypothesis that the proposed criteria for LOC-ED would identify children with greater adiposity, more disordered eating attitudes, and greater mood disturbance than those without LOC-ED. Participants were 251 youth (10.29y ± 1.54, 53.8% female, 57.8 % White, 35.5% Black, 2.0% Asian, 4.8% Hispanic, 53.0% overweight). Youth were interviewed regarding eating attitudes and behaviors, completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology, and underwent measurements of body fat mass. Using previously proposed criteria for LOC-ED, children were classified as LOC-ED (n = 19), LOC in the absence of the full disorder (subLOC, n = 33), and youth not reporting LOC (noLOC, n = 199). LOC-ED youth had higher BMIz (p = 0.001) and adiposity (p = 0.003) and reported greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) compared to noLOC youth. Compared to subLOC youth, LOC-ED youth had non-significantly higher BMIz (p = 0.11), and significantly higher adiposity (p = 0.04) and disordered eating attitudes (p = 0.02). SubLOC youth had greater disordered eating concerns (p < 0.001) and BMIz (p = 0.03) but did not differ in adiposity (p = 0.33) compared to noLOC youth. These preliminary data suggest that LOC-ED youth are elevated on disordered eating cognitions and anthropometric measures compared to youth without LOC-ED. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if those with LOC-ED are at particularly increased risk for progression of disordered eating and excess weight gain. PMID:25913008

  7. Debunking the Myths. Research Offers Ammunition to Fight Misperceptions of Voc Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Debunks seven myths: vocational students are low achievers, they do not pursue higher education, voc ed does not help academic competence, it does not make a difference in the labor market, vocational students are economically rich and psychologically poor, student employment engenders poor work attitudes, and voc ed is a poor investment. (SK)

  8. EdTrAc Teacher Education Program: First-Year Implementation Evaluation (2005-2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Brian; Shelton, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The Educational Training Academy (EdTrAc) is an NSF-funded project of Normandale Community College to increase the number, diversity, and skills of students preparing to be elementary and middle school teachers with a specialty in math and science. Overall, this evaluation indicates that the EdTrAc implementation is on track after its first year…

  9. Standalone engine simulator (SAES), Engine Dynamics simulator (EDS) Xerox Sigma 5 interface hardware manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshten, P. M.; Black, S.; Pearson, R.

    1979-01-01

    The ESS-EDS and EDS-Sigma interfaces within the standalone engine simulator are described. The operation of these interfaces, including the definition and use of special function signals and data flow paths within them during data transfers, is presented along with detailed schematics and circuit layouts of the described equipment.

  10. Unstandardized Responses to a "Standardized" Test: The edTPA as Gatekeeper and Curriculum Change Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwell, Katherine; Oyler, Celia

    2016-01-01

    We examine edTPA (a teacher performance assessment) implementation at one private university during the first year that our state required this exam for initial teaching certification. Using data from semi-structured interviews with 19 teacher educators from 12 programs as well as public information on edTPA pass rates, we explore whether the…

  11. Evaluation of the Demonstration Sites in the ConnectEd Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Beverly; Bradby, Denise; Hartry, Ardice; Sipes, Laurel; Hall, Leslie; Tasoff, Shayna

    2009-01-01

    In California, the James Irvine Foundation created ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career to promote multiple pathways that link to the state's 15 major industry sectors. The ConnectEd Network of Schools, a demonstration project supported by Irvine, plays a critical role in expanding student options through multiple pathways and…

  12. An EDS1 orthologue is required for N-mediated resistance against tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Peart, Jack R; Cook, Graeme; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E; Baulcombe, David C

    2002-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, EDS1 is essential for disease resistance conferred by a structural subset of resistance (R) proteins containing a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich-repeats and amino-terminal similarity to animal Toll and Interleukin-1 (so-called TIR-NBS-LRR proteins). EDS1 is not required by NBS-LRR proteins that possess an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif (CC-NBS-LRR proteins). Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of a Nicotiana benthaminana EDS1 orthologue, we investigated the role of EDS1 in resistance specified by structurally distinct R genes in transgenic N. benthamiana. Resistance against tobacco mosaic virus mediated by tobacco N, a TIR-NBS-LRR protein, was EDS1-dependent. Two other R proteins, Pto (a protein kinase), and Rx (a CC-NBS-LRR protein) recognizing, respectively, a bacterial and viral pathogen did not require EDS1. These data, together with the finding that expression of N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis EDS1 mRNAs are similarly regulated, lead us to conclude that recruitment of EDS1 by TIR-NBS-LRR proteins is evolutionarily conserved between dicotyledenous plant species in resistance against bacterial, oomycete and viral pathogens. We further demonstrate that VIGS is a useful approach to dissect resistance signaling pathways in a genetically intractable plant species.

  13. Characteristics of Reading Disability Types in Middle School Students Classified ED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Types of reading disabilities (RD) have not yet been investigated in students classified with emotional disturbance (ED). The prevalence of RD and differentiating characteristics were examined in 118 middle school students attending a self-contained school for ED students by defining RDs with reading standard scores less than 85 on the two…

  14. Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gracious, F. L. Antony; Shyla, F. L. Jasmine Anne

    2012-01-01

    The present study Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of prospective B.Ed teachers was probed to find the relationship between Multiple Intelligence and Digital Learning Awareness of Prospective B.Ed Teachers. Data for the study were collected using self made Multiple Intelligence Inventory and Digital Learning Awareness Scale.…

  15. "What about Bilingualism?" A Critical Reflection on the edTPA with Teachers of Emergent Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleyn, Tatyana; López, Dina; Makar, Carmina

    2015-01-01

    Amidst the debates surrounding teacher quality and preparation programs, the edTPA (education Teaching Performance Assessment) has emerged to assess future teachers through a portfolio-based certification process. This study offers the perspective of three faculty members who participated in an experimental configuration of edTPA implementation…

  16. Economic Development Network (ED>Net): 1995-96 Report to the Governor and the Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    The Economic Development Network (ED>Net) of the California Community Colleges was designed to advance the state's economic growth and competitiveness by coordinating and facilitating workforce improvement, technology deployment, and business development initiatives. This report reviews outcomes for ED>Net for 1995-96 based on reports prepared by…

  17. Internet-Based Economic Education: The Case of EconEdLink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanFossen, Phillip J.; Herman-Ellison, Lisa C.

    2006-01-01

    The National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconEdLink site provides lessons and classroom learning activities based on economics topics in the news, as well as access to real-time economic data. EconEdLink's content is designed to help integrate economic concepts across the curriculum as outlined in the Voluntary National Content…

  18. G. ED. Paper-Book 1974-1984. The Process of Growth of an Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verduin-Muller, Henriette, Ed.

    Fifteen papers presented at conferences throughout Europe and in the USSR, Nigeria, Japan, Jamaica, and Tunesia provide an introduction to the research work being done by the graduate level Department of Geography for Education (G.ED.) at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. An introductory chapter describes the three G.ED. modules, which…

  19. Race to the Top District Competition: The Data Quality Campaign's Comments on ED's Proposed Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) submits these comments in response to the US Department of Education's (ED) draft requirements, priorities, selection criteria, and definitions for the Race to the Top District (RTT-D) competition. DQC applauds ED for including the following components of the proposal: (1) Data is acknowledged throughout the…

  20. A Review of "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Joan Mogul

    2010-01-01

    While virtually all sex ed curricula are designed to be used with children, teens and young adults, "Older, Wiser, Sexually Smarter: 30 Sex Ed Lessons for Adults Only" ([C] 2009, Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey) offers lessons to help participants fully embrace the possibility of sexual pleasure and intimacy from mid-life through…

  1. An Evaluation of California's Community College Based Economic Development Programs (ED>Net).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman (James) Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    This study describes economic outcomes of California's ED>Net (California Community College Economic Network) program, an alliance between community colleges and California businesses. ED>Net's purpose is to advance the state's economic growth by providing job-related education and services to businesses and organizations. This report develops…

  2. Interdisciplinary mistrust, communication breakdowns cited in survey of ED handoffs.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Both emergency and inpatient physicians agree that miscommunication during interunit handoffs can compromise patient care and that sequential handoffs are particularly problematic, according to a new study conducted at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) in Omaha, NE. The study highlights physician survey data showing that there is mistrust between inpatient and emergency physicians, and that which provider is responsible for patient care can be unclear when a verbal handoff is made. To make improvements, UNMC has been piloting a tool aimed at standardizing verbal and written handoff communications. Nearly a third of all the participating physicians surveyed reported having handoff-related adverse events, and most put the blame on ineffective communication. Ninety-four percent of emergency physicians surveyed indicated that they had to defend their clinical decisions at least some of the time. The admitting physicians largely validated this concern, with more than 25% noting that they usually disagree with decisions made in the ED. Using the situation, background, assessment, recommendation (SBAR) form of communication as a starting point, an intervention tool aims to streamline handoff communications, both verbally and in the electronic medical record.

  3. The MAL-ED cohort study in Mirpur, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Islam, Md Munirul; Mondal, Dinesh; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Am Shamsir; Tofail, Fahmida; Gaffar, Sm Abdul; Haque, Rashidul; Guerrant, Richard L; Petri, William A

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study site in Bangladesh is located in the capital city of Dhaka in an urban slum that has one of the highest population densities in the world. The site is in the Bauniabadh area of Mirpur, Dhaka. A typical squatter settlement, the average family size of households in Mirpur Bauniabadh is 4.5, with 48% females. About 20% of households have a monthly income of only US$62. About 30% of mothers never attended school, and only 3% obtained secondary school education. The majority of the people are day laborers, garment workers, and transport workers. About 72% of caregivers always wash their hands after helping the child defecate and 6.6% never wash their hands. The diarrheal attack rate for Mirpur is 4.69 episodes per child per year. The study site is representative of a typical urban slum of Dhaka city in terms of demographics, socioeconomic status, and general health indicators.

  4. The MAL-ED cohort study in Mirpur, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Islam, Md Munirul; Mondal, Dinesh; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Am Shamsir; Tofail, Fahmida; Gaffar, Sm Abdul; Haque, Rashidul; Guerrant, Richard L; Petri, William A

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study site in Bangladesh is located in the capital city of Dhaka in an urban slum that has one of the highest population densities in the world. The site is in the Bauniabadh area of Mirpur, Dhaka. A typical squatter settlement, the average family size of households in Mirpur Bauniabadh is 4.5, with 48% females. About 20% of households have a monthly income of only US$62. About 30% of mothers never attended school, and only 3% obtained secondary school education. The majority of the people are day laborers, garment workers, and transport workers. About 72% of caregivers always wash their hands after helping the child defecate and 6.6% never wash their hands. The diarrheal attack rate for Mirpur is 4.69 episodes per child per year. The study site is representative of a typical urban slum of Dhaka city in terms of demographics, socioeconomic status, and general health indicators. PMID:25305298

  5. Perceived social support among adults seeking care for acute respiratory tract infections in US EDs.

    PubMed

    Levin, Sara K; Metlay, Joshua P; Maselli, Judith H; Kersey, Ayanna S; Camargo, Carlos A; Gonzales, Ralph

    2009-06-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) provide a disproportionate amount of care to disenfranchised and vulnerable populations. We examined social support levels among a diverse population of adults seeking ED care for acute respiratory tract infections. A convenience sample of adults seeking care in 1 of 15 US EDs was telephone interviewed 1 to 6 weeks postvisit. The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (7-point Likert) assessed social support across 3 domains: friends, family, and significant others. Higher scores indicate higher support. Of 1104 subjects enrolled, 704 (64%) completed the follow-up interview. Factor analysis yielded 3 factors. Mean social support score was 5.54 (SD 1.04). Female sex, greater household income, and better health status were independently associated with higher levels of social support. Social support levels among adults seeking care in the ED for acute respiratory tract infections are similar to general population cohorts, suggesting that social support is not a strong determinant of health care seeking in EDs.

  6. ED diversion: multidisciplinary approach engages high utilizers, helps them better navigate the health care system.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Working with partners, the St. Charles Health System in Bend, OR, has implemented an ED diversion project that is helping patients who frequent the ED connect with more appropriate settings for their primary care needs. The hospital identifies high ED utilizers using claims data, then a multidisciplinary engagement team establishes care plans for these patients. The most at-risk patients are paired with community health workers to help them better navigate the health care system. The ED diversion project has reduced unnecessary ED utilization by 45% to 70% in cohorts of patients that the hospital has analyzed thus far. The hospital contracts with a non-profit organization to supply and train community health workers. Community health workers follow a structured model that includes more than 80 different pathways to follow, based on patient conditions. PMID:22043590

  7. High-Resolution Macromolecular Structure Determination by MicroED, a cryo-EM Method.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J A; Gonen, T

    2016-01-01

    Microelectron diffraction (MicroED) is a new cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) method capable of determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution from vanishingly small 3D crystals. MicroED promises to solve atomic resolution structures from even the tiniest of crystals, less than a few hundred nanometers thick. MicroED complements frontier advances in crystallography and represents part of the rebirth of cryo-EM that is making macromolecular structure determination more accessible for all. Here we review the concept and practice of MicroED, for both the electron microscopist and crystallographer. Where other reviews have addressed specific details of the technique (Hattne et al., 2015; Shi et al., 2016; Shi, Nannenga, Iadanza, & Gonen, 2013), we aim to provide context and highlight important features that should be considered when performing a MicroED experiment.

  8. High-Resolution Macromolecular Structure Determination by MicroED, a cryo-EM Method.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J A; Gonen, T

    2016-01-01

    Microelectron diffraction (MicroED) is a new cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) method capable of determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution from vanishingly small 3D crystals. MicroED promises to solve atomic resolution structures from even the tiniest of crystals, less than a few hundred nanometers thick. MicroED complements frontier advances in crystallography and represents part of the rebirth of cryo-EM that is making macromolecular structure determination more accessible for all. Here we review the concept and practice of MicroED, for both the electron microscopist and crystallographer. Where other reviews have addressed specific details of the technique (Hattne et al., 2015; Shi et al., 2016; Shi, Nannenga, Iadanza, & Gonen, 2013), we aim to provide context and highlight important features that should be considered when performing a MicroED experiment. PMID:27572734

  9. Evaluation of Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal-derived liquid as utility diesel fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heater, W.R.; Froh, T.W.; Ariga, S.; Baker, Q.A.; Piispanen, W.; Webb, P.; Trayser, D.; Keane, W.J.

    1983-10-01

    The program consisted of three phases: (I) characterization of the physical and chemical properties of EDS, (II) evaluation of EDS in a laboratory medium-speed diesel engine, and (III) evaluation of EDS in a low-speed diesel engine operating at a utility. The characteristics of high aromatic content and low cetane number that were found during Phase I made it unlikely that EDS could be used as a direct substitute for diesel fuel without engine modification to provide ignition assistance. Phase II was conducted on a 12-cylinder General Electric Company 7FDL diesel engine. Blends of up to 30% EDS and 70% 0.2 diesel fuel (DF-2) were successfully consumed. Dual fuel tests were also conducted on a single cylinder by injecting EDS through the existing engine fuel oil system and injecting DF-2 through an auxiliary nozzle as an ignition source. Acceptable operation was achieved using 5 to 10% pilot oil heat input. Phase III was conducted on a 16-cylinder Cooper-Bessemer LSV-16-GDT diesel engine at an EUC plant in Easton, Maryland. Blends of up to 66.7% EDS and 33.3% DF-2 were successfully consumed. Dual fuel tests were also conducted on a single cylinder by injecting EDS through the existing fuel oil system and using a natural-gas-fueled precombustion chamber as an ignition source. Acceptable operation was achieved using 3 to 6% pilot gas heat input. The program confirmed that it is feasible to consume significant proportions of EDS in a diesel engine, but more development is needed before EDS can be considered a viable alternative liquid fuel for diesel engines, and an industrial hygiene program is needed to assure safe handling of the fuel.

  10. Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions (Joseph F. Bunnett and Marian Mikotajczyk, Eds.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Benjamin

    1999-10-01

    technologies; and international obligations attendant to the Chemical Weapons Convention, which entered into force in 1997. Hermann Martens's presentation of German arsenical and mustard munitions and of technical approaches to their destruction is similarly detailed, thorough, and engaging. W. R. Cullen's chapter "Arsenic in the Environment" and Shigeru Maeda's chapter "Biotransformation of Arsenic in Freshwater Organisms" help place the problems associated with the arsenicals in their environmental context and, hence, should appeal to a large audiencenot merely those specialists dealing with chemical weapon destruction. The reports of the three discussion groupsYperite,3 Arsenicals, and Recovered Munitionsprovide useful summaries of current knowledge and needs for additional research. The Arsenicals report observes that "destruction of arsenical agents appears to have received little attention." This situation may change if searches in Washington, DC, should uncover caches of old arsenicals at CUA and, especially, when the governments of the People's Republic of China and Japan agree on funding for destruction of the chemical munitions Japan caused to be abandoned on what is now the territory of the PRC. A conservative estimate is that there are 2,000,000 of these abandoned munitions, most of them being arsenicals and mustards.4 Notes and References 1. Nieuwland (1878-1936) hired Rockne in 1914 as a chemistry instructor. According to Father Nieuwland, Rockne owed much of his prowess as one of the greatest coaches of all time to his training in chemistry, which taught him the method of reasoning (Ind. Eng. Chem. New Ed., April 20, 1931). W. Lee Lewis, Lewisite's eponym, credits Nieuwland's unpublished dissertation as the source for his 1918 synthesis (Lewis, W. L.; Perkins, G. A. The beta-Chlorovinyl Chloroarsines; Ind. Eng. Chem. 1923, 15, 290-295). Lewisite itself is actually the group of mono-, di-, and tri-substituted 2-chloroethenyl derivatives of arsenic(III) chloride

  11. Improved spectrum simulation for validating SEM-EDS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statham, P.; Penman, C.; Duncumb, P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray microanalysis by SEM-EDS requires corrections for the many physical processes that affect emitted intensity for elements present in the material. These corrections will only be accurate provided a number of conditions are satisfied and it is essential that the correct elements are identified. As analysis is pushed to achieve results on smaller features and more challenging samples it becomes increasingly difficult to determine if all conditions are upheld and whether the analysis results are valid. If a theoretical simulated spectrum based on the measured analysis result is compared with the measured spectrum, any marked differences will indicate problems with the analysis and can prevent serious mistakes in interpretation. To achieve the necessary accuracy a previous theoretical model has been enhanced to incorporate new line intensity measurements, differential absorption and excitation of emission lines, including the effect of Coster-Kronig transitions and an improved treatment of bremsstrahlung for compounds. The efficiency characteristic has been measured for a large area SDD detector and data acquired from an extensive set of standard materials at both 5 kV and 20 kV. The parameterized model has been adjusted to fit measured characteristic intensities and both background shape and intensity at the same beam current. Examples are given to demonstrate how an overlay of an accurate theoretical simulation can expose some non-obvious mistakes and provide some expert guidance towards a valid analysis result. A new formula for calculating the effective mean atomic number for compounds has also been derived that is appropriate and should help improve accuracy in techniques that calculate the bremsstrahlung or use a bremsstrahlung measurement for calibration.

  12. Population-Based Burden of COPD-Related Visits in the ED

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Steven J.; Waller, Anna E.; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Travers, Debbie; Weinberger, Morris; Donohue, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the population-based burden of ED care for COPD. Methods: We analyzed statewide ED surveillance system data to quantify the frequency of COPD-related ED visits, hospital admissions, and comorbidities. Results: In 2008 to 2009 in North Carolina, 97,511 COPD-related ED visits were made by adults ≥ 45 years of age, at an annual rate of 13.8 ED visits/1,000 person-years. Among patients with COPD (n = 33,799), 7% and 28% had a COPD-related return ED visit within a 30- and 365-day period of their index visit, respectively. Compared with patients on private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, and noninsured patients were more likely to have a COPD-related return visit within 30 and 365 days and have three or more COPD-related visits within 365 days. There were no differences in return visits by sex. Fifty-one percent of patients with COPD were admitted to the hospital from the index ED visit. Subsequent hospital admission risk in the cohort increased with age, peaking at 65 to 69 years (risk ratio [RR], 1.41; 95% CI, 1.26-1.57); there was no difference by sex. Patients with congestive heart failure (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.22-1.37), substance-related disorders (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.60), or respiratory failure/supplemental oxygen (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.19-1.31) were more likely to have a subsequent hospital admission compared with patients without these comorbidities. Conclusions: The population-based burden of COPD-related care in the ED is significant. Further research is needed to understand variations in COPD-related ED visits and hospital admissions. PMID:23579283

  13. New levitation scheme with AC superconducting magnet for EDS MAGLEV system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Lee, J.K.; Hahn, S.Y.; Cha, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a new magnetic levitation scheme which is able to generate levitation force for all speeds including a standstill. Auxiliary wheels which are needed in EDS MAGLEV vehicle can be eliminated. This scheme uses AC superconducting magnets to generate levitation force. In this paper, magnetic fields, forces and power dissipations generated by AC magnets moving above a conducting slab are calculated analytically. Results of calculation show characteristics of EDS system with AC magnet, such as levitation force and loss, are superior to those of EDS system with DC magnets for all speeds.

  14. AB006. Erectile dysfunction (ED) as a marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVD)

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2015-01-01

    In 1973 V. Michal, a vascular surgeon said “Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to diseases of the vascular bed”. And this makes sense since ED and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) share many risk factors like aging, obesity, inactivity, smoking, depression, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes/insuline resistance. These conditions may lead to an oxidative stress which ultimately can promote vasoconstriction, thrombosis, atherosclerosis and finally ED and CVD. One of the most accepted Idea is that small vessels plug earlier, it means, small arteries when have for example 50% of obstruction will probably have a clinical manifestation before bigger arteries!

  15. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Ana V; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E

    2010-07-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  16. Balanced Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Activities of EDS1 Are Required for a Complete Plant Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P.; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack. PMID:20617163

  17. Variation of retinal ED50 with exposure duration for near-IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, David J.; Fuller, Daniel R.; Hoxie, Stephen W.; Edsall, P. R.

    1997-05-01

    A body of data relates the ED50 for laser-induced retinal damage to exposure duration for visible-wavelength laser exposure and for 1064 nm laser exposure. The database, extending from sub-nanosecond exposures to kilosecond exposures, can for the most part, be fit to models based on thermal interactions, thermal-mechanical mechanisms, and photochemical processes. Exceptions to this fit occur between 1 and 100 microseconds where the damage mechanism transitions from exclusively thermal to thermal-mechanical. Disagreement exists as to whether this anomalous dip of ED50 is real or is an artifact of the data. We determined the laser-induced retinal ED50 in Rhesus monkey eyes for several exposure durations from 12 nanoseconds to 1000 milliseconds at 755 nm using a dye laser, an alexandrite laser, and a Ti:Sapphire laser. These data do not show a dip in ED50 in the microsecond time period.

  18. Harvesting Your Prof Crop: Nine Tips for Launching an Op-Ed Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joseph L.

    1983-01-01

    Faculty can be helpful by providing commentaries to newspaper op-ed pages, but such a public relations program requires consistency, tact, good internal communications, thoughtfulness, and marketing skills. (MSE)

  19. Alcohol Interventions Among Underage Drinkers in the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chermack, Stephen T.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Carter, Patrick M.; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.; Barry, Kristen L.; Walton, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the efficacy of emergency department (ED)-based brief interventions (BIs), delivered by a computer or therapist, with and without a post-ED session, on alcohol consumption and consequences over 12 months. METHODS: Patients (ages 14–20 years) screening positive for risky drinking were randomized to: BI (n = 277), therapist BI (n = 278), or control (n = 281). After the 3-month follow-up, participants were randomized to receive a post-ED BI session or control. Incorporating motivational interviewing, the BIs addressed alcohol consumption and consequences, including driving under the influence (DUI), and alcohol-related injury, as well as other concomitant drug use. The computer BI was an offline, Facebook-styled program. RESULTS: Among 4389 patients screened, 1054 patients reported risky drinking and 836 were enrolled in the randomized controlled trial. Regression models examined the main effects of the intervention conditions (versus control) and the interaction effects (ED condition × post-ED condition) on primary outcomes. The therapist and computer BIs significantly reduced consumption at 3 months, consequences at 3 and 12 months, and prescription drug use at 12 months; the computer BI reduced the frequency of DUI at 12 months; and the therapist BI reduced the frequency of alcohol-related injury at 12 months. The post-ED session reduced alcohol consequences at 6 months, benefiting those who had not received a BI in the ED. CONCLUSIONS: A single-session BI, delivered by a computer or therapist in the ED, shows promise for underage drinkers. Findings for the fully automated stand-alone computer BI are particularly appealing given the ease of future implementation. PMID:26347440

  20. The impact of smoking-related illness in the ED: an attributable risk model.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Steven L

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the clinical and economic impact of smoking among adult emergency department (ED) patients. An attributable risk analysis of patients seen in 2 urban EDs in 1998 was performed. Data were obtained from hospital databases, national sources describing the prevalence of smoking in the state, and risk ratios for smoking-related illnesses. Of 78,617 patient visits, 12,573 (16.0%) had any smoking-related International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision code. The smoking-attributable risk fraction (SARF) for all patients was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.7%-5.0%). Of 13,245 admissions, 6.8% (95% CI 6.4%-7.2%) were smoking attributable. Of $296,962,685 in hospital charges, 10.0% (95% CI 9.9%-10.1%) were smoking attributable. The SARFs for ED visits, admissions, and charges for men were higher than for women (all P <.0001). Smoking-attributable illness accounts for 4.9% of ED adult visits, 6.8% of ED adult admissions, and 10.0% of hospital charges. The use of ED-based smoking intervention remains to be determined.

  1. Symptoms and functional health status of individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS).

    PubMed

    Berglund, B; Nordström, G

    2001-10-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited connective tissue disorder that can have a substantial impact on daily life. The aims of this study were to describe the symptoms reported in a group of individuals with EDS and to investigate the impact on functional health status by means of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). Seventy-seven individuals, members of the Swedish EDS Association, completed 2 mailed questionnaires. The most frequent symptoms were related to activity, e.g., joint problems (75%), to pain (71%), and to skin/tissue (52%). Pain was reported by 37 individuals (48%) as their most severe symptom. The SIP results showed an overall mean score of 13.0 (females 13.9, males 5.6), compared with a Swedish reference group with a SIP score 1.3. Women with EDS reported a better functional health status than females with rheumatoid arthritis (overall SIP score 13.9 versus 21.4). In comparison with women with fibromyalgia, the EDS females rated their functional health status as worse on the physical dimension (p <0.05) and the subscale home management (p <0.05), and as better on the subscale work (p <0.05). Impact of EDS on the individual's daily life needs to be acknowledged, assessed, and evaluated in healthcare. PMID:17039161

  2. Arabidopsis EDS1 connects pathogen effector recognition to cell compartment-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, Katharina; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Tasset, Céline; Pouzet, Cécile; Deslandes, Laurent; Parker, Jane E

    2011-12-01

    Pathogen effectors are intercepted by plant intracellular nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors. However, processes linking receptor activation to downstream defenses remain obscure. Nucleo-cytoplasmic basal resistance regulator EDS1 (ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1) is indispensible for immunity mediated by TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor)-NB-LRR receptors. We show that Arabidopsis EDS1 molecularly connects TIR-NB-LRR disease resistance protein RPS4 recognition of bacterial effector AvrRps4 to defense pathways. RPS4-EDS1 and AvrRps4-EDS1 complexes are detected inside nuclei of living tobacco cells after transient coexpression and in Arabidopsis soluble leaf extracts after resistance activation. Forced AvrRps4 localization to the host cytoplasm or nucleus reveals cell compartment-specific RPS4-EDS1 defense branches. Although nuclear processes restrict bacterial growth, programmed cell death and transcriptional resistance reinforcement require nucleo-cytoplasmic coordination. Thus, EDS1 behaves as an effector target and activated TIR-NB-LRR signal transducer for defenses across cell compartments.

  3. Solving the worldwide emergency department crowding problem - what can we learn from an Israeli ED?

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Bernstein, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    ED crowding is a prevalent and important issue facing hospitals in Israel and around the world, including North and South America, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa. ED crowding is associated with poorer quality of care and poorer health outcomes, along with extended waits for care. Crowding is caused by a periodic mismatch between the supply of ED and hospital resources and the demand for patient care. In a recent article in the Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, Bashkin et al. present an Ishikawa diagram describing several factors related to longer length of stay (LOS), and higher levels of ED crowding, including management, process, environmental, human factors, and resource issues. Several solutions exist to reduce ED crowding, which involve addressing several of the issues identified by Bashkin et al. This includes reducing the demand for and variation in care, and better matching the supply of resources to demands in care in real time. However, what is needed to reduce crowding is an institutional imperative from senior leadership, implemented by engaged ED and hospital leadership with multi-disciplinary cross-unit collaboration, sufficient resources to implement effective interventions, access to data, and a sustained commitment over time. This may move the culture of a hospital to facilitate improved flow within and across units and ultimately improve quality and safety over the long-term.

  4. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  5. Biophysical Investigations with MARCKS-ED: Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Its Curvature Sensing Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Armando J.; Espinoza, Arianna; Yin, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Curved membranes are a common and important attribute in cells. Protein and peptide curvature sensors are known to activate signaling pathways, initiate vesicle budding, trigger membrane fusion, and facilitate molecular transport across cell membranes. Nonetheless, there is little understanding how these proteins and peptides achieve preferential binding of different membrane curvatures. The current study is to elucidate specific factors required for curvature sensing. As a model system, we employed a recently identified peptide curvature sensor, MARCKS-ED, derived from the effector domain of the myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate protein, for these biophysical investigations. An atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suggested an important role played by the insertion of the Phe residues within MARCKS-ED. To test these observations from our computational simulations, we performed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies to determine the insertion depth of MARCKS-ED into differently curved membrane bilayers. Next, studies with varied lipid compositions revealed their influence on curvature sensing by MARCKS-ED, suggesting contributions from membrane fluidity, rigidity, as well as various lipid structures. Finally, we demonstrated that the curvature sensing by MARCKS-ED is configuration independent. In summary, our studies have shed further light to the understanding of how MARCKS-ED differentiates between membrane curvatures, which may be generally applicable to protein curvature sensing behavior. PMID:25195712

  6. Integrated CMOS amplifier for ENG signal recording.

    PubMed

    Uranga, A; Navarro, X; Barniol, N

    2004-12-01

    The development and in vivo test of a fully integrated differential CMOS amplifier, implemented with standard 0.7-microm CMOS technology (one poly, two metals, self aligned twin-well CMOS process) intended to record extracellular neural signals is described. In order to minimize the flicker noise generated by the CMOS circuitry, a chopper technique has been chosen. The fabricated amplifier has a gain of 74 dB, a bandwidth of 3 kHz, an input noise of 6.6 nV/(Hz)0.5, a power dissipation of 1.3 mW, and the active area is 2.7 mm2. An ac coupling has been used to adapt the electrode to the amplifier circuitry for the in vivo testing. Compound muscle action potentials, motor unit action potentials, and compound nerve action potentials have been recorded in acute experiments with rats, in order to validate the amplifier. PMID:15605867

  7. Test Review: Epstein, M. H., & Cullinan, D. (2010). "Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance" (2nd Ed.). Austin, TX: Pro-Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    The author reviews "Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance-Second Edition" (SAED-2; Epstein & Cullinan, 2010), an assessment system primarily designed to assist in determining eligibility for special education services under the category of emotional disturbance (ED), as defined by the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act…

  8. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider in Front of SR-71 Blackbird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    SR-71 research pilot Ed Schneider is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Schneider became a NASA research pilot at Dryden in 1983. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  9. The capacity of Australian ED to absorb the projected increase in intern numbers.

    PubMed

    Chong, Anthony; Weiland, Tracey J; Mackinlay, Claire; Jelinek, George A

    2010-04-01

    As a reaction to the medical workforce shortage in Australia, a large expansion of undergraduate medical education has occurred through the provision of funding of additional medical student places. As a consequence, the number of medical graduates is anticipated to increase by as much as 90% with a peak in numbers anticipated in 2012. With ED already under pressure, this increase has serious implications for ED, particularly the delivery of intern and student teaching. This integrated review describes potential challenges that might arise from the predicted increase in intern numbers working in ED. A structured literature search was conducted from which 44 directly relevant articles were identified. We discuss the possible impact of an increased number of medical graduates on emergency medical staff, education, supervision and feedback to interns, and given the potential impacts on the education of junior doctors; we review the purpose and implementation of the Australian Curriculum framework for Junior Doctors in relation to their learning requirements. Although there is consensus by most postgraduate bodies that the core emergency term in emergency medicine should be retained, the impact of increased intern numbers might dramatically affect the clinical experiences, supervision and educational resources in the ED. This might necessitate cultural changes in medical education and ED function.

  10. Bedside point of care toxicology screens in the ED: Utility and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to drugs and toxins is a major cause for patients’ visits to the emergency department (ED). For most drugs-of-abuse intoxication, ED physicians are skeptical to rely on results of urine drug testing for emergent management decisions. This is partially because immunoassays, although rapid, have limitations in sensitivity and specificity and chromatographic assays, which are more definitive, are more labor intensive. Testing for toxic alcohols is needed, but rapid commercial assays are not available. ED physicians need stat assays for acetaminophen, salicylates, co-oximetry, cholinesterase, iron, and some therapeutic drugs that could be used as agents of self-harm. In this review, we look at the potential limitations of these screening tests and suggest improvements and innovations needed for better clinical utilization. New drugs of abuse should be sought and assays should be developed to meet changing abuse patterns. PMID:25337490

  11. Enhanced Mental Health Interventions in the Emergency Department: Suicide and Suicide Attempt Prevention in the ED

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jennifer L.; Asarnow, Joan R.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents, and often youths with suicidal behavior or ideation present to the emergency department (ED) for care. Many suicidal youths do not receive mental health care after discharge from the ED, and interventions are needed to enhance linkage to outpatient intervention. This paper describes the Family Intervention for Suicide Prevention (FISP). Designed for use in emergency settings, the FISP is a family-based cognitive-behavior therapy session designed to increase motivation for follow-up treatment, support, coping, and safety, augmented by care linkage telephone contacts after discharge. In a randomized trial of the intervention, the FISP was shown to significantly increase the likelihood of youths receiving outpatient treatment, including psychotherapy and combined medication and psychotherapy. The FISP is a brief, focused, efficacious treatment that can be delivered in the ED to improve the probability of follow-up treatment for suicidal youths. PMID:25904825

  12. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-08-01

    An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

  13. Combined EBSD/EDS tomography in a dual-beam FIB/FEG-SEM.

    PubMed

    West, G D; Thomson, R C

    2009-03-01

    An automated method for collecting combined three-dimensional (3D) electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) data sets on a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB)/field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) microscope is described. The method uses simple scripting files on the dual beam to move between the EBSD collection and the FIB slicing positions, which are linked to a commercial EBSD data collection programme. The EDS data are collected simultaneously with the EBSD patterns analogous to combined two-dimensional (2D) EBSD/EDS. The technique has been successfully applied to study both the interdiffusion zone between a coating and a substrate and a complex multi-phase coating on a nickel-based superalloy sample. This analysis is shown to enable the complex grain shapes, location of precipitates and phase interconnectivity within these samples to be determined without the ambiguities associated with 2D stereographic analysis. PMID:19250465

  14. Patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED boosts satisfaction, improves safety.

    PubMed

    2013-02-01

    To improve safety and patient flow, administrators at Hallmark Health System, based in Melrose, MA, implemented a new patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED at the health system's two hospitals. Under the new approach, inpatient nurses come down to the ED to take reports on new patients in a process that includes the ED care team as well as family members. The inpatient nurses then accompany the patients up to their designated floors. Since the new patient-transfer process was implemented in June 2012, patient satisfaction has increased by at least one point on patient satisfaction surveys. Administrators anticipate that medical errors or omissions related to the handoff process will show a drop of at least 50%, when data is tabulated.

  15. Study: To minimize errors, rely on interpreters when caring for LEP patients in the ED.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    A new study strongly suggests that it is important for EDs to rely on professional interpreters, rather than ad hoc interpreters or no interpreters at all, when caring for patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). The researchers examined health care encounters involving LEP patients at two pediatric EDs, and found that the encounters associated with professional interpreters were associated with far fewer errors of potential clinical consequence than the encounters associated with ad hoc interpreters or no interpreters. Experts say the most important first step in minimizing language-based errors is to identify patients with LEP when they present for care. Professional interpreters are defined as having at least 100 hours of training. Researchers say that when evaluating interpreters, professional training is more valuable in terms of minimizing errors than experience on the job. Make sure that interpreters are available to LEP patients throughout the course of their ED visit as well as during any follow-up visits or telephone calls.

  16. Combined EBSD/EDS tomography in a dual-beam FIB/FEG-SEM.

    PubMed

    West, G D; Thomson, R C

    2009-03-01

    An automated method for collecting combined three-dimensional (3D) electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) data sets on a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB)/field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) microscope is described. The method uses simple scripting files on the dual beam to move between the EBSD collection and the FIB slicing positions, which are linked to a commercial EBSD data collection programme. The EDS data are collected simultaneously with the EBSD patterns analogous to combined two-dimensional (2D) EBSD/EDS. The technique has been successfully applied to study both the interdiffusion zone between a coating and a substrate and a complex multi-phase coating on a nickel-based superalloy sample. This analysis is shown to enable the complex grain shapes, location of precipitates and phase interconnectivity within these samples to be determined without the ambiguities associated with 2D stereographic analysis.

  17. Bedside point of care toxicology screens in the ED: Utility and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Ashish

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to drugs and toxins is a major cause for patients' visits to the emergency department (ED). For most drugs-of-abuse intoxication, ED physicians are skeptical to rely on results of urine drug testing for emergent management decisions. This is partially because immunoassays, although rapid, have limitations in sensitivity and specificity and chromatographic assays, which are more definitive, are more labor intensive. Testing for toxic alcohols is needed, but rapid commercial assays are not available. ED physicians need stat assays for acetaminophen, salicylates, co-oximetry, cholinesterase, iron, and some therapeutic drugs that could be used as agents of self-harm. In this review, we look at the potential limitations of these screening tests and suggest improvements and innovations needed for better clinical utilization. New drugs of abuse should be sought and assays should be developed to meet changing abuse patterns. PMID:25337490

  18. Usefulness of ED036 kit for measuring serum PIVKA-II levels in small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuromatsu, R; Tanaka, M; Shimauchi, Y; Shimada, M; Tanikawa, K; Watanabe, K; Yokoo, T

    1997-08-01

    As a tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), serum protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has high specificity, yet its sensitivity is relatively low, marking it less suitable to serve as an adjunct in the diagnosis of small HCC. Recently, the ED036 kit (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan), whose detection limit is approximately ten times superior to that of a conventional kit (Eitest MONOP II, Eisai) has been developed. In this study, serum PIVKA-II levels in serum samples from 83 patients with benign chronic liver diseases (CLD) and 129 patients with HCC were measured with those two kits. With the ED036 kit, the cut-off value was set at 40 mAU/ml. For PIVKA-II measured with the ED036 kit, sensitivity was 45.0%, specificity 92.8%, and accuracy 63.7%, when we discriminated patients with HCC from those with CLD without HCC. While maintaining a high specificity, of 92.8%, the ED036 kit showed a significantly higher sensitivity than the conventional kit (45.0% versus 27.9%; P < 0.0001). With patients who had HCC consisting of a single nodule 30 mm or less in diameter, the positivity rate for serum PIVKA-II with the ED036 kit was significantly greater than the rate with the conventional kit (21.4% versus 9.5%; P < 0.005). Thus, the ED036 kit was thought to be more useful than the conventional kit as a tumor marker for small HCC.

