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Sample records for eddy accumulation technique

  1. Methane fluxes above the Hainich forest by True Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas; Gentsch, Lydia; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the role of forests for the global methane cycle requires quantifying vegetation-atmosphere exchange of methane, however observations of turbulent methane fluxes remain scarce. Here we measured turbulent fluxes of methane (CH4) above a beech-dominated old-growth forest in the Hainich National Park, Germany, and validated three different measurement approaches: True Eddy Accumulation (TEA, closed-path laser spectroscopy), and eddy covariance (EC, open-path and closed-path laser spectroscopy, respectively). The Hainich flux tower is a long-term Fluxnet and ICOS site with turbulent fluxes and ecosystem observations spanning more than 15 years. The current study is likely the first application of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) for the measurement of turbulent exchange of methane and one of the very few studies comparing open-path and closed-path eddy covariance (EC) setups side-by-side. We observed uptake of methane by the forest during the day (a methane sink with a maximum rate of 0.03 μmol m-2 s-1 at noon) and no or small fluxes of methane from the forest to the atmosphere at night (a methane source of typically less than 0.01 μmol m-2 s-1) based on continuous True Eddy Accumulation measurements in September 2015. First results comparing TEA to EC CO2 fluxes suggest that True Eddy Accumulation is a valid option for turbulent flux quantifications using slow response gas analysers (here CRDS laser spectroscopy, other potential techniques include mass spectroscopy). The TEA system was one order of magnitude more energy efficient compared to closed-path eddy covariance. The open-path eddy covariance setup required the least amount of user interaction but is often constrained by low signal-to-noise ratios obtained when measuring methane fluxes over forests. Closed-path eddy covariance showed good signal-to-noise ratios in the lab, however in the field it required significant amounts of user intervention in addition to a high power consumption. We conclude

  2. USE OF RELAXED EDDY ACCUMULATION TO MEASURE BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE EXCHANGE OF ISOPRENE AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL TRACE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The micrometeorological flux measurement technique known as relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) holds promise as a powerful new tool for ecologists. The more popular eddy covariance (eddy correlation) technique requires the use of sensors that can respond at fast rates (10 Hz), and t...

  3. USE OF RELAXED EDDY ACCUMULATION TO MEASURE BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE EXCHANGE OF ISOPRENE AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL TRACE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The micrometeorological flux measurement technique known as relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) holds promise as a powerful new tool for ecologists. The more popular eddy covariance (eddy correlation) technique requires the use of sensors that can respond at fast rates (10 Hz), and t...

  4. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOEpatents

    Petri, Mark C.; Kupperman, David S.; Morman, James A.; Reifman, Jaques; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  5. A True Eddy Accumulation - Eddy Covariance hybrid for measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is state-of-the-art in directly and continuously measuring turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapor. However, low signal-to-noise ratios, high flow rates and missing or complex gas analyzers limit it's application to few scalars. True eddy accumulation, based on conditional sampling ideas by Desjardins in 1972, requires no fast response analyzers and is therefore potentially applicable to a wider range of scalars. Recently we showed possibly the first successful implementation of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide of a grassland. However, most accumulation systems share the complexity of having to store discrete air samples in physical containers representing entire flux averaging intervals. The current study investigates merging principles of eddy accumulation and eddy covariance, which we here refer to as "true eddy accumulation in transient mode" (TEA-TM). This direct flux method TEA-TM combines true eddy accumulation with continuous sampling. The TEA-TM setup is simpler than discrete accumulation methods while avoiding the need for fast response gas analyzers and high flow rates required for EC. We implemented the proposed TEA-TM method and measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O) above a mixed beech forest at the Hainich Fluxnet and ICOS site, Germany, using a G2301 laser spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA). We further simulated a TEA-TM sampling system using measured high frequency CO2 time series from an open-path gas analyzer. We operated TEA-TM side-by-side with open-, enclosed- and closed-path EC flux systems for CO2, H2O and CH4 (LI-7500, LI-7200, LI-6262, LI-7700, Licor, USA, and FGGA LGR, USA). First results show that TEA-TM CO2 fluxes were similar to EC fluxes. Remaining differences were similar to those between the three eddy covariance setups (open-, enclosed- and closed-path gas analyzers). Measured TEA-TM CO2 fluxes from our physical

  6. Development of magnetic eddy current testing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Toyokazu; Suetsugu, Hidehiko

    2017-02-01

    IRIS (Internal Rotary Inspection System) has become a major maintenance inspection technique for the heat exchanger and reactor tubes. It is known that IRIS has a high precision of evaluation thickness, however there are a few disadvantages, such as slow inspection speed. Therefore, we have developed a magnetic eddy current flaw testing technique which combines a magnetic array forming a strong magnetic field, 4 coil structures for controlling the generation area of the eddy currents, and a desorption yoke structure to control the magnetizing force. In this presentation, details of this technique and practical application will be elaborated.

  7. Application of relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) on managed grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, M.; Hübner, J.; Ruppert, J.; Brand, W. A.; Foken, T.

    2014-05-01

    Relaxed eddy accumulation is applied for measuring fluxes of trace gases for which there is a lack of sensors fast enough in their resolution for eddy-covariance. On managed grasslands, the length of time between management events and the application of relaxed eddy accumulation has an essential influence on the determination of the proportionality factor b and thereby on the resulting flux. In this study this effect is discussed for the first time. Also, scalar similarity between proxy scalars and scalars of interest is affected until the ecosystem has completely recovered. Against this background, CO2 fluxes were continuously measured and 13CO2 isofluxes were determined with a high measurement precision on two representative days in summer 2010. This enabled the evaluation of the 13CO2 flux portion of the entire CO2 flux, in order to estimate potential influences on tracer experiments in ecosystem sciences and to compare a common method for the partitioning of the net ecosystem exchange into assimilation and respiration based on temperature and light response with an isotopic approach directly based on the isotope discrimination of the biosphere.

  8. Toward relaxed eddy accumulation measurements of sediment-water exchange in aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Bruno J.; Noss, Christian; Lorke, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Solute transport across the sediment-water interface has major implications for water quality and biogeochemical cycling in aquatic ecosystems. Existing measurement techniques, however, are not capable of resolving sediment-water fluxes of most constituents under in situ flow conditions. We investigated whether relaxed eddy accumulation (REA), a micrometeorological technique with conditional sampling of turbulent updrafts and downdrafts, can be adapted to the aquatic environment. We simulated REA fluxes by reanalyzing eddy covariance measurements from a riverine lake. We found that the empirical coefficient that relates mass fluxes to the concentration difference between both REA samples is invariant with scalar and flow and responds as predicted by a joint Gaussian distribution of linearly correlated variables. Simulated REA fluxes differed on average by around 30% from eddy covariance fluxes (mean absolute error). Assessment of the lower quantification limit suggests that REA can potentially be applied for measuring benthic fluxes of a new range of constituents that cannot be assessed by standard eddy covariance methods.

  9. A Comparison of GHG Flux Measurements by Relaxed Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance Methods Using FTIR and QCL Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, A. T.; Laborde, M.; Hensen, A.; van den Bulk, P.; Famulari, D.; Griffith, D. W.; Nemitz, E.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation results obtained with a novel system for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements using an Ecotech Spectronus FTIR analyzer (Griffth et al, 2012) will be compared to eddy covariance fluxes using an Aerodyne QCL and a Licor 6262 NDIR analyzer. The REA FTIR system can be easily combined with other standard (e.g. NDIR) analyzers suited for eddy covariance measurements to allow for scaling of the obtained up/down concentration differences with the directly measured fluxes. Furthermore the FTIR system allows for on-line simultaneous high precision concentration measurement of a large number of different gases and even isotope composition, next to the measurement of CO2, CH4 and N2O mixing ratios. The final design goal for the REA FTIR system is an attractive fully automated, low maintenance system for long-term monitoring of Greenhouse Gas fluxes at the hourly time scale and a spatial scale of about 1 km2. During a campaign of four weeks in June 2013 (in the framework of the InGOS EU project) at a grazed grassland site at Easter Bush, Scotland (UK), simultaneous surface flux measurements of N2O and additionally CO2 and CH4 have been performed using our systems and a number of setups from other groups.. Weather conditions during the campaign were excellent and after the application of fertilizer at the field and some rainfall the increased emission of N2O was detected clearly by all systems. Both the eddy covariance and REA methods performed well during the campaign and the measured fluxes compare satisfactorily. In general the resulting fluxes from the FTIR system are lower then the QCL based results. Reasons for these deviations will be discussed together with implications of the results for the design of future REA measurements using the FTIR system. Griffith, D.W.T., N.M. Deutscher, C.G.R. Caldow, G. Kettlewell, M. Riggenbach and S. Hammer, A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications. Atmospheric Measurement

  10. Inspection of laser welds with array eddy current technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, E.; Nagy, B.; Levesque, S.; Ames, N.; Na, J.

    2013-01-01

    Three groups of laser weld specimens made of steel 316L for nuclear applications were fabricated - acceptable, missed seam (MS) and lack of penetration (LOP). An array eddy current technique was developed and investigated. The specimens top and bottom surfaces were scanned parallel and transverse to the weld line. The MS and LOP were easily imaged, detected and sized. Additional flaw indications were found in visually acceptable weld areas. Limited weld destructive testing was performed validating characteristic eddy current flaw indications.

  11. Toward finding a universally applicable parameterization of the β factor for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, Teresa; Hrdina, Amy; Thomas, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The traditional eddy covariance (EC) technique requires the use of fast responding sensors (≥ 10 Hz) that do not exist for many chemical species found in the atmosphere. In this case, the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) method offers a means to calculate fluxes of trace gases and other scalar quantities (Businger and Oncley, 1990) and was originally derived from the eddy accumulation method (EA) first proposed by Desjardins (1972). While REA lessens the requirements for sensors and sampling and thus offers practical appeal, it introduces a dependence of the computed flux from a proportionality factor β. The accuracy of the REA fluxes hinges upon the correct determination of β, which was found to vary between 0.40 and 0.63 (Milne et al., 1999, Ammann and Meixner, 2002, Ruppert et al., 2006). However, formulating a universally valid parameterization for β instead of empirical evaluation has remained a conundrum and has been a main limitation for REA. In this study we take a fresh look at the dependencies and mathematical models of β by analyzing eddy covariance (EC) data and REA simulations for two field experiments in drastically contrasting environments: an exclusively physically driven environment in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and a biologically active system in a grassland in Germany. The main objective is to work toward a model parameterization for β that can be applied over wide range of surface conditions and forcings without the need for empirical evaluation, which is not possible for most REA applications. Our study discusses two different models to define β: (i) based upon scalar-scalar similarity, in which a different scalar is measured with fast-response sensors as a proxy for the scalar of interest, here referred to as β0; and (ii) computed solely from the vertical wind statistics, assuming a linear relationship between the scalar of interest and the vertical wind speed, referred to as βw. Results are presented for the carbon

  12. Non-destructive techniques based on eddy current testing.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future.

  13. Non-Destructive Techniques Based on Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  14. The use of relaxed eddy accumulation to measure biosphere-atmosphere exchange of isoprene and other biological trace gases.

    PubMed

    Bowling, D R; Turnipseed, A A; Delany, A C; Baldocchi, D D; Greenberg, J P; Monson, R K

    1998-09-01

    The micrometeorological flux measurement technique known as relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) holds promise as a powerful new tool for ecologists. The more popular eddy covariance (eddy correlation) technique requires the use of sensors that can respond at fast rates (10 Hz), and these are unavailable for many ecologically relevant compounds. In contrast, the use of REA allows flux measurement with sensors that have much slower response time, such as gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this review, relevant micrometeorological details underlying REA are presented, and critical analytical and system design details are discussed, with the goal of introducing the technique and its potential applications to ecologists. The validity of REA for measuring fluxes of isoprene, a photochemically reactive hydrocarbon emitted by several plant species, was tested with measurements over an oak-hickory forest in the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. Concurrent eddy covariance measurements of isoprene flux were made using a newly available chemiluminesence instrument. Excellent agreement was obtained between the two techniques (r (2) = 0.974, n = 62), providing the first direct comparison between REA and eddy covariance for measuring the flux rate of a reactive compound. The influence of a bias in vertical wind velocity on the accuracy of REA was examined. This bias has been thought to be a source of significant error in the past. Measurements of normalized bias ([Formula: see text]) alone would lead us to think that a large potential error exists at this site. However, with our isoprene data and through simulations of REA with fast-response H2O and CO2 data, we conclude that accurate REA flux measurements can be made even in the presence of a bias in w.

  15. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train’s motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train’s vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  16. Ammonia flux above fertilized corn in central Illinois, USA, using relaxed eddy accumulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research is to quantify NH3 flux above an intensively managed cornfield in the Midwestern United States to improve understanding of NH3 emissions and evaluations of new and existing emission models. A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system was deployed above a corn canopy in ce...

  17. A lee-side eddy and its influence on snow accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Franziska; Mott, Rebecca; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of changes in seasonal mountain snow water resources is essential for e.g. hydropower companies. To successfully predict these changes a fundamental understanding of precipitation patterns and their changes in mountainous terrain is needed. Both, snow accumulation and ablation need to be investigated to make precise predictions of the amount of water stored in seasonal snow cover. Only if the processes governing snow accumulation and ablation are understood with sufficient quantitative accuracy, the evolution of snow water resources under a changing climate can be addressed. Additionally, knowledge of detailed snow accumulation patterns is essential to assess avalanche danger. In alpine terrain, snow accumulation is strongly dependent on the local wind field. Based on the concept of preferential deposition, reduced snow accumulation is expected on the upper windward slope of a mountain due to updrafts, while enhanced snow accumulation should occur through blocking at the windward foot or due to flow separation on the leeward side. However, the understanding of these processes is mainly based on numerical simulations, as they are hard to measure. A LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) campaign was conducted in October 2015 in the Dischma valley (Davos, CH) to investigate the local flow field in the lee of the Sattelhorn during a one-day snowfall event. The flow field was monitored using a plane position indicator (PPI) scan at 25/28° and a range height indicator (RHI) scan across the Sattelhorn. Additionally, snow height change measurements on the leeward side of the Sattelhorn were performed by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Analyses of the flow field in the framework of preferential deposition are in agreement with the concept of flow separation and preferred snow deposition on leeward slopes. A very persistent eddy that formed over the leeward slope of the Sattelhorn detached from the main flow became evident from the retrievals of the RHI scans. An

  18. True eddy accumulation and eddy covariance methods and instruments intercomparison for fluxes of CO2, CH4 and H2O above the Hainich Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is state-of-the-art in directly measuring vegetation-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and H2O at ecosystem scale. However, the EC method is currently limited to a small number of atmospheric tracers by the lack of suitable fast-response analyzers or poor signal-to-noise ratios. High resource and power demands may further restrict the number of spatial sampling points. True eddy accumulation (TEA) is an alternative method for direct and continuous flux observations. Key advantages are the applicability to a wider range of air constituents such as greenhouse gases, isotopes, volatile organic compounds and aerosols using slow-response analyzers. In contrast to relaxed eddy accumulation (REA), true eddy accumulation (Desjardins, 1977) has the advantage of being a direct method which does not require proxies. True Eddy Accumulation has the potential to overcome above mentioned limitations of eddy covariance but has hardly ever been successfully demonstrated in practice in the past. This study presents flux measurements using an innovative approach to true eddy accumulation by directly, continuously and automatically measuring trace gas fluxes using a flow-through system. We merge high-frequency flux contributions from TEA with low-frequency covariances from the same sensors. We show flux measurements of CO2, CH4 and H2O by TEA and EC above an old-growth forest at the ICOS flux tower site "Hainich" (DE-Hai). We compare and evaluate the performance of the two direct turbulent flux measurement methods eddy covariance and true eddy accumulation using side-by-side trace gas flux observations. We further compare performance of seven instrument complexes, i.e. combinations of sonic anemometers and trace gas analyzers. We compare gas analyzers types of open-path, enclosed-path and closed-path design. We further differentiate data from two gas analysis technologies: infrared gas analysis (IRGA) and laser spectrometry (open path and CRDS closed

  19. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  20. Integration and Testing of a Disjunct Eddy Accumulation VOC Flux Measurement System in a Research Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garman, K.; Everly, M.; Wyss, P.; Carlsen, M.; Zimmerman, J.; Stirm, B.; Carney, T.; Santini, R.; Shepson, P.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes can now be measured using Disjunct Eddy Accumulation (DEA). This method is primarily applied from fixed towers above forest canopies to study biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes. To expand these tower-based BVOC measurements to spatial scales beyond the tower footprint, an aircraft-based DEA platform is required. Among the significant challenges to such an approach is the capability to determine the vertical component of atmospheric wind from the aircraft with adequate precision and accuracy. The design of a suitable airborne sampling system is another significant challenge. The development of the Airborne Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (ALAR) is described herein. We describe the DEA design and installation along with calibration results which characterize the uncertainties of the vertical wind component measurement. We also describe initial tests of the DEA sampling system, the capabilities of the final installation, and the expected flux uncertainties.

  1. A High Frequency Response Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Flux Measurement System for Sampling Short-Lived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m−2 hr−1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozo...

  2. A High Frequency Response Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Flux Measurement System for Sampling Short-Lived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m−2 hr−1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozo...

  3. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  4. Immersed transient eddy current flow metering: a calibration-free velocity measurement technique for liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauter, N.; Stefani, F.

    2017-10-01

    Eddy current flow meters are widely used for measuring the flow velocity of electrically conducting fluids. Since the flow induced perturbations of a magnetic field depend both on the geometry and the conductivity of the fluid, extensive calibration is needed to get accurate results. Transient eddy current flow metering has been developed to overcome this problem. It relies on tracking the position of an impressed eddy current system that is moving with the same velocity as the conductive fluid. We present an immersed version of this measurement technique and demonstrate its viability by numerical simulations and a first experimental validation.

  5. Field comparison of an eddy accumulation and an aerodynamic-gradient system for measuring pesticide volatilization fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.; Desjardina, R.; Rochette, P.; Pattey, E.; Selber, J.; Glotfelty, D.

    1993-01-01

    The field experiment reported here applied the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) technique to the measurement of triallate (TA) and trifluralin (TF) volatilization from fallow soil. A critical analysis of the REA system used in this experiment is done, and the fluxes are compared to those obtained by the aerodynamic-gradient (AG) technique. The measured cumulative volatilization losses, corrected for the effective upwind source area (footprint), for the AG system were higher than with the REA system. The differences between the methods over the first 5 days of the experiment were 27 and 13% for TA and TF, respectively. A mass balance based on the amount of parent compounds volatilized from soil during the first 5 days of the experiment showed a 110 and 70% and a 79 and 61% accountability for triallate and trifluralin by the AG and REA methods, respectively. These results also show that the non-footprint-corrected AG flux values underestimated the volatilization flux by approximately 16%. The footprint correction model used in this experiment does not presently have the capability of accounting for changes in atmospheric stability. However, these values still provide an indication of the most likely upwind area affecting the evaporative flux estimations. The soil half-lives for triallate and trifluralin were 9.8 and 7.0 days, respectively. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  6. Prerequisites for application of hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation on managed grasslands and alternative net ecosystem exchange flux partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, M.; Hübner, J.; Ruppert, J.; Brand, W. A.; Foken, T.

    2014-12-01

    Relaxed eddy accumulation is still applied in ecosystem sciences for measuring trace gas fluxes. On managed grasslands, the length of time between management events and the application of relaxed eddy accumulation has an essential influence on the determination of the proportionality factor b and thus on the resulting flux. In this study this effect is discussed for the first time. Also, scalar similarity between proxy scalars and scalars of interest is affected until the ecosystem has completely recovered. Against this background, CO2 fluxes were continuously measured and 13CO2 isofluxes were determined with a high measurement precision on two representative days in summer 2010. Moreover, a common method for the partitioning of the net ecosystem exchange into assimilation and respiration based on temperature and light response was compared with an isotopic approach directly based on the isotope discrimination of the biosphere. This approach worked well on the grassland site and could enhance flux partitioning results by better reproducing the environmental conditions.

  7. Dry deposition of PM2.5 sulfate above a hilly forest using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Ichiro; Mizukami, Kou; Ban, Satomi; Takahashi, Akira

    2015-04-01

    Sulfur compounds continue to be an important component of atmospheric deposition in East Asia. In order to better understand the dry deposition of PM2.5 sulfate, which is one of the most significant transboundary air pollutants in this region, we measured the dry deposition flux of PM2.5 sulfate above a hilly forest of the Field Museum Tamakyuryo (FM Tama) site in suburban Tokyo. We used the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method and took measurements during the summer, from 26 July to 2 August 2013, and the autumn, from 18 to 22 November 2013. We primarily focused on the evaluation of dry deposition above a forest on complex terrain. The total flux and 80% of the runs showed downward flux. The deposition velocities measured by the REA method during times when the wind direction was from a relatively uniform sloping surface over the forest were more reasonable than those measured when the wind direction was from a more complex surface. Using a resistance model that includes the effect of growth of hygroscopic aerosols, we inferred the deposition velocities during two experimental periods. When the fluxes were averaged for a long time (i.e., about 2 weeks) the inferred fluxes and deposition velocities were in reasonable agreement with the measurements. Although averages over long periods showed good agreement, the measured deposition velocities were distributed in a wider range than those inferred by the model. An increased range of deposition velocities was associated with flux footprints from complex terrain. It is possible that the agreements between measured and inferred fluxes or deposition velocities at the site are because the depositions of sulfate are largely controlled by surface factors rather than aerodynamic resistance.

  8. Continuous determination of land-atmosphere Hg0 exchange using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, Stefan; Fritsche, Johannes; Nilsson, Mats B.; Alewell, Christine; Bishop, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental mercury (Hg0) with the earth surface. However, it remains challenging to quantify these exchanges which hold the key to a better understanding of mercury cycling at different scales, from the entire earth to specific environments. To better test hypotheses about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we applied dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) for short term measurements and developed a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) design for continuous flux monitoring. Accurate determination of Hg0 fluxes has proven difficult due to the technical challenges presented by the small concentration differences (< 1 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. To address this we present a dual-intake, single analyzer REA system including a calibration module for periodic quality-control measurements with reference gases. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from two contrasting environments: In February 2012 REA monitored a heterogeneous urban surface in the center of Basel, Switzerland where an average flux of 14 ng m-2 h-1 was detected with a distinct diurnal pattern. In May 2012, the REA monitored a boreal mire in northern Sweden with different turbulence regimes and Hg0 sink/source characteristics. During the snowmelt period in May 2012 the Hg0 flux averaged at 2 ng m-2 h-1. In order to better quantify inputs and outputs of Hg from boreal landscapes, we subsequently monitored the land-atmosphere exchange of Hg0 during a course of a year and compared the fluxes occasionally with DFC measurements. The amount of Hg0 volatilized from boreal mires was at a similar level as the annual export of Hg in stream water, identifying the mire as net source of Hg to neighboring environments. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant innovation which can help realize the potential of REA for continuous, long-term determination of land-atmosphere Hg0

  9. A high-frequency response relaxed eddy accumulation flux measurement system for sampling short-lived biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnts, Robert R.; Mowry, Fred L.; Hampton, Gary A.

    2013-05-01

    second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m-2 hr-1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozone removal procedure to allow for the measurement of highly reactive species such as β-caryophyllene and polar terpenoids such as linalool. A two-component internal standard continuously added to the accumulators was used to correct for switching-induced volumetric errors and as a check on VOC losses exceeding accumulator tube adsorption limits. In addition, the internal standards were used to demonstrate that accumulators quickly return to target flow rates at segregation valve switching frequencies up to at least 0.8 Hz. The system was able to measure daytime hourly fluxes of individual biogenic VOC including oxygenated terpenoids, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes.

  10. A dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation system for long-term measurement of mercury flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, S.; Fritsche, J.; Alewell, C.; Schmutz, M.; Nilsson, M. B.; Jocher, G.; Sommar, J.; Rinne, J.; Bishop, K.

    2016-02-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental Hg with the earth surface. This exchange holds the key to a better understanding of Hg cycling from local to global scales, which has been difficult to quantify. To advance research about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we developed a dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system. REA is an established technique for measuring turbulent fluxes of trace gases and aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer. Accurate determination of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) fluxes has proven difficult due to technical challenges presented by extremely small concentration differences (typically < 0.5 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. We present an advanced REA design that uses two inlets and two pairs of gold cartridges for continuous monitoring of GEM fluxes. This setup reduces the major uncertainty created by the sequential sampling in many previous designs. Additionally, the instrument is equipped with a GEM reference gas generator that monitors drift and recovery rates. These innovations facilitate continuous, autonomous measurement of GEM flux. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from field campaigns in two contrasting environments: an urban setting with a heterogeneous fetch and a boreal peatland during snowmelt. The observed average emission rates were 15 and 3 ng m-2 h-1, respectively. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant improvement of the REA system for ultra-trace gases and can help to advance our understanding of long-term land-atmosphere GEM exchange.

  11. An Eddy Current Testing Platform System for Pipe Defect Inspection Based on an Optimized Eddy Current Technique Probe Design

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Razali, Ramdan; Ali, Kharudin; Faraj, Moneer A.

    2017-01-01

    The use of the eddy current technique (ECT) for the non-destructive testing of conducting materials has become increasingly important in the past few years. The use of the non-destructive ECT plays a key role in the ensuring the safety and integrity of the large industrial structures such as oil and gas pipelines. This paper introduce a novel ECT probe design integrated with the distributed ECT inspection system (DSECT) use for crack inspection on inner ferromagnetic pipes. The system consists of an array of giant magneto-resistive (GMR) sensors, a pneumatic system, a rotating magnetic field excitation source and a host PC acting as the data analysis center. Probe design parameters, namely probe diameter, an excitation coil and the number of GMR sensors in the array sensor is optimized using numerical optimization based on the desirability approach. The main benefits of DSECT can be seen in terms of its modularity and flexibility for the use of different types of magnetic transducers/sensors, and signals of a different nature with either digital or analog outputs, making it suited for the ECT probe design using an array of GMR magnetic sensors. A real-time application of the DSECT distributed system for ECT inspection can be exploited for the inspection of 70 mm carbon steel pipe. In order to predict the axial and circumference defect detection, a mathematical model is developed based on the technique known as response surface methodology (RSM). The inspection results of a carbon steel pipe sample with artificial defects indicate that the system design is highly efficient. PMID:28335399

  12. An Eddy Current Testing Platform System for Pipe Defect Inspection Based on an Optimized Eddy Current Technique Probe Design.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Razali, Ramdan; Ali, Kharudin; Faraj, Moneer A

    2017-03-13

    The use of the eddy current technique (ECT) for the non-destructive testing of conducting materials has become increasingly important in the past few years. The use of the non-destructive ECT plays a key role in the ensuring the safety and integrity of the large industrial structures such as oil and gas pipelines. This paper introduce a novel ECT probe design integrated with the distributed ECT inspection system (DSECT) use for crack inspection on inner ferromagnetic pipes. The system consists of an array of giant magneto-resistive (GMR) sensors, a pneumatic system, a rotating magnetic field excitation source and a host PC acting as the data analysis center. Probe design parameters, namely probe diameter, an excitation coil and the number of GMR sensors in the array sensor is optimized using numerical optimization based on the desirability approach. The main benefits of DSECT can be seen in terms of its modularity and flexibility for the use of different types of magnetic transducers/sensors, and signals of a different nature with either digital or analog outputs, making it suited for the ECT probe design using an array of GMR magnetic sensors. A real-time application of the DSECT distributed system for ECT inspection can be exploited for the inspection of 70 mm carbon steel pipe. In order to predict the axial and circumference defect detection, a mathematical model is developed based on the technique known as response surface methodology (RSM). The inspection results of a carbon steel pipe sample with artificial defects indicate that the system design is highly efficient.

  13. Studies of the eddy structure in the lower ionosphere by the API technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev, Gennadii I.; Lapin, Victor G.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new application of the API technique to study of turbulent phenomena in the lower ionosphere. The main objective of these studies is experimental diagnostics of natural ordered eddy structures at the altitudes of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, such as those that occur when internal gravity waves propagate in stratified flows in the atmospheric boundary layer. To this end, we considered the impact of eddy motions in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere on the relaxation time and the frequency of the signal scattered by periodic irregularities. Theoretical study of eddy structures base on experiments using SURA heating facility (56,14 N; 44,1 W). It is known, artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) are formed in the field of the powerful standing wave as a result of the interference of the incident wave and reflected from the ionosphere (Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - 2002. Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. Copernicus GmbH. 160 p.). The relaxation or decay of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the amplitude and decay time of the API scattered signal in comparison with the diffusion time. We found a relation between the eddy period and the characteristic decay time of scattered signal, for which the synchronism of the waves scattered by a periodic structure is broken. Besides, it is shown, when the eddy structure moves by a horizontal wind exists at these heights, the frequency of the radio wave scattered by API structure will periodically increase and decrease compared with the frequency of the radiated diagnostic (probing) radio-wave. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation under grant No 14-12-00556.

  14. Application of Eddy Current Techniques for Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John

    2005-01-01

    The development and application of advanced nondestructive evaluation techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) components of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) was identified as a crucial step toward returning the shuttle fleet to service. In order to help meet this requirement, eddy current techniques have been developed for application to RCC components. Eddy current technology has been found to be particularly useful for measuring the protective coating thickness over the reinforced carbon-carbon and for the identification of near surface cracking and voids in the RCC matrix. Testing has been performed on as manufactured and flown RCC components with both actual and fabricated defects representing impact and oxidation damage. Encouraging initial results have led to the development of two separate eddy current systems for in-situ RCC inspections in the orbiter processing facility. Each of these systems has undergone blind validation testing on a full scale leading edge panel, and recently transitioned to Kennedy Space Center to be applied as a part of a comprehensive RCC inspection strategy to be performed in the orbiter processing facility after each shuttle flight.

  15. Pulsed remote field eddy current technique applied to non-magnetic flat conductive plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Binfeng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhanbin

    2013-12-01

    Non-magnetic metal plates are widely used in aviation and industrial applications. The detection of cracks in thick plate structures, such as multilayered structures of aircraft fuselage, has been challenging in nondestructive evaluation societies. The remote field eddy current (RFEC) technique has shown advantages of deep penetration and high sensitivity to deeply buried anomalies. However, the RFEC technique is mainly used to evaluate ferromagnetic tubes. There are many problems that should be fixed before the expansion and application of this technique for the inspection of non-magnetic conductive plates. In this article, the pulsed remote field eddy current (PRFEC) technique for the detection of defects in non-magnetic conducting plates was investigated. First, the principle of the PRFEC technique was analysed, followed by the analysis of the differences between the detection of defects in ferromagnetic and non-magnetic plain structures. Three different models of the PRFEC probe were simulated using ANSYS. The location of the transition zone, defect detection sensitivity and the ability to detect defects in thick plates using three probes were analysed and compared. The simulation results showed that the probe with a ferrite core had the highest detecting ability. The conclusions derived from the simulation study were also validated by conducting experiments.

  16. Thickness measurement of multi-layer conductive coatings using multifrequency eddy current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Yu, Yating; Lai, Chao; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-07-01

    To ensure the key structural performance in high-temperature and high-stress environments, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are often adopted in engineering. The thickness of these multi-layer conductive coatings is an important quality indicator. In order to measure the thickness of multi-layer conductive coatings, a new measurement approach is presented using eddy current testing techniques, and then, an inversion algorithm is proposed and proved efficient and applicable, of which the maximum experimental relative error is within 10%. Therefore, the new approach can be effectively applied to thickness measurement of multi-layer conductive coatings such as TBCs.

  17. Airborne eddy correlation gas flux measurements - Design criteria for optical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, John A.; Sachse, Glen W.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    Although several methods exist for the determination of the flux of an atmospheric species, the airborne eddy correlation method has the advantage of providing direct flux measurements that are representative of regional spatial domains. The design criteria pertinent to the construction of chemical instrumentation suitable for use in airborne eddy correlation flux measurements are discussed. A brief overview of the advantages and limitations of the current instrumentation used to obtain flux measurements for CO, CH4, O3, CO2, and water vapor are given. The intended height of the measurement within the convective boundary layer is also shown to be an important design criteria. The sensitivity, or resolution, which is required in the measurement of a scalar species to obtain an adequate species flux measurement is discussed. The relationship between the species flux resolution and the more commonly stated instrumental resolution is developed and it is shown that the standard error of the flux estimate is a complicated function of the atmospheric variability and the averaging time that is used. The use of the recently proposed intermittent sampling method to determine the species flux is examined. The application of this technique may provide an opportunity to expand the suite of trace gases for which direct flux measurements are possible.

  18. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  19. [Research progress on urban carbon fluxes based on eddy covariance technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Fu, Yu-Ling; Yang, Fang

    2014-02-01

    Land use change and fossil fuel consumption due to urbanization have made significant effect on global carbon cycle and climate change. Accurate estimating and understanding of the carbon budget and its characteristics are the premises for studying carbon cycle and its driving mechanisms in urban system. Based on the theory of eddy covariance (EC) technique, the characteristics atmospheric boundary layer and carbon cycle in urban area, this study systematically reviewed the principles of CO2 flux monitoring in urban system with EC technique, and then summarized the problems faced in urban CO2 flux monitoring and the method for data processing and further assessment. The main research processes on urban carbon fluxes with EC technique were also illustrated. The results showed that the urban surface was mostly acting as net carbon source. The CO2 exchange between urban surface and atmosphere showed obvious diurnal, weekly and seasonal variation resulted from the vehicle exhaust, domestic heating and vegetation respiration. However, there still exist great uncertainties in urban flux measurement and its explanation due to high spatial heterogeneity and complex distributions of carbon source/sink in urban environments. In the end, we suggested that further researches on EC technique and data assessment in complex urban area should be strengthened. It was also requisite to develop models of urban carbon cycle on the basis of the system principle, to investigate the influencing mechanism and variability of urban cycle at regional scale with spatial analysis technique.

  20. Very Large Eddy Simulation Technique for Noise Prediction and Control in Turbomachinery and Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, Vladimir V.

    2003-01-01

    The summer fellowship research project focused on further developing an advanced computational technique based on Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES) for analysis and control of major sources of noise in turbomachinery and propulsion systems, including jet noise and fan noise. Major part of the work during the 10-week tenure dealt with implementing a low-order, implicit A-stable time-stepping scheme in the existing explicit VLES code of Dr. Ray Hixon. The preliminary plan of the work also included application of a new time marching formulation to the problem of viscous gust-airfoil interaction. Other research items selected for implementation (possibly in the future) included investigating a set of new subgrid turbulent models for the code, and code application to a number of test cases, including a supersonic jet and swirling flow downstream of a rotor stage.

  1. A Method for the Measurement of Nitrous Acid Flux Using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertman, S.; Marchewka, M.; King, J.

    2003-12-01

    HONO has recently received renewed attention as a byproduct of condensed nitrogen photolysis and as a potential atmospheric radical source. In particular, several recent accounts suggesting a photochemical source in forests have lead us to develop a method for assessing nitrous acid flux above a hardwood forest in northern Michigan. The technique was based on nitrous acid in ambient air being scrubbed into a 1mM phosphate buffer that was then derivatized into a light absorbing complex. A separate scrubbing system was used for updrafts and downdrafts after the air had been separated through Teflon valves according to input from a sonic anemometer. The detection of the complex was performed via UV absorption through a capillary flowthrough cell. Detection limit for this analytical method is around 10 pptv. Derivatized solution from each flow system was injected into the capillary cell via an 8-port valve with two sample loops. Each sample loop was injected as soon as it filled, which allowed measurement of all of the scrubbed material in each flow system. Laboratory tests were performed to assess the accuracy and suitability of this method. The field worthiness of the instrument was determined during the summer of 2003 at the University of Michigan Biological Station in northern Michigan where it was placed on top of a 35m tower above a forest canopy.

  2. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  3. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  4. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-5, Fundamentals of Eddy Current Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This fifth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II describes the fundamental concepts applicable to eddy current testing in general. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 32: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II. Module 32-6, Operation of Eddy Current Test Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This sixth in a series of six modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques II details eddy current examination of steam generator tubing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject…

  6. Four-year measurement of methane flux over a temperate forest with a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakabe, A.; Kosugi, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Hamotani, K.; Takahashi, K.; Iwata, H.; Itoh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are generally assumed to be an atmospheric methane (CH4) sink (Le Mer and Roger, 2001). However, under Asian monsoon climate, forests are subject to wide spatiotemporal range in soil water status, where forest soils often became water-saturated condition heterogeneously. In such warm and humid conditions, forests may act as a CH4 source and/or sink with considerable spatiotemporal variations. Micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) method continuously measure spatially-representative flux at a canopy scale without artificial disturbance. In this study, we measured CH4 fluxes over a temperate forest during four-year period using a CH4 analyzer based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy detection with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method (Hamotani et al., 1996, 2001). We revealed the amplitude and seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes. The REA method is the attractive alternative to the EC method to measure trace-gas flux because it allows the use of analyzers with an optimal integration time. We also conducted continuous chamber measurements on forest floor to reveal spatial variations in soil CH4 fluxes and its controlling processes. The observations were made in an evergreen coniferous forest in central Japan. The site has a warm temperate monsoon climate with wet summer. Some wetlands were located in riparian zones along streams within the flux footprint area. For the REA method, the sonic anemometer (SAT-550, Kaijo) was mounted on top of the 29-m-tall tower and air was sampled from just below the sonic anemometer to reservoirs according to the direction of vertical wind velocity (w). After accumulating air for 30 minutes, the air in the reservoirs was pulled into a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-840, Li-Cor) and a CH4 analyzer (FMA-200, Los Gatos Research). Before entering the analyzers, the sampled air was dried using a gas dryer (PD-50 T-48; Perma Pure Inc.). The REA flux is obtained from the difference in the mean concentrations

  7. Comprehensive comparison of gap filling techniques for eddy covariance net carbon fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. M.; Papale, D.; Reichstein, M.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Richardson, A. D.; Barr, A. G.; Beckstein, C.; Braswell, B. H.; Churkina, G.; Desai, A. R.; Falge, E.; Gove, J. H.; Heimann, M.; Hui, D.; Jarvis, A. J.; Kattge, J.; Noormets, A.; Stauch, V. J.

    2007-12-01

    Review of fifteen techniques for estimating missing values of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) in eddy covariance time series and evaluation of their performance for different artificial gap scenarios based on a set of ten benchmark datasets from six forested sites in Europe. The goal of gap filling is the reproduction of the NEE time series and hence this present work focuses on estimating missing NEE values, not on editing or the removal of suspect values in these time series due to systematic errors in the measurements (e.g. nighttime flux, advection). The gap filling was examined by generating fifty secondary datasets with artificial gaps (ranging in length from single half-hours to twelve consecutive days) for each benchmark dataset and evaluating the performance with a variety of statistical metrics. The performance of the gap filling varied among sites and depended on the level of aggregation (native half- hourly time step versus daily), long gaps were more difficult to fill than short gaps, and differences among the techniques were more pronounced during the day than at night. The non-linear regression techniques (NLRs), the look-up table (LUT), marginal distribution sampling (MDS), and the semi-parametric model (SPM) generally showed good overall performance. The artificial neural network based techniques (ANNs) were generally, if only slightly, superior to the other techniques. The simple interpolation technique of mean diurnal variation (MDV) showed a moderate but consistent performance. Several sophisticated techniques, the dual unscented Kalman filter (UKF), the multiple imputation method (MIM), the terrestrial biosphere model (BETHY), but also one of the ANNs and one of the NLRs showed high biases which resulted in a low reliability of the annual sums, indicating that additional development might be needed. An uncertainty analysis comparing the estimated random error in the ten benchmark datasets with the artificial gap residuals suggested that the

  8. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commercial cornfield (Zea mays) measured using the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, J.; Hui, D.; Miller, D. R.; Bhattarai, S.; Dennis, S.; Smart, D.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in observed atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have been well documented. However, information on event-related instantaneous emissions during fertilizer applications is lacking. With the development of fast-response N2O analyzers, the eddy covariance (EC) technique can be used to gather instantaneous measurements of N2O concentrations to quantify the exchange of nitrogen between the soil and atmosphere. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of a new EC system, to measure the N2O flux with the system, and finally to examine relationships of the N2O flux with soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, and fertilization events. An EC system was assembled with a sonic anemometer and a fast-response N2O analyzer (quantum cascade laser spectrometer) and applied in a cornfield in Nolensville, Tennessee during the 2012 corn growing season (4 April-8 August). Fertilizer amounts totaling 217 kg N ha-1 were applied to the experimental site. Results showed that this N2O EC system provided reliable N2O flux measurements. The cumulative emitted N2O amount for the entire growing season was 6.87 kg N2O-N ha-1. Seasonal fluxes were highly dependent on soil moisture rather than soil temperature. This study was one of the few experiments that continuously measured instantaneous, high-frequency N2O emissions in crop fields over a growing season of more than 100 days.