  19. Effect of Job Specialization on the Hospital Stay and Job Satisfaction of ED Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Vahid; Mahmoudi, Hosein; Sirati Nir, Masoud; Babatabar Darzi, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent decades, the increasing crowdedness of the emergency departments has posed various problems for patients and healthcare systems worldwide. These problems include prolonged hospital stay, patient dissatisfaction and nurse burnout or job dissatisfaction. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of emergency department (ED) nurses’ job specialization on their job satisfaction and the length of patient stay in the ED. Patients and Methods: This before-after quasi-experimental study was conducted from April to May 2014 at the Baqiyatallah Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Initially, 35 patients were recruited as controls and the length of their stay in the ED was measured in minutes via a chronometer; Moreover, nurses’ job satisfaction was evaluated using the Mohrman-Cooke-Mohrman job satisfaction scale. Then, a job specialization intervention was developed based on the stabilization model. After that, 35 new patients were recruited to the treatment group and received specialized care services. Accordingly, the length of their stay in the ED was measured. Moreover, the same nurses’ job satisfaction was re-evaluated after the study. The study intervention lasted one month. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 20 and statistical tests such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov, the paired and the independent t, and chi-square tests. Results: There was a significant difference between the two groups of patients concerning the length of their stay in the ED (P < 0.001). Moreover, compared with the pretest readings, nurses had greater job satisfaction after the study (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The job specialization intervention can improve nurses’ satisfaction and relieve the crowdedness of the EDs. PMID:27218054

  20. SEM/EDS analysis for problem solving in the food industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Wayne D.

    2015-10-01

    For forensic investigation in the food industry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) is a powerful, often non-destructive, instrumental analysis tool to provide information about: • Identification of inorganic (and some organic) materials found as foreign contaminants in food products returned by consumers or detected during quality control inspections in the production facilities • Identification of wear particles found in production lines • Distribution of materials within a matrix • Corrosion and failure analysis of production equipment The identification of materials by SEM/EDS is accomplished through a combination of morphology by SEM imaging and the elemental composition of the material by EDS. Typically, the EDS analysis provides a qualitative spectrum showing the elements present in the sample. Further analysis can be done to quantify the detected elements in order to further refine the material identification. Metal alloys can often be differentiated even within the same family such as 300 Series stainless steels. Glass types can be identified by the elemental composition where the detected elements are quantified as the oxides of each element. In this way, for example, common window glass is distinguishable from insulation glass used in many ovens. Wear particles or fragments from breakage can find their way into food products. SEM/EDS analysis of the materials is an important resource to utilize when trying to determine the original source. Suspected source materials can then be sampled for comparative analysis. EDS X-ray mapping is another tool that is available to provide information about the distribution of materials within a matrix. For example, the distribution of inorganic ingredients in a dried food helps to provide information about the grind and blend of the materials.

  1. Washington state initiative trims Medicaid budget, ED utilization without denying access.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    In its first year of operation, Washington state's "ER is for Emergencies" initiative has helped to save the state's Medicaid budget $33.6 million. The initiative, which is based on the implementation of seven best practices, has succeeded in part by improving care coordination and by linking EDs across the state so information can be shared electronically. Leaders of the effort concede that while state pressure was essential in pushing providers to address excess use of the ED for nonemergency needs, they stress that the approach worked because all sides were willing to sit down and hammer out a solution. Further, they note that the infrastructure is now in place to address other problems in a similar fashion. An analysis of claims data shows that in the first year of the initiative, ED visits by Medicaid recipients declined by 9.9%, and the rate of visits by frequent ED utilizers declined by 10.7%. The analysis also shows that ED visits resulting in a scheduled drug prescription fell by 24%, and the rate of visits for a low-acuity diagnosis declined by 14.2%. While many EDs had to adjust their staffing and other resources to accommodate reduced volumes, others experienced few changes or even saw an uptick in volume, possibly from implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Leaders of the effort say the biggest challenge involved with implementing the initiative was securing administrative buy-in for investments that would likely result in improved efficiency and care, but also reduced revenue--at least initially.

  2. MedEdPORTAL: a report on oral health resources for health professions educators.

    PubMed

    Chickmagalur, Nithya S; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Sandmeyer, Sue; Valachovic, Richard W; Candler, Christopher S; Saleh, Michael; Cahill, Emily; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-09-01

    MedEdPORTAL is a unique web-based peer-reviewed publication venue for clinical health educators sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The open exchange of educational resources promotes professional collaboration across health professions. In 2008, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) collaborated with AAMC to allow dental educators to use the platform to publish dental curriculum resources. Oral health is integral to general health; hence, collaboration among health care professionals brings enormous value to patient-centered care. The aim of this study was to conduct a current survey of metrics and submission statistics of MedEdPORTAL resources. The data were collected using the MedEdPORTAL search engine and ADEA and AAMC staff. The data collected were categorized and reported in tables and charts. Results showed that at the time of this study there were over 2,000 medical and dental resources available to anyone worldwide. Oral health resources constituted approximately 30 percent of the total resources, which included cross-indexing with information relevant to both medical and dental audiences. There were several types of dental resources available; the most common were the ones focusing on critical thinking. The usage of MedEdPORTAL has been growing, with participation from over 190 countries and 10,000 educational institutions around the world. The findings of this report suggest that MedEdPORTAL is succeeding in its aim to foster global collaborative education, professional education, and educational scholarship. As such, MedEdPORTAL is providing a new forum for collaboration and opens venues for promising future work in professional education.

  3. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B.; Havens, Joaquim M.; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED). Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. Methods : We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006–2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13). We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age <50 with no comorbidities (Elixhauser). We used hierarchical multivariate logistic regression to identify patient characteristics associated with admission for diverticulitis. Results Fryom 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (−7.2%, 95% CI [−7.78 to −6.62]; p<0.001 for trend). The admission rate among low-risk patients decreased from 35.2% in 2006 to 26.8% in 2011 (−8.4%, 95% CI [−9.6 to −7.2]; p<0.001 for trend). Admission for diverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (−1.8%, 95% CI [−2.1 to −1.5]; p<0.001 for trend), and among low-risk patients decreased from 4.0% to 2.2% (−1.8%, 95% CI [−4.5 to −1.7]; p<0.001 for trend). Conclusion From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased

  4. ED handles 30 burn patients after plant fire and explosion in Georgia.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    Dealing with a mass casualty event involving a high number of burn victims requires strategic use of ED resources. The ED at Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah, GA, was praised by the receiving burn center for the care it gave victims of a recent plant disaster. Here are some of their key strategies: After making your primary concern the patient's airway, turn to fluid resuscitation and pain management. Be certain burn victims are placed in warm rooms and are covered with blankets. Have a pre-plan with a regional burn center, then establish contact with that center in multiple-burn patient incidents.

  5. EdU, a new thymidine analogue for labelling proliferating cells in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chehrehasa, Fatemah; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Dwyer, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Greger; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2009-02-15

    Labelling and identifying proliferating cells is central to understanding neurogenesis and neural lineages in vivo and in vitro. We present here a novel thymidine analogue, ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU) for labelling dividing cells, detected with a fluorescent azide which forms a covalent bond via the "click" chemistry reaction (the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of an organic azide to a terminal acetylene). Unlike the commonly used BrdU, EdU detection requires no heat or acid treatment. It is quick and easy and compatible with multiple probes for fluorescence immunochemistry, facilitating the characterisation of proliferating cells at high resolution.

  6. EDS1, an essential component of R gene-mediated disease resistance in Arabidopsis has homology to eukaryotic lipases.

    PubMed

    Falk, A; Feys, B J; Frost, L N; Jones, J D; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E

    1999-03-16

    A major class of plant disease resistance (R) genes encodes leucine-rich-repeat proteins that possess a nucleotide binding site and amino-terminal similarity to the cytoplasmic domains of the Drosophila Toll and human IL-1 receptors. In Arabidopsis thaliana, EDS1 is indispensable for the function of these R genes. The EDS1 gene was cloned by targeted transposon tagging and found to encode a protein that has similarity in its amino-terminal portion to the catalytic site of eukaryotic lipases. Thus, hydrolase activity, possibly on a lipid-based substrate, is anticipated to be central to EDS1 function. The predicted EDS1 carboxyl terminus has no significant sequence homologies, although analysis of eight defective eds1 alleles reveals it to be essential for EDS1 function. Two plant defense pathways have been defined previously that depend on salicylic acid, a phenolic compound, or jasmonic acid, a lipid-derived molecule. We examined the expression of EDS1 mRNA and marker mRNAs (PR1 and PDF1.2, respectively) for these two pathways in wild-type and eds1 mutant plants after different challenges. The results suggest that EDS1 functions upstream of salicylic acid-dependent PR1 mRNA accumulation and is not required for jasmonic acid-induced PDF1.2 mRNA expression.

  7. Breakers, Benders, and Obeyers: Inquiring into Teacher Educators' Mediation of edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratner, Andrew R.; Kolman, Joni S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects a qualitative exploratory inquiry into the lived experiences of faculty members working within a system of urban schools of education as they supported diverse teacher candidates in completing the Educative Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) during its first semesters of high-stakes implementation. Drawing upon…

  8. Studying Learning in the Worldwide Classroom Research into edX's First MOOC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Lori; Pritchard, David E.; DeBoer, Jennifer; Stump, Glenda S.; Ho, Andrew D.; Seaton, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    "Circuits and Electronics" (6.002x), which began in March 2012, was the first MOOC developed by edX, the consortium led by MIT and Harvard. Over 155,000 students initially registered for 6.002x, which was composed of video lectures, interactive problems, online laboratories, and a discussion forum. As the course ended in June 2012,…

  9. Measuring relative performance of an EDS detector using a NiO standard.

    SciTech Connect

    Sugar, Joshua Daniel; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2013-09-01

    A method for measuring the relative performance of energy dispersive spectrometers (EDS) on a TEM is discussed. A NiO thin-film standard fabricated at Sandia CA is used. A performance parameter,, is measured and compared to values on several TEM systems.

  10. Meeting the Needs of Distance Learners of M.Ed Program: Bangladesh Open University Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Amirul; Ferdowsi, Sakiba

    2014-01-01

    This study draws on the experience of a cohort of 22 students from 09 tutorial centers enrolled in a Master of Education (M Ed) distance learning program administered by the Bangladesh Open University (BOU). It's purpose is to locate the aims and philosophies of distance learning within the experiences of actual distance learners in order to…

  11. PROJECT RE-ED, A DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR THE REEDUCATION OF EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Mental Health, Raleigh.

    THE PROJECT FOR THE REEDUCATION OF EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN (PROJECT RE-ED), A DEMONSTRATION PROJECT (1961-1968) TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS (SUNDAY THROUGH FRIDAY) FOR DISTURBED CHILDREN, IS DESCRIBED. THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AT GEORGE PEABODY COLLEGE, TENNESSEE, AND USE OF CAREFULLY SELECTED…

  12. Racist Ordering, Settler Colonialism, and EdTPA: A Participatory Policy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Eve; Gorlewski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This article tells the story of an intervention by a collective of teacher educators on New York State's adoption of edTPA. Too often in education policy analysis, issues of race are discussed briefly, if at all. This article argues that attending to constructions of race specific to settler colonialism is an important approach to education policy…

  13. Chemical quantification of atomic-scale EDS maps under thin specimen conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-12-01

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). With thin specimen conditions and localized EDS scattering potential, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak width are investigated using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak width and spatial resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore, the method developed by this work is applied to study cation occupancy in a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries (APBs) present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the APBs likely owing to the effect of strain.

  14. A Model for Developing Literacy Leadership through an M.A. Ed. Program in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice-Crickmer, Janet; Thompson, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    Arthur Levine's (2006) study of teacher preparation in the United States and his resulting controversial recommendations have increased the need for teacher educators in independent institutions to share insights into designing and implementing effective degree programs. To that end, this article highlights aspects of an innovative M.A. Ed.…

  15. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore,more » the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.« less

  16. EFNEP and SNAP-Ed Initial Paraprofessional Training Materials and Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Charlene; Baker, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Western Region EFNEP coordinators were frustrated by the apparent lack of materials available for training newly hired paraprofessional nutrition educators. An on-line survey was distributed to all EFNEP and SNAP-Ed state coordinators seeking details about initial training and available materials and requesting copies of materials for review.…

  17. Towards Understanding the DO-178C / ED-12C Assurance Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes initial work towards building an explicit assurance case for DO-178C / ED-12C. Two specific questions are explored: (1) What are some of the assumptions upon which the guidance in the document relies, and (2) What claims are made concerning test coverage analysis?

  18. Buyer Beware: Lessons Learned from EdTPA Implementation in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenblatt, Deborah; O'Hara, Kate E.

    2015-01-01

    As states across the country continue their implementation of the Teacher Performance Assessment Portfolio (edTPA), a complex and high-stakes certification requirement for teacher certification, there are important lessons for educators and education advocates to learn from New York State's implementation. As Linda Darling-Hammond, developer and…

  19. Pathogen effectors target Arabidopsis EDS1 and alter its interactions with immune regulators.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Halane, Morgan K; Kim, Sang Hee; Gassmann, Walter

    2011-12-01

    Plant resistance proteins detect the presence of specific pathogen effectors and initiate effector-triggered immunity. Few immune regulators downstream of resistance proteins have been identified, none of which are known virulence targets of effectors. We show that Arabidopsis ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1), a positive regulator of basal resistance and of effector-triggered immunity specifically mediated by Toll-interleukin-1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NB-LRR) resistance proteins, forms protein complexes with the TIR-NB-LRR disease resistance proteins RPS4 and RPS6 and with the negative immune regulator SRFR1 at a cytoplasmic membrane. Further, the cognate bacterial effectors AvrRps4 and HopA1 disrupt these EDS1 complexes. Tight association of EDS1 with TIR-NB-LRR-mediated immunity may therefore derive mainly from being guarded by TIR-NB-LRR proteins, and activation of this branch of effector-triggered immunity may directly connect to the basal resistance signaling pathway via EDS1.

  20. EDS1 contributes to nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Manon; Degrave, Alexandre; Vedel, Régine; Bitton, Frédérique; Patrit, Oriane; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Barny, Marie-Anne; Fagard, Mathilde

    2012-03-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight in rosaceous plants. In nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana, E. amylovora triggers necrotic symptoms associated with transient bacterial multiplication, suggesting either that A. thaliana lacks a susceptibility factor or that it actively restricts E. amylovora growth. Inhibiting plant protein synthesis at the time of infection led to an increase in necrosis and bacterial multiplication and reduced callose deposition, indicating that A. thaliana requires active protein synthesis to restrict E. amylovora growth. Analysis of the callose synthase-deficient pmr4-1 mutant indicated that lack of callose deposition alone did not lead to increased sensitivity to E. amylovora. Transcriptome analysis revealed that approximately 20% of the genes induced following E. amylovora infection are related to defense and signaling. Analysis of mutants affected in NDR1 and EDS1, two main components of the defense-gene activation observed, revealed that E. amylovora multiplied ten times more in the eds1-2 mutant than in the wild type but not in the ndr1-1 mutant. Analysis of mutants affected in three WRKY transcription factors showing EDS1-dependent activation identified WRKY46 and WRKY54 as positive regulators and WRKY70 as a negative regulator of defense against E. amylovora. Altogether, we show that EDS1 is a positive regulator of nonhost resistance against E. amylovora in A. thaliana and hypothesize that it controls the production of several effective defenses against E. amylovora through the action of WRKY46 and WRKY54, while WRKY70 acts as a negative regulator.

  1. Is the EdTPA the Right Choice for Evaluating Teacher Readiness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Kelly A.; Powell, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the edTPA, a performance assessment created by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE) and administered by Pearson, Inc., to assess the professional readiness of student teachers. We challenge claims made in support of using this assessment, specifically within the…

  2. Telepsychiatry program eases patient crowding in the ED, expedites mental health services to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    With funding from the Duke Endowment, the Albemarle Hospital Foundation in Elizabeth City, NC, implemented a telepsychiatry program aimed at decreasing patient backlogs in the health system's EDs, while also quickly connecting patients with needed mental health care. The approach has more than halved LOS for patients who are discharged to inpatient treatment facilities. The approach is also credited with reducing recidivism rates and the need for involuntary commitments. Now the state has announced plans to employ a similar approach statewide. Patients in the ED are connected with psychiatric providers at a remote location through the use of telemedicine carts that are equipped with wireless technology. With expedited psychiatric treatment, administrators say that nearly 30% of patients with involuntary commitment (IVC) orders stabilize to the point that their IVC orders can be rescinded and they can be discharged from the ED to outpatient care. Since the start of the pilot program in March of 2011, project administrators report that the average LOS in the ED for patients discharged to inpatient treatment facilities has decreased from 48 hours to 22.5 hours. PMID:24195141

  3. Evaluating the Amazon water cycle components using ED model against GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Han, S. C.; Yeo, I. Y.; Longo, M.; Swann, A. L. S.; Knox, R. G.; Briscoe, J.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the water cycle components of the Amazon and its surrounding regions are a key to assessing regional impacts of climate and land-cover changes, as they may affect rain-fed agriculture and hydroelectric power generation in Brazil. A comprehensive validation of the modeled water budget, therefore, is a necessary part of understanding the region's hydroclimatology. We evaluate the water cycle components from Ecosystem Demography (ED) model both as a stand-alone model and a coupled model to the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS). Model results are compared with satellite-driven observations and a flux tower measurement in central Amazon. Our results indicate that the modeled EDBRAMS precipitation over Amazonia replicates the observed patterns of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) from 2001 to 2009. Total Water Storage Change (TWSC) anomalies from the ED model at the Paraná River basin shows a better agreement with the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observation from 2002 to 2008, as compared to the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)/NOAH model. The Nash-Sutcliff model efficiency coefficient improved from 0.50 (GLDAS/NOAH vs. GRACE) to 0.65 (ED vs. GRACE). We also evaluate the modeled evapotranspiration (ET) against the flux tower measurement. Our study affirms the capabilities of the ED model in simulating the Amazon hydrological cycle, which helps investigate its sustainable thresholds with various land-cover and climate change scenarios.

  4. WORK-ED. (World of Related Knowledge and Educational Development). A Manual for Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraleigh, Virginia A.

    This manual is designed to assist personnel responsible for training teachers in the implementation of the World of Related Knowledge and Educational Development (WORK-ED). (The program is a career education course for ninth graders developed to enable students who have not chosen the traditional college-prep high school course to make career…

  5. Work-Ed. A Guide to the Changing World of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraleigh, Virginia A.

    A description of the project, its development process, evaluation results, and exportability are included in this overview of WORK-ED (World of Related Knowledge and Educational Development), a program to provide ninth grade students both basic skills in communication and exposure to twelve career clusters. Introductory sections describe the…

  6. ED50 determination of corneal lesions produced by 1318-nm laser radiation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzenberger, Bryan K.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Wild, Steven P.; Pletcher, Kenneth B.; Roach, William P.

    2001-05-01

    High-energy use of 1318 nm laser systems is becoming more prevalent in military and industrial settings. Threshold, ED50, exposure data and mechanism of laser-tissue interaction need to be determined for this wavelength using appropriate animal models that allow for extrapolation to control human exposures. Threshold, ED50, exposure data at 1318 nm for retinal and corneal injury have previously been undertaken and reported for rhesus monkeys. Using comparable methods, we examine exposure data at 1318 nm to determine the ED50 and laser-tissue interaction in the rabbit model to evaluate cornea. We present preliminary data for the ED50 threshold on the cornea from exposure to 1318 nm single laser pulses. Delivery of laser energy is accomplished using an Nd:YAG system producing 1318 nm light in the 0.5 millisecond time exposure regime and in the range of 0 to 500 mJ. Results from this work will aid in the establishment of safety standards for near infrared laser systems.

  7. APA Reporting Standards in Quantitative Research Dissertations from an Online EdD Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgado, Griselle

    2013-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the reporting practices in dissertations with quantitative research designs produced by students enrolled in an online Doctor of Education (EdD) program, one that follows the American Psychological Association (APA) standards for reporting research. Limited, empirical information exists about the competencies in…

  8. Shifting Interests: Changes in the Lexical Semantics of ED-MEDIA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Fridolin; Valentine, Chris; Scott, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Large research networks naturally form complex communities with overlapping but not identical expertise. To map the distribution of professional competence in field of "technology-enhanced learning", the lexical semantics expressed in research articles published in a representative, large-scale conference (ED-MEDIA) can be investigated and changes…

  9. Crystal structures of the components of the Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin ED

    PubMed Central

    Nocadello, S.; Minasov, G.; Shuvalova, L.; Dubrovska, I.; Sabini, E.; Bagnoli, F.; Grandi, G.; Anderson, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal leukotoxins are a family of β-barrel, bicomponent, pore-forming toxins with membrane-damaging functions. These bacterial exotoxins share sequence and structural homology and target several host-cell types. Leukotoxin ED (LukED) is one of these bicomponent pore-forming toxins that Staphylococcus aureus produces in order to suppress the ability of the host to contain the infection. The recent delineation of the important role that LukED plays in S. aureus pathogenesis and the identification of its protein receptors, combined with its presence in S. aureus methicillin-resistant epidemic strains, establish this leukocidin as a possible target for the development of novel therapeutics. Here, the crystal structures of the water-soluble LukE and LukD components of LukED have been determined. The two structures illustrate the tertiary-structural variability with respect to the other leukotoxins while retaining the conservation of the residues involved in the interaction of the protomers in the bipartite leukotoxin in the pore complex. PMID:26894539

  10. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  11. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  12. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  13. 34 CFR 110.17 - Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Age distinctions contained in ED's regulations. 110.17..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Standards for Determining Age Discrimination § 110.17 Age distinctions contained in...

  14. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore, the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.

  15. Learning the Attachment Theory with the CM-ED Concept Map Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueda, U.; Arruarte, A.; Elorriaga, J. A.; Herran, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out at the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU with the aim of evaluating the CM-ED (concept map editor) with social education students. Concept mapping is a widely accepted technique that promotes meaningful learning. Graphically representing concepts of the learning domain and relationships between them…

  16. Time to Grow: Year Two Report on ExpandED Schools. A TASC Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traill, Saskia; Brohawn, Katie

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of data from the second year of The After-School Corporation's (TASC's) national demonstration of an expanded school day for elementary and middle school students shows that ExpandED Schools improved school culture, decreased rates of students' chronic absenteeism and helped students develop positive learning habits and attitudes.…

  17. Choice of Instructional Media of B.Ed. Students of Ignou from Two Indian Metropolises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bose, Sutapa; Sharma, Parveen

    2010-01-01

    Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) of India uses multiple media and modes for reaching out to its distant learners. For most of the programmes offered to these learners, print is the master medium and other media supplement it. Instructions for the Bachelor in Education (B.Ed.), one of the popular programmes of IGNOU, are also…

  18. Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems: Contribution, Impact and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on the ontology engineering methodology discussed by the paper entitled "Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems" published in this journal in 2000. We discuss the achievements obtained in the last 10 years, the impact of our work as well as recent trends and perspectives in ontology engineering for…

  19. An Analysis of Professional Practice Ed.D. Dissertations in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kara; Kumar, Swapna

    2014-01-01

    The University of Florida offers an online professional practice Ed.D. focused on Educational Technology. Twenty-three students have completed professional practice dissertations and graduated since the program's inception in 2008. The purpose of this article is to share what these dissertations have looked like and to begin a dialogue about…

  20. EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Final technical progress report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1984-02-01

    All objectives in the EDS Cooperative Agreement for Phases III-B through V have been achieved for the RCLU pilot plants. EDS operations have been successfully demonstrated in both the once-through and bottoms recycle modes for coals of rank ranging from bituminous to lignitic. An extensive data base detailing the effects of process variable changes on yields, conversions and product qualities for each coal has been established. Continuous bottoms recycle operations demonstrated increased overall conversion and improved product slate flexibility over once-through operations. The hydrodynamics of the liquefaction reactor in RCLU were characterized through tests using radioactive tracers in the gas and slurry phases. RCLU was shown to have longer liquid residence times than ECLP. Support work during ECLP operations contributed to resolving differences between ECLP conversions and product yields and those of the small pilot plants. Solvent hydrogenation studies during Phases IIIB-V of the EDS program focused on long term activity maintenance of the Ni-MO-10 catalyst. Process variable studies for solvents from various coals (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignitic), catalyst screening evaluations, and support of ECLP solvent hydrogenation operations. Product quality studies indicate that highly cyclic EDS naphthas represent unique and outstanding catalytic reforming feedstocks. High volumes of high octane motor gasoline blendstock are produced while liberating a considerable quantity of high purity hydrogen.

  1. Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) Network Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Shaun; Edelmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) network dataset. It entails information on two online communication networks resulting from two consecutive offerings of the MOOC called "The Digital Learning Transition in K-12 Schools" in spring and fall 2013. The courses were offered to educators from the USA…

  2. ED's Proposed Changes to SFSF Data Collection and Reporting Requirements: DQC's Submitted Comments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This letter is submitted to comment on the U.S. Department of Education's (ED) proposed revisions to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's (ARRA) State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF), as published in the September 23, 2011, Federal Register. Overall, the Data Quality Campaign believes the proposed changes strike a sensible balance: they…

  3. GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS) ALTERS DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE TESTIS. D.K. Tarka*1,2, J.D. Suarez*2, N.L. Roberts*2, J.M. Rogers*1,2, M.P. Hardy3, and G.R. Klinefelter1,2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC; 2USEPA,...

  4. Sex Ed for Caring Schools: Creating an Ethics-Based Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    While arguments for and against teaching abstinence, the use of contraceptives, and sexual identity are becoming more and more polarized, most people agree that students must learn to navigate an increasingly sexual world. "Sex Ed for Caring Schools" presents a curriculum that goes beyond the typical health education most students receive today.…

  5. Developing Scientific Literacy Skills through Interdisciplinary, Technology-Based Global Simulations: GlobalEd 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Kimberly A.; Brown, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    GlobalEd 2 (GE2) is a set of technology-mediated, problem-based learning (PBL) simulations for middle-grade students, that capitalises on the multidisciplinary nature of the social sciences as an expanded curricular space for students to learn and apply scientific literacies and concepts, while simultaneously also enriching their understanding of…

  6. Telepsychiatry program eases patient crowding in the ED, expedites mental health services to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    With funding from the Duke Endowment, the Albemarle Hospital Foundation in Elizabeth City, NC, implemented a telepsychiatry program aimed at decreasing patient backlogs in the health system's EDs, while also quickly connecting patients with needed mental health care. The approach has more than halved LOS for patients who are discharged to inpatient treatment facilities. The approach is also credited with reducing recidivism rates and the need for involuntary commitments. Now the state has announced plans to employ a similar approach statewide. Patients in the ED are connected with psychiatric providers at a remote location through the use of telemedicine carts that are equipped with wireless technology. With expedited psychiatric treatment, administrators say that nearly 30% of patients with involuntary commitment (IVC) orders stabilize to the point that their IVC orders can be rescinded and they can be discharged from the ED to outpatient care. Since the start of the pilot program in March of 2011, project administrators report that the average LOS in the ED for patients discharged to inpatient treatment facilities has decreased from 48 hours to 22.5 hours.

  7. Impact of Curricular Reforms on Educational Philosophy Courses in M.Ed Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, K. Abdul; Remia, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of Vision of Teacher Education envisaged in National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education, this study probes "Do M.Ed programmes provide for the prerequisites of educational philosophy for teacher educators?" and "whether the syllabi following credit and non credit pattern vary in their coverage of content of…

  8. With Medicare revenues at stake, ED managers place new importance on elevating the patient experience.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    With a portion of Medicare revenue soon to be on the line based on patient satisfaction, ED managers have a heightened focus on making sure patients not only receive first-rate care, but that they also come away from the experience with good things to say. Some hospitals have implemented "patient centric" training for all employees, including the clinical staff, and they're getting regular feedback from patients on things they could do better. Furthermore, patient throughput--always an important factor--has taken on added significance. Beginning this fall, Medicare will begin withholding 1% of payments to hospitals so that it can use these funds to provide incentives to institutions that score high on patient satisfaction. The percent of payments withheld will rise to 2% by 2017. ED managers have implemented rounding through the waiting areas so that patients and family members are kept informed, and they're coming up with new ways to shorten patient-to-provider times. Experts say patient views of time spent in the ED also impact satisfaction scores from inpatient stays. Sophistication in the art of cue management is helping some EDs clear waiting rooms and maximize resources.

  9. Structural and biophysical analysis of sero-specific immune responses using epitope grafted Dengue ED3 mutants.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manjiri R; Islam, Monirul M; Numoto, Nobutaka; Elahi, Montasir; Mahib, Mamunur R; Ito, Nobutoshi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    Dengue fever is a re-emerging tropical disease and its severe form is caused by cross-reactivity between its four serotypes (DEN1, DEN2, DEN3 and DEN4). The third domain of the viral envelope protein (ED3) contains the two major putative epitopes and is a highly suitable model protein for examining the molecular determinants of a virus' sero-specificity. Here we examine d the sero-specificity and cross-reactivity of the immune response against DEN3 and DEN4 ED3 using six epitope grafted ED3 variants where the surface-exposed epitope residues from DEN3 ED3 were switched to those of DEN4 ED3 and vice versa. We prepared anti-DEN3 and anti-DEN4 ED3 serum by immunizing Swiss albino mice and measured their reactivities against all six grafted mutants. As expected, both sera exhibited strong reactivity against its own serotype's ED3, and little cross-reactivity against their counterpart serotype's ED3s. E2 played a major role in the sero-specificity of anti-DEN3 serum, whereas E1 was important for DEN4 ED3's sero-specificity. Next, the reactivity patterns corroborated our working hypothesis that sero-specificity could be transferred by grafting the surface exposed epitope residues from one serotype to the other. To analyze the above results from a structural viewpoint, we determined the crystal structure of a DEN4 ED3 variant, where E2 was grafted from DEN3 ED3, at 2.78Å resolution and modeled the structures of the five remaining grafted variants by assuming that the overall backbone remained unchanged. The examination of the electrostatic and molecular surfaces of the variants suggested some further rationale for the sero-specificity of the immune responses.

  10. The Customers' Perspective: The EdNET 98 Survey of Buyers and Managers of Educational Technology. Constructive Input for the Educational Technology Industry from the EdNET 98 Education Executives Advisory Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craighead, Donna; Bigham, Vicki Smith; Heller, Nelson B.

    The EdNET 98 Education Executives Advisory Board, also known as Partners in Education Program (PEP), is a featured activity of the EdNET 98 Conference. Its focus is to bring educators and vendors together to share their perspectives about technology in education and discussion technology-related concerns and issues. This report presents results…

  11. Exposure to Community Violence is Associated with Asthma Hospitalizations and ED Visits

    PubMed Central

    Apter, Andrea J.; Garcia, Laura A.; Boyd, Rhonda C.; Wang, Xingmei; Bogen, Daniel K.; Have, Thomas Ten

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to community violence (ECV) has been associated with asthma morbidity of children living in inner-city neighborhoods. Objective To examine with prospective longitudinal data whether ECV is independently associated with asthma-related health outcomes in adults. Methods Adults with moderate-severe asthma, recruited from clinics serving inner-city neighborhoods, completed questionnaires covering socio-demographics, asthma severity, and ECV and were followed for 26 weeks. Longitudinal models were employed to assess unadjusted and adjusted associations of subsequent asthma outcomes (emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, FEV1, quality of life). Results 397 adults, 47±14 years, 73% female, 70% African American, 7% Latino, mean FEV1 66%±19%, 133 with hospitalizations and 222 with ED visits for asthma in the year before entry were evaluated. 91 reported ECV. Controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and household income, those exposed to violence had 2.27 (95% CI: 1.32-3.90) times more asthma-related ED visits per month and 2.49 (95% CI: 1.11-5.60) times more asthma-related hospitalizations per month over the 26-week study period compared to those unexposed. Violence-exposed participants also had 1.71 (95% CI: 1.14-2.56) times more overall ED visits per month and 1.72 (95% CI: 0.95-3.11) times more overall hospitalizations per month from any cause. Asthma-related quality of life was lower in the violence-exposed participants (-0.40 (95%CI: -0.77-0.025), p=0.04). Effect modification by depressive symptoms was only statistically significant for the ECV association with overall ED visits and quality of life outcomes (p<.01). Conclusion In adults, ECV is associated with increased hospitalizations and emergency care for asthma or any condition and with asthma-related quality of life. PMID:20816190

  12. From Napkin to Orbit in 9 Months; The TechEdSat Spacecraft Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Aaron; Hoppins, Nicholas; Trinh, Greenfield; Schulte, Jan; Bruhn, Fredrik; Loefgren, Henrik; Selin, Per

    2013-01-01

    The TechEdSat spacecraft mission saw one of the fastest turn around times for concept through launch of a CubeSat. On 26 October 2011, John Hines sketched on a brown paper napkin the outline for which components would be in this 1U CubeSat, and how they would be stacked; 269 days later that spacecraft launched from Tanegashima Space Center aboard the HTV-3 ISS resupply mission, with a total development time of only eight months. TechEdSat was among the first of five CubeSats deployed from the ISS. The goals of the TechEdSat mission were to explore the use of the Space Plug-n-Play Architecture (SPA) in a CubeSat, and to evaluate Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) space-to-space communication solutions. TechEdSat featured an array of processors from ÅAC Microtec including four NanoRTU's and the RTULite main processor, all communicating using the SPA-1 protocol. TechEdSat featured two primary payloads: an Iridium 9602 Modem, and a Quake Global Q1000 OrbComm modem. After a successful deployment on 4 October 2012 from the ISS, over 2000 packets of 122 bytes each (250 kB total) were received in the first four months of the mission. In this paper we discuss the challenges to rapid CubeSat development, the experience of having a CubeSat approved for deployment from the ISS, the ongoing results of the mission and lessons learned.

  13. Depression Prevention for Early Adolescent Girls: A Pilot Study of All Girls Versus Co-Ed Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen; Elkon, Andrea G. L.; Samuels, Barbra; Freres, Derek R.; Winder, Breanna; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2006-01-01

    Given the dramatic increase in depression that occurs during early adolescence in girls, interventions must address the needs of girls. The authors examined whether a depression prevention program, the Penn Resiliency Program, was more effective for girls in all-girls groups than in co-ed groups. Within co-ed groups, the authors also tested…

  14. Mentoring from Different Social Spheres: How Can Multiple Mentors Help in Doctoral Student Success in Ed.D Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Tarae; Ghosh, Rajashi

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students leave their programs early due to lack of mentoring relationships needed to support degree completion and success. However, how mentoring contributes to Ed.D degree completion is not widely studied. In this qualitative narrative study, we sought to explore how multiple mentoring relationships reduced attrition in an Ed.D program.…

  15. Disruption of the Arabidopsis Defense Regulator Genes SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 Confers Enhanced Freezing Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin-Fang; Xu, Le; Tan, Wei-Juan; Chen, Liang; Qi, Hua; Xie, Li-Juan; Chen, Mo-Xian; Liu, Bin-Yi; Yu, Lu-Jun; Yao, Nan; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2015-10-01

    In Arabidopsis, three lipase-like regulators, SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4, act downstream of resistance protein-associated defense signaling. Although the roles of SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 in biotic stress have been extensively studied, little is known about their functions in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we show that SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 are involved in the regulation of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. With or without cold acclimation, the sag101, eds1, and pad4 single mutants, as well as their double mutants, exhibited similarly enhanced tolerance to freezing temperatures. Upon cold exposure, the sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants showed increased transcript levels of C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTORs and their regulons compared with the wild type. Moreover, freezing-induced cell death and accumulation of hydrogen peroxide were ameliorated in sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants. The sag101, eds1, and pad4 mutants had much lower salicylic acid (SA) and diacylglycerol (DAG) contents than the wild type, and exogenous application of SA and DAG compromised the freezing tolerance of the mutants. Furthermore, SA suppressed the cold-induced expression of DGATs and DGKs in the wild-type leaves. These findings indicate that SAG101, EDS1, and PAD4 are involved in the freezing response in Arabidopsis, at least in part, by modulating the homeostasis of SA and DAG.

  16. Effectiveness of Mathematics Teaching and Learning Experiences through Wireless Technology as Recent Style to Enhance B.Ed. Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to find out the effect of learning through Wireless technologies and the traditional method in teaching and learning Mathematics. The investigator adopted experimental research to find the effectiveness of implementing Wireless technologies in the population of B.Ed. trainees. The investigator selected 32 B.Ed.…

  17. Effectiveness of Mutual Learning Approach in the Academic Achievement of B.Ed Students in Learning Optional II English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arulselvi, Evangelin

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at finding out the effectiveness of Mutual learning approach over the conventional method in learning English optional II among B.Ed students. The randomized pre-test, post test, control group and experimental group design was employed. The B.Ed students of the same college formed the control and experimental groups. Each…

  18. Competencies for Effective School Leadership: To What Extent Are They Included in Ed.D. Leadership Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Jody; Li, Jinyi; Kladifko, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: With the increasing need for well-­-prepared and leading practitioners in the field of education as well as the renewed efforts to further distinguish the EdD from the PhD in higher education in recent years, the curriculum of EdD programs nationwide has been questioned and criticized for its disconnection from the needs of leading…

  19. Comparison of adjuvant ED and EC-D regimens in operable breast invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liyu; Jing, Chuyu; Kong, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoyan; Ma, Tingting; Huo, Qiang; Chen, Junfei; Wang, Xiaoting; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-01-01

    In China, the adjuvant epirubicin and docetaxel (ED) regimen is widely used as a substitute for the epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel (EC-D) regimen in patients with operable breast cancer. However, their equivalence has not yet been demonstrated. This retrospective study compared these two adjuvant regimens as regards feasibility, safety and efficacy. Data on consecutive patients who received either ED (70/75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for 6 cycles) or EC-D (70/600 mg/m2 epirubicin/cyclophosphamide followed by 75 mg/m2 docetaxel every 3 weeks for 4 cycles each) as their adjuvant chemotherapy in our center from January 2009 to January 2014, were analyzed. A total of 374 patients was enrolled, among whom 250 patients received the ED regimen, and 124 patients received the EC-D regimen. The overall median follow-up time was 38.6 months. In total, 90 and 94.4% of patients in the ED and EC-D groups, respectively, completed full cycles of chemotherapy (P=0.174). There was no difference in efficacy in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) (DFS, P=0.919; OS, P=0.069). The incidence of neutropenia in the ED group was similar to that in the EC-D group (81.2 vs. 78.9%, P=0.660) with a similar utilization rate of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; 76.9 vs. 75.2%, P=0.850). However, grade 3/4 gastrointestinal reactions were more frequently observed in the patients who received the EC-D regimen (42.0 vs. 29.2%, P=0.058). The findings of our study indicate that with similar feasibility, safety and mid-term efficacy, the adjuvant ED regimen for 6 cycles may be an alternative to the EC-D regimen in operable breast cancer. PMID:27446451

  20. Different roles of Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 (EDS1) bound to and dissociated from Phytoalexin Deficient4 (PAD4) in Arabidopsis immunity.

    PubMed

    Rietz, Steffen; Stamm, Anika; Malonek, Stefan; Wagner, Stephan; Becker, Dieter; Medina-Escobar, Nieves; Vlot, A Corina; Feys, Bart J; Niefind, Karsten; Parker, Jane E

    2011-07-01

    • Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 (EDS1) is an important regulator of plant basal and receptor-triggered immunity. Arabidopsis EDS1 interacts with two related proteins, Phytoalexin Deficient4 (PAD4) and Senescence Associated Gene101 (SAG101), whose combined activities are essential for defense signaling. The different sizes and intracellular distributions of EDS1-PAD4 and EDS1-SAG101 complexes in Arabidopsis leaf tissues suggest that they perform nonredundant functions. • The nature and biological relevance of EDS1 interactions with PAD4 and SAG101 were explored using yeast three-hybrid assays, in vitro analysis of recombinant proteins purified from Escherichia coli, and characterization of Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing an eds1 mutant (eds1(L262P) ) protein which no longer binds PAD4 but retains interaction with SAG101. • EDS1 forms molecularly distinct complexes with PAD4 or SAG101 without additional plant factors. Loss of interaction with EDS1 reduces PAD4 post-transcriptional accumulation, consistent with the EDS1 physical association stabilizing PAD4. The dissociated forms of EDS1 and PAD4 are fully competent in signaling receptor-triggered localized cell death at infection foci. By contrast, an EDS1-PAD4 complex is necessary for basal resistance involving transcriptional up-regulation of PAD4 itself and mobilization of salicylic acid defenses. • Different EDS1 and PAD4 molecular configurations have distinct and separable functions in the plant innate immune response.

  1. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis.

  2. Segregation Behavior of Sulfur and Other Impurities Onto the Free Surfaces of ED-Ni Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Binayak; Jerman, Gregory; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Most researchers attribute grain boundary embrittlement in electro-deposited Nickel (ED-Ni) to the presence of small quantities of Sulfur as an impurity. It occurs in a highly mobile form that segregates to the grain boundaries. Evaluation of Sulfur segregation requires that a sample be fractured through the grain boundaries. However, this action may not always be possible. ED-Ni is inherently tough at ambient temperature, especially if a low level of Sulfur was intentionally maintained. A new method was developed to study Sulfur and other migrant species to the grain boundaries, which also migrate to free surfaces. A test specimen is heated by a quartz lamp within the sample preparation chamber, allowing the mobile species to migrate to polished free surfaces. There the mobile species are analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also known as Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA).

  3. Segregation Behavior of Sulfur and Other Impurities onto the Free Surfaces of ED-NI Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, B.; Jerman, G.

    2001-01-01

    Most researchers attribute grain boundary embrittlement in electro-deposited nickel (ED-Ni) to the presence of small quantities of sulfur as an impurity. It occurs in a highly mobile form that segregates to the grain boundaries. Evaluation of sulfur segregation requires that a sample be fractured through the grain boundaries. However, this action may not always be possible. ED-Ni is inherently tough at ambient temperature, especially if a low level of sulfur was intentionally maintained. A new method was developed to study sulfur and other migrant species to the grain boundaries, which also migrate to free surfaces. A test specimen is heated by a quartz lamp within the sample preparation chamber, allowing the mobile species to migrate to polished free surfaces. There the mobile species are analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) also known as Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA).

  4. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis. PMID:26659962

  5. Modeling and analysis of the EDS Maglev system with the Halbach magnet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wonsuk

    The magnetic field analysis based on the wavelet transform is performed. The Halbach array magnetic field analysis has been studied using many methods such as magnetic scalar potential, magnetic vector potential, Fourier analysis and Finite Element Methods. But these analyses cannot identify a transient oscillation at the beginning stage of levitation. The wavelet transform is used for analyzing the transient oscillatory response of an EDS Maglev system. The proposed scheme explains the under-damped dynamics that results from the cradle's dynamic response to the irregular distribution of the magnetic field. It suggests this EDS Maglev system that responds to a vertical repulsive force could be subject to such instability at the beginning stage of a low levitation height. The proposed method is useful in analyzing instabilities at the beginning stage of levitation height. A controller for the EDS maglev system with the Halbach array magnet is designed for the beginning stage of levitation and after reaching the defined levitation height. To design a controller for the EDS system, two different stages are suggested. Before the object reaches a stable position and after it has reached a stable position. A stable position can be referred to as a nominal height. The former is the stage I and the latter is the stage II. At the stage I, to achieve a nominal height the robust controller is investigated. At the stage II, both translational and rotational motions are considered for the control design. To maintain system stability, damping control as well as LQR control are performed. The proposed method is helpful to understand system dynamics and achieve system stability.

  6. Improvement in student science proficiency through InSciEd out.

    PubMed

    Pierret, Chris; Sonju, James D; Leicester, Jean E; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R; Ekker, Stephen C

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K-8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5(th) and 8(th) grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools.

  7. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  8. COL5A1 haploinsufficiency is a common molecular mechanism underlying the classical form of EDS.

    PubMed Central

    Wenstrup, R J; Florer, J B; Willing, M C; Giunta, C; Steinmann, B; Young, F; Susic, M; Cole, W G

    2000-01-01

    We have identified haploinsufficiency of the COL5A1 gene that encodes the proalpha1(V) chain of type V collagen in the classical form of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a heritable connective-tissue disorder that severely alters the collagen-fibrillar structure of the dermis, joints, eyes, and blood vessels. Eight of 28 probands with classical EDS who were heterozygous for expressed polymorphisms in COL5A1 showed complete or nearly complete loss of expression of one COL5A1 allele. Reduced levels of proalpha1(V) mRNA relative to the levels of another type V collagen mRNA, proalpha2(V), were also observed in the cultured fibroblasts from EDS probands. Products of the two COL5A1 alleles were approximately equal after the addition of cycloheximide to the fibroblast cultures. After harvesting of mRNAs from cycloheximide-treated cultured fibroblasts, heteroduplex analysis of overlapping reverse transcriptase-PCR segments spanning the complete proalpha1(V) cDNA showed anomalies in four of the eight probands that led to identification of causative mutations, and, in the remaining four probands, targeting of CGA-->TGA mutations in genomic DNA revealed a premature stop at codon in one of them. We estimate that approximately one-third of individuals with classical EDS have mutations of COL5A1 that result in haploinsufficiency. These findings indicate that the normal formation of the heterotypic collagen fibrils that contain types I, III, and V collagen requires the expression of both COL5A1 alleles. PMID:10777716

  9. ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

    2014-05-01

    President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

  10. Improvement in Student Science Proficiency Through InSciEd Out

    PubMed Central

    Sonju, James D.; Leicester, Jean E.; Hoody, Maggie; LaBounty, Thomas J.; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Integrated Science Education Outreach (InSciEd Out) is a collaboration formed between Mayo Clinic, Winona State University, and Rochester Public Schools (MN) with the shared vision of achieving excellence in science education. InSciEd Out employs an equitable partnership model between scientists, teachers, education researchers, and the community. Teams of teachers from all disciplines within a single school experience cutting-edge science using the zebrafish model system, as well as current pedagogical methods, during a summer internship at the Mayo Clinic. Within the internship, the teachers produce new curriculum that directly addresses opportunities for science education improvement at their own school. Zebrafish are introduced within the new curriculum to support a living model of the practice of science. Following partnership with the InSciEd Out program and 2 years of implementation in the classroom, teacher-interns from a K–8 public school reported access to local scientific technology and expertise they had not previously recognized. Teachers also reported improved integration of other disciplines into the scientific curriculum and a flow of concepts vertically from K through 8. Students more than doubled selection of an Honors science track in high school to nearly 90%. 98% of students who took the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments in their 5th and 8th grade year (a span that includes 2 years of InSciEd Out) showed medium or high growth in science proficiency. These metrics indicate that cooperation between educators and scientists can result in positive change in student science proficiency and demonstrate that a higher expectation in science education can be achieved in US public schools. PMID:23244687

  11. Selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors improve performance on the ED/ID cognitive task in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodefer, Joshua S; Saland, Samantha K; Eckrich, Samuel J

    2012-03-01

    A number of selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have been demonstrated to improve learning in several rodent models of cognition. Given that schizophrenia is associated with impairments in frontal lobe-dependent cognitive functions (e.g., working memory and cognitive flexibility), we examined whether PDE inhibitors would attenuate cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Persistent suppression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function produces enduring structural changes in neocortical and limbic regions in a pattern similar to changes reported in schizophrenia. This similarity suggests that subchronic treatment with NMDA receptor antagonists (e.g., phencyclidine, PCP) may represent a useful preclinical model of neurobiological and related cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. We treated male Long-Evans rats with subchronic PCP (5 mg/kg, ip, BID, 7 d) or saline and then examined the effects of acute treatment with selected doses of PDE inhibitors that have been demonstrated to regulate both intracellular levels of cAMP and/or cGMP, and to improve cognitive function. We used an extradimensional-intradimensional (ED/ID) test of cognitive flexibility similar to those used in humans and non-human primates for assessing executive function. Subchronic treatment with PCP produced a selective impairment on ED shift (EDS) performance without significant impairment on any other discrimination problem when compared to saline-treated control animals. Selected doses of the four PDEIs evaluated (PDE2: BAY 60-7550; PDE4: rolipram; PDE5: sildenafil; PDE10A: papaverine) were able to significantly attenuate this cognitive deficit in EDS performance. This suggests that this rodent model of executive function was sensitive to pro-cognitive effects of intracellular effects resulting from PDE inhibition. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of PDE activity may represent valuable therapeutic targets to improve cognition associated with

  12. Advances in EBSD and EBSD/EDS integration for the characterization of mineralogical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, L.; Goran, D.; Schwager, T.

    2013-12-01

    Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a well-known powerful technique for petrofabric studies using Scanning Electron Microscope. By assessing the quantitative microstructural information, i.e. crystallographic orientation data, it allows a large variety of applications: understanding the deformation mechanisms, seismic properties, metamorphic processes; and more recently, performing phase identification and discrimination when combined with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). However, it is known that for multiphase mineralogical samples, the information delivered either by EBSD or by EDS alone is not enough to successfully distinguish the present phases. Typical examples for EBSD related indexing issues are phases creating similar patterns; and for EDS technique alone, phases with similar chemical composition like calcite and aragonite, quartz and cristobalite. Recent software and hardware developments have significantly improved the data quality as well as the efficiency/productivity. This presentation aims to reveal the latest development in data processing that has transformed the combination of the two complementary techniques into a powerful tool for characterizing multiphase materials. Through geosciences application examples, we will present the advantages brought by this new approach which uses the quantified EDS results and EBSP to identify the correct phase, reducing the need of data cleaning, and without spending extra time at the SEM. We will also demonstrate how powerful EBSD indexing algorithm can overcome the limitation from sample preparation, with some examples of high hit rate achieved on polyphase mineralogical specimen and even on shock-metamorphosed minerals. Last but not least, recent developments also enable the investigation of nanostructured materials in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Through some mineralogical applications, we will demonstrate the high spatial resolution

  13. Prevalence of Past Year Assault among Inner-City ED Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Murray, Regan; Walton, Maureen A.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Wojnar, Marcin; Wozniak, Piotr; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives 1) To determine the rates of past year non-partner violent assault (NPV), both victimization and aggression. 2) To assess variables associated with NPV, particularly with regards to substance use. Method A cross sectional computerized standardized survey study was conducted to assess NPV, physical and mental health, and substance use among patients presenting to an inner-city ED over two years. Patients (age 19–60) with normal vital signs in an urban ED from 9am–11pm were eligible; pregnant patients and those with a chief complaint of psychiatric evaluation were excluded. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict any NPV Results 10,744 patients were enrolled (80 % response rate); 14% of the sample reported any past year NPV (9% perpetration; 11% victimization). Findings from regression analyses found participants with any past year NPV (victimization or aggression) were more likely than their counterparts to be younger (OR 1.1), male (2.2), single (1.5), unemployed (1.1), present to the ED for injury (1.9), report poor physical health (1.32) poor mental health (1.9). They were less likely to be African-American (0.8). Alcohol use (1.7), marijuana use (2.4), cocaine use (3.1), prescription drug use (1.4) and past treatment (1.7) were associated with experiencing past year NPV. Conclusions Fourteen percent of patients seeking care in this inner-city ED experience violence with a non-partner. Substance use and cocaine specifically, was the strongest predictor of any NPV. PMID:19282061

  14. Emergency Doses (ED) - Revision 3: A calculator code for environmental dose computations

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1990-12-01

    The calculator program ED (Emergency Doses) was developed from several HP-41CV calculator programs documented in the report Seven Health Physics Calculator Programs for the HP-41CV, RHO-HS-ST-5P (Rittman 1984). The program was developed to enable estimates of offsite impacts more rapidly and reliably than was possible with the software available for emergency response at that time. The ED - Revision 3, documented in this report, revises the inhalation dose model to match that of ICRP 30, and adds the simple estimates for air concentration downwind from a chemical release. In addition, the method for calculating the Pasquill dispersion parameters was revised to match the GENII code within the limitations of a hand-held calculator (e.g., plume rise and building wake effects are not included). The summary report generator for printed output, which had been present in the code from the original version, was eliminated in Revision 3 to make room for the dispersion model, the chemical release portion, and the methods of looping back to an input menu until there is no further no change. This program runs on the Hewlett-Packard programmable calculators known as the HP-41CV and the HP-41CX. The documentation for ED - Revision 3 includes a guide for users, sample problems, detailed verification tests and results, model descriptions, code description (with program listing), and independent peer review. This software is intended to be used by individuals with some training in the use of air transport models. There are some user inputs that require intelligent application of the model to the actual conditions of the accident. The results calculated using ED - Revision 3 are only correct to the extent allowed by the mathematical models. 9 refs., 36 tabs.

  15. Data-driven process and operational improvement in the emergency department: the ED Dashboard and Reporting Application.

    PubMed

    Stone-Griffith, Suzanne; Englebright, Jane D; Cheung, Dickson; Korwek, Kimberly M; Perlin, Jonathan B

    2012-01-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) in the United States are expected to provide consistent, high-quality care to patients. Unfortunately, EDs are encumbered by problems associated with the demand for services and the limitations of current resources, such as overcrowding, long wait times, and operational inefficiencies. While increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of emergency care would improve both access and quality of patient care, coordinated improvement efforts have been hindered by a lack of timely access to data. The ED Dashboard and Reporting Application was developed to support data-driven process improvement projects. It incorporated standard definitions of metrics, a data repository, and near real-time analysis capabilities. This helped acute care hospitals in a large healthcare system evaluate and target individual improvement projects in accordance with corporate goals. Subsequently, there was a decrease in "arrival to greet" time--the time from patient arrival to physician contact--from an average of 51 minutes in 2007 to the goal level of less than 35 minutes by 2010. The ED Dashboard and Reporting Application has also contributed to data-driven improvements in length of stay and other measures of ED efficiency and care quality. Between January 2007 and December 2010, overall length of stay decreased 10.5 percent while annual visit volume increased 13.6 percent. Thus, investing in the development and implementation of a system for ED data capture, storage, and analysis has supported operational management decisions, gains in ED efficiency, and ultimately improvements in patient care. PMID:22724375

  16. Structural basis for signaling by exclusive EDS1 heteromeric complexes with SAG101 or PAD4 in plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stephan; Stuttmann, Johannes; Rietz, Steffen; Guerois, Raphael; Brunstein, Elena; Bautor, Jaqueline; Niefind, Karsten; Parker, Jane E

    2013-12-11

    Biotrophic plant pathogens encounter a postinfection basal resistance layer controlled by the lipase-like protein enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and its sequence-related interaction partners, senescence-associated gene 101 (SAG101) and phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4). Maintainance of separate EDS1 family member clades through angiosperm evolution suggests distinct functional attributes. We report the Arabidopsis EDS1-SAG101 heterodimer crystal structure with juxtaposed N-terminal α/β hydrolase and C-terminal α-helical EP domains aligned via a large conserved interface. Mutational analysis of the EDS1-SAG101 heterodimer and a derived EDS1-PAD4 structural model shows that EDS1 signals within mutually exclusive heterocomplexes. Although there is evolutionary conservation of α/β hydrolase topology in all three proteins, a noncatalytic resistance mechanism is indicated. Instead, the respective N-terminal domains appear to facilitate binding of the essential EP domains to create novel interaction surfaces on the heterodimer. Transitions between distinct functional EDS1 heterodimers might explain the central importance and versatility of this regulatory node in plant immunity.

  17. An electrodynamics-Langevin dynamics (ED-LD) approach to simulate metal nanoparticle interactions and motion.

    PubMed

    Sule, N; Rice, S A; Gray, S K; Scherer, N F

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the formation of electrodynamically interacting assemblies of metal nanoparticles requires accurate computational methods for determining the forces and propagating trajectories. However, since computation of electromagnetic forces occurs on attosecond to femtosecond timescales, simulating the motion of colloidal nanoparticles on milliseconds to seconds timescales is a challenging multi-scale computational problem. Here, we present a computational technique for performing accurate simulations of laser-illuminated metal nanoparticles. In the simulation, we self-consistently combine the finite-difference time-domain method for electrodynamics (ED) with Langevin dynamics (LD) for the particle motions. We demonstrate the ED-LD method by calculating the 3D trajectories of a single 100-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticle and optical trapping and optical binding of two and three 150-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticles in simulated optical tweezers. We show that surface charge on the colloidal metal nanoparticles plays an important role in their optically driven self-organization. In fact, these simulations provide a more complete understanding of the assembly of different structures of two and three Ag nanoparticles that have been observed experimentally, demonstrating that the ED-LD method will be a very useful tool for understanding the self-organization of optical matter.

  18. Sevoflurane administration initiated out of the ED for life-threatening status asthmaticus.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daniel; Fahimi, Jahan; Hern, H Gene

    2015-08-01

    Status asthmaticus is both a common and dangerous cause of acute dyspnea in the emergency department (ED) setting. Although most cases respond favorably to standard treatment, there are rare cases in which therapy beyond traditional treatment is needed. One of these treatment modalities includes inhalational anesthesia. We present a case in which inhaled sevoflurane was initiated out of the ED for a life-threatening asthma exacerbation refractory to conventional treatment. To our knowledge, this is only the second case to report the use of inhaled anesthetics initiated out of the ED for status asthmaticus and is the first report of its kind to thoroughly detail the respiratory response noted while inhalation anesthesia was being implemented. A brief review of other case reports involving the use of sevoflurane for asthma is included. This case, as well as the others reviewed, illustrates the significant beneficial effect inhaled anesthetics can have on asthma, making this a treatment modality that must be recognized and appreciated by all emergency medicine providers. PMID:25662208

  19. EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1-March 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-01

    This report is the twenty-first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-77ET10069 for EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development Phase V. A detailed comparison of RCLU, CLPP, and ECLP yields has been initiated. This study builds off previous yield modeling results, which found that RCLU, CLPP, and ECLP yields were generally consistent given the scatter of the data, although some differences were noted. These pilot unit yield differences have now been quantified, and operating/configurational differences which account for some of them have been identified. Preliminary yield comparison results after correcting for these known process differences between the pilot plants indicate that: RCLU and CLPP yields are generally consistent; ECLP's conversion is about 5 lb/100 lb DAF coal lower than RCLU/CLPP at comparable operating conditions; and work has been initiated to define the EDS slurry preheater feed system design (based on slurry distributor manifold guidelines and coking correlation predictions, which influence furnace pass control issues such as slurry flow measurement). EDS hydrotreated naphtha showed a low level of systemic toxicity to rats exposed to the vapor six hours per day, five days per week for thirteen weeks.

  20. System-wide flow initiative slashes patient wait times in the ED, boosts volume by 25%.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Emergency department administrators at Cambridge Health Alliance, a three-hospital health care organization in Cambridge, MA, implemented a system-wide flow initiative that has reduced the average length-of-stay for rapid assessment patients from three hours to just over an hour. Under the approach, patients are immediately placed in a room, and providers and registration staff come to the patients rather than the traditional approach of having patients constantly move from place to place with wait times in between each interval of care. The approach relies on "patient partners," non-clinical personnel who are trained in customer service, to greet and quick-register patients who present to the ED for care. Administrators say 97% of patients who present to the ED are in a room within five minutes, and over 90% of them are seen by a provider within 14 minutes. The leave-without-being-seen (LWBS) rate has been slashed from 4.5% to 0.6%. System-wide ED volume, which was dropping before the new approach was implemented, has gone from 77,000 patients per year to nearly 100,000 patients per year.

  1. A new e-learning platform for radiology education (RadEd).

    PubMed

    Xiberta, Pau; Boada, Imma

    2016-04-01

    One of the key elements of e-learning platforms is the content provided to the students. Content creation is a time demanding task that requires teachers to prepare material taking into account that it will be accessed on-line. Moreover, the teacher is restricted by the functionalities provided by the e-learning platforms. In contexts such as radiology where images have a key role, the required functionalities are still more specific and difficult to be provided by these platforms. Our purpose is to create a framework to make teacher's tasks easier, specially when he has to deal with contents where images have a main role. In this paper, we present RadEd, a new web-based teaching framework that integrates a smart editor to create case-based exercises that support image interaction such as changing the window width and the grey scale used to render the image, taking measurements on the image, attaching labels to images and selecting parts of the images, amongst others. It also provides functionalities to prepare courses with different topics, exercises and theory material, and also functionalities to control students' work. Different experts have used RadEd and all of them have considered it a very useful and valuable tool to prepare courses where radiological images are the main component. RadEd provides teachers functionalities to prepare more realistic cases and students the ability to make a more specific diagnosis.

  2. Medicolegal errors in the ED related to the involuntary confinement of psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R R; Pinkofsky, H B; Stevens, L

    1998-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of emergency department (ED) physicians properly and correctly completing documents required for emergency confinement of psychiatric patients, 1,000 Physician Emergency Certificates filed by ED physicians in the Shreveport, Louisiana, region were reviewed for appropriateness and for correctness of completion based on the applicable state law. Of the Physician Emergency Certificates reviewed 4.2% were incomplete or inappropriate. The most significant sources of error involved incomplete documentation of the mental status examination and not documenting the specific reason (dangerous to self, dangerous to others, or gravely disabled) for the patient meeting requirements for involuntary confinement. Other errors included confinement for reasons not appropriate for a psychiatric unit. This study suggests that ED physicians should be more cautious and thorough in completing the documents required for emergency confinement of psychiatric patients, so that the physician is less likely to be sued for malpractice or charged with the false imprisonment of such patients, and the patient's civil liberties are protected.

  3. Mid-term NEAT review: analysing the improvements in hospital ED performance.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sankalp; Boyle, Justin; Good, Norm; Lind, James

    2014-01-01

    Introduced with a promise to reduce overcrowding in the Emergency Department (ED) and the associated morbidity and mortality linked to bed access difficulties, the National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) is now over halfway through transitionary arrangements towards a target of 90% of patients that visit a hospital ED being admitted or discharged within 4 hours. Facilitation and reward funding has ensured hospitals around the country are remodelling workflows to ensure compliance. Recent reports however show that the majority of hospitals are still far from being able to meet this target. We investigate the NEAT journey of 30 Queensland hospitals over the past two years and compare this performance to a previous study that investigated the 4 hour ED discharge performance of these hospitals at various times of day and under varying occupancy conditions. Our findings reveal that, while most hospitals have made significant improvements to their 4 hour discharge performance in 2013, the underlying flow patterns and periods of poor NEAT compliance remain largely unchanged. The work identifies areas for targeted improvement to inform system redesign and workflow planning.

  4. An electrodynamics-Langevin dynamics (ED-LD) approach to simulate metal nanoparticle interactions and motion.

    PubMed

    Sule, N; Rice, S A; Gray, S K; Scherer, N F

    2015-11-16

    Understanding the formation of electrodynamically interacting assemblies of metal nanoparticles requires accurate computational methods for determining the forces and propagating trajectories. However, since computation of electromagnetic forces occurs on attosecond to femtosecond timescales, simulating the motion of colloidal nanoparticles on milliseconds to seconds timescales is a challenging multi-scale computational problem. Here, we present a computational technique for performing accurate simulations of laser-illuminated metal nanoparticles. In the simulation, we self-consistently combine the finite-difference time-domain method for electrodynamics (ED) with Langevin dynamics (LD) for the particle motions. We demonstrate the ED-LD method by calculating the 3D trajectories of a single 100-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticle and optical trapping and optical binding of two and three 150-nm-diameter Ag nanoparticles in simulated optical tweezers. We show that surface charge on the colloidal metal nanoparticles plays an important role in their optically driven self-organization. In fact, these simulations provide a more complete understanding of the assembly of different structures of two and three Ag nanoparticles that have been observed experimentally, demonstrating that the ED-LD method will be a very useful tool for understanding the self-organization of optical matter. PMID:26698479

  5. Higher Ed Meets Public Ed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olenick, Mary Jo

    1996-01-01

    The University of Connecticut is revitalizing the Avery Point campus with two new buildings. A Marine Sciences and Technology Center will serve graduate and undergraduate students. A separate Marine Sciences Field Station/Hostel will house Project Oceanology: a science program for students in grades 5-12. (MLF)

  6. Salicylic acid antagonism of EDS1-driven cell death is important for immune and oxidative stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Straus, Marco R; Rietz, Steffen; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Bartsch, Michael; Parker, Jane E

    2010-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as signals in the responses of plants to stress. Arabidopsis Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1 (EDS1) regulates defense and cell death against biotrophic pathogens and controls cell death propagation in response to chloroplast-derived ROS. Arabidopsis Nudix hydrolase7 (nudt7) mutants are sensitized to photo-oxidative stress and display EDS1-dependent enhanced resistance, salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and initiation of cell death. Here we explored the relationship between EDS1, EDS1-regulated SA and ROS by examining gene expression profiles, photo-oxidative stress and resistance phenotypes of nudt7 mutants in combination with eds1 and the SA-biosynthetic mutant, sid2. We establish that EDS1 controls steps downstream of chloroplast-derived O(2)(*-) that lead to SA-assisted H(2)O(2) accumulation as part of a mechanism limiting cell death. A combination of EDS1-regulated SA-antagonized and SA-promoted processes is necessary for resistance to host-adapted pathogens and for a balanced response to photo-oxidative stress. In contrast to SA, the apoplastic ROS-producing enzyme NADPH oxidase RbohD promotes initiation of cell death during photo-oxidative stress. Thus, chloroplastic O(2)(*-) signals are processed by EDS1 to produce counter-balancing activities of SA and RbohD in the control of cell death. Our data strengthen the idea that EDS1 responds to the status of O(2)(*-) or O(2)(*-)-generated molecules to coordinate cell death and defense outputs. This activity may enable the plant to respond flexibly to different biotic and abiotic stresses in the environment.

  7. SEM/EDS analysis of boron in waste glasses with ultrathin window detector and digital pulse processor

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wolf, S.F.; Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-07-01

    Analysis of boron in waste glasses and in the reaction products that form during the reaction of glass is important for understanding the reaction kinetics and mechanism of glass corrosion. Two borosilicate waste glasses (1.55 and 3.47 wt% B) have been analyzed by SEM/EDS. The 1.55 wt% is the lowest B concentration detected with EDS. However, the B peaks severely overlap with the C peaks due to the carbon films used for conductive layers, but this problem can be solved by subtracting the C peaks, and possibly even lower B content could be detected by EDS with the digital pulse processor.

  8. Characterization of low alloy ferritic steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interface by SPM techniques, SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS and SVET

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Siyan; Ding, Jie; Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jianqiu

    2015-02-15

    The interface region of welded A508–Alloy 52 M is characterized by scanning probe microscope (SPM) techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning vibrate electrode technique (SVET). The regions along the welded A508–Alloy 52 M interface can be categorized into two types according to their different microstructures. In the type-I interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by the fusion boundary, while in the type-II interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by a martensite zone. A508, martensite zone and grain boundaries in Alloy 52 M are ferromagnetic while the Alloy 52 M matrix is paramagnetic. The Volta potentials measured by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) of A508, martensite zone and Alloy 52 M follow the order: V{sub 52} {sub M} > V{sub A508} > V{sub martensite}. The corrosion behavior of A508–Alloy 52 M interface region is galvanic corrosion, in which Alloy 52 M is cathode while A508 is anode. The martensite dissolves faster than Alloy 52 M, but slower than A508 in the test solution. - Highlights: • The A508–Alloy 52 M interface regions can be categorized into two types. • The chromium depleted region is observed along the Alloy 52 M grain boundary. • The Alloy 52 M grain boundaries which are close to the interface are ferromagnetic. • Martensite zone has lower Volta potential but higher corrosion resistance than A508.

  9. Elementary and Secondary Education: Ed-Flex States Vary in Implementation of Waiver Process. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Health, Education, and Human Services Div.

    Under the Education Flexibility Partnership Demonstration Act (Ed-Flex), the state--rather than the federal Department of Education (DOE)--is allowed to make decisions about whether particular school districts should be granted waivers of certain federal requirements. This document explains the Ed-Flex program. To be selected as an Ed-Flex state,…

  10. Bedding, not boarding. Psychiatric patients boarded in hospital EDs create crisis for patient care and hospital finances.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-11-18

    As the supply of psychiatric beds dwindles, hospitals are devising innovative ways handle psych patients who come through the emergency department. Some collaborate with other hospitals, use separate pysch EDs or refer patients to residential treatment centers.

  11. Detection of Soluble ED-A(+) Fibronectin and Evaluation as Novel Serum Biomarker for Cardiac Tissue Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ziffels, Barbara; Ospel, Johanna; Grün, Katja; Neri, Dario; Pfeil, Alexander; Fritzenwanger, Michael; Figulla, Hans R; Jung, Christian; Berndt, Alexander; Franz, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Fibronectin containing the extra domain A (ED-A(+) Fn) was proven to serve as a valuable biomarker for cardiac remodeling. The study was aimed at establishing an ELISA to determine ED-A(+) Fn in serum of heart failure patients. Methods. ED-A(+) Fn was quantified in serum samples from 114 heart failure patients due to ischemic (ICM, n = 44) and dilated (DCM, n = 39) cardiomyopathy as well as hypertensive heart disease (HHD, n = 31) compared to healthy controls (n = 12). Results. In comparison to healthy volunteers, heart failure patients showed significantly increased levels of ED-A(+) Fn (p < 0.001). In particular in ICM patients there were significant associations between ED-A(+) Fn serum levels and clinical parameters, for example, increased levels with rising NYHA class (p = 0.013), a negative correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.026, r: -0.353), a positive correlation with left atrial diameter (p = 0.008, r: 0.431), and a strong positive correlation with systolic pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.002, r: 0.485). In multivariate analysis, ED-A(+) Fn was identified as an independent predictor of an ischemic heart failure etiology. Conclusions. The current study could clearly show that ED-A(+) Fn is a promising biomarker in cardiovascular diseases, especially in heart failure patients due to an ICM. We presented a valid ELISA method, which could be applied for further studies investigating the value of ED-A(+) Fn. PMID:27635109

  12. Double-row loop-coil configuration for EDS maglev suspension, guidance, and electromagnetic guideway directional switching

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M. . Center for Transportation Research)

    1993-11-01

    This paper discusses a new suspension and guidance configuration for a high-speed, electrodynamic suspension (EDS) maglev system. The configuration can also be used to develop an electromagnetic guideway directional switch. The performance of the system Is predicted using the dynamic circuit model. General expressions of the magnetic forces based on the harmonic approximation are obtained. The principle of the electromagnetic guideway directional switch for the EDS maglev system is discussed.

  13. RuleEd, a web-based semantic network interface for constructing and revising computable eligibility rules.

    PubMed

    Olasov, Ben; Sim, Ida

    2006-01-01

    RuleEd is a web-based editing environment which enables clinical trial eligibility rules entered as free text to be represented as a series of terms mapped to unique concepts in a controlled vocabulary. RuleEd provides interfaces for creating and refining concept mappings for terms within rules and disambiguating multiply-mapped terms. A combination of inter-active and non-interactive methods enable authors to specify eligibility rule representations with a fine level of control.

  14. Detection of Soluble ED-A+ Fibronectin and Evaluation as Novel Serum Biomarker for Cardiac Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ospel, Johanna; Neri, Dario; Pfeil, Alexander; Fritzenwanger, Michael; Figulla, Hans R.; Jung, Christian; Berndt, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Fibronectin containing the extra domain A (ED-A+ Fn) was proven to serve as a valuable biomarker for cardiac remodeling. The study was aimed at establishing an ELISA to determine ED-A+ Fn in serum of heart failure patients. Methods. ED-A+ Fn was quantified in serum samples from 114 heart failure patients due to ischemic (ICM, n = 44) and dilated (DCM, n = 39) cardiomyopathy as well as hypertensive heart disease (HHD, n = 31) compared to healthy controls (n = 12). Results. In comparison to healthy volunteers, heart failure patients showed significantly increased levels of ED-A+ Fn (p < 0.001). In particular in ICM patients there were significant associations between ED-A+ Fn serum levels and clinical parameters, for example, increased levels with rising NYHA class (p = 0.013), a negative correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.026, r: −0.353), a positive correlation with left atrial diameter (p = 0.008, r: 0.431), and a strong positive correlation with systolic pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.002, r: 0.485). In multivariate analysis, ED-A+ Fn was identified as an independent predictor of an ischemic heart failure etiology. Conclusions. The current study could clearly show that ED-A+ Fn is a promising biomarker in cardiovascular diseases, especially in heart failure patients due to an ICM. We presented a valid ELISA method, which could be applied for further studies investigating the value of ED-A+ Fn. PMID:27635109

  15. Detection of Soluble ED-A+ Fibronectin and Evaluation as Novel Serum Biomarker for Cardiac Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ospel, Johanna; Neri, Dario; Pfeil, Alexander; Fritzenwanger, Michael; Figulla, Hans R.; Jung, Christian; Berndt, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Fibronectin containing the extra domain A (ED-A+ Fn) was proven to serve as a valuable biomarker for cardiac remodeling. The study was aimed at establishing an ELISA to determine ED-A+ Fn in serum of heart failure patients. Methods. ED-A+ Fn was quantified in serum samples from 114 heart failure patients due to ischemic (ICM, n = 44) and dilated (DCM, n = 39) cardiomyopathy as well as hypertensive heart disease (HHD, n = 31) compared to healthy controls (n = 12). Results. In comparison to healthy volunteers, heart failure patients showed significantly increased levels of ED-A+ Fn (p < 0.001). In particular in ICM patients there were significant associations between ED-A+ Fn serum levels and clinical parameters, for example, increased levels with rising NYHA class (p = 0.013), a negative correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.026, r: −0.353), a positive correlation with left atrial diameter (p = 0.008, r: 0.431), and a strong positive correlation with systolic pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.002, r: 0.485). In multivariate analysis, ED-A+ Fn was identified as an independent predictor of an ischemic heart failure etiology. Conclusions. The current study could clearly show that ED-A+ Fn is a promising biomarker in cardiovascular diseases, especially in heart failure patients due to an ICM. We presented a valid ELISA method, which could be applied for further studies investigating the value of ED-A+ Fn.

  16. Evidence of salicylic acid pathway with EDS1 and PAD4 proteins by molecular dynamics simulation for grape improvement.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Gitanjali; Jaiswal, Sarika; Iquebal, M A; Kumar, Sunil; Kaur, Sukhdeep; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Biotic stress is a major cause of heavy loss in grape productivity. In order to develop biotic stress-resistant grape varieties, the key defense genes along with its pathway have to be deciphered. In angiosperm plants, lipase-like protein phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) is well known to be essential for systemic resistance against biotic stress. PAD4 functions together with its interacting partner protein enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) to promote salicylic acid (SA)-dependent and SA-independent defense pathway. Existence and structure of key protein of systemic resistance EDS1 and PAD4 are not known in grapes. Before SA pathway studies are taken in grape, molecular evidence of EDS1: PAD4 complex is to be established. To establish this, EDS1 protein sequence was retrieved from NCBI and homologous PAD4 protein was generated using Arabidopsis thaliana as template and conserved domains were confirmed. In this study, computational methods were used to model EDS1 and PAD4 and simulated the interactions of EDS1 and PAD4. Since no structural details of the proteins were available, homology modeling was employed to construct three-dimensional structures. Further, molecular dynamic simulations were performed to study the dynamic behavior of the EDS1 and PAD4. The modeled proteins were validated and subjected to molecular docking analysis. Molecular evidence of stable complex of EDS1:PAD4 in grape supporting SA defense pathway in response to biotic stress is reported in this study. If SA defense pathway genes are explored, then markers of genes involved can play pivotal role in grape variety development especially against biotic stress leading to higher productivity.

  17. For success with frequent ED utilizers, take steps to understand patient needs, connect them with appropriate resources.