  9. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzalla, S.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad; Chabaat, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  10. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    SciTech Connect

    Harzalla, S. Chabaat, M.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  11. Microplate technique for determining accumulation of metals by algae

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, J.M.; Jennett, J.C.; Smith, J.E.

    1981-05-01

    A microplate technique was developed to determine the conditions under which pure cultures of algae removed heavy metals from aqueous solutions. Variables investigated included algal species and strain, culture age (11 and 44 days), metal (mercury, lead, cadmium, and zinc), pH, effects of different buffer solutions, and time of exposure. Plastic, U-bottomed microtiter plates were used in conjunction with heavy metal radionuclides to determine concentration factors for metal-alga combinations. The technique developed was rapid, statistically reliable, and economical of materials and cells. All species of algae studied removed mercury from solution. Green algae proved better at accumulating cadmium than did blue-green algae. No alga studied removed zinc, perhaps because cells were maintained in the dark during the labeling period. Chlamydomonas sp. proved superior in ability to remove lead from solution.

  12. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for Detection of Deep Fatigue Cracks in Multi-Layer Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Thick, multi-layer aluminum structure has been widely used in aircraft design in critical wing splice areas. The multi-layer structure generally consists of three or four aluminum layers with different geometry and varying thickness, which are held together with fasteners. The detection of cracks under fasteners with ultrasonic techniques in subsurface layers away from the skin is impeded primarily by interlayer bonds and faying sealant condition. Further, assessment of such sealant condition is extremely challenging in terms of complexity of structure, limited access, and inspection cost. Although Eddy current techniques can be applied on in-service aircraft from the exterior of the skin without knowing sealant condition, the current eddy current techniques are not able to detect defects with wanted sensitivity. In this work a series of low frequency eddy current probes have been designed, fabricated and tested for this application. A probe design incorporating a shielded magnetic field sensor concentrically located in the interior of a drive coil has been employed to enable a localized deep diffusion of the electromagnetic field into the part under test. Due to the required low frequency inspections, probes have been testing using a variety of magnetic field sensors (pickup coil, giant magneto-resistive, anisotropic magneto-resistive, and spin-dependent tunneling). The probe designs as well as capabilities based upon a target inspection for sub-layer cracking in an airframe wing spar joint is presented.

  13. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for Detection of Deep Fatigue Cracks in Multi-Layer Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Thick, multi-layer aluminum structure has been widely used in aircraft design in critical wing splice areas. The multi-layer structure generally consists of three or four aluminum layers with different geometry and varying thickness, which are held together with fasteners. The detection of cracks under fasteners with ultrasonic techniques in subsurface layers away from the skin is impeded primarily by interlayer bonds and faying sealant condition. Further, assessment of such sealant condition is extremely challenging in terms of complexity of structure, limited access, and inspection cost. Although Eddy current techniques can be applied on in-service aircraft from the exterior of the skin without knowing sealant condition, the current eddy current techniques are not able to detect defects with wanted sensitivity. In this work a series of low frequency eddy current probes have been designed, fabricated and tested for this application. A probe design incorporating a shielded magnetic field sensor concentrically located in the interior of a drive coil has been employed to enable a localized deep diffusion of the electromagnetic field into the part under test. Due to the required low frequency inspections, probes have been testing using a variety of magnetic field sensors (pickup coil, giant magneto-resistive, anisotropic magneto-resistive, and spin-dependent tunneling). The probe designs as well as capabilities based upon a target inspection for sub-layer cracking in an airframe wing spar joint is presented.

  14. Benthic oxygen flux in permeable sediments of the German Bight calculated with the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Dirk; Ahmerkamp, Soeren; Holtappels, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Permeable sediments in coastal zones are highly biologically active, contributing to tight recycling of carbon and nutrients between sediments and overlying water. A growing body of literature demonstrates that oxygen flux in these sediments responds dynamically to changes in current velocities and turbulent kinetic energy. As currents interact with bedforms, pressure gradients are created that drive exchange across the sediment-water interface, displacing oxygen-depleted porewaters into surface waters. We used the eddy covariance technique to quantify oxygen flux at three stations in the German Bight. Station 1 (24 m depth) was composed of medium sands with 1-2 cm bedforms and approximately 100 polychaete worms per square meter. Station 2 (24 m depth) was composed of coarse sands with 3-5 cm bedforms and few worms. Station 3 (38 m depth) and was similar to Station 1 but with intermediate worm densities. In each of the sands advection appeared to drive the displacement of hypoxic or anoxic porewater into surface waters, generating net oxygen consumption. The correspondence between the water velocity and oxygen flux was high, with oscillations in tidal currents yielding similar oscillations in benthic oxygen consumption. The tidal current was very similar across sites (mean of 16.5 - 18 cm s-1 measured 30 cm off of the bed). Oxygen consumption was greatest (45 ± 15 mmol m-2 d-1) in Station 1, the medium-grained shallow site with high polychaete worm densities. It was close to equivalent at the other two sites (27 ± 12 mmol m-2 d-1 and 28 ± 10 mmol m-2 d 1). The implications for scaling these rates up will be examined.

  15. Development of Eddy Current Technique for the Detection of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Koshti, Ajay

    2006-01-01

    A recent identification of stress corrosion cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  16. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for the Detection of Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A.; Simpson, John W.; Koshti, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    A recent identification of cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  17. Nitrous oxide emissions from a commercial cornfield (Zea mays) measured using the eddy-covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Wang, J.; Hui, D.; Miller, D. R.; Bhattarai, S.; Dennis, S.; Smart, D.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, K. C.

    2014-08-01

    Increases in observed atmospheric concentrations of the long-lived greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O), have been well documented. However, information on event-related instantaneous emissions during fertilizer applications is lacking. With the development of fast-response N2O analyzers, the eddy covariance (EC) technique can be used to gather instantaneous measurements of N2O concentrations to quantify the exchange of nitrogen between the soil and atmosphere. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of a new EC system, to measure the N2O flux with the system, and finally to examine relationships of the N2O flux with soil temperature, soil moisture, precipitation, and fertilization events. We assembled an EC system that included a sonic anemometer and a fast-response N2O analyzer (quantum cascade laser spectrometer) in a cornfield in Nolensville, Tennessee during the 2012 corn growing season (4 April-8 August). Fertilizer amounts totaling 217 kg N ha-1 were applied to the experimental site. The precision of the instrument was 0.066 ppbv for 10 Hz measurements. The seasonal mean detection limit of the N2O flux measurements was 2.10 ng N m-2 s-1. This EC system can be used to provide reliable N2O flux measurements. The cumulative emitted N2O for the entire growing season was 6.87 kg N2O-N ha-1. The 30 min average N2O emissions ranged from 0 to 11 100 μg N2O{-}N m-2 h-1 (mean = 257.5, standard deviation = 817.7). Average daytime emissions were much higher than night emissions (278.8 ± 865.8 vs. 100.0 ± 210.0 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1). Seasonal fluxes were highly dependent on soil moisture rather than soil temperature, although the diurnal flux was positively related to soil temperature. This study was one of the few experiments that continuously measured instantaneous, high-frequency N2O emissions in crop fields over a growing season of more than 100 days.

  18. Water Velocity as a Driver of Stream Metabolism: a Parallel Application of the Open Water and Eddy Correlation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, D.; Berg, P.

    2013-12-01

    Inland waters respire or store a large portion of net terrestrial ecosystem production. As a result their metabolism is significant to the global carbon budget. The proximal drivers of aquatic respiration are organic matter availability, temperature, nutrients, and water velocity. Among these water velocity may be the least quantified. A partial explanation is that the footprint of the open water technique is typically hundreds of meters of river length, while the effect of a change in velocity may be specific to a local benthic environment, e.g., a riffle. With the eddy correlation technique oxygen flux is calculated from the turbulent fluctuation of vertical velocity and the oxygen concentration at a point in the water column. The footprint of the technique scales with the height of the point of measurement allowing an investigation of the in situ oxygen flux at the scale of a riffle. The combination of techniques, then, can be used to investigate the coupling of hydrodynamic conditions and benthic environments in driving aquatic ecosystem metabolism. This parallel approach was applied seasonally to examine the drivers of metabolism in a nutrient-rich, sand-bed coastal stream on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. An ecosystem-scale oxygen flux was calculated with the open water technique while pool-, run-, riffle-, and freshwater tidal-scale oxygen fluxes were calculated with the eddy correlation technique. At the ecosystem scale the stream bed functioned as an effective biocatalytic filter with an average annual net oxygen consumption of 300 mmol m^-2 d^-1. Prior to a stage-discharge shift water velocity explained 90% of the variance in ecosystem respiration (n = 63 days). After the stage-discharge shift water velocity explained 96 % of it (n = 40 days). Hyporheic exchange supported respiration in this system, contributing to its close correlation with water velocity. Among the physically similar benthic environments of the run, riffle, and freshwater tidal sites

  19. Grafting: A Technique to Modify Ion Accumulation in Horticultural Crops

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Muhammad A.; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Kong, Qiusheng; Cheng, Fei; Ahmed, Waqar; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Grafting is a centuries-old technique used in plants to obtain economic benefits. Grafting increases nutrient uptake and utilization efficiency in a number of plant species, including fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Selected rootstocks of the same species or close relatives are utilized in grafting. Rootstocks absorb more water and ions than self-rooted plants and transport these water and ions to the aboveground scion. Ion uptake is regulated by a complex communication mechanism between the scion and rootstock. Sugars, hormones, and miRNAs function as long-distance signaling molecules and regulate ion uptake and ion homeostasis by affecting the activity of ion transporters. This review summarizes available information on the effect of rootstock on nutrient uptake and utilization and the mechanisms involved. Information on specific nutrient-efficient rootstocks for different crops of commercial importance is also provided. Several other important approaches, such as interstocking (during double grafting), inarching, use of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria, use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, use of plant growth substances (e.g., auxin and melatonin), and use of genetically engineered rootstocks and scions (transgrafting), are highlighted; these approaches can be combined with grafting to enhance nutrient uptake and utilization in commercially important plant species. Whether the rootstock and scion affect each other's soil microbiota and their effect on the nutrient absorption of rootstocks remain largely unknown. Similarly, the physiological and molecular bases of grafting, crease formation, and incompatibility are not fully identified and require investigation. Grafting in horticultural crops can help reveal the basic biology of grafting, the reasons for incompatibility, sensing, and signaling of nutrients, ion uptake and transport, and the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation and restriction in rootstocks. Ion transporter and miRNA-regulated nutrient

  20. Grafting: A Technique to Modify Ion Accumulation in Horticultural Crops.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Muhammad A; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Kong, Qiusheng; Cheng, Fei; Ahmed, Waqar; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Grafting is a centuries-old technique used in plants to obtain economic benefits. Grafting increases nutrient uptake and utilization efficiency in a number of plant species, including fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Selected rootstocks of the same species or close relatives are utilized in grafting. Rootstocks absorb more water and ions than self-rooted plants and transport these water and ions to the aboveground scion. Ion uptake is regulated by a complex communication mechanism between the scion and rootstock. Sugars, hormones, and miRNAs function as long-distance signaling molecules and regulate ion uptake and ion homeostasis by affecting the activity of ion transporters. This review summarizes available information on the effect of rootstock on nutrient uptake and utilization and the mechanisms involved. Information on specific nutrient-efficient rootstocks for different crops of commercial importance is also provided. Several other important approaches, such as interstocking (during double grafting), inarching, use of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria, use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, use of plant growth substances (e.g., auxin and melatonin), and use of genetically engineered rootstocks and scions (transgrafting), are highlighted; these approaches can be combined with grafting to enhance nutrient uptake and utilization in commercially important plant species. Whether the rootstock and scion affect each other's soil microbiota and their effect on the nutrient absorption of rootstocks remain largely unknown. Similarly, the physiological and molecular bases of grafting, crease formation, and incompatibility are not fully identified and require investigation. Grafting in horticultural crops can help reveal the basic biology of grafting, the reasons for incompatibility, sensing, and signaling of nutrients, ion uptake and transport, and the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation and restriction in rootstocks. Ion transporter and miRNA-regulated nutrient

  1. Combined investigation of Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques for composite materials NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. W.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J. P.; Namkung, M.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced composites are not without trade-offs. Their increased designability brings an increase in the complexity of their internal geometry and, as a result, an increase in the number of failure modes associated with a defect. When two or more isotropic materials are combined in a composite, the isotropic material failure modes may also combine. In a laminate, matrix delamination, cracking and crazing, and voids and porosity, will often combine with fiber breakage, shattering, waviness, and separation to bring about ultimate structural failure. This combining of failure modes can result in defect boundaries of different sizes, corresponding to the failure of each structural component. This paper discusses a dual-technology NDE (Non Destructive Evaluation) (eddy current (EC) and ultrasonics (UT)) study of graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) laminate samples. Eddy current and ultrasonic raster (Cscan) imaging were used together to characterize the effects of mechanical impact damage, high temperature thermal damage and various types of inserts in gr/ep laminate samples of various stacking sequences.

  2. Prospects and Techniques for Eddy-Resolving Acoustic Tomography in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, J. W.; Nechaev, D.; Roman, D. A.; Sidorovskaia, N. A.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2007-05-01

    For several decades monitoring and modeling the dynamics and physical structure of the Gulf of Mexico have been major efforts undertaken by oceanographers of the United States and other American countries. There are very interesting physical oceanographic features in the Gulf, not the least of which are the Gulf Loop Current and the eddies it spawns. Satellite sensing of IR and altimeter imagery has been a major input to modeling those features. Such efforts are very important to the economy and well being of much of the United States and Mexico, including fisheries, mineral economies, hurricane strengths and paths in the summer, and severe snow storms in the eastern US in the winter. A major shortcoming of the present monitoring of the Gulf is the lack of subsurface input to the dynamic models of the Gulf. Acoustic tomography is a viable means of providing that missing input. Several universities have come together to investigate the prospects for establishing a Gulf Eddy Monitoring System (GEMS) for the deep eastern half of the Gulf using acoustic tomography. The group has conducted several acoustics experiments and propagation studies to determine the feasibility of long-range propagation in the eastern Gulf and the mitigation of adverse effects on marine mammal populations in that region under the Office of Naval Research project entitled the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC). The group has also convened an invited session for the 9th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI 2005) Orlando, FL, July 2005. This paper discusses prospects for establishing the GEMS tomographic system, its technical characteristics, and its contributions to advancing the knowledge of the dynamics of the Gulf. This presentation will concentrate on the characteristics of a single-slice tomographic system, called GEMS Phase I, across the approaches to the DeSoto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf and its prospect for monitoring the movements of

  3. Frequency Optimization for Enhancement of Surface Defect Classification Using the Eddy Current Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengbao; Wang, Qi; Cao, Binghua; Ye, Bo; Sunny, Ali Imam; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Eddy current testing is quite a popular non-contact and cost-effective method for nondestructive evaluation of product quality and structural integrity. Excitation frequency is one of the key performance factors for defect characterization. In the literature, there are many interesting papers dealing with wide spectral content and optimal frequency in terms of detection sensitivity. However, research activity on frequency optimization with respect to characterization performances is lacking. In this paper, an investigation into optimum excitation frequency has been conducted to enhance surface defect classification performance. The influences of excitation frequency for a group of defects were revealed in terms of detection sensitivity, contrast between defect features, and classification accuracy using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and a support vector machine (SVM). It is observed that probe signals are the most sensitive on the whole for a group of defects when excitation frequency is set near the frequency at which maximum probe signals are retrieved for the largest defect. After the use of KPCA, the margins between the defect features are optimum from the perspective of the SVM, which adopts optimal hyperplanes for structure risk minimization. As a result, the best classification accuracy is obtained. The main contribution is that the influences of excitation frequency on defect characterization are interpreted, and experiment-based procedures are proposed to determine the optimal excitation frequency for a group of defects rather than a single defect with respect to optimal characterization performances. PMID:27164112

  4. Frequency Optimization for Enhancement of Surface Defect Classification Using the Eddy Current Technique.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mengbao; Wang, Qi; Cao, Binghua; Ye, Bo; Sunny, Ali Imam; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-05-07

    Eddy current testing is quite a popular non-contact and cost-effective method for nondestructive evaluation of product quality and structural integrity. Excitation frequency is one of the key performance factors for defect characterization. In the literature, there are many interesting papers dealing with wide spectral content and optimal frequency in terms of detection sensitivity. However, research activity on frequency optimization with respect to characterization performances is lacking. In this paper, an investigation into optimum excitation frequency has been conducted to enhance surface defect classification performance. The influences of excitation frequency for a group of defects were revealed in terms of detection sensitivity, contrast between defect features, and classification accuracy using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) and a support vector machine (SVM). It is observed that probe signals are the most sensitive on the whole for a group of defects when excitation frequency is set near the frequency at which maximum probe signals are retrieved for the largest defect. After the use of KPCA, the margins between the defect features are optimum from the perspective of the SVM, which adopts optimal hyperplanes for structure risk minimization. As a result, the best classification accuracy is obtained. The main contribution is that the influences of excitation frequency on defect characterization are interpreted, and experiment-based procedures are proposed to determine the optimal excitation frequency for a group of defects rather than a single defect with respect to optimal characterization performances.

  5. Evaluation of laser absorption spectroscopic techniques for eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, James D; Twigg, Marsailidh; Famulari, Daniela; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A; Gallagher, Martin W; Fowler, David

    2008-03-15

    An intercomparison was made between eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and a lead-salt tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). The measurements took place in September 2004 and again in April 2005 over a managed grassland site in Southern Scotland, U.K. These were also compared with a flux estimate derived from an "Ammonia Measurement by ANnular Denuder with online Analysis" (AMANDA), using the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM). The concentration and flux measurements from the QCLAS correlated well with those of the TDLAS and the AGM systems when emissions were high, following slurry application to the field. Both the QCLAS and TDLAS, however, underestimated the flux when compared with the AMANDA system, by 64%. A flux loss of 41% due to chemical reaction of ammonia in the QCLAS (and 37% in the TDLAS) sample tube walls was identified and characterized using laboratory tests but did not fully accountforthis difference. Recognizing these uncertainties, the agreement between the systems was nevertheless very close (R2 = 0.95 between the QCLAS and the TDLAS; R2 = 0.84 between the QCLAS and the AMANDA) demonstrating the suitability of the laser absorption methods for quantifying the temporal dynamics of ammonia fluxes.

  6. A Model of Turbulence, Sediment Transport and Morphodynamics of Lateral Separation Zones in Canyon Rivers using Detached Eddy Simulation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, L. V.; Schmeeckle, M. W.; Grams, P. E.; Moreno, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Lateral separation zones are featured by large-scale flow separation, secondary recirculation zones and free shear layers. In the Colorado River, lateral separation zones are the principal source of fine sediment for eddy sandbars. A parallelized, three-dimensional turbulence-resolving model is coupled with a continuum sediment transport model and tested in lateral separation zones located in two pools along the Colorado River in Marble Canyon. The model aims to study the flow and sediment dynamics of lateral separation zones, recognizing the important role that these processes play in the erosion, deposition and morphodynamics of eddy sandbars. The Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) technique is employed for fully resolved turbulence at larger scales than the Sub-Grid-Scale (SGS) while SGS turbulence is modeled using the Spalart-Allmaras one equation turbulence closure model. This DES-3D flow model is coupled to a sediment advection-diffusion formulation, wherein advection is provided by the DES velocity field minus particles settling velocity, and diffusion is provided by the SGS. The Smith and McLean suspended sediment boundary condition is used to calculate the upward and downward settling of sediment fluxes in the near-bed grid cells. Five groups of sediment sizes are employed and estimated using a mixing layer model. Each fraction of the grain size group is redistributed every time step. Thus, the model is able to predict the exposure and burial of bedrock by fine grain size sediment. The simulated results show a pattern of unsteady pulsations in the exchange of concentration of sediment and deposition fluxes between the primary zone and the main channel. This exchange occurs at the convergence and divergence zones. These pulsations are more accentuated at the convergence zone, but still evidenced at the divergence zone. Along the simulated river-reach, the concentration values increase in the constrictions and decrease in the main channel. At both rapids, net

  7. Time Resolved Measurement of Ecosystem-Atmosphere NH3 Exchange Using the Eddy Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Littlejohn, D.

    2005-12-01

    Quantifying ammonia fluxes between the land surface and atmosphere is required for effective control of air quality, improving agricultural practices, and understanding natural ecosystem function. Ammonia (NH3) is emitted in large but uncertain amounts from animal agriculture, in lesser amounts from imperfect use of nitrogen fertilizers in crop agriculture, from catalytic converters used on automobiles and other energy related industrial processes, and exchanged between the ecosystem and atmosphere by natural ecosystem processes on vast spatial scales. To address the need for accurate, time-resolved NH3 flux measurements, we have developed an eddy covariance (EC) instrument for direct measurements of NH3 flux. EC flux measurements of NH3 were not previously possible because instruments were not sufficiently sensitive at high frequencies required to capture rapid variations in surface layer NH3 concentrations. To overcome this hurdle we combined a tunable-diode-laser (TDL) spectrometer with a fast-response NH3 sampling inlet and automated pulse-response calibration system. Laboratory tests of the inlet system demonstrate that the response to 10 ppb step in NH3 concentration is well described by a double exponential model with (1/e) times of 0.3 (85% response) and 1.5 (15% response) seconds. This response combined with a routinely measured instrument stability of ~ 0.1 ppb (on 30 minute timescales) indicates that the instrumental contribution to noise in NH3 flux measurements is ~ 0.2 umol NH3 m-2 hr-1, sufficient to stringently test models for NH3 exchange under most conditions. Recent results of field work to verify the instrument performance and observe examples of NH3 exchange will be presented.

  8. Flux measurements of volatile organic compounds by the relaxed eddy accumulation method combined with a GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changhyoun; Schade, Gunnar W.; Boedeker, Ian

    2010-07-01

    A tall tower flux measurement setup was established in metropolitan Houston, Texas, to measure trace gas fluxes from emission sources in the urban surface layer. We describe a new relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, focusing on benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) results. Ambient air sampled from 60 m above the ground next to a sonic anemometer was subsampled by a membrane pump and pushed into an REA valve system with two Teflon bag reservoirs, then transferred to two preconcentration units for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and the selected BTEX measurement results using approximately 8 weeks of data (May 22-July 22, 2008), presenting diurnal variations of concentrations and fluxes of these traffic tracers. The measured values exhibited diurnal cycles with dominant morning and midday peaks during weekdays related to rush hour traffic and additional weekday daytime toluene and xylenes emissions. Local evaporative emissions, likely from solvent usage, significantly contributed to the measured fluxes. We upscaled measured emissions to the county level using a high resolution land cover data set and compared the results with EPA's National Emission Inventory (NEI).

  9. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  10. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    for the field (one to two orders of magnitude lower compared to current closed-path laser based eddy covariance systems). Potential applications include fluxes of CO2, CH4, N2O, VOCs and other tracers. Finally we assess the flux accuracy of the Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) approach as in our real implementation relative to alternative techniques including eddy covariance (EC) and relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). We further quantify various sources of instrument and method specific measurement errors. This comparison uses real measurements of 20 Hz turbulent time series of 3D wind velocity, sonic temperature and CO2 mixing ratio over a mixed decidious forest at the 'ICOS' flux tower site 'Hainich', Germany. Results from a simulation using real wind and CO2 timeseries from the Hainich site from 30 April to 3 November 2014 and real instrument performance suggest that the maximum flux estimates error (50% and 75% error quantiles) from Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) relative to the true flux is 1.3% and 10%, respectively for monthly net fluxes, 1.6% and 7%, respectively for daily net fluxes and 8% and 35%, respectively for 30-minute CO2 flux estimates. Those results from CES are promising and outperform our REA estimates by about a factor of 50 assuming REA with constant b value. Results include flux time series from the EC, CES and REA approaches from 30-min to annual resolution.

  11. The Image-Accumulation Technique as a Variable in Multiple-Image Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Peter Tim-Kui; Reeve, Robert H.

    A study was conducted to determine the relative effectiveness of various techniques of accumulating and organizing images in multiple-screen, slide-tape presentations of geographical information. Identical stimulus materials were presented in five different ways from sequential presentation to accumulated presentation to programed accumulated…

  12. Application of a GC-ECD for measurements of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of peroxyacetyl nitrate using the relaxed eddy accumulation and gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Foken, T.; Trebs, I.

    2014-07-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) may constitute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. Current knowledge about the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of PAN is limited, and only few studies have investigated the deposition of PAN to terrestrial ecosystems. We developed a flux measurement system for the determination of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of PAN using both the hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) method and the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. The system consists of a modified, commercially available gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD, Meteorologie Consult GmbH, Germany). Sampling was performed by trapping PAN onto two pre-concentration columns; during HREA operation one was used for updraft and one for downdraft events, and during MBR operation the two columns allowed simultaneous sampling at two measurement heights. The performance of the PAN flux measurement system was tested at a natural grassland site, using fast-response ozone (O3) measurements as a proxy for both methods. The measured PAN fluxes were comparatively small (daytime PAN deposition was on average -0.07 nmol m-2 s-1) and, thus, prone to significant uncertainties. A major challenge in the design of the system was the resolution of the small PAN mixing ratio differences. Consequently, the study focuses on the performance of the analytical unit and a detailed analysis of errors contributing to the overall uncertainty. The error of the PAN mixing ratio differences ranged from 4 to 15 ppt during the MBR and between 18 and 26 ppt during the HREA operation, while during daytime measured PAN mixing ratios were of similar magnitude. Choosing optimal settings for both the MBR and HREA method, the study shows that the HREA method did not have a significant advantage towards the MBR method under well-mixed conditions as was expected.

  13. Application of a GC-ECD for measurements of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of peroxyacetyl nitrate using the relaxed eddy accumulation and gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Foken, T.; Trebs, I.

    2014-02-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) may constitute a significant fraction of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. Current knowledge about the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of PAN is limited and only few studies have investigated the deposition of PAN to terrestrial ecosystems. We developed a flux measurement system for the determination of biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes of PAN using both the hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) method and the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method. The system consists of a modified, commercially available gas chromatograph with electron capture detection (GC-ECD, Meteorologie Consult GmbH, Germany). Sampling was performed by trapping PAN onto two pre-concentration columns; during HREA operation one was used for updraft and one for downdraft events and during MBR operation the two columns allowed simultaneous sampling at two measurement heights. The performance of the PAN flux measurement system was tested at a natural grassland site, using fast response ozone (O3) measurements as a proxy for both methods. The measured PAN fluxes were comparatively small (daytime PAN deposition was on average -0.07 nmol m-2 s-1 and, thus, prone to significant uncertainties. A major challenge in the design of the system was the resolution of the small PAN mixing ratio differences. Consequently, the study focuses on the performance of the analytical unit and a detailed analysis of errors contributing to the overall uncertainty. The error of the PAN mixing ratio differences ranged from 4 to 15 ppt during the MBR and between 18 and 26 ppt during the HREA operation, while during daytime measured PAN mixing ratios were of similar magnitude. Choosing optimal settings for both the MBR and HREA method, the study shows that the HREA method did not have a significant advantage towards the MBR method under well mixed conditions as it was expected.

  14. Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J. R.; Karigan, G. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An accumulator particularly adapted for use in controlling the pressure of a stream of fluid in its liquid phase utilizing the fluid in its gaseous phase was designed. The accumulator is characterized by a shell defining a pressure chamber having an entry throat for a liquid and adapted to be connected in contiguous relation with a selected conduit having a stream of fluid flowing through the conduit in its liquid phase. A pressure and volume stabilization tube, including an array of pressure relief perforations is projected into the chamber with the perforations disposed adjacent to the entry throat for accommodating a discharge of the fluid in either gaseous or liquid phases, while a gas inlet and liquid to gas conversion system is provided, the chamber is connected with a source of the fluid for continuously pressuring the chamber for controlling the pressure of the stream of liquid.

  15. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  16. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca F.; Johnson, Darren J.; Neubauer, Scott C.; Raynie, Richard C.

    2016-06-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 yr-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 yr-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 yr-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 yr-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 yr-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  17. Long-term energy flux measurements and energy balance over a small boreal lake using eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordbo, Annika; Launiainen, Samuli; Mammarella, Ivan; LeppäRanta, Matti; Huotari, Jussi; Ojala, Anne; Vesala, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the energy balance components of a small boreal lake (area 0.041 km2, mean depth 2.5 m) in southern Finland were performed during four open water periods (April-October) in 2005-2008. Turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat acquired using the eddy covariance technique were accompanied by net radiation and water heat storage measurements. In April the lake was near isothermal, whereas in May the development of a thermocline was enabled by dark water color and a sheltered location. The thermocline continued to deepen until September down to the depth of 3.5 m and prevented the deeper water from interacting with the atmosphere. The sensible heat flux was governed by the air-water temperature difference and had its minimum in the afternoon (values down to -45 W m-2) and peaked in the early morning (values up to 32 W m-2). The monthly means ranged from -9 W m-2 (April 2005) to 24 W m-2 (July 2008). The diurnal variation of the latent heat flux, controlled by vapor pressure deficit, had an opposite diurnal phase with a maximum in the afternoon (values up to 120 W m-2) and minimum in the morning (values down to ˜2 W m-2). The monthly averages ranged from 4 W m-2 (October 2008) to 77 W m-2 (July 2006). Furthermore, the lake acted as a heat sink until July and August when the maximum heat content was about 230 MJ m-2. The monthly energy balance closure varied from 57% to 112%, and the average closure was 82% (residual 16 W m-2) and 72% (residual 23 W m-2) for 2006 and 2007, respectively.

  18. Development of Quality Assessment Techniques for Large Eddy Simulation of Propulsion and Power Systems in Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Large-eddy-simulation (LES) is quickly becoming a method of choice for studying complex thermo-physics in a wide range of propulsion and power systems. It provides a means to study coupled turbulent combustion and flow processes in parameter spaces that are unattainable using direct-numerical-simulation (DNS), with a degree of fidelity that can be far more accurate than conventional engineering methods such as the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approx- imation. However, development of predictive LES is complicated by the complex interdependence of different type of errors coming from numerical methods, algorithms, models and boundary con- ditions. On the other hand, control of accuracy has become a critical aspect in the development of predictive LES for design. The objective of this project is to create a framework of metrics aimed at quantifying the quality and accuracy of state-of-the-art LES in a manner that addresses the myriad of competing interdependencies. In a typical simulation cycle, only 20% of the computational time is actually usable. The rest is spent in case preparation, assessment, and validation, because of the lack of guidelines. This work increases confidence in the accuracy of a given solution while min- imizing the time obtaining the solution. The approach facilitates control of the tradeoffs between cost, accuracy, and uncertainties as a function of fidelity and methods employed. The analysis is coupled with advanced Uncertainty Quantification techniques employed to estimate confidence in model predictions and calibrate model's parameters. This work has provided positive conse- quences on the accuracy of the results delivered by LES and will soon have a broad impact on research supported both by the DOE and elsewhere.

  19. Application of Self Nulling Eddy Current Probe Technique to the Detection of Fatigue Crack Initiation and Control of Test Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Nath, S.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    A major part of fracture mechanics is concerned with studying the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. This typically requires constant monitoring of crack growth during fatigue cycles and the knowledge of the precise location of the crack tip at any given time. One technique currently available for measuring fatigue crack length is the Potential Drop method. The method, however, may be inaccurate if the direction of crack growth deviates considerably from what was assumed initially or the curvature of the crack becomes significant. Another popular approach is to optically view the crack using a high magnification microscope, but this entails a person constantly monitoring it. The present proposed technique uses an automated scheme, in order to eliminate the need for a person to constantly monitor the experiment. Another technique under development elsewhere is to digitize an optical image of the test specimen surface and then apply a pattern recognition algorithm to locate the crack tip. A previous publication showed that the self nulling eddy current probe successfully tracked a simulated crack in an aluminum sample. This was the impetus to develop an online real time crack monitoring system. An automated system has been developed which includes a two axis scanner mounted on the tensile testing machine, the probe and its instrumentation and a personal computer (PC) to communicate and control all the parameters. The system software controls the testing parameters as well as monitoring the fatigue crack as it propagates. This paper will discuss the experimental setup in detail and demonstrate its capabilities. A three dimensional finite element model is utilized to model the magnetic field distribution due to the probe and how the probe voltage changes as it scans the crack. Experimental data of the probe for different samples under zero load, static load and high cycle fatigue load will be discussed. The final section summarizes the major accomplishments

  20. Component greenhouse gas fluxes and radiative balance from two deltaic marshes in Louisiana: Pairing chamber techniques and eddy covariance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krauss, Ken W.; Holm, Guerry O.; Perez, Brian C.; McWhorter, David E.; Cormier, Nicole; Moss, Rebecca; Johnson, Darren; Neubauer, Scott C; Raynie, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Coastal marshes take up atmospheric CO2 while emitting CO2, CH4, and N2O. This ability to sequester carbon (C) is much greater for wetlands on a per-area basis than from most ecosystems, facilitating scientific, political, and economic interest in their value as greenhouse gas sinks. However, the greenhouse gas balance of Gulf of Mexico wetlands is particularly understudied. We describe the net ecosystem exchange (NEEc) of CO2 and CH4 using eddy covariance (EC) in comparison with fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O using chambers from brackish and freshwater marshes in Louisiana, USA. From EC, we found that 182 g C m-2 y-1 was lost through NEEc from the brackish marsh. Of this, 11 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CH4 emissions and the remaining 171 g C m-2 y-1 resulted from net CO2 emissions. In contrast, -290 g C m2 y-1 was taken up through NEEc by the freshwater marsh, with 47 g C m-2 y-1 emitted as CH4 and -337 g C m-2 y-1 taken up as CO2. From chambers, we discovered that neither site had large fluxes of N2O. Sustained-flux greenhouse gas accounting metrics indicated that both marshes had a positive (warming) radiative balance, with the brackish marsh having a substantially greater warming effect than the freshwater marsh. That net respiratory emissions of CO2 and CH4 as estimated through chamber techniques were 2-4 times different from emissions estimated through EC requires additional understanding of the artifacts created by different spatial and temporal sampling footprints between techniques.

  1. Air-sea CO2 exchange from kelp forests (Macrocystis) in San Diego, Southern California - CO2 flux measurements by the boat based eddy covariance technique -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, H.; Oechel, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    The California Bight near San Diego in Southern California is characterized by extensive kelp forests (Macrocystis). To quantify air-sea CO2 exchange (CO2 flux) on the kelp forest, we set up an eddy covariance system on a boat together with a gyro sensor for the motion correction. We also measured pCO2 and estimated CO2 flux by using the bulk method. The measurements were taken on May 19th (15-17 PST), December 9th (12-16 PST) and December 23rd (13-16 PST) in 2009 over the kelp forest (N32.6°, W 117.2°) near Point Loma, San Diego. Both CO2 flux measured by the eddy covariance system and estimated by the bulk method showed a consistent sink of CO2. However, there were some discrepancies between the two methods in the flux estimation. The lowest dpCO2 (pCO2 - atmospheric CO2) of -152 ppm with the highest wind speed was observed on May 19th resulting in the highest CO2 sink of -0.26 gCm-2day-1 estimated by the bulk method. On the other hand, the eddy covariance technique recorded the highest CO2 sink of -1.34 gCm-2day-1 on December 9th, although dpCO2 of -50.6 ppm recorded on December 9th was higher than that on May 19th. CO2 flux calculated by the bulk method was overall smaller than CO2 flux measured by the eddy covariance technique. The discrepancy in between the two methods was relatively less on May 19th when higher wind speeds were observed compared to the other two cruises.

  2. Study of eddy current probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Wang, Morgan

    1992-01-01

    The recognition of materials properties still presents a number of problems for nondestructive testing in aerospace systems. This project attempts to utilize current capabilities in eddy current instrumentation, artificial intelligence, and robotics in order to provide insight into defining geometrical aspects of flaws in composite materials which are capable of being evaluated using eddy current inspection techniques.

  3. Energy balance closure on a winter wheat stand: comparing the eddy covariance technique with the soil water balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imukova, K.; Ingwersen, J.; Hevart, M.; Streck, T.

    2016-01-01

    The energy balance of eddy covariance (EC) flux data is typically not closed. The nature of the gap is usually not known, which hampers using EC data to parameterize and test models. In the present study we cross-checked the evapotranspiration data obtained with the EC method (ETEC) against ET rates measured with the soil water balance method (ETWB) at winter wheat stands in southwest Germany. During the growing seasons 2012 and 2013, we continuously measured, in a half-hourly resolution, latent heat (LE) and sensible (H) heat fluxes using the EC technique. Measured fluxes were adjusted with either the Bowen-ratio (BR), H or LE post-closure method. ETWB was estimated based on rainfall, seepage and soil water storage measurements. The soil water storage term was determined at sixteen locations within the footprint of an EC station, by measuring the soil water content down to a soil depth of 1.5 m. In the second year, the volumetric soil water content was additionally continuously measured in 15 min resolution in 10 cm intervals down to 90 cm depth with sixteen capacitance soil moisture sensors. During the 2012 growing season, the H post-closed LE flux data (ETEC = 3.4 ± 0.6 mm day-1) corresponded closest with the result of the WB method (3.3 ± 0.3 mm day-1). ETEC adjusted by the BR (4.1 ± 0.6 mm day-1) or LE (4.9 ± 0.9 mm day-1) post-closure method were higher than the ETWB by 24 and 48 %, respectively. In 2013, ETWB was in best agreement with ETEC adjusted with the H post-closure method during the periods with low amount of rain and seepage. During these periods the BR and LE post-closure methods overestimated ET by about 46 and 70 %, respectively. During a period with high and frequent rainfalls, ETWB was in-between ETEC adjusted by H and BR post-closure methods. We conclude that, at most observation periods on our site, LE is not a major component of the energy balance gap. Our results indicate that the energy balance gap is made up by

  4. Application of Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) method to estimate CO2 and CH4 surface fluxes in the city of Krakow, southern Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Pieniazek, Katarzyna; Jasek, Alina; Chmura, Lukasz; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2013-04-01

    There is a growing interest in the recent years in studies aimed at quantifying carbon cycling in urban centres. Worldwide migration of human population from rural to urban areas and corresponding growth of extensive urban agglomerations and megacities leads to intensification of anthropogenic emissions of carbon and strong disruption of natural carbon cycle on these areas. Therefore, a deeper understanding of the carbon "metabolism" of such regions is required. Apart of better quantification of surface carbon fluxes, also a thorough understanding of the functioning of biosphere under strong anthropogenic influence is needed. Nowadays, covariance methods are widely applied for studying gas exchange between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface. Relaxed Eddy Accumulation method (REA), combined with the CO2 and CH4 CRDS analyser allows simultaneous measurements of surface fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane within the chosen footprint of the detection system, thus making possible thorough characterisation of the overall exchange of those gases between the atmosphere and the urban surface across diverse spatial and temporal scales. Here we present preliminary results of the study aimed at quantifying surface fluxes of CO2 and CH4 in Krakow, southern Poland. The REA system for CO2 and CH4 flux measurements has been installed on top of a 20m high tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building, close to the city centre of Krakow. The sensors were installed ca 42 m above the local ground. Gill Windmaster-Pro sonic anemometer was coupled with self-made system, designed by the Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland, for collecting air samples in two pairs of 10-liter Tedlar bags, and with Picarro G2101-i CRDS analyser. The air was collected in 30-min intervals. The CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios in these cumulative downdraft and updraft air samples were determined by the CRDS analyser after each sampling interval. Based on the measured mixing ratios difference and the

  5. Finite Element Analysis for Imaging Steel Bars Placed Under a Mild Steel Boundary Using Eddy Current Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hussin, H.; Zaid, M.; Gaydecki, P.; El-Madaani, F.; Fernandes, B.

    2006-03-06

    This paper reports on recent modelling results obtained using finite-element analysis for penetrating a magnetic field through a 2 mm steel boundary. The object is to detect 16 mm steel bars placed under mild steel boundaries at different operating frequencies. To penetrate thicker steel boundaries and increase the depth penetration, a different configuration based on remote field eddy currents (RFEC) has been modelled.

  6. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California; with a section on estimating evapotranspiration using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, John B.; Stannard, David I.

    1997-01-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the ground-water-flow system associated with Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site of a high-level nuclear-waste repository. By using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique, measurements made between June 1983 and April 1984 to estimate evapotranspiration were found to range from 0.1 centimeter per day during winter months to about 0.3 centimeter per day during summer months; the annual average was 0.16 centimeter per day. These estimates were compared with evapotranspiration estimates calculated from six other methods.