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    Through its newly created Consistent Care Program, St. Luke's Hospital in Cedar Rapids, IA, has been able to significantly reduce ED utilization among patients who have been identified as having used the ED at least 12 times in the past year. Patients who meet program criteria are automatically identified once per month. A committee of social workers, nurses, and providers then creates care plans for these individuals, so that when they present to the ED, emergency providers will have a consistent road map to follow. In one year, the program has reduced the number ED visits among frequent utilizers by one-third, saving the hospital close to $1 million. Of the original 103 patients who were first identified for the program in January of 2012, only 10 patients still meet the criteria of visiting the ED 12 times in 12 months. Administrators say that key elements of the program are case manager who can interact with the patients and their providers, a mechanism for flagging these patients when they present to the ED, and engaged providers. PMID:23667953

  18. Experts: to crack down on violence in the ED, establish a robust system of reporting, educating staff.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    Researchers say that most ED personnel will experience some form of physical or verbal violence at some point in their careers. However, when such incidents are regularly reported, the patients involved can be flagged in a hospital's computer system, making future events involving the same patients much less likely. Further, when ED personnel are alert to the clues that a patient or family member is becoming agitated, early intervention can usually prevent the situation from escalating to violence. About one-half of all ED personnel will experience a physical assault, and 97%-100% will experience verbal abuse during their careers, according to research. A first step in developing a strategy for dealing with violence is to educate ED personnel about what constitutes workplace violence so that all such incidents can be reported. Experts say many ED workers fail to recognize some instances of violence, based on the intent of the person involved. However, intent should not be a factor, they say. In many cases, empathy and good customer service skills can prevent tense situations from escalating to violence, but experts say that it is important to intervene at the first sign of agitation. ED administrators should gather input from frontline staff on how to most effectively derail instances of violence. PMID:24058947

  19. Intimate partner violence and mental health symptoms in African American female ED patients#

    PubMed Central

    Houry, Debra; Kemball, Robin; Rhodes, Karin V.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2006-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) victims often seek care in the ED, whether for an injury from abuse or other sequelae such as mental health symptoms. Objectives The objective of the study was to assess whether depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidality were associated with physical, sexual, or emotional IPV in African American female ED patients and to determine if experiencing multiple types of abuse was associated with increased mental health symptoms. Methods All eligible African American female patients were approached in the ED waiting room during study periods. Patients participated in the screening process via a computer kiosk. Questions regarding IPV and mental health symptoms were asked using validated tools. Results In this prospective cohort, 569 participated and 36% of those in a relationship in the past year (n = 461) disclosed that there were victims of IPV in the past year. In the past year, 22% experienced recent physical abuse, 9% recent sexual abuse, and 32% recent emotional abuse. A Pearson correlation was conducted and showed that all mental health symptoms were positively correlated with each type of IPV and each type of mental health symptom category. Mental health symptoms increased significantly with amount of abuse: depression (odds ratio [OR], 5.9 for 3 types of abuse), PTSD (OR, 9.4 for 3), and suicidality (OR, 17.5 for 3). Conclusions Emotional, sexual, and physical IPV were significantly associated with mental health symptoms. Each type of abuse was independently associated with depression, suicidality, and PTSD. Experiencing more than 1 type of abuse was also correlated with increased mental health symptoms. PMID:16787803

  20. Effect of carbon source type on intracellular stored polymers during endogenous denitritation (ED) treating landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Miao, Lei; Wang, Shuying; Li, Baikun; Cao, Tianhao; Zhang, Fangzhai; Wang, Zhong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) capable of storing organic compounds as polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) have been used for endogenous denitritation (ED), but the effect of carbon sources type on nitrogen removal performance of GAOs treating landfill leachate is unclear. In this study, a successful ED system treating landfill leachate (COD/NH4(+)-N (C/N): 4) without external carbon source addition was applied. The mature leachate with C/N of 1 was used as the feeding base solution, with acetate, propionate, and glucose examined as the carbon sources, and their effects on yields and compositions of PHA produced by GAOs were determined and associated with nitrogen removal performance. In the case of sole carbon source, acetate was much easier to be stored than propionate and glucose, which led to a higher nitrogen removal efficiency. Glucose had the lowest amount of PHA storage and led to the lowest performance. In the case of composite carbon sources (two scenarios: acetate + propionate; acetate + propionate + glucose), GAOs stored sufficient PHA and exhibited similar nitrogen removal efficiencies. Moreover, type of carbon source influenced the compositions of PHA. The polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) fraction in PHA was far more than polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV) in all tests. PHV was synthesized only when acetate existed in carbon source. The microbial diversity analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum. Among the 108 genera detected in this ED system, the genera responsible for denitritation were Thauera, Paracoccus, Ottowia and Comamonadaceae_unclassified, accounting for 46.21% of total bacteria. Especially, Paracoccus and Comamonadaceae_unclassified transformed the carbon source into PHA for denitritation, and carried out endogenous denitritation. PMID:27232984

  1. Rates and Correlates of Violent Behaviors among Adolescents Treated in an Urban ED

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Goldstein, Abby L.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Zimmerman, Marc; Bingham, C. Raymond; Shope, Jean T.; Stanley, Rachel; Blow, Frederic C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Violence is a leading cause of death for adolescents in inner-city settings. This paper describes violent behaviors in relation to other risk behaviors (e.g., substance use) among adolescents screened in an urban ED. Methods Patients ages 14–18 were approached to self-administer a computerized survey assessing violent behaviors (i.e., physical aggression), substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana), and weapon carriage. Results 1128 adolescents (83.8% participation rate; 45.9% male; 58.0% African-American) were surveyed. In the past year, 75.3% of adolescents reported peer violence, 27.6% reported dating violence, and 23.5% carried a weapon. In the past year, 28.0% drank alcohol, 14.4% binge drank, 5.7% reported alcohol-related fighting, and 36.9% smoked marijuana. Logistic regression analyses predicting violent behaviors were significant. Teens reporting peer violence were more likely to be younger, African-American, on public assistance, carry a weapon, binge drink, and smoke marijuana. Teens reporting dating violence were more likely to be female, African-American, carry a weapon, binge drink, screen positive for alcohol problems, and smoke marijuana. Teens reporting alcohol-related fighting were more likely to carry a weapon, binge drink, screen positive for alcohol problems, and smoke marijuana. Conclusions Adolescents presenting to an urban ED have elevated rates of violent behaviors. Substance use (i.e., binge drinking and smoking marijuana) is an important risk factor for violent behaviors among urban adolescents. Universal screening and intervention protocols to address multiple risk behaviors, including violent behaviors and substance use, may be useful to prevent injury among adolescents presenting to the urban ED. PMID:19541253

  2. Health, ED use, and early identification of young children exposed to trauma

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Yvonne Humenay; Huang, Cindy Y.; Crusto, Cindy A.; Kaufman, Joy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood trauma is an important public health problem with financial, physical health, and mental health repercussions. Emergency Departments are often the first point of contact for many young children affected by emotionally or psychologically traumatic events (e.g., neglect, separation from primary caregiver, maltreatment, witness to domestic violence within the family, natural disasters). Study Objectives Describe the prevalence of physical health symptoms, ED use and health related problems in young children (birth through 5 years) affected by trauma, and to predict whether or not children experiencing trauma are more likely to be affected by health related problems. Methods Community-based, cross-sectional survey of 208 young children. Traumatic events were assessed by the Traumatic Events Screening Inventory – Parent Report Revised. Child health symptoms and health related problems were measured using the Caregiver Information Questionnaire, developed by ORC Macro. Results Seventy-two percent of children had experienced at least one type of traumatic event. Children exposed to trauma were also experiencing recent health related events, including visits to the ED (32.2%) and the doctor (76.9%) for physical health symptoms, and recurring physical health problems (40.4%). Children previously exposed to high levels of trauma (4 or more types of events) were 2.9 times more likely to report having had recently visited the ED for health purposes. Conclusions Preventing recurrent trauma or recognizing early trauma exposure is difficult but essential if long-term negative consequences are to be mitigated or prevented. Within emergency departments, there are missed opportunities for identification and intervention for trauma-exposed children, as well as great potential for expanding primary and secondary prevention of maltreatment-associated illness, injury and mortality. PMID:24565881

  3. SAG101 forms a ternary complex with EDS1 and PAD4 and is required for resistance signaling against turnip crinkle virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shifeng; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Venugopal, Srivathsa C; Lapchyk, Ludmila; Navarre, DuRoy; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2011-11-01

    EDS1, PAD4, and SAG101 are common regulators of plant immunity against many pathogens. EDS1 interacts with both PAD4 and SAG101 but direct interaction between PAD4 and SAG101 has not been detected, leading to the suggestion that the EDS1-PAD4 and EDS1-SAG101 complexes are distinct. We show that EDS1, PAD4, and SAG101 are present in a single complex in planta. While this complex is preferentially nuclear localized, it can be redirected to the cytoplasm in the presence of an extranuclear form of EDS1. PAD4 and SAG101 can in turn, regulate the subcellular localization of EDS1. We also show that the Arabidopsis genome encodes two functionally redundant isoforms of EDS1, either of which can form ternary complexes with PAD4 and SAG101. Simultaneous mutations in both EDS1 isoforms are essential to abrogate resistance (R) protein-mediated defense against turnip crinkle virus (TCV) as well as avrRps4 expressing Pseudomonas syringae. Interestingly, unlike its function as a PAD4 substitute in bacterial resistance, SAG101 is required for R-mediated resistance to TCV, thus implicating a role for the ternary complex in this defense response. However, only EDS1 is required for HRT-mediated HR to TCV, while only PAD4 is required for SA-dependent induction of HRT. Together, these results suggest that EDS1, PAD4 and SAG101 also perform independent functions in HRT-mediated resistance.

  4. ESSEA On-Line Courses and the WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognier, E.

    2001-12-01

    The WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC) is in its second year of offering two Earth Systems Science On-line Graduate courses from IGES - one for High School teachers, and one for Middle School teachers. These high-quality courses support WERC's commitment to "supporting increased scientific and mathematical literacy among our nation's youth through services and other support aimed at enhancing the efforts of those who provide K-12 science and mathematics education." WERC has been able to use its EdGateway online community network to offer these courses to environmental education and science teachers nationwide. Through partnerships with the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE), the National Environmental Education Advancement Project (NEEAP), and other regional, state and local science and environmental education organizations, WERC has a broad reach in connecting with science educators nationwide. WERC manages several state and national listservs, which enable us to reach thousands of educators with information about the courses. EdGateway also provides a private online community in which we offer the courses. WERC partners with two Master Teachers from Utah, who facilitate the courses, and with the Center for Science and Mathematics Education at Weber State University, who provides low-cost graduate credit for the courses. Our students have included classroom teachers from upper elementary through high school, community college science teachers, and environmental science center staff who provide inservice for teachers. Educators from Hawaii to New Jersey have provided diverse personal experiences of Earth Systems Science events, and add richness to the online discussions. Two Earth Science Experts, Dr. Rick Ford from Weber State University, and Dr. Art Sussman from WestEd also contribute to the high caliber of learning the students experience in the courses. (Dr. Sussman's book, Dr. Art's Guide to Planet Earth, is used as one of

  5. White powder triggers lockdown of ED, as fire and police respond.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    When an unauthorized individual walked into the ED at a Tennessee hospital, he placed a bottle of white power in the department and left, which resulted in a lockdown. Prompt action is essential when an unidentified substance is discovered: If the substance is in a package or an envelope, do not open it. It could be harmful to you, your patients, or other staff members. Alert those around you. If possible, remove the container and the substance outside your building. A disruptive lockdown may not be necessary if the above steps have been taken and all decontamination procedures are taking place outside the building. PMID:18198760

  6. Dr. Ray Gause examines student Skylab experiment ED-52 Web Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Ray Gause of the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) places dinner, in the form of a housefly, in the web of Arabella - the prime spider for the ED-52 Web Formation Experiment. Arabella can be delineated near the end of the black pen in Dr. Gause's hand. The experiment is one of 25 student experiments accepted for the Skylab program and will be performed during the Skylab 3 mission. Judy Miles, a 17-year-old high school student from Lexington, Massachusetts, is the student experimenter and Dr. Gause is the NASA student advisor.

  7. "Yes board" facilitates rapid sharing of key data, trims LOS in the ED by 40 minutes.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    A practicing emergency medicine physician who is also a computer engineer has helped Mayo Clinic sites in Rochester, MN, and Phoenix, AZ, develop a web-based ED monitoring system that is responsive to the needs of clinicians. Data suggest that the innovation, called a Yes Board, has sliced LOS by as much as 40 minutes, and it is constantly being tweaked with changes and new functionality. Data flows automatically into the Yes Board from as many as 15 different data systems the hospital is already using. The Yes Board conveys the status of tests and procedures, clinical results, vital sign information, and where patients are in the admissions or discharge process.

  8. Characterization and Analysis of Networked Array of Sensors for Event Detection (CANARY-EDS)

    2011-05-27

    CANARY -EDS provides probabilistic event detection based on analysis of time-series data from water quality or other sensors. CANARY also can compare patterns against a library of previously seen data to indicate that a certain pattern has reoccurred, suppressing what would otherwise be considered an event. CANARY can be configured to analyze previously recorded data from files or databases, or it can be configured to run in real-time mode directory from a database, or throughmore » the US EPA EDDIES software.« less

  9. Research results from the Ashland Exploration, Inc. Ford Motor Company 78 (ed) well, Pike County, Kentucky. Topical report, April 1992-December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, C.W.; Frantz, J.H.; Lancaster, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the Ashland Exploration, Inc. Ford Motor Company 78 (Experimental Development (ED)) Well, in Pike County, KY. The ED well was the third well drilled in a research project conducted by GRI in eastern Kentucky targeting both the Devonian Shales and Berea Sandstone. Both the Shales and Berea were completed and tested in the ED well. The primary objective of the ED well was to apply what was learned from studying the Shalers in COOP 1 (first well drilled) and the Berea in COOP 2 (second well drilled) to both the Shales and the Berea in the ED well. Additionally, the ED well was used to evaluate the impact of different stimulation treatments on Shales production. Research in the ED well brings to a close GRI`s extensive field-based research program in the Appalachian Basin over the last ten years.

  10. Characterization of eds1, a mutation in Arabidopsis suppressing resistance to Peronospora parasitica specified by several different RPP genes.

    PubMed

    Parker, J E; Holub, E B; Frost, L N; Falk, A; Gunn, N D; Daniels, M J

    1996-11-01

    The interaction between Arabidopsis and the biotrophic oomycete Peronospora parasitica (downy mildew) provides an attractive model pathosystem to identify molecular components of the host that are required for genotype-specific recognition of the parasite. These components are the so-called RPP genes (for resistance to P. parasitica). Mutational analysis of the ecotype Wassilewskija (Ws-0) revealed an RPP-nonspecific locus called EDS1 (for enhanced disease susceptibility) that is required for the function of RPP genes on chromosomes 3 (RPP1/RPP14 and RPP10) and 4 (RPP12). Genetic analyses demonstrated that the eds1 mutation is recessive and is not a defective allele of any known RPP gene, mapping to the bottom arm of chromosome 3 (approximately 13 centimorgans below RPP1/RPP14). Phenotypically, the Ws-eds1 mutant seedlings supported heavy sporulation by P. parasitica isolates that are each diagnostic for one of the RPP genes in wild-type Ws-0; none of the isolates is capable of sporulating on wild-type Ws-0. Ws-eds1 seedlings exhibited enhanced susceptibility to some P. parasitica isolates when compared with a compatible wild-type ecotype, Columbia, and the eds1 parental ecotype, Ws-0. This was observed as earlier initiation of sporulation and elevated production of conidiosporangia. Surprisingly, cotyledons of Ws-eds1 also supported low sporulation by five isolates of P. parasitica from Brassica oleracea. These isolates were unable to sporulate on > 100 ecotypes of Arabidopsis, including wild-type Ws-0. An isolate of Albugo candida (white blister) from B. oleracea also sporulated on Ws-eds1, but the mutant exhibited no alteration in phenotype when inoculated with several oomycete isolates from other host species. The bacterial resistance gene RPM1, conferring specific recognition of the avirulence gene avrB from Pseudomonas syringae pv glycinea, was not compromised in Ws-eds1 plants. The mutant also retained full responsiveness to the chemical inducer of systemic

  11. Rapid intake, empowered nursing staff energize no-wait ED model.

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    By empowering front-line staff to come up with some of their own solutions, the ED at Swedish Medical Center in Issaquah, WA, has implemented a no-wait model that eschews traditional triage in favor of a rapid intake process that puts patients in beds immediately and kick-starts the evaluation process. While the approach has proven challenging to implement and maintain, patient satisfaction is greater than 95%. The no-wait model was developed and fine-tuned by the staff at a free-standing ED that preceded the opening of the hospital in Issaquah, WA. Key to the approach is a team-based system that puts all personnel on the same level with no hierarchical structure. In the model, charge nurses are under constant pressure to make sure a room is always available for the next patient, and nursing staff are empowered through protocols and standard order sets to respond to patient needs before physicians complete their assessments. PMID:22545340

  12. GeoEd - A strategy for GeoEducation in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, Britta; Bergner, Andreas; Schneider, Simon; Ellger, Christof

    2014-05-01

    Geosciences are not an obligatory classroom topic in Germany. Furthermore, they are underrepresented compared to other natural sciences curricula, although geosciences are highly applicable to implement interdisciplinary exercises in the classroom. One important strategy to attract future geoscientists in the classroom and share the passion for science is to make geoscience more visible and support and attract teachers for interdisciplinary teaching. To emphasize the wide range of application and the tight linkage among several disciplines, successful geoscience education needs to combine modern educational tools with applied science. The new GeoEd initiative will set up a platform to present (existing and novel) teaching material, provide and convey teacher workshops, and connect teachers, science centers and geo-park centers. Building on existing experiences, GeoEd will partner with museums and universities to develop modern geoscientific applications to attract teachers and high-school students. A first kickoff meeting in Autumn 2013, bringing together representatives from 17 museums, science centers, teacher organizations, and universities, revealed the strong need and support for such a network. The first outcome will be the development of an online searchable database of regionally existing outreach efforts and materials. Simultaneously, further requirements for classroom teaching material will be contented (e.g. prepared lesson plans in combination with hands-on material) and professional teacher's training will be organized. Ultimately, we hope to enlighten teachers and students for the highly interdisciplinary variety of geosciences and provide links to everyday life.

  13. Enforcement of Mask Rule Compliance in Model-Based OPC'ed Layouts during Data Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Dirk H.; Vuletic, Radovan; Seidl, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    Currently available commercial model-based OPC tools do not always generate layouts which are mask rule compliant. Additional processing is required to remove mask rule violations, which are often too numerous for manual patching. Although physical verification tools can be used to remove simple mask rule violations, the results are often unsatisfactory for more complicated geometrical configurations. The subject of this paper is the development and application of a geometrical processing engine that automatically enforces mask rule compliance of the OPC'ed layout. It is designed as an add-on to a physical verification tool. The engine constructs patches, which remove mask rule violations such as notches or width violations. By employing a Mixed Integer Programming (MIP) optimization method, the edges of each patch are placed in a way that avoids secondary violations while modifying the OPC'ed layout as little as possible. A sequence of enforcement steps is applied to the layout to remove all types of mask rule violations. This approach of locally confined minimal layout modifications retains OPC corrections to a maximum amount. This method has been used successfully in production on a variety of DRAM designs for the non-array regions.

  14. Bhaktapur, Nepal: the MAL-ED birth cohort study in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Prakash Sunder; Shrestha, Sanjaya Kumar; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Strand, Tor; Shrestha, Binob; Shrestha, Rita; Chandyo, Ram Krishna; Ulak, Manjeswori; Mason, Carl J

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study site in Nepal is located in the Bhaktapur municipality, 15 km east of Kathmandu, the capital city of Nepal. Bhaktapur, an ancient city famous for its traditional temples and buildings, is included on UNESCO's World Heritage List and is a major tourist attraction in Nepal. Nepal is a land-locked country located in South Asia between China and India with an area of 147 181 km(2), ranging from sea-level plains to Mount Everest, the world's highest peak. The total population as of the 2011 census was 26.6 million, with an average annual population growth rate of 1.4. Nepal is one of the world's least developed countries and is ranked 157 of 186 in the 2013 Human Development Report; one-third of the Nepali population lives below the poverty line. The current under-5 mortality rate is 54 per 1000 live births, the infant mortality rate is 46 per 1000 live births, and the neonatal mortality rate is 33 per 1000 live births. Vaccine coverage for all Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines is >80%. Among children, the most common diseases contributing to significant morbidity and mortality are acute respiratory infection and dehydration from severe diarrhea. In this article, we report on the geographic, demographic, and socioeconomic features of the Bhaktapur MAL-ED site and describe the data that informed our cohort recruitment strategy.

  15. Ab initio structure determination from prion nanocrystals at atomic resolution by MicroED

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Jose; Cascio, Duilio; Collazo, Michael J.; Shi, Dan; Reyes, Francis E.; Gonen, Tamir; Eisenberg, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrons, because of their strong interaction with matter, produce high-resolution diffraction patterns from tiny 3D crystals only a few hundred nanometers thick in a frozen-hydrated state. This discovery offers the prospect of facile structure determination of complex biological macromolecules, which cannot be coaxed to form crystals large enough for conventional crystallography or cannot easily be produced in sufficient quantities. Two potential obstacles stand in the way. The first is a phenomenon known as dynamical scattering, in which multiple scattering events scramble the recorded electron diffraction intensities so that they are no longer informative of the crystallized molecule. The second obstacle is the lack of a proven means of de novo phase determination, as is required if the molecule crystallized is insufficiently similar to one that has been previously determined. We show with four structures of the amyloid core of the Sup35 prion protein that, if the diffraction resolution is high enough, sufficiently accurate phases can be obtained by direct methods with the cryo-EM method microelectron diffraction (MicroED), just as in X-ray diffraction. The success of these four experiments dispels the concern that dynamical scattering is an obstacle to ab initio phasing by MicroED and suggests that structures of novel macromolecules can also be determined by direct methods. PMID:27647903

  16. Quality assurance in transnational higher education: a case study of the tropEd network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Transnational or cross-border higher education has rapidly expanded since the 1980s. Together with that expansion issues on quality assurance came to the forefront. This article aims to identify key issues regarding quality assurance of transnational higher education and discusses the quality assurance of the tropEd Network for International Health in Higher Education in relation to these key issues. Methods Literature review and review of documents. Results From the literature the following key issues regarding transnational quality assurance were identified and explored: comparability of quality assurance frameworks, true collaboration versus erosion of national education sovereignty, accreditation agencies and transparency. The tropEd network developed a transnational quality assurance framework for the network. The network accredits modules through a rigorous process which has been accepted by major stakeholders. This process was a participatory learning process and at the same time the process worked positive for the relations between the institutions. Discussion The development of the quality assurance framework and the process provides a potential example for others. PMID:23537108

  17. Avoided costs associated with cogeneration: a case study of Con Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, R.; Davitian, H.; Martorella, J.

    1980-08-01

    The potential impact of cogeneration in office and apartment buildings in New York City on the Consolidated Edison Company (Con Ed) has been investigated using a method of utility cost and fuel use analysis developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This method computes a utility's long run marginal costs and long run marginal fuel consumption associated with load modifications due to the introduction of on-site energy producing technologies. The principal findings of this study show that Con Ed's long run average cost is more likely to go down than up due to cogeneration in office and apartment building; the utility's avoided costs (i.e., its long run marginal savings) associated with the gross power output of the cogeneration systems are 10.5 cents/KWh for the office building and 6.4 cents/KWh for the apartment buildings; the utility's marginal savings include a component for avoided capacity costs; and there are net savings in the use of oil due to cogeneration (assuming the building used oil for its boilers before it switched and diesel fuel in its cogenerators afterwards).

  18. ESEM-EDS: In vivo characterization of the Ni hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Mattarozzi, Monica; Visioli, Giovanna; Sanangelantoni, Anna Maria; Careri, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) permits to analyze samples in their native-hydrated state, allowing a broad spectrum of biological applications. In this study, ESEM equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) was used as a fast method to analyze tissue morphology and to investigate metal distribution in the Ni hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, an established model to study the adaptation of plants to metalliferous soils. The low vacuum and wet mode operative conditions required the proper choice of experimental parameters both for morphological and compositional characterization of plant tissues. The calibration strategy for semi-quantitative analysis involved the use of Ni fortified agar as standard and signal normalization respect to endogenous carbon, chosen as internal standard. The obtained results are in accordance with present literature, showing a preferential Ni distribution in the epidermal cells respect to near the stomata for leaves and in the cotyledon epidermidis respect to cotyledon parenchyma area for seeds. Thanks to the absence of any time consuming sample treatment steps, ESEM-EDS technique can be proposed as valid strategy for in vivo high-throughput analysis of plant tissues and for a rapid screening and identification of other hyperaccumulator plants in a selected contaminated area. PMID:25984895

  19. Ethanedisulfonate is degraded via sulfoacetaldehyde in Ralstonia sp. strain EDS1.

    PubMed

    Denger, K; Cook, A M

    2001-07-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures (11) yielded three cultures able to utilise ethane-1,2-disulfonate as sole source of carbon and energy in salts medium. Two pure cultures were obtained and we worked with strain EDS1, which was assigned to the genus Ralstonia on the basis of its 16S rDNA sequence and simple taxonomic tests. Strain EDS1 utilised at least seven alkane(di)sulfonates, ethane-1,2-disulfonate, taurine, isethionate, sulfoacetate, sulfoacetaldehyde and propane-1,3-disulfonate, as well as methanesulfonate and formate. Growth with ethanedisulfonate was concomitant with substrate disappearance and the formation of 2 mol sulfate per mol substrate. The growth yield, 7 g protein (mol C)(-1), indicated quantitative utilisation of the substrate. Ethanedisulfonate-dependent oxygen uptake of whole cells during growth rose to a maximum before the end of growth and then sank rapidly; this was interpreted as evidence for an inducible desulfonative oxygenase that was not active in cell extracts. Inducible sulfoacetaldehyde sulfo-lyase was detected at high activity. Inducible degradation of taurine or isethionate or sulfoacetate via sulfoacetaldehyde sulfo-lyase is interpreted from the data.

  20. EDS and μ-XRF mapping of amalgam degradation products in ancient mirrors.

    PubMed

    Arizio, E; Orsega, E F; Falcone, R; Vallotto, M

    2014-12-01

    An amalgam mirror is a mirror type, used from the fifteenth century until the end of the nineteenth century, where the reflective layer is constituted by a tin amalgam layer adhered to a glass sheet. In this work, two amalgam mirrors samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer and by micro-X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping to go deeply into the understanding of the degradation mechanism of the amalgam layer of ancient mirrors. The investigation has been focused for the first time on the reflective surface of the amalgam layer adherent to the glass sheet to better understand the processes of amalgam corrosion. The two amalgam degradation compounds, romarchite and cassiterite, has been spatially differentiated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) maps. SEM images and micro-X-ray fluorescence and EDS maps showed that the amalgam degradation products grow up to form hemispherical stratified calottes. This structure is probably due to a mechanism involves cyclic phases and oxygen radial diffusion from a superficial oxidation nucleus.

  1. Methods of analysis of enteropathogen infection in the MAL-ED Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Platts-Mills, James A; McCormick, Benjamin J J; Kosek, Margaret; Pan, William K; Checkley, William; Houpt, Eric R

    2014-11-01

    Studies of diarrheal etiology in low- and middle-income countries have typically focused on children presenting with severe symptoms to health centers and thus are best equipped to describe the pathogens capable of leading to severe diarrheal disease. The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study was designed to evaluate, via intensive community surveillance, the hypothesis that repeated exposure to enteropathogens has a detrimental effect on growth, vaccine response, and cognitive development, which are the primary outcome measures for this study. In the setting of multiple outcomes of interest, a longitudinal cohort design was chosen. Because many or even the majority of enteric infections are asymptomatic, the collection of asymptomatic surveillance stools was a critical element. However, capturing diarrheal stools additionally allowed for the determination of the principle causes of diarrhea at the community level as well as for a comparison between those enteropathogens associated with diarrhea and those that are associated with poor growth, diminished vaccine response, and impaired cognitive development. Here, we discuss the analytical methods proposed for the MAL-ED study to determine the principal causes of diarrhea at the community level and describe the complex interplay between recurrent exposure to enteropathogens and these critical long-term outcomes.

  2. Assessment of environmental enteropathy in the MAL-ED cohort study: theoretical and analytic framework.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-11-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world.

  3. The use of SEM/EDS analysis to distinguish dental and osseus tissue from other materials.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Ward, Dennis C; Braz, Valéria S; Stewart, John

    2002-09-01

    With increasing frequency, relatively small, fragmentary evidence thought to be osseous or dental tissue of human origin is submitted to the forensic laboratory for DNA analysis with the request for positive identification. Prior to performing DNA analysis, however, it is prudent to first perform a presumptive test or "screen" to determine whether the questioned material may be eliminated from further consideration. When material is shown not to be consistent with bone/teeth, DNA testing is not performed. When such determinations cannot be made from gross morphological features, elemental analysis can be indicative. This presumptive test is made possible by applying scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in conjunction with an X-ray spectral database recently developed by the FBI laboratory. This database includes spectra for many different materials including known examples of bone and tooth from many different contexts and representing the full range of taphonomic conditions. Results of SEM/EDS analysis of evidence can be compared to these standards to determine if they are consistent with bone and/or tooth and, if not, then what the material might represent. Analysis suggests that although the proportions and amounts of calcium and phosphorus are particularly important in differentiating bone and tooth from other materials, other minor differences in spectral profile can also provide significant discrimination. Analysis enables bone and tooth to be successfully distinguished from other materials in most cases. Exceptions appear to be ivory, mineral apatite, and perhaps some types of corals. PMID:12353578

  4. Assessment of Environmental Enteropathy in the MAL-ED Cohort Study: Theoretical and Analytic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L.; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A.; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C.; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world. PMID:25305293

  5. Establishment of the MAL-ED birth cohort study site in Vellore, Southern India.

    PubMed

    John, Sushil M; Thomas, Rahul J; Kaki, Shiny; Sharma, Srujan L; Ramanujam, Karthikeyan; Raghava, Mohan V; Koshy, Beena; Bose, Anuradha; Rose, Anuradha; Rose, Winsley; Ramachandran, Anup; Joseph, A J; Babji, Sudhir; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-11-01

    The Indian Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) site is in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, in south India and is coordinated by the Christian Medical College, Vellore, which has many years of experience in establishing and following cohorts. India is a diverse country, and no single area can be representative with regard to many health and socioeconomic indicators. The site in Vellore is an urban semiorganized settlement or slum. In the study site, the average family size is 5.7, adults who are gainfully employed are mostly unskilled laborers, and 51% of the population uses the field as their toilet facility. Previous studies from Vellore slums have reported stunting in well over a third of children, comparable to national estimates. The infant mortality rate is 38 per 1000 live births, with deaths due mainly to perinatal and infectious causes. Rigorous staff training, monitoring, supervision and refinement of tools have been essential to maintaining the quality of the significantly large quantity of data collected. Establishing a field clinic within the site has minimized inconvenience to participants and researchers and enabled better rapport with the community and better follow-up. These factors contribute to the wealth of information that will be generated from the MAL-ED multisite cohort, which will improve our understanding of enteric infections and its interactions with malnutrition and development of young children.

  6. Analytical survey of restorative resins by SEM/EDS and XRF: databases for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Bush, Mary A; Miller, Raymond G; Norrlander, Ann L; Bush, Peter J

    2008-03-01

    Frequently in forensic cases, unknown substances must be identified. Automated databases can ease the burden of comparison as materials may be compared against many known standards in a relatively short period of time. It has been shown that dental resins can be named according to brand or brand group even in conditions as harsh as cremation. Databases are already in use for many materials, but no such database exists for dental resins. Thus, two databases were generated. One utilized a laboratory-based method, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), in conjunction with the Spectral Library Identification and Classification Explorer (SLICE) software. The other was based on portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The ability to perform database comparison with portable instrumentation can thus be brought directly to the field. Both the SLICE and XRF databases were evaluated by testing unknown resins. EDS is a well-established technique and the SLICE program was demonstrated to be a good tool for unknown resin identification. Portable XRF is a relatively new instrument in this regard and its databases have been constructed mostly for metal alloy comparison and environmental soil testing. However, by creation of a custom spectral library, it was possible to distinguish resin brand and bone and tooth from other substances.

  7. Dental materials as an aid for victim identification: examination of calcined remains by SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Mary A.; Bush, Peter J.

    2010-06-01

    Detection and identification of human remains in situations in which they are calcined, disarticulated, and fragmented may be a challenging task. In such situations the non-biological materials that may be present in the dentition can provide the best evidence available for potential identification. Four human jaw segments were utilized. A known combination of dental resins was placed in each segment, when possible. Other restorations, pre-existing in the cadavers, were retained. The jaw segments were cremated in a commercial cremation oven for 2.5 hrs at 1010C. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) was used to analyze the dentition and fragmented debris. Analysis with SEM/EDS demonstrated the ability to confirm brand of known dental resins placed in each cadaver. In addition, pre-existing materials in each jaw segment were profiled and a likely brand name suggested. It was shown that microscopic fragments of heat-altered materials could be identified and classified, adding another level of certainty in victim identification.

  8. Assessment of environmental enteropathy in the MAL-ED cohort study: theoretical and analytic framework.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-11-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world. PMID:25305293

  9. Modeling environmental influences on child growth in the MAL-ED cohort study: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Richard, Stephanie A; McCormick, Benjamin J J; Miller, Mark A; Caulfield, Laura E; Checkley, William

    2014-11-01

    Although genetics, maternal undernutrition and low birth weight status certainly play a role in child growth, dietary insufficiency and infectious diseases are key risk factors for linear growth faltering during early childhood. A primary goal of the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) study is to identify specific risk factors associated with growth faltering during the first 2 years of life; however, growth in early childhood is challenging to characterize because growth may be inherently nonlinear with age. In this manuscript, we describe some methods for analyzing longitudinal growth to evaluate both short- and long-term associations between risk factors and growth trajectories over the first 2 years of life across 8 resource-limited settings using harmonized protocols. We expect there will be enough variability within and between sites in the prevalence of risk factors and burden of linear growth faltering to allow us to distinguish some of the key pathways to linear growth faltering in the MAL-ED study. PMID:25305295

  10. Methods of analysis of enteropathogen infection in the MAL-ED Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Platts-Mills, James A; McCormick, Benjamin J J; Kosek, Margaret; Pan, William K; Checkley, William; Houpt, Eric R

    2014-11-01

    Studies of diarrheal etiology in low- and middle-income countries have typically focused on children presenting with severe symptoms to health centers and thus are best equipped to describe the pathogens capable of leading to severe diarrheal disease. The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study was designed to evaluate, via intensive community surveillance, the hypothesis that repeated exposure to enteropathogens has a detrimental effect on growth, vaccine response, and cognitive development, which are the primary outcome measures for this study. In the setting of multiple outcomes of interest, a longitudinal cohort design was chosen. Because many or even the majority of enteric infections are asymptomatic, the collection of asymptomatic surveillance stools was a critical element. However, capturing diarrheal stools additionally allowed for the determination of the principle causes of diarrhea at the community level as well as for a comparison between those enteropathogens associated with diarrhea and those that are associated with poor growth, diminished vaccine response, and impaired cognitive development. Here, we discuss the analytical methods proposed for the MAL-ED study to determine the principal causes of diarrhea at the community level and describe the complex interplay between recurrent exposure to enteropathogens and these critical long-term outcomes. PMID:25305292

  11. The role of EDS1 (enhanced disease susceptibility) during singlet oxygen-mediated stress responses of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ochsenbein, Christian; Przybyla, Dominika; Danon, Antoine; Landgraf, Frank; Göbel, Cornelia; Imboden, André; Feussner, Ivo; Apel, Klaus

    2006-08-01

    Upon a dark/light shift the conditional flu mutant of Arabidopsis starts to generate singlet oxygen (1O2) that is restricted to the plastid compartment. Distinct sets of genes are activated that are different from those induced by hydrogen peroxide/superoxide. One of the genes that is rapidly upregulated is EDS1 (enhanced disease susceptibility). The EDS1 protein has been shown to be required for the resistance to biotrophic pathogens and the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) that enhances the defenses of a plant by inducing the synthesis of pathogen-related (PR) proteins. Because of the similarity of its N-terminal portion to the catalytic site of lipases, EDS1 has also been implicated with the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the subsequent formation of various oxylipins. The release of singlet oxygen in the flu mutant triggers a drastic increase in the concentration of free SA and activates the expression of PR1 and PR5 genes. These changes depend on the activity of EDS1 and are suppressed in flu/eds1 double mutants. Soon after the beginning of singlet oxygen production, the synthesis of oxylipins such as jasmonic acid (JA) and 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) also start and plants stop growing and induce a cell-death response. The inactivation of EDS1 does not affect oxylipin synthesis, growth inhibition and the initiation of cell death, but it does allow plants to recover much faster from singlet oxygen-mediated growth inhibition and it also suppresses the spread of necrotic lesions in leaves. Hence, singlet oxygen activates a complex stress-response program with EDS1 playing a key role in initiating and modulating several steps of it. This program includes not only responses to oxidative stress, but also responses known to be activated during plant-pathogen interactions and wounding.

  12. Isolation of Plant Nuclei at Defined Cell Cycle Stages Using EdU Labeling and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wear, Emily E; Concia, Lorenzo; Brooks, Ashley M; Markham, Emily A; Lee, Tae-Jin; Allen, George C; Thompson, William F; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a nucleoside analog of thymidine that can be rapidly incorporated into replicating DNA in vivo and, subsequently, detected by using "click" chemistry to couple its terminal alkyne group to fluorescent azides such as Alexa Fluor 488. Recently, EdU incorporation followed by coupling with a fluorophore has been used to visualize newly synthesized DNA in a wide range of plant species. One particularly useful application is in flow cytometry, where two-parameter sorting can be employed to analyze different phases of the cell cycle, as defined both by total DNA content and the amount of EdU pulse-labeled DNA. This approach allows analysis of the cell cycle without the need for synchronous cell populations, which can be difficult to obtain in many plant systems. The approach presented here, which was developed for fixed, EdU-labeled nuclei, can be used to prepare analytical profiles as well as to make highly purified preparations of G1, S, or G2/M phase nuclei for molecular or biochemical analysis. We present protocols for EdU pulse labeling, tissue fixation and harvesting, nuclei preparation, and flow sorting. Although developed for Arabidopsis suspension cells and maize root tips, these protocols should be modifiable to many other plant systems. PMID:26659955

  13. Data on the utilization of treatment modalities for ED in Taiwan in the era of PDE5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W-K; Jiann, B-P

    2014-01-01

    Oral PDE5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection and penile implants are mainstay treatments for ED. Data on their utilization reflect economic aspects of ED, but are underreported. We report utilization data and user characteristics for these modalities in Taiwan between 1999 and 2011. Sales data on PDE5 inhibitors-sildenafil citrate, tadalafil and vardenafil and on alprostadil were retrieved from International Market Services Health, and on penile implants from the local importing company for them. Users' clinical characteristics were derived from one institution. Between 1999 and 2011, sales of PDE5 inhibitors increased 5.9-fold, whereas those of alprostadil and penile implants remained stable. Over 90% of PDE5 inhibitors were purchased in pharmacies without a prescription. Between 1999 and 2011, the number of patients who received PDE5 inhibitors (n=4715) exceeded those who underwent penile injection (n=333) and penile implantation (n=108). The mean age of patients with ED who first received PDE5 inhibitors tended to decrease over consecutive years. Discontinuation of treatment with PDE5 inhibitors or intracavernosal injection reached 90% within 3 years of treatment initiation. Our data on the increasing market for PDE5 inhibitors and the trend for first use of PDE5 inhibitors at younger ages highlight the growing burden of ED and the acceptance of PDE5 inhibitors as the primary treatment for ED. PMID:24451166

  14. Ethics seminar: the hospice patient in the ED: an ethical approach to understanding barriers and improving care.

    PubMed

    Zieske, Michael; Abbott, Jean

    2011-11-01

    Emergency physicians (EPs) are asked to evaluate and treat a growing population of hospice patients who present to the emergency department (ED) for a number of important reasons. Hospice patients pose unique ethical challenges, and "best practices" for these patients can differ from the life-preserving interventions of usual ED care. Having a solid understanding of professional responsibilities and ethical principles is useful for guiding EP management of these patients. In end-of-life care, EPs need to recognize that there are barriers and complexities to the best management of hospice patients, but they need to commit to strategies that optimize their care. This article describes the case of a hospice patient who presented with sepsis and end-stage cancer to the ED. Patient, system, and physician factors made management decisions in the ED difficult. The goal in the ED should be to determine the best way to address terminally ill patient needs while respecting wishes to limit interventions that will only increase suffering near the end of life.

  15. Isolation of Plant Nuclei at Defined Cell Cycle Stages Using EdU Labeling and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wear, Emily E; Concia, Lorenzo; Brooks, Ashley M; Markham, Emily A; Lee, Tae-Jin; Allen, George C; Thompson, William F; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a nucleoside analog of thymidine that can be rapidly incorporated into replicating DNA in vivo and, subsequently, detected by using "click" chemistry to couple its terminal alkyne group to fluorescent azides such as Alexa Fluor 488. Recently, EdU incorporation followed by coupling with a fluorophore has been used to visualize newly synthesized DNA in a wide range of plant species. One particularly useful application is in flow cytometry, where two-parameter sorting can be employed to analyze different phases of the cell cycle, as defined both by total DNA content and the amount of EdU pulse-labeled DNA. This approach allows analysis of the cell cycle without the need for synchronous cell populations, which can be difficult to obtain in many plant systems. The approach presented here, which was developed for fixed, EdU-labeled nuclei, can be used to prepare analytical profiles as well as to make highly purified preparations of G1, S, or G2/M phase nuclei for molecular or biochemical analysis. We present protocols for EdU pulse labeling, tissue fixation and harvesting, nuclei preparation, and flow sorting. Although developed for Arabidopsis suspension cells and maize root tips, these protocols should be modifiable to many other plant systems.

  16. Liver growth factor induces testicular regeneration in EDS-treated rats and increases protein levels of class B scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Lobo, M V T; Arenas, M I; Huerta, L; Sacristán, S; Pérez-Crespo, M; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Díaz-Gil, J J; Lasunción, M A; Martín-Hidalgo, A

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of liver growth factor (LGF) on the regeneration process of rat testes after chemical castration induced by ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) by analyzing some of the most relevant proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism, such as hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), scavenger receptor SR-BI, and other components of the SR family that could contribute to the recovery of steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. Sixty male rats were randomized to nontreated (controls) and LGF-treated, EDS-treated, and EDS + LGF-treated groups. Testes were obtained on days 10 (T1), 21 (T2), and 35 (T3) after EDS treatment, embedded in paraffin, and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. LGF improved the recovery of the seminiferous epithelia, the appearance of the mature pattern of Leydig cell interstitial distribution, and the expression of mature SR-BI. Moreover, LGF treatment resulted in partial recovery of HSL expression in Leydig cells and spermatogonia. No changes in serum testosterone were observed in control or LGF-treated rats, but in EDS-castrated animals LGF treatment induced a progressive increase in serum testosterone levels and 3β-HSD expression. Based on the pivotal role of SR-BI in the uptake of cholesteryl esters from HDL, it is suggested that the observed effects of LGF would facilitate the provision of cholesterol for sperm cell growth and Leydig cell recovery.

  17. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Prescribing Pattern of Drugs in Patients with ED Visiting an Andrology Specialty Clinic, Mumbai: 2012-14

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Vijay R.; Bhagat, Sagar B.; Beldar, Amit S.; Patel, Sadiq B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common occurrence and its incidence is expected to increase significantly along with the increase in various lifestyle diseases. The drug utilization for ED is very low. Also, studies describing the prescription pattern in ED are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional observational study, including a drug utilization analysis, of 606 prescriptions as per the standard guidelines (WHO and STROBE). Results: Out of 606, 249 (41%) were from the age group of 30-39 years. Addictions were present in 388 (64%). Out of 606, 186 had urological, 154 had cardiovascular and 102 had psychological co-morbid disorders. Out of 348, 201 were prescribed Tadalafil (low dose) on a once daily basis. Out of 172, 121 were prescribed Sildenafil (high dose) on an ‘as and when required’ basis. Nutritional/ herbal supplements were prescribed in 126/606. The ratio of ‘Prescribed Daily Dose’ to ‘Defined Daily Dose’ of Tadalafil, Sildenafil, and Dapoxetine were 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion: Measures for de-addiction play an important role in the overall management of ED. The most common co-morbid disorders were urological, like BPH, LUTS, etc, followed by cardiovascular, psychological and diabetes. Overall, rational pharmacotherapy was observed. Tadalafil was the most commonly prescribed drug for ED. The main factor in the selection of a particular PDE5 inhibitor was its pharmacokinetics and cost. Udenafil, being the costliest, was the least prescribed. Dapoxetine was used in a significant number of individuals primarily for PE with ED. The combination of Papaverine, Chlorpromazine ± Alprostadil was used as intracavernosal injection in patients not responding to oral drugs. PMID:26393163

  18. MARS - CheObs ed. -- A flexible Software Framework for future Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Dorner, D.

    2010-04-01

    In gamma-ray astronomy, a new ground-based project named DWARF (Dedicated multiWavelength Agn Research Facility) is entering the field. It is a Cherenkov telescope project aimed at long-term monitoring of the brightest AGNs in the TeV energy range. One of the former HEGRA telescopes is being refurbished and upgraded with a Geigermode-APD camera. It is planned to be operated as a robotic telescope on the Canary Island of La Palma. Using new technologies, an improvement in sensitivity and an energy threshold of 400GeV are expected. Future plans foresee more small Cherenkov telescopes around the globe enabling for the first time 24 h monitoring in the VHE range. Long-term observations of the brightest AGNs provide the possibility to search for orbital modulation of blazar emission due to super-massive black hole binaries, to study the statistics of flares and their physical origin, and to correlate the data with corresponding data from the neutrino observatory IceCube to search for evidence of hadronic emission processes. For this project, a flexible and user friendly software package is available: Modular Analysis and Reconstruction Software - Cherenkov Observatory edition (MARS - CheObs ed.). The package provides a framework for any event-based analysis. For the application in the Imaging Air Cherenkov Technique, various methods and algorithms are available. Currently, it is being used for the MAGIC telescope. To allow for automatic analysis, MARS - CheObs ed. includes an automation concept which allows not only for automatic processing of the data, but also for automatic production of simulated data. For the DWARF project, a simulation program (ceres) has been developed and included in the software package. Using this, a design study for the technical upgrades of the telescope was performed. The simulation of the showers in the atmosphere is performed using the CORSIKA package. The output of this is fed into the telescope simulation ceres. Proper simulations are

  19. The influence of surface chemistry on GSR particles: using XPS to complement SEM/EDS analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwoeble, A. J.; Strohmeier, Brian R.; Piasecki, John D.

    2010-06-01

    Gunshot residue particles (GSR) were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) to illustrate the size, shape, morphology, and elemental composition normally observed in particulate resulting from a discharged firearm. Determining the presence of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb), and barium (Ba), barring other elemental tags, fused together in a single particle with the correct morphology, is all that is required for the positive identification of GSR. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), however, can reveal more detailed information on surface chemistry than SEM/EDS. XPS is a highly surface-sensitive (<= ~10 nm), non-destructive, analytical technique that provides qualitative information for all elements except hydrogen and helium. Nanometer-scale sampling depth and its ability to provide unique chemical state information make XPS a potential technique for providing important knowledge on the surface chemistry of GSR that complements results obtained from SEM/EDS analysis.

  20. A hybrid ED/RO process for TDS reduction of produced waters

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.P.; Datta, R.; Frank, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Large volumes of produced waters are generated from natural gas production. In the United States the prevailing management practice for produced waters is deep well injection, but this practice is costly. Therefore minimizing the need for deep well injection is desirable. A major treatment issue for produced waters is the reduction of total dissolved solids (TDS), which consist mostly of inorganic salts. A hybrid electrodialysis/reverse-osmosis (ED/RO) treatment process is being developed to concentrate the salts in produced waters and thereby reduce the volume of brine that needs to be managed for disposal. The desalted water can be used beneficially or discharged. In this study, laboratory feasibility experiments were conducted by using produced waters from multiple sites. A novel-membrane configuration approach to prevent fouling and scale formation was developed and demonstrated. Results of laboratory experiments and plans for field demonstration are discussed.

  1. A new species of Tityus (Scorpiones, Buthidae) from El Edén Cave, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Flórez D, Eduardo

    2014-05-16

    A new scorpion species, Tityus (Tityus) grottoedensis sp. nov., is herein described based on male and female specimens collected in El Edén Cave and its vicinities (Tolima department, Colombia). The new species, which becomes the first scorpion described from a Colombian cave, is probably a eutroglophile or subtroglophile element; however, additional studies are needed to determine the degree of association of the species to the cave. Among other features, the new species is characterized by having a relatively thin body, a yellow-to-chestnut coloration, sternites IV to VI with visible lateral longitudinal carinae, and the basal piece of the middle lamella of the pectines dilated in male and female.

  2. New tool aims to standardize handoffs in the ED, boosting safety and preventing communication failures.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    To address identified patient safety risks in the handoff process, a group of emergency providers developed Safer Sign Out, a paper-based template that prompts clinicians to jointly review issues of concern on patients who are being passed from one clinician to another at the end of a shift. Already in practice at 12 hospitals in the Mid-Atlantic region, the approach is now being disseminated nationwide with the help of the non-profit Emergency Medicine Patient Safety Foundation. Advocates of the new tool say very few EDs have a clear, agreed-upon process for how to conduct handoffs. Safer Sign Out seeks to prevent communications failures by putting structure into the handoff process. In addition to prompting incoming and outgoing physicians to discuss each patient being handed off, the approach involves having both physicians round at the bedside of these patients so that patients fully understand when their care is being transitioned to a new provider.

  3. Hospital addresses ED overcrowding, sees treatment times and walkout rates drop.

    PubMed

    2005-11-01

    Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, VA, addressed the new accreditation standard on overcrowding and saw its treatment times drop by about two hours and its walkout rate drop to 2%, despite increases in volume. A Patient Flow Excellence and Accountability Team focused on getting patients upstairs in under one hour, which was achieved through nurse and supervisor buy-in. Monthly staff meetings were added for all shifts. Computers and equipment for trauma and codes were placed closer to where they were needed. The staffing ratio on the acute side was reduced to 1:4 for nurses and 1:12 for physicians. The ED converted to a five-level triage system, and the hospital is experimenting with a triage nurse focused on lower acuity areas and a "virtual bed system" in which patients are seen by a physician/nurse team at triage and start having labs and X-rays done immediately. PMID:16752445

  4. Cogenerator to quit Con Ed by selling kWh to neighbor

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, N.

    1986-02-10

    Selling 125 kilowatts of electricity around the clock to a nearby supermarket will make cogeneration feasible for the Flagship Restaurant in White Plains, NY, allowing it to drop off Consolidated Edison's grid and pay for a necessary backup generator, according to John Prayias, the restaurant's owner. The ambitious $536,000 project, which will be financed conventionally with a commercial bank loan, will eliminate the Flagship's $70,000 electricity costs and the $7240 spent of heating and domestic hot water, Prayias said. By selling the power to the supermarket at 9 cents per kilowatt hour - 3 cents less than Con Ed's rate of 12 cents per kWh - the restaurant will collect $120,000 a year in revenues - just about enough to cover the cost of diesel fuel for the 350-kW system and pay for monitoring and maintenance.

  5. Infant Feeding Practices, Dietary Adequacy, and Micronutrient Status Measures in the MAL-ED Study

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, Laura E.; Bose, Anuradha; Chandyo, Ram Krishna; Nesamvuni, Cebisa; de Moraes, Milena Lima; Turab, Ali; Patil, Crystal; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Ambikapathi, Ramya; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study is to evaluate the roles of repeated enteric infection and poor dietary intakes on the development of malnutrition, poor cognitive development, and diminished immune response. The use of 8 distinct sites for data collection from Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia allow for an examination of these relationships across different environmental contexts. Key to testing study hypotheses is the collection of appropriate data to characterize the dietary intakes and nutritional status of study children from birth through 24 months of age. The focus of the current article is on the collection of data to describe the nature and adequacy of infant feeding, energy and nutrient intakes, and the chosen indicators to capture micronutrient status in children over time. PMID:25305294

  6. ED-based Counseling Sessions Reduce Risky Opioid Use Among Certain Patients.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Investigators at the University of Michigan have shown promising results from an ED-based intervention designed to curb risky opioid use among patients who have reported opioid misuse within the previous three months. The intervention includes a 30-minute counseling session with a therapist who utilizes motivational interviewing techniques to strengthen their desire to move away from opioid use behaviors. The randomized clinical trial included 204 emergency patients, divided between patients receiving printed educational materials and patients receiving printed materials as well as counseling sessions. Researchers followed up with all patients after six months, finding that those who received the counseling intervention demonstrated a substantially higher reduction in behaviors that heighten the risk of an overdose than patients who received only printed materials. Investigators are working now to adapt the counseling intervention so that it can be delivered by more cost-efficient,means, such as via interactive voice response messages or computer. PMID:27439227

  7. Infant feeding practices, dietary adequacy, and micronutrient status measures in the MAL-ED study.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Laura E; Bose, Anuradha; Chandyo, Ram Krishna; Nesamvuni, Cebisa; de Moraes, Milena Lima; Turab, Ali; Patil, Crystal; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Ambikapathi, Ramya; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2014-11-01

    The overall goal of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study is to evaluate the roles of repeated enteric infection and poor dietary intakes on the development of malnutrition, poor cognitive development, and diminished immune response. The use of 8 distinct sites for data collection from Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia allow for an examination of these relationships across different environmental contexts. Key to testing study hypotheses is the collection of appropriate data to characterize the dietary intakes and nutritional status of study children from birth through 24 months of age. The focus of the current article is on the collection of data to describe the nature and adequacy of infant feeding, energy and nutrient intakes, and the chosen indicators to capture micronutrient status in children over time. PMID:25305294

  8. EDs in the Midwest and South activate disaster plans as deadly tornadoes sweep through the region.

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    Hospitals in the Midwest and South activated their disaster plans in early March to deal with a phalanx of powerful tornadoes that leveled several small towns and killed at least two dozen people. Some hospitals had to activate plans for both internal and external disasters as their own facilities were threatened. One small critical-access hospital in West Liberty, KY, sustained significant damage and had to evacuate its patients to another facility. All the hospitals credit their disaster plans and practice drills with helping them to manage the crisis as efficiently as possible. Morgan County ARH Hospital in West Liberty, KY, went for several days without an operational lab or radiology department, but staff kept the ED open for absolute emergencies. Margaret Mary Community Hospital (MMCH) in Batesville, IN, received six tornado victims, but it was prepared for many more. Administrators credit advanced warning of the storms with helping them to prepare effectively, as well as to coordinate their response with other hospitals in the area. As a level 1 trauma center, the University of Louisville Hospital in Louisville, KY, received all the most seriously injured patients in the region, even while the facility itself was under a tornado warning. Staff had to route families away from the glassed-in waiting room to the basement until the tornado warning had passed. At one point during the crisis, there were 90 patients in the hospital's ED even though the department is only equipped with 29 beds. Administrators at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, AL, encouraged colleagues to take advantage of smaller-scale emergencies to activate parts of their disaster plans, and to focus disaster preparation drills on their hospital's top hazard vulnerabilities. PMID:22545338

  9. Bhaktapur, Nepal: the MAL-ED birth cohort study in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Prakash Sunder; Shrestha, Sanjaya Kumar; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Strand, Tor; Shrestha, Binob; Shrestha, Rita; Chandyo, Ram Krishna; Ulak, Manjeswori; Mason, Carl J

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study site in Nepal is located in the Bhaktapur municipality, 15 km east of Kathmandu, the capital city of Nepal. Bhaktapur, an ancient city famous for its traditional temples and buildings, is included on UNESCO's World Heritage List and is a major tourist attraction in Nepal. Nepal is a land-locked country located in South Asia between China and India with an area of 147 181 km(2), ranging from sea-level plains to Mount Everest, the world's highest peak. The total population as of the 2011 census was 26.6 million, with an average annual population growth rate of 1.4. Nepal is one of the world's least developed countries and is ranked 157 of 186 in the 2013 Human Development Report; one-third of the Nepali population lives below the poverty line. The current under-5 mortality rate is 54 per 1000 live births, the infant mortality rate is 46 per 1000 live births, and the neonatal mortality rate is 33 per 1000 live births. Vaccine coverage for all Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines is >80%. Among children, the most common diseases contributing to significant morbidity and mortality are acute respiratory infection and dehydration from severe diarrhea. In this article, we report on the geographic, demographic, and socioeconomic features of the Bhaktapur MAL-ED site and describe the data that informed our cohort recruitment strategy. PMID:25305301

  10. Solvent effect on librational dynamics of spin-labelled haemoglobin by ED- and CW-EPR.

    PubMed

    Scarpelli, Francesco; Bartucci, Rosa; Sportelli, Luigi; Guzzi, Rita

    2011-03-01

    Two-pulse, echo-detected electron paramagnetic resonance (ED-EPR) spectra and continuous-wave EPR (CW-EPR) spectra were used to investigate the solvent effect on the librational motion of human haemoglobin spin-labelled on cysteine β93 with the nitroxide derivative of maleimide, 6-MSL. Protein samples fully hydrated in phosphate buffer solution (PBS), in a 60% v/v glycerol/water mixture and in the lyophilized form were measured at cryogenic temperature in the frozen state. The protein librational motion was characterized by the amplitude-correlation time product, <α²>τ(c), deduced from the ED-EPR spectra. The librational amplitude, <α²>τ(c), was determined independently, from the motionally averaged hyperfine splitting in the CW-EPR spectra, and the librational correlation time, τ(c), was derived from the combination of the pulsed and conventional EPR data. Rapid librational motion of small amplitude was detected in all samples. In each case, the librational dynamics was restricted up to 180 K, beyond which it increased steeply for the hydrated protein in PBS and in the presence of glycerol. In contrast, in the dehydrated protein, the librational dynamics was hindered and less dependent on temperature up to ~240 K. In all samples, <α²> deviated from small values only for T > 200 K, where a rapid increase of <α²> was evident for the hydrated samples, whereas limited temperature variation was shown in the lyophilized samples. The librational correlation time was in the sub-nanosecond regime and weakly dependent on temperature. The results evidence that solvent favours protein dynamics.

  11. ER vs. ED: A Comparison of Televised and Real-Life Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Roberts, Traci; Fine, Michael J.; Dillman Carpentier, Francesca R.; Rice, Kristen R.; Barnato, Amber E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although accurate health-related representations of medical situations on television can be valuable, inaccurate portrayals can engender misinformation. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare socio-demographic and medical characteristics of patients depicted on television vs. actual U.S. Emergency Department (ED) patients. Methods Two independently working coders analyzed all 22 programs in one complete year of the popular emergency room drama ER. Inter-rater reliability was excellent, and all initial coding differences were easily adjudicated. Actual health data were obtained from the National Heath and Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from the same year. We used Pearson’s chi-squared test to compare televised vs. real distribution across key socio-demographic and medical variables. Results Ages at the extremes (e.g., ≤4 and ≥45) were less commonly represented on television compared with reality. Compared with reality, characters on television were less commonly women (31.2% vs. 52.9%), African American (12.7% vs. 20.3%) or Hispanic (7.1% vs. 12.5%). The two most common acuity categories for television were the extreme categories “non-urgent” and “emergent,” whereas the two most common categories for reality were the middle categories “semi-urgent” and “urgent.” Compared with reality, televised visits were most commonly due to injury (63.5% vs. 37.0%), and televised injuries were less commonly work-related (4.2% vs. 14.8%). Conclusions Comparison of represented and actual characteristics of ED patients may be valuable in helping us determine what types of patient misperceptions may exist as well as what types of interventions may be beneficial in correcting that potential misinformation. PMID:22766407

  12. The Significance of Marijuana Use Among Alcohol Using Adolescent ED Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Thomas H.; Spirito, Anthony; Hernández, Lynn; Fairlie, Anne M.; Sindelar-Manning, Holly; Eaton, Cheryl A.; Lewander, William

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine if adolescents presenting to a Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) for an alcohol-related event requiring medical care differ in terms of substance use, behavioral and mental health problems, peer relationships, and parental monitoring, based on their history of marijuana use. Methods Cross-sectional comparison of adolescents 13–17 years old, with evidence of recent alcohol use, 13–17 years old, presenting to a PED based on a self-reported history of marijuana use. Assessment tools included the Adolescent Drinking Inventory, Adolescent Drinking Questionnaire, Young Adult Drinking and Driving Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Behavioral Assessment System for Children, and Peer Substance Use and Tolerance of Substance Use Scale, Results Compared to alcohol only (AO) using adolescents, adolescents who use alcohol and marijuana (AM) have higher rates of smoking (F=23.62) and binge drinking (F=11.56), consume more drinks per sitting (F=9.03), have more externalizing behavior problems (F=12.53), and report both greater peer tolerance of substance use (F=12.99) and lower parental monitoring (F=7.12). Conclusions Adolescents who use both AM report greater substance use and more risk factors for substance abuse than AO using adolescents. Screening for a history of marijuana use may be important when treating adolescents presenting with an alcohol-related event. Alcohol and marijuana co-use may identify a high risk population, which may have important implications for ED clinicians in the ED care of these patients, providing parental guidance, and planning follow-up care. PMID:20078438

  13. EDs in the Midwest and South activate disaster plans as deadly tornadoes sweep through the region.

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    Hospitals in the Midwest and South activated their disaster plans in early March to deal with a phalanx of powerful tornadoes that leveled several small towns and killed at least two dozen people. Some hospitals had to activate plans for both internal and external disasters as their own facilities were threatened. One small critical-access hospital in West Liberty, KY, sustained significant damage and had to evacuate its patients to another facility. All the hospitals credit their disaster plans and practice drills with helping them to manage the crisis as efficiently as possible. Morgan County ARH Hospital in West Liberty, KY, went for several days without an operational lab or radiology department, but staff kept the ED open for absolute emergencies. Margaret Mary Community Hospital (MMCH) in Batesville, IN, received six tornado victims, but it was prepared for many more. Administrators credit advanced warning of the storms with helping them to prepare effectively, as well as to coordinate their response with other hospitals in the area. As a level 1 trauma center, the University of Louisville Hospital in Louisville, KY, received all the most seriously injured patients in the region, even while the facility itself was under a tornado warning. Staff had to route families away from the glassed-in waiting room to the basement until the tornado warning had passed. At one point during the crisis, there were 90 patients in the hospital's ED even though the department is only equipped with 29 beds. Administrators at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, AL, encouraged colleagues to take advantage of smaller-scale emergencies to activate parts of their disaster plans, and to focus disaster preparation drills on their hospital's top hazard vulnerabilities.

  14. GeoEd - Teaching teachers for a better GeoEducation in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Andreas; Bookhagen, Britta; Ellger, Christoff; Schneider, Simon

    2015-04-01

    In Germany, diverse activities have been developed over the last couple of years to make Geosciences more visible and support teachers for interdisciplinary teaching Geosciences in class room. This is important, because Geosciences are not an obligatory classroom topic in Germany and geo-related topics are taught primarily under a social science perspective. To overcome this situation, diverse attempts from educational organizations, industry and administration have been developed to provide adequate hands-on materials for teachers and students in in elementary and secondary school. Parallel, research departments fostered their efforts to provide school materials in the course of newly designed outreach activities. In 2013, a new Germany-wide initiative GeoEd was set up as a platform to (1) link existing teaching materials and (2) provide access to these materials through teacher-focused workshops. For the workshops, GeoEd partners with natural science museums in order to profit from the experience of the museum's teaching professionals. Also, natural science museums provide own materials, which are an additional source of information for the presented geo-scientific topics. After the kickoff in fall 2013, first workshops on Rare Earth Elements have been established and an online searchable database of existing teaching materials was established. Simultaneously, further requirements for classroom teaching material will be contented (e.g. prepared lesson plans in combination with hands-on material) and professional teacher's training will be organized. Ultimately, we hope to enlighten teachers and students for the highly interdisciplinary variety of geosciences and provide links to everyday life.

  15. Detection of metal residues on bone using SEM-EDS--part II: Sharp force injury.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, D; Mazzarelli, D; Porta, D; Rizzi, A; Cattaneo, C

    2012-11-30

    Scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) is extensively seen in the literature for the improvement of the macroscopic analysis of sharp lesions, but very few indications concerning its real potential in the forensic context, particularly in forensic anthropology, are at the moment available. This paper represents a pilot study for the analysis of the behaviour of metallic residues found on bone after sharp force injury. Fourteen lesions were made on human bone (radius), cleaned of all soft tissues, with seven different sharp tools (three metal instruments, three metal saws and a baked-clay knife). Tools and lesions underwent SEM-EDS. From 3 to 18 particles were detected on each lesion, whose diameter was included between 0.5 and 150 μm. In 58% of cases, particle composition was concordant with the instrument used. The results seem to suggest that sharp force injury frequently leaves relatively few residues on bone, particularly in the case of common types of metal. Saws showed slightly more contamination with other residues than knives, which may be explained by the capability of the saw's teeth to retain the residues of previously encountered material. In addition, metal residues related to the tool used to cut the bone were located on the edges/walls of lesions in the case of saw marks, whereas they were more frequently found on the kerf floor in the case of knives/scissors, with the exception of the baked clay knife which when it leaves residues at all, seemed to leave them equally divided between the floor, the edges and the surrounding bone.

  16. Effect of Concentration on Median Effective Dose (ED50) for Motor Block of Intrathecal Plain Bupivacaine in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-quan; Xia, Zhong-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the median effective dose (ED50) for motor block of various concentrations of intrathecally administered plain bupivacaine. Material/Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 64 patients aged ≥70 years, undergoing transurethral, or lower limb surgery with combined spinal and epidural anesthesia in a single hospital were enrolled. The patients were randomized into 3 groups to receive intrathecal 0.75% bupivacaine (Group 1), 0.375% bupivacaine (Group 2) or 0.25% bupivacaine (Group 3). Spinal anesthesia was achieved using injections of up-and-down doses of 0.75%, 0.375%, or 0.25% plain bupivacaine. The first patient in each group received 7.5 mg bupivacaine, and the testing interval was set at 0.75 mg. The efficacy of motor block in both legs was determined using a modified Bromage and a hip motor function scale. The ED50 for motor block was estimated according to the Dixon’s up-and-down method. Results The ED50 for motor block of bupivacaine was 6.10 (95% CI 5.58–6.66) mg in Group 1, 6.04 (95% CI 5.82–6.28) mg in Group 2, and 5.43 (95% CI 5.19–5.67) mg in Group 3. There were significant differences in the ED50 for motor block among the groups (P=0.008). Conclusions The ED50 doses for motor block with 3 bupivacaine concentrations were significantly different in elderly patients; the ED50 dose of 0.75% bupivacaine being significantly higher than that of 0.25% bupivacaine. PMID:26327527

  17. Characterization of an antigenic site that contains a dominant, type-specific neutralization determinant on the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue 2 virus

    SciTech Connect

    Gromowski, Gregory D.; Barrett, Alan D.T.

    2007-09-30

    The surface of the mature dengue virus (DENV) particle consists of 90 envelope (E) protein dimers that mediate both receptor binding and fusion. The E protein ectodomain can be divided into three structural domains designated ED1, ED2, and ED3, of which ED3 contains the critical and dominant virus-specific neutralization sites. In this study the ED3 epitopes recognized by seven, murine, IgG1 DENV-2 type-specific, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were determined using site-directed mutagenesis of a recombinant DENV-2 ED3 (rED3) protein. A total of 41 single amino acid substitutions were introduced into the rED3 at 30 different surface accessible residues. The affinity of each MAb with the mutant rED3s was assessed by indirect ELISA and the results indicate that all seven MAbs recognize overlapping epitopes with residues K305 and P384 critical for binding. These residues are conserved among DENV-2 strains and cluster together on the upper lateral face of ED3. A linear relationship was observed between relative occupancy of ED3 on the virion by MAb and neutralization of the majority of virus infectivity ({approx} 90%) for all seven MAbs. Depending on the MAb, it is predicted that between 10% and 50% relative occupancy of ED3 on the virion is necessary for virus neutralization and for all seven MAbs occupancy levels approaching saturation were required for 100% neutralization of virus infectivity. Overall, the conserved antigenic site recognized by all seven MAbs is likely to be a dominant DENV-2 type-specific, neutralization determinant.

  18. Determination of metal components in marine sediments using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tung, Joanne Wai Ting

    2004-11-01

    A rapid energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometric method for the analysis of metal components of marine sediments has been presented. Calibrations were made using synthetic matrix. The agreement of the results for sediment standard reference materials with reference values is satisfactory. Major advantages of the non-destructive ED-XRF technique over conventional chemical digestion methods include the applicability to analyzing the major oxide components, as well as to trace metals, and the avoidance of hazardous chemicals. The method has been applied to the routine analysis of Hong Kong marine sediment.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana EDS1, a key component of plant immunity, in complex with its signalling partner SAG101.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stephan; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E; Niefind, Karsten

    2011-02-01

    In plants, the nucleocytoplasmic protein EDS1 (Enhanced disease susceptibility1) is an important regulator of innate immunity, coordinating host-cell defence and cell-death programs in response to pathogen attack. Arabidopsis thaliana EDS1 stabilizes and signals together with its partners PAD4 (Phytoalexin deficient4) and SAG101 (Senescence-associated gene101). Characterization of EDS1 molecular configurations in vitro and in vivo points to the formation of structurally and spatially distinct EDS1 homomeric dimers and EDS1 heteromeric complexes with either PAD4 or SAG101 as necessary components of the immune response. EDS1, PAD4 and SAG101 constitute a plant-specific protein family with a unique `EP' (EDS1-PAD4-specific) domain at their C-termini and an N-terminal domain resembling enzymes with an α/β-hydrolase fold. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of a functional EDS1 complex formed by EDS1 and SAG101 from Arabidopsis thaliana are reported. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 101.8, b = 115.9, c = 122.8 Å, and diffracted to 3.5 Å resolution.

  20. Different requirements for EDS1 and NDR1 by disease resistance genes define at least two R gene-mediated signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Aarts, N; Metz, M; Holub, E; Staskawicz, B J; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E

    1998-08-18

    The Arabidopsis genes EDS1 and NDR1 were shown previously by mutational analysis to encode essential components of race-specific disease resistance. Here, we examined the relative requirements for EDS1 and NDR1 by a broad spectrum of Resistance (R) genes present in three Arabidopsis accessions (Columbia, Landsberg-erecta, and Wassilewskija). We show that there is a strong requirement for EDS1 by a subset of R loci (RPP2, RPP4, RPP5, RPP21, and RPS4), conferring resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Peronospora parasitica, and to Pseudomonas bacteria expressing the avirulence gene avrRps4. The requirement for NDR1 by these EDS1-dependent R loci is either weak or not measurable. Conversely, three NDR1-dependent R loci, RPS2, RPM1, and RPS5, operate independently of EDS1. Another RPP locus, RPP8, exhibits no strong exclusive requirement for EDS1 or NDR1 in isolate-specific resistance to P. parasitica, although resistance is compromised weakly by eds1. Similarly, resistance conditioned by two EDS1-dependent RPP genes, RPP4 and RPP5, is impaired partially by ndr1, implicating a degree of pathway cross-talk. Our results provide compelling evidence for the preferential utilization of either signaling component by particular R genes and thus define at least two disease resistance pathways. The data also suggest that strong dependence on EDS1 or NDR1 is governed by R protein structural type rather than pathogen class.

  1. Student Support and Advising in a New Online Ed.D. of Instructional Systems Technology Program: A Design Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exter, Marisa; Korkmaz, Nilufer; Boling, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This design case describes an online Ed.D. in Instructional Systems Technology (IST) launched in 2012. We will focus on a key aspect of the design: program advising and students' relationship with their advisors. While the design was responsive in its earliest stages to organizational constraints, legislative requirements and the known…

  2. ED-based screening programs for hepatitis C (HCV) highlight significant opportunity to identify patients, prevent downstream costs/complications.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest there is a huge opportunity for EDs to identify patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and link them into care before downstream complications lead to higher medical costs and adverse outcomes. Early results from a pilot study at the University of Alabama Medical Center in Birmingham show that at least 12% of the targeted baby boomer population being screened for HCV in the ED is testing positive for HCV, with confirmatory tests showing that about 9% of the screened population is infected with the disease. Both the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and the US Preventive Services Task Force recommend one-time HCV screening for patients who were born between 1945 and 1965. Public health experts say 75% of HCV infections occur in patients born during the baby boomer years, and that roughly half of them are unaware of their HCV status. Researchers at UAB report that so many patients are testing positive for HCV that demand for care can quickly overwhelm the health system if new primary care/specialty resources are not identified. Administrators of ED-based HCV screening programs in both Birmingham and Houston note that EDs with existing screening programs for HIV should have the easiest time implementing HCV screening. They also stress that patients are more accepting of HCV screening, and that the counseling process is easier. PMID:24432549

  3. 78 FR 71591 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program between the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... (74 FR 46774-46781). ED will disclose this information to VA under routine use 14 of the system of... system of records (38VA21) by a notice published in the Federal Register on June 4, 2001 (66 FR 30049... Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at:...

  4. Can Multimedia Make Kids Care about Social Studies? The GlobalEd Problem-Based Learning Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Brown, Scott W.; Hannafin, Robert D.; Boyer, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether using multimedia-based instructional material in a problem-based social studies simulation enhances student learning about world issues, increases interest in social studies, and generates positive attitudes toward the instruction. The GlobalEd Project, a Web-based international negotiation simulation embedded in…

  5. Faults and foibles of quantitative scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2012-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a powerful and flexible elemental analysis method that can identify and quantify elements with atomic numbers > 4 (Be) present as major constituents (where the concentration C > 0.1 mass fraction, or 10 weight percent), minor (0.01<= C <= 0.1) and trace (C < 0.01, with a minimum detectable limit of ~+/- 0.0005 - 0.001 under routine measurement conditions, a level which is analyte and matrix dependent ). SEM/EDS can select specimen volumes with linear dimensions from ~ 500 nm to 5 μm depending on composition (masses ranging from ~ 10 pg to 100 pg) and can provide compositional maps that depict lateral elemental distributions. Despite the maturity of SEM/EDS, which has a history of more than 40 years, and the sophistication of modern analytical software, the method is vulnerable to serious shortcomings that can lead to incorrect elemental identifications and quantification errors that significantly exceed reasonable expectations. This paper will describe shortcomings in peak identification procedures, limitations on the accuracy of quantitative analysis due to specimen topography or failures in physical models for matrix corrections, and quantitative artifacts encountered in xray elemental mapping. Effective solutions to these problems are based on understanding the causes and then establishing appropriate measurement science protocols. NIST DTSA II and Lispix are open source analytical software available free at www.nist.gov that can aid the analyst in overcoming significant limitations to SEM/EDS.

  6. EdMedia 2012: World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications. Proceedings (Denver, Colorado, June 26-29, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiel, Tel, Ed.; Wilson, Brent, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) is an international, non-profit educational organization. The Association's purpose is to advance the knowledge, theory, and quality of teaching and learning at all levels with information technology. "EdMedia 2012: World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and…

  7. TPACK Development in Teacher Education: A Longitudinal Study of Preservice Teachers in a Secondary M.A.Ed. Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Mark; Grandgenett, Neal

    2012-01-01

    How does preservice teachers' knowledge for technology integration develop during their teacher preparation program? Which areas of their knowledge develop most naturally, and which areas require more scaffolding? In this mixed-methods, descriptive study of preservice teachers enrolled in an 11-month M.A.Ed. program, we sought to trace the…

  8. ChemEd Bridges: Building Bridges between Two-Year College Chemistry Faculty and the National Chemical Education Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Harry; Brown, David R.

    2010-01-01

    ChemEd Bridges is an NSF-funded project that provides career and professional development opportunities for chemistry faculty members who teach at two-year colleges (2YCs). We broaden the interests and the horizons of these faculty members by building bridges between them and the broader community of chemical educators. In particular, we have…

  9. Test Review: Naglieri, J. A., Das, J. P., & Goldstein, S. (2014). Cognitive Assessment System-Second Edition (2nd Ed.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The Cognitive Assessment System-Second Edition (CAS2) is an individually administered measure of cognitive ability designed for children and adolescents ages 5 through 18 years. The measure, authored by Jack A. Naglieri, J. P. Das, and Sam Goldstein, was published by Pro-Ed in 2014 and is the first revision of the Cognitive Assessment System (CAS;…

  10. The GlobalEd Project: Gender Differences in a Problem-Based Learning Environment of International Negotiations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott W.; Boyer, Mark A.; Mayall, Hayley J.; Johnson, Paula R.; Meng, Lin; Butler, Michael J.; Weir, Kimberly; Florea, Natalie; Hernandez, Magnolia; Reis, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Describes the GlobalEd project, which employs a technology-rich environment for high school students to participate in a simulation of international relations and negotiation via the Internet. Reports participants' changes in academic and technology self-efficacy skills and the use of educational technology and discusses results in terms of…

  11. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT OXFORD ED2000 XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oxford ED2000 x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field portion of the demonstration was conducted in January 2005 at the Kennedy Athletic, Recr...