  7. Energy budget measurements using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio techniques at the Kinosheo Lake tower site during the Northern Wetlands Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Den Hartog, G.; Neumann, H. H.; King, K. M.; Chipanshi, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    Fluxes of heat and water vapor were measured on a 20-m tower at Kinosheo Lake in the Hudson Bay lowlands using eddy correlation and Bowen ratio energy balance techniques. The study period was June 25 to July 28, 1990. Measurements were made over a peat bog consisting of a mixture of sphagnum moss and lichen hummocks and black pools. About 200 m west of the tower were several shallow ponds. The hummocks had a dry, insulating surface and were underlain by an ice layer near 50 cm depth until mid-July. At the beginning of the period the black pools were covered with water, and although the free water gradually disappeared over the study period, they remained saturated to the end of July. The depth of peat near the tower was about 3 m. Despite the ice layer under the hummocks, their daytime surface temperatures were high, near 35 C, and after the middle of July, above 40 C. Inspection of temperature, precipitation, and radiation data showed that the midsummer period of 1990 was warmer, drier, and sunnier than usual at Moosonee and so by influence at Lake Kinosheo. When all the data were combined to yield average diurnal energy balance components, the eddy correlation fluxes accounted for 90% of the available energy. Latent heat flux averaged 46% of the total available energy and the sensible heat flux averaged 34%. Daytime Bowen ratios were near 1 for the experimental period, suggesting that the bog behaved more like a dryland than a wetland. Eddy correlation measurements of sensible heat and latent heat flux were less than those measured using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique, the average ratios being 0.81 and 0.86 respectively. These differences were possibly due to the difficulty in measuring energy balance components of net radiation and ground heat flux over the mosaic surface.

  8. Evaluation of the Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Surface Algorithm (ACASA Model) Using Eddy Covariance Technique Over Sparse Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Spano, D.; Sirca, C.; Duce, P.; Snyder, R.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K. T.

    2008-12-01

    Land surface models are usually used to quantify energy and mass fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere on micro- and regional scales. One of the most elaborate land surface models for flux modelling is the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA) model, which provides micro-scale as well as regional-scale fluxes when imbedded in a meso-scale meteorological model (e.g., MM5 or WRF). The model predicts vegetation conditions and changes with time due to plant responses to environment variables. In particular, fluxes and profiles of heat, water vapor, carbon and momentum within and above canopy are estimated using third-order equations. It also estimates turbulent profiles of velocity, temperature, humidity within and above canopy, and CO2 fluxes are estimated using a combination of Ball-Berry and Farquhar equations. The ACASA model is also able to include the effects of water stress on stomata, transpiration and CO2 assimilation. ACASA model is unique because it separates canopy domain into twenty atmospheric layers (ten layers within the canopy and ten layers above the canopy), and the soil is partitioned into fifteen layers of variable thickness. The model was mainly used over dense canopies in the past, so the aim of this work was to test the ACASA model over a sparse canopy as Mediterranean maquis. Vegetation is composed by sclerophyllous species of shrubs that are always green, with leathery leaves, small height, with a moderately sparse canopy, and that are tolerant at water stress condition. Eddy Covariance (EC) technique was used to collect continuous data for more than 3 years period. Field measurements were taken in a natural maquis site located near Alghero, Sardinia, Italy and they were used to parameterize and validate the model. The input values were selected by running the model several times varying the one parameter per time. A second step in the parameterization process was the simultaneously variation of some parameters

  9. Characterisation of Phosphate Accumulating Organisms and Techniques for Polyphosphate Detection: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tarayre, Cédric; Nguyen, Huu-Thanh; Brognaux, Alison; Delepierre, Anissa; De Clercq, Lies; Charlier, Raphaëlle; Michels, Evi; Meers, Erik; Delvigne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate minerals have long been used for the production of phosphorus-based chemicals used in many economic sectors. However, these resources are not renewable and the natural phosphate stocks are decreasing. In this context, the research of new phosphate sources has become necessary. Many types of wastes contain non-negligible phosphate concentrations, such as wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, phosphorus is eliminated by physicochemical and/or biological techniques. In this latter case, a specific microbiota, phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), accumulates phosphate as polyphosphate. This molecule can be considered as an alternative phosphate source, and is directly extracted from wastewater generated by human activities. This review focuses on the techniques which can be applied to enrich and try to isolate these PAOs, and to detect the presence of polyphosphate in microbial cells. PMID:27258275

  10. On the estimate of the transpiration in Mediterranean heterogeneous ecosystems with the coupled use of eddy covariance and sap flow techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, Roberto; Curreli, Matteo; Montaldo, Nicola; Oren, Ram

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are commonly heterogeneous savanna-like ecosystems, with contrasting plant functional types (PFT) competing for the water use. Mediterranean regions suffer water scarcity due to the dry climate conditions. In semi-arid regions evapotranspiration (ET) is the leading loss term of the root-zone water budget with a yearly magnitude that may be roughly equal to the precipitation. Despite the attention these ecosystems are receiving, a general lack of knowledge persists about the estimate of ET and the relationship between ET and the plant survival strategies for the different PFTs under water stress. During the dry summers these water-limited heterogeneous ecosystems are mainly characterized by a simple dual PFT-landscapes with strong-resistant woody vegetation and bare soil since grass died. In these conditions due to the low signal of the land surface fluxes captured by the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer the widely used eddy covariance may fail and its ET estimate is not robust enough. In these conditions the use of the sap flow technique may have a key role, because theoretically it provides a direct estimate of the woody vegetation transpiration. Through the coupled use of the sap flow sensor observations, a 2D foot print model of the eddy covariance tower and high resolution satellite images for the estimate of the foot print land cover map, the eddy covariance measurements can be correctly interpreted, and ET components (bare soil evaporation and woody vegetation transpiration) can be separated. The case study is at the Orroli site in Sardinia (Italy). The site landscape is a mixture of Mediterranean patchy vegetation types: trees, including wild olives and cork oaks, different shrubs and herbaceous species. An extensive field campaign started in 2004. Land-surface fluxes and CO2 fluxes are estimated by an eddy covariance technique based micrometeorological tower. Soil moisture profiles were also continuously estimated using water

  11. A comparison of methane emission measurements using Eddy Covariance and manual and automated chamber-based techniques in Tibetan Plateau alpine wetland.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingfei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Guangshuai; Song, Weimin; Huang, Yao; Li, Sheng-Gong; Liang, Naishen; Tang, Yanhong; He, Jin-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Comparing of different CH4 flux measurement techniques allows for the independent evaluation of the performance and reliability of those techniques. We compared three approaches, the traditional discrete Manual Static Chamber (MSC), Continuous Automated Chamber (CAC) and Eddy Covariance (EC) methods of measuring the CH4 fluxes in an alpine wetland. We found a good agreement among the three methods in the seasonal CH4 flux patterns, but the diurnal patterns from both the CAC and EC methods differed. While the diurnal CH4 flux variation from the CAC method was positively correlated with the soil temperature, the diurnal variation from the EC method was closely correlated with the solar radiation and net CO2 fluxes during the daytime but was correlated with the soil temperature at nighttime. The MSC method showed 25.3% and 7.6% greater CH4 fluxes than the CAC and EC methods when measured between 09:00 h and 12:00 h, respectively.

  12. Comparison of horizontal winds and turbulent eddy dissipation rates obtained by two different multi-receiver techniques - Spaced Antenna and Postset Beam Steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shridhar; Rao, T. Narayana; Anandan, V. K.; Sureshbabu, V. N.; Arunamani, T.

    2016-01-01

    The horizontal winds and eddy dissipation rates (ε) obtained by two multi-receiver techniques, Spaced Antenna (SA) and Postset Beam Steering (PBS), are compared and contrasted, using Middle and Upper atmospheric radar measurements. Comparison of mean horizontal winds obtained by both methods indicates a good agreement in zonal and meridional winds. On the other hand, the agreement in ε derived by SA and PBS is good in the lower troposphere (below ~9 km), but the profiles of ε show some discrepancy in the upper troposphere. While the discrepancy is relatively more in layers of depleted turbulence, it is small in layers of enhanced turbulence. Comparison of signal-to-noise ratio and turbulence variations reveal that these variations are not due to specular echoes, rather due to anisotropic turbulence. The study suggests that these techniques and correction formulae for spectral width work well in the regions of enhanced turbulence but yield relatively less accurate values in regions of depleted turbulence.

  13. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance and static chamber techniques at a temperate forest in central ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Geddes, J. A.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Thomas, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate forest (Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve) in central Ontario (45°17´11´´ N, 78°32´19´´ W) from June-October, 2011. Continuous measurements were made by an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA) from Los Gatos Research Inc. that measures methane (CH4) at 10 Hz sampling rates. Fluxes were calculated from the gas measurements in conjunction with wind data collected by a 3-D sonic anemometer using the eddy covariance (EC) method. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7 ± 0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. Methane fluxes showed a seasonal progression with average rates of uptake increasing from June through September and remaining high in October. This pattern was consistent with a decreasing trend in soil moisture content at the monthly time scale. On the diurnal timescale, there was evidence of increased uptake during the day, when the mid-canopy wind speed was at a maximum. These patterns suggest that substrate supply of CH4 and oxygen to methanotrophs, and in certain cases hypoxic soil conditions supporting methanogenesis in low-slope areas, drive the observed variability in fluxes. A network of soil static chambers used at the tower site showed close agreement with the eddy covariance flux measurements. This suggests that soil-level microbial processes, and not abiological leaf-level CH4 production, drive overall CH4 dynamics in temperate forest ecosystems such as Haliburton Forest.

  14. Semidiurnal and seasonal variations in methane (CH4) emissions from a subtropical hydroelectric reservoir (Nam Theun 2 Reservoir) measured by eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Chandrashekhar; Serça, Dominique; Tardif, Raphael; Demarty, Maud; Descloux, Stéphane; Chanudet, Vincent; Guédant, Pierre; Guérin, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Hydroelectric reservoirs have globally been identified as a significant source of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere, especially in the tropics. Assessing these emissions and their variations at small and large time scale represent important scientific challenges. In this context, the objectives of this work are (i) to compare different methodologies used to assess CH4 emissions. (ii) to determine the temporal variations in these emissions at different scales i.e. from daily to seasonal, and link these variations to environmental controlling factors. Measurements of CH4 emissions were made in a recently impounded (May 2008) subtropical hydroelectric reservoir, Nam Theun 2 (NT2), in Lao PDR, Asia. The sampling strategy included three different types of flux measurement techniques: floating chambers (FC), submerged funnels (SF), and the eddy covariance technique (EC). Flux measurements were carried out during four field campaigns conducted between May 2009 and June 2011. Eddy covariance system, composed by a 3D sonic anemometer coupled with a DLT-100 fast methane analyzer (Los Gatos Inc®), was deployed on a mast erected in a large surface of open water. Diffusive and bubbling fluxes were measured using respectively the FC and the SF techniques within the footprint of the EC station. Results from the four field campaigns show individual EC fluxes (30min) varying over 4 orders of magnitude (from 0.01 to 102 mmol.m-2.day-1). Individual diffusive fluxes measured by floating chambers ranged between 0.2 and 3.2 mmol.m-2.day-1. Bubbling fluxes were found to be highly sporadic, with individual daily flux values varying from 0 to 102 mmol.m-2.day-1. For all field campaigns, EC fluxes were very consistent with the sum of the two terms measured independently (diffusive fluxes + bubbling fluxes = EC fluxes), indicating that the eddy covariance system picked-up both diffusive and bubbling emissions from the reservoir, which is a very new and encouraging result for further studies

  15. Transient eddies in the MACDA Mars reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooring, Todd A.; Wilson, R. John

    2015-10-01

    We present a survey of the transient eddy activity in the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) reanalysis. The spatial structure and propagation characteristics of the eddies are emphasized. Band-pass-filtered variance and covariance fields are found to be zonally modulated, indicating a longitude dependence of the typical amplitudes of Martian transient eddies. Considerable repeatability of the eddy field spatial structures is found across Mars years, including a roughly wave number 3 pattern of low-level eddy meridional temperature transport (v'T'¯) in the northern hemisphere that is evident before and after winter solstice and a possible tendency for northern hemisphere eddy kinetic energy maxima to be located above low-lying areas. Southern hemisphere eddy fields tend to feature two local maxima, one roughly south of Tharsis and the other associated with Hellas. Eddies are weakened near winter solstice in both hemispheres and were generally weakened in the northern hemisphere during the 2001 (Mars year 25) global dust storm, albeit with little change in spatial patterns. Because the transient eddies propagate in space, we also used a teleconnection map-based technique to estimate their phase velocities. Eddy propagation at the surface is found to follow topography, a phenomenon less evident at higher altitude. Possible physical mechanisms underlying the documented eddy phenomena are discussed.

  16. Non-contact online thickness measurement system for metal films based on eddy current sensing with distance tracking technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an online, non-contact metal film thickness measurement system based on eddy current sensing. The slope of the lift-off curve (LOC) is used for characterizing target thickness. Theoretical derivation was conducted to prove that the slope is independent of the lift-off variation. In practice, the measurement has some immunity to the lift-off, but not perfect. The slope of LOC is still affected at some extent by the lift-off. Hence, a height tracking system was also proposed, which could stabilize the distance between the sensor and the target and significantly reduce the lift-off effect. The height tracking system contains a specially designed probe, which could vibrate rapidly to obtain a fast measurement speed, and its height can be adjusted up and down continuously to stabilize the lift-off. The sensor coil in the thickness measurement system was also used as the height sensor in the height tracking system. Several experiments were conducted to test the system performances under static and dynamic conditions. This measurement system demonstrated significant advantages, such as simple and clear conversion between the slope of LOC and target thickness, high resolution and stability, and minimized effect of lift-off variation.

  17. Net ecosystem exchange and energy fluxes measured with the eddy covariance technique in a western Siberian bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseychik, Pavel; Mammarella, Ivan; Karpov, Dmitry; Dengel, Sigrid; Terentieva, Irina; Sabrekov, Alexander; Glagolev, Mikhail; Lapshina, Elena

    2017-08-01

    Very few studies of ecosystem-atmosphere exchange involving eddy covariance data have been conducted in Siberia, with none in the western Siberian middle taiga. This work provides the first estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy budgets in a typical bog of the western Siberian middle taiga based on May-August measurements in 2015. The footprint of measured fluxes consisted of a homogeneous mixture of tree-covered ridges and hollows with the vegetation represented by typical sedges and shrubs. Generally, the surface exchange rates resembled those of pine-covered bogs elsewhere. The surface energy balance closure approached 100 %. Net CO2 uptake was comparatively high, summing up to 202 gC m-2 for the four measurement months, while the Bowen ratio was seasonally stable at 28 %. The ecosystem turned into a net CO2 source during several front passage events in June and July. The periods of heavy rain helped keep the water table at a sustainably high level, preventing a usual drawdown in summer. However, because of the cloudy and rainy weather, the observed fluxes might rather represent the special weather conditions of 2015 than their typical magnitudes.

  18. An advanced test technique to quantify thermomechanical fatigue damage accumulation in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanical test technique was developed to assist in quantifying the accumulation of damage in composite materials during thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) cycling. This was accomplished by incorporating definitive elastic mechanical property measurements into an ongoing load-controlled TMF test without disturbing the test specimen or significantly altering the test conditions. The technique allows two fundamental composite properties consisting of the isothermal elastic static moduli and the macroscopic coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to be measured and collected as functions of the TMF cycles. The specific implementation was incorporated into the commonly employed idealized in-phase and out-of-phase TMF cycles. However, the techniques discussed could be easily implemented into any form of load-controlled TMF mission cycle. By quantifying the degradations of these properties, tremendous insights are gained concerning the progression of macroscopic composite damage and often times the progression of damage within a given constituent. This information should also be useful for the characterization and essential for the verification of analytical damage modeling methodologies. Several examples utilizing this test technique are given for three different fiber lay-ups of titanium metal matrix composites.

  19. Analysis of uncertainty in the nitrous oxide flux values measured using a coupled eddy covariance - flux gradient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Sturman, A.; Mcmillan, A. M.; Harvey, M.; Zawar-Reza, P.

    2012-12-01

    An error analysis has been performed for a typical flux gradient - eddy covariance system setup for N2O flux measurement using data from two field campaigns. The diffusivity parameters were estimated using both a thermal and parameterization approach. Algebraic relationships of random relative error have been derived between the diffusivity parameters and the surface layer stability and turbulence terms. Based on these relationships, a Monte Carlo type analysis was performed to explore the dependency of the diffusivity terms on their contributing factors during the stable and unstable atmospheric conditions in the surface layer. The total relative uncertainty in the flux values due to errors in diffusivity terms and concentration gradients were then estimated. It was found that the mean uncertainty in the diffusivity parameter derived using the thermal method is higher (11%) than the parameterization method (≈7%), irrespective of stability. However, depending on the initial uncertainty among the surface layer variables, the maximum uncertainty can vary between 0-80% and 0-37% for the thermal and parameterization methods irrespective of stability. These maximum variations were obtained from the synthetic population of the random errors of the diffusivity parameters. The probability density function of the error anomaly of the diffusivity term from parameterization method was found to have higher kurtosis during unstable atmosphere, whereas marginally higher positive skewness was observed in the relative error term of the same diffusivity parameter during the unstable condition. Errors in the concentration gradients were estimated based on the minimum resolvable estimates from the gas analyzer and the associated random errors were found to be 6% and 8% for unstable and stable conditions. Finally, the mean total error in the N2O flux values was found to be approximately of the order of 9% and 11% for the parameterization method for unstable and stable conditions

  20. Nonperiodic eddy pulsations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; McDonald, Richard R.

    1995-01-01

    Recirculating flow in lateral separation eddies is typically weaker than main stem flow and provides an effective environment for trapping sediment. Observations of recirculating flow and sedimentary structures demonstrate that eddies pulsate in size and in flow velocity even when main stem flow is steady. Time series measurements of flow velocity and location of the reattachment point indicate that these pulsations are nonperiodic. Nonperiodic flow in the lee of a channel margin constriction is grossly different from the periodic flow in the lee of a cylinder that is isolated in a flow. Our experiments demonstrate that placing a flow-parallel plate adjacent to a cylinder is sufficient to cause the leeside flow to change from a periodic sequence of vortices to a nonperiodically pulsating lateral separation eddy, even if flow conditions are otherwise unchanged. Two processes cause the leeside flow to become nonperiodic when the plate is added. First, vortices that are shed from the cylinder deform and become irregular as they impact the plate or interfere with remnants of other vortices near the reattachment point. Second, these deformed vortices and other flow structures are recirculated in the lateral separation eddy, thereby influencing the future state (pressure and momentum distribution) of the recirculating flow. The vortex deformation process was confirmed experimentally by documenting spatial differences in leeside flow; vortex shedding that is evident near the separation point is undetectable near the reattachment point. Nonlinear forecasting techniques were used in an attempt to distinguish among several possible kinds of nonperiodic flows. The computational techniques were unable to demonstrate that any of the nonperiodic flows result from low-dimensional nonlinear processes.

  1. Strength enhancement of a biomedical titanium alloy through a modified accumulative roll bonding technique.

    PubMed

    Kent, Damon; Wang, Gui; Yu, Zhentao; Ma, Xiqun; Dargusch, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    The strength of a biomedical β-type alloy, Ti-25Nb-3Zr-3Mo-2Sn, was enhanced through severe plastic deformation using a modified accumulative roll bonding technique. Incremental strength increases were observed after each cycle, while ductility initially fell but showed some recovery with further cycles. After 4 cycles there was a 70% improvement in the ultimate tensile strength to 1220 MPa, a two-fold increase in the 0.5% proof stress to 946 MPa and the ductility was 4.5%. The microstructure comprised of ultrafine grain β grains heavily elongated in the rolling direction with a fine dispersion of nanocrystalline α phase precipitates on the β grain boundaries. Shear bands formed in order to accommodate large plastic strains during processing and the grains within the bands were significantly finer than the surrounding matrix.

  2. Semidiurnal and seasonal variations in methane emissions from a sub-tropical hydroelectric reservoir (Nam Theun 2, Laos) measured by eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, C.; Serca, D.; Guerin, F.; Meyerfeld, Y.; Descloux, S.; Chanudet, V.; Pighini, S.; Godon, A.; Guedant, P.

    2012-12-01

    The quantification of sources and sinks of greenhouse gases (GHG) have become an important scientific issue. Hydroelectric reservoirs have been identified as considerable methane (CH4) sources to the atmosphere, especially in the tropics. Assessing these emissions and their variations on small and large time scale represent important challenges in our understanding of water-atmosphere exchange. In this context, objectives of this study are (i) to quantify the CH4 emissions, (ii) to determine the variations in the emissions on daily and seasonal time scale, and link these variations to environmental driving forces (iii) to compare different methodologies to assess CH4 emissions. Measurements of CH4 emissions were made in a recently impounded (in 2009) subtropical hydroelectric reservoir, Nam Theun 2 (NT2), in Lao PDR, Asia. The sampling strategy included three different types of flux measurement techniques: floating chambers, submerged funnels, and a micrometeorological station allowing for flux determination based on the eddy covariance technique (EC). We carried out flux measurements during four intensive field campaigns conducted in between May 2009 and June 2011. Eddy covariance system, composed by a 3D sonic anemometer coupled with a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer, was deployed on the mast in a large surface of open water corresponding to an homogeneous ecosystem (floodplain). Diffusive and bubbling fluxes were measured using respectively floating chambers and submerged funnel techniques around the mast. Our results from the all four field campaigns show that individual 30-min EC fluxes varied by 4 order of magnitude (from 0.01 to 102 mmol.m-2.day-1). Average EC fluxes of individual campaigns varied inversely with water depth, from 5±3.5 to 28±16 mmol.m-2.day-1 for respectively from 10.5 to 2 m of water depths. Diffusive fluxes measured by floating chambers ranged between 0.2 and 3.2 mmol.m-2.day-1. Bubbling fluxes were found to be highly

  3. Easy sperm processing technique allowing exclusive accumulation and later usage of DNA-strandbreak-free spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ebner, T; Shebl, O; Moser, M; Mayer, R B; Arzt, W; Tews, G

    2011-01-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation is increased in poor-quality semen samples and correlates with failed fertilization, impaired preimplantation development and reduced pregnancy outcome. Common sperm preparation techniques may reduce the percentage of strandbreak-positive spermatozoa, but, to date, there is no reliable approach to exclusively accumulate strandbreak-free spermatozoa. To analyse the efficiency of special sperm selection chambers (Zech-selectors made of glass or polyethylene) in terms of strandbreak reduction, 39 subfertile men were recruited and three probes (native, density gradient and Zech-selector) were used to check for strand breaks using the sperm chromatin dispersion test. The mean percentage of affected spermatozoa in the ejaculate was 15.8 ± 7.8% (range 5.0–42.1%). Density gradient did not significantly improve the quality of spermatozoa selected(14.2 ± 7.0%). However, glass chambers completely removed 90% spermatozoa showing strand breaks and polyethylene chambers removed 76%. Both types of Zech-selectors were equivalent in their efficiency, significantly reduced DNA damage (P < 0.001) and,with respect to this, performed better than density gradient centrifugation (P < 0.001). As far as is known, this is the first report ona sperm preparation technique concentrating spermatozoa unaffected in terms of DNA damage. The special chambers most probably select for sperm motility and/or maturity.

  4. Charge plasma technique based dopingless accumulation mode junctionless cylindrical surrounding gate MOSFET: analog performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Nitin; Kumar, Manoj; Haldar, Subhasis; Deswal, S. S.; Gupta, Mridula; Gupta, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    A charge plasma technique based dopingless (DL) accumulation mode (AM) junctionless (JL) cylindrical surrounding gate (CSG) MOSFET has been proposed and extensively investigated. Proposed device has no physical junction at source to channel and channel to drain interface. The complete silicon pillar has been considered as undoped. The high free electron density or induced N+ region is designed by keeping the work function of source/drain metal contacts lower than the work function of undoped silicon. Thus, its fabrication complexity is drastically reduced by curbing the requirement of high temperature doping techniques. The electrical/analog characteristics for the proposed device has been extensively investigated using the numerical simulation and are compared with conventional junctionless cylindrical surrounding gate (JL-CSG) MOSFET with identical dimensions. For the numerical simulation purpose ATLAS-3D device simulator is used. The results show that the proposed device is more short channel immune to conventional JL-CSG MOSFET and suitable for faster switching applications due to higher I ON/ I OFF ratio.

  5. A Low Power Digital Accumulation Technique for Digital-Domain CMOS TDI Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changwei; Nie, Kaiming; Xu, Jiangtao; Gao, Jing

    2016-09-23

    In this paper, an accumulation technique suitable for digital domain CMOS time delay integration (TDI) image sensors is proposed to reduce power consumption without degrading the rate of imaging. In terms of the slight variations of quantization codes among different pixel exposures towards the same object, the pixel array is divided into two groups: one is for coarse quantization of high bits only, and the other one is for fine quantization of low bits. Then, the complete quantization codes are composed of both results from the coarse-and-fine quantization. The equivalent operation comparably reduces the total required bit numbers of the quantization. In the 0.18 µm CMOS process, two versions of 16-stage digital domain CMOS TDI image sensor chains based on a 10-bit successive approximate register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC), with and without the proposed technique, are designed. The simulation results show that the average power consumption of slices of the two versions are 6 . 47 × 10 - 8 J/line and 7 . 4 × 10 - 8 J/line, respectively. Meanwhile, the linearity of the two versions are 99.74% and 99.99%, respectively.

  6. Comparison between eddy covariance and automatic chamber techniques for measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide in cotton and wheat fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Liu, C.; Zheng, X.; Pihlatie, M.; Li, B.; Haapanala, S.; Vesala, T.; Liu, H.; Wang, Y.; Liu, G.; Hu, F.

    2013-05-01

    Static and transparent automatic chamber (AC) technique is a~necessary choice for measuring net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide (CO2) in circumstances where eddy covariance (EC) technique is not applicable. However, a comparison of the two techniques for measurements on croplands has seldom been undertaken. We carried out NEE observations in a cotton field (for one year) and a winter wheat field (for one cropping season) using both AC and EC techniques, to (a) compare the NEE fluxes measured using each technique, and (b) test the NEE measurement performance of an automatic chamber system (AMEG), which was designed for simultaneous flux measurements of multiple gases. The half-hourly NEE fluxes measured with the two techniques were in approximate agreement, with the AC fluxes being 0.78 (cotton) and 1.06 (wheat) times those of the EC. When integrated to daily timescale, the fluxes of the two techniques were in better agreement, showing an average ratio of 0.94 and 1.00 for the cotton and wheat, respectively. During the periods with comparable field conditions and normal performance of both instruments, the cumulative NEE fluxes revealed small differences between the two techniques (-9.0 ~ 6.7%, with a mean of 0.1%). The measurements resulted in annual cumulative NEE of -40 g C m-2 yr-1 (EC) and -42 g C m-2 yr-1 (AC) in the cotton field and seasonal cumulative NEE of -251 g C m-2 (EC) and -205 g C m-2 (AC) in the wheat field. Our results indicate that, for cropland populated by short plants, the AMEG system and the data processing procedures applied in this study are able to provide NEE estimates comparable to those from EC measurements, although either technique may lead to an overestimation of the loss rate (or underestimation of the gain rate) of the soil organic carbon stock of an ecosystem, in particular with calcareous soils exposed to increasing atmospheric acid deposition.

  7. Assessment of the soil water balance by the combination of cosmic ray neutron sensing and eddy covariance technique in an irrigated citrus orchard (Marrakesh, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroos, Katja; Baroni, Gabriele; Er-Raki, Salah; Francke, Till; Khabba, Said; Jarlan, Lionel; Hanich, Lahoucine; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation water requirement plays a crucial role in many agricultural areas and especially in arid and semi-arid landscapes. Improvements in the water management and the performance of the irrigation systems require a correct evaluation of the hydrological processes involved. However, some difficulties can arise due to the heterogeneity of the soil-plant system and of the irrigation scheme. To overcome these limitations, in this study, the soil water balance is analyzed by the combination of the Eddy Covariance technique (EC) and Cosmic Ray neutron Sensing (CRS). EC provides the measurement of the actual evapotranspiration over the area as it was presented in many field conditions. Moreover CRS showed to be a valuable approach to measure the root zone soil moisture integrated in a footprint of ~30 ha. In this way, the combination of the two methodologies should provide a better analysis of the soil water balance at field scale, as opposed to point observations, e.g. by TDR, evaporimeter and fluxmeter. Then, this could increase the capability to assess the irrigation efficiency and the agricultural water management. The study is conducted in a citrus orchard situated in a semi-arid region, 30 km southwest of Marrakesh (Morocco). The site is flat and planted with trees of same age growing in parallel rows with drip irrigation lines and application of fertilizer and pesticides. The original soil seems modified on the surface by the agricultural use, creating differences between trees, rows and lines. In addition, the drip irrigation creates also a spatial variability of the water flux distribution in the field, making this site an interesting area to test the methodology. Particular attention is given to the adaptation of the standard soil sampling campaign used for the calibration of the CRS and the introduction of a weighing function. Data were collected from June to December 2013, which corresponds to the high plant transpiration. Despite the intention of the

  8. The Fate of Ozone at a Ponderosa Pine Plantation: Partitioning Between Stomatal and Non-stomatal Deposition Using Sap Flow and Eddy Covariance Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpius, M. R.; McKay, M. M.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2001-12-01

    Major advances in quantifying ozone deposition to vegetated ecosystems have been made using above-canopy techniques -- such as eddy covariance -- that allow for the direct measure of ozone flux into natural systems. However, from above-canopy flux measurements alone, it is impossible to differentiate between deposition through stomatal openings of trees versus non-stomatal surfaces or within canopy chemical loss. Therefore, there is a need to partition ozone fluxes into plant stomatal and non-stomatal components. Sap flow measurements provide a direct measurement of stomatal conductance from which we can infer ozone uptake by trees: this represents a novel way to determine pollutant loading on stomatal surfaces of trees that is inexpensive, reliable, and can be deployed in a multitude of environments. Sap flow measurements were used to determine ozone uptake by ponderosa pine trees in the Sierra Nevada Mountains year-round starting in June 2000 at Blodgett Forest, an Ameriflux site located ~75 miles downwind of Sacramento, CA. Concurrently, total ecosystem ozone flux was measured using eddy covariance. Mean total ozone flux to the ecosystem was 46.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-15.1) in summer 2000, 27.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-14.2) in fall 2000, 8.2 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-5.1) in winter 2001, and 21.1 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-11.6) in spring 2001. Mean ozone flux through the stomata was 14.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-4.1) during summer 2000, 12.9 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-5.8) during fall 2000, 5.6 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-2.8) during winter 2001, and 12.7 μ mol m-2 h-1 (+/-3.7) during spring 2001. The percentage of total ozone deposition which occurred through the stomata was 31% in summer, 47% in fall, 69% but highly variable in winter, and 60% in spring. The difference between total ozone flux to the ecosystem and stomatal ozone flux to the trees varied exponentially with air temperature, suggesting that much of the non-stomatal deposition was actually due to chemical loss either on surfaces or within

  9. Accurate prediction of unsteady and time-averaged pressure loads using a hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/large-eddy simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozinoski, Radoslav

    Significant research has been performed over the last several years on understanding the unsteady aerodynamics of various fluid flows. Much of this work has focused on quantifying the unsteady, three-dimensional flow field effects which have proven vital to the accurate prediction of many fluid and aerodynamic problems. Up until recently, engineers have predominantly relied on steady-state simulations to analyze the inherently three-dimensional ow structures that are prevalent in many of today's "real-world" problems. Increases in computational capacity and the development of efficient numerical methods can change this and allow for the solution of the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications. An integral part of this capability has been the performance and accuracy of the turbulence models coupled with advanced parallel computing techniques. This report begins with a brief literature survey of the role fully three-dimensional, unsteady, Navier-Stokes solvers have on the current state of numerical analysis. Next, the process of creating a baseline three-dimensional Multi-Block FLOw procedure called MBFLO3 is presented. Solutions for an inviscid circular arc bump, laminar at plate, laminar cylinder, and turbulent at plate are then presented. Results show good agreement with available experimental, numerical, and theoretical data. Scalability data for the parallel version of MBFLO3 is presented and shows efficiencies of 90% and higher for processes of no less than 100,000 computational grid points. Next, the description and implementation techniques used for several turbulence models are presented. Following the successful implementation of the URANS and DES procedures, the validation data for separated, non-reattaching flows over a NACA 0012 airfoil, wall-mounted hump, and a wing-body junction geometry are presented. Results for the NACA 0012 showed significant improvement in flow predictions

  10. Anisotropic eddy viscosity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Cabot, W.

    1996-01-01

    A general discussion on the structure of the eddy viscosity tensor in anisotropic flows is presented. The systematic use of tensor symmetries and flow symmetries is shown to reduce drastically the number of independent parameters needed to describe the rank 4 eddy viscosity tensor. The possibility of using Onsager symmetries for simplifying further the eddy viscosity is discussed explicitly for the axisymmetric geometry.

  11. Detecting defects in marine structures by using eddy current infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, W

    2016-12-01

    Eddy current infrared (IR) thermography is a new nondestructive testing (NDT) technique used for the detection of cracks in electroconductive materials. By combining the well-established inspection methods of eddy current NDT and IR thermography, this technique uses induced eddy currents to heat test samples. In this way, IR thermography allows the visualization of eddy current distribution that is distorted in defect sites. This paper discusses the results of numerical modeling of eddy current IR thermography procedures in application to marine structures.

  12. Estimation of net ecosystem metabolism of seagrass meadows in the coastal waters of the East Sea and Black Sea using the noninvasive eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Kang, Dong-Jin; Hineva, Elitsa; Slabakova, Violeta; Todorova, Valentina; Park, Jiyoung; Cho, Jin-Hyung

    2017-06-01

    We measured the community-scale metabolism of seagrass meadows in Bulgaria (Byala [BY]) and Korea (Hoopo Bay [HP]) to understand their ecosystem function in coastal waters. A noninvasive in situ eddy covariance technique was applied to estimate net O2 flux in the seagrass meadows. From the high-quality and high-resolution time series O2 data acquired over > 24 h, the O2 flux driven by turbulence was extracted at 15-min intervals. The spectrum analysis of vertical flow velocity and O2 concentration clearly showed well-developed turbulence characteristics in the inertial subrange region. The hourly averaged net O2 fluxes per day ranged from -474 to 326 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 (-19 ± 41 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) at BY and from -74 to 482 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 (31 ± 17 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) at HP. The net O2 production rapidly responded to photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and showed a good relationship between production and irradiance (P-I curve). The hysteresis pattern of P-I relationships during daytime also suggested increasing heterotrophic respiration in the afternoon. With the flow velocity between 3.30 and 6.70 cm s-1, the community metabolism during daytime and nighttime was significantly increased by 20 times and 5 times, respectively. The local hydrodynamic characteristics may be vital to determining the efficiency of community photosynthesis. The net ecosystem metabolism at BY was estimated to be -17 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, which was assessed as heterotrophy. However, that at HP was 36 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, which suggested an autotrophic state.

  13. Unified Ultrasonic/Eddy-Current Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James; Butler, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging station for detecting cracks and flaws in solid materials developed combining both ultrasonic C-scan and eddy-current imaging. Incorporation of both techniques into one system eliminates duplication of computers and of mechanical scanners; unifies acquisition, processing, and storage of data; reduces setup time for repetitious ultrasonic and eddy-current scans; and increases efficiency of system. Same mechanical scanner used to maneuver either ultrasonic or eddy-current probe over specimen and acquire point-by-point data. For ultrasonic scanning, probe linked to ultrasonic pulser/receiver circuit card, while, for eddy-current imaging, probe linked to impedance-analyzer circuit card. Both ultrasonic and eddy-current imaging subsystems share same desktop-computer controller, containing dedicated plug-in circuit boards for each.

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, A. T.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2001-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Large Eddy Simulation of a non-buoyant jet issuing from a circular orifice in a wall, and developing in neutral surroundings. The effects of the subgrid scales on the large eddies have been modeled with the dynamic large eddy simulation model applied to the fully 3D domain in spherical coordinates. The simulation captures the unsteady motions of the large-scales within the jet as well as the laminar motions in the entrainment region surrounding the jet. The computed time-averaged statistics (mean velocity, concentration, and turbulence parameters) compare well with laboratory data without invoking an empirical entrainment coefficient as employed by line integral models. The use of the large eddy simulation technique allows examination of unsteady and inhomogeneous features such as the evolution of eddies and the details of the entrainment process.

  15. A new approach of weighted integration technique based on accumulated images using dynamic PET and H2(15)O

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, T.; Kanno, I.; Iida, H.; Miura, S.; Uemura, K. )

    1991-05-01

    We developed a new technique of weighted integration for the measurement of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and the blood-tissue partition coefficient (p) using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and H2(15)O. The weighted integration in the new technique is carried out on the equation of the first time integration of the Kety-Schmidt differential equation. Practically, serially accumulated images with sequentially prolonged accumulation times are weighted by two arbitrary functions. The weighting functions do not have to be differentiated because of the exclusion of the differential term in the starting equation. Consequently, the method does not require data at the end of the scan. The technique was applied to H2(15)O dynamic PET performed on four normal subjects, and was verified to provide a better signal-to-noise ratio than the previously developed integrated projection (IP) technique. Computer simulations were carried out to investigate the effects of statistical noise, tissue heterogeneity, and time delay and dispersion in arterial input function. The simulation showed that the new technique provided about a 1.4 times lower statistical error in both LCBF and p at 50 ml 100 g-1 min-1 compared to the IP technique, and it should be noted that the new technique was less sensitive to the shape of the weighting functions. The new technique provides a new strategy with respect to the statistical error for estimation of LCBF and p.

  16. Comparison of Accumulated Rainfall Using a Blended Polarimetric and NEXRAD Z-R Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, R.; Kennedy, P. C.; Rutledge, S. A.; Carey, L.; Gimmestad, C.; Barjenbruch, D.

    2004-05-01

    Following the devastating Fort Collins flash flood in 1997, an algorithm was developed at Colorado State University (CSU) to estimate rainfall from CSU-CHILL dual-polarization radar data. The algorithm first attempts to remove ground clutter using thresholds on the correlation coefficient RHOHV and standard deviation of the total differential phase PHIDP. Specific differential phase KDP is then calculated from PHIDP. The radar data are interpolated to a Cartesian grid and rainfall estimates at each grid point are determined using an optimization procedure. The procedure picks the "best" estimate of rainfall based on measurement thresholds of KDP, ZDR, and ZH. During the summers of 2002 and 2003, a UCAR-COMET grant provided an opportunity to apply the polarimetric algorithm in a real-time environment and quantitatively evaluate the performance in comparison to the standard NWS Z-R technique on selected rainfall events in northeast Colorado. Validation of the rainfall algorithms was made using 24-hour accumulated precipitation data from the Community Collaborative Rain and Hail Study (CoCoRaHS), which includes hundreds of volunteers across northeast Colorado. Verification was also achieved with available automated rain guage data (e.g., ASOS). This study focuses on a rainfall event that occurred during the afternoon and early evening hours of 19 June 2003 in the vicinity of Denver International Airport (DIA) as well as regions south and east of DIA. Comparisons of the radar and ASOS gauge rainfall total at DIA showed that the CSU-CHILL blended algorithm was in very good agreement with the gauge total; however, the CSU-CHILL estimate using the standard NEXRAD Z-R greatly overestimated the rainfall total compared to the ASOS gauge. Ground observations at DIA and a CSU-CHILL hydrometeor identification (HID) algorithm indicated that the presence of hail in the vicinity of the DIA ASOS was the likely cause of the overestimate by the NEXRAD Z-R method. Comparisons of

  17. Southern Ocean eddy phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenger, I.; Münnich, M.; Gruber, N.; Knutti, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous features in the Southern Ocean, yet their phenomenology is not well quantified. To tackle this task, we use satellite observations of sea level anomalies and sea surface temperature (SST) as well as in situ temperature and salinity measurements from profiling floats. Over the period 1997-2010, we identified over a million mesoscale eddy instances and were able to track about 105 of them over 1 month or more. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the boundary current systems, and the regions where they interact are hot spots of eddy presence, representing also the birth places and graveyards of most eddies. These hot spots contrast strongly to areas shallower than about 2000 m, where mesoscale eddies are essentially absent, likely due to topographical steering. Anticyclones tend to dominate the southern subtropical gyres, and cyclones the northern flank of the ACC. Major causes of regional polarity dominance are larger formation numbers and lifespans, with a contribution of differential propagation pathways of long-lived eddies. Areas of dominance of one polarity are generally congruent with the same polarity being longer-lived, bigger, of larger amplitude, and more intense. Eddies extend down to at least 2000 m. In the ACC, eddies show near surface temperature and salinity maxima, whereas eddies in the subtropical areas generally have deeper anomaly maxima, presumably inherited from their origin in the boundary currents. The temperature and salinity signatures of the average eddy suggest that their tracer anomalies are a result of both trapping in the eddy core and stirring.