  12. Treatment expectations of men with ED and their female partners: an exploratory qualitative study based on grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Henninger, S; Höhn, C; Leiber, C; Berner, M M

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) can impair the quality of life and the relationship. An early treatment is necessary to avoid the development of comorbid complaints. To arise the help-seeking behavior and to improve the treatment of affected men, it is necessary to be aware of the treatment expectations. The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment expectations of men with ED and their female partners. This is an explorative qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews with 12 men with ED and their female partners. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed and analyzed on the basis of the grounded theory. We could identify various treatment expectations, which could be differentiated into expectations according to the conditions (for example, low costs and an early access), the handling of the practitioner (for example, showing interest and taking the patient seriously or incorporate the female partner), the treatment itself (for example, clearing the causes and helpful medication) and the treatment outcome (for example, having no ED and more sexual desire). Considering the identified expectations could increase treatment motivation and compliance. We derive five theses from our data, how to implement our findings.

  13. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  14. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  15. The Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Administration: The Students' and Alumni's Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Edith B.

    2012-01-01

    The doctoral experience unfolds many complexities and challenges for students, faculty, and institutions that contribute toward degree completion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the students' and alumni's experiences afforded by the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Administration at the University of Texas at El Paso…

  16. 48 CFR 3452.232-70 - Prohibition against the use of ED funds to influence legislation or appropriations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibition against the use of ED funds to influence legislation or appropriations. 3452.232-70 Section 3452.232-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ACQUISITION REGULATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts...

  17. 48 CFR 3432.770 - Prohibition against the use of ED funds to influence legislation or appropriations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibition against the use of ED funds to influence legislation or appropriations. 3432.770 Section 3432.770 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Funding...

  18. Comparison of Selected Requirements for the Ph.D. and Ed.D. in Adult Education in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Barbara J.; Carl, Linda

    A survey was conducted for the Graduate Student Section of the Adult Education Association to determine the differences in requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degrees in adult education. Of forty-three institutions identified as offering both degrees, forty participated in answering the…

  19. The Common Core State Standards and the Role of Instructional Materials: A Case Study on EdReports.org

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review research studies investigating the role of instructional materials in relation to the Common Core State Standards and to evaluate whether a new organisation, EdReports.org, founded to evaluate the alignment of instructional materials to the Common Core State Standards, has achieved its objectives. Content…

  20. Relevance of Item Analysis in Standardizing an Achievement Test in Teaching of Physical Science in B.Ed Syllabus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marie, S. Maria Josephine Arokia; Edannur, Sreekala

    2015-01-01

    This paper focused on the analysis of test items constructed in the paper of teaching Physical Science for B.Ed. class. It involved the analysis of difficulty level and discrimination power of each test item. Item analysis allows selecting or omitting items from the test, but more importantly item analysis is a tool to help the item writer improve…

  1. A Study on Attitude and Opinion towards Using Computer Technology in Teaching among B.Ed. Trainees in Tiruchirappalli District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, C. Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to find out whether there was a significant difference in the attitude and opinion towards using Computer Technology in teaching among B.Ed., trainees in terms of select independent variables. Normative survey was the technique employed. Opinion towards Computer Usage and Attitude towards Computer Technology inventory…

  2. Review of "Promising Start: An Empirical Analysis of How EdChoice Vouchers Affect Ohio Public Schools"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubienski, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A Friedman Foundation report attempts to find empirical support for the contention that competition from private schools, through voucher programs, improves the effectiveness of public schools. In the first year of Ohio's new EdChoice voucher program, the report claims to have found substantial academic gains at public schools exposed to the…

  3. What Does It Mean to Be Student Centered? An Institutional Case Study of edTPA Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayne, Harriet; Qian, Gaoyin

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal case study investigated how one School of Education (SOE), situated in an urban, commuter, public university, responded to the New York State mandate to require the edTPA for initial teacher certification. In order to engage faculty in the work of program redesign, SOE administrators employed a covert leadership approach. Based…

  4. A natural driven membrane process for brackish and wastewater treatment: photovoltaic powered ED and FO hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Pinoy, Luc; Meesschaert, Boudewijn; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2013-09-17

    In isolated locations, remote areas, or islands, potable water is precious because of the lack of drinking water treatment facilities and energy supply. Thus, a robust and reliable water treatment system based on natural energy is needed to reuse wastewater or to desalinate groundwater/seawater for provision of drinking water. In this work, a hybrid membrane system combining electrodialysis (ED) and forward osmosis (FO), driven by renewable energy (solar energy), denoted as EDFORD (ED-FO Renewable energy Desalination), is proposed to produce high-quality water (potable) from secondary wastewater effluent or brackish water. In this hybrid membrane system, feedwater (secondary wastewater effluent or synthetic brackish water) was drawn to the FO draw solution while the organic and inorganic substances (ions, compounds, colloids and particles) were rejected. The diluted draw solution was then pumped to the solar energy driven ED. In the ED unit, the diluted draw solution was desalted and high-quality water was produced; the concentrate was recycled to the FO unit and reused as the draw solution. Results show that the water produced from this system contains a low concentration of total organic carbon (TOC), carbonate, and cations derived from the feedwater; had a low conductivity; and meets potable water standards. The water production cost considering the investment for membranes and solar panel is 3.32 to 4.92 EUR m(-3) (for 300 days of production per year) for a small size potable water production system.

  5. Test Reviews: Reynolds, C., & Voress, J. K. (2007). "Test of Memory and Learning: Second Edition." Austin, TX: PRO-ED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Ara J.; Decker, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the Test of Memory and Learning: Second Edition (TOMAL-2), published by PRO-ED, which constitutes a recent revision of the Test of Memory and Learning (TOMAL; Reynolds & Bigler, 1994). Advertised as the "single most comprehensive memory battery available for the entire age range of 5 years through 59 years of age", the TOMAL-2…

  6. Students' Interest in Social Studies and Negotiation Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis of the GlobalEd Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yukhymenko, Mariya

    2011-01-01

    The current meta-analysis study summarizes the effects of the GlobalEd Project, a web-based educational intervention of international negotiations embedded within social studies curricula, on middle and high school students' interest in social studies and negotiation self efficacy. Meta-analytic evidence supports statistically significant…

  7. Treatment expectations of men with ED and their female partners: an exploratory qualitative study based on grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Henninger, S; Höhn, C; Leiber, C; Berner, M M

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) can impair the quality of life and the relationship. An early treatment is necessary to avoid the development of comorbid complaints. To arise the help-seeking behavior and to improve the treatment of affected men, it is necessary to be aware of the treatment expectations. The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment expectations of men with ED and their female partners. This is an explorative qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews with 12 men with ED and their female partners. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed and analyzed on the basis of the grounded theory. We could identify various treatment expectations, which could be differentiated into expectations according to the conditions (for example, low costs and an early access), the handling of the practitioner (for example, showing interest and taking the patient seriously or incorporate the female partner), the treatment itself (for example, clearing the causes and helpful medication) and the treatment outcome (for example, having no ED and more sexual desire). Considering the identified expectations could increase treatment motivation and compliance. We derive five theses from our data, how to implement our findings. PMID:26063159

  8. A natural driven membrane process for brackish and wastewater treatment: photovoltaic powered ED and FO hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Pinoy, Luc; Meesschaert, Boudewijn; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2013-09-17

    In isolated locations, remote areas, or islands, potable water is precious because of the lack of drinking water treatment facilities and energy supply. Thus, a robust and reliable water treatment system based on natural energy is needed to reuse wastewater or to desalinate groundwater/seawater for provision of drinking water. In this work, a hybrid membrane system combining electrodialysis (ED) and forward osmosis (FO), driven by renewable energy (solar energy), denoted as EDFORD (ED-FO Renewable energy Desalination), is proposed to produce high-quality water (potable) from secondary wastewater effluent or brackish water. In this hybrid membrane system, feedwater (secondary wastewater effluent or synthetic brackish water) was drawn to the FO draw solution while the organic and inorganic substances (ions, compounds, colloids and particles) were rejected. The diluted draw solution was then pumped to the solar energy driven ED. In the ED unit, the diluted draw solution was desalted and high-quality water was produced; the concentrate was recycled to the FO unit and reused as the draw solution. Results show that the water produced from this system contains a low concentration of total organic carbon (TOC), carbonate, and cations derived from the feedwater; had a low conductivity; and meets potable water standards. The water production cost considering the investment for membranes and solar panel is 3.32 to 4.92 EUR m(-3) (for 300 days of production per year) for a small size potable water production system. PMID:23957893

  9. 20 CFR 641.360 - How does the State Plan relate to the equitable distribution (ED) report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... equitable distribution (ED) report? 641.360 Section 641.360 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM The State Senior Employment Services Coordination Plan § 641.360 How does the State Plan relate to...

  10. 78 FR 54875 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Education (ED) and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Education (ED) and the Social Security Administration (SSA) AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988, the Computer Matching and Privacy...

  11. Brief Report: Data on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (5th Ed.) in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coolican, Jamesie; Bryson, Susan E.; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2008-01-01

    The Fifth Edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (SB5; Roid, G. H. (2003). "Stanford Binet intelligence scales" (5th ed.). Itasca, IL: Riverside Publishing) is relatively new, with minimal published research on general populations and none with special populations. The present study provides information on the cognitive profiles of…

  12. EdGCM: Research Tools for Training the Climate Change Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Zhou, J.; Sieber, R.

    2011-12-01

    Climate scientists employ complex computer simulations of the Earth's physical systems to prepare climate change forecasts, study the physical mechanisms of climate, and to test scientific hypotheses and computer parameterizations. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 4th Assessment Report (2007) demonstrates unequivocally that policy makers rely heavily on such Global Climate Models (GCMs) to assess the impacts of potential economic and emissions scenarios. However, true climate modeling capabilities are not disseminated to the majority of world governments or U.S. researchers - let alone to the educators who will be training the students who are about to be presented with a world full of climate change stakeholders. The goal is not entirely quixotic; in fact, by the mid-1990's prominent climate scientists were predicting with certainty that schools and politicians would "soon" be running GCMs on laptops [Randall, 1996]. For a variety of reasons this goal was never achieved (nor even really attempted). However, around the same time NASA and the National Science Foundation supported a small pilot project at Columbia University to show the potential of putting sophisticated computer climate models - not just "demos" or "toy models" - into the hands of non-specialists. The Educational Global Climate Modeling Project (EdGCM) gave users access to a real global climate model and provided them with the opportunity to experience the details of climate model setup, model operation, post-processing and scientific visualization. EdGCM was designed for use in both research and education - it is a full-blown research GCM, but the ultimate goal is to develop a capability to embed these crucial technologies across disciplines, networks, platforms, and even across academia and industry. With this capability in place we can begin training the skilled workforce that is necessary to deal with the multitude of climate impacts that will occur over the coming decades. To

  13. Comparing CLM and CLM-ED as a basis for representing carbon cycling dynamics in a Central Amazonian forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, R. G.; Holm, J. A.; Koven, C. D.; Riley, W. J.; Chambers, J. Q.; Fisher, R.; Muszala, S.; Higuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Old-growth tropical forests are responsible for a potentially large portion of the terrestrial carbon sink, although the underlying control mechanisms of that sink, has large uncertainties. The quantification of the tropical forest carbon sink is a grand challenge of measurement scale. Therefore, there is a strong emphasis on incorporating improved vegetation structure and compositional representativeness in land-surface modeling. Vegetation demography, plant competition, mechanistic mortality, disturbance cycling, and plant functional traits strongly control carbon dynamics and energy budgets of the Earth's surface. Size and age structured scaling processes have not been represented in the widely used Community Land Model (CLM) until the recent inclusion of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model into CLM 4.5, i.e., CLM-ED. The goal of this study was to compare how CLM-ED captured tropical carbon cycling dynamics compared to CLM and 16 years of field measurements from a central Amazonian forest. We evaluated critical carbon flux processes (Mg C ha-1 yr-1) such as net ecosystem exchange (NEE), net primary production (NPP), and autotrophic respiration (AR), and additional representations of growth and maintenance in CLM and CLM-ED. For a central Amazonian forest CLM estimated GPP from 2000-2012, with transient CO2 concentrations, to be 31.5 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 and was similar to field measurements, while initial evaluation of the newly developed CLM-ED estimated GPP to be substantially higher. The introduction of the size and age structure of ED to the CLM framework enables a finer granularity of state information in the canopy and new ways to represent canopy physics. Therefore alternative physics processes were compared, including those that are highly resolved at the cohort scale (i.e. plant groups) to those at the highly parameterized community scale (i.e. the plant canopy as a whole). CLM serves as the land-model component for nearly 40% of the Earth System Models

  14. Identification of tobacco smoke components in indoor breathable particles by SEM-EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slezakova, K.; Pires, J. C. M.; Martins, F. G.; Pereira, M. C.; Alvim-Ferraz, M. C.

    2011-02-01

    Tobacco smoke is one of the greatest sources of indoor particles, which has been linked with serious health effects. Consequently, there has been a widespread interest in analysing tobacco related indoor particulate matter (PM). Nevertheless, the majority of performed studies focused on bulk chemical composition of tobacco related PM, but the knowledge of individual tobacco smoke particles is still limited. Therefore, more information on PM should be provided, namely concerning morphological and chemical characterisation of individual particles. Aiming to further understand the impact of tobacco smoke on human health, this work studied the influence of tobacco smoke on chemical and morphological characteristics of PM 10 and PM 2.5, collected at one site influenced by smoking and at one reference (non-smoking) site. Chemical and morphological characteristics of 4000 individual particles were determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with X-ray microanalysis (by Energy Dispersive Spectrometer - EDS). Cluster analysis (CA) was used to classify different particle groups that occurred in PM, aiming the identification of the respective emission sources. The results showed that tobacco smoke influenced the characteristics of both fine and coarse particles, this influence being stronger for fine fraction. The abundance of particles associated with tobacco smoke was 27% and 5% for PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10, respectively; as expected, those particles were not identified in PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 of the reference (non-smoking) site. The results showed that at both sites PM was also influenced by outdoor sources. For PM 2.5-10, outdoor particles essentially originated from natural sources accounting for 35% and 15% at the smoking and reference sites, respectively. For PM 2.5, outdoor particles account for 38% and 29% at the smoking and reference sites, respectively; these particles showed considerable contribution (13% and 17%) from anthropogenic sources (mainly from

  15. An Evidence-Based Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Curriculum for Emergency Department (ED) Providers Improves Skills and Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Emergency Departments (EDs) offer an opportunity to improve the care of patients with at-risk and dependent drinking by teaching staff to screen, perform brief intervention and refer to treatment (SBIRT). We describe here the implementation at 14 Academic EDs of a structured SBIRT curriculum to determine if this learning experience…

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify nonprofit organizations that surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health... May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)...

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify nonprofit organizations that surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health... May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)...

  18. Free and Reduced-Price Lunch Eligibility Data in Ed"Facts": A White Paper on Current Status and Potential Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Lee

    2012-01-01

    ED"Facts" is an initiative of the U. S. Department of Education to base education policy on reliable performance data provided by state education agencies. Among its many data items, ED"Facts" houses school-level counts of students disaggregated by state-defined student economic status, typically free and reduced-price lunch…

  19. “Pressured to prescribe” The impact of economic and regulatory factors on South-Eastern ED physicians when managing the drug seeking patient

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sharon; Johnson, Giffe T.; Harbison, Raymond D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to elicit the opinions of Emergency Department (ED) physicians, currently practicing in the United States, regarding the impact of economic and regulatory factors on their management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study, utilizing a convenience sample of ED physicians located in Florida and Georgia was conducted for a period of 2 months. The inclusion criteria specified that any ED physician, currently practicing within the United States, could participate. Results: Of the ED physicians surveyed (n = 141), 71% reported a perceived pressure to prescribe opioid analgesics to avoid administrative and regulatory criticism and 98% related patient satisfaction scores as being too highly emphasized by reimbursement entities as a means of evaluating their patient management. Rising patient volumes and changes in the healthcare climate were cited by ED physicians as impacting their management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. Conclusions: The ED physician faces unique challenges in changing healthcare and economic climates. Requirements to address pain as the “fifth vital sign,” patient satisfaction based reimbursement metrics and an economically driven rise in ED patient volume, may have inadvertently created an environment conducive to exploitation by prescription opioid abusers. There is an identified need for the development of continuing medical education and standardized regulatory and legislative protocols to assist ED physicians in the appropriate management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. PMID:27162437

  20. Preservice Teachers' Adaptations to Tensions Associated with the edTPA during Its Early Implementation in New York and Washington States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuwissen, Kevin W.; Choppin, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The edTPA is a teaching performance assessment (TPA) that the states of New York and Washington implemented as a licensure requirement in 2013. While TPAs are not new modes of assessment, New York and Washington are the first states to use the edTPA specifically as a compulsory, high-stakes policy lever in an effort to strengthen the quality and…

  1. Assessment of silicone gel breast implant biodurability by NMR and EDS techniques.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R B; Eldred, D E; Kim, G; Curtis, J M; Brandon, H J; Klykken, P C

    2008-06-01

    In a study using explanted gel breast implants and appropriate nonimplanted controls, we examined silicone biodurability after long-term implantation. Using NMR spectroscopy, as well as NMR relaxometry measurements (T(2)), no evidence of hydrolysis or other chemical degradation of the cross-linked silicone matrix was observed in specimens from an early breast implant model (Cronin) explanted after 32 years in vivo or a more recent Silastic II model after 13 years in vivo. In addition, no appreciable differences were seen in T(2) relaxation times comparing explanted breast implants to suitably-matched nonimplanted controls, further underscoring the biostability of the cross-linked silicone shell and gel. Our T(2) data and resultant interpretations differ from a 2004 report by the NMR lab at the University of Münster, highlighting the importance of suitable nonimplanted controls and sample preparation. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was also performed, confirming the persistence of a fluorosilicone layer inside the elastomer shells of Silastic II implants.

  2. EDs credit drills, community engagement with helping them manage casualties from tornado crises.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Emergency department leaders at DCH Regional Medical Center in Tuscaloosa, AL, and Cullman Regional Medical Center in Cullman, AL, credit their regular practice drills with helping them deal with unprecedented demand when deadly tornadoes swept through the South this past April. Both facilities used the hospital instant command structure (HICS) to mobilize the resources needed to care for the surge in patients, and say the approach worked well in helping them meet the needs of their communities. However, the crises also showcased opportunities for improvement. The ED at DCH Regional Medical Center saw more than 600 patients on the day of the storm, a three-fold increase in the hospital's typical volume. CRMC treated 99 patients in the seven hours immediately following the storm when it usually treats 114 patients per day. In addition to a big surge in patients, both hospitals dealt with power outages that limited access to some services such as radiology. Triage proved particularly challenging at DCH Regional Medical Center, as patients flowed into the hospital from numerous access points. The hospital plans to assign coordinators to each area of the hospital to better manage the influx in the future. When reviewing emergency operations plans, Joint Commission reviewers often find deficiencies in hazard vulnerability analyses as well as the processes used to determine the emergency credentials of licensed independent practitioners. PMID:21749003

  3. FORESEE: Fully Outsourced secuRe gEnome Study basEd on homomorphic Encryption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing availability of genome data motivates massive research studies in personalized treatment and precision medicine. Public cloud services provide a flexible way to mitigate the storage and computation burden in conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, data privacy has been widely concerned when sharing the sensitive information in a cloud environment. Methods We presented a novel framework (FORESEE: Fully Outsourced secuRe gEnome Study basEd on homomorphic Encryption) to fully outsource GWAS (i.e., chi-square statistic computation) using homomorphic encryption. The proposed framework enables secure divisions over encrypted data. We introduced two division protocols (i.e., secure errorless division and secure approximation division) with a trade-off between complexity and accuracy in computing chi-square statistics. Results The proposed framework was evaluated for the task of chi-square statistic computation with two case-control datasets from the 2015 iDASH genome privacy protection challenge. Experimental results show that the performance of FORESEE can be significantly improved through algorithmic optimization and parallel computation. Remarkably, the secure approximation division provides significant performance gain, but without missing any significance SNPs in the chi-square association test using the aforementioned datasets. Conclusions Unlike many existing HME based studies, in which final results need to be computed by the data owner due to the lack of the secure division operation, the proposed FORESEE framework support complete outsourcing to the cloud and output the final encrypted chi-square statistics. PMID:26733391

  4. AB003. Erectile dysfunction (ED) after radical prostatectomy: mile stones in development of rehabilitation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Run; Crigler, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    Radical Prostatectomy is a commonly used treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. The nerve-sparing technique was one of the major break-troughs in the last century with the hope to preserve erectile function. Unfortunately, despite the perfection of nerve-sparing surgery with robot, many men still suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED) as a complication of prostatectomy. In the last two decades, the concept of penile rehabilitation was introduced and many therapeutic approaches have been studied with the aim to promote erectile function recovery. Despite the understanding of the mechanisms and well-established rationale for post-prostatectomy penile rehabilitation, there is still no consensus regarding effective rehabilitation programs. This presentation will provide an overview of the mile stones in basic, translational and clinical research aimed at preserving or promoting erectile function after radical prostatectomy. The contemporary series of trials that assess penile rehabilitation and explore treatment modalities that might play a role in the future will also be analyzed. Although recent trials have shown that most therapies are well-tolerated and aid in some degree on EF recovery, we currently do not have tangible evidence to recommend an irrefutable penile rehabilitation algorithm. However, advancements in research and technology will ultimately create and refine management options for penile rehabilitation.

  5. Microbial quality of some vegetables sold in ED DueimTwon, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Goja, Arafat Mohammed; Mahmoud, Mohamed Salih Osman

    2013-06-15

    This study was probably the first research carried out to investigate the microbiological quality of some vegetables sold in ED DueimTwon, Sudan. Four species of vegetables were used, Arugula (Eruca sativa), Mloukhia (Corchorus olitorius), Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and Green pepper (Capsicum annuum). The samples were collected and examined according to standardized methods for total viable bacteria, coliforms and fecal coliform count. The average of total viable count ranged from 1.2 x 105-5.6 x 105 CFU mL(-1) for Arugula; 2.1 x 105-2.8 x 107 CFU mL(-1) for Mloukhia; 3.4 x 105-4.8 x 105 for Tomato and 2.3 x 105-8.0 x 106 CFU mL(-1) for Green pepper. However, the maximum level of total and fecal coliform were (93, 21); (28, 11); (75, 15) and (150, 20) MPN 100 mL(-1), respectively. Twelve bacteria belonging to five genera were isolated. Staphylococcus (33%) was the most predominant isolated followed by Enterobacteriaceae (25%), Bacillus (17%) and Streptococcus (17%). Micrococcus (8%) was the least dominant isolated. The results of microbial counts of these vegetable samples in this study indicate that, the agricultural practices, harvesting, hygiene, transporting and selling points are poor and therefore, the higher microbial load could be risked for public health.

  6. EDs credit drills, community engagement with helping them manage casualties from tornado crises.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Emergency department leaders at DCH Regional Medical Center in Tuscaloosa, AL, and Cullman Regional Medical Center in Cullman, AL, credit their regular practice drills with helping them deal with unprecedented demand when deadly tornadoes swept through the South this past April. Both facilities used the hospital instant command structure (HICS) to mobilize the resources needed to care for the surge in patients, and say the approach worked well in helping them meet the needs of their communities. However, the crises also showcased opportunities for improvement. The ED at DCH Regional Medical Center saw more than 600 patients on the day of the storm, a three-fold increase in the hospital's typical volume. CRMC treated 99 patients in the seven hours immediately following the storm when it usually treats 114 patients per day. In addition to a big surge in patients, both hospitals dealt with power outages that limited access to some services such as radiology. Triage proved particularly challenging at DCH Regional Medical Center, as patients flowed into the hospital from numerous access points. The hospital plans to assign coordinators to each area of the hospital to better manage the influx in the future. When reviewing emergency operations plans, Joint Commission reviewers often find deficiencies in hazard vulnerability analyses as well as the processes used to determine the emergency credentials of licensed independent practitioners.

  7. Compositional and technological features of glazed pottery from Aosta Valley (Italy): a SEM-EDS investigation.

    PubMed

    Gulmini, Monica; Appolonia, Lorenzo; Framarin, Patrizia; Mirti, Piero

    2006-11-01

    Twelve finds from archaeological excavations carried out in the Aosta region (Italy) were studied by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray detection (SEM-EDS). The archaeological samples were shards of glazed pottery dating from the fourth to the seventh century AD. Analysis of ceramic bodies revealed a general homogeneity in composition among the studied samples and the use of a noncalcareous clay for their manufacture; however, two shards stand out due to their high iron contents. Glazes proved to be high-lead products with more than 70% PbO in all of the samples investigated but one. For the latter, a composition poorer in lead and richer in silicon, aluminium and iron was found. SEM observation of the contact region between body and glaze suggests that the vitreous coatings were mostly obtained by applying the glazing components onto the unfired clay body; moreover, a comparison between clay and glaze compositions suggests the use of a lead compound mixed with a silica-rich material, not a lead compound by itself. PMID:17028850

  8. Liquid Motion in Zero-G - Skylab Student Experiment ED-78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    W. Brian Dunlap of Youngstown, Ohio, proposed Skylab student experiment ED-78, Liquid Motion in Zero-G, a study of wave motion in a liquid. He was particularly interested in comparing surface waves over a liquid in zero-gravity with those occurring on Earth. In space, with the absence of gravity, a liquid does not necessarily take the shape of its container as it does on Earth. Adhesion forces may hold the liquid in contact with its container, but the liquid can also assume a free-floating condition. It was in this latter state that Dunlap wished to examine the behavior of surface waves. Data were recorded on videotape and subsequently converted to 16-mm film. Dunlap analyzed these data to determine periods of oscillation of free-floating globules and found agreement with the theory to be much better than expected. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  9. An integrative review: triage protocols and the effect on ED length of stay.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dana J

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to identify the effectiveness of using triage protocols to decrease ED length of stay. The review method described by Ganong was used to guide the review process. Data sources included CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Medline, the Cochrane Library, Mosby's Nursing Consult, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse. In addition, reference lists of all articles were reviewed, 3 authors of previous articles were contacted for more current or updated work, and a hand search of the Journal of Emergency Nursing was conducted. The search generated 56 articles, 8 of which met inclusion criteria. Data were interpreted and evaluated by use of a data summary sheet. Key conclusions drawn from the appraisals included that a decrease in length of stay was related to protocol use and nurses were able to initiate diagnostic testing and treatments appropriately. These conclusions apply to acuity levels 3 and 4, which require either little or no testing or require testing to facilitate a disposition decision. The implications for nursing are that appraisals of evidence lead to better practice decisions, protocols can provide greater nursing autonomy and satisfaction, and protocols are able to increase the facilitation of patient care in the emergency department. PMID:22513188

  10. Evaluation of coal liquids derived from the EDS process in carcinogenesis screening tests.

    PubMed

    McKee, R H; Traul, K A; Przygoda, R T

    1995-01-01

    Four process streams derived from the EDS not equal to direct coal liquefaction process were evaluated in two in vitro assays to screen for carcinogenic potential: the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay and the Syrian hamster embryo morphologic transformation assay. Three high boiling liquids (two recycle solvents, nominal boiling range 200-425 degrees C; and a fuel oil blend, nominal boiling range 200-538 degrees C) were active in both assays. A hydrotreated naphtha sample (< 200 degrees C) was not active in either. The Salmonella data agreed qualitatively with results of dermal carcinogenesis studies; however, quantitative differences as measured by the estimation of mutagenic potency were apparent. The lack of quantitative agreement may have been related to the fact that the dermal carcinogenic activity of coal-derived synthetic fuels is predominantly associated with neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas activity in the Salmonella assay is strongly influenced by the presence of aromatic amines and nitroaromatic compounds. Two modifications of the Salmonella assay--detergent dispersion and hamster S9 activation--were examined. These techniques improved assay performance for some but not all of the coal liquids. The differences in response may have been related to compositional differences in the various liquids.

  11. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-01

    This report is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report for US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC01-77ET10069 (formerly EF-77-A-01-2893) for Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) Coal Liquefaction Process Development - Phase V. The Laboratory Process Research and Development studies were conducted at various Exxon Research and Engineering Co. (ER and E) facilities: Research and Development Division at Baytown, Texas; Products Research Division at Linden, New Jersey; and the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Engineering Research and Development studies were performed at the Synthetic Fuels Engineering and Exxon Engineering Technology Departments of ER and E at Florham Park, New Jersey. The information dealing with the Management, Detailed Engineering, and Procurement activities related to revamp of the FLEXICOKING Prototype Unit was generated at Exxon Company, USA, Houston, Texas, and Exxon Engineering - Project Management Department of ER and E, Florham Park, New Jersey. The information dealing with operation of the 250 T/D Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant (ECLP) was generated at Exxon Company, USA, Houston, Texas.

  12. Raman, SEM-EDS and XRPD investigations on pre-Columbian Central America "estucado" pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova Municchia, Annalaura; Micheli, Mario; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Toledo, Michelle; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Lo Mastro, Sergio; Sodo, Armida

    2016-03-01

    Seventeen different colored fragments from six selected pre-Columbian estucado ceramics from El Salvador have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The peculiarity of this kind of ceramics consist of the unusual presence of a white engobe, traditionally termed stucco, between the ceramic body and the decoration elements, hence the name estucado ceramics. The aim of this work was to study the unusual manufacturing technique and to identify the chemical composition of the engobe and of the pigment palette. The results showed that the stucco layer is made of clay (kaolinite) with traces of titanium oxide (anatase). Remarkably, this is the same composition of the white pigments used for the decoration layer, thus excluding an early use of natural titanium oxide as a white pigment in the estucado productions as suggested in previous investigations. Moreover, the presence of kaolinite and anatase both in the stucco and in the decoration layer suggests a cold-working or low temperature technique. The red, yellow and green decorations were realized by the use of natural ochre, while in all the blue and gray decorations Maya blue pigment was identified. Finally, an amorphous carbon pigment of vegetal origin and manganese oxide were used to obtain black pigments.

  13. Raman, SEM-EDS and XRPD investigations on pre-Columbian Central America "estucado" pottery.

    PubMed

    Casanova Municchia, Annalaura; Micheli, Mario; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Toledo, Michelle; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Lo Mastro, Sergio; Sodo, Armida

    2016-03-01

    Seventeen different colored fragments from six selected pre-Columbian estucado ceramics from El Salvador have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The peculiarity of this kind of ceramics consist of the unusual presence of a white engobe, traditionally termed stucco, between the ceramic body and the decoration elements, hence the name estucado ceramics. The aim of this work was to study the unusual manufacturing technique and to identify the chemical composition of the engobe and of the pigment palette. The results showed that the stucco layer is made of clay (kaolinite) with traces of titanium oxide (anatase). Remarkably, this is the same composition of the white pigments used for the decoration layer, thus excluding an early use of natural titanium oxide as a white pigment in the estucado productions as suggested in previous investigations. Moreover, the presence of kaolinite and anatase both in the stucco and in the decoration layer suggests a cold-working or low temperature technique. The red, yellow and green decorations were realized by the use of natural ochre, while in all the blue and gray decorations Maya blue pigment was identified. Finally, an amorphous carbon pigment of vegetal origin and manganese oxide were used to obtain black pigments.

  14. Detection of metal residues on bone using SEM-EDS. Part I: Blunt force injury.

    PubMed

    Pechníková, Markéta; Porta, Davide; Mazzarelli, Debora; Rizzi, Agostino; Drozdová, Eva; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-11-30

    Previous studies have indicated that metal particles remain on bone after sharp force injury or gunshot and that their detection by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) could greatly help in tool identification. However, the presence of metal particles on bone surfaces in the context of blunt force trauma has never been assessed experimentally. For this reason the present paper represents an experimental study of the behaviour of metal residues on bone following blunt force injury. Ten fresh sub-adult bovine metatarsal bones were manually cleaned of soft tissues. They were then struck by metal bars (copper, iron or aluminium) on the external surface of the mid-diaphysis. All blunt metal instruments used in this study left a sign in the form of single particles, a smear or a powder-like deposit on the bone surface. The residues of all three metal implements were detected on the bone surface, 0.3-10 mm from the fracture border. The presence of metal particles was confirmed in all samples struck with iron and copper and in two of six aluminium samples; no particles were detected on the negative control. Chemical composition of residues highly corresponded with the composition of applied bars.

  15. Raman, SEM-EDS and XRPD investigations on pre-Columbian Central America "estucado" pottery.

    PubMed

    Casanova Municchia, Annalaura; Micheli, Mario; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Toledo, Michelle; Bellatreccia, Fabio; Lo Mastro, Sergio; Sodo, Armida

    2016-03-01

    Seventeen different colored fragments from six selected pre-Columbian estucado ceramics from El Salvador have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The peculiarity of this kind of ceramics consist of the unusual presence of a white engobe, traditionally termed stucco, between the ceramic body and the decoration elements, hence the name estucado ceramics. The aim of this work was to study the unusual manufacturing technique and to identify the chemical composition of the engobe and of the pigment palette. The results showed that the stucco layer is made of clay (kaolinite) with traces of titanium oxide (anatase). Remarkably, this is the same composition of the white pigments used for the decoration layer, thus excluding an early use of natural titanium oxide as a white pigment in the estucado productions as suggested in previous investigations. Moreover, the presence of kaolinite and anatase both in the stucco and in the decoration layer suggests a cold-working or low temperature technique. The red, yellow and green decorations were realized by the use of natural ochre, while in all the blue and gray decorations Maya blue pigment was identified. Finally, an amorphous carbon pigment of vegetal origin and manganese oxide were used to obtain black pigments. PMID:26641285

  16. Santa Clara de Nanay: the MAL-ED cohort in Peru.

    PubMed

    Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Lee, Gwenyth; Olórtegui, Maribel Paredes; Chávez, César Banda; Flores, Julian Torres; Vasquez, Angel Orbe; Burga, Rosa; Pinedo, Silvia Rengifo; Asayag, César Ramal; Black, Robert E; Caulfield, Laura E; Kosek, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study communities in Peru are located in Loreto province, in a rural area 15 km from the city of Iquitos. This riverine population of approximately 5000 individuals is fairly representative of Loreto. The province lags behind the rest of the country in access to water and sanitation, per capita income, and key health indicators including infant mortality (43.0 vs 16.0 per 1000 nationwide) and under-5 mortality (60.6 vs 21.0 per 1000). Total fertility rates are higher than elsewhere in the country (4.3 vs 2.6). Nationwide, the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus is estimated at 0.45%, the prevalence of tuberculosis is 117 per 100 000, and the incidence of malaria is 258 per 100 000. Stunting in this community is high, whereas acute undernutrition is relatively uncommon. The population suffers from high rates of diarrheal disease. Prevalent enteric pathogens include Ascaris, Giardia, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Shigella, and Campylobacter.

  17. SEM, EDS and vibrational spectroscopic study of dawsonite NaAl(CO3)(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Sampaio, Ney Pinheiro; de Oliveira, Fernando A. N.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we have studied the mineral dawsonite by using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with EDS and vibrational spectroscopy. Single crystals show an acicular habitus forming aggregates with a rosette shape. The chemical analysis shows a phase composed of C, Al, and Na. Two distinct Raman bands at 1091 and 1068 cm-1 are assigned to the CO32- ν1 symmetric stretching mode. Multiple bands are observed in both the Raman and infrared spectra in the antisymmetric stretching and bending regions showing that the symmetry of the carbonate anion is reduced and in all probability the carbonate anions are not equivalent in the dawsonite structure. Multiple OH deformation vibrations centred upon 950 cm-1 in both the Raman and infrared spectra show that the OH units in the dawsonite structure are non-equivalent. Raman bands observed at 3250, 3283 and 3295 cm-1 are assigned to OH stretching vibrations. The position of these bands indicates strong hydrogen bonding of the OH units in the dawsonite structure. The formation of the mineral dawsonite has the potential to offer a mechanism for the geosequestration of greenhouse gases.

  18. Disease surveillance methods used in the 8-site MAL-ED cohort study.

    PubMed

    Richard, Stephanie A; Barrett, Leah J; Guerrant, Richard L; Checkley, William; Miller, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    Describing the early life associations between infectious disease episodes and growth, cognitive development, and vaccine response in the first 2 years of life is one of the primary goals of the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study. To collect high-resolution data during a critical early period of development, field staff visit each study participant at their house twice weekly from birth to 2 years of age to collect daily reported illness and treatment data from caregivers. Detailed infectious disease histories will not only allow us to relate the overall burden of infectious disease with the primary outcomes of the study, but will also allow us to describe the ages at which infectious diseases have the greatest effect on child health. In addition, twice-weekly visits allow for sample collection when diarrhea episodes are identified. This article describes the methods used to collect illness and treatment history data and discusses the a priori definitions of diarrhea and acute lower respiratory illness episodes. PMID:25305290

  19. Compositional and technological features of glazed pottery from Aosta Valley (Italy): a SEM-EDS investigation.

    PubMed

    Gulmini, Monica; Appolonia, Lorenzo; Framarin, Patrizia; Mirti, Piero

    2006-11-01

    Twelve finds from archaeological excavations carried out in the Aosta region (Italy) were studied by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray detection (SEM-EDS). The archaeological samples were shards of glazed pottery dating from the fourth to the seventh century AD. Analysis of ceramic bodies revealed a general homogeneity in composition among the studied samples and the use of a noncalcareous clay for their manufacture; however, two shards stand out due to their high iron contents. Glazes proved to be high-lead products with more than 70% PbO in all of the samples investigated but one. For the latter, a composition poorer in lead and richer in silicon, aluminium and iron was found. SEM observation of the contact region between body and glaze suggests that the vitreous coatings were mostly obtained by applying the glazing components onto the unfired clay body; moreover, a comparison between clay and glaze compositions suggests the use of a lead compound mixed with a silica-rich material, not a lead compound by itself.

  20. Clitoridectomy -- the disastrous downfall of Isaac Baker Brown, F.R.C.S. (1867).

    PubMed

    Fleming, J B

    1960-12-01

    The investigation of the circumstances surrounding the downfall of the surgeon Baker Brown is reviewed. In March 1866 Brown's book "The Curability of Certain Forms of Insanity, Epilepsy, Catalepsy, and Hysteria in Females" was published. Brown's thesis presented in this volume was that nervous affections complicating diseases of the female genitalia were the direct result of "peripheral excitement of the pudic nerve" or masturbation. Brown maintained that this excitement gave rise to disease which could be divided into 8 stages -- hysteria, spinal irritation, epileptoid fits or hysterical epilepsy, cataleptic fits, epileptic fits, idiocy, mania, death -- the 8th stage being arrived at, by gradations, more or less distinct, directly from the 1st stage. The book was harshly criticized by the editor of the "British Medical Journal." Brown proposed excision of the clitoris and nymphae as a cure of epilepsy in females. Brown's success as a bold and courageous operator, which raised him to an important position in the field, caused extreme jealousy among his rivals. By involving himself, however sincerely, with the highly controversial subject of clitoridectomy progress in ovariotomy was considerably slowed for a considerable period. Although his character and shortcomings remain open to speculation, there is little question that he was an acknowledged leader in ovariotomy.

  1. Self-consistent electric fields and flows in the edge plasma of FRCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren

    2002-11-01

    The shorting of open field lines where they intersect external boundaries strongly modifies the electric field all along the field lines.[1] The resulting electric field is found by an extension of the familiar Boltzmann relation for the electric potential. This leads to a prediction of the electric drift. Rotational flow generation by electrical shorting is applied to three aspects of elongated field-reversed configurations (FRC): plasma rotation rate; the particle-loss spin-up mechanism; and the sustainability of the rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive method. The outflow of plasma along open field lines is also analyzed using a double-adiabatic model. The outflow is represented as that in a magnetic "duct" extending from the side of the FRC proper out through the jet. Double-adiabatic effects and angular momentum conservation may explain the anomalously slow outflow of particles inferred from experiments.[2] [1] L.C. Steinhauer, Phys. Plasmas 9, September 2002 issue (in press). [2] L.C. Steinhauer, Phys. Fluids 29, 3379 (1986). This work supported by USDOE Grant No. DE-FG03-98ER54480.

  2. Sir Michael Francis Addison Woodruff (1911-2001) FRS DSc MD MS FRCS.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Winston

    2011-02-01

    Michael Woodruff performed the first successful renal transplant in the UK and described the technique of joining the ureter of the transplant to the bladder. He contributed to all aspects of transplantation biology and was responsible for the design of the first purpose-built transplant unit in the world. As a Japanese prisoner of war at Changi in Singapore, Michael Woodruff studied the effects of malnutrition and devised a machine for extracting vitamins and trace elements from grass. After the war he demonstrated that the anterior chamber of the eye was an immunologically privileged site. He was the first person to describe 'adaptation'. He showed that antilymphocytic serum was effective as an immunosuppressive agent for homografts.

  3. Fast-ion Characteristics in Colliding FRCs with Neutral Beam Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Ryan; Smirnov, Artem; Korepanov, Sergey; Dettrick, Sean; TAE Team Team

    2011-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device aims to explore confinement properties of colliding Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas, augmented with neutral beam injection. Naturally, it is desirable to understand the general characteristics of the resulting fast- ion population. For this purpose, several 16 channel silicone-based Neutral Particle Bolometers (NPB) have been designed and installed on the C-2 device, measuring charge-exchanged fast-neutrals originating from the fast-ion population. We present results illustrating the effects on fast-ions from wall recycling and from the n = 2 rotation instability. In addition we find good agreement between NPB measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The NPB diagnostics are a spatially resolved complement to the energy resolved Neutral Particle Analyzers installed on the C-2 device.

  4. Density Profile Evolution Diagnostics for RMF driven FRCs on STX and TCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votroubek, G. R.; Slough, J.; Crawford, E. A.

    1998-11-01

    RMF penetration dependence on density is currently being investigated at RPPL. Two time resolved density diagnostics have been designed, and are being applied to STX and TCS. The first density measurement will use laser interferometry to look at the phase difference induced by the plasma along a beam of laser light. We use a diode pumped cw Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06 μ in a double pass Mach-Zehnder setup. A pulsed electro-optical phase modulator (EOM) provides reference phase information and an automated data reduction program is used for direct evaluation of line averaged density. On STX, the interferometer views end-on with easily varied radial position. The second diagnostic is an array of filtered continuum emission detectors. It employs a 3" ball lens, 3mm plastic optical fibers, and large area photodiodes for maximum throughput. The change in phase in the interferometer caused by plasma is proportional to the integral of n dl, while light emission is proportional to the integral of n^2 dl. We will use appropriate interferometer data to calibrate the continuum array. After the emission array data is processed through a tomographic inversion, we will have time resolved radial density profiles. Hardware, layout, and preliminary experimental data for both systems will be presented. Supported by USDOE.

  5. A Detailed Comparison Between Probe Measurements and Numerical Simulation in RMF Driven FRCs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, R. D.; Miller, K. E.; Slough, J. T.

    2001-10-01

    A detailed set of magnetic and Langmuire probe measurements have been made in both the STX^1 and TCS^2 devices at the University of Washington. These probes provide a direct measure of the magnetic field, density and electron temperature as a function of radius at the axial mid-plane. These measurements are compared with the predictions of a two-dimensional (r-θ) numerical model^3, which was developed to study RMF current drive in an FRC. Two sorts of comparison are made. In the first we compare the phase and magnitude of the B_θ component as a function of radius with that of the code, to infer the 2-D structure of the RMF as it penetrates. We look for evidence of “magnetic structures” that rotate relative to the RMF, that were predicted by the code for some conditions. In the second, we compare equilibrium profiles to estimate the plasma resistivity, and gain information about the physical processes that are required to sustain equilibrium. ^1J.T. Slough and K. E. Miller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1444 (2000) ^2H.Y. Guo, et.al., Submitted to Phys. Plasmas. ^3Richard D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 7, 4135 (2000)

  6. Early interruption of exclusive breastfeeding: results from the eight-country MAL-ED study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Crystal L; Turab, Ali; Ambikapathi, Ramya; Nesamvuni, Cebisa; Chandyo, Ram Krishna; Bose, Anuradha; Islam, M Munirul; Ahmed, A M Shamsir; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; de Moraes, Milena Lima; Caulfield, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    We report the infant feeding experiences in the first month of life for 2,053 infants participating in "Malnutrition and Enteric Infections: Consequences for Child Health and Development" (MAL-ED). Eight sites (in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Brazil, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania), each followed a cohort of children from birth (by day 17), collecting detailed information on infant feeding practices, diet and illness episodes. Mothers were queried twice weekly regarding health status, breastfeeding and the introduction (or no) of non-breast milk liquids and foods. Here, our goal is to describe the early infant feeding practices in the cohort and evaluate factors associated with termination of exclusive breastfeeding in the first month of life. With data from enrollment to a visit at 28-33 days of life, we characterized exclusive, predominant or partial breastfeeding (using a median of 6-9 visits per child across the sites). Only 6 of 2,053 infants were never breastfed. By one month, the prevalences of exclusive breastfeeding were < 60% in 6 of 8 sites, and of partial breastfeeding (or no) were > 20% in 6 of 8 sites. Logistic regression revealed that prelacteal feeding (given to 4-63% of infants) increased the likelihood of partial breastfeeding (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.48 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 2.10), as did the withholding of colostrum (2-16% of infants) (OR: 1.63:1.01, 2.62), and being a first-time mother (OR: 1.38:1.10, 1.75). Our results reveal diversity across these sites, but an overall trend of early transition away from exclusive breastfeeding in the first month of life. Interventions which introduce or reinforce the WHO/UNICEF Ten Steps for Successful Breastfeeding are needed in these sites to improve breastfeeding initiation, to reinforce exclusive breastfeeding and delay introduction of non-breast milk foods and/or liquids. PMID:26825923

  7. SEM/EDS of Submicron and Coarse PM Using Modified Passive Aerosol Sampler Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wang, Z.; Willis, B.; Casuccio, G.

    2008-12-01

    Deployment of multiple UNC Passive Aerosol Samplers is an inexpensive and unobtrusive technique for assessing airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure and spatial variability. Computer-controlled SEM/EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) is used to measure the deposited particle mass and chemistry. A deposition velocity model is used to obtain ambient PM and elemental size distributions. Previous results have correlated well with active sampler results in environments dominated by coarse mineral dusts. To accurately measure submicron and carbonaceous aerosols, an improved collection substrate is needed. Previous studies used a double-sided carbon adhesive tab, which was ideal for coarse PM but under-detected submicron PM. One promising alternative is polycarbonate (PC) filter substrates. Another is transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids with formvar films mounted over holes drilled in the samplers. Preliminary tests of PC filters and TEM grid substrates, including tests in areas with smoke aerosols, exhibited substantial submicron aerosol and differing elemental size distributions. Detailed qualitative and quantitative evidence shows that the PC filters retained coarse PM well and yielded improved submicron PM imaging. TEM grids yield the best imaging and chemistry of submicron carbonaceous PM, but potentially the poorest retention of coarse PM. PM and elemental size distributions are presented for collocated passive samplers using the three substrate types, in both indoor and outdoor environments. Several methods are proposed to further optimize passive sampling of both submicron and coarse PM. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  8. Confirmatory analysis of field-presumptive GSR test sample using SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toal, Sarah J.; Niemeyer, Wayne D.; Conte, Sean; Montgomery, Daniel D.; Erikson, Gregory S.

    2014-09-01

    RedXDefense has developed an automated red-light/green-light field presumptive lead test using a sampling pad which can be subsequently processed in a Scanning Electron Microscope for GSR confirmation. The XCAT's sampling card is used to acquire a sample from a suspect's hands on the scene and give investigators an immediate presumptive as to the presence of lead possibly from primer residue. Positive results can be obtained after firing as little as one shot. The same sampling card can then be sent to a crime lab and processed on the SEM for GSR following ASTM E-1588-10 Standard Guide for Gunshot Residue Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry, in the same manner as the existing tape lifts currently used in the field. Detection of GSR-characteristic particles (fused lead, barium, and antimony) as small as 0.8 microns (0.5 micron resolution) has been achieved using a JEOL JSM-6480LV SEM equipped with an Oxford Instruments INCA EDS system with a 50mm2 SDD detector, 350X magnification, in low-vacuum mode and in high vacuum mode after coating with carbon in a sputter coater. GSR particles remain stable on the sampling pad for a minimum of two months after chemical exposure (long term stability tests are in progress). The presumptive result provided by the XCAT yields immediate actionable intelligence to law enforcement to facilitate their investigation, without compromising the confirmatory test necessary to further support the investigation and legal case.

  9. ED-XRF analysis for Cultural Heritage: is quantitative evaluation always essential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonizzoni, L.

    2015-07-01

    Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) is a very suitable tool for examination of Cultural Heritage materials because of its simplicity, with no requirement for any sample preparation and the possibility of operating with portable instruments, and it can probably be considered the most useful non-destructive analytical technique for ancient valuable objects of archaeological, historical or artistic interest. As regards the possibility of getting quantitative analysis in archaeometric applications, the problems arising from the limited sensitivity in detecting low Z elements, the irregular shape or the non-homogeneous composition of the sample have generated a widespread opinion that only semi-quantitative analyses are possible in XRF applications to archaeometry. In fact, this is always true for non-homogeneous samples as, typically, painting layers. On the contrary, the problems deriving from limited sensitivity in detecting matrix light elements as well as from irregular surface under analysis can be solved in most cases. Notwithstanding, working on unique and not standardized objects requires to pay attention on details and to know how to choose correct parameters and calculation algorithms to obtain reliable results. Indeed opportunities to deal with these objects are very limited and results have implication in other fields, so that each information about materials and production technique is of great interest. Two typical materials of archaeological interest showing particular features are considered - namely high corroded metallic artefacts and ceramics - revealing that, even if in cultural heritage field detailed quantitative analysis is the goal, it is not always necessary as also qualitative information by XRF spectra increase the knowledge of artefact.

  10. TEM-EDS study of metals' partition at particle level after their sorption in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipos, Peter; Kovács Kis, Viktória; Németh, Tibor; Balázs, Réka

    2016-04-01

    Association of soil mineral particles could significantly modify the sorption capacity of the individual soil components. We studied this phenomena using single element and competitive batch Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn sorption experiments on six soil samples with contrasting characteristics. Their sorption properties were characterized by XRD and FTIRS analyses, as well as sorption curve evaluation. TEM-EDS analyses were used to characterize the soil mineral particle associations and their metal sorption capacities. Submicron sized smectite particles were found to be associated to tiny ferryhidrite and goethite patches in the acidic forest soil samples, whereas the alkaline meadow soils could be characterized by goethite and smectite particles attached to large carbonate grains. Point chemical analyses carried out on such associations showed that significant metal separation may occur at particle level within the mineral associations observed. This is primarily obvious for Cu and Pb, which are preferentially sorbed by iron oxides over clay mineral particles. This phenomenon is more pronounced in competitive situation. Highest affinity to clay minerals was found for Zn and it may be also characteristic for Cd in acid conditions. However, decrease in available sorption sites and increase in pH may result in enhanced precipitation for the studied metals. Our results suggest that estimation of the role of soil components in metals' sorption can not be adequate enough when the sorption properties of a set of bulk soils are studied exclusively. Direct observation of metals' partition at particle level may result in a deeper insight into soil-metal interaction. This study was financially supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA K105009).

  11. MetEd Resources for Embracing Advances with S-NPP and JPSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, W. E.; Dills, P. N.; Weingroff, M.

    2014-12-01

    The COMET® Program (www.comet.ucar.edu), a part of the UCAR Community Programs (UCP) at UCAR, receives funding from NOAA NESDIS as well as EUMETSAT and the Meteorological Service of Canada to support education and training in satellite meteorology. For many years COMET's satellite education programs have focused on developing self-paced online educational materials that highlight the capabilities and applications of current and next-generation operational geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites and their relevance to operational forecasters and other user communities. By partnering with experts from the Naval Research Laboratory, NOAA-NESDIS and its Cooperative Institutes, Meteorological Service of Canada, EUMETSAT, and other user communities, COMET stimulates greater use of current and future satellite observations and products. This presentation provides a tour of COMET's satellite training and education offerings that are directly applicable to data and products from the S-NPP and JPSS satellite series. A recommended set of lessons for users who wish to learn more will be highlighted, including excerpts from the newest materials on the Suomi NPP VIIRS imager and its applications, as well as advances in nighttime visible observation with the VIIRS Day-Night Band. We'll show how the lessons introduce users to the advances these systems bring to forecasting, numerical weather prediction, and environmental monitoring. Over 90 satellite-focused, self-paced, online materials are freely available on the of the MetEd Web site (http://www.meted.ucar.edu) via the "Education & Training", "Satellite" topic area. Quite a few polar-orbiting-related lessons are available in both English, Spanish, and French. Additionally, S-NPP and JPSS relevant information can also be found on the the Environmental Satellite Resource Center (ESRC) Web site (www.meted.ucar.edu/esrc) that is maintained by COMET. The ESRC is a searchable, database-driven Web site that provides access to

  12. [Genotypic characterization of toxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from pigs with postweaning diarrhea (PWD) and edema disease (ED)].

    PubMed

    Moredo, Fabiana A; Cappuccio, Javier A; Insarralde, Lucas; Perfumo, Carlos J; Quiroga, María A; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize 47 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 32 pigs diagnosed with postweaning diarrhea and three pigs with edema disease by PCR. Forty two (95.5 %) of the strains isolated from diarrheic pigs were characterized as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and 2 (4.5 %) as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Fourteen (33.3 %) ETEC strains were positive for est/estII/fedA genes. The most complex genotype was eltA/estI/faeG/aidA. Strains isolated from pigs with ED were classified as porcine STEC and were stx2e/aidA carriers. Eleven (25 %) strains carried the gene encoding adhesin protein AIDA-I. However, genes coding for F5, F6, F41, intimin and Paa were not detected. The development of vaccines generating antibodies against prevalent E. coli adhesins in Argentina could be useful for the prevention of PWD and ED. PMID:22997765

  13. Feasibility of Non-Mydriatic Ocular Fundus Photography in the Emergency Department: Phase I of the FOTO-ED Study

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B.; Lamirel, Cédric; Biousse, Valérie; Ward, Antionette; Heilpern, Katherine L.; Newman, Nancy J.; Wright, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Examination of the ocular fundus is imperative in many acute medical and neurologic conditions, but direct ophthalmoscopy by non-ophthalmologists is underutilized, poorly performed, and difficult without pharmacologic pupillary dilation. The objective was to examine the feasibility of non-mydriatic fundus photography as a clinical alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy by emergency physicians (EPs). Methods Adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with headache, acute focal neurologic deficit, diastolic blood pressure ≥ 120 mmHg, or acute visual change had ocular fundus photographs taken by nurse practitioners using a non-mydriatic fundus camera. Photographs were reviewed by a neuro-ophthalmologist within 24 hours for findings relevant to acute ED patient care. Nurse practitioners and patients rated ease, comfort, and speed of non-mydriatic fundus photography on a 10-point Likert scale (10 best). Timing of visit and photography were recorded by automated electronic systems. Results Three hundred fifty patients were enrolled. There were 1,734 photographs taken during 230 nurse practitioner shifts. Eighty-three percent of the 350 patients had at least one eye with a high quality photograph, while only 3% of patients had no photographs of diagnostic value. Mean ratings were ≥ 8.7 (standard deviation [SD] ≤ 1.9) for all measures. The median photography session lasted 1.9 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] 1.3 to 2.9 minutes), typically accounting for less that 0.5% of the patient’s total ED visit. Conclusions Non-mydriatic fundus photography taken by nurse practitioners is a feasible alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy in the ED. It is performed well by non-physician staff, is well-received by staff and patients, and requires a trivial amount of time to perform. PMID:21906202

  14. Effect of shape and thickness of asbestos bundles and fibres on EDS microanalysis: A Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, D.; Valdre, G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative microanalysis of tiny asbestos mineral fibres by scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) still represents a complex analytical issue. This complexity arises from the variable fibre shape and small thickness (< 5 μm) compared with the penetration of the incident electron beam. Here, we present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of chrysotile, crocidolite and amosite fibres (and bundles of fibres) of circular and square section and thicknesses from 0.1 μm to 10 μm, to investigate the effect of shape and thickness on SEM-EDS microanalysis. The influence of shape and thickness on the simulated spectrum was investigated for electron beam energies of 5, 15 and 25 keV, respectively. A strong influence of the asbestos bundles and fibres shape and thickness on the detected EDS X-ray intensity was observed. The X-ray intensity trends as a function of fibre thickness showed a non-linear dependence for all the elements and minerals. In general, the X-ray intensities showed a considerable reduction for thicknesses below about 5 μm at 5 keV, 2 μm at 15 keV, and 5 μm at 25 keV. Correction parameters, k-ratios, for the asbestos fibre thickness effect, are reported.

  15. Barite aerosol particles from volcanic plumes and fumaroles - FESEM/EDS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Schroettner, H.; Delgado, H.

    2003-04-01

    Studies of aerosol particles (AP) contained in volcanic plumes has been enormously benefited by the use of field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM/EDS; responsability by H. Schroettner) permitting morphological, mineralogical and chemical detailed observations and opening new scientific questions. This work shows the ubiquitous presence of Ba in volcanic emissions. We sampled e.g. a volcanic plume (Popocatepetl v.; 1997, 2002) revealing Ba-S-O particles, interpreteted as barite (BaSO4) and Sr-bearing barite with Fe-rich rim (w=1µm). The ca. 500 nm - 4 µm long crystals are +/- euhedral, anhedral and/or partially etched. The µm-sized crystals had been collected on a Teflon fiber filter (1997), the nm-sized on borosilicate fiber filter (BFF, 2002); one set of crystals (ca. l=500-800 nm) is scattered on Fe-hydr/oxide(?). APs collected from the degassing lava flow of Etna (2001) revealed barite (l= ca. 100 nm) on a rounded NaCl (d= 500 nm) and on Fe-hydr/oxides (?). BFF exposed to the F0 fumarole at Vulcano (2001) showed incrustations of barite (l=ca.200 nm) on fibers indicating barite formation during 5 min sampling. At Solfatra we observed almost euhedral barite particles (l=ca.300 nm) of unusual pseudo-trigonal shape. APs from Alpine air masses (A) did not reveal barite. Sources for barite could be vesicle fillings of lavas (known from continental-crust settings), vapor-phase crystallization of ignimbrites (Bandelier Tuff, USA), Ba-rich fumarolic incrustations, rock coatings in the vicinity of fumaroles (Vulcano, I.), sinter of hot springs (Akita-Yaka-Yama v., J.), barite veins (Milos, Gr.), contact-metamorphosed sedimentary xenoliths (Kloech, A.) or lithics associated with hydrovolcanic eruptions (Alban Hills v., I.). Barite has been observed in many Si-tube experiments. Stratospheric APs (1985) of the El Chichon eruption (1982) revealed barite. Ba is known as a trace element in fumarole gases of Vulcano (F11) and TOF mass spectrometry studies detected

  16. Fifth Grade: Findings From the Fifth Grade Follow-up of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K). E.D. TAB. NCES 2006-038

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Princiotta, Dan; Germino Hausken, Elvira

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this E.D. TAB is to introduce new NCES survey data through the presentation of selected descriptive information. The E.D. TAB is purely descriptive in nature. Readers are cautioned not to draw causal inferences based solely on the bivariate results presented in this E.D. TAB. It is important to note that many of the variables…

  17. Structural in silico dissection of the collagen V interactome to identify genotype-phenotype correlations in classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS).

    PubMed

    Paladin, Lisanna; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Minervini, Giovanni

    2015-12-21

    Collagen V mutations are associated with Elhers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a group of heritable collagenopathies. Collagen V structure is not available and the disease-causing mechanism is unclear. To address this issue, we manually curated missense mutations suspected to promote classic type EDS (cEDS) insurgence from the literature and performed a genotype-phenotype correlation study. Further, we generated a homology model of the collagen V triple helix to evaluate the pathogenic effects. The resulting structure was used to map known protein-protein interactions enriched with in silico predictions. An interaction network model for collagen V was created. We found that cEDS heterogeneous manifestations may be explained by the involvement in two different extracellular matrix pathways, related to cell adhesion and tissue repair or cell differentiation, growth and apoptosis.

  18. Structural in silico dissection of the collagen V interactome to identify genotype-phenotype correlations in classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS).

    PubMed

    Paladin, Lisanna; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Minervini, Giovanni

    2015-12-21

    Collagen V mutations are associated with Elhers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a group of heritable collagenopathies. Collagen V structure is not available and the disease-causing mechanism is unclear. To address this issue, we manually curated missense mutations suspected to promote classic type EDS (cEDS) insurgence from the literature and performed a genotype-phenotype correlation study. Further, we generated a homology model of the collagen V triple helix to evaluate the pathogenic effects. The resulting structure was used to map known protein-protein interactions enriched with in silico predictions. An interaction network model for collagen V was created. We found that cEDS heterogeneous manifestations may be explained by the involvement in two different extracellular matrix pathways, related to cell adhesion and tissue repair or cell differentiation, growth and apoptosis. PMID:26608033

  19. Linkage of the gene that encodes the alpha 1 chain of type V collagen (COL5A1) to type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS II).

    PubMed

    Loughlin, J; Irven, C; Hardwick, L J; Butcher, S; Walsh, S; Wordsworth, P; Sykes, B

    1995-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders of connective tissue with skin, ligaments and blood vessels being the main sites affected. The commonest variant (EDS II) exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and is characterized by joint hypermobility, cigarette paper scars, lax skin and excessive bruising. As yet no gene has been linked to EDS II, nor has linkage been established to a specific region of the genome. However, several candidate genes encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix have been excluded. Using an intragenic simple sequence repeat polymorphism, we report linkage of the COL5A1 gene, which encodes the alpha 1(V) chain of type V collagen, to EDS II. A maximum LOD score (Zmax) for linkage of 8.3 at theta = 0.00 was generated for a single large pedigree.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana DM2h (R8) within the Landsberg RPP1-like Resistance Locus Underlies Three Different Cases of EDS1-Conditioned Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Stuttmann, Johannes; Peine, Nora; Garcia, Ana V; Wagner, Christine; Choudhury, Sayan R; Wang, Yiming; James, Geo Velikkakam; Griebel, Thomas; Alcázar, Ruben; Tsuda, Kenichi; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Parker, Jane E

    2016-04-01

    Plants have a large panel of nucleotide-binding/leucine rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors which monitor host interference by diverse pathogen molecules (effectors) and trigger disease resistance pathways. NLR receptor systems are necessarily under tight control to mitigate the trade-off between induced defenses and growth. Hence, mis-regulated NLRs often cause autoimmunity associated with stunting and, in severe cases, necrosis. Nucleocytoplasmic ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) is indispensable for effector-triggered and autoimmune responses governed by a family of Toll-Interleukin1-Receptor-related NLR receptors (TNLs). EDS1 operates coincidently or immediately downstream of TNL activation to transcriptionally reprogram cells for defense. We show here that low levels of nuclear-enforced EDS1 are sufficient for pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana, without causing negative effects. Plants expressing higher nuclear EDS1 amounts have the genetic, phenotypic and transcriptional hallmarks of TNL autoimmunity. In a screen for genetic suppressors of nuclear EDS1 autoimmunity, we map multiple, independent mutations to one gene, DM2h, lying within the polymorphic DANGEROUS MIX2 cluster of TNL RPP1-like genes from A. thaliana accession Landsberg erecta (Ler). The DM2 locus is a known hotspot for deleterious epistatic interactions leading to immune-related incompatibilities between A. thaliana natural accessions. We find that DM2hLer underlies two further genetic incompatibilities involving the RPP1-likeLer locus and EDS1. We conclude that the DM2hLer TNL protein and nuclear EDS1 cooperate, directly or indirectly, to drive cells into an immune response at the expense of growth. A further conclusion is that regulating the available EDS1 nuclear pool is fundamental for maintaining homeostatic control of TNL immune pathways.

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana DM2h (R8) within the Landsberg RPP1-like Resistance Locus Underlies Three Different Cases of EDS1-Conditioned Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ana V.; Wagner, Christine; Choudhury, Sayan R.; Wang, Yiming; James, Geo Velikkakam; Griebel, Thomas; Alcázar, Ruben; Tsuda, Kenichi; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Parker, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have a large panel of nucleotide-binding/leucine rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors which monitor host interference by diverse pathogen molecules (effectors) and trigger disease resistance pathways. NLR receptor systems are necessarily under tight control to mitigate the trade-off between induced defenses and growth. Hence, mis-regulated NLRs often cause autoimmunity associated with stunting and, in severe cases, necrosis. Nucleocytoplasmic ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) is indispensable for effector-triggered and autoimmune responses governed by a family of Toll-Interleukin1-Receptor-related NLR receptors (TNLs). EDS1 operates coincidently or immediately downstream of TNL activation to transcriptionally reprogram cells for defense. We show here that low levels of nuclear-enforced EDS1 are sufficient for pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana, without causing negative effects. Plants expressing higher nuclear EDS1 amounts have the genetic, phenotypic and transcriptional hallmarks of TNL autoimmunity. In a screen for genetic suppressors of nuclear EDS1 autoimmunity, we map multiple, independent mutations to one gene, DM2h, lying within the polymorphic DANGEROUS MIX2 cluster of TNL RPP1-like genes from A. thaliana accession Landsberg erecta (Ler). The DM2 locus is a known hotspot for deleterious epistatic interactions leading to immune-related incompatibilities between A. thaliana natural accessions. We find that DM2hLer underlies two further genetic incompatibilities involving the RPP1-likeLer locus and EDS1. We conclude that the DM2hLer TNL protein and nuclear EDS1 cooperate, directly or indirectly, to drive cells into an immune response at the expense of growth. A further conclusion is that regulating the available EDS1 nuclear pool is fundamental for maintaining homeostatic control of TNL immune pathways. PMID:27082651

  2. Collaborative effort in Washington state slashes non-essential use of the ED by Medicaid patients, delivering millions in projected savings.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Early data suggest a coordinated, state-wide effort has reduced non-essential use of the ED by 10% among Medicaid recipients in Washington state, and is projected to save the state an estimated $31 million in the first year of the approach. The effort includes the adoption of seven best practices by hospitals across the state.These include the creation of an Emergency Department Information Exchange, so that EDs can immediately access a patient's utilization history, strict narcotic prescribing guidelines, and regular feedback reports to hospitals regarding ED utilization patterns. The effort was prompted by threats by the state legislature to limit Medicaid payments for ED visits deemed not medically necessary in the emergency setting. The legislature backed down when emergency physicians in the state countered with their own proposal to reduce nonessential use of the ED. They worked with other health care groups in the state to develop the plan. Data on the first six months of the effort are included in a report to the state legislature by the Washington State Health Care Authority. Among the findings are a 23% reduction in ED visits among Medicaid recipients with five or more visits, a 250% increase in providers who have registered with the state's Prescription Monitoring Program, aimed at identifying patients with narcotic-seeking behavior, and a doubling in the number of shared care plans, intended to improve care coordination. Emergency providers say big challenges remain, including a need for more resources for patients with mental health and dental care needs.

  3. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    SAIC

    2010-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Parcel ED-9 at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Parcel ED-9 consists of about 13 acres that DOE proposes to transfer to Heritage Center, LLC (hereafter referred to as 'Heritage Center'), a subsidiary of the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). The 13 acres include two tracts of land, referred to as ED-9A (7.06 acres) and ED-9B (5.02 acres), and a third tract consisting of about 900 linear feet of paved road and adjacent right-of-way, referred to as ED-9C (0.98 acres). Transfer of the title to ED-9 will be by deed under a Covenant Deferral Request (CDR) pursuant to Section 120(h)(3)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This report provides a summary of information to support the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity.

  4. Quantitative ED-EPMA of Individual Particles and its Application for Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, C.

    2008-12-01

    An electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) technique using an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, named low-Z particle EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such as C, N, and O, as well as higher-Z elements that can be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive EPMA (ED-EPMA). The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual environmental particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric particles, e.g. sulfates, nitrates, ammonium, and carbonaceous particles, contain low-Z elements. In addition, an expert system that can perform chemical speciation from the elemental composition data obtained by the low-Z particle EPMA has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA was applied to characterize K-feldspar particle samples of which the chemical compositions are well defined by the use of various bulk analytical methods. Chemical compositions of the K-feldspar samples obtained from the low-Z particle EPMA turn out to be very close to those from bulk analyses. The low-Z particle EPMA technique has been applied for the characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle samples, including Asian dust, urban, and indoor particulate samples: (1) The extent of chemical modification of Asian dust particles sampled in Chuncheon and Incheon, Korea, during several Asian dust storm events occurred in 2002-2006 was investigated. Mixing of Asian dust with air pollutants and sea-salts strongly depends on the characteristics of Asian dust storm events such as air-mass backward trajectories. For instance, no significant chemical modification of mineral dust corresponded to fast moving air-masses at high altitudes. Inversely, extensive chemical modification was

  5. Environmental Baseline Survey Report for the Title Transfer of Land Parcel ED-4 at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    SAIC

    2008-05-01

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of a land parcel referred to as 'ED-4' (ED-4) at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to transfer the title of this land to the Heritage Center, LLC. Parcel ED-4 is a land parcel that consists of two noncontiguous areas comprising a total of approximately 18 acres located east of the ETTP. The western tract of ED-4 encompasses approximately 8.5 acres in the northeastern quadrant of the intersection of Boulevard Road and Highway 58. The eastern tract encompasses an area of approximately 9.5 acres in the northwestern quadrant of the intersection of Blair Road and Highway 58 (the Oak Ridge Turnpike). Aerial photographs and site maps from throughout the history of the ETTP, going back to its initial development in the 1940s as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), indicate that this area has been undeveloped woodland with the exception of three support facilities for workers constructing the ORGDP since federal acquisition in 1943. These three support facilities, which were located in the western tract of ED-4, included a recreation hall, the Town Hall Camp Operations Building, and the Property Warehouse. A railroad spur also formerly occupied a portion of Parcel ED-4. These former facilities only occupied approximately 5 percent of the total area of Parcel ED-4. This report provides supporting information for the transfer of this government-owned property at ETTP to a non-federal entity. This EBS is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). In order to support a Clean Parcel Determination (CPD) in accordance with CERCLA Sect. 120(h)(4)(d), groundwater and sediment samples were collected within, and adjacent to, the Parcel ED-4 study area. The potential for DOE to make a CPD for ED-4 is further supported by a No

  6. [Identification of yougui and jisheng shenqi pills with FTIR and EDS fingerprint spectra by new visual comparison].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Shuang; Zou, Hua-Bin; Tian, Fang; Du, Ai-Qin; Dong, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Xin-Ling

    2011-09-01

    FTIR combined with EDS fingerprint spectra was first applied to the identification of two kind of traditional Chinese compound formulae-Yougui pill and Jisheng shenqi pills, which have the similar composition The IR FPS of extraction of two kinds of pills extracted with chloroform were measured by liquid membrane method. The exclusively characteristic peak groups of these two kinds of formulae were theoretically established based on the Shapiro-Wilk W testing method,and the characteristic radicals and compound species corresponding to each characteristic peak were determined. Meanwhile, EDS fingerprint spectra of the two kinds of original powders were also measured which can reflect the element species and content information. Based on the three kinds of information (characteristic peak groups, radicals and compound species, different elements), Yougui and Jisheng shenqi pills were identified quickly, precisely and reliably. In this method, infrared fingerprint spectra possess the similar ability with chromatograph fingerprint spectra in identification of traditional Chinese compound formulae. The results show that the new visual comparison method is suitable for identifying traditional Chinese compound formulae with the same dosage-form and similar composition.

  7. SEM-EDS analysis of glass fibers corroded in physiological solutions by dynamic tests with variable flow rates.

    PubMed Central

    Lehuédé, P; de Meringo, A

    1994-01-01

    The dissolution of mineral fibers has been studied in simulated physiological fluids using a dynamic testing procedure. Fibers of different chemical composition and obtained by different processes with a mean diameter of about 1 micron, have been characterized with respect to their solubility under various test conditions of flow-rate. The surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction techniques. SEM examinations show the formation of various corrosion patterns: porous, gel-like outer layers; precipitation zones and even, in some cases, no modification of the surface aspect. EDS analyses performed on the fibers, on the fiber surface layers, or on the deposits show three types of chemical composition: areas enriched in Al, in Ca and P, or in Al, Ca, and P. These surface compositions can be found for the same type of fiber tested, depending on the flow rate of the solution. Surface changes depend strongly on the initial composition of the glass and on the test conditions, particularly the flow rate. It is of particular interest to characterize the remaining surfaces (if any) obtained at the end of the in vitro test run and to compare them with surface analysis of the recovered fibers from the in vivo tests to assess the validity of the in vitro tests. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. B PMID:7882960

  8. Probe current determination in analytical TEM/STEM and its application to the characterization of large area EDS detectors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David R G; Nancarrow, Mitchell J B

    2015-10-01

    A simple procedure, which enables accurate measurement of transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/STEM probe currents using an energy loss spectrometer drift tube is described. The currents obtained are compared with those measured on the fluorescent screen to enable the losses due to secondary and backscattered electrons to be determined. The current values obtained from the drift tube allow the correction of fluorescent screen current densities to yield true current. They also enable CCD conversion efficiencies to be obtained, which in turn allows images to be calibrated in terms of electron fluence. Using probes of known current in conjunction with a NiO reference specimen enables the X-ray detector solid angle to be determined. The NiO specimen also allows a wide range of other EDS detector parameters to be obtained, including the presence of ice and carbon contamination. A range of performance characteristics are reported for two large area EDS detector systems. Many of the measurements reported herein have been automated via the use of freely available scripts for DigitalMicrograph. PMID:26260274

  9. Nuclear accumulation of the Arabidopsis immune receptor RPS4 is necessary for triggering EDS1-dependent defense.

    PubMed

    Wirthmueller, Lennart; Zhang, Yan; Jones, Jonathan D G; Parker, Jane E

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of specific pathogen molecules inside the cell by nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors constitutes an important layer of innate immunity in plants. Receptor activation triggers host cellular reprogramming involving transcriptional potentiation of basal defenses and localized programmed cell death. The sites and modes of action of NB-LRR receptors are, however, poorly understood. Arabidopsis Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR) type NB-LRR receptor RPS4 recognizes the bacterial type III effector AvrRps4. We show that epitope-tagged RPS4 expressed under its native regulatory sequences distributes between endomembranes and nuclei in healthy and AvrRps4-triggered tissues. RPS4 accumulation in the nucleus, mediated by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) at its C terminus, is necessary for triggering immunity through authentic activation by AvrRps4 in Arabidopsis or as an effector-independent "deregulated" receptor in tobacco. A strikingly conserved feature of TIR-NB-LRR receptors is their recruitment of the nucleocytoplasmic basal-defense regulator EDS1 in resistance to diverse pathogens. We find that EDS1 is an indispensable component of RPS4 signaling and that it functions downstream of RPS4 activation but upstream of RPS4-mediated transcriptional reprogramming in the nucleus.

  10. Calculating slope and ED50 of additive dose-response curves, and application of these tabulated parameter values.

    PubMed

    Pöch, G; Pancheva, S N

    1995-06-01

    Comparing dose-response curves (DRCs) of a compound A in the absence and presence of a fixed dose of an antagonist B is standard in pharmacology and toxicology. When B qualitatively resembles A in its action, it is often useful to construct theoretical DRCs of additive and independent combinations. Theoretical curves are calculated from experimental values by the program ALLFIT, which uses the four parameter logistic equation. DRCs of theoretical, additive DRCs are obtained by using the respective values for slope and ED50, which were taken from tables presented here compiled on the basis of the slope of the DRC of A alone (0.6-14) and of the effect of B alone (1-75%). These tables are unnecessary for the construction of theoretical curves if A acts by an independent mechanism, giving values for slope and ED50 identical to those of the DRC of A alone. Experimental DRCs of antiviral and other effects (the latter taken from data in the literature) are compared with theoretical curves by an F-test analysis provided by ALLFIT. The method can be used successfully for the construction of theoretical curves for additive and independent DRCs and comparison with experimental curves. This comparison may help clarify the mode of interaction of A with B. PMID:7640393

  11. Taking off the training wheels: the properties of a dynamic vegetation model without climate envelopes, CLM4.5(ED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. A.; Muszala, S.; Verteinstein, M.; Lawrence, P.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Knox, R. G.; Koven, C.; Holm, J.; Rogers, B. M.; Spessa, A.; Lawrence, D.; Bonan, G.

    2015-11-01

    We describe an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept in the Community Land Model. The structure of CLM(ED) and the physiological and structural modifications applied to the CLM are presented. A major motivation of this development is to allow the prediction of biome boundaries directly from plant physiological traits via their competitive interactions. Here we investigate the performance of the model for an example biome boundary in eastern North America. We explore the sensitivity of the predicted biome boundaries and ecosystem properties to the variation of leaf properties using the parameter space defined by the GLOPNET global leaf trait database. Furthermore, we investigate the impact of four sequential alterations to the structural assumptions in the model governing the relative carbon economy of deciduous and evergreen plants. The default assumption is that the costs and benefits of deciduous vs. evergreen leaf strategies, in terms of carbon assimilation and expenditure, can reproduce the geographical structure of biome boundaries and ecosystem functioning. We find some support for this assumption, but only under particular combinations of model traits and structural assumptions. Many questions remain regarding the preferred methods for deployment of plant trait information in land surface models. In some cases, plant traits might best be closely linked to each other, but we also find support for direct linkages to environmental conditions. We advocate intensified study of the costs and benefits of plant life history strategies in different environments and the increased use of parametric and structural ensembles in the development and analysis of complex vegetation models.