  18. OSL and TL techniques combined in a beryllium oxide detector to evaluate simultaneously accumulated and single doses.

    PubMed

    Malthez, Anna L M C; Freitas, Marcelo B; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M; Umisedo, Nancy K; Button, Vera L S N

    2016-04-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) are similar techniques widely used in radiation dosimetry. The main difference between these techniques is the stimulus to induce luminescence emission: TL technique uses thermal stimulation, whereas OSL uses optical stimulation. One of the main intrinsic characteristics of the OSL technique is the possibility of reading several times the dosimetric materials with a negligible loss of signal. In the case of BeO, recent studies have shown that TL stimulation up to 250°C does not affect its OSL signal. Taking the advantages of dosimetric characteristics of BeO combined with both techniques, in this study, we demonstrated the possibility of measuring accumulated and single doses in the same BeO-based detector in order to use it to improve individual monitoring of radiation workers exposed to X-ray or gamma-ray fields. Single doses were measured using TL technique by heating the detector up to 250°C, whereas accumulated doses were estimated using OSL technique in the same detector in a relatively short time of optical stimulation. The detectors were exposed to two energies: 28keV X-rays and 1.25MeV Co-60 gamma rays. The doses estimated by OSL and TL of BeO (Thermalox 995) were compared with those obtained with LiF (TLD-100) and recorded with a calibrated ionization chamber. The results indicate that combined OSL and TL signals of BeO detectors can provide additional information of accumulated dose, with additional exploration of the advantages of both techniques, such as speed in readouts with OSL, and double-check the doses using TL and OSL intensities from BeO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of optically stimulated luminescence technique to evaluate simultaneously accumulated and single doses with the same dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malthez, Anna Luiza M. C.; Freitas, Marcelo B.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Button, Vera L. S. N.

    2014-02-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) can be read several times with a negligible loss (degradation) of signal. In this work, we explore this OSL property to estimate simultaneously the accumulated and single doses using a unique Al2O3 dosimeter, irradiated repeated times along over 4 months. This was done through several irradiations of OSLD (Landauer Luxel Dots) with two energies (28 keV X-rays and 1.25 MeV Co-60 gamma rays) and several doses distributed over time. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used as a reference to compare the estimated doses obtained with OSLD. For each irradiation, and both energies, a calibration curve was evaluated with OSLD and TLD to estimate the dose values. The OSL readouts were made with a MicroStar (Landauer) OSL reader. To estimate background (BG) over time, a set of OSLD and TLD (Bycron TLD100) was not irradiated and BG was monitored at each readout section. After irradiations, the OSL and TL signals were converted to dose and values were compared. As a set of OSLD suffered no bleaching after the readouts, it was possible to estimate simultaneously the accumulated and single doses with a unique OSLD. Each single dose was estimated through the subtraction of successive accumulated doses determined for each single OSLD. We concluded that the single doses determined by OSL and TL techniques were compatible, and that the accumulated dose, obtained with OSL technique was comparable to the sum of single doses determined with TLD. We can conclude that using OSL technique and Al2O3 dosimeters it is possible to estimate simultaneously accumulated and single doses with the same dosimeter irradiated with low or high energy photons.

  20. Eddy current inspection of graphite fiber components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.; Bryson, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    The recognition of defects in materials properties still presents a number of problems for nondestructive testing in aerospace systems. This project attempts to utilize current capabilities in eddy current instrumentation, artificial intelligence, and robotics in order to provide insight into defining geometrical aspects of flaws in composite materials which are capable of being evaluated using eddy current inspection techniques. The unique capabilities of E-probes and horseshoe probes for inspecting probes for inspecting graphite fiber materials were evaluated and appear to hold great promise once the technology development matures. The initial results are described of modeling eddy current interactions with certain flaws in graphite fiber samples.

  1. Estimations of the Seismic Pressure Noise on Mars Determined from Large Eddy Simulations and Demonstration of Pressure Decorrelation Techniques for the Insight Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, Naomi; Kenda, Balthasar; Kawamura, Taichi; Spiga, Aymeric; Lognonné, Philippe; Mimoun, David; Banerdt, William B.

    2017-04-01

    The atmospheric pressure fluctuations on Mars induce an elastic response in the ground that creates a ground tilt, detectable as a seismic signal on the InSight seismometer SEIS. The seismic pressure noise is modeled using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the wind and surface pressure at the InSight landing site and a Green's function ground deformation approach that is subsequently validated via a detailed comparison with two other methods: a spectral approach, and an approach based on Sorrells' theory (Sorrells, Geophys. J. Int. 26:71-82, 1971; Sorrells et al., Nat. Phys. Sci. 229:14-16, 1971). The horizontal accelerations as a result of the ground tilt due to the LES turbulence-induced pressure fluctuations are found to be typically ˜ 2 - 40 nm/s2 in amplitude, whereas the direct horizontal acceleration is two orders of magnitude smaller and is thus negligible in comparison. The vertical accelerations are found to be ˜ 0.1 - 6 nm/s2 in amplitude. These are expected to be worst-case estimates for the seismic noise as we use a half-space approximation; the presence at some (shallow) depth of a harder layer would significantly reduce quasi-static displacement and tilt effects. We show that under calm conditions, a single-pressure measurement is representative of the large-scale pressure field (to a distance of several kilometers), particularly in the prevailing wind direction. However, during windy conditions, small-scale turbulence results in a reduced correlation between the pressure signals, and the single-pressure measurement becomes less representative of the pressure field. The correlation between the seismic signal and the pressure signal is found to be higher for the windiest period because the seismic pressure noise reflects the atmospheric structure close to the seismometer. In the same way that we reduce the atmospheric seismic signal by making use of a pressure sensor that is part of the InSight Auxiliary Payload Sensor Suite, we also the use the

  2. Seasonal Dynamics of N2O and CO2 Emissions from a Corn Production System measured with the Eddy covariance and Chamber techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwuozo, S. A.; Hui, D.; Dennis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural Practices play a major role in the global fluxes of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. The use of fertilizer in Corn production has generated concerns about its contribution to global climate change. Thus, farmers and others concerned have become interested in more efficient fertilization management practice and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. To understand best management practices, in the 2012 and 2013 corn growing seasons, field experiments was conducted at Tennessee State University Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. The study examines the seasonal variations of (N2O) and (CO2) emissions from soil as a function of six treatment that include inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, chicken litter and biochar application. The combinations were: regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) no till, regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) conventional till, multiple URAN applications (4 times) no till, Denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application in no till, chicken litter with regular URAN application no till and URAN application with biochar in no tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated 6 times. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured using a closed chamber method after rainfall event(s), fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during gas sampling. Plant physiological and growth parameters were measured as appropriate and meteorological records were kept. N2O flux was also continuously measured in a commercial corn field using the eddy covariance (EC) technique fitted with a fast response N2O analyzer to check the N2O emissions at the large scale and compare it to the chamber method. Results obtained with the EC technique were comparable with the chamber methods. Preliminary data indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the agricultural

  3. Analysis and encoder prevention techniques for pathological IDCT drift accumulation in static video scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Gary J.

    2007-09-01

    This paper discusses the problem of severe pathological encoder-decoder IDCT drift in video compression coding when using a very small quantization step size and typical encoding techniques to encode video sequences with areas of completely static source content. We suggest that there are two ways to try to address the problem: 1) using a highaccuracy IDCT (or an encoder-matched IDCT) in a decoder design, and 2) using encoder techniques to avoid such drift build-up. The primary problem is asserted to be the encoder's behavior. Effective encoder techniques to avoid the problem are described, including a simple "generalized Morris drift test", which is suggested as being superior to the test currently described in the MPEG-2 video specification. Experiment results are reported to show that performing this test in an encoder will completely solve the problem. Other encoding techniques to address the problem are also discussed.

  4. Electrochemical Evaluation of Lead Base Composite Anodes Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasi, Maryam; Keshavarz Alamdari, Eskandar

    2015-04-01

    Accumulative roll bonding is used for the first time in lead systems to fabricate advanced lead base composite anodes. For this purpose, Ag as the most common and effective additive, Co as the best metallic immiscible substitution for Ag, and MnO2 as the ceramic and electrocatalytic agent have been used as additives to produce anodes. The accumulative roll bonding processed sheets have been fabricated under determined conditions. The electrochemical properties of the prepared samples are investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry, Polarization tests, electrowinning tests, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results indicate that the ARB-processed composite lead sheets can be perfectly used as novel developed anodes. The advantages include 5.51 times increase of current density, in the Pb-pct0.5Ag 9-pass sample compared to pure lead anode, decreased charge transfer resistance from 56.31 (Ω cm2) in pure lead anode to 17.5 (Ω cm2) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (72 pct lower), and decreased oxygen evolution potential from 1.95 (V/SHE) in pure lead anode to 1.77 (V/SHE) in the Pb-pct2MnO2 8-pass sample (0.18 (V/SHE) lower). Electrowinning tests results reveal Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass showed best anodic performance withsignificant lower compared corrosion rate (75 pct), product and electrolyte contamination, slime formation, energy consumption and higher Zn deposit and energy conservation (to 294 kWh/t-Zn). Finest Zn deposit morphology (effective reduced grain size corresponding to smoothness and compaction) has been supplied by Pb-2 pctMnO2 8-pass sample resulted from enhanced growth rate of Zn in lack of Pb contaminations that could act as suitable nucleation sites.

  5. Automated eddy current analysis of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for characterizing flaws in graphite-based filament-wound cylindrical structures is described. A major emphasis was also placed upon incorporating artificial intelligence techniques into the signal analysis portion of the inspection process. Developing an eddy current scanning system using a commercial robot for inspecting graphite structures (and others) was a goal in the overall concept and is essential for the final implementation for the expert systems interpretation. Manual scans, as performed in the preliminary work here, do not provide sufficiently reproducible eddy current signatures to be easily built into a real time expert system. The expert systems approach to eddy current signal analysis requires that a suitable knowledge base exist in which correct decisions as to the nature of a flaw can be performed. A robotic workcell using eddy current transducers for the inspection of carbon filament materials with improved sensitivity was developed. Improved coupling efficiencies achieved with the E-probes and horseshoe probes are exceptional for graphite fibers. The eddy current supervisory system and expert system was partially developed on a MacIvory system. Continued utilization of finite element models for predetermining eddy current signals was shown to be useful in this work, both for understanding how electromagnetic fields interact with graphite fibers, and also for use in determining how to develop the knowledge base. Sufficient data was taken to indicate that the E-probe and the horseshoe probe can be useful eddy current transducers for inspecting graphite fiber components. The lacking component at this time is a large enough probe to have sensitivity in both the far and near field of a thick graphite epoxy component.

  6. Stationary mesoscale eddies, upgradient eddy fluxes, and the anisotropy of eddy diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianhua; Wang, Fuchang; Liu, Hailong; Lin, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    The mesoscale eddies of which parameterization is needed in coarse-resolution ocean models include not only the transient eddies akin to baroclinic instability but also the stationary eddies associated with topography. By applying a modified Lorenz-type decomposition to the eddy-permitting Southern Ocean State Estimate, we show that the stationary mesoscale eddies contribute a significant part to the total eddy kinetic energy, eddy enstrophy, and the total eddy-induced isopycnal thickness and potential vorticity fluxes. We find that beneath middepth (about 1000 m) the upgradient eddy fluxes, or so-called "negative" eddy diffusivities, are mainly attributed to the stationary mesoscale eddies, whereas the remaining transient eddy diffusivity is positive, for which the Gent and McWilliams (1990) parameterization scheme applies well. A quantitative method of measuring the anisotropy of eddy diffusivity is presented. The effect of stationary mesoscale eddies is one of major sources responsible for the anisotropy of eddy diffusivity. We suggest that an independent parameterization scheme for stationary mesoscale eddies may be needed for coarse-resolution ocean models, although the transient eddies remain the predominant part of mesoscale eddies in the oceans.

  7. Modeling Gas and Gas Hydrate Accumulation in Marine Sediments Using a K-Nearest Neighbor Machine-Learning Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, W. T.; Runyan, T. E.; Palmsten, M.; Dale, J.; Crawford, C.

    2016-12-01

    Natural Gas (primarily methane) and gas hydrate accumulations require certain bio-geochemical, as well as physical conditions, some of which are poorly sampled and/or poorly understood. We exploit recent advances in the prediction of seafloor porosity and heat flux via machine learning techniques (e.g. Random forests and Bayesian networks) to predict the occurrence of gas and subsequently gas hydrate in marine sediments. The prediction (actually guided interpolation) of key parameters we use in this study is a K-nearest neighbor technique. KNN requires only minimal pre-processing of the data and predictors, and requires minimal run-time input so the results are almost entirely data-driven. Specifically we use new estimates of sedimentation rate and sediment type, along with recently derived compaction modeling to estimate profiles of porosity and age. We combined the compaction with seafloor heat flux to estimate temperature with depth and geologic age, which, with estimates of organic carbon, and models of methanogenesis yield limits on the production of methane. Results include geospatial predictions of gas (and gas hydrate) accumulations, with quantitative estimates of uncertainty. The Generic Earth Modeling System (GEMS) we have developed to derive the machine learning estimates is modular and easily updated with new algorithms or data.

  8. Eddies along western boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruda, Wilton Zumpichiatti

    The Ulleung eddy owes its existence to beta and nonlinearities . A nonlinear theory for the Ulleung Warm Eddy (UWE) in the Japan/East Sea is proposed. Using the nonlinear reduced gravity (shallow water) equations, it is shown analytically and numerically that the eddy is established in order to balance the northward momentum flux exerted by the separating western boundary current (WBC). In this scenario the presence of beta produces a southward (eddy) force balancing the northward momentum flux of the separating East Korea Warm Current. In contrast to the familiar idea attributing the formation of eddies to instabilities (i.e., the breakdown of a known steady solution), the UWE is an integral part of the steady stable solution. On an f-plane no eddy is produced. To balance the northward momentum force imparted by the nonlinear WBC the f-plane system moves offshore producing a southward Coriolis force. We also found that the observed UWE scale agrees with the analytical and numerical estimates. The Mindanao and Halmahera eddies are due to the bending of their parent currents, nonlinearities and beta. Starting with the simple case of a northward (southward) WBC flowing along a concave solid boundary with a sharp corner on an beta-plane, it is shown that an anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddy is established to balance the upstream momentum flux. (On an f-plane no eddy is established because a pressure force which balances the WBC momentum flux is generated.) With the aid of the above analysis we then examine the collision of two opposing WBCs on a beta-plane. It is shown that this problem can be conceptually reduced to the above problem of two WBCs turning in a solid corner on a beta-plane where the streamline separating the two colliding currents acts like a "zonal wall." We show that an eddy is established (to balance the momentum flux of the respective WBC) on each side of the dividing streamline. Based on the collision problem, an explanation for the Mindanao and

  9. Using passive, thermal remote sensing techniques for detecting subsurface gravel accumulations in vegetated, unconsolidated sedimentary terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Gregory S.; Scholen, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Multiband radiometric data from an airborne imaging thermal scanner are being studied for use in finding buried gravel deposits. The techniques are based on measuring relative differences in the thermal properties between gravel-laden targets and the surrounding gravelless background. These properties are determined from modeling the spectral radiant emittance recorded over both types of surfaces in conjunction with ground measurements of the most significant heat flows above and below the surface. Thermodynamic properties of sampled materials from control sites are determined, and diurnal and annual subsurface heat waves are recorded. Thermal models that account for heat exchange at the surface, as well as varying levels of soil moisture, humidity, and vegetation, are needed for adaptation and modification to simulate the physical and radiative environments of this region.

  10. Eddy-current testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasley, R. L.; Birdwell, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Eddy-current inspection is discussed as a method for locating subsurface flaws in electrically conductive materials. The physical principles and electrical circuitry are described along with the test equipment.

  11. Remote field eddy current inspection of support plate fretting wear

    SciTech Connect

    Shatat, A.; Atherton, D.L.

    1997-03-01

    This article demonstrates how the remote field eddy current technique might be extended to measure support plate fretting wear in heat exchanger tubes. A finite element analysis was used to examine the plate`s effect on the eddy current signal. Experimental data lend support to a suggested multifrequency method for sizing fretting grooves.

  12. Revolving Eddy-Current Probe Detects Cracks Near Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, James P.; Nath, Shridhar; Simpson, John

    1995-01-01

    Scanning eddy-current probe in circular pattern increases sensitivity with which probe indicates fatigue cracks and other defects in metal surfaces in vicinity of rivets. Technique devised to facilitate inspection of riveted joints in aircraft. Eddy-current probe in question described in "Electro-magnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use" (LAR-15046).

  13. Automated eddy current analysis of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    This research effort focused on the use of eddy current techniques for characterizing flaws in graphite-based filament-wound cylindrical structures. A major emphasis was on incorporating artificial intelligence techniques into the signal analysis portion of the inspection process. Developing an eddy current scanning system using a commercial robot for inspecting graphite structures (and others) has been a goal in the overall concept and is essential for the final implementation for expert system interpretation. Manual scans, as performed in the preliminary work here, do not provide sufficiently reproducible eddy current signatures to be easily built into a real time expert system. The expert systems approach to eddy current signal analysis requires that a suitable knowledge base exist in which correct decisions as to the nature of the flaw can be performed. In eddy current or any other expert systems used to analyze signals in real time in a production environment, it is important to simplify computational procedures as much as possible. For that reason, we have chosen to use the measured resistance and reactance values for the preliminary aspects of this work. A simple computation, such as phase angle of the signal, is certainly within the real time processing capability of the computer system. In the work described here, there is a balance between physical measurements and finite element calculations of those measurements. The goal is to evolve into the most cost effective procedures for maintaining the correctness of the knowledge base.

  14. Mesoscale Eddies Are Oases for Higher Trophic Marine Life

    PubMed Central

    Godø, Olav R.; Samuelsen, Annette; Macaulay, Gavin J.; Patel, Ruben; Hjøllo, Solfrid Sætre; Horne, John; Kaartvedt, Stein; Johannessen, Johnny A.

    2012-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies stimulate biological production in the ocean, but knowledge of energy transfers to higher trophic levels within eddies remains fragmented and not quantified. Increasing the knowledge base is constrained by the inability of traditional sampling methods to adequately sample biological processes at the spatio-temporal scales at which they occur. By combining satellite and acoustic observations over spatial scales of 10 s of km horizontally and 100 s of m vertically, supported by hydrographical and biological sampling we show that anticyclonic eddies shape distribution and density of marine life from the surface to bathyal depths. Fish feed along density structures of eddies, demonstrating that eddies catalyze energy transfer across trophic levels. Eddies create attractive pelagic habitats, analogous to oases in the desert, for higher trophic level aquatic organisms through enhanced 3-D motion that accumulates and redistributes biomass, contributing to overall bioproduction in the ocean. Integrating multidisciplinary observation methodologies promoted a new understanding of biophysical interaction in mesoscale eddies. Our findings emphasize the impact of eddies on the patchiness of biomass in the sea and demonstrate that they provide rich feeding habitat for higher trophic marine life. PMID:22272294

  15. Mesoscale eddies are oases for higher trophic marine life.

    PubMed

    Godø, Olav R; Samuelsen, Annette; Macaulay, Gavin J; Patel, Ruben; Hjøllo, Solfrid Sætre; Horne, John; Kaartvedt, Stein; Johannessen, Johnny A

    2012-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies stimulate biological production in the ocean, but knowledge of energy transfers to higher trophic levels within eddies remains fragmented and not quantified. Increasing the knowledge base is constrained by the inability of traditional sampling methods to adequately sample biological processes at the spatio-temporal scales at which they occur. By combining satellite and acoustic observations over spatial scales of 10 s of km horizontally and 100 s of m vertically, supported by hydrographical and biological sampling we show that anticyclonic eddies shape distribution and density of marine life from the surface to bathyal depths. Fish feed along density structures of eddies, demonstrating that eddies catalyze energy transfer across trophic levels. Eddies create attractive pelagic habitats, analogous to oases in the desert, for higher trophic level aquatic organisms through enhanced 3-D motion that accumulates and redistributes biomass, contributing to overall bioproduction in the ocean. Integrating multidisciplinary observation methodologies promoted a new understanding of biophysical interaction in mesoscale eddies. Our findings emphasize the impact of eddies on the patchiness of biomass in the sea and demonstrate that they provide rich feeding habitat for higher trophic marine life.

  16. Detecting the fingerprints of complex land management practices in a tallgrass prairie site using PhenoCam, satellite remote sensing, and the eddy covariance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Xiao, X.; Wagle, P.; Bajgain, R.; Mahan, H. R.; Basara, J. B.; Dong, J.; Qin, Y.; Zhang, G.; Luo, Y.; Steiner, J. L.; Gowda, P. H.; Neel, J. P. S.

    2016-12-01

    Burning, grazing, and baling (hay harvesting) are common management practices for tallgrass prairie. However, the impacts of these management practices on grassland phenology and carbon uptake are not well understood. Utilizing multiple observations to detect fingerprints of various management practices on phenology and carbon uptake is important to develop and adopt sustainable management practices. In this study, we used canopy greenness (green chromatic coordinate, GCC) extracted from PhenoCam images, vegetation indices (VIs) extracted from satellite images (Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)), and eddy covariance data to investigate the impacts of burning, an intensive field campaign, baling, and grazing on phenology and carbon uptake in a tallgrass prairie site in El Reno, Oklahoma. Landsat images were used to assess the baling area and the trajectory of vegetation recovery. The MODIS-derived VIs were used in a satellite-based Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM) to simulate gross primary production (GPPVPM) at the flux tower (baled) site. For comparison, we substituted VIs of the flux tower located pixel with VIs from a neighbor pixel (unbaled) and simulated GPP. Phenocam images vividly showed the land management activities (burning, baling, and grazing) and the quick recovery of grassland after field campaign and baling. GCC values showed two peaks with similar magnitude (0.37-0.38) because of quick recovery of grassland after baling. VIs and GPPVPM values showed that the grassland recovered in one month after field campaign and baling. The GPPVPM matched well (R2 = 0.89) with the eddy covariance-derived GPP (GPPEC). The reduction in GPP after baling was compensated by higher GPP after rain pulses in late July and early September, causing little differences in GPP between the baled and unbaled conditions. Our results show that different management practices and their interactions with climate make it complicated to understand

  17. Laboratory studies of isolated eddies in a rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. A.

    Numerous laboratory techniques have been used to generate isolated eddies in a rotating fluid, but they can all be divided into two categories; those in which the eddies are directly produced by inserting or withdrawing fluid, and those in which eddies are produced by an instability or separation process. Two examples are reviewed for the latter category. Dipole eddies in a homogeneous rotating fluid have been produced by Flierl, Stern, and Whitehead. In most cases, modification was observed due to a third vortex. This is usually accompanied by a curved track of the vortex pairs. Recent studies have focused on isolated eddies which form from rather general and nondescript initial conditions. Baroclinic eddies in a rotating fluid with a sloping bottom were produced by squirting dense salt water up the sloping bottom and along the eastern wall. The jet stagnated in shallow water and was ejected normal to the wall. For certain parameters (volume flux of jet, etc.), a coherent lens of dense bottom water formed and propagated west with an overlying cyclonic vortex. The circulation in the bottom lens, on the other hand, was relatively weak. No such eddy forms when the depth of fresh water is relatively deep, and a regime diagram is given for the formation of the coherent eddies. The pressure field determined from analysis of the density distribution and using streak photographs is discussed in terms of an integral theorem for coherent eddies. The westward propagation is also related to previous theories.

  18. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  19. Effects of Eddy Viscosity on Time Correlations in Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Guowei; Rubinstein, R.; Wang, Lian-Ping; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large. eddy simulation (LES) have generally been evaluated by their ability to predict single-time statistics of turbulent flows such as kinetic energy and Reynolds stresses. Recent application- of large eddy simulation to the evaluation of sound sources in turbulent flows, a problem in which time, correlations determine the frequency distribution of acoustic radiation, suggest that subgrid models should also be evaluated by their ability to predict time correlations in turbulent flows. This paper compares the two-point, two-time Eulerian velocity correlation evaluated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) with that evaluated from LES, using a spectral eddy viscosity, for isotropic homogeneous turbulence. It is found that the LES fields are too coherent, in the sense that their time correlations decay more slowly than the corresponding time. correlations in the DNS fields. This observation is confirmed by theoretical estimates of time correlations using the Taylor expansion technique. Tile reason for the slower decay is that the eddy viscosity does not include the random backscatter, which decorrelates fluid motion at large scales. An effective eddy viscosity associated with time correlations is formulated, to which the eddy viscosity associated with energy transfer is a leading order approximation.

  20. The Tundra is a Net Source of CO2 Measured by Autochambers and Eddy Covariance Techniques During Five Years in a Site With Permafrost Thawing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, G.; Mauritz, M.; Bracho, R. G.; Salmon, V. G.; Webb, E.; Hutchings, J. A.; Natali, S.; Crummer, K. G.; Schuur, E.; Schaedel, C.

    2015-12-01

    Current and future warming of high latitude tundra ecosystems will play an important role in climate change through feedbacks to the global carbon (C) cycle. Long-term observational and experimental studies are pivotal for detecting and understanding changes in the coming decades. Yet studies of the C feedbacks from observational studies and manipulative experiments made on tundra plant communities often have significantly different conclusions with regards to impacts of warming on the ecosystem. Comparing results from these two study types, however, often involves integrating CO2 flux measurements that were collected on different spatial scales using a variety of methods. The process of data assimilation for landscape level analysis is often complicated by the fact that many projects only utilize one method for measuring CO2 fluxes at a given site. This study compares five years of C dynamics in a moist acidic tundra from control plots in a manipulative warming experiment (CiPEHR - plot-scale) and landscape-level natural permafrost thaw gradient (Gradient - Eddy covariance) observations all within a 1km distance from each other. We found net ecosystem exchange (NEE) to be an annual net source of carbon using both methods (Gradient 12.3 - 125.6 g CO2-C m-2 and CiPEHR warming manipulation 80.2 - 175.8 g CO2-C m-2). The differences between sites were biggest in the first three years of observation, and can be explained by lower growing season gross primary production (GPP - first three years) from the manipulation (CiPEHR), and lower ecosystem respiration (Reco) from CiPEHR in the first year only. Suppressed GPP and Reco could be from the impact of experimental setup (chamber soil collars - root damage), which lowered the plant community's capacity to fix C, but recovered within three years. This warrants caution of making generalization of short-term experiments in the tundra and more research is needed evaluating coupling of belowground and aboveground C dynamics.

  1. Pulsed eddy current testing. [nondestructive tests of the external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Since a large number of the procedures used for inspecting the external tank are concerned with determining flaws in welds, there is a need to develop an inspection technique, which can be automated, to determine flaws in welds and structures with complex geometries. Techniques whereby an eddy current is generated in a metallic material and the changes in the circuit parameters due to material differences are observed, were chosen as one possible approach. Pulsed eddy current and its relationship to multifrequency techniques is discussed as well as some preliminary results obtained from observing pulsed waveforms with apparatus and algorithms currently in use for ultrasonic testing of welds. It can be shown the pulsed eddy current techniques can provide similar results, can eliminate some of the noncritical parameters affecting the eddy current signals, and can facilitate in the detection of critical parameter such as flaws, subsurface voids, and corrosion.

  2. Interview with Eddie Reisch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Hazel

    2013-01-01

    Eddie Reisch is currently working as a policy advisor for Te Reo Maori Operational Policy within the Student Achievement group with the Ministry of Education in New Zealand, where he has implemented and led a range of e-learning initiatives and developments, particularly the Virtual Learning Network (VLN). He is regarded as one of the leading…

  3. Eddies off Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color satellite image shows a large phytoplankton bloom, several hundred square kilometers in size, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Tasmania. In this scene, the rich concentration of microscopic marine plants gives the water a lighter, more turquoise appearance which helps to highlight the current patterns there. Notice the eddies, or vortices in the water, that can be seen in several places. It is possible that these eddies were formed by converging ocean currents flowing around Tasmania, or by fresh river runoff from the island, or both. Often, eddies in the sea serve as a means for stirring the water, thus providing nutrients that help support phytoplankton blooms, which in turn provide nutrition for other organisms. Effectively, these eddies help feed the sea (click to read an article on this topic). This image was acquired November 7, 2000, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. Tasmania is located off Australia's southeastern coast. Image courtesy SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  4. Eddies off Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color satellite image shows a large phytoplankton bloom, several hundred square kilometers in size, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Tasmania. In this scene, the rich concentration of microscopic marine plants gives the water a lighter, more turquoise appearance which helps to highlight the current patterns there. Notice the eddies, or vortices in the water, that can be seen in several places. It is possible that these eddies were formed by converging ocean currents flowing around Tasmania, or by fresh river runoff from the island, or both. Often, eddies in the sea serve as a means for stirring the water, thus providing nutrients that help support phytoplankton blooms, which in turn provide nutrition for other organisms. Effectively, these eddies help feed the sea (click to read an article on this topic). This image was acquired November 7, 2000, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. Tasmania is located off Australia's southeastern coast. Image courtesy SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Don Eddy; "Jewelry."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Claire

    1989-01-01

    Presents a lesson that introduces students in grades K-three to sources of design inspiration in contemporary urban settings. Using Don Eddy's painting of a jewelry store window display, asks students to describe and analyze the interplay of shape, pattern, and color. Suggests studio activities, including an activity in which students build a…

  6. Emergent eddy saturation from an energy constrained eddy parameterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, J.; Marshall, D. P.; Maddison, J. R.; Bachman, S. D.

    2017-04-01

    The large-scale features of the global ocean circulation and the sensitivity of these features with respect to forcing changes are critically dependent upon the influence of the mesoscale eddy field. One such feature, observed in numerical simulations whereby the mesoscale eddy field is at least partially resolved, is the phenomenon of eddy saturation, where the time-mean circumpolar transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current displays relative insensitivity to wind forcing changes. Coarse-resolution models employing the Gent-McWilliams parameterisation with a constant Gent-McWilliams eddy transfer coefficient seem unable to reproduce this phenomenon. In this article, an idealised model for a wind-forced, zonally symmetric flow in a channel is used to investigate the sensitivity of the circumpolar transport to changes in wind forcing under different eddy closures. It is shown that, when coupled to a simple parameterised eddy energy budget, the Gent-McWilliams eddy transfer coefficient of the form described in Marshall et al. (2012) [A framework for parameterizing eddy potential vorticity fluxes, J. Phys. Oceanogr., vol. 42, 539-557], which includes a linear eddy energy dependence, produces eddy saturation as an emergent property.

  7. Observations of accumulation mode aerosol composition and soot carbon concentrations by means of a high-temperature volatility technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.

    1996-08-01

    A high-temperature volatility system has been deployed for the measurement of the composition and concentration of the accumulation mode aerosol (0.05 μm < r < 1 μm) within the atmospheric boundary layer. This instrumentation comprises a volatility system based around a Particle Measuring Systems ASASP-X optical particle counter, which was operated together with an aethalometer for the direct observation of soot carbon concentrations. By cycling the heater tube through a range of temperatures from near ambient to over 1000°C, size-differentiated information upon aerosol composition may be obtained. Furthermore, by careful selection of analysis temperatures, discrimination is possible between elemental carbon and the more volatile fractions of the soot carbon aerosol. Observations made over the North Sea near the Dutch coast and in the central United Kingdom are presented for differing environmental conditions with soot carbon concentrations ranging from about 100 to over 6000 ng m-3. For polluted conditions over the North Sea the volatility technique clearly showed the dominance of soot carbon particles over other aerosol components with a narrow carbon particle distribution of mode radius around 0.06 μm accounting for about 80% of all particles with radii below 0.1 μm. Under polluted conditions, only about 25% of the total soot carbon aerosol comprised elemental carbon (with the remainder consisting of more volatile material), whereas this proportion rose to around 50% in the lower carbon loadings found in a cleaner maritime air mass. The use of soot carbon loadings as a tracer of anthropogenic aerosol inputs to oceanic regions is explored on the basis of measurements from a NE Atlantic cruise.

  8. Towards a mesoscale eddy closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Carsten; Greatbatch, Richard J.

    A turbulence closure for the effect of mesoscale eddies in non-eddy-resolving ocean models is proposed. The closure consists of a prognostic equation for the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) that is integrated as an additional model equation, and a diagnostic relation for an eddy length scale ( L), which is given by the minimum of Rhines scale and Rossby radius. Combining EKE and L using a standard mixing length assumption gives a diffusivity ( K), corresponding to the thickness diffusivity in the [Gent, P.R., McWilliams, J.C. 1990. Isopycnal mixing in ocean circulation models. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 20, 150-155] parameterisation. Assuming downgradient mixing of potential vorticity with identical diffusivity shows how K is related to horizontal and vertical mixing processes in the horizontal momentum equation, and also enables us to parameterise the source of EKE related to eddy momentum fluxes. The mesoscale eddy closure is evaluated using synthetic data from two different eddy-resolving models covering the North Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean, respectively. The diagnosis shows that the mixing length assumption together with the definition of eddy length scales is valid within certain limitations. Furthermore, implementation of the closure in non-eddy-resolving models of the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean shows consistently that the closure has skill at reproducing the results of the eddy-resolving model versions in terms of EKE and K.

  9. Recent peat accumulation rates in minerotrophic peatlands of the Bay James region, Eastern Canada, inferred by 210Pb and 137Cs radiometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Ali, Adam A; Ghaleb, Bassam; Garneau, Michelle; Asnong, Hans; Loisel, Julie

    2008-10-01

    (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating techniques are used to characterise recent peat accumulation rates of two minerotrophic peatlands located in the La Grande Rivière hydrological watershed, in the James Bay region (Canada). Several cores were collected during the summer 2005 in different parts of the two selected peatlands. These minerotrophic patterned peatlands are presently affected by erosion processes, expressed by progressive mechanical destruction of their pools borders. This erosion process is related to a water table rise induced by a regional increase of humidity since the last century. The main objective of the present paper is to (1) evaluate if (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating techniques can be applied to build accurate chronologies in these environments and (2) detect changes in the peat accumulation rates in regard to this amplification of humidity. In both sites, unsupported (210)Pb shows an exponential decreasing according to the depth. Chronologies inferred from (210)Pb allow to reconstruct peat accumulation rates since ca. 1855 AD. The (137)Cs data displayed evident mobility and diffusion, preventing the establishment of any sustained chronology based on these measurements. In the two sites, peat accumulation rates inferred from (210)Pb chronologies fluctuate between 0.005 and 0.038 g cm(-2) yr(-1). As a result, the rise of the water table during the last decade has not yet affected peat accumulation rates.

  10. Investigations of eddy coherence in jet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    In turbulent shear flow the term coherent structures refers to eddies which are both spatially coherent, i.e., large eddies, aand also temporally coherent, i.e., they retain their identities for times which are long compared with their time scales in fixed point measurements. In transitional flows, the existence of such structures is evident from flow visualizations. In many other flows, such structures are not so evident. The reasons for the existence of these two classes of flows are discussed and attention is focused upon the more difficult flows, where coherent structures are not so evident. Techniques by which the existence (or nonexistence) of such structures in these flows can be established from point measurements, are also discussed. A major problem is shown to be the need to discriminate between real losses in eddy coherence and apparent losses in coherence introduced by phase scrambling effects which 'smear' multipoint correlations. The analysis of multiprobe time dependent data in cold and reacting round turbulent jets is described and it is shown how evidence of strong eddy coherence can be extracted from data.

  11. [The study of mechanisms of accumulation of daunorubicin and rodamin-123 in cells of human venous blood using cytometry technique].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, A S; Olkhovskii, I A

    2015-02-01

    The article presents comparative data of cytometry estimation of accumulation of daunorubicin and rodamin-123 in cells of peripheralbloodofhealthypeople underincubation ofsubstances in vitro. It is demonstrated that maximal saturation of thrombocytes occurs during the first five minutes, of leukocytes during forty five minutes. The erythrocytes factually never accumulate these compounds. The maximal values of accumulation of substances in leukocytes are characterized by high inter-individual variation. The close correlation (Rs = 0.96-0.98) of parameters of accumulation of substances in lymphocytes and neutrophils testifies the presence ofsimilar mechanisms ofcontrol ofactivity transportation ofxenobiotics in nucleated cells of blood. However, the results of inhibitor analysis of input of Pgp-dependent mechanisms of accumulation of rodamin-123 by leukocytes differ the data received under application of daunorubicin that reflects differences of their intracellular binding sites. The expressed differences between parameters of accumulation ofdaunorubicin and rodamin-123 by leukocytes in various patients determine necessity of individual approach in monitoring of development of medicinal resistance.

  12. Non-destructive testing of composite materials used in military applications by eddy current thermography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderski, Waldemar

    2016-10-01

    Eddy current thermography is a new NDT-technique for the detection of cracks in electro conductive materials. It combines the well-established inspection techniques of eddy current testing and thermography. The technique uses induced eddy currents to heat the sample being tested and defect detection is based on the changes of induced eddy currents flows revealed by thermal visualization captured by an infrared camera. The advantage of this method is to use the high performance of eddy current testing that eliminates the known problem of the edge effect. Especially for components of complex geometry this is an important factor which may overcome the increased expense for inspection set-up. The paper presents the possibility of applying eddy current thermography method for detecting defects in ballistic covers made of carbon fiber reinforced composites used in the construction of military vehicles.

  13. Relating chamber measurements to eddy correlation measurements of methane flux

    Treesearch

    R.J. Clement; S.B. Verma; E.S. Verry

    1995-01-01

    Methane fluxes were measured using eddy correlation and chamber techniques during 1991 and 1997 at a peatland in north central Minnesota. Comparisons of the two techniques were made using averages of methane flux data available during 1-week periods. The seasonal patterns of fluxes measured by the two techniques compared well. Chamber flux, in 1991, was about 1.8 mg m...

  14. Satellite observations of the small-scale cyclonic eddies in the western South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Tang, S.; Chen, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution ocean color observations offer an opportunity to investigate the oceanic small-scale processes. In this study, the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) daily 300 m data were used to study small-scale processes in the western South China Sea. It is indicated that the cyclonic eddies with horizontal scales of 10 km are frequently observed during the upwelling season of each year over the 2004-2009 period. These small-scale eddies were generated in the vicinity of the southern front of the cold tongue, and then propagated eastward with a speed of approximately 12 cm s-1. This propagation speed was consistent with the velocity of the western boundary current. As a result, the small-scale eddies kept the high levels of phytoplankton rotating away from the coastal areas, resulting in the accumulation of phytoplankton in the interior of the eddies. The generation of the small-scale eddies may be associated with strengthening of the relative movement between the rotation speed of the anticyclonic mesoscale eddies and the offshore transport. With the increases of the normalized rotation speed of the anticyclonic mesoscale eddies relative to the offshore transport, the offshore current became a meander under the impacts of the anticyclonic mesoscale eddies. The meandered cold tongue and instability front may stimulate the generation of the small-scale eddies. Unidirectional uniform wind along the cold tongue may also contribute to the formation of the small-scale eddies.

  15. Eddy current correction in volume-localized MR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Wendt, R. E. 3rd; Evans, H. J.; Rowe, R. M.; Hedrick, T. D.; LeBlanc, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    The quality of volume-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy is affected by eddy currents caused by gradient switching. Eddy currents can be reduced with improved gradient systems; however, it has been suggested that the distortion due to eddy currents can be compensated for during postprocessing with a single-frequency reference signal. The authors propose modifying current techniques for acquiring the single-frequency reference signal by using relaxation weighting to reduce interference from components that cannot be eliminated by digital filtering alone. Additional sequences with T1 or T2 weighting for reference signal acquisition are shown to have the same eddy current characteristics as the original signal without relaxation weighting. The authors also studied a new eddy current correction method that does not require a single-frequency reference signal. This method uses two free induction decays (FIDs) collected from the same volume with two sequences with opposite gradients. Phase errors caused by eddy currents are opposite in these two FIDs and can be canceled completely by combining the FIDs. These methods were tested in a phantom. Eddy current distortions were corrected, allowing quantitative measurement of structures such as the -CH = CH- component, which is otherwise undetectable.

  16. Potential of a New Technique for Remote Sensing of Hydrocarbon Accumulations and Blind Uranium Deposits: Buried Lif Thermoluminescence Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, F. R.; Vaz, J. E.; Lindholm, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Buried thermoluminescence dosimeters may be useful in remote sensing of petroleum and natural gas accumulations and blind uranium deposits. They act as integrating detectors that smooth out the effects of environmental variations that affect other measuring systems and result in irregularities and poor repeatability in measurements made during gas and radiometric surveys.

  17. Eddy current enhancement for EMATs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, S. B.; Jian, X.; Dixon, S.

    2007-04-01

    When an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) is used to generate ultrasound in an electrically conducting sample, eddy currents are generated in the sample's skin depth as the first stage in transduction. The resultant acoustic wave amplitude is proportional to the amplitude of this eddy current, and so anything that we can do to increase the eddy current will lead to the generation of larger amplitude ultrasonic waves. In eddy current testing, wire coils are often wound onto a ferrite core to increase the generated eddy current, with the effect that inductance of the coil increases greatly. When we are dealing with an EMAT, any increase in the coil inductance is usually unacceptable as it leads to a reduction in the amplitude of a given frequency of eddy current from a limited voltage source. This is particularly relevant where current arises from capacitor discharge, as is typically used in EMAT driver current circuitry. We present a method for electromagnetic acoustic transduction where ferrite is used to increase eddy current amplitude, without significantly increasing coil inductance or changing the frequency content of the eddy current or the generated acoustic wave.

  18. Numerical simulations of eddies in the Gulf of Lion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. Y.; Doglioli, A. M.; Petrenko, A. A.; Marsaleix, P.; Dekeyser, I.

    We present realistic simulations of mesoscale anticyclonic eddies, present in the western side of the Gulf of Lion and generally observed in satellite imagery during July and August. A nested model of 1-km resolution covering the Gulf of Lion is implemented from a coarse model of 3-km resolution. The models use an upwind-type advection-diffusion scheme, in which the numerical diffusion term is adjusted by an attenuation coefficient. Sensitivity tests have been carried out, varying the model spatial resolution and the attenuation coefficient to reproduce the (sub)mesoscale structures. A wavelet technique is applied to analyze the modelled horizontal relative vorticity in order to define the area, position and tracking duration of the eddy structures. Comparisons between the modelled eddies and those observed by satellite have allowed us to choose the best model setup. With this setup, the studied anticyclonic eddy lasted for 60 days.

  19. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  20. Characteristic-eddy decomposition of turbulence in a channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Moser, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Lumley's proper orthogonal decomposition technique is applied to the turbulent flow in a channel. Coherent structures are extracted by decomposing the velocity field into characteristic eddies with random coefficients. A generalization of the shot-noise expansion is used to determine the characteristic eddies in homogeneous spatial directions. Three different techniques are used to determine the phases of the Fourier coefficients in the expansion: (1) one based on the bispectrum, (2) a spatial compactness requirement, and (3) a functional continuity argument. Similar results are found from each of these techniques.

  1. Characteristic-eddy decomposition of turbulence in a channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Moser, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Lumley's proper orthogonal decomposition technique is applied to the turbulent flow in a channel. Coherent structures are extracted by decomposing the velocity field into characteristic eddies with random coefficients. A generalization of the shot-noise expansion is used to determine the characteristic eddies in homogeneous spatial directions. Three different techniques are used to determine the phases of the Fourier coefficients in the expansion: (1) one based on the bispectrum, (2) a spatial compactness requirement, and (3) a functional continuity argument. Similar results are found from each of these techniques.

  2. Diagnosing ocean eddy diffusivities from eddy flux divergences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, J.; Maddison, J. R.; Marshall, D. P.

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale numerical ocean models typically include parametrizations for mesoscale eddies, and these are often based upon the principle of down-gradient mixing. The corresponding eddy diffusivities, when diagnosed directly from eddy fluxes, are generally polluted by the presence of large dynamically inert rotational components which require filtering. Here, instead, a new methodology is proposed, which constructs an inverse problem for eddy diffusivities in a manner which is independent of any rotational fluxes. This alleviates the aforementioned problems, diagnosing the diffusivity in a non-local, gauge-invariant fashion. This new diagnostic approach is applied to multi-layer quasi-geostrophic ocean gyre simulations, in order to diagnose eddy potential vorticity diffusivities. It is found that, away from the layer of direct wind forcing, the diffusivity is predominantly positive and has a significant degree of correlation with the eddy energy. The diagnostic approach is additionally applied to down-gradient buoyancy mixing, where both strong positive and negative diffusivity signals are observed. The consequences for eddy parametrizations are considered.

  3. Modeling mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    Mesoscale eddies are not resolved in coarse resolution ocean models and must be modeled. They affect both mean momentum and scalars. At present, no generally accepted model exists for the former; in the latter case, mesoscales are modeled with a bolus velocity u∗ to represent a sink of mean potential energy. However, comparison of u∗(model) vs. u∗ (eddy resolving code, [J. Phys. Ocean. 29 (1999) 2442]) has shown that u∗(model) is incomplete and that additional terms, "unrelated to thickness source or sinks", are required. Thus far, no form of the additional terms has been suggested. To describe mesoscale eddies, we employ the Navier-Stokes and scalar equations and a turbulence model to treat the non-linear interactions. We then show that the problem reduces to an eigenvalue problem for the mesoscale Bernoulli potential. The solution, which we derive in analytic form, is used to construct the momentum and thickness fluxes. In the latter case, the bolus velocity u∗ is found to contain two types of terms: the first type entails the gradient of the mean potential vorticity and represents a positive contribution to the production of mesoscale potential energy; the second type of terms, which is new, entails the velocity of the mean flow and represents a negative contribution to the production of mesoscale potential energy, or equivalently, a backscatter process whereby a fraction of the mesoscale potential energy is returned to the original reservoir of mean potential energy. This type of terms satisfies the physical description of the additional terms given by [J. Phys. Ocean. 29 (1999) 2442]. The mesoscale flux that enters the momentum equations is also contributed by two types of terms of the same physical nature as those entering the thickness flux. The potential vorticity flux is also shown to contain two types of terms: the first is of the gradient-type while the other terms entail the velocity of the mean flow. An expression is derived for the mesoscale

  4. Characteristic eddy decomposition of turbulence in a channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, Parviz; Moser, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    The proper orthogonal decomposition technique (Lumley's decomposition) is applied to the turbulent flow in a channel to extract coherent structures by decomposing the velocity field into characteristic eddies with random coefficients. In the homogeneous spatial directions, a generaliztion of the shot-noise expansion is used to determine the characteristic eddies. In this expansion, the Fourier coefficients of the characteristic eddy cannot be obtained from the second-order statistics. Three different techniques are used to determine the phases of these coefficients. They are based on: (1) the bispectrum, (2) a spatial compactness requirement, and (3) a functional continuity argument. Results from these three techniques are found to be similar in most respects. The implications of these techniques and the shot-noise expansion are discussed. The dominant eddy is found to contribute as much as 76 percent to the turbulent kinetic energy. In both 2D and 3D, the characteristic eddies consist of an ejection region straddled by streamwise vortices that leave the wall in the very short streamwise distance of about 100 wall units.

  5. Chemical speciation of arsenic-accumulating mineral in a sedimentary iron deposit by synchrotron radiation multiple X-ray analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Terada, Yasuko; Kato, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Izumi

    2008-10-01

    The comprehensive characterization of As(V)-bearing iron minerals from the Gunma iron deposit, which were probably formed by biomineralization, was carried out by utilizing multiple synchrotron radiation (SR)-based analytical techniques at BL37XU at SPring-8. SR microbeam X-ray fluorescence (SR-mu-XRF) imaging showed a high level of arsenic accumulation in the iron ore as dots of ca. 20 microm. Based on SEM observations and SR X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRD) analysis, it was found that arsenic is selectively accumulated in strengite (FePO4 x 2H2O) with a concentric morphology, which may be produced by a biologically induced process. Furthermore, the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis showed that arsenic in strengite exists in the arsenate (AsO4(3-)) form and is coordinated by four oxygen atoms at 1.68 angstroms. The results suggest that strengite accumulates arsenic by isomorphous substitution of AsO4(3-) for PO4(3-) to form a partial solid-solution of strengite and scorodite (FeAsO4 x 2H2O). The specific correlation between the distribution of As and biominerals indicates that microorganisms seems to play an important role in the mineralization of strengite in combination with an arsenic-accumulating process.

  6. Eddy-current examination of large-diameter insulated pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A new concept eddy-current technique has been developed to examine large-diameter insulated pipes without removing the insulation, and in many cases, without securing system operation. The new concept allows the in-place examination of piping systems using an encircling eddy-current coil that is a proven eddy-current technology. Eliminating the requirement to secure or drain the system or to remove the insulation from the pipe provides significant cost savings. The new concept also provides a significantly higher percentage of inspection volume coverage than ultrasonic techniques despite limitations of pipe brackets and other physical obstructions. The technique has been demonstrated on copper, copper nickel and limited carbon steel pipe ranging from 4 to 8 inches in diameter with insulation thicknesses from 1 to 2 inches.

  7. Nonlinear multiscale interactions and internal dynamics underlying a typical eddy-shedding event at Luzon Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan-Bing; Liang, X. San; Gan, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Eddy-shedding is a highly nonlinear process that presents a major challenge in geophysical fluid dynamics. Using the newly developed localized multiscale energy and vorticity analysis (MS-EVA), this study investigates an observed typical warm eddy-shedding event as the Kuroshio passes the Luzon Strait, in order to gain insight into the underlying internal dynamics. Through multiscale window transform (MWT), it is found that the loop-form Kuroshio intrusion into the South China Sea (SCS) is not a transient feature, but a quasi-equilibrium state of the system. A mesoscale reconstruction reveals that the eddy does not have its origin at the intrusion path, but comes from the Northwest Pacific. It propagates westward, preceded by a cyclonic (cold) eddy, through the Kuroshio into the SCS. As the eddy pair runs across the main current, the cold one weakens and the warm one intensifies through a mixed instability. In its development, another cold eddy is generated to its southeast, which also experiences a mixed instability. It develops rapidly and cuts the warm eddy off the stream. Both the warm and cold eddies then propagate westward in the form of a Rossby wave (first baroclinic mode). As the eddies approach the Dongsha Islands, they experience another baroclinic instability, accompanied by a sudden accumulation of eddy available potential energy. This part of potential energy is converted to eddy kinetic energy through buoyancy conversion, and is afterward transferred back to the large-scale field through inverse cascading, greatly reducing the intensity of the eddy and eventually leading to its demise.

  8. Method and apparatus for correcting eddy current signal voltage for temperature effects

    DOEpatents

    Kustra, Thomas A.; Caffarel, Alfred J.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring physical characteristics of an electrically conductive material by the use of eddy-current techniques and compensating measurement errors caused by changes in temperature includes a switching arrangement connected between primary and reference coils of an eddy-current probe which allows the probe to be selectively connected between an eddy current output oscilloscope and a digital ohm-meter for measuring the resistances of the primary and reference coils substantially at the time of eddy current measurement. In this way, changes in resistance due to temperature effects can be completely taken into account in determining the true error in the eddy current measurement. The true error can consequently be converted into an equivalent eddy current measurement correction.

  9. Lagrangian analysis of formation, structure, evolution and splitting of anticyclonic Kuril eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Lobanov, V. B.; Budyansky, M. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    We studied in detail a mesoscale anticylonic eddy that has been sampled in the R/V Professor Gagarinskiy cruise (June-July 2012) in the area east of the Kuril Islands in the northwestern subarctic Pacific. Lagrangian approach was applied to study formation, structure and evolution of this feature called the eddy A and of its parent eddy B using a simulation with synthetic tracers advected by the AVISO velocity field. We used different Lagrangian methods and techniques to identify those eddies and their boundaries, to know their structure and to document their deformation, metamorphoses and splitting. It has been found that the eddy A was born as a result of splitting of the eddy B with the core water to be borrowed from the eddy B which, in turn, was influenced by the Okhotsk Sea water flowing into the ocean through the Kuril straits. The periphery of the eddy A was formed mainly by East Kamchatka Current water in the process of its winding onto the eddy A core by portions. All these processes have been documented in detail with the help of drift and tracking Lagrangian maps computed forward and backward in time with a large number of synthetic tracers distributed over the studied area. We have found a Lagrangian structure of those eddies and the ways how they have gained and released water. Simulated and measured locations of the center of the eddy A and its boundary have been be estimated to coincide with the accuracy of ≈ 7-10 and ≈ 15-20 km, respectively. Our simulations were validated in part by tracks of available surface drifters and Argo floats. We presented CTD hydrographic observations of the Kuril eddy A from the surface to deep waters and compared observed and simulated results in order to establish origin and properties of water masses constituting that eddy.

  10. Hot-cell design considerations for interfacing eddy-current systems

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, E.M.; Webb, J.P.; Larson, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North conducts remote eddy-current examination of irradiated fuel elements. Applications include cladding breach detection and irradiation-induced ferrite examination. The seccussful use of remote eddy-current techniques is achieved by applying basic test parameters and interfacing considerations. These include impedance matching, operating frequency, and feedthrough considerations.

  11. A comparison of winter mercury accumulation at forested and no-canopy sites measured with different snow sampling techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, S.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Weathers, K.C.; Loftin, C.S.; Fernandez, I.J.; Kahl, J.S.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is delivered to ecosystems via rain, snow, cloud/fog, and dry deposition. The importance of snow, especially snow that has passed through the forest canopy (throughfall), in delivering Hg to terrestrial ecosystems has received little attention in the literature. The snowpack is a dynamic system that links atmospheric deposition and ecosystem cycling through deposition and emission of deposited Hg. To examine the magnitude of Hg delivery via snowfall, and to illuminate processes affecting Hg flux to catchments during winter (cold season), Hg in snow in no-canopy areas and under forest canopies measured with four collection methods were compared: (1) Hg in wet precipitation as measured by the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) for the site in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA, (2) event throughfall (collected after snowfall cessation for accumulations of >8 cm), (3) season-long throughfall collected using the same apparatus for event sampling but deployed for the entire cold season, and (4) snowpack sampling. Estimates (mean ?? SE) of Hg deposition using these methods during the 91-day cold season in 2004-2005 at conifer sites showed that season-long throughfall Hg flux (1.80 ??g/m2) < snowpack Hg (2.38 ?? 0.68 ??g/m2) < event throughfall flux (5.63 ?? 0.38 ??g/m2). Mercury deposition at the MDN site (0.91 ??g/m2) was similar to that measured at other no-canopy sites in the area using the other methods, but was 3.4 times less than was measured under conifer canopies using the event sampling regime. This indicates that snow accumulated under the forest canopy received Hg from the overstory or exhibited less re-emission of Hg deposited in snow relative to open areas. The soil surface of field-scale plots were sprayed with a natural rain water sample that contained an Hg tracer (202Hg) just prior to the first snowfall to explore whether some snowpack Hg might be explained from soil emissions. The appearance of the 202Hg tracer in the snowpack (0

  12. A simple model of eddy saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, D. P.; Ambaum, M.; Munday, D. R.; Novak, L.; Maddison, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    A simple model is developed for eddy saturation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC): the relative insensitivity of its volume transport to the magnitude of the surface wind stress in ocean models with explicit eddies. The simple model solves prognostic equations for the ACC volume transport and the eddy energy, forming a 2-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system. In equilibrium, the volume transport is independent of the surface wind stress but scales with the bottom drag, whereas the eddy energy scales with the wind stress but is independent of bottom drag. The magnitude of the eddy energy is controlled by the zonal momentum balance between the surface wind stress and eddy form stress, whereas the baroclinic volume transport is controlled by the eddy energy balance between the mean-to-eddy energy conversion and bottom dissipation. The theoretical predictions are confirmed in eddy-resolving numerical calculations for an idealised reentrant channel. The results suggest that the rate of eddy energy dissipation has a strong impact not only the volume transport of the ACC, but also on global ocean stratification and heat content through the thermal wind relation. Moreover, a vital ingredient in this model is a relation between the eddy form stress and eddy energy derived in the eddy parameterisation framework of Marshall et al. (2012, J. Phys. Oceanogr.), offering the prospect of obtaining eddy saturation in ocean models with parameterised eddies.

  13. NONDESTRUCTIVE EDDY CURRENT TESTING

    DOEpatents

    Renken, C.J. Jr.

    1961-05-23

    An eddy current testing device is described for measuring metal continuity independent of probe-to-sample spacing. An inductance would test probe is made a leg of a variable impedance bridge and the bridge is balanced with the probe away from the sample. An a-c signal is applied across the input terminals of the bridge circuit. As the probe is brought into proximity with the metal sample, the resulting impedance change in the probe gives an output signal from the bridge whose phase angle is proportional to the sample continuity and amplitude is proportional to the probe-tosample spacing. The output signal from the bridge is applied to a compensating network where, responsive to amplitude changes from the bridge output signal, a constant phased voltage output is maintained when the sample is continuous regardless of probe-to-sample spacing. A phase meter calibrated to read changes in resistivity of the metal sample measures the phase shift between the output of the compensating network and the original a-c signal applied to the bridge.

  14. Large eddy simulation of LDL surface concentration in a subject specific human aorta.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-02-02

    The development of atherosclerosis is correlated to the accumulation of lipids in the arterial wall, which, in turn, may be caused by the build-up of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) on the arterial surface. The goal of this study was to model blood flow within a subject specific human aorta, and to study how the LDL surface concentration changed during a cardiac cycle. With measured velocity profiles as boundary conditions, a scale-resolving technique (large eddy simulation, LES) was used to compute the pulsatile blood flow that was in the transitional regime. The relationship between wall shear stress (WSS) and LDL surface concentration was investigated, and it was found that the accumulation of LDL correlated well with WSS. In general, regions of low WSS corresponded to regions of increased LDL concentration and vice versa. The instantaneous LDL values changed significantly during a cardiac cycle; during systole the surface concentration was low due to increased convective fluid transport, while in diastole there was an increased accumulation of LDL on the surface. Therefore, the near-wall velocity was investigated at four representative locations, and it was concluded that in regions with disturbed flow the LDL concentration had significant temporal changes, indicating that LDL accumulation is sensitive to not only the WSS but also near-wall flow.

  15. Electrical Resistance as a NDE Technique to Monitor Processing and Damage Accumulation in SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to process components reliable and to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution that leads to failure under stressed-oxidation conditions. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. Electrical resistance of SiC/SiC composites is one technique that shows special promise towards this end. Since both the matrix and the fibers are conductive, changes in matrix or fiber properties should relate to changes in electrical conductivity along the length of a specimen or part. Initial efforts to quantify the electrical resistance of different fiber and different matrix SiC/SiC composites will be presented. Also, the effect of matrix cracking on electrical resistivity for several composite systems will be presented. The implications towards electrical resistance as a technique applied to composite processing, damage detection, and life-modeling will be discussed.

  16. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  17. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-02-26

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper.

  18. Applied large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G; Lardeau, Sylvain

    2009-07-28

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is now seen more and more as a viable alternative to current industrial practice, usually based on problem-specific Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods. Access to detailed flow physics is attractive to industry, especially in an environment in which computer modelling is bound to play an ever increasing role. However, the improvement in accuracy and flow detail has substantial cost. This has so far prevented wider industrial use of LES. The purpose of the applied LES discussion meeting was to address questions regarding what is achievable and what is not, given the current technology and knowledge, for an industrial practitioner who is interested in using LES. The use of LES was explored in an application-centred context between diverse fields. The general flow-governing equation form was explored along with various LES models. The errors occurring in LES were analysed. Also, the hybridization of RANS and LES was considered. The importance of modelling relative to boundary conditions, problem definition and other more mundane aspects were examined. It was to an extent concluded that for LES to make most rapid industrial impact, pragmatic hybrid use of LES, implicit LES and RANS elements will probably be needed. Added to this further, highly industrial sector model parametrizations will be required with clear thought on the key target design parameter(s). The combination of good numerical modelling expertise, a sound understanding of turbulence, along with artistry, pragmatism and the use of recent developments in computer science should dramatically add impetus to the industrial uptake of LES. In the light of the numerous technical challenges that remain it appears that for some time to come LES will have echoes of the high levels of technical knowledge required for safe use of RANS but with much greater fidelity.

  19. Coastal (Sub)Mesoscale Eddies in the Gulf of Lion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. Y.; Doglioli, A. M.; Petrenko, A. A.; Marsaleix, P.; Dekeyser, I.

    2009-04-01

    The LAgrangian Transport EXperiment (LATEX) project (2008-2011) has been initiated in order to study the role of (sub)mesoscale structures on shelf-offshore exchanges in the Gulf of Lion. The strategy will combine use of data from an inert tracer release (SF6), Lagrangian drifters, satellites and Eulerian moorings with numerical modeling. In this work, we present a shelf-scale model of high resolution (1-km) nested in a regional-scale model (3-km). We use an upwind-type advection-diffusion scheme, in which the numerical diffusion term is adjusted by an attenuation coefficient. Sensitivity tests have been carried out, varying the model spatial resolution and the attenuation coefficient to reproduce the (sub)mesoscale structures. A wavelet technique is applied on model outputs to identify eddies and to define their area, position and tracking duration. Comparisons between the modeled eddies and those observed by satellite have allowed us to choose the best model configuration. With this setup, single and combined effects of wind forcing, bathymetry and mesoscale circulation are investigated to propose a generation process of these simulated eddies. Then, simulations are run for long period to obtain annual variability and statistics of the coastal eddies. These coastal (sub)mesoscale eddies potentially interact with the distal plume of the Rhône river and the Northern Current. Numerical modeling sets the foundation to understand the eddies' dynamics and helps us set up the sampling strategy of the cruises. The in situ measurements combined with the modeling results will allow us to evaluate the eddies' potential impact on the coastal-offshore transfer of matter and energy.

  20. Might eddies dominate carbon export ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J.; Rixen, M.; Fielding, S.; Mustard, A.; Brown, L.; Sanders, R.

    2003-04-01

    Yes - from a review of recent data sets we present a scale analysis of the potential for globally integrated carbon export, from the surface ocean, due to the vertical transports of mesoscale eddies. Mesoscale eddies are the oceanic equivalent of atmospheric storms, most are a fundamental result of horizontally unstable density gradients on the surface of a rotating sphere (baroclinic instability) and ~ 90% of the oceans energy exchanges take place at this scale. Recent studies from satellite remote sensing and high resolution models show that mesoscale eddies are a ubiquitous feature of the open ocean in both time and space; they are even present in sub-tropical oligotrophic gyres. Individual atmospheric weather systems generally have little ecological impact on terrestrial or marine biological systems. Grass grows and herbivores munch through many cyclone and anticyclone periods. In the open ocean we have a very different picture. The primary producers and herbivores have shorter time scales; time scales that coincide with those of mesoscale eddies. Plankton can have either good or bad weather lifetimes associated with just a single cyclone or anticyclone period. Furthermore, although the spring bloom may be the single largest source of material for the export of carbon from the upper ocean, it is short lived and may not be dominant everywhere in the annual export budget. The magnitude of vertical motion associated with mesoscale eddies is significant on biological timescales both for phytoplankton growth and the development of zooplankton grazing pressure. Critically this motion does not form a closed vertical circulation; baroclinic instability releases potential energy and thus water masses are exchanged both vertically and horizontally across water mass boundaries. Thus mesoscale eddies have been shown to provide a mechanism for export both in the direct transport of biomass downwards out of the surface mixed layer and the fertilisation of an exhausted

  1. Transplantation of three-dimensional artificial human vascular tissues fabricated using an extracellular matrix nanofilm-based cell-accumulation technique.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshiya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Okano, Daisuke; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    We have established a novel three-dimensional (3D) tissue-constructing technique, referred to as the 'cell-accumulation method', which is based on the self-assembly of cultured human cells. In this technique, cells are coated with fibronectin and gelatin to construct extracellular matrix (ECM) nanofilms and cultured to form multi-layers in vitro. By using this method, we have successfully fabricated artificial tissues with vascular networks constructed by co-cultivation of human umbilical vein-derived vascular endothelial cells between multi-layers of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, to assess these engineered vascular tissues as therapeutic implants, we transplanted the 3D human tissues with microvascular networks, fabricated based on the cell-accumulation method, onto the back skin of nude mice. After the transplantation, we found vascular networks with perfusion of blood in the transplanted graft. At the boundary between host and implanted tissue, connectivity between murine and human vessels was found. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted artificial vascular tubules demonstrated the ultrastructural features of blood capillaries. Moreover, maturation of the vascular tissues after transplantation was shown by the presence of pericyte-like cells and abundant collagen fibrils in the ECM surrounding the vasculature. These results demonstrated that artificial human vascular tissues constructed by our method were engrafted and matured in animal skin. In addition, the implanted artificial human vascular networks were connected with the host circulatory system by anastomosis. This method is an attractive technique for engineering prevascularized artificial tissues for transplantation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A new eddy-covariance method using empirical mode decomposition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We introduce a new eddy-covariance method that uses a spectral decomposition algorithm called empirical mode decomposition. The technique is able to calculate contributions to near-surface fluxes from different periodic components. Unlike traditional Fourier methods, this method allows for non-ortho...

  3. Eddy correlation measurements of submarine groundwater discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, J.; Berg, P.; Koopmans, D.J.; Erban, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new, non-invasive means of quantifying groundwater discharge into marine waters using an eddy correlation approach. The method takes advantage of the fact that, in virtually all aquatic environments, the dominant mode of vertical transport near the sediment–water interface is turbulent mixing. The technique thus relies on measuring simultaneously the fluctuating vertical velocity using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter and the fluctuating salinity and/or temperature using rapid-response conductivity and/or temperature sensors. The measurements are typically done at a height of 5–15 cm above the sediment surface, at a frequency of 16 to 64 Hz, and for a period of 15 to 60 min. If the groundwater salinity and/or temperature differ from that of the water column, the groundwater specific discharge (cm d− 1) can be quantified from either a heat or salt balance. Groundwater discharge was estimated with this new approach in Salt Pond, a small estuary on Cape Cod (MA, USA). Estimates agreed well with previous estimates of discharge measured using seepage meters and 222Rn as a tracer. The eddy correlation technique has several desirable characteristics: 1) discharge is quantified under in-situ hydrodynamic conditions; 2) salinity and temperature can serve as two semi-independent tracers of discharge; 3) discharge can be quantified at high temporal resolution, and 4) long-term records of discharge may be possible, due to the low power requirements of the instrumentation.

  4. Investigation on a new inducer of pulsed eddy current thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Zhang, Laibin; Zheng, Wenpei; Feng, Yijing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new inducer of pulsed eddy current thermography (PECT) is presented. The use of the inducer can help avoid the problem of blocking the infrared (IR) camera's view in eddy current thermography technique. The inducer can also provide even heating of the test specimen. This paper is concerned with the temperature distribution law around the crack on a specimen when utilizing the new inducer. Firstly, relative mathematical models are provided. In the following section, eddy current distribution and temperature distribution around the crack are studied using the numerical simulation method. The best separation distance between the inducer and the specimen is also determined. Then, results of temperature distribution around the crack stimulated by the inducer are gained by experiments. Effect of current value on temperature rise is studied as well in the experiments. Based on temperature data, temperature features of the crack are discussed.

  5. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  6. Eddies in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-08

    The cloud cover over the Southern Ocean occasionally parts as it did on January 1, 2015 just west of the Drake Passage where the VIIRS instrument on the Suomi NPP satellite glimpsed the above collection of ocean-color delineated eddies which have diameters ranging from a couple of kilometers to a couple of hundred kilometers. Recent studies indicate that eddy activity has been increasing in the Southern Ocean with possible implications for climate change. Credit: NASA's OceanColor/Suomi NPP/VIIRS

  7. Physical interpretation and separation of eddy current pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Aijun; Gao, Bin; Yun Tian, Gui; Woo, W. L.; Li, Kongjing

    2013-02-01

    Eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT) applies induction heating and a thermal camera for non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). Because of the variation in resultant surface heat distribution, the physical mechanism that corresponds to the general behavior of ECPT can be divided into an accumulation of Joule heating via eddy current and heat diffusion. However, throughout the literature, the heating mechanisms of ECPT are not given in detail in the above two thermal phenomena and they are difficult to be separated. Nevertheless, once these two physical parameters are separated, they can be directly used to detect anomalies and predict the variation in material properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability and microstructure. This paper reports physical interpretation of these two physical phenomena that can be found in different time responses given the ECPT image sequences. Based on the phenomenon and their behaviors, the paper proposes a statistical method based on single channel blind source separation to decompose the two physical phenomena using different stages of eddy current and thermal propagation from the ECPT images. Links between mathematical models and physical models have been discussed and verified. This fundamental understanding of transient eddy current distribution and heating propagation can be applied to the development of feature extraction and pattern recognition for the quantitative analysis of ECPT measurement images and defect characterization.

  8. Evaluation of scale-aware subgrid mesoscale eddy models in a global eddy-rich model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brodie; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Two parameterizations for horizontal mixing of momentum and tracers by subgrid mesoscale eddies are implemented in a high-resolution global ocean model. These parameterizations follow on the techniques of large eddy simulation (LES). The theory underlying one parameterization (2D Leith due to Leith, 1996) is that of enstrophy cascades in two-dimensional turbulence, while the other (QG Leith) is designed for potential enstrophy cascades in quasi-geostrophic turbulence. Simulations using each of these parameterizations are compared with a control simulation using standard biharmonic horizontal mixing.Simulations using the 2D Leith and QG Leith parameterizations are more realistic than those using biharmonic mixing. In particular, the 2D Leith and QG Leith simulations have more energy in resolved mesoscale eddies, have a spectral slope more consistent with turbulence theory (an inertial enstrophy or potential enstrophy cascade), have bottom drag and vertical viscosity as the primary sinks of energy instead of lateral friction, and have isoneutral parameterized mesoscale tracer transport. The parameterization choice also affects mass transports, but the impact varies regionally in magnitude and sign.

  9. Methane Emissions from Permafrost Regions using Low-Power Eddy Covariance Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G.; Sturtevant, C.; Schreiber, P.; Peltola, O.; Zulueta, R.; Mammarella, I.; Haapanala, S.; Rinne, J.; Vesala, T.; McDermitt, D.; Oechel, W.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential 23 times that of carbon dioxide over a 100-year cycle. The permafrost regions of the world store significant amounts of organic materials under anaerobic conditions, leading to large methane production and accumulation in the upper layers of bedrock, soil and ice. These regions are currently undergoing dramatic change in response to warming trends, and may become a significant potential source of global methane release under a warming climate over the coming decades and centuries. Presently, most measurements of methane fluxes in permafrost regions have been made with static chamber techniques, and very few were done with the eddy covariance approach using closed-path analyzers. Although chambers and closed-path analyzers have advantages, both techniques have significant limitations, especially for permafrost research. Static chamber measurements are discrete in time and space, and particularly difficult to use over polygonal tundra with highly non-uniform micro-topography and active water layer. They also may not capture the dynamics of methane fluxes on varying time scales (hours to annual estimates). In addition, placement of the chamber may disturb the surface integrity causing a significant over-estimation of the measured flux. Closed-path gas analyzers for measuring methane eddy fluxes employ advanced technologies such as TDLS (Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy), ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy), WS-CRDS (wavelength scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy), but require high flow rates at significantly reduced optical cell pressures to provide adequate response time and sharpen absorption features. Such methods, when used with the eddy covariance technique, require a vacuum pump and a total of 400-1500 Watts of grid power for the pump and analyzer system. The weight of such systems often exceeds 100-200 lbs, restricting practical applicability for remote or portable field studies. As a

  10. Dynamic Model of Mesoscale Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikov, Mikhail S.

    2003-04-01

    Oceanic mesoscale eddies which are analogs of well known synoptic eddies (cyclones and anticyclones), are studied on the basis of the turbulence model originated by Dubovikov (Dubovikov, M.S., "Dynamical model of turbulent eddies", Int. J. Mod. Phys.B7, 4631-4645 (1993).) and further developed by Canuto and Dubovikov (Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: I. General formalism", Phys. Fluids8, 571-586 (1996a) (CD96a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: II. Sheardriven flows", Phys. Fluids8, 587-598 (1996b) (CD96b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S., Cheng, Y. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: III. Numerical results", Phys. Fluids8, 599-613 (1996c)(CD96c); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: IV. Buoyancy-driven flows", Phys. Fluids9, 2118-2131 (1997a) (CD97a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: V. The effect of rotation", Phys. Fluids9, 2132-2140 (1997b) (CD97b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Wielaard, D.J., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VI. Two dimensional turbulence", Phys. Fluids9, 2141-2147 (1997c) (CD97c); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Physical regimes and dimensional structure of rotating turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 666-669 (1997d) (CD97d); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "Turbulent convection in a spectral model", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 662-665 (1997e) (CD97e); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A new approach to turbulence", Int. J. Mod. Phys.12, 3121-3152 (1997f) (CD97f); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Two scaling regimes for rotating Raleigh-Benard convection", Phys. Rev. Letters78, 281-284, (1998) (CD98); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VII. The five invariants for shear driven flows", Phys. Fluids11, 659-664 (1999a) (CD99a); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Yu, G., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VIII. IR and UV

  11. Use of eddy current mixes to solve a weld examination application

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.C.; LaBoissonniere, A.

    1995-12-31

    The augmentation of typical nondestructive (i.e., ultrasound) weld inspection techniques by the use of eddy current tools may significantly enhance the quality and reliability of weld inspections. One recent example is the development of an eddy current technique for use in the examination of BWR core shroud welds, where multi-frequency mixes are used to eliminate signals coming from the weld material so that the examination of the heat affected zone is enhanced. An analysis tool most commonly associated with ultrasound examinations, the C-Scan based on gated information, may be implemented with eddy current data to enhance analysis.

  12. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo D'Ottone, Marcela; Bravo, Luis; Ramos, Marcel; Pizarro, Oscar; Karstensen, Johannes; Gallegos, Mauricio; Correa-Ramirez, Marco; Silva, Nelson; Farias, Laura; Karp-Boss, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of the circulation in the eastern South Pacific (ESP) Ocean, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from the productive shelves to the open ocean. Some of these eddies exhibit subsurface hypoxic or suboxic conditions and may serve as important hotspots for nitrogen loss, but little is known about oxygen consumption rates and nitrogen transformation processes associated with these eddies. In the austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a suboxic (< 2 µmol kg-1 of O2), subsurface layer (200-400 m) was detected ˜ 900 km off the Chilean shore (30° S, 81° W). The core of the eddy's suboxic layer had a temperature-salinity signature characteristic of Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted to an area near the coast. Measurements of nitrogen species within the eddy revealed undersaturation (below 44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 µM), suggesting that active denitrification occurred in this water mass. Using satellite altimetry, we were able to track the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). Field studies conducted in Chilean shelf waters close to the time of eddy formation provided estimates of initial O2 and N2O concentrations of the ESSW source water in the eddy. By the time of its offshore sighting, concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the eddy were lower than concentrations in surrounding water and "source water" on the shelf, indicating that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. These results show that mesoscale eddies affect open-ocean biogeochemistry in the ESP

  13. Expert system for analyzing eddy current measurements

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Arthur J.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Brudnoy, David M.; Englund, James M.; Loomis, Kent C.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus (called DODGER) analyzes eddy current data for heat exchanger tubes or any other metallic object. DODGER uses an expert system to analyze eddy current data by reasoning with uncertainty and pattern recognition. The expert system permits DODGER to analyze eddy current data intelligently, and obviate operator uncertainty by analyzing the data in a uniform and consistent manner.

  14. Eddy-Resolving Global Ocean Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    key observing system for mapping ocean eddies and current meanders, but sea surface temperature, temperature and salinity profiles, and atmospheric...for mapping ocean eddies and current meanders, but sea surface temperature, temperature and salinity profiles, and atmospheric forcing arc also...fronts, eddies, Rossby waves, and the associated temperature, salinity, currents, and sea surface height (SSH). Only since the turn of the century

  15. Expert system for analyzing eddy current measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.J.; Oppenlander, J.E.; Brudnoy, D.M.; Englund, J.M.; Loomis, K.C.

    1994-08-16

    A method and apparatus (called DODGER) analyzes eddy current data for heat exchanger tubes or any other metallic object. DODGER uses an expert system to analyze eddy current data by reasoning with uncertainty and pattern recognition. The expert system permits DODGER to analyze eddy current data intelligently, and obviate operator uncertainty by analyzing the data in a uniform and consistent manner. 21 figs.

  16. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  17. Eddy current thickness measurement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Gary J.; Sinclair, Frank; Soskov, Alexander; Buff, James S.

    2015-06-16

    A sheet of a material is disposed in a melt of the material. The sheet is formed using a cooling plate in one instance. An exciting coil and sensing coil are positioned downstream of the cooling plate. The exciting coil and sensing coil use eddy currents to determine a thickness of the solid sheet on top of the melt.

  18. From Phenomena to Objects: Segmentation of Fuzzy Objects and its Application to Oceanic Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingling

    A challenging image analysis problem that has received limited attention to date is the isolation of fuzzy objects---i.e. those with inherently indeterminate boundaries---from continuous field data. This dissertation seeks to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, the recognized need for Object-Based Image Analysis of fuzzy remotely sensed features, and on the other, the optimization of existing image segmentation techniques for the extraction of more discretely bounded features. Using mesoscale oceanic eddies as a case study of a fuzzy object class evident in Sea Surface Height Anomaly (SSHA) imagery, the dissertation demonstrates firstly, that the widely used region-growing and watershed segmentation techniques can be optimized and made comparable in the absence of ground truth data using the principle of parsimony. However, they both have significant shortcomings, with the region growing procedure creating contour polygons that do not follow the shape of eddies while the watershed technique frequently subdivides eddies or groups together separate eddy objects. Secondly, it was determined that these problems can be remedied by using a novel Non-Euclidian Voronoi (NEV) tessellation technique. NEV is effective in isolating the extrema associated with eddies in SSHA data while using a non-Euclidian cost-distance based procedure (based on cumulative gradients in ocean height) to define the boundaries between fuzzy objects. Using this procedure as the first stage in isolating candidate eddy objects, a novel "region-shrinking" multicriteria eddy identification algorithm was developed that includes consideration of shape and vorticity. Eddies identified by this region-shrinking technique compare favorably with those identified by existing techniques, while simplifying and improving existing automated eddy detection algorithms. However, it also tends to find a larger number of eddies as a result of its ability to separate what other techniques identify as connected

  19. Quantifying mesoscale eddies in the Lofoten Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, R. P.; Johannessen, J. A.; Eldevik, T.; Nilsen, J. E. Ø.; Halo, I.

    2016-07-01

    The Lofoten Basin is the most eddy rich region in the Norwegian Sea. In this paper, the characteristics of these eddies are investigated from a comprehensive database of nearly two decades of satellite altimeter data (1995-2013) together with Argo profiling floats and surface drifter data. An automated method identified 1695/1666 individual anticyclonic/cyclonic eddies in the Lofoten Basin from more than 10,000 altimeter-based eddy observations. The eddies are found to be predominantly generated and residing locally. The spatial distributions of lifetime, occurrence, generation sites, size, intensity, and drift of the eddies are studied in detail. The anticyclonic eddies in the Lofoten Basin are the most long-lived eddies (>60 days), especially in the western part of the basin. We reveal two hotspots of eddy occurrence on either side of the Lofoten Basin. Furthermore, we infer a cyclonic drift of eddies in the western Lofoten Basin. Barotropic energy conversion rates reveals energy transfer from the slope current to the eddies during winter. An automated colocation of surface drifters trapped inside the altimeter-based eddies are used to corroborate the orbital speed of the anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies. Moreover, the vertical structure of the altimeter-based eddies is examined using colocated Argo profiling float profiles. Combination of altimetry, Argo floats, and surface drifter data is therefore considered to be a promising observation-based approach for further studies of the role of eddies in transport of heat and biomass from the slope current to the Lofoten Basin.

  20. Subduction in an Eddy-Resolving State Estimate of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebbie, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    Are eddies an important contributor to subduction in the eastern subtropical gyre? Here, an adjoint model is used to combine a regional, eddy-resolving numerical model with observations to produce a state estimate of the ocean circulation. The estimate is a synthesis of a variety of in- situ observations from the Subduction Experiment, TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry, and the MTI General Circulation Model. The adjoint method is successful because the Northeast Atlantic Ocean is only weakly nonlinear. The state estimate provides a physically-interpretable, eddy-resolving information source to diagnose subduction. Estimates of eddy subduction for the eastern subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic are larger than previously calculated from parameterizations in coarse-resolution models. Furthermore, eddy subduction rates have typical magnitudes of 15% of the total subduction rate. Eddies contribute as much as 1 Sverdrup to water-mass transformation, and hence subduction, in the North Equatorial Current and the Azores Current. The findings of this thesis imply that the inability to resolve or accurately parameterize eddy subduction in climate models would lead to an accumulation of error in the structure of the main thermocline, even in the relatively-quiescent eastern subtropical gyre.

  1. Eddy resolving modelling of the Gulf of Lions and Catalan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garreau, Pierre; Garnier, Valérie; Schaeffer, Amandine

    2011-07-01

    The generation process of strong long-lived eddies flowing southwestwards along the Catalan slope was revealed through numerical modelling and in situ observations. Careful analyses of a particular event in autumn 2007 demonstrated a link between a "LATEX" eddy, which remained in the southwestern corner of the Gulf of Lions and a "CATALAN" eddy, which moved along the Catalan Shelf, since the death of the former gave birth to the latter. The origin of such eddies was found to be an accumulation of potential energy in the southwestern corner of the Gulf of Lions: under the influence of the negative wind stress curl associated with the Tramontane, a warm and less dense water body can be isolated and fed by a coastal current carrying warm water from the Catalan Sea. In summer, this structure can grow and intensify to generate a strong anticyclonic eddy. After a long period of Tramontane, a burst of southeasterlies and northerlies appeared to detach the "LATEX" eddy, which flowed out of the Gulf of Lions, migrating along the Catalan continental slope and continued into the Balearic Sea as the "CATALAN" eddy.

  2. Mesoscale Eddy - Internal Wave Coupling:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    The issue of internal wave--mesoscale eddy interactions is revisited. Direct estimates of energy transfer from the Local Dynamics Experiment of the PolyMode field program (Polzin, 2010 JPO) return viscosity estimates of ν h \\cong 50 m2 s-1 and ν v + (f2)/(N^2) Kh \\cong 2.5×10-3 m2 s-1. These estimates indicate that mesoscale eddy-internal wave interactions may play an O(1) role in the mesoscale eddy energy budget as dissipation and the internal wave budget as a source. Radiation balance equation formulations for this coupling (Müller 1976, JFM) are examined. In these formulations permanent transfer of energy and internal wave pseudomomentum for mesoscale eddy potential vorticity is enabled by nonlinearity in the wavefield. Revision of radiation balance equation formulations to account for non-local effects returns predictions of ν h \\cong 50-100 m2 s-1 and ν v + (f2)/(N^2) Kh \\cong -1×10-3 to 4×10-3 m2 s-1. The prediction for the effective vertical viscosity is sensitive to how internal wave energy is distributed in the spectral domain with negative values appropriate to the Garrett and Munk spectrum and positive values appropriate to the background spectrum in the LDE area. Geographic scalings in terms of latitude, stratification and mesoscale eddy variability will be described. The process described here is best interpreted as an amplifier of a pre-existing or externally forced finite amplitude wavefield rather than the spontaneous imbalance of a linear field. Energy, pseudomomentum and vorticity can be transfered from the slow manifold (geostrophically balanced motions) to the fast manifold (internal gravity waves) via linear wave propagation in asymmetric background flows, but that transfer is reversible. The permanent transfer is accomplished by nonlinearity on the fast manifold.

  3. Construction of three-dimensional liver tissue models by cell accumulation technique and maintaining their metabolic functions for long-term culture without medium change.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hepatocyte cultures have attracted much attention to obtain high biological functions of hepatocyte for pharmaceutical drug assessment. However, maintaining the high functions for over one month is still a key challenge although many approaches have been reported. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time simple and rapid construction of 3D-hepatocyte constructs by our cell accumulation technique and their high biological functions for one month, without any medium change. The human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) cells were coated with ∼ 7 nm-sized extracellular matrix (ECM) films consisting of fibronectin (FN) and gelatin (G), and then incubated in cell culture insert to construct 3D-tissue constructs for 24 h. The thickness of obtained 3D-HepG2 constructs was easily controlled by altering seeding cell number and the maximum is over 100 μm. When a large volume of culture media was employed, the 3D-constructs showed higher mRNA expression of albumin and some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes as compared to general two-dimensional (2D) culture. Surprisingly, their high cell viabilities (over 80%) and high mRNA expressions were successfully maintained without medium change for at least 27 days. These results demonstrate novel easy and rapid technique to construct 3D-human liver tissue models which can maintain their high functions and viability for 1 month without medium change.

  4. A new climatological oceanic eddy census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Evan; Pascual, Ananda; Pujol, Isabel; Faugère, Yannice; Delepoulle, Antoine; Briol, Frederic

    2015-04-01

    We present a new climatological oceanic eddy census dataset based on gridded sea level anomalies from satellite altimeter observations that is due for release by Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data (AVISO). The identification and automated tracking of oceanic eddies is carried out using the py-eddy-tracker of Mason et al. (2014). Daily outputs of eddy properties (including position, radius, amplitude and nonlinearity) covering the period 1993-2013 over the global domain are presented and discussed. Validation and comparison is made with the published global eddy track database of Chelton et al. (2011).

  5. 3-D residual eddy current field characterisation: applied to diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kieran; Daducci, Alessandro; Kickler, Nils; Lazeyras, Francois; Gruetter, Rolf; Feiweier, Thorsten; Krueger, Gunnar

    2013-08-01

    Clinical use of the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion weighted images is hampered by the geometric distortions that result from the large residual 3-D eddy current field induced. In this work, we aimed to predict, using linear response theory, the residual 3-D eddy current field required for geometric distortion correction based on phantom eddy current field measurements. The predicted 3-D eddy current field induced by the diffusion-weighting gradients was able to reduce the root mean square error of the residual eddy current field to ~1 Hz. The model's performance was tested on diffusion weighted images of four normal volunteers, following distortion correction, the quality of the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion-weighted images was found to have comparable quality to image registration based corrections (FSL) at low b-values. Unlike registration techniques the correction was not hindered by low SNR at high b-values, and results in improved image quality relative to FSL. Characterization of the 3-D eddy current field with linear response theory enables the prediction of the 3-D eddy current field required to correct eddy current induced geometric distortions for a wide range of clinical and high b-value protocols.

  6. Pulsed eddy current thickness measurements of transuranic waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, T.K.; Kunerth, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Thickness measurements on fifty five gallon waste drums for drum integrity purposes have been traditionally performed at the INEL using ultrasonic testing methods. Ultrasonic methods provide high resolution repeatable thickness measurements in a timely manner, however, the major drawback of using ultrasonic techniques is coupling to the drum. Areas with severe exterior corrosion, debonded paper labels or any other obstacle in the acoustic path will have to be omitted from the ultrasonic scan. We have developed a pulsed eddy current scanning system that can take thickness measurements on fifty five gallon carbon steel drums with wall thicknesses up to 65 mils. This type of measurement is not susceptible to the problems mentioned above. Eddy current measurements in the past have excluded ferromagnetic materials such as carbon steel because of the difficulty in penetrating the material and in compensating for changes in permeability from material to material. New developments in data acquisition electronics as well as advances in personal computers have made a pulsed eddy current system practical and inexpensive. Certain aspects of the pulsed eddy current technique as well as the operation of such a system and features such as real time pass/fail thresholds for overpacking identification and full scan data archiving for future evaluation will be discussed.

  7. Influence of anticyclonic eddies on the Biogeochemistry from the Oligotrophic to the Ultraoligotrophic Mediterranean (BOUM cruise)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutin, T.; Prieur, L.

    2012-10-01

    that the eddies are close to an equilibrium state where input is equal to loss. The annual N-input by winter convection, which is a fundamental criterion for new nutrient availability, may be extremely variable inside eddies, with W-MLD varying from 90.5 m at the western station to 396.5 m at the eastern station. W-MLDs are always deeper inside the eddies than outside where they are in keeping with climatological averages. AOU was low inside the eddies; this together with the near-identical export measured at 230 and 460 m seems to indicate that eddy cores are areas where low mineralisation of particulate organic matter occurs. "In" and "out" AOU comparisons indicate lower mineralisation inside the eddies suggesting a higher efficiency for CO2 sequestration via sedimentation of particulate organic matter. The three eddies are enriched in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Sequestration of CO2 by vertical export of accumulated DOC therefore seems to be higher inside eddies. The relative importance of DOC transport in the biological pump is probably one of the main characteristics of low-P low chlorophyll (LPLC) areas, and it is likely to be reinforced inside anticyclonic eddies. The numerous anticyclonic eddies in the MS are likely to influence the water masses and their dispersion, and therefore have a strong impact on the biogeochemical properties at the scale of the MS.

  8. Observed eddy dissipation in the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braby, Laura; Backeberg, Björn C.; Ansorge, Isabelle; Roberts, Michael J.; Krug, Marjolaine; Reason, Chris J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing eddy characteristics from a global data set of automatically tracked eddies for the Agulhas Current in combination with surface drifters as well as geostrophic currents from satellite altimeters, it is shown that eddies from the Mozambique Channel and south of Madagascar dissipate as they approach the Agulhas Current. By tracking the offshore position of the current core and its velocity at 30°S in relation to eddies, it is demonstrated that eddy dissipation occurs through a transfer of momentum, where anticyclones consistently induce positive velocity anomalies, and cyclones reduce the velocities and cause offshore meanders. Composite analyses of the anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddy-current interaction events demonstrate that the positive (negative) velocity anomalies propagate downstream in the Agulhas Current at 44 km/d (23 km/d). Many models are unable to represent these eddy dissipation processes, affecting our understanding of the Agulhas Current.

  9. Observed eddy dissipation in the Agulhas Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braby, Laura; Backeberg, Björn; Ansorge, Isabelle; Roberts, Michael; Krug, Marjolaine; Reason, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Analyzing eddy characteristics from a global data set of automatically tracked eddies for the Agulhas Current in combination with surface drifters as well as geostrophic currents from satellite altimeters, it is shown that eddies from the Mozambique Channel and south of Madagascar dissipate as they approach the Agulhas Current. By tracking the offshore position of the current core and its velocity at 30°S in relation to eddies, it is demonstrated that eddy dissipation occurs through a transfer of momentum, where anticyclones consistently induce positive velocity anomalies, and cyclones reduce the velocities and cause offshore meanders. Composite analyses of the anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddy-current interaction events demonstrate that the positive (negative) velocity anomalies propagate downstream in the Agulhas Current at 44 km/d (23 km/d). Many models are unable to represent these eddy dissipation processes, affecting our understanding of the Agulhas Current.

  10. Coherent mesoscale eddies in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre: 3-D structure and transport with application to the salinity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amores, Angel; Melnichenko, Oleg; Maximenko, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    The mean vertical structure and transport properties of mesoscale eddies are investigated in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre by combining historical records of Argo temperature/salinity profiles and satellite sea level anomaly data in the framework of the eddy tracking technique. The study area is characterized by a low eddy kinetic energy and sea surface salinity maximum. Although eddies have a relatively weak signal at surface (amplitudes around 3-7 cm), the eddy composites reveal a clear deep signal that penetrates down to at least 1200 m depth. The analysis also reveals that the vertical structure of the eddy composites is strongly affected by the background stratification. The horizontal patterns of temperature/salinity anomalies can be reconstructed by a linear combination of a monopole, related to the elevation/depression of the isopycnals in the eddy core, and a dipole, associated with the horizontal advection of the background gradient by the eddy rotation. A common feature of all the eddy composites reconstructed is the phase coherence between the eddy temperature/salinity and velocity anomalies in the upper ˜300 m layer, resulting in the transient eddy transports of heat and salt. As an application, a box model of the near-surface layer is used to estimate the role of mesoscale eddies in maintaining a quasi-steady state distribution of salinity in the North Atlantic subtropical salinity maximum. The results show that mesoscale eddies are able to provide between 4 and 21% of the salt flux out of the area required to compensate for the local excess of evaporation over precipitation.

  11. Eddies in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    The cloud cover over the Southern Ocean occasionally parts as it did on January 1, 2015 just west of the Drake Passage where the VIIRS instrument on the Suomi NPP satellite glimpsed the above collection of ocean-color delineated eddies which have diameters ranging from a couple of kilometers to a couple of hundred kilometers. Recent studies indicate that eddy activity has been increasing in the Southern Ocean with possible implications for climate change. Credit: NASA's OceanColor/Suomi NPP/VIIRS NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  12. Large eddy simulation applications in gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Kevin

    2009-07-28

    The gas turbine presents significant challenges to any computational fluid dynamics techniques. The combination of a wide range of flow phenomena with complex geometry is difficult to model in the context of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers. We review the potential for large eddy simulation (LES) in modelling the flow in the different components of the gas turbine during a practical engineering design cycle. We show that while LES has demonstrated considerable promise for reliable prediction of many flows in the engine that are difficult for RANS it is not a panacea and considerable application challenges remain. However, for many flows, especially those dominated by shear layer mixing such as in combustion chambers and exhausts, LES has demonstrated a clear superiority over RANS for moderately complex geometries although at significantly higher cost which will remain an issue in making the calculations relevant within the design cycle.

  13. Loop Current Eddy formation and baroclinic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, K. A.; Watts, D. R.; Hamilton, P.; Leben, R.; Kennelly, M.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of three Loop Current Eddies, Ekman, Franklin, and Hadal, during the period April 2009 through November 2011 was observed by an array of moored current meters and bottom mounted pressure equipped inverted echo sounders. The array design, areal extent nominally 89° W to 85° W, 25° N to 27° N with 30-50 km mesoscale resolution, permits quantitative mapping of the regional circulation at all depths. During Loop Current Eddy detachment and formation events, a marked increase in deep eddy kinetic energy occurs coincident with the growth of a large-scale meander along the northern and eastern parts of the Loop Current. Deep eddies develop in a pattern where the deep fields were offset and leading upper meanders consistent with developing baroclinic instability. The interaction between the upper and deep fields is quantified by evaluating the mean eddy potential energy budget. Largest down-gradient heat fluxes are found along the eastern side of the Loop Current. Where strong, the horizontal down-gradient eddy heat flux (baroclinic conversion rate) nearly balances the vertical down-gradient eddy heat flux indicating that eddies extract available potential energy from the mean field and convert eddy potential energy to eddy kinetic energy.

  14. Eddy-Current Inspection of Cracking in Land-Based Gas Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, H.; Ogata, T.

    2004-02-01

    There has been a growing need in the electric utility industry to assess the remaining life of blades in gas turbines. It is quite important to nondestructively comprehend the depths of surface-breaking cracks in blades. Flexible eddy current array probes have been developed to overcome the major limitations of existing eddy current inspection systems. The use of an array of sensors allows cracks of all lengths to be detected and will ultimately allow real time data imaging to provide rapid inspection and easy interpretation. For this study using eddy current techniques, crack detection equipment has been developed and applied to gas turbine Stage 1 blades for field use.

  15. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, D. M. D.; Dolman, A. J.; van der Molen, M. K.; van Huissteden, J.

    2008-01-01

    A Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA) is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up in a peat meadow. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2-20×103 m. Statistical testing and a calibration experiment showed high precision (7.8×10-3 ppb) and accuracy (<0.30%) of the instrument, while no drift was observed. The instrument response time was determined to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a 3-axis ultrasonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer for measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instruments were satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates. Due to erroneous measurements, spikes and periods of low turbulence the data series consisted for 26% of gaps. Observed CH4 fluxes consisted mainly of emission, showed a diurnal cycle, but were rather variable over. The average CH4 emission was 29.7 nmol m-2 s-1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission was approximately 80.0 nmol m-2 s-1 and the typical minimum flux was approximately 0.0 nmol m-2 s-1. The correspondence of the measurements with flux chamber measurements in the footprint was good and the observed CH4 emission rates were comparable with eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas. Additionally, three measurement techniques with lower sampling frequencies were simulated, which might give the possibility to measure CH4 fluxes without an external pump and save energy. Disjunct eddy covariance appeared to be the most reliable substitute for 10 Hz eddy covariance, while relaxed eddy accumulation gave reliable estimates of the fluxes over periods in the order of days or weeks.

  16. Vibration attenuation of conductive beams by inducing eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irazu, L.; Elejabarrieta, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    The increasing requirements for structural vibration control in many industries, require innovative attenuation techniques. In this work, the phenomenon of eddy currents is proposed to reduce the vibration of conductive and non-magnetic beam-like structures without modifying the system, neither the weight nor the stiffness. The motion of a conductive material in a stationary magnetic field induces eddy currents, which in turn generate a repulsive force and attenuate the vibration. In this study, the vibrational response of a thin aluminium beam under a partial and stationary magnetic field is analysed. The influence of the eddy currents is experimentally studied in the bandwidth from 0 to 1 kHz and a preliminary numerical model is proposed. The results show the vibration of all the length of the beam can be attenuated by inducing eddy currents, whereas the natural frequencies of the system remain unmodified. The attenuation of the vibration is more remarkable at low frequencies and when the position of the magnetic field coincides with a maximum vibration of a mode.

  17. Eddy Covariance Measurements of the Sea-Spray Aerosol Flu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, I. M.; Norris, S. J.; Yelland, M. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Prytherch, J.

    2015-12-01

    Historically, almost all estimates of the sea-spray aerosol source flux have been inferred through various indirect methods. Direct estimates via eddy covariance have been attempted by only a handful of studies, most of which measured only the total number flux, or achieved rather coarse size segregation. Applying eddy covariance to the measurement of sea-spray fluxes is challenging: most instrumentation must be located in a laboratory space requiring long sample lines to an inlet collocated with a sonic anemometer; however, larger particles are easily lost to the walls of the sample line. Marine particle concentrations are generally low, requiring a high sample volume to achieve adequate statistics. The highly hygroscopic nature of sea salt means particles change size rapidly with fluctuations in relative humidity; this introduces an apparent bias in flux measurements if particles are sized at ambient humidity. The Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) was developed specifically to make high rate measurements of aerosol size distributions for use in eddy covariance measurements, and the instrument and data processing and analysis techniques have been refined over the course of several projects. Here we will review some of the issues and limitations related to making eddy covariance measurements of the sea spray source flux over the open ocean, summarise some key results from the last decade, and present new results from a 3-year long ship-based measurement campaign as part of the WAGES project. Finally we will consider requirements for future progress.

  18. Eddy covariance based methane flux in Sundarbans mangroves, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Chandra Shekhar; Rodda, Suraj Reddy; Thumaty, Kiran Chand; Raha, A. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-06-01

    We report the initial results of the methane flux measured using eddy covariance method during summer months from the world's largest mangrove ecosystem, Sundarbans of India. Mangrove ecosystems are known sources for methane (CH4) having very high global warming potential. In order to quantify the methane flux in mangroves, an eddy covariance flux tower was recently erected in the largest unpolluted and undisturbed mangrove ecosystem in Sundarbans (India). The tower is equipped with eddy covariance flux tower instruments to continuously measure methane fluxes besides the mass and energy fluxes. This paper presents the preliminary results of methane flux variations during summer months (i.e., April and May 2012) in Sundarbans mangrove ecosystem. The mean concentrations of CH4 emission over the study period was 1682 ± 956 ppb. The measured CH4 fluxes computed from eddy covariance technique showed that the study area acts as a net source for CH4 with daily mean flux of 150.22 ± 248.87 mg m-2 day-1. The methane emission as well as its flux showed very high variability diurnally. Though the environmental conditions controlling methane emission is not yet fully understood, an attempt has been made in the present study to analyse the relationships of methane efflux with tidal activity. This present study is part of Indian Space Research Organisation-Geosphere Biosphere Program (ISRO-GBP) initiative under `National Carbon Project'.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging inside cylindrical metal containers with an eddy current self-compensated method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hui; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements inside cylindrical metal structures have recently been proposed and form the basis for new high-pressure MRI studies. The critical problem for MRI inside cylindrical metal structures is significant eddy currents induced by the switched magnetic field gradients, which usually corrupt spatial and motion encoding without appropriate correction. In this work a so-called standard SPRITE (single point ramped imaging with T1 enhancement) technique is applied for imaging inside cylindrical metal structures. We show that the standard SPRITE technique is fundamentally immune to large-scale eddy current effects and yields artifact-free high-quality images with no eddy current correction required. Standard SPRITE image acquisition avoids the complications involved in the measurement and compensation of eddy current effects for MRI with cylindrical metal structures. This work is a substantial advance toward the extension of MRI to new challenging systems, which are of practical importance.

  20. Formation of the Haida-1998 oceanic eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, W. R.; Cherniawsky, J. Y.; Foreman, M. G. G.; Gower, J. F. R.

    2002-07-01

    Two large, mesoscale, anticyclonic eddies formed along the west coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands of western Canada in early 1998. Altimetry measurements from TOPEX/Poseidon and ERS-2 satellites suggest that these eddies first appeared near Cape St. James at the southern tip of the islands. The eddies merged in June to form ``Haida-1998,'' the highest eddy ever observed in the region. Currents near Cape St. James in winter follow complicated patterns attributed to tidal rectification and pressure-driven outflow from Hecate Strait. The adjustment of these flows to the bathymetric features likely contributes to the formation of Haida Eddies. Eddies that first appear farther north along the west coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands are set up by other processes, such as baroclinic instability.

  1. Evaluation and Improvement of Eddy Current Position Sensors in Magnetically Suspended Flywheel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Thomas, Erwin M., III; Jansen, Ralph H.; McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Soeder, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Eddy current position sensor performance is evaluated for use in a high-speed flywheel development system. The flywheel utilizes a five axis active magnetic bearing system. The eddy current sensors are used for position feedback for the bearing controller. Measured characteristics include sensitivity to multiple target materials and susceptibility to noise from the magnetic bearings and from sensor-to-sensor crosstalk. Improvements in axial sensor configuration and techniques for noise reduction are described.

  2. Quantitative void fraction measurement with an eddy current flowmeter for generation IV Sodium cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Tordjeman, Ph.; Bergez, W.; Cavaro, M.; Paumel, K.; Jeannot, J.P.

    2015-07-01

    This study was carried out to understand the response of an eddy current type flowmeter in two phase liquid-metal flow. We use the technique of ellipse fit and correlate the fluctuations in the angle of inclination of this ellipse with the void fraction. The effects of physical parameters such as coil excitation frequency and flow velocity have been studied. The results show the possibility of using an eddy current flowmeter as a gas detector for large void fractions. (authors)

  3. Quantitative void fraction detection with an eddy current flowmeter for generation IV Sodium cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Tordjeman, Ph.; Bergez, W.; Cavaro, M.; Paumel, K.; Jeannot, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    This study was carried out to understand the response of an eddy current type flowmeter in two phase liquid-metal flow. We use the technique of ellipse fit and correlate the fluctuations in the angle of inclination of this ellipse with the void fraction. The effects of physical parameters such as coil excitation frequency and flow velocity have been studied. The results show the possibility of using an eddy current flowmeter as a gas detector for large void fractions. (authors)

  4. Observations of Three Dimensional Surfzone Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. L.; Henderson, S. M.; Solovitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the vertical structure of surfzone eddies (frequencies 0.0005-0.01 Hz). From 16 Oct to 07 Nov 2011, an array of 12 Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADPs) measured velocity profiles in 0-6 m water depth on a natural beach near Duck, North Carolina. We will analyze and describe vertical variations in eddy velocity. Vertical variability of eddy magnitude will be presented, as well as coherence and phase between near-surface and near-bed velocities. We aim to shed light on the causes and consequences of vertical eddy variability, which has recently been recognized in observations, but is not yet well understood.

  5. Using eddy currents for noninvasive in vivo pH monitoring for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E; Daschner, Frank; Christofzik, David W; Knöchel, Reinhard; Wiltfang, Jörg; Becker, Stephan T

    2015-03-01

    The metabolic processes that regulate bone healing and bone induction in tissue engineering models are not fully understood. Eddy current excitation is widely used in technical approaches and in the food industry. The aim of this study was to establish eddy current excitation for monitoring metabolic processes during heterotopic osteoinduction in vivo. Hydroxyapatite scaffolds were implanted into the musculus latissimus dorsi of six rats. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) was applied 1 and 2 weeks after implantation. Weekly eddy current excitation measurements were performed. Additionally, invasive pH measurements were obtained from the scaffolds using fiber optic detection devices. Correlations between the eddy current measurements and the metabolic values were calculated. The eddy current measurements and pH values decreased significantly in the first 2 weeks of the study, followed by a steady increase and stabilization at higher levels towards the end of the study. The measurement curves and statistical evaluations indicated a significant correlation between the resonance frequency values of the eddy current excitation measurements and the observed pH levels (p = 0.0041). This innovative technique was capable of noninvasively monitoring metabolic processes in living tissues according to pH values, showing a direct correlation between eddy current excitation and pH in an in vivo tissue engineering model.

  6. Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulations Using High-resolution Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, B.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Bailey, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Inaccurate parameterization of sub-grid eddies can cause excessive damping and spurious diapycnal mixing, especially in high-resolution [O(10km)] ocean models. The Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulation (MOLES) approach provides a framework for developing resolution- and flow-adaptive parameterizations of eddy effects. Large eddy simulation techniques are commonly used to simulate 3D turbulence, and MOLES is modified to be appropriate for the more two-dimensional nature of mesoscale ocean turbulence. However, the effect of MOLES in high-resolution ocean models has not been investigated extensively. We will contrast results, and cost, from a suite of idealized simulations of frontal spin-down (MITgcm) and from high-resolution global climate models (0.1o, POP2), under a variety of eddy parameterizations. These include MOLES based upon 2D turbulence theory, MOLES based upon quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence theory, and traditional biharmonic schemes. The idealized simulations show that MOLES (particularly QG) improves the spectral slopes of energy and enstrophy near the grid-scale when compared to more traditional eddy parameterizations, across a range of grid resolutions. In the high-resolution global climate model we compare the effect of different parameterizations on the spectral characteristics of the simulated flow, and on the large-scale transport. Using MOLES in a climate model results in greater energy and variability near the grid scale, and this produces a flow, which, spectrally, is more consistent with an inertial turbulent cascade and observations of eddy behavior.

  7. Eddy current system for inspection of train hollow axles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, Tomasz; Psuj, Grzegorz; Sikora, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Spychalski, Ireneusz

    2014-02-01

    The structural integrity of wheelsets used in rolling stock is of great importance to the safety. In this paper, electromagnetic system with an eddy current transducer suitable for the inspection of hollow axles have been presented. The transducer was developed to detect surface braking defects having depth not smaller than 0.5 mm. Ultrasound technique can be utilized to inspect the whole axle, but it is not sufficiently sensitive to shallow defects located close to the surface. Therefore, the electromagnetic technique is proposed to detect surface breaking cracks that cannot be detected by ultrasonic technique.

  8. Eddy current system for inspection of train hollow axles

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, Tomasz; Psuj, Grzegorz; Sikora, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Spychalski, Ireneusz

    2014-02-18

    The structural integrity of wheelsets used in rolling stock is of great importance to the safety. In this paper, electromagnetic system with an eddy current transducer suitable for the inspection of hollow axles have been presented. The transducer was developed to detect surface braking defects having depth not smaller than 0.5 mm. Ultrasound technique can be utilized to inspect the whole axle, but it is not sufficiently sensitive to shallow defects located close to the surface. Therefore, the electromagnetic technique is proposed to detect surface breaking cracks that cannot be detected by ultrasonic technique.

  9. Instantaneous Wavelet Energetic Transfers between Atmospheric Blocking and Local Eddies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Aimé

    2005-07-01

    A new wavelet energetics technique, based on best-shift orthonormal wavelet analysis (OWA) of an instantaneous synoptic map, is constructed for diagnosing nonlinear kinetic energy (KE) transfers in five observed blocking cases. At least 90% of the longitudinal variance of time and latitude band mean 50-kPa geopotential is reconstructed by only two wavelets using best shift. This superior efficiency to the standard OWAs persists for time-evolving structures. The cases comprise two categories, respectively dominated by zonal-wavenumber sets {1} and {1, 2}. Further OWA of instantaneous residual nonblocking structures, combined with new “nearness” criteria, yields three more orthogonal components, representing smaller-scale eddies near the block (upstream and downstream) and distant structures. This decomposition fulfills a vision expressed to the author by Saltzman. Such a decomposition is not obtainable by simple Fourier analysis.Eddy patterns apparent in the components' contours suggest inferring geostrophic energetic interactions, but the component Rossby numbers may be too large to support the inference. However, a new result enabled by this method is the instantaneous attribution of blocking strain-field effects to particular energetically interactive eddies, consistent with Shutts' hypothesis. Such attribution was only possible before in simplified models or in a time-average sense. In four of five blocks, the upstream eddies feed KE to the block, which in turn, in three of four cases, transmits KE to the downstream eddies. The small case size precludes statistically significant conclusions. The appendixes link low-order blocking structure and dynamics to some wavelet design principles and propose a new interaction diagnosis, similar to E-vector analysis, but instantaneous.

  10. On the response to tropical cyclones in mesoscale oceanic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes, Benjamin

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) often change intensity as they move over mesoscale oceanic features, as a function of the oceanic mixed layer (OML) thermal response (cooling) to the storm's wind stress. For example, observational evidence indicates that TCs in the Gulf of Mexico rapidly weaken over cyclonic cold core eddies (CCEs) where the cooling response is enhanced, and they rapidly intensify over anticyclonic warm features such as the Loop Current (LC) and Warm Core Eddies (WCEs) where OML cooling is reduced. Understanding this contrasting thermal response has important implications for oceanic feedback to TCs' intensity in forecasting models. Based on numerical experimentation and data acquired during hurricanes Katrina and Rita, this dissertation delineates the contrasting velocity and thermal response to TCs in mesoscale oceanic eddies. Observational evidence and model results indicate that, during the forced stage, the wind-driven horizontal current divergence under the storm's eye is affected by the underlying geostrophic circulation. Upwelling (downwelling) regimes develop when the wind stress vector is with (against) the geostrophic OML velocity vector. During the relaxation stage, background geostrophic circulations modulate vertical dispersion of OML near-inertial energy. The near-inertial velocity response is subsequently shifted toward more sub-inertial frequencies inside WCEs, where rapid vertical dispersion prevents accumulation of kinetic energy in the OML that reduces vertical shears and layer cooling. By contrast, near-inertial oscillations are vertically trapped in OMLs inside CCEs that increases vertical shears and entrainment. Estimates of downward vertical radiation of near-inertial wave energies were significantly stronger in the LC bulge (12.1x10-2 W m-2) compared to that in CCEs (1.8x10-2 W m-2). The rotational and translation properties of the geostrophic eddies have an important impact on the internal wave wake produced by TCs. More near

  11. Video Analysis of Eddy Structures from Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present a method of analyzing turbulent eddy structures in explosive volcanic eruptions using high definition video. Film from the eruption of Sakurajima on 25 September 2011 was analyzed using a modified version of FlowJ, a Java-based toolbox released by National Institute of Health. Using the Lucas and Kanade algorithm with a Gaussian derivative gradient, it tracks the change in pixel position over a 23 image buffer to determine the optical flow. This technique assumes that the optical flow, which is the apparent motion of the pixels, is equivalent to the actual flow field. We calculated three flow fields per second for the duration of the video. FlowJ outputs flow fields in pixels per frame that were then converted to meters per second in Matlab using a known distance and video rate. We constructed a low pass filter using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and critical point analysis to identify the underlying eddy structure with boundaries determined by tracing the flow lines. We calculated the area of each eddy and noted its position over a series of velocity fields. The changes in shape and position were tracked to determine the eddy growth rate and overall eddy rising velocity. The eddies grow in size 1.5 times quicker than they rise vertically. Presently, this method is most successful in high contrast videos when there is little to no effect of wind on the plumes. Additionally, the pixel movement from the video images represents a 2D flow with no depth, while the actual flow is three dimensional; we are continuing to develop an algorithm that will allow 3D reprojection of the 2D data. Flow in the y-direction lessens the overall velocity magnitude as the true flow motion has larger y-direction component. POD, which only uses the pattern of the flow, and analysis of the critical points (points where flow is zero) is used to determine the shape of the eddies. The method allows for video recorded at remote distances to be used to study eruption dynamics

  12. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  13. Ingredients of the Eddy Soup: A Geometric Decomposition of Eddy-Mean Flow Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterman, S.; Lilly, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding eddy-mean flow interactions is a long-standing problem in geophysical fluid dynamics with modern relevance to the task of representing eddy effects in coarse resolution models while preserving their dependence on the underlying dynamics of the flow field. Exploiting the recognition that the velocity covariance matrix/eddy stress tensor that describes eddy fluxes, also encodes information about eddy size, shape and orientation through its geometric representation in the form of the so-called variance ellipse, suggests a potentially fruitful way forward. Here we present a new framework that describes eddy-mean flow interactions in terms of a geometric description of the eddy motion, and illustrate it with an application to an unstable jet. Specifically we show that the eddy vorticity flux divergence F, a key dynamical quantity describing the average effect of fluctuations on the time-mean flow, may be decomposed into two components with distinct geometric interpretations: 1. variations in variance ellipse orientation; and 2. variations in the anisotropic part of the eddy kinetic energy, a function of the variance ellipse size and shape. Application of the divergence theorem shows that F integrated over a region is explained entirely by variations in these two quantities around the region's periphery. This framework has the potential to offer new insights into eddy-mean flow interactions in a number of ways. It identifies the ingredients of the eddy motion that have a mean flow forcing effect, it links eddy effects to spatial patterns of variance ellipse geometry that can suggest the mechanisms underpinning these effects, and finally it illustrates the importance of resolving eddy shape and orientation, and not just eddy size/energy, to accurately represent eddy feedback effects. These concepts will be both discussed and illustrated.

  14. Toward large eddy simulation of turbulent flow over an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon

    1993-01-01

    The flow field over an airfoil contains several distinct flow characteristics, e.g. laminar, transitional, turbulent boundary layer flow, flow separation, unstable free shear layers, and a wake. This diversity of flow regimes taxes the presently available Reynolds averaged turbulence models. Such models are generally tuned to predict a particular flow regime, and adjustments are necessary for the prediction of a different flow regime. Similar difficulties are likely to emerge when the large eddy simulation technique is applied with the widely used Smagorinsky model. This model has not been successful in correctly representing different turbulent flow fields with a single universal constant and has an incorrect near-wall behavior. Germano et al. (1991) and Ghosal, Lund & Moin have developed a new subgrid-scale model, the dynamic model, which is very promising in alleviating many of the persistent inadequacies of the Smagorinsky model: the model coefficient is computed dynamically as the calculation progresses rather than input a priori. The model has been remarkably successful in prediction of several turbulent and transitional flows. We plan to simulate turbulent flow over a '2D' airfoil using the large eddy simulation technique. Our primary objective is to assess the performance of the newly developed dynamic subgrid-scale model for computation of complex flows about aircraft components and to compare the results with those obtained using the Reynolds average approach and experiments. The present computation represents the first application of large eddy simulation to a flow of aeronautical interest and a key demonstration of the capabilities of the large eddy simulation technique.

  15. Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brodie; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Bachman, Scott; Bryan, Frank

    2015-11-01

    The highest resolution global climate models (GCMs) can now resolve the largest scales of mesoscale dynamics in the ocean. This has the potential to increase the fidelity of GCMs. However, the effects of the smallest, unresolved, scales of mesoscale dynamics must still be parametrized. One such family of parametrizations are mesoscale ocean large eddy simulations (MOLES), but the effects of including MOLES in a GCM are not well understood. In this presentation, several MOLES schemes are implemented in a mesoscale-resolving GCM (CESM), and the resulting flow is compared with that produced by more traditional sub-grid parametrizations. Large eddy simulation (LES) is used to simulate flows where the largest scales of turbulent motion are resolved, but the smallest scales are not resolved. LES has traditionally been used to study 3D turbulence, but recently it has also been applied to idealized 2D and quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence. The MOLES presented here are based on 2D and QG LES schemes.

  16. Biogeochemical characteristics of a long-lived anticyclonic eddy in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Bravo, L.; Ramos, M.; Pizarro, O.; Karstensen, J.; Gallegos, M.; Correa-Ramirez, M.; Silva, N.; Farias, L.; Karp-Boss, L.

    2015-09-01

    Eastern boundary upwelling systems are characterized by high productivity that often leads to subsurface hypoxia on the shelf. Mesoscale eddies are important, frequent, and persistent features of circulation in these regions, transporting physical, chemical and biological properties from shelves to the open ocean. In austral fall of 2011, during the Tara Oceans expedition, a subsurface layer (200-400 m) in which the concentration of oxygen was very low (< 2 μmol kg-1 of O2) was observed in the eastern South Pacific, ~ 900 km offshore (30° S, 81° W). Satellite altimetry combined with CTD observations associated the local oxygen anomaly with an intrathermocline, anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy with a diameter of about 150 km. The eddy contained Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) that at this latitude is normally restricted near the coast. Undersaturation (44 %) of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrite accumulation (> 0.5 μM) gave evidence for denitrification in this water mass. Based on satellite altimetry, we tracked the eddy back to its region of formation on the coast of central Chile (36.1° S, 74.6° W). We estimate that the eddy formed in April 2010. Field studies conducted on the Chilean shelf in June 2010 provided approximate information on initial O2 and N2O concentrations of "source water" in the region at the time of eddy formation. Concentrations of both O2 and N2O in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the offshore eddy were lower than its surroundings or "source water" on the shelf, suggesting that these chemical species were consumed as the eddy moved offshore. Estimates of apparent oxygen utilization rates at the OMZ of the eddy ranged from 0.29 to 44 nmol L-1 d-1 and the rate of N2O consumption was 3.92 nmol L-1 d-1. Our results show that mesoscale eddies in the ESP not only transport physical properties of the ESSW from the coast to the ocean interior, but also export and transform biogeochemical properties, creating suboxic environments in the oligotrophic

  17. Diapycnal mixing by meso-scale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Carsten; Greatbatch, Richard J.

    The mean available potential energy released by baroclinic instability into the meso-scale eddy field has to be dissipated in some way and Tandon and Garrett [Tandon, A., Garrett, C., 1996. On a recent parameterization of mesoscale eddies. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 26 (3), 406-416] suggested that this dissipation could ultimately involve irreversible mixing of buoyancy by molecular processes at the small-scale end of the turbulence cascade. We revisit this idea and argue that the presence of dissipation within the thermocline automatically requires that a component of the eddy flux associated with meso-scale eddies must be associated with irreversible mixing of buoyancy within the thermocline. We offer a parameterisation of the implied diapycnal diffusivity based on (i) the dissipation rate for eddy kinetic energy given by the meso-scale eddy closure of Eden and Greatbatch [Eden, C., Greatbatch, R.J., 2008. Towards a meso-scale eddy closure. Ocean Modell. 20, 223-239.] and (ii) a fixed mixing efficiency. The implied eddy-induced diapycnal diffusivity ( κ) is implemented in a coarse resolution model of the North Atlantic. In contrast to the vertical diffusivity given by a standard vertical mixing scheme, large lateral inhomogeneities can be found for κ in the interior of the ocean. In general, κ is large, i.e. up to o(10) cm 2/s, near the western boundaries and almost vanishing in the interior of the ocean.

  18. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport.

  19. Temporal evolution of Townsend's attached eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Jimenez, Javier

    2013-11-01

    The temporal evolution of the eddies responsible for the momentum transfer in a turbulent channel are studied using time-resolved DNS data at Reτ = 4000 . The eddies are identified as connected regions of intense tangential Reynolds stress, and tracked in time. Once their evolutions are properly organized, they provide the necessary information to characterize eddies from birth to death. Eddies are born at all distances from the wall, although with higher probability near it, where the shear is strongest. Most of them stay small and do not last for long times. However, there is a family of eddies that become large enough to get attached to the wall while they reach into the logarithmic layer. They can be considered the best candidates for Townsend's attached eddies found until now. They are geometrically self-similar, with sizes and lifetimes proportional to their distance from the wall. Eddies associated with ejections move away from the wall with dy / dt =uτ , and their base attaches very fast at the beginning of their lives. Conversely, sweeps move towards the wall at -uτ , and attach later. In both cases, they remain attached for 2 / 3 of their lives. In the streamwise direction, eddies are advected and sheared by the local mean velocity. Funded by ERC, CICYT and Spanish Ministry of Science.

  20. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-11-30

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport.

  1. Mesoscale Eddies in the Solomon Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. G.; Kessler, W. S.; McWilliams, J. C.; Molemaker, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Water mass transformation in the strong equatorward flows through the Solomon Sea influences the properties of the Equatorial Undercurrent and subsequent cold tongue upwelling. High eddy activity in the interior Solomon Sea seen in altimetric sea surface height (SSH) and in several models may provide a mechanism for these transformations. We investigate these effects using a mesoscale (4-km resolution) sigma-coordinate (ROMS) model of the Solomon Sea nested in a basin solution, forced by a repeating seasonal cycle, and evaluated against observational data. The model generates a vigorous upper layer eddy field; some of these are apparently shed as the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent threads through the complex topography of the region, others are independent of the strong western boundary current. We diagnose the scales and vertical structure of the eddies in different parts of the Solomon Sea to illuminate their generation processes and propagation characteristics, and compare these to observed eddy statistics. Hypotheses tested are that the Solomon Sea mesoscale eddies are generated locally by baroclinic instability, that the eddies are shed as the South Equatorial Current passes around and through the Solomon Island chain, that eddies are generated by the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent, or that eddies occurring outside of the Solomon Sea propagate into the Solomon Sea. These different mechanisms have different implications for the resulting mixing and property fluxes. They also provide different interpretations for SSH signals observed from satellites (e.g., that will be observed by the upcoming SWOT satellite).

  2. Birth of a Loop Current Eddy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-24

    The northern portion of the Gulf of Mexico Loop Current, shown in red, appears about to detach a large ring of current, creating a separate eddy. An eddy is a large, warm, clockwise-spinning vortex of water -- the ocean version of a cyclone.

  3. Modelling the generation of Haida Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lorenzo, E.; Foreman, M. G. G.; Crawford, W. R.

    2005-04-01

    A numerical model forced with average annual cycles of climatological winds, surface heat flux, and temperature and salinity along the open boundaries is used to demonstrate that Haida Eddies are typically generated each winter off Cape St. James, at the southern tip of the Queen Charlotte Islands of western Canada. Annual cycles of sea-surface elevation measured at coastal tide gauges and TOPEX/POSEIDON crossover locations are reproduced with reasonable accuracy. Model sensitivity studies show that Haida Eddies are baroclinic in nature and are generated by the merging of several smaller eddies that have been formed to the west of Cape St. James. The generation mechanism does not require the existence of instability processes and is associated with the mean advection of warmer and fresher water masses around the cape from Hecate Strait and from the southeast. These advected water masses generate plumes of buoyant flow, which intensify and sustain small patches of anticyclonic circulation immediately to the northwest of the cape. When the flow is stronger, several of these smaller eddies can merge to generate a larger eddy, the Haida Eddy. Similar to observations, a typical generation-shedding cycle for larger Haida Eddies in the model is 3-4 months. Consistent with previous in situ water property measurements, these experiments show that the eddies are generally comprised of mixed-layer water from Hecate Strait, Queen Charlotte Sound, and the continental shelves off northern Vancouver Island. Their vertical extent during the mature stage is roughly 1000 m.

  4. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  5. Exploring Eddy-Covariance Measurements Using a Spatial Approach: The Eddy Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, Christian; Bernhofer, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis states that "standard" eddy-covariance measurements of fluxes at a fixed location can replace a spatial ensemble of instantaneous values at multiple locations. For testing this hypothesis, a unique turbulence measurement set-up was used for two measurement campaigns over desert (Namibia) and grassland (Germany) in 2012. This "Eddy Matrix" combined nine ultrasonic anemometer-thermometers and 17 thermocouples in a 10 m × 10 m regular grid with 2.5-m grid distance. The instantaneous buoyancy flux derived from the spatial eddy covariance of the Eddy Matrix was highly variable in time (from -0.3 to 1 m K s^{-1}). However, the 10-min average reflected 83 % of the reference eddy-covariance flux with a good correlation. By introducing a combined eddy-covariance method (the spatial eddy covariance plus the additional flux of the temporal eddy covariance of the spatial mean values), the mean flux increases by 9 % relative to the eddy-covariance reference. Considering the typical underestimation of fluxes by the standard eddy-covariance method, this is seen as an improvement. Within the limits of the Eddy Matrix, Taylor's hypothesis is supported by the results.

  6. Design and Development of Rogowski Coil Sensors for Eddy Currents Measurement on Toroidal Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, N. Ravi; Flora, Kanikdeep; Babu, Rajan; Gangradey, R.; Patel, H. K.

    2013-04-01

    In tokamak, eddy currents are produced due to change in plasma positions during plasma instabilities that result into generation of electromagnetic forces on interaction with the induced currents. Measurement of this current is essential to design a mechanical structure that can withstand this force. Principle objective of this paper is the development of Rogowski coil sensor to measure eddy currents on a toroidal vessel. The paper presents an elaborative and practical construction technique of a Rogowski coil. The calibration method for the Rogowski coil is also presented. Rogowski coils as an eddy currents diagnostics are tested and experiments to measure induced currents on the toroidal vessel are performed using the coils. Experimental values of eddy currents are compared with the ANSYS simulation results.

  7. Depth sizing of intergranular attack with multi-frequency analysis of eddy current data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jia; Horn, Dag

    2014-02-01

    Depth sizing of intergranular attack (IGA) with conventional eddy-current analysis is difficult, and typically gives results of poor accuracy. This paper presents a sizing technique using multi-frequency analysis for bobbin probe and X-Probe eddy-current data, along with a case study of outer-surface IGA in 0.510" (12.95 mm) diameter, 0.044" (1.12 mm) wall Alloy 600 tubing. A mathematical framework for the expected eddy-current phase and amplitude response is provided. Using this formulation, eddy-current amplitude and phase responses at four inspection frequencies are calculated, and compared to the corresponding measured responses. IGA flaw geometry is approximated through the optimization of flaw parameters via a least-squares minimization of the residual from the comparison.

  8. Negative Magnetic Eddy Diffusivities from the Test-field Method and Multiscale Stability Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrievsky, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel; Noullez, Alain; Zheligovsky, Vladislav

    2015-10-01

    The generation of a large-scale magnetic field in the kinematic regime in the absence of an α-effect is investigated by following two different approaches: the test-field method and the multiscale stability theory relying on the homogenization technique. Our computations of the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor of the parity-invariant flow IV of G. O. Roberts and the modified Taylor-Green flow confirm the findings of previous studies and also explain some of their apparent contradictions. The two flows have large symmetry groups; this is used to considerably simplify the eddy diffusivity tensor. Finally, a new analytic result is presented: upon expressing the eddy diffusivity tensor in terms of solutions to auxiliary problems for the adjoint operator, we derive relations between the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensors that arise for mutually reverse small-scale flows {\\boldsymbol{v}}(x) and -{\\boldsymbol{v}}(x).

  9. Wind changes above warm Agulhas Current eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouault, M.; Verley, P.; Backeberg, B.

    2016-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) estimated from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E onboard the Aqua satellite and altimetry-derived sea level anomalies are used south of the Agulhas Current to identify warm-core mesoscale eddies presenting a distinct SST perturbation greater than to 1 °C to the surrounding ocean. The analysis of twice daily instantaneous charts of equivalent stability-neutral wind speed estimates from the SeaWinds scatterometer onboard the QuikScat satellite collocated with SST for six identified eddies shows stronger wind speed above the warm eddies than the surrounding water in all wind directions, if averaged over the lifespan of the eddies, as was found in previous studies. However, only half of the cases showed higher wind speeds above the eddies at the instantaneous scale; 20 % of cases had incomplete data due to partial global coverage by the scatterometer for one path. For cases where the wind is stronger above warm eddies, there is no relationship between the increase in surface wind speed and the SST perturbation, but we do find a linear relationship between the decrease in wind speed from the centre to the border of the eddy downstream and the SST perturbation. SST perturbations range from 1 to 6 °C for a mean eddy SST of 15.9 °C and mean SST perturbation of 2.65 °C. The diameter of the eddies range from 100 to 250 km. Mean background wind speed is about 12 m s-1 (mostly southwesterly to northwesterly) and ranging mainly from 4 to 16 m s-1. The mean wind increase is about 15 %, which corresponds to 1.8 m s-1. A wind speed increase of 4 to 7 m s-1 above warm eddies is not uncommon. Cases where the wind did not increase above the eddies or did not decrease downstream had higher wind speeds and occurred during a cold front associated with intense cyclonic low-pressure systems, suggesting certain synoptic conditions need to be met to allow for the development of wind speed anomalies over warm-core ocean eddies. In many cases

  10. Linkages between controlled floods, eddy sandbar dynamics, and riparian vegetation along the Colorado River in Marble Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, E. R.; Grams, P. E.; Hazel, J. E., Jr.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Controlled floods are released from Glen Canyon Dam to build and maintain eddy sandbars along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. Long-term monitoring shows that the topographic response to controlled floods varies considerably between eddies, likely reflecting different geometric configurations and flow hydraulics. Differences in eddy sandbar response also reflect the degree of vegetation establishment since the 1980s when reservoir spills more than double the magnitude of controlled floods cleared most sandbars of vegetation. Here we explore the geomorphology of sandbar responses in the context of controlled floods, debris fan-eddy geometry, and riparian vegetation establishment. In Marble Canyon, the proportion of eddy area stabilized by vegetation is negatively correlated with water surface slope and the rate of stage change with discharge. Less vegetated sites are more dynamic; they tend to build open sandbars during controlled floods and show greater topographic variability in the eddy compared to the main channel. In contrast, deposition of open sandbars is limited where vegetation establishment has decreased channel width, altering the pattern of eddy recirculation and sediment redistribution. In these locations, deposition during controlled floods is more akin to floodplain sedimentation, and the elevation of vegetated bar surfaces increases with successive floods. Changes in sand storage in the main channel are greater than storage change in the eddy at these lower gradient sites, and controlled floods tend to evacuate sand that has accumulated on the bed. The degree to which vegetation has stabilized sandbar surfaces may thus provide a proxy for different hydraulic conditions and a better canyon-wide assessment of controlled flood response. Our results apply primarily to large eddies in Marble Canyon, and ongoing flow modeling and vegetation composition mapping will allow further assessment of eddy sandbar-riparian vegetation interactions

  11. Intense submesoscale upwelling in anticyclonic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannigan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations from around the global ocean show that enhanced biological activity can be found in anticyclonic eddies. This may mean that upwelling of nutrient-rich water occurs within the eddy, but such upwelling is not captured by models that resolve mesoscale processes. High-resolution simulations presented here show intense submesoscale upwelling from the thermocline to the mixed layer in anticyclonic eddies. The properties of the upwelling are consistent with a process known as symmetric instability. A simple limiting nutrient experiment shows that this upwelling can drive much higher biological activity in anticyclonic eddies when there is a high nutrient concentration in the thermocline. An estimate for the magnitude of upwelling associated with symmetric instability in anticyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea shows that it may be of comparable magnitude to other processes, though further work is required to understand the full implications for basin-scale nutrient budgets.

  12. Eddy Generation by a Steady Poleward Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durland, T. S.; Pedlosky, J.; Spall, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    The energetic eddy field coincident with the South Equatorial Current (SEC) in the eastern Indian Ocean has been variously attributed to baroclinic instability of the SEC, barotropic instability of the SEC and shedding of eddies by the branch of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) entering the basin through Timor Passage. We present an additional mechanism by demonstrating that in an idealized numerical model, a steady poleward outflow (meant to simulate the Lombok Strait branch of the ITF) can generate an eddy field with spatial and temporal patterns that bear a remarkable resemblance to observations of sea surface height varibility in the region. A simple conceptual model will be presented which links the nonlinear, eddy-generating dynamics to linear dynamics, thus making possible the prediction of eddy amplitudes and periodicity for a wide range of outflow latitudes and volume fluxes.

  13. Eddy current analysis in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1988-06-01

    In magnetic fusion devices, particularly tokamaks and reversed field pinch (RFP) experiments, time-varying magnetic fields are in intimate contact with electrically conducting components of the device. Induced currents, fields, forces, and torques result. This note reviews the analysis of eddy current effects in the following systems: Interaction of a tokamak plasma with the eddy currents in the first wall, blanket, and shield (FWBS) systems; Eddy currents in a complex but two-dimensional vacuum vessel, as in TFTR, JET, and JT-60; Eddy currents in the FWBS system of a tokamak reactor, such as NET, FER, or ITER; and Eddy currents in a RFP shell. The cited studies are chosen to be illustrative, rather than exhaustive. 42 refs.

  14. A turnkey data logger program for field-scale energy flux density measurements using eddy covariance and surface renewal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Micrometeorological methods and ecosystem-scale energy and mass flux density measurements have become increasingly important in soil, agricultural, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Eddy cov...

  15. Observational evidence of seasonality in the timing of loop current eddy separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cody A.; Leben, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    Observational datasets, reports and analyses over the time period from 1978 through 1992 are reviewed to derive pre-altimetry Loop Current (LC) eddy separation dates. The reanalysis identified 20 separation events in the 15-year record. Separation dates are estimated to be accurate to approximately ± 1.5 months and sufficient to detect statistically significant LC eddy separation seasonality, which was not the case for previously published records because of the misidentification of separation events and their timing. The reanalysis indicates that previously reported LC eddy separation dates, determined for the time period before the advent of continuous altimetric monitoring in the early 1990s, are inaccurate because of extensive reliance on satellite sea surface temperature (SST) imagery. Automated LC tracking techniques are used to derive LC eddy separation dates in three different altimetry-based sea surface height (SSH) datasets over the time period from 1993 through 2012. A total of 28-30 LC eddy separation events were identified in the 20-year record. Variations in the number and dates of eddy separation events are attributed to the different mean sea surfaces and objective-analysis smoothing procedures used to produce the SSH datasets. Significance tests on various altimetry and pre-altimetry/altimetry combined date lists consistently show that the seasonal distribution of separation events is not uniform at the 95% confidence level. Randomization tests further show that the seasonal peak in LC eddy separation events in August and September is highly unlikely to have occurred by chance. The other seasonal peak in February and March is less significant, but possibly indicates two seasons of enhanced probability of eddy separation centered near the spring and fall equinoxes. This is further quantified by objectively dividing the seasonal distribution into two seasons using circular statistical techniques and a k-means clustering algorithm. The estimated

  16. Consequences of Advanced Glycation End Products Accumulation in Chronic Kidney Disease and Clinical Usefulness of Their Assessment Using a Non-invasive Technique - Skin Autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Oleniuc, Mihaela; Secara, Irina; Onofriescu, Mihai; Hogas, Simona; Voroneanu, Luminita; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Covic, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Accelerated formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products occur under circumstances of increased supply of substrates such as hyperglycaemic or oxidative stress and in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, neurodegenerative diseases, osteoarthritis and also non-diabetic atherosclerosis and chronic heart failure. Advanced glycation end-products accumulation occurs especially on long-lived proteins such as collagen in the skin and in vascular basement membranes leading to vascular damage. Adequate renal clearance capacity is an important factor in the effective removal of advanced glycation end-products. The Autofluorescence Reader was developed as a marker, representative for tissue advanced glycation end-products accumulation, easily applicable in a clinical setting, initially for predicting diabetes related complications. Studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as well as its predictive value for total and cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetes. Moreover skin autofluorescence was demonstrated to be superior to Haemoglobin A1c and other conventional risk factors. Advanced glycation end-products have been proposed as a novel factor involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure. Assessment of advanced glycation end-products accumulation in end-stage renal disease and undergoing renal replacement therapies patients has become of great importance. Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease, and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products is significantly increased in these patients. Mortality is markedly increased in patients with decreased kidney function, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. Skin advanced glycation end-products levels are strong predictors of survival in haemodialysis patients independent of other established risk factors

  17. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  18. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phil; Rackow, Kirk A.; Hohman, Ed

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  19. A High Performance Sample Delivery System for Closed-Path Eddy Covariance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottrott, Anders; Leggett, Graham; Alstad, Karrin; Wahl, Edward

    2016-04-01

    The Picarro G2311-f Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) measures CO2, CH4 and water vapor at high frequency with parts-per-billion (ppb) sensitivity for eddy covariance, gradient, eddy accumulation measurements. In flux mode, the analyzer measures the concentration of all three species at 10 Hz with a cavity gas exchange time of 5 Hz. We developed an enhanced pneumatic sample delivery system for drawing air from the atmosphere into the cavity. The new sample delivery system maintains a 5 Hz gas exchange time, and allows for longer sample intake lines to be configured in tall tower applications (> 250 ft line at sea level). We quantified the system performance in terms of vacuum pump head room and 10-90% concentration step response for several intake line lengths at various elevations. Sample eddy covariance data are shown from an alfalfa field in Northern California, USA.

  20. Determining Confounding Sensitivities In Eddy Current Thin Film Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gros, Ethan; Udpa, Lalita; Smith, James A.; Wachs, Katelyn

    2016-07-01

    Determining Confounding Sensitivities In Eddy Current Thin Film Measurements Ethan Gros, Lalita Udpa, Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824 James A. Smith, Experiment Analysis, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID 83415 Eddy current (EC) techniques are widely used in industry to measure the thickness of non-conductive films on a metal substrate. This is done using a system whereby a coil carrying a high-frequency alternating current is used to create an alternating magnetic field at the surface of the instrument's probe. When the probe is brought near a conductive surface, the alternating magnetic field will induce ECs in the conductor. The substrate characteristics and the distance of the probe from the substrate (the coating thickness) affect the magnitude of the ECs. The induced currents load the probe coil affecting the terminal impedance of the coil. The measured probe impedance is related to the lift off between coil and conductor as well as conductivity of the test sample. For a known conductivity sample, the probe impedance can be converted into an equivalent film thickness value. The EC measurement can be confounded by a number of measurement parameters. It is the goal of this research to determine which physical properties of the measurement set-up and sample can adversely affect the thickness measurement. The eddy current testing is performed using a commercially available, hand held eddy current probe (ETA3.3H spring loaded eddy probe running at 8 MHz) that comes with a stand to hold the probe. The stand holds the probe and adjusts the probe on the z-axis to help position the probe in the correct area as well as make precise measurements. The signal from the probe is sent to a hand held readout, where the results are recorded directly in terms of liftoff or film thickness. Understanding the effect of certain factors on the measurements of film thickness, will help to evaluate how accurate the ETA3.3H spring loaded

  1. Eddy Generation and Shedding in a Tidally Energetic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlvenny, J.; Gillibrand, P. A.; Walters, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Pentland Firth in northern Scotland, and its subsidiary channel the Inner Sound, are currently under scrutiny as the first tidal energy array in the world is installed during 2016. The tidal flows in the channel and sound have been intensively observed and modelled in recent years, and the turbulent nature of the flow, with features of eddy generation and shedding, is becoming increasingly well known. Turbulence and eddies pose potential risks to the turbine infrastructure through enhanced stress on the blades, while understanding environmental effects of energy extraction also requires accurate simulation of the hydrodynamics of the flow. Here, we apply a mixed finite element/finite volume hydrodynamic model to the northern Scottish shelf, with a particular focus on flows through the Pentland Firth and the Inner Sound. We use an unstructured grid model, which allows the open boundaries to be far removed from the region of interest, while still allowing a grid spacing of 40m in the Inner Sound. The model employs semi-implicit techniques to solve the momentum and free surface equations, and semi-Lagrangian methods to solve the material derivative in the momentum equation, making it fast, robust and accurate and suitable for simulating flows in irregular coastal ocean environments. The model is well suited to address questions relating to tidal energy potential. We present numerical simulations of tidal currents in The Pentland Firth and Inner Sound. Observed velocities in the Inner Sound, measured by moored ADCP deployments, reach speeds of up to 5 m s-1 and the model successfully reproduces these strong currents. In the simulations, eddies are formed by interactions between the strong flow and the northern and southern headlands on the island of Stroma; some of these eddies are trapped and remain locked in position, whereas others are shed and transported away from the generation zone. We track the development and advection of eddies in relation to the site of

  2. Eddy Covariance Method: Overview of General Guidelines and Conventional Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Anderson, D. J.; Amen, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric flux measurements are widely used to estimate water, heat, carbon dioxide and trace gas exchange between the ecosystem and the atmosphere. The Eddy Covariance method is one of the most direct, defensible ways to measure and calculate turbulent fluxes within the atmospheric boundary layer. However, the method is mathematically complex, and requires significant care to set up and process data. These reasons may be why the method is currently used predominantly by micrometeorologists. Modern instruments and software can potentially expand the use of this method beyond micrometeorology and prove valuable for plant physiology, hydrology, biology, ecology, entomology, and other non-micrometeorological areas of research. The main challenge of the method for a non-expert is the complexity of system design, implementation, and processing of the large volume of data. In the past several years, efforts of the flux networks (e.g., FluxNet, Ameriflux, CarboEurope, Fluxnet-Canada, Asiaflux, etc.) have led to noticeable progress in unification of the terminology and general standardization of processing steps. The methodology itself, however, is difficult to unify, because various experimental sites and different purposes of studies dictate different treatments, and site-, measurement- and purpose-specific approaches. Here we present an overview of theory and typical workflow of the Eddy Covariance method in a format specifically designed to (i) familiarize a non-expert with general principles, requirements, applications, and processing steps of the conventional Eddy Covariance technique, (ii) to assist in further understanding the method through more advanced references such as textbooks, network guidelines and journal papers, (iii) to help technicians, students and new researchers in the field deployment of the Eddy Covariance method, and (iv) to assist in its use beyond micrometeorology. The overview is based, to a large degree, on the frequently asked questions

  3. Multifrequency eddy-current inspection of seam weld in steel sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Dodd, C.V.; Chitwood, L.D.

    1985-04-01

    Multifrequency eddy-current techniques were used to perform a continuous on-line inspection of the seam weld in the steel jacket for a superconducting cable. The inspection was required to detect both surface and internal weld flaws in the presence of a large, highly conductive central conductor. Raw eddy-current data were recorded on magnetic tape, and test properties such as discontinuity size and weld penetration were determined by mathematically fitting these data to coefficients developed with representative standards. A sophisticated computer-controlled scanning technique was applied, and a unique scanning device was developed to provide full coverage of the weld and heat-affected zone. The techniques used to develop this multifrequency eddy-current examination are described in this report along with the test equipment, test procedures, and computer programs.

  4. Delving three-dimensional structure of mesoscale eddies in the Northern South China Sea from seismic reflection transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Tao

    2017-04-01

    The seismic oceanography technique, a new option to oceanographers, is capable of capturing oceanic fine scale structures of oceanic mesoscale eddies. Mesoscale eddy has significant influence on the ocean thermodynamics and dynamics, biology, and military and civil activities, and is always the hot focus in oceanography. Most of the former eddy studies are focused on the sea surface and little is known about the vertical structures of eddies. Unraveling the three-dimensional structure of mesoscale eddies has been limited by the lack of observations and the complex dynamics of the system. Using an abundance of seismic data, satellite altimeter data and an automated eddy detection scheme, three-dimensional structure of mesoscale eddies during its propagation and evolution are examined in the Northern South China Sea (NSCS). During seismic data processing, after seismic prestack time migration, high-density bispectral analysis method in geovation seismic data process system is applicated. The results show that high-density bispectral analysis method could achieve a speed-by-point analysis and solve the effect of anisotropy at far offset in the vertical inhomogeneous media, and the image quality of final PSTM profile is effectively improved. The possible outcome of this study would advance our understanding of the interaction between the flow and mesoscale eddy.

  5. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  6. A western boundary current eddy characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribbe, Joachim; Brieva, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The analysis of an eddy census for the East Australian Current (EAC) region yielded a total of 497 individual short-lived (7-28 days) cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies for the period 1993 to 2015. This was an average of about 23 eddies per year. 41% of the tracked individual cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies were detected off southeast Queensland between about 25 °S and 29 °S. This is the region where the flow of the EAC intensifies forming a swift western boundary current that impinges near Fraser Island on the continental shelf. This zone was also identified as having a maximum in detected short-lived cyclonic eddies. A total of 94 (43%) individual cyclonic eddies or about 4-5 per year were tracked in this region. The census found that these potentially displaced entrained water by about 115 km with an average displacement speed of about 4 km per day. Cyclonic eddies were likely to contribute to establishing an on-shelf longshore northerly flow forming the western branch of the Fraser Island Gyre and possibly presented an important cross-shelf transport process in the life cycle of temperate fish species of the EAC domain. In-situ observations near western boundary currents previously documented the entrainment, off-shelf transport and export of near shore water, nutrients, sediments, fish larvae and the renewal of inner shelf water due to short-lived eddies. This study found that these cyclonic eddies potentially play an important off-shelf transport process off the central east Australian coast.

  7. Accumulation of airborne trace elements in mosses, lichens and synthetic materials exposed at urban monitoring stations: towards a harmonisation of the moss-bag technique.

    PubMed

    Giordano, S; Adamo, P; Spagnuolo, V; Tretiach, M; Bargagli, R

    2013-01-01

    Mosses, lichens and cellulose filters were exposed for 17 weeks at four urban monitoring stations in Naples (S Italy) to assess the accumulation of airborne Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn. In each site, the element accumulation was significantly higher in the moss Hypnum cupressiforme than in the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. Acid washed mosses accumulated the highest amount of trace elements, but the differences in element concentrations among the moss samples exposed after water washing and different devitalisation treatments (acid washing, oven drying and water boiling) and between the lichen samples exposed with and without the nylon bag were not statistically significant. The cellulose filters showed the lowest accumulation capability. The reciprocal ordination of sites and exposed materials showed an increasing contamination gradient (especially for Pb, Cu and Zn) from the background site to the trafficked city streets; this pattern was undetectable from PM(10) data recorded by the automatic monitoring devices operating in the four exposure sites. The element profile in exposed materials did not change substantially throughout the urban area and particles of polluted urban soils seem the main source of airborne metals in Naples. Through a comprehensive evaluation of the results from this and previous studies, a protocol is suggested for the moss-bag monitoring of trace element deposition in urban environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anatomy of a subtropical intrathermocline eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barceló-Llull, Bàrbara; Sangrà, Pablo; Pallàs-Sanz, Enric; Barton, Eric D.; Estrada-Allis, Sheila N.; Martínez-Marrero, Antonio; Aguiar-González, Borja; Grisolía, Diana; Gordo, Carmen; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Arístegui, Javier

    2017-06-01

    An interdisciplinary survey of a subtropical intrathermocline eddy was conducted within the Canary Eddy Corridor in September 2014. The anatomy of the eddy is investigated using near submesoscale fine resolution two-dimensional data and coarser resolution three-dimensional data. The eddy was four months old, with a vertical extension of 500 m and 46 km radius. It may be viewed as a propagating negative anomaly of potential vorticity (PV), 95% below ambient PV. We observed two cores of low PV, one in the upper layers centered at 85 m, and another broader anomaly located between 175 m and the maximum sampled depth in the three-dimensional dataset (325 m). The upper core was where the maximum absolute values of normalized relative vorticity (or Rossby number), |Ro| =0.6, and azimuthal velocity, U=0.5 m s-1, were reached and was defined as the eddy dynamical core. The typical biconvex isopleth shape for intrathermocline eddies induces a decrease of static stability, which causes the low PV of the upper core. The deeper low PV core was related to the occurrence of a pycnostad layer of subtropical mode water that was embedded within the eddy. The eddy core, of 30 km radius, was in near solid body rotation with period of 4 days. It was encircled by a thin outer ring that was rotating more slowly. The kinetic energy (KE) content exceeded that of available potential energy (APE), KE/APE=1.58; this was associated with a low aspect ratio and a relatively intense rate of spin as indicated by the relatively high value of Ro. Inferred available heat and salt content anomalies were AHA=2.9×1018 J and ASA=14.3×1010 kg, respectively. The eddy AHA and ASA contents per unit volume largely exceed those corresponding to Pacific Ocean intrathermocline eddies. This suggests that intrathermocline eddies may play a significant role in the zonal conduit of heat and salt along the Canary Eddy Corridor.

  9. Renormalization group formulation of large eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakhot, V.; Orszag, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Renormalization group (RNG) methods are applied to eliminate small scales and construct a subgrid scale (SSM) transport eddy model for transition phenomena. The RNG and SSM procedures are shown to provide a more accurate description of viscosity near the wall than does the Smagorinski approach and also generate farfield turbulence viscosity values which agree well with those of previous researchers. The elimination of small scales causes the simultaneous appearance of a random force and eddy viscosity. The RNG method permits taking these into account, along with other phenomena (such as rotation) for large-eddy simulations.

  10. Multiple dipole eddies in the Alaska Coastal Current detected with Landsat thematic mapper data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AhlnäS, Kristina; Royer, Thomas C.; George, Thomas H.

    1987-11-01

    Seventeen dipole eddies, including five large, well-formed ones, three second-generation eddies, and two double eddies, were observed in the Alaska Coastal Current near Kayak Island in one single scene of the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) on April 22, 1985. The digital Landsat TM satellite data were computer analyzed to extract details in the near coastal circulation in the northern Gulf of Alaska. Enhancement techniques were applied to the visible and thermal IR bands. The features are evident only in the visible bands because of the ability of these bands to detect the distribution of sediments in the near surface. These eddies did not have a significant thermal signature. The sources of these sediments are the glacial streams found throughout the Gulf of Alaska coast. Eddies of this configuration and frequency have never been observed here previously. However, the oceanographic and meteorological conditions are typical for this time of year. These eddies should be important to the cross-shelf mixing processes in the Alaska Coastal Current and are an indicator that the flow here can be unstable at certain times of the year.

  11. Multiple dipole eddies in the Alaska Coastal Current detected with Landsat thematic mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlnas, Kristina; Royer, Thomas C.; George, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen dipole eddies, including five large, well-formed ones, three second-generation eddies, and two double eddies, were observed in the Alaska Coastal Current near Kayak Island in one single scene of the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) on April 22, l985. The digital Landsat TM satellite data were computer analyzed to extract details in the near coastal circulation in the northern Gulf of Alaska. Enhancement techniques were applied to the visible and thermal IR bands. The features are evident only in the visible bands because of the ability of these bands to detect the distribution of sediments in the near surface. These eddies did not have a significant thermal signature.The sources of these sediments are the glacial streams found throughout the Gulf of Alaska coast. Eddies of this configuration and frequency have never been observed here previously. However, the oceanographic and meteorological conditions are typical for this time of year. These eddies should be important to the cross-shelf mixing processes in the Alaska Coastal Current and are an indicator that the flow here can be unstable at certain times of the year.

  12. Eddy Current Testing, RQA/M1-5330.17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

    As one in the series of classroom training handbooks, prepared by the U.S. space program, instructional material is presented in this volume concerning familiarization and orientation on eddy current testing. The subject is presented under the following headings: Introduction, Eddy Current Principles, Eddy Current Equipment, Eddy Current Methods,…

  13. Eddy current scanning of niobium for SRF cavities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Boffo, C.; Bauer, P.; Foley, M.; Antoine, C.; Cooper, C.; Brinkmann, A.; /DESY

    2006-08-01

    In the framework of SRF cavity development, Fermilab is creating the infrastructure needed for the characterization of the material used in the cavity fabrication. An important step in the characterization of ''as received'' niobium sheets is eddy current scanning. Eddy current scanning is a non-destructive technique first adopted and further developed by DESY with the purpose of checking the cavity material for subsurface defects and inclusions. Fermilab has received and further upgraded a commercial eddy current scanner previously used for the SNS project. This scanner is now used daily to scan the niobium sheets for the Fermilab third harmonic, the ILC, and the Proton Driver cavities. After optical inspection, more than 400 squares and disks have been scanned and when necessary checked at the optical and electron microscopes, anodized, or measured with profilometers looking for surface imperfections that might limit the performance of the cavities. This paper gives a status report on the scanning results obtained so far, including a discussion of the classification of signals being detected.

  14. Subsurface Defect Detection in Metals with Pulsed Eddy Current

    SciTech Connect

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Bantz, Walter J.

    2005-04-09

    The eddy current (EC) method is traditionally used for open surface crack detection in metallic components. Subsurface voids in bulk metals can also be detected by the eddy current devices. Taking into consideration the skin effect in conductive materials, a lower frequency of electromagnetic excitation is used for a deeper penetration. A set of special specimens was designed and fabricated to investigate sensitivity to subsurface voids. Typically, flat bottom holes (FBHs) are used for subsurface defect simulation. This approach is not very representative of real defects for eddy current inspection because the FBH depth extends to the bottom of the specimen. Two-layer specimens with finite depth FBHs were fabricated and scanned with conventional EC of variable frequency. Sensitivity and spatial resolution of EC diminish with flaw depth. The pulsed EC approach was applied for flaw detection at variable distance under the surface. The transient response from multi-layer model was derived and compared to experiments. The multi-frequency nature of pulsed excitation provides effective coverage of a thick layer of material in one pass. Challenging aspects of subsurface flaw detection and visualization using the EC technique are discussed.

  15. Simulated response of the Southern Ocean to wind changes: towards the role of mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patara, Lavinia; Böning, Claus; Biastoch, Arne

    2013-04-01

    The role of ocean mesoscale eddies in the Southern Ocean response to recent wind changes is explored with a suite of realistic global ocean simulations at increasing horizontal resolution. Southern Ocean mesoscale eddies are known to be critical in the meridional redistribution of tracers, and are suggested to affect how the Southern Ocean responds to wind changes, takes up heat, and exchanges CO2 with the atmosphere. By employing the ocean general circulation model NEMO-LIM, ocean simulations with horizontal resolutions of 1/2°, 1/4°, and 1/12°, i.e. ranging from non-eddying to eddy-resolving, are performed and compared. In particular, a "two-way" nesting technique is used to refine the ocean grid up to 1/12° in the Southern Ocean. The ocean models are forced with the CORE v.2 atmospheric reanalysis during the period 1948-2007, and companion experiments under a repeated-annual-cycle forcing are used to detect model spurious drifts. First, we assess the effect of explicitly simulated eddies on ocean mean properties. Mesoscale eddies are shown to modify the mixed layer depth and the upper-ocean density, with potential effects on the formation properties of Subantarctic Mode Waters. Second, we explore the role of mesoscale eddies in affecting the ocean circulation sensitivity to the sustained increase of Southern Hemisphere winds during the past decades. Whereas the non-eddying simulations exhibit large increases of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current transport, the 1/4° and 1/12° models are less sensitive to the wind increase, in better agreement with available observations. These results show a clear effect of model resolution on the Southern Ocean response to climate variability and change.

  16. Eddy Current Flexible Probes for Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles-Pascaud, C.; Decitre, J. M.; Vacher, F.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier, M.; Cattiaux, G.

    2006-03-01

    The inspection of materials used in aerospace, nuclear or transport industry is a critical issue for the safety of components exposed to stress or/and corrosion. The industry claims for faster, more sensitive, and more flexible techniques. Technologies based on Eddy Current (EC) flexible array probe and magnetic sensor with high sensitivity such as giant magneto-resistance (GMR) could be a good solution to detect surface-breaking flaws in complex shaped surfaces. The CEA has recently developed, with support from the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), a flexible array probe based on micro-coils etched on Kapton. The probe's performances have been assessed for the inspection of reactor residual heat removal pipes, and for aeronautical applications within the framework of the European project VERDICT. The experimental results confirm the very good detection of narrow cracks on plane and curve shaped surfaces. This paper also describes the recent progresses concerning the application of GMR sensors to EC testing, and the results obtained for the detection of small surface breaking flaws.

  17. Eddy current measurements of the new high T(sub c) ceramic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telschow, K. L.; Kunerth, D. C.

    The major properties of superconductors are zero resistance and diamagetism (Meissner effect). Eddy current techniques provide a means of determining these properties simultaneously with a noncontacting probe. We present the results of CW measurements obtained for YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x prepared by solid state reaction and sol-gel powder fabrication techniques, along with concurrent dc resistive measurements of the transition. The data are interpreted in light of the sample's superconducting properties and the general effects of superconductivity on the eddy current measurement method.

  18. Removing Wave Artifacts from Eddy Correlation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Brand, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    on the example of the North-Frisian Wadden Sea we will discuss the potentials and limits of this method. References: Berg, P., H. Roy, F. Janssen, V. Meyer, B. Jorgensen, M. Huettel, and D. de Beer (2003), Oxygen uptake by aquatic sediments measured with a novel non-invasive eddy-correlation technique, Marine Ecology-Progress Series, 261, 75-83, doi:10.3354/meps261075. Bricker, J. D., and S. G. Monismith (2007), Spectral wave turbulence decomposition, J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 24(8), 1479-1487, doi:10.1175/JTECH2066.1.

  19. Large-eddy Advection in Evapotranspiration Estimates from an Array of Eddy Covariance Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Evett, S. R.; Gowda, P. H.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Aiken, R.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration was continuously measured by an array of eddy covariance systems and large weighting lysimeter in a sorghum in Bushland, Texas in 2014. The advective divergence from both horizontal and vertical directions were measured through profile measurements above canopy. All storage terms were integrated from the depth of soil heat flux plate to the height of eddy covariance measurement. Therefore, a comparison between the eddy covariance system and large weighing lysimeter was conducted on hourly and daily basis. The results for the discrepancy between eddy covariance towers and the lysimeter will be discussed in terms of advection and storage contributions in time domain and frequency domain.

  20. Production and destruction of eddy kinetic energy in forced submesoscale eddy-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sonaljit; Ramachandran, Sanjiv; Tandon, Amit; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-09-01

    We study the production and dissipation of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in a submesoscale eddy field forced with downfront winds using the Process Study Ocean Model (PSOM) with a horizontal grid resolution of 0.5 km. We simulate an idealized 100 m deep mixed-layer front initially in geostrophic balance with a jet in a domain that permits eddies within a range of O(1 km-100 km). The vertical eddy viscosities and the dissipation are parameterized using four different subgrid vertical mixing parameterizations: the k - ɛ , the KPP, and two different constant eddy viscosity and diffusivity profiles with a magnitude of O(10-2m2s-1) in the mixed layer. Our study shows that strong vertical eddy viscosities near the surface reduce the parameterized dissipation, whereas strong vertical eddy diffusivities reduce the lateral buoyancy gradients and consequently the rate of restratification by mixed-layer instabilities (MLI). Our simulations show that near the surface, the spatial variability of the dissipation along the periphery of the eddies depends on the relative alignment of the ageostrophic and geostrophic shear. Analysis of the resolved EKE budgets in the frontal region from the simulations show important similarities between the vertical structure of the EKE budget produced by the k - ɛ and KPP parameterizations, and earlier LES studies. Such an agreement is absent in the simulations using constant eddy-viscosity parameterizations.

  1. Accumulation and Translocation of Essential and Nonessential Elements by Tomato Plants (Solanum lycopersicum) Cultivated in Open-Air Plots under Organic or Conventional Farming Techniques.

    PubMed

    Liñero, Olaia; Cidad, Maite; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Nguyen, Christophe; de Diego, Alberto

    2015-11-04

    A 5-month experiment was performed to study the accumulation of several inorganic elements in tomato plants cultivated using organic or synthetic fertilizer. Plants were harvested in triplicate at six sampling dates during their life cycle. Statistical and chemometric analysis of data indicated the sequestration of toxic elements and of Na, Zn, Fe, and Co in roots, while the rest of the elements, including Cd, were mainly translocated to aboveground organs. A general decreasing trend in element concentrations with time was observed for most of them. A negative correlation between some element concentrations and ripening stage of fruits was identified. Conventionally grown plants seemed to accumulate more Cd and Tl in their tissues, while organic ones were richer in some nutrients. However, there was no clear effect of the fertilizer used (organic vs synthetic) on the elemental composition of fruits.

  2. Process Specification for Eddy Current Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    This process specification establishes the minimum requirements for eddy current inspection of flat surfaces, fastener holes, threaded fasteners and seamless and welded tubular products made from nonmagnetic alloys such as aluminum and stainless steel.

  3. Eddy viscosity measurements in a rectangular jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, David H.; Morrison, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field of a rectangular jet with a 2:1 aspect ratio was studied at a Reynolds number of 100,000 (Mach number 0.09) using three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Velocity gradients, Reynolds stress tensor components, and scalar eddy viscosities are presented for the major and minor axis planes of the jet. The eddy viscosity model was found to be applicable only in the direction of maximum mean velocity gradient.

  4. Winds, Eddies and Flow through Straits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    driven origin of the Philippine dipole eddies. By contrast, in other volcanic island regions of the world (including the Hawaiian, Cabo Verde, and... volcanic island regions of the world. By contrast in the Hawaiian, Cabo Verde and Canary Islands, the driving mechanism in the eddy dynamics is...J. Aristegui, and F. Herrera (2000), Lee region of Gran Canaria , J. Geophys. Res., 105(C7), 17173-17193. Chang, C.-P., Z. Wang, and H. Hendon

  5. Comparison of Current and Historical Rates of Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation in a Northern Alberta Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, K. H.; Flanagan, L. B.; Carlson, P. J.; Glenn, A. J.; Ponton, S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of Fluxnet-Canada, we have been investigating the environmental controls on net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange using the eddy covariance technique in a moderately rich (treed) fen in northern Alberta, Canada. In addition, integrated CO2 fluxes were compared to carbon stock measurements and rates of peat accumulation. The total ecosystem carbon stock was 52,669 g C m-2 with the vast majority (52,129) accumulated in peat over a 2 meter depth. The basal age for the peat was 2210 ± 50 years before present. The above-ground carbon stock in the two tree species was 226 g C m-2. The oldest Picea mariana trees were aged at 135 years, and they showed a rapid increase in basal area increment starting about 65 years ago that peaked at rates of 2 cm2 yr-1 about 40 years ago. The Larix laricina trees became established approximately 45 years ago and currently have a basal area increment of 3 to 4 cm2 yr-1, much higher than the current rates (0.5 cm2 yr-1) observed for Picea mariana. The rates of peat accumulation were determined on 210Pb-dated cores. Over the last 70 years the peat gained an average of 113 ± 12 g C m-2 yr-1. This was similar to net ecosystem production measured by eddy covariance (95 and 210 g C m-2 yr-1) over the last two years. Variation in annual net ecosystem production was associated with shifts in weather and growing season length. Current and recent historical rates of carbon accumulation were quite consistent despite significant variation in tree species growth and successional changes in this peatland over the last 70 years.

  6. Mesoscale eddies transport deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanwei; Liu, Zhifei; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Wenguang; Li, Jianru; Xu, Jingping

    2014-08-04

    Mesoscale eddies, which contribute to long-distance water mass transport and biogeochemical budget in the upper ocean, have recently been taken into assessment of the deep-sea hydrodynamic variability. However, how such eddies influence sediment movement in the deepwater environment has not been explored. Here for the first time we observed deep-sea sediment transport processes driven by mesoscale eddies in the northern South China Sea via a full-water column mooring system located at 2100 m water depth. Two southwestward propagating, deep-reaching anticyclonic eddies passed by the study site during January to March 2012 and November 2012 to January 2013, respectively. Our multiple moored instruments recorded simultaneous or lagging enhancement of suspended sediment concentration with full-water column velocity and temperature anomalies. We interpret these suspended sediments to have been trapped and transported from the southwest of Taiwan by the mesoscale eddies. The net near-bottom southwestward sediment transport by the two events is estimated up to one million tons. Our study highlights the significance of surface-generated mesoscale eddies on the deepwater sedimentary dynamic process.

  7. Eddies off the Queen Charlotte Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The bright red, green, and turquoise patches to the west of British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands and Alaska's Alexander Archipelago highlight the presence of biological activity in the ocean. These colors indicate high concentrations of chlorophyll, the primary pigment found in phytoplankton. Notice that there are a number of eddies visible in the Pacific Ocean in this pseudo-color scene. The eddies are formed by strong outflow currents from rivers along North America's west coast that are rich in nutrients from the springtime snowmelt running off the mountains. This nutrient-rich water helps stimulate the phytoplankton blooms within the eddies. (For more details, read Tracking Eddies that Feed the Sea.) To the west of the eddies in the water, another type of eddy-this one in the atmosphere-forms the clouds into the counterclockwise spiral characteristic of a low pressure system in the Northern Hemisphere. (Click on the image above to see it at full resolution; or click to see the scene in true-color.) The snow-covered mountains of British Columbia are visible in the upper righthand corner of the image. This scene was constructed using SeaWiFS data collected on June 13, 2002. SeaWiFS image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  8. Eddies off the Queen Charlotte Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The bright red, green, and turquoise patches to the west of British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands and Alaska's Alexander Archipelago highlight the presence of biological activity in the ocean. These colors indicate high concentrations of chlorophyll, the primary pigment found in phytoplankton. Notice that there are a number of eddies visible in the Pacific Ocean in this pseudo-color scene. The eddies are formed by strong outflow currents from rivers along North America's west coast that are rich in nutrients from the springtime snowmelt running off the mountains. This nutrient-rich water helps stimulate the phytoplankton blooms within the eddies. (For more details, read Tracking Eddies that Feed the Sea.) To the west of the eddies in the water, another type of eddy-this one in the atmosphere-forms the clouds into the counterclockwise spiral characteristic of a low pressure system in the Northern Hemisphere. (Click on the image above to see it at full resolution; or click to see the scene in true-color.) The snow-covered mountains of British Columbia are visible in the upper righthand corner of the image. This scene was constructed using SeaWiFS data collected on June 13, 2002. SeaWiFS image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  9. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  10. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality By Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B. Mi; G. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-08-10

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bao; Zhao, Xiaoliang (George); Bayles, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  12. Large Eddy Simulations in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Wolfram

    2015-12-01

    In this review, the methodology of large eddy simulations (LES) is introduced and applications in astrophysics are discussed. As theoretical framework, the scale decomposition of the dynamical equations for neutral fluids by means of spatial filtering is explained. For cosmological applications, the filtered equations in comoving coordinates are also presented. To obtain a closed set of equations that can be evolved in LES, several subgrid-scale models for the interactions between numerically resolved and unresolved scales are discussed, in particular the subgrid-scale turbulence energy equation model. It is then shown how model coefficients can be calculated, either by dynamic procedures or, a priori, from high-resolution data. For astrophysical applications, adaptive mesh refinement is often indispensable. It is shown that the subgrid-scale turbulence energy model allows for a particularly elegant and physically well-motivated way of preserving momentum and energy conservation in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations. Moreover, the notion of shear-improved models for in-homogeneous and non-stationary turbulence is introduced. Finally, applications of LES to turbulent combustion in thermonuclear supernovae, star formation and feedback in galaxies, and cosmological structure formation are reviewed.

  13. Discrepancies between eddy covariance and lysimeter measurements in the assessment of energy balance modeling in vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Juan M.; López-Urrea, Ramón; Doña, Carolina; Montoro, Amelia; Caselles, Vicente; Galve, Joan M.

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing-based models are a potential technique when evapotranspiration (ET) estimates are needed on a regional scale. These remote sensing methods are typically validated and calibrated using in situ measurements. Eddy covariance (EC) and lysimetry are two of the most prevalent techniques for measuring ET. Some discrepancies arise between these two techniques consequence of the measurement footprint or the spatial variability in atmospheric and surface conditions. An experiment was carried out in the growing season of 2015 in a 4 ha row-crop vineyard in a semi-arid advective location in Central Spain, encouraged by the necessity to assess the feasibility of EC measurements in this area and under these conditions. A 9-m2 monolithic weighting lysimeter was available. An EC system was deployed together with a net radiometer and a set of soil heat flux plates. Data of the different terms of the energy balance equation were stored every 15 min, and then averaged at an hourly and daily scales. In this work we focus on the comparison between ET measurements from the two methods, EC and lysimetry. The imbalance in the surface energy budget was first analyzed. A lack of closure around 20% was observed. After forcing the closure, discrepancies between EC and lysimeter measurements still remained. Average estimation errors of +/-0.09 mm h-1 and +/-0.5 mm d-1 were obtained at hourly and daily scales, respectively, whereas a deviation of only 2% was observed in the accumulated ET for the entire experiment. These results support the use of adjusted EC technique to monitor accurate ET in vineyards.

  14. Three-dimensional properties of mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea based on eddy-resolving model output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiayan; Dong, Changming; Chen, Dake; Liu, Yu; Yang, Jingsong; Zou, Bin; Guan, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    Last decade has witnessed extensive studies on mesoscale oceanic eddies in the Southern China Sea (SCS), however most of these studies are focused on the surface eddies, and three-dimensional features of eddies are not well known except some individual eddies. We apply a three-dimensional eddy detection scheme to a 9-year (2000-2008) eddy-resolving numerical solution to acquire three-dimensional eddy data set in the SCS. The model solution is validated with observational data in terms of both seasonal and intra-seasonal scales. The statistical characteristics of eddies at the sea surface, such as eddy number, lifetime and radius, from the model are comparable with those derived from the satellite altimetry data. The vertical profiles of the physical features of eddies are exposed from the statistical analysis of the three-dimensional eddy data set. For examples, more cyclonic eddies (CEs) are generated than anticyclonic eddies (AEs) in the depth above about 350 m and an opposite trend is presented below 350 m. The lifetimes of CEs and AEs are statistically equal and no significant variation at different vertical levels. Eddies in the central SCS have the largest size than in other areas and their sizes decrease with the increase in water depth. The relative vorticity amplitude of eddies decreases with the increase in the depth. There are three different types of eddies: bowl-shaped with the largest size at the surface, lens-shaped with the largest size in the middle and cone-shaped with the largest size at the bottom. Most of eddies are bowl-shaped eddies. The three types of eddies have different effects on the temperature and salinity profiles. Eddy genesis mechanisms are discussed and categorized into three types in the SCS: surface wind curl input, current interaction with the bottom topography and Kuroshio intrusion.

  15. Fatty acid profiles of phyllosoma larvae of western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus) in cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies of the Leeuwin Current off Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; O'Rorke, R.; Waite, A. M.; Beckley, L. E.; Thompson, P.; Jeffs, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    The recent dramatic decline in settlement in the population of the spiny lobster, Panulirus cygnus, may be due to changes in the oceanographic processes that operate offshore of Western Australia. It has been suggested that this decline could be related to poor nutritional condition of the post-larvae, especially lipid which is accumulated in large quantities during the preceding extensive pelagic larval stage. The current study focused on investigations into the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) profiles of lobster phyllosoma larvae from three mid to late stages of larval development (stages VI, VII, VIII) sampled from two cyclonic and two anticyclonic eddies of the Leeuwin Current off Western Australia. The results showed significant accumulation of lipid and energy storage FAs with larval development regardless of location of capture, however, larvae from cyclonic eddies had more lipid and FAs associated with energy storage than larvae from anticyclonic eddies. FA food chain markers from the larvae indicated significant differences in the food webs operating in the two types of eddy, with a higher level of FA markers for production from flagellates and a lower level from copepod grazing in cyclonic versus anticyclonic eddies. The results indicate that the microbial food web operating in cyclonic eddies provides better feeding conditions for lobster larvae despite anticyclonic eddies being generally more productive and containing greater abundances of zooplankton as potential prey for lobster larvae. Gelatinous zooplankton, such as siphonophores, may play an important role in cyclonic eddies by accumulating dispersed microbial nutrients and making them available as larger prey for phyllosoma. The markedly superior nutritional condition of lobster larvae feeding in the microbial food web found in cyclonic eddies, could greatly influence their subsequent settlement and recruitment to the coastal fishery.

  16. Detached eddy simulation (DES) of turbulence and suspended sediment transport in lateral separation eddies in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    DES is applied to flow in a rapid and lateral separation eddy in Grand Canyon using the Spalart and Allmaras subgrid stress and RANS closure. DES is a hybrid large eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) technique. The RANS portion of the flow extends only a very short distance above the bed where grid length scales are too large to resolve the turbulent motions necessary to correctly calculate the momentum transport. A wall viscosity approach, utilizing a local bed roughness scale, is used to account for the hydraulically-rough bed. The convective terms are discretized using central differences, with a small proportion of upwinding in zones of high shear to prevent pressure-velocity decoupling. A two-dimensional depth-averaged flow model is utilized to determine the local water surface elevation of the three-dimensional, DES, finite volume grid. Suspended sediment is modeled using the advection-diffusion equation under the assumption that the sediment velocity is equal to the modeled DES fluid velocity minus the particle settling velocity. Sediment diffusivity is assumed to be the subgrid or RANS viscosity. The Smith and McLean suspended sediment boundary condition is utilized to calculate the influx of suspended sediment from the bed based upon the local, instantaneous boundary shear stress at each time step. The model currently calculates the flux of five grain sizes and grain size distribution of the be evolves by a mixing depth model. Model results compare favorably with published ADCP measurements of flow during the high flow experiment of 2008. In addition to the position of the large eddy recircultion cell, the model captures two smaller eddy cells. Turbulence structures produced at the shear layer between the main flow and the eddy zone rapidly become three-dimensional with no-preferred orientation of vorticity. The influx of suspended sediment to the largest eddy zone, upstream of the point of reattachment is relatively constant

  17. Application of neutron capture autoradiography to Boron Delivery seeking techniques for selective accumulation of boron compounds to tumor with intra-arterial administration of boron entrapped water-in-oil-in-water emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikado, S.; Yanagie, H.; Yasuda, N.; Higashi, S.; Ikushima, I.; Mizumachi, R.; Murata, Y.; Morishita, Y.; Nishimura, R.; Shinohara, A.; Ogura, K.; Sugiyama, H.; Iikura, H.; Ando, H.; Ishimoto, M.; Takamoto, S.; Eriguchi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Kimura, M.

    2009-06-01

    It is necessary to accumulate the 10B atoms selectively to the tumor cells for effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). In order to achieve an accurate measurement of 10B accumulations in the biological samples, we employed a technique of neutron capture autoradiography (NCAR) of sliced samples of tumor tissues using CR-39 plastic track detectors. The CR-39 track detectors attached with the biological samples were exposed to thermal neutrons in the thermal column of the JRR3 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). We obtained quantitative NCAR images of the samples for VX-2 tumor in rabbit liver after injection of 10BSH entrapped water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) emulsion by intra-arterial injection via proper hepatic artery. The 10B accumulations and distributions in VX-2 tumor and normal liver of rabbit were investigated by means of alpha-track density measurements. In this study, we showed the selective accumulation of 10B atoms in the VX-2 tumor by intra-arterial injection of 10B entrapped WOW emulsion until 3 days after injection by using digitized NCAR images (i.e. alpha-track mapping).

  18. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  19. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  20. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B.Mi; X. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-05-26

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with different surface preparation conditions before applying the coating, e.g., grit-blasted surface, wire-brush cleaned surface, and a dirty surface. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that the three surface preparation conditions can be successfully differentiated by looking into the impedance difference observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. More specimens are also prepared with variations of process parameters, such as spray angle, stand-off distance, and application of corrosion protective sealant, etc. They are blindly tested to evaluate the reliability of the eddy current system. Quantitative relations between the coating bond strength and the eddy current response are also established with the support of destructive testing. This non-contact, non-destructive, easy to use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  1. Assessing thermal barrier coatings by eddy-current inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Kim Murphy, R.; Nyenhuis, John

    2002-05-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of high-temperature coatings is one of the important factors in achieving a high level of structural integrity in advanced gas turbines. In this paper, we demonstrate that sophisticated eddy-current techniques can be utilized to measure the thickness and remaining-life of high-temperature coatings. We discuss the difficult in-service case, in which the time-temperature exposure of the combustion turbine blade has created a four-layered system, in addition to the base metal.

  2. Investigating electrical resonance in eddy-current array probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R.; Fan, Y.; Dixon, S.

    2016-02-01

    The sensitivity enhancing effects of eddy-current testing at frequencies close to electrical resonance are explored. Var-ied techniques exploiting the phenomenon, dubbed near electrical resonance signal enhancement (NERSE), were experimentally investigated to evaluate its potential exploitation for other interesting applications in aerospace materials, in particular its potential for boosting the sensitivity of standard ECT measurements. Methods for setting and controlling the typically unstable resonant frequencies of such systems are discussed. This research is funded by the EPSRC, via the Research Centre for Non-Destructive Evaluation RCNDE, and Rolls-Royce plc.

  3. Laminar flow transition: A large-eddy simulation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A vectorized, semi-implicit code was developed for the solution of the time-dependent, three dimensional equations of motion in plane Poiseuille flow by the large-eddy simulation technique. The code is tested by comparing results with those obtained from the solutions of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Comparisons indicate that finite-differences employed along the cross-stream direction act as an implicit filter. This removes the necessity of explicit filtering along this direction (where a nonhomogeneous mesh is used) for the simulation of laminar flow transition into turbulence in which small scale turbulence will be accounted for by a subgrid scale turbulence model.

  4. Short communication: malic acid does not promote vaccenic acid accumulation in mixed ruminal fluid with fractionated fish oil by a rumen-simulation technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, J Q; Bu, D P; Liu, S J; Liang, S; Wei, H Y; Zhou, L Y; Liu, K L

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether malic acid could promote the accumulation of vaccenic acid in the rumen. The control diet was composed of a 65:35 ratio of forage to concentrate with 1% (dry matter basis) added fractionated fish oil (rich in docosahexaenoic acid), and treatment diets consisted of the control diet with added malic acid to achieve final concentrations of 10 mM (treatment 1) and 20 mM (treatment 2), respectively. The experiment was conducted with rumen-simulation equipment (Rusitec) consisting of 9 fermenters. Each treatment included 3 fermenters as replicates. After 7 d of incubation, concentrations of vaccenic acid from treatment 1 (4.38% fatty acids) and treatment 2 (4.46% fatty acids) were similar to that of the control treatment (4.51% fatty acids). The disappearance of docosahexaenoic acid was not different among the control, treatment 1, or treatment 2. These data indicated that malic acid did not promote the accumulation of vaccenic acid in ruminal fluid.

  5. Anticyclonic eddies are more productive than cyclonic eddies in subtropical gyres because of winter mixing.

    PubMed

    Dufois, François; Hardman-Mountford, Nick J; Greenwood, Jim; Richardson, Anthony J; Feng, Ming; Matear, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous features of ocean circulation that modulate the supply of nutrients to the upper sunlit ocean, influencing the rates of carbon fixation and export. The popular eddy-pumping paradigm implies that nutrient fluxes are enhanced in cyclonic eddies because of upwelling inside the eddy, leading to higher phytoplankton production. We show that this view does not hold for a substantial portion of eddies within oceanic subtropical gyres, the largest ecosystems in the ocean. Using space-based measurements and a global biogeochemical model, we demonstrate that during winter when subtropical eddies are most productive, there is increased chlorophyll in anticyclones compared with cyclones in all subtropical gyres (by 3.6 to 16.7% for the five basins). The model suggests that this is a consequence of the modulation of winter mixing by eddies. These results establish a new paradigm for anticyclonic eddies in subtropical gyres and could have important implications for the biological carbon pump and the global carbon cycle.

  6. Anticyclonic eddies are more productive than cyclonic eddies in subtropical gyres because of winter mixing

    PubMed Central

    Hardman-Mountford, Nick J.; Greenwood, Jim; Richardson, Anthony J.; Feng, Ming; Matear, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous features of ocean circulation that modulate the supply of nutrients to the upper sunlit ocean, influencing the rates of carbon fixation and export. The popular eddy-pumping paradigm implies that nutrient fluxes are enhanced in cyclonic eddies because of upwelling inside the eddy, leading to higher phytoplankton production. We show that this view does not hold for a substantial portion of eddies within oceanic subtropical gyres, the largest ecosystems in the ocean. Using space-based measurements and a global biogeochemical model, we demonstrate that during winter when subtropical eddies are most productive, there is increased chlorophyll in anticyclones compared with cyclones in all subtropical gyres (by 3.6 to 16.7% for the five basins). The model suggests that this is a consequence of the modulation of winter mixing by eddies. These results establish a new paradigm for anticyclonic eddies in subtropical gyres and could have important implications for the biological carbon pump and the global carbon cycle. PMID:27386549

  7. Determining confounding sensitivities in eddy current thin film measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, Ethan; Udpa, Lalita; Smith, James A.; Wachs, Katelyn

    2017-02-01

    Eddy current (EC) techniques are widely used in industry to measure the thickness of non-conductive films on a metal substrate. This is done by using a system whereby a coil carrying a high-frequency alternating current is used to create an alternating magnetic field at the surface of the instrument's probe. When the probe is brought near a conductive surface, the alternating magnetic field will induce ECs in the conductor. The substrate characteristics and the distance of the probe from the substrate (the coating thickness) affect the magnitude of the ECs. The induced currents load the probe coil affecting the terminal impedance of the coil. The measured probe impedance is related to the lift off between coil and conductor as well as conductivity of the test sample. For a known conductivity sample, the probe impedance can be converted into an equivalent film thickness value. The EC measurement can be confounded by a number of measurement parameters. It was the goal of this research to determine which physical properties of the measurement set-up and sample can adversely affect the thickness measurement. The eddy-current testing was performed using a commercially available, hand-held eddy-current probe (ETA3.3H spring-loaded eddy probe running at 8 MHz) that comes with a stand to hold the probe. The stand holds the probe and adjusts the probe on the z-axis to help position the probe in the correct area as well as make precise measurements. The signal from the probe was sent to a hand-held readout, where the results are recorded directly in terms of liftoff or film thickness. Understanding the effect of certain factors on the measurements of film thickness, will help to evaluate how accurate the ETA3.3H spring-loaded eddy probe was at measuring film thickness under varying experimental conditions. This research studied the effects of a number of factors such as i) conductivity, ii) edge effect, iii) surface finish of base material and iv) cable condition.

  8. On the variation of divergent flow: an eddy-flux form equation based on the quasi-geostrophic balance and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shenming; Cao, Jie; Jiang, Xingwen; Sun, Jianhua

    2017-05-01

    Based on basic equations in isobaric coordinates and the quasi-geostrophic balance, an eddy-flux form budget equation of the divergent wind has been derived. This newly derived budget equation has evident physical significance. It can show the intensity of a weather system, the variation of its flow pattern, and the feedback effects from smaller-scale systems (eddy flows). The usefulness of this new budget equation is examined by calculating budgets for the strong divergent-wind centers associated with the South Asian high, and the strong divergence centers over the Tibetan Plateau, during summer (June-August) 2010. The results indicate that the South Asian high significantly interacts with eddy flows. Compared with effects from the mean flow (background circulation), the eddy flows' feedback influences are of greater importance in determining the flow pattern of the South Asian high. Although the positive divergence centers over the Tibetan Plateau intensify through different mechanisms, certain similarities are also obvious. First, the effects from mean flow are dominant in the rapid intensification process of the positive divergence center. Second, an intense offsetting mechanism exists between the effects associated with the eddy flows' horizontal component and the effects related to the eddy flows' convection activities, which weakens the total effects of the eddy flows significantly. Finally, compared with the effects associated with the convection activities of the mean flow, the accumulated effects of the eddy flows' convection activities may be more favorable for the enhancement of the positive-divergence centers.

  9. Discrimination between Fatigue Cracking and Mechanical Damage in Aircraft Fastener Holes by Eddy-Current Phase Rotation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    is a well-established NDI method that employs the induced magnetic fields and electrical currents produced by a small probe coil to detect defects...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Discrimination between Fatigue Cracking and Mechanical Damage in Aircraft Fastener Holes by Eddy- Current Phase...using the nondestructive inspection technique of bolt-hole eddy- current (BHEC) testing. BHEC testing is based on detection of a disturbance in the

  10. Work done by atmospheric winds on mesoscale ocean eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chi; Zhai, Xiaoming; Shang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Mesoscale eddies are ubiquitous in the ocean and dominate the ocean's kinetic energy. However, physical processes influencing ocean eddy energy remain poorly understood. Mesoscale ocean eddy-wind interaction potentially provides an energy flux into or out of the eddy field, but its effect on ocean eddies has not yet been determined. Here we examine work done by atmospheric winds on more than 1,200,000 mesoscale eddies identified from satellite altimetry data and show that atmospheric winds significantly damp mesoscale ocean eddies, particularly in the energetic western boundary current regions and the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, the large-scale wind stress curl is found to on average systematically inject kinetic energy into anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddies in the subtropical (subpolar) gyres while mechanically damps anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddies in the subpolar (subtropical) gyres.

  11. A daily global mesoscale ocean eddy dataset from satellite altimetry.

    PubMed

    Faghmous, James H; Frenger, Ivy; Yao, Yuanshun; Warmka, Robert; Lindell, Aron; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale ocean eddies are ubiquitous coherent rotating structures of water with radial scales on the order of 100 kilometers. Eddies play a key role in the transport and mixing of momentum and tracers across the World Ocean. We present a global daily mesoscale ocean eddy dataset that contains ~45 million mesoscale features and 3.3 million eddy trajectories that persist at least two days as identified in the AVISO dataset over a period of 1993-2014. This dataset, along with the open-source eddy identification software, extract eddies with any parameters (minimum size, lifetime, etc.), to study global eddy properties and dynamics, and to empirically estimate the impact eddies have on mass or heat transport. Furthermore, our open-source software may be used to identify mesoscale features in model simulations and compare them to observed features. Finally, this dataset can be used to study the interaction between mesoscale ocean eddies and other components of the Earth System.

  12. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approximate 10 to the 25th g in mass; and a later stage in which the approximately 10 to the 25th g planetesimals accumulate into the final planets. In the terrestrial planet region, an initial planetesimal swarm corresponding to the critical mass of dust layer gravitational instabilities is considered. In order to better understand the accumulation history of Mercury-sized bodies, 19 Monte-Carlo simulations of terrestrial planet growth were calculated. A Monte Carlo technique was used to investigate the orbital evolution of asteroidal collision debris produced interior to 2.6 AU. It was found that there are two regions primarily responsible for production of Earth-crossing meteoritic material and Apollo objects. The same techniques were extended to include the origin of Earth-approaching asteroidal bodies. It is found that these same two resonant mechanisms predict a steady-state number of Apollo-Amor about 1/2 that estimated based on astronomical observations.

  13. A numerical simulation of the Catalina Eddy

    SciTech Connect

    Ueyoshi, Kyozo; Roads, J.O.; Alpert, J.

    1991-12-31

    A shallow cyclonic eddy termed the Catalina Eddy has occasionally been observed during summer in the bight of southern California. The Catalina Eddy occurs within {approximately}100 km from the coastal mountains with a depth typically extending up to the marine inversion level of several hundred meters above sea level and a diameter on the order of 100--200 km. The Catalina Eddy is produced by the interaction between the synoptic-scale northerly flow and the formidable topography along the southern California coast. A favorable synoptic situation that enhances the increased low-level climatological northerly flow along the central California coastline is the presence of the prominent east-west pressure gradient between the subtropical East Pacific high and the inland thermal low over California. Increased northerlies impinging on the San Rafael mountains north of Santa Barbara result in enhanced mesoscale lee troughing in the bight and establishment of a narrow ridge alongshore, leading to establishment of cyclonic vorticity in the bight. This paper describes numerical simulations and predictions of a Catalina Eddy event with a high-resolution multi-level limited area model. The model is initialized and forced at the lateral boundaries by the National Meteorological Center`s (NMC) 2.5{degree} {times} 2.5{degree} global objective analysis and also by NMC`s medium range forecast model (MRF) 1--10 day forecasts. In the authors previous effort to simulate mesoscale disturbances such as the Catalina Eddy the integrations were performed up to 1 model-day utilizing the NMC analysis as fixed lateral boundary conditions. In this paper they describe the results of continuous 5- to 7-day simulations of the Catalina Eddy event of 26--30 June 1988 by utilizing time-dependent lateral boundary conditions obtained from NMC`s global objective analysis as well as NMC`s MRF forecasts.

  14. Temporal Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Thomas, B. C.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999, Stolz and Adams unveiled a subgrid-scale model for LES based upon approximately inverting (defiltering) the spatial grid-filter operator and termed .the approximate deconvolution model (ADM). Subsequently, the utility and accuracy of the ADM were demonstrated in a posteriori analyses of flows as diverse as incompressible plane-channel flow and supersonic compression-ramp flow. In a prelude to the current paper, a parameterized temporal ADM (TADM) was developed and demonstrated in both a priori and a posteriori analyses for forced, viscous Burger's flow. The development of a time-filtered variant of the ADM was motivated-primarily by the desire for a unifying theoretical and computational context to encompass direct numerical simulation (DNS), large-eddy simulation (LES), and Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation (RANS). The resultant methodology was termed temporal LES (TLES). To permit exploration of the parameter space, however, previous analyses of the TADM were restricted to Burger's flow, and it has remained to demonstrate the TADM and TLES methodology for three-dimensional flow. For several reasons, plane-channel flow presents an ideal test case for the TADM. Among these reasons, channel flow is anisotropic, yet it lends itself to highly efficient and accurate spectral numerical methods. Moreover, channel-flow has been investigated extensively by DNS, and a highly accurate data base of Moser et.al. exists. In the present paper, we develop a fully anisotropic TADM model and demonstrate its utility in simulating incompressible plane-channel flow at nominal values of Re(sub tau) = 180 and Re(sub tau) = 590 by the TLES method. The TADM model is shown to perform nearly as well as the ADM at equivalent resolution, thereby establishing TLES as a viable alternative to LES. Moreover, as the current model is suboptimal is some respects, there is considerable room to improve TLES.

  15. Carbon dioxide emissions in fallow periods of a corn-soybean rotation: eddy-covariance versus chamber methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes at terrestrial surface are typically quantified using eddy-covariance (EC) or chamber (Ch) techniques; however, long-term comparisons of the two techniques are not available. This study was conducted to assess the agreement between EC and Ch techniques when measuring CO2 ...

  16. Development and Experimental Validation of Large Eddy Simulation Techniques for the Prediction of Combustion-Dynamic Process in Syngas Combustion: Characterization of Autoignition, Flashback, and Flame-Liftoff at Gas-Turbine Relevant Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ihme, Matthias; Driscoll, James

    2015-08-31

    The objective of this closely coordinated experimental and computational research effort is the development of simulation techniques for the prediction of combustion processes, relevant to the oxidation of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels at gas-turbine relevant operating conditions. Specifically, the research goals are (i) the characterization of the sensitivity of syngas ignition processes to hydrodynamic processes and perturbations in temperature and mixture composition in rapid compression machines and ow-reactors and (ii) to conduct comprehensive experimental investigations in a swirl-stabilized gas turbine (GT) combustor under realistic high-pressure operating conditions in order (iii) to obtain fundamental understanding about mechanisms controlling unstable flame regimes in HHC-combustion.

  17. Transformed eddy-PV flux and positive synoptic eddy feedback onto low-frequency flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hong-Li; Jin, Fei-Fei; Kug, Jong-Seong; Gao, Li

    2011-06-01

    Interaction between synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) has been the subject of many studies. In this study, we further examine the interaction by introducing a transformed eddy-potential-vorticity (TEPV) flux that is obtained from eddy-potential-vorticity flux through a quasi-geostrophic potential-vorticity inversion. The main advantage of using the TEPV flux is that it combines the effects of the eddy-vorticity and heat fluxes into the net acceleration of the low-frequency flow in such a way that the TEPV flux tends to be analogous to the eddy-vorticity fluxes in the barotropic framework. We show that the anomalous TEPV fluxes are preferentially directed to the left-hand side of the low-frequency flow in all vertical levels throughout the troposphere for monthly flow anomalies and for climate modes such as the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Furthermore, this left-hand preference of the TEPV flux direction is a convenient three-dimensional indicator of the positive reinforcement of the low-frequency flow by net eddy-induced acceleration. By projecting the eddy-induced net accelerations onto the low-frequency flow anomalies, we estimate the eddy-induced growth rates for the low frequency flow anomalies. This positive eddy-induced growth rate is larger (smaller) in the lower (upper) troposphere. The stronger positive eddy feedback in the lower troposphere may play an important role in maintaining an equivalent barotropic structure of the low-frequency atmospheric flow by balancing some of the strong damping effect of surface friction.

  18. Transformed Eddy-PV Flux and Positive Synoptic Eddy Feedback onto Low-Frequency Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H.; Jin, F.; Kug, J.; Gao, L.

    2010-12-01

    Interaction between synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) has been the subject of many studies. In this study, we further examine the interaction by introducing a transformed eddy-potential-vorticity (TEPV) flux that is obtained from eddy-potential-vorticity flux through a quasi-geostrophic potential-vorticity inversion. The main advantage of using the TEPV flux is that it combines the effects of the eddy-vorticity and heat fluxes into the net acceleration of the low-frequency flow in such a way that the TEPV flux tends to be analogous to the eddy-vorticity fluxes in the barotropic framework. We show that the anomalous TEPV fluxes are preferentially directed to the left-hand side of the low-frequency flow in all vertical levels throughout the troposphere for monthly flow anomalies and for climate modes such as the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Furthermore, this left-hand preference of the TEPV flux direction is a convenient three-dimensional indicator of the positive reinforcement of the low-frequency flow by net eddy-induced acceleration. By projecting the eddy-induced net accelerations onto the low-frequency flow anomalies, we estimate the eddy-induced growth rates for the low frequency flow anomalies. This positive eddy-induced growth rate is larger (smaller) in the lower (upper) troposphere. The stronger positive eddy feedback in the lower troposphere may play an important role in maintaining an equivalent barotropic structure of the low-frequency atmospheric flow by balancing some of the strong damping effect of surface friction.

  19. Role of mesoscale eddies in transport of Fukushima-derived cesium isotopes in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budyansky, M. V.; Goryachev, V. A.; Kaplunenko, D. D.; Lobanov, V. B.; Prants, S. V.; Sergeev, A. F.; Shlyk, N. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of in situ measurements of 134Cs and 137Cs released from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) collected at surface and different depths in the western North Pacific in June and July 2012. It was found that 15 month after the incident concentrations of radiocesium in the Japan and Okhotsk seas were at background or slightly increased level, while they had increased values in the subarctic front area east of Japan. The highest concentrations of 134Cs and 137Cs up to 13.5±0.9 and 22.7±1.5 Bq m-3 have been found to exceed ten times the background levels before the accident. Maximal content of radiocesium was observed within subsurface and intermediate water layers inside the cores of anticyclonic eddies (100-500 m). Even slightly increased content of radiocesium was found at some eddies at depth of 1000 m. It is expected that convergence and subduction of surface water inside eddies are main mechanisms of downward transport of radionuclides. In situ observations are compared with the results of simulated advection of these radioisotopes by the AVISO altimetric velocity field. Different Lagrangian diagnostics are used to reconstruct the history and origin of synthetic tracers imitating measured seawater samples collected in each of those eddies. The results of observations are consistent with the simulated results. It is shown that the tracers, simulating water samples with increased radioactivity to be measured in the cruise, really visited the areas with presumably high level of contamination. Fast water advection between anticyclonic eddies and convergence of surface water inside eddies makes them responsible for spreading, accumulation and downward transport of cesium rich water to the intermediate depth in the frontal zone.

  20. Evidence of various mechanisms of Cd sequestration in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri, the non-accumulator Arabidopsis lyrata, and their progenies by combined synchrotron-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Huguet, Stéphanie; Meyer, Claire-Lise; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Testemale, Denis; Vantelon, Delphine; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is a model plant for Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the chemical forms of Cd, its distribution in leaves, and Cd accumulation and tolerance. An interspecific cross was carried out between A. halleri and the non-tolerant and non-hyperaccumulating relative A. lyrata providing progenies segregating for Cd tolerance and accumulation. Cd speciation and distribution were investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and microfocused X-ray fluorescence. In A. lyrata and non-tolerant progenies, Cd was coordinated by S atoms only or with a small contribution of O groups. Interestingly, the proportion of O ligands increased in A. halleri and tolerant progenies, and they were predominant in most of them, while S ligands were still present. Therefore, the binding of Cd with O ligands was associated with Cd tolerance. In A. halleri, Cd was mainly located in the xylem, phloem, and mesophyll tissue, suggesting a reallocation process for Cd within the plant. The distribution of the metal at the cell level was further discussed. In A. lyrata, the vascular bundles were also Cd enriched, but the epidermis was richer in Cd as compared with the mesophyll. Cd was identified in trichomes of both species. This work demonstrated that both Cd speciation and localization were related to the tolerance character of the plant. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Evaluation of a scalar eddy transport coefficient based on geometric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S. D.; Marshall, D. P.; Maddison, J. R.; Mak, J.

    2017-01-01

    A suite of idealized models is used to evaluate and compare several previously proposed scalings for the eddy transport coefficient in downgradient mesoscale eddy closures. Of special interest in this comparison is a scaling introduced as part of the eddy parameterization framework of Marshall et al. (2012), which is derived using the inherent geometry of the Eliassen-Palm eddy flux tensor. The primary advantage of using this coefficient in a downgradient closure is that all dimensional terms are explicitly specified and the only uncertainty is a nondimensional parameter, α, which is bounded by one in magnitude. In each model a set of passive tracers is initialized, whose flux statistics are used to invert for the eddy-induced tracer transport. Unlike previous work, where this technique has been employed to diagnose the tensor coefficient of a linear flux-gradient relationship, the idealization of these models allows the lateral eddy transport to be described by a scalar coefficient. The skill of the extant scalings is then measured by comparing their predicted values against the coefficients diagnosed using this method. The Marshall et al. (2012), scaling is shown to scale most closely with the diagnosed coefficients across all simulations. It is shown that the skill of this scaling is due to its functional dependence on the total eddy energy, and that this scaling provides an excellent match to the diagnosed fluxes even in the limit of constant α. Possible extensions to this work, including how to incorporate the resultant transport coefficient into the Gent and McWilliams parameterization, are discussed.

  2. Influence of fishing technique on organochlorine pesticide accumulation in fish and its possible human health risk in the Republic of Bénin.

    PubMed

    Yehouenou A Pazou, Elisabeth; Azehoun, Judicaël P; Ahoyo, Theodora; Aléodjrodo, Patrick Edorh; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2013-09-01

    In Bénin different techniques are used for large-scale commercial fishing, Acadjas (enclosures constructed in the river) and Whédos (holes made in the river banks). This study aimed at assessing the extent of contamination related to these fishing techniques. Fish contained residues of DDT and its metabolites, α-endosulfan, dieldrin, aldrin, endrin and lindane. Pesticide levels were similar in fish from Acadjas and Whédos, except for higher α-endosulfan levels in fish from the Whédos. Comparing pesticide intake levels through fish consumption with tolerable daily intake levels showed that in all cases risk for human health is low.

  3. Eddy stirring in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Ferrari, R.; Polzin, K. L.

    2011-09-01

    There is an ongoing debate concerning the distribution of eddy stirring across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the nature of its controlling processes. The problem is addressed here by estimating the isentropic eddy diffusivity κ from a collection of hydrographic and altimetric observations, analyzed in a mixing length theoretical framework. It is shown that, typically, κ is suppressed by an order of magnitude in the upper kilometer of the ACC frontal jets relative to their surroundings, primarily as a result of a local reduction of the mixing length. This observation is reproduced by a quasi-geostrophic theory of eddy stirring across a broad barotropic jet based on the scaling law derived by Ferrari and Nikurashin (2010). The theory interprets the observed widespread suppression of the mixing length and κ in the upper layers of frontal jets as the kinematic consequence of eddy propagation relative to the mean flow within jet cores. Deviations from the prevalent regime of mixing suppression in the core of upper-ocean jets are encountered in a few special sites. Such `leaky jet' segments appear to be associated with sharp stationary meanders of the mean flow that are generated by the interaction of the ACC with major topographic features. It is contended that the characteristic thermohaline structure of the Southern Ocean, consisting of multiple upper-ocean thermohaline fronts separated and underlaid by regions of homogenized properties, is largely a result of the widespread suppression of eddy stirring by parallel jets.

  4. Modelling of the North Atlantic eddy characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, Konstantin; Ibrayev, Rashit

    2017-04-01

    We investigate eddy characteristics of the Atlantic basin circulation and their impact on the ocean heat transport. A 15-year-long numerical experiment is performed with the global 3-dimensional z-coordinate INMIO ocean general circulation model of 0.1 deg., 49 levels resolution in conditions of the CORE-II protocol. The model is tuned to maximal intensity of eddies production by using only biharmonic filters instead of lateral viscous and diffusive terms in the model equations. Comparison with viscous and coarse-resolution simulations shows the increase of explicitly resolved heat transfer fraction and absolute values. Vertical turbulent mixing is parameterized by the Munk-Anderson scheme including convective adjustment. The sea ice is described by a simple thermodynamic submodel. The eddying velocity and temperature field components are defined as anomalies relative to the 3-month sliding mean. The regional distributions of hydrological parameters, eddy kinetic energy, heat convergence, meridional heat transport (MHT) and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) streamfunction, and their temporal variability are analyzed. In some parts of the basin the simulated eddy heat transport is opposite to the mean flow transport and may change direction with depth. The MHT intensity is slightly below observationally based assessments with notable influence of the East Greenland current simulation bias. The work is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project N 14-27-00126) and performed in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences.

  5. Eddy Current, Magnetic Particle and Hardness Testing, Aviation Quality Control (Advanced): 9227.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This unit of instruction includes the principles of eddy current, magnetic particle and hardness testing; standards used for analyzing test results; techniques of operating equipment; interpretation of indications; advantages and limitations of these methods of testing; care and calibration of equipment; and safety and work precautions. Motion…

  6. Numerical method for calculating the apparent eddy current conductivity loss on randomly rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feng; Nagy, Peter B.

    2004-06-01

    Because of their frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping the near-surface depth profile of the electrical conductivity. This technique is used to nondestructively characterize the subsurface residual stress and cold work distributions in shot-peened metal components. Unfortunately, the spurious surface roughness produced by the shot peening process causes an apparent loss of eddy current conductivity, thereby decreasing the accuracy of the measurements, especially in thermally relaxed specimens where the primary material effects are significantly reduced. In this paper, a numerical method is introduced based on the Rayleigh approximation for calculating the apparent eddy current conductivity loss exhibited by 1D randomly rough surfaces. The relevant boundary conditions are satisfied using the so-called point-by-point technique, and the results are first compared to the previously developed Rayleigh-Fourier technique for a 1D sinusoidal corrugation. Pseudorandom surface profiles of different autocorrelation functions are considered. It is found that the Gaussian model lends itself the best to numerical simulations, but it significantly underestimates the apparent eddy current conductivity loss expected on real shot-peened surfaces, which exhibit essentially exponential correlation function. It is also demonstrated that the Lorentzian model is numerically less stable, but physically closer to the exponential one. The latter could not be simulated reliably by the present numerical technique because of its slowly decaying high-frequency spectral components.

  7. Distributed point source method for the modeling of a three-dimensional eddy current NDE problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bore, T.; Joubert, P.-Y.; Placko, D.

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with modeling in electromagnetism in the field of eddy current for Non Destructive Evaluation. Several techniques could be used to diagnose structural damages. In eddy current application, a magnetic field generates by an excitation coil (or primary coil), interacts with a conductive target and generates eddy current. Variations in the phase and the magnitude of these eddy currents can be monitored using a second "receiver" coil. Variations in the physical properties (electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability,..) or the presence of any flaw in the target will cause a change in eddy current and a corresponding change in the phase and amplitude of measured signal. The interpretation of the signals requires a good understanding of the interaction between eddy current and structure. Therefore, researchers need analytical or numerical techniques to obtain a clear