  12. The effect of CO2 and Nd:YAP lasers on CAD/CAM Ceramics: SEM, EDS and thermal studies

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean Paul; Muhammad, Omid H; Medioni, Etienne; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The objective of this study was to investigate the interaction of infrared laser light on Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramic surfaces. Material and Methods: Sixty CAD/CAM ceramic discs were prepared and divided into two different groups: lithiumdisilicate ceramic (IPSe.maxCADs) and Zirconia ceramic (IPSe.maxZirCADs). The laser irradiation was performed on graphite and non-graphite surfaces with a Carbon Dioxide laser at 5W and 10W power in continuous mode (CW mode) and with Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Perovskite (Nd:YAP) laser at 10W. Surface textures and compositions were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Thermal elevation was measured by thermocouple during laser irradiation. Results: The SEM observation showed a rough surface plus cracks and fissures on CO2 10W samples and melting areas in Nd:YAP samples; moreover, with CO2 5W smooth and shallow surfaces were observed. EDS analysis revealed that laser irradiation does not result in modifications of the chemical composition even if minor changes in the atomic mass percentage of the components were registered. Thermocouple showed several thermal changes during laser irradiation. Conclusion: CO2 and Nd:YAP lasers modify CAD/CAM ceramic surface without chemical composition modifications. PMID:27141152

  13. Enhanced understanding of the relationship between erection and satisfaction in ED treatment: application of a longitudinal mediation model.

    PubMed

    Bushmakin, A G; Cappelleri, J C; Symonds, T; Stecher, V J

    2014-01-01

    To apportion the direct effect and the indirect effect (through erections) that sildenafil (vs placebo) has on individual satisfaction and couple satisfaction over time, longitudinal mediation modeling was applied to outcomes on the Sexual Experience Questionnaire. The model included data from weeks 4 and 10 (double-blind phase) and week 16 (open-label phase) of a controlled study. Data from 167 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) were available for analysis. Estimation of statistical significance was based on bootstrap simulations, which allowed inferences at and between time points. Percentages (and corresponding 95% confidence intervals) for direct and indirect effects of treatment were calculated using the model. For the individual satisfaction and couple satisfaction domains, direct treatment effects were negligible (not statistically significant) whereas indirect treatment effects via the erection domain represented >90% of the treatment effects (statistically significant). Week 4 vs week 10 percentages of direct and indirect effects were not statistically different, indicating that the mediation effects are longitudinally invariant. As there was no placebo arm in the open-label phase, mediation effects at week 16 were not estimable. In conclusion, erection has a crucial role as a mediator in restoring individual satisfaction and couple satisfaction in men with ED treated with sildenafil. PMID:23759829

  14. Assessment of metal species in river Ganga sediment at Varanasi, India using sequential extraction procedure and SEM-EDS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mayank; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, B D

    2015-09-01

    Aim of the present study was to assess impact of urban drains over river water and sediments by physico-chemical and metal analysis. Metal speciation (Sequential Extraction Procedure) and elemental composition analysis (SEM-EDS) was used to quantify metal pollution load in river sediments. Metal speciation analysis showed dominance of available and labile fractions of all heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) except Mn and Fe which were dominant in residual forms. Cluster analysis (CA), Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) were applied as source receptor modeling for pollutants. Results classified river stretch into three zones i.e. moderately, severely and extremely polluted, on the basis of pollutant concentration released from anthropogenic sources. SEM-EDS study revealed the elemental composition percentage in river sediments. Pollution Load Index (PLI) varied from 1.8 (S1)-3.9 (S15). The Geo accumulation index (GAI) was found highest for Cd (6.88-8.97) and Pb (2.41-3.24). PMID:26011279

  15. Assessment of metal species in river Ganga sediment at Varanasi, India using sequential extraction procedure and SEM-EDS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mayank; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, B D

    2015-09-01

    Aim of the present study was to assess impact of urban drains over river water and sediments by physico-chemical and metal analysis. Metal speciation (Sequential Extraction Procedure) and elemental composition analysis (SEM-EDS) was used to quantify metal pollution load in river sediments. Metal speciation analysis showed dominance of available and labile fractions of all heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) except Mn and Fe which were dominant in residual forms. Cluster analysis (CA), Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) were applied as source receptor modeling for pollutants. Results classified river stretch into three zones i.e. moderately, severely and extremely polluted, on the basis of pollutant concentration released from anthropogenic sources. SEM-EDS study revealed the elemental composition percentage in river sediments. Pollution Load Index (PLI) varied from 1.8 (S1)-3.9 (S15). The Geo accumulation index (GAI) was found highest for Cd (6.88-8.97) and Pb (2.41-3.24).

  16. Comparing the detection of iron-based pottery pigment on a carbon-coated sherd by SEM-EDS and by Micro-XRF-SEM.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Michael W; Washburn, Dorothy K; Ellis, E Ann; Pendleton, Bonnie B

    2014-03-01

    The same sherd was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and a micro X-ray fluorescence tube attached to a scanning electron microscope (Micro-XRF-SEM) to compare the effectiveness of elemental detection of iron-based pigment. To enhance SEM-EDS mapping, the sherd was carbon coated. The carbon coating was not required to produce Micro-XRF-SEM maps but was applied to maintain an unbiased comparison between the systems. The Micro-XRF-SEM analysis was capable of lower limits of detection than that of the SEM-EDS system, and therefore the Micro-XRF-SEM system could produce elemental maps of elements not easily detected by SEM-EDS mapping systems. Because SEM-EDS and Micro-XRF-SEM have been used for imaging and chemical analysis of biological samples, this comparison of the detection systems should be useful to biologists, especially those involved in bone or tooth (hard tissue) analysis.

  17. Comparing the Detection of Iron-Based Pottery Pigment on a Carbon-Coated Sherd by SEM-EDS and by Micro-XRF-SEM

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Michael W.; Washburn, Dorothy K.; Ellis, E. Ann; Pendleton, Bonnie B.

    2014-01-01

    The same sherd was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and a micro X-ray fluorescence tube attached to a scanning electron microscope (Micro-XRF-SEM) to compare the effectiveness of elemental detection of iron-based pigment. To enhance SEM-EDS mapping, the sherd was carbon coated. The carbon coating was not required to produce Micro-XRF-SEM maps but was applied to maintain an unbiased comparison between the systems. The Micro-XRF-SEM analysis was capable of lower limits of detection than that of the SEM-EDS system, and therefore the Micro-XRF-SEM system could produce elemental maps of elements not easily detected by SEM-EDS mapping systems. Because SEM-EDS and Micro-XRF-SEM have been used for imaging and chemical analysis of biological samples, this comparison of the detection systems should be useful to biologists, especially those involved in bone or tooth (hard tissue) analysis. PMID:24600333

  18. [Development and validation of a German questionnaire assessing motivation to change in eating disorders - the Stages of Change Questionnaire for Eating Disorders (SOCQ-ED)].

    PubMed

    von Brachel, Ruth; Hötzel, Katrin; Schloßmacher, Lena; Hechler, Tanja; Kosfelder, Joachim; Rieger, Elizabeth; Rüddel, Heinz; Braks, Karsten; Huber, Thomas J; Vocks, Silja

    2012-12-01

    The present study describes the development and validation of a German questionnaire assessing motivation to change in individuals with eating disorders (Stages of Change Questionnaire-Eating Disorders, SOCQ-ED). The SOCQ-ED measures stages of change separately for each eating disorder symptom domain. Psychometric properties were assessed in a sample of N=63 women with Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa. Test-retest reliability ranged from rtt=0.42 to 0.78 (Mdn=0.56), correlations with the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment were between r=0.21 and 0.32 and correlations with measurements of eating pathology ranged from r=0.19 to 0.46. The results provide initial support for the reliability and validity of the SOCQ-ED. PMID:23247619

  19. In the midst of a large measles outbreak, EDs take steps to bolster screening procedures, prevent potential transmissions.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    A large, multi-state outbreak of measles is prompting EDs around the country to bolster their screening procedures and provide education to staff, most of whom have never seen a measles case. Dozens of people in more than 17 states have been confirmed to have the disease, with most of these cases associated with an outbreak that began at an amusement park in southern California. Measles is extremely contagious, infecting nine out of 10 people exposed to the virus if they are susceptible to the disease. In cases in which a contagious disease is suspected, experts advise emergency providers to protect themselves before proceeding to the traditional vital signs. It's a concept referred to as "vital sign zero." Once a measles case is confirmed, experts say emergency staff should isolate the patient with protection such as an N-95 mask, and inform both the hospital's infection control department and public health authorities. PMID:25844431

  20. SEM-EDS Analyses of Small Craters in Stardust Aluminum Foils: Implications for the Wild-2 Dust Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, J.; Horz, F.; Bridges, J. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Djouadi, Z.; Floss, C.; Graham, G. A.; Green, S. F.; Heck, P. R.; Hoppe, P.; Huth, J.; Kearsley, A; Leroux, H.; Marhas, K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Teslich, N.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminium foils were used on Stardust to stabilize the aerogel specimens in the modular collector tray. Part of these foils were fully exposed to the flux of cometary grains emanating from Wild 2. Because the exposed part of these foils had to be harvested before extraction of the aerogel, numerous foil strips some 1.7 mm wide and 13 or 33 mm long were generated during Stardusts's Preliminary Examination (PE). These strips are readily accommodated in their entirety in the sample chambers of modern SEMs, thus providing the opportunity to characterize in situ the size distribution and residue composition - employing EDS methods - of statistically more significant numbers of cometary dust particles compared to aerogel, the latter mandating extensive sample preparation. We describe here the analysis of nearly 300 impact craters and their implications for Wild 2 dust.

  1. Medication huddles slash adverse drug events (ADE), promote safety culture across all hospital units, including the ED.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    To make a big dent in adverse drug events (ADE), Nationwide Children's Hospital devised medication huddles: a process that takes place after every reported ADE. A core huddle team meets with clinicians from the specific unit involved to discuss why the ADE occurred, and what can be done to prevent future events. In three years, the approach has reduced ADEs by 74%, and the rate of ADEs per 1,000 dispensed doses has decreased by 85%. * Administrators say a safety culture that encourages error reporting is key to making the process work. * To facilitate the huddle discussions, developers created a data collection tool that prompts huddle participants to describe the ADE, what factors were involved, and potential solutions. * While the medication huddles were first implemented in the hospital's critical care units, the process has since been expanded to include all areas of the hospital, including the ED. PMID:24640292

  2. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  3. Imaging and elemental mapping of biological specimens with a dual-EDS dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Kim, A M; Bleher, R; Myers, B D; Marvin, R G; Inada, H; Nakamura, K; Zhang, X F; Roth, E; Li, S Y; Woodruff, T K; O'Halloran, T V; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2013-05-01

    A dedicated analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with dual energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors has been designed for complementary high performance imaging as well as high sensitivity elemental analysis and mapping of biological structures. The performance of this new design, based on a Hitachi HD-2300A model, was evaluated using a variety of biological specimens. With three imaging detectors, both the surface and internal structure of cells can be examined simultaneously. The whole-cell elemental mapping, especially of heavier metal species that have low cross-section for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), can be faithfully obtained. Optimization of STEM imaging conditions is applied to thick sections as well as thin sections of biological cells under low-dose conditions at room and cryogenic temperatures. Such multimodal capabilities applied to soft/biological structures usher a new era for analytical studies in biological systems.

  4. Growth of and toxin production by nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in cooked puréed vegetables at refrigeration temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, F; Peck, M W

    1996-01-01

    Seven strains of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum (types B, E, and F) were each inoculated into a range of anaerobic cooked puréed vegetables. After incubation at 10 degrees C for 15 to 60 days, all seven strains formed toxin in mushrooms, five did so in broccoli, four did so in cauliflower, three did so in asparagus, and one did so in kale. Growth kinetics of nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B in cooked mushrooms, cauliflower, and potatoes were determined at 16, 10, 8, and 5 degrees C. Growth and toxin production occurred in cooked cauliflower and mushrooms at all temperatures and in potatoes at 16 and 8 degrees C. The C. botulinum neurotoxin was detected within 3 to 5 days at 16 degrees C, 11 to 13 days at 10 degrees C, 10 to 34 days at 8 degrees C, and 17 to 20 days at 5 degrees C. PMID:8702303

  5. In the midst of a large measles outbreak, EDs take steps to bolster screening procedures, prevent potential transmissions.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    A large, multi-state outbreak of measles is prompting EDs around the country to bolster their screening procedures and provide education to staff, most of whom have never seen a measles case. Dozens of people in more than 17 states have been confirmed to have the disease, with most of these cases associated with an outbreak that began at an amusement park in southern California. Measles is extremely contagious, infecting nine out of 10 people exposed to the virus if they are susceptible to the disease. In cases in which a contagious disease is suspected, experts advise emergency providers to protect themselves before proceeding to the traditional vital signs. It's a concept referred to as "vital sign zero." Once a measles case is confirmed, experts say emergency staff should isolate the patient with protection such as an N-95 mask, and inform both the hospital's infection control department and public health authorities.

  6. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  7. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM-EDS: using the full set of available X-ray lines.

    PubMed

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S A; Midgley, P A

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM-EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  8. MicroRaman, PXRD, EDS and microscopic investigation of magnesium calcite biomineral phases. The case of sea urchin biominerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzęcka-Prokop, B.; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, A.; Koszowska, E.

    2007-02-01

    This study concerns Mg-calcite characterization (and in particular molecular structure and microstructural studies of mineral phases) of a sea urchin mineralised test and spines. Sea urchins are spiny sea animals (kingdom Animalia, phylum Echinodermata, class Echinoidea). Microscopic observations, SEM, EDS, PXRD and spectroscopic microRaman methods have been applied to characterize the biomineral parts of the sea urchin. The latter technique is very useful in research of biological systems and especially suitable for monitoring differences within biomineral phases exhibiting varieties of morphological forms. Crystalline magnesium calcium carbonate, Mg xCa 1- xCO 3 (magnesian calcite; space group R-3 cH; a = 4.9594(8) Å, c = 16.886(6) Å), has been identified as the predominant biomineral component.

  9. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM–EDS: Using the full set of available X-ray lines

    PubMed Central

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S.A.; Midgley, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM–EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  10. Brief report: data on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (5th ed.) in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Coolican, Jamesie; Bryson, Susan E; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie

    2008-01-01

    The Fifth Edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales (SB5; Roid, G. H. (2003). Stanford Binet intelligence scales (5th ed.). Itasca, IL: Riverside Publishing) is relatively new, with minimal published research on general populations and none with special populations. The present study provides information on the cognitive profiles of children with ASD (N=63) and on the whether the abbreviated battery is representative of the full scale. A high percentage of the children had significantly stronger nonverbal (vs. verbal) skills. This pattern was not related to Full Scale IQ, age or diagnostic subgroup. IQs derived from the abbreviated battery accounted for a large proportion of the variance in FSIQ relative to comparable abbreviated batteries. However, caution is warranted when using the abbreviated battery, as it misrepresents actual ability in a small percentage of cases.

  11. Selective targeting of tumour neovasculature by a radiohalogenated human antibody fragment specific for the ED-B domain of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Demartis, S; Tarli, L; Borsi, L; Zardi, L; Neri, D

    2001-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a characteristic feature of many aggressive tumours and other disorders. Antibodies capable of binding to new blood vessels, but not to mature vessels, could be used as selective targeting agents for immunoscintigraphic and radioimmunotherapeutic applications. Here we show that scFv(L19), a recombinant human antibody fragment with sub-nanomolar affinity for the ED-B domain of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, can be stably labelled with iodine-125 and astatine-211 with full retention of immunoreactivity, using a trimethyl-stannyl benzoate bifunctional derivative. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing two different types of tumour grafted subcutaneously, followed by ex vivo micro-autoradiographic analysis, revealed that scFv(L19) rapidly localises around tumour blood vessels, but not around normal vessels. Four hours after intravenous injection of the stably radioiodinated scFv(L19), tumour to blood ratios were 6:1 in mice bearing the F9 murine teratocarcinoma and 9:1 in mice bearing an FE8 rat sarcoma. As expected, all other organs (including kidney) contained significantly less radioactivity than the tumour. Since the ED-B domain of fibronectin has an identical sequence in mouse and man, scFv(L19) is a pan-species antibody and the results presented here suggest clinical utility of radiolabelled scFv(L19) for the scintigraphic detection of angiogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, it should now be possible to investigate scFv(L19) for the selective delivery of 211At to the tumour neovasculature, causing the selective death of tumour endothelial cells and tumour collapse. PMID:11357506

  12. Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 and Historic Assessement of the Happy Valley Worker Camp Roane County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    New South Associates

    2009-08-17

    Parcel ED-3 was the location of a portion of 'Happy Valley', a temporary worker housing area occupied from 1943 to 1947 during the construction of the K-25 Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The project was carried out under subcontract for the Department of Energy. The survey report will be used in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). New South Associates conducted a Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Roane County, Tennessee. The survey was conducted in two parts. The first survey was carried out in 2008 and covered an area measuring approximately 110 acres. The second survey took place in 2009 and focused on 72 acres west of the first survey area. The objective of the surveys was to identify any archaeological remains associated with Happy Valley and any additional sites on the property and to assess these sites for National Register eligibility. New South Associates also conducted a historic assessment to gather information on Happy Valley. This historic assessment was used in conjunction with the archaeological survey to evaluate the significance of the Happy Valley site. Archaeological remains of Happy Valley were located throughout the parcel, but no additional sites were located. The official state site number for Happy Valley is 40RE577. During the two surveys a total of 13 artifact concentrations, 14 isolated finds, and 75 structural features were located. Due to the Happy Valley's stron gassociation with the Manhattan Project, the site is recommended eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A.

  13. Assessment of the potential reproductive and subchronic toxicity of EDS coal liquids in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    McKee, R H; Plutnick, R T; Traul, K A

    1987-11-01

    The EDS direct coal liquefaction process is one of several methods of producing liquid fuels from coal which have reached the pilot or demonstration stage of development. Relatively high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are present in distillate fractions boiling above approximately 370 degrees C, and unrefined coal-derived liquids which contain substantial amounts of material from this boiling range are relatively potent dermal carcinogens. Because coal-derived liquids containing high boiling (i.e., greater than 370 degrees C) material may pose a variety of toxic hazards, efforts have been made to evaluate the potential effects on biological endpoints other than cancer. The present studies assessed the potential for reproductive and subchronic toxicity following repeated oral administration of 2 coal-derived liquids, recycle solvent and fuel oil, which contained substantial amounts of high boiling material. Few biologically important differences were found in any of the experimental parameters. In the reproductive toxicity study, frequency of fertilization and implantation, mean number of live births, fraction of litter surviving through the lactation period and mean weight gain of the litters during the lactation period were not affected by treatment; in addition, there was no evidence of increased frequency of malformation. In the subchronic toxicity study, weight gain was reduced in animals from the high dose groups, but was not significantly different from controls. Liver weights were significantly elevated, but there was no microscopic evidence of pathologic changes. Erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin levels and hematocrits were significantly reduced suggesting a tendency towards anemia. These findings suggested that repeated exposure to EDS recycle solvent and fuel oil at levels of up to 0.5 g/kg per day had no detectable effect on reproductive capacity or performance and did not induce substantial systemic toxicity.

  14. Preventing avoidable incidents leading to a presentation to the emergency department (ED) by older adults with cognitive impairment: protocol for a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, Véronique; Généreux, Mélissa; Gagnon-Roy, Mireille; Veillette, Nathalie; Egan, Mary; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Lacasse, Francis; Rose, Kathy; Stocco, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Older adults with cognitive impairment represent a large portion (21–42%) of people (65+) who consult at an emergency department (ED). Because this sub-group is at higher risk for hospitalisation and mortality following an ED visit, awareness about ‘avoidable’ incidents should be increased in order to prevent presentations to the ED due to such incidents. This study aims to synthetise the actual knowledge related to ‘avoidable’ incidents (ie, traumatic injuries, poisoning and other consequences of external causes) (WHO, 2016) leading to ED presentations in older people with cognitive impairment. Methodology and analysis A scoping review will be performed. Scientific and grey literature (1996–2016) will be searched using a combination of key words pertaining to avoidable incidents, ED presentations, older adults and cognitive impairment. A variety of databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Ageline, SCOPUS, ProQuest Dissertations/theses, EBM Reviews, Healthstar), online library catalogues, governmental websites and published statistics will be examined. Included sources will pertain to community-dwelling older adults presenting to the ED as a result of an avoidable incident, with the main focus on those with cognitive impairment. Data (eg, type, frequency, severity, circumstances of incidents, preventive measures) will be extracted and analysed using a thematic chart and content analysis. Discussion and dissemination This scoping review will provide a picture of the actual knowledge on the subject and identify knowledge gaps in existing literature to be filled by future primary researches. Findings will help stakeholders to develop programmes in order to promote safe and healthy environments and behaviours aimed at reducing avoidable incidents in seniors, especially those with cognitive impairment. PMID:26873049

  15. Incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) as a novel strategy for identification of the skewed X inactivation pattern in balanced and unbalanced X-rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Sisdelli, Luiza; Vidi, Angela Cristina; Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Di Battista, Adriana; Bortolai, Adriana; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; da Silva, Magnus R Dias; Melaragno, Maria Isabel; Carvalheira, Gianna

    2016-02-01

    X-chromosome inactivation occurs randomly in normal female cells. However, the inactivation can be skewed in patients with alterations in X-chromosome. In balanced X-autosome translocations, normal X is preferentially inactivated, while in unbalanced X alterations, the aberrant X is usually inactivated. Here, we present a novel strategy to verify the skewed X inactivation pattern through the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into cells, in 11 patients: five carriers of balanced X-autosome translocations and six of unbalanced X-chromosome alterations. Since EdU is a labeled nucleoside analog of thymidine, its incorporation during DNA synthesis can reveal late replication regions and the inactive X-chromosome. All EdU findings were validated by the human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) assay. The late replication regions were easily and quickly visualized in all cells, where inactive Xs are marked with strong green fluorescence. It was observed that the normal X-chromosome was preferentially inactivated in patients with balanced X-autosome translocations; while the aberrant X-chromosome was inactivated in most cells from patients with unbalanced alterations. By performing the fluorescence-based EdU assay, the differences between the active and inactive X-chromosomes are more easily recognizable than by classic cytogenetic methods. Furthermore, EdU incorporation allows the observation of the late replication regions in autosomal segments present in X derivatives from X-autosome translocations. Therefore, EdU assay permits an accurate and efficient cytogenetic evaluation of the X inactivation pattern with a low-cost, easy to perform and highly reproducible technique. PMID:26670424

  16. An Evidence-Based Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Curriculum for Emergency Department (ED) Providers Improves Skills and Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Edward; Bernstein, Judith; Feldman, James; Fernandez, William; Hagan, Melissa; Mitchell, Patricia; Safi, Clara; Woolard, Robert; Mello, Mike; Baird, Janette; Lee, Cristina; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Broderick, Kerry; LaPerrier, Kathryn A.; Kellermann, Arthur; Wald, Marlena M.; Taylor, Robert E.; Walton, Kim; Grant-Ervin, Michelle; Rollinson, Denise; Edwards, David; Chan, Theodore; Davis, Dan; Marshall, Jean Buchanan; Aseltine, Robert; James, Amy; Abu-Hasaballah, Khamis; Schilling, Elizabeth; Baumann, Brigitte M.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.; Maio, Ronald; Cunningham, Rebecca; Murrell, Teresa; Doezema, David; Bauer, Michael J.; Anglin, Deirdre; Eliassen, Adriana; Martin, Marcus; Pines, Jesse; Buchanan, Leslie; Turner, James; D'Onofrio, Gail; Degutis, Linda C.; Owens, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Emergency Departments (EDs) offer an opportunity to improve the care of patients with at-risk and dependent drinking by teaching staff to screen, perform brief intervention and refer to treatment (SBIRT). We describe here the implementation at 14 Academic EDs of a structured SBIRT curriculum to determine if this learning experience improves provider beliefs and practices. Methods ED faculty, residents, nurses, physician extenders, social workers, and Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) were surveyed prior to participating in either a two hour interactive workshops with case simulations, or a web-based program (www.ed.bmc.org/sbirt). A pre-post repeated measures design assessed changes in provider beliefs and practices at three and 12 months post-exposure. Results Among 402 ED providers, 74% reported < 10 hours of prior professional alcohol-related education and 78% had < 2 hours exposure in the previous year. At 3-month follow-up, scores for self-reported confidence in ability, responsibility to intervene, and actual utilization of SBIRT skills all improved significantly over baseline. Gains decreased somewhat at 12 months, but remained above baseline. Length of time in practice was positively associated with SBIRT utilization, controlling for gender, race and type of profession. Persistent barriers included time limitations and lack of referral resources. Conclusions ED providers respond favorably to SBIRT. Changes in utilization were substantial at three months post-exposure to a standardized curriculum, but less apparent after 12 months. Booster sessions, trained assistants and infrastructure supports may be needed to sustain changes over the longer term. PMID:18077305

  17. Wait watchers. Smart organizations are demonstrating that while they can't erase ED wait times, they can leverage technology to keep patients better informed.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Kate Huvane

    2010-04-01

    Increases in ED visits are significantly affecting patient access, quality, cost and care management--a trend that is expected to continue. A number of organizations are dealing with the increased demand for services by implementing technologies to keep patients better informed of wait times. Publishing ED wait times online offers hospitals a way to communicate information to patients quickly without requiring a significant investment from the IT staff. Hospitals are also utilizing visibility boards to keep both patients and staff updated on patient conditions and room status. PMID:20426236

  18. A Recap of the Sixth Nationwide Vocational Education Dissemination Conference: Disseminating for Tomorrow's Voc Ed. The Proceedings (Columbus, Ohio, November 15-17, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Norman M., Comp.; And Others

    This document reviews the activities of a conference on "Disseminating for Tomorrow's Voc Ed." The conference featured tools, techniques, information, examples that can be used to promote good dissemination, use of research, and developmental results. Considerable emphasis at the conference was given to topics and activities related to…

  19. 40 CFR 721.1735 - Alkylbisoxyalkyl (sub-sti-tut-ed-1,1-dimethylethylphenyl) ben-zo-tria-zole (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylbisoxyalkyl (sub-sti-tut-ed-1,1-dimethylethylphenyl) ben-zo-tria-zole (generic name). 721.1735 Section 721.1735 Protection of Environment... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1735 Alkylbisoxyalkyl...

  20. The Process in Completing a Nontraditional Group Dissertation in Practice for the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate, the Ed.D. Educational Leadership Program at Lynn University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on how a cohort of scholarly practitioners extended the traditional Doctorate in Education (Ed.D.) model at Lynn University by undertaking a nontraditional group Dissertation in Practice (DiP). The participants were a cohort of 11 scholarly practitioners known as Cohort 5 who became the first Lynn University doctoral students to…

  1. Chasing Woozles? A Personal Reflection on a Quarter-Century in Ed Tech, and an Attempt to Peer Ahead through the Fog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Corrie

    2014-01-01

    While it's easy to get caught up in the frenetic drive to do the Next Big New Thing in educational technology, it's helpful to remember that a lot of important things "don't" change. But, today, we face almost constant change, and that has serious implications for education and ed-tech professionals. This article looks back at where…

  2. EFFECT OF GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS), BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID (BCA) AND MOLINATE ON REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION IN CD-1 MALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECT OF GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO ETHANE DIMETHANESULFONATE (EDS), BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID (BCA) AND MOLINATE ON REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION IN CD-1 MALE MICE. D.K. Tarka1,2 , G.R. Klinefelter2, J.C. Rockett2, J.D. Suarez2, N.L. Roberts2 and J.M. Rogers1,2. 1 University of North Carol...

  3. ED-MEDIA 2001 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications. Proceedings (13th, Tampere, Finland, June 25-30, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomerie, Craig, Ed.; Viteli, Jarmo, Ed.

    This 13th annual ED-MEDIA conference serves as a multidisciplinary forum for the discussion of the latest research, developments, and applications of multimedia, hypermedia, and telecommunications for all levels of education. This document contains papers from attendees representing more than 60 countries, with keynote speakers representing both…

  4. Shifting the Focus to Learning: California's Accountability Debates. State Experts Discuss How Accountability Can Improve Student Achievement. EdSource Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EdSource, Inc., Palo Alto, CA.

    Based on an April 1998 conference, this EdSource report focuses on what several prominent education experts and school district superintendents perceive as the primary challenges and opportunities faced by California's school accountability movement. Gerald Hayward, a policy analyst, believes that any proposed accountability system should be based…

  5. Modeling the Integrated Expansion of the Canadian and U.S. Power Sectors with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zinaman, Owen; Ibanez, Eduardo; Heimiller, Donna; Eurek, Kelly; Mai, Trieu

    2015-07-02

    This document describes the development effort for creating a robust representation of the combined capacity expansion of the U.S. and Canadian electric sectors within the NREL ReEDS model. Thereafter, it demonstrates the newly established capability through an illustrative sensitivity analysis. In conducting the sensitivity analysis, we describe the value of an integrated modeling approach.

  6. The disease resistance signaling components EDS1 and PAD4 are essential regulators of the cell death pathway controlled by LSD1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rustérucci, C; Aviv, D H; Holt, B F; Dangl, J L; Parker, J E

    2001-10-01

    Specific recognition of pathogens is mediated by plant disease resistance (R) genes and translated into a successful defense response. The extent of associated hypersensitive cell death varies from none to an area encompassing cells surrounding an infection site, depending on the R gene activated. We constructed double mutants in Arabidopsis between positive regulators of R function and a negative regulator of cell death, LSD1, to address whether genes required for normal R function also regulate the runaway cell death observed in lsd1 mutants. We report here that EDS1 and PAD4, two signaling genes that mediate some but not all R responses, also are required for runaway cell death in the lsd1 mutant. Importantly, this novel function of EDS1 and PAD4 is operative when runaway cell death in lsd1 is initiated through an R gene that does not require EDS1 or PAD4 for disease resistance. NDR1, another component of R signaling, also contributes to the control of plant cell death. The roles of EDS1 and PAD4 in regulating lsd1 runaway cell death are related to the interpretation of reactive oxygen intermediate-derived signals at infection sites. We further demonstrate that the fate of superoxide at infection sites is different from that observed at the leading margins of runaway cell death lesions in lsd1 mutants.

  7. ChemEd X Data: Exposing Students to Open Scientific Data for Higher-Order Thinking and Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eklund, Brandon; Prat-Resina, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ChemEd X Data is an open web tool that collects and curates physical and chemical data of hundreds of substances. This tool allows students to navigate, select, and graphically represent data such as boiling and melting points, enthalpies of combustion, and heat capacities for hundreds of molecules. By doing so, students can independently identify…

  8. Building on Strengths in a Time of Retrenchment: Developing an M.Ed. in Higher Education--Student Affairs Emphasis to Train Christian Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jason; Haseltine, Jeffrey; Williams, Carol

    2007-01-01

    To gain approval of a new master's degree in difficult financial times, the authors applied strategies that are applicable at other institutions. Using existing internal resources to build on the university's mission was key in developing a new M.Ed. in Higher Education--Student Affairs Emphasis at Abilene Christian University. Creativity and…

  9. Politics of Policy: Assessing the Implementation, Impact, and Evolution of the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reagan, Emilie Mitescu; Schram, Thomas; McCurdy, Kathryn; Chang, Te-Hsin; Evans, Carla M.

    2016-01-01

    Summative performance assessments in teacher education, such as the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and the edTPA, have been heralded through polices intended to enhance the quality of the teaching profession and raise its stature among other professions. However, the development and implementation of the PACT, and…

  10. The Effect of Computer Games on the Proficiency of the B.Ed. Teacher Trainees in Using the Conventional Expressions in Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muthiah, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the effect of computer games on the proficiency of the B.Ed teacher trainees in using the conventional expressions in conversations. The role of technology in language learning has made outdated, drills, grammatical explanations and translation of texts, and the focus is shifted to communication based…

  11. National Conference on the Educational Applications of Geographic Information Systems (EdGIS): Conference Report (1st, Washington, D.C., January 27-29, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barstow, Daniel, Ed.; And Others

    The goals of the Educational Applications of Geographic Information Systems (EdGIS) Conference were to: showcase current applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, and other mapping software in pre-college education; develop a better understanding of the current state of the art in both GIS software and related…

  12. 34 CFR Appendix B to Part 5b - Routine Uses Applicable to More Than One System of Records Maintained by ED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Routine Uses Applicable to More Than One System of... One System of Records Maintained by ED (1) In the event that a system of records maintained by this..., criminal or regulatory in nature, and whether arising by general statute or particular program statute,...

  13. The Convergent and Divergent Validity of the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education (VAL-ED): Instructional Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Cravens, Xiu; Porter, Andrew; Murphy, Joseph; Elliott, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the ongoing dialog of whether and how instructional leadership is distinguished conceptually from general leadership notions, such as charisma, and to continue the ongoing psychometric research on the The Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education (VAL-ED) by examining its convergent and…

  14. Degree Completions in Areas of National Need, 1996-97 and 2001-02. E.D. Tab. NCES 2006-154

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goan, Sarah Krichels; Cunningham, Alisa F.

    2006-01-01

    This E.D. Tab focuses on degree completions in academic programs that have been deemed areas of national need by federal legislation. The analysis focuses on completions data from 1996-97 and 2001-02 and examines completions at institutions granting awards of associate's degrees and higher. In particular, it looks at the change in the total number…

  15. Motivation for change as a predictor of eating disorder treatment outcomes using a brief self-report YBC-EDS in a residential eating disorder population.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Mary E; Weltzin, Theodore

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure and psychometric properties of a new brief self-report form of the Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale (YBC-EDS-BSR) in a transdiagnostic eating disorder population, and to determine the predictive ability of motivation for change and ego syntonic subscales on treatment outcome. Self-report measures of the YBC-EDS-BSR, eating pathology, depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive symptoms were collected from 164 individuals entering residential treatment. Of these, 107 individuals completed identical measures at discharge. The admission items on the YBC-EDS-BSR were examined for factor structure, and subscales were examined for internal, convergent and discriminant validity. Multiple regression analysis was used to investigate predictive value of the motivation and ego syntonic subscales on two measures of treatment outcome. Results indicate that the YBC-EDS-BSR demonstrated a robust factor structure and good psychometric properties in this population. The predicted ego-syntonic subscale did not emerge as an independent factor. The motivation for change subscale significantly predicted treatment outcome on the EDE-Q and the EDI-3 Global Maladjustment Scale. The ego-syntonic items and other psychopathology measures had no predictive value on treatment outcome. Results suggest that motivation for change is a significant predictor of treatment outcome over and above baseline psychopathology.

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health... DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for Educational and Public Health Purposes § 102-75.495... educational and public health purposes? Yes, ED or HHS may notify eligible non-profit institutions that...

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.495 - May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May the Department of Education (ED) or the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) notify nonprofit organizations that surplus real property and related personal property is available for educational and public health purposes? 102-75.495 Section 102-75.495...

  18. Pain management trend of vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) at a community hospital emergency department (ED) for patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Susumu; Khan, Isra'a; Mushtaq, Rao; Sanikommu, Srinivasa Reddy; Mbeumo, Carline; LaChance, Jenny; Roebuck, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pain management at the emergency department (ED) for vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) for patients with sickle cell disease has not been optimum, with a long delay in giving the initial analgesic. We conducted a retrospective survey over a 7-year period to determine our ED's timing in giving pain medication to patients with VOC as a quality improvement project. We compared different periods, children vs adults, and the influence of gender in the analgesic administration timing. This is a retrospective chart review of three different periods: (1) years 2007-2008, (2) years 2011-2012, and (3) year 2013. We extracted relevant information from ED records. Data were analyzed using Student t test, chi-square analysis, and the Kruskal-Wallis test. There was a progressive improvement in the time interval to the 1st analgesic over these three periods. Children received analgesics more quickly than adults in all periods. Male adult patients received pain medication faster than female adult patients, although initial pain scores were higher in female than in male patients. Progressively fewer pediatric patients utilized ED over these three periods, but no difference for adult patients was observed. The proportion of pediatric patients admitted to the hospital increased with each period. The progressive decrease in both the number of patients and the number of visits to the ED by children suggested that the collective number of VOC in children has decreased, possibly secondary to the dissemination of hydroxyurea use. We failed to observe the same trend in adult patients. The need for IV access, and ordering laboratory tests or imaging studies tends to delay analgesic administration. Delay in administration of the first analgesic was more pronounced for female adult patients than male adult patients in spite of their higher pain score. Health care providers working in ED should make conscious efforts to respect pain in women as well as pain in men. Though not proven from this study

  19. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2011-01-01

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing. PMID:22709611

  20. FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS microstructural analysis of metal-ceramic and zirconia-ceramic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Sebastiani, M; Battaini, P; Menghini, P; Bemporad, E

    2012-01-10

    Recently introduced FIB/SEM analysis in microscopy seems to provide a high-resolution characterization of the samples by 3D (FIB) cross-sectioning and (SEM) high resolution imaging. The aim of this study was to apply the FIB/SEM and SEM/EDS analysis to the interfaces of a metal-ceramic vs. two zirconia-ceramic systems. Plate samples of three different prosthetic systems were prepared in the dental lab following the manufacturers' instructions, where metal-ceramic was the result of a ceramic veneering (porcelain-fused-to-metal) and the two zirconia-ceramic systems were produced by the dedicated CAD-CAM procedures of the zirconia cores (both with final sintering) and then veneered by layered or heat pressed ceramics. In a FIB/SEM equipment (also called DualBeam), a thin layer of platinum (1 μm) was deposited on samples surface crossing the interfaces, in order to protect them during milling. Then, increasingly deeper trenches were milled by a focused ion beam, first using a relatively higher and later using a lower ion current (from 9 nA to 0.28 nA, 30KV). Finally, FEG-SEM (5KV) micrographs (1000-50,000X) were acquired. In a SEM the analysis of the morphology and internal microstructure was performed by 13KV secondary and backscattered electrons signals (in all the samples). The compositional maps were then performed by EDS probe only in the metal-ceramic system (20kV). Despite the presence of many voids in all the ceramic layers, it was possible to identify: (1) the grain structures of the metallic and zirconia substrates, (2) the thin oxide layer at the metal-ceramic interface and its interactions with the first ceramic layer (wash technique), (3) the roughness of the two different zirconia cores and their interactions with the ceramic interface, where the presence of zirconia grains in the ceramic layer was reported in two system possibly due to sandblasting before ceramic firing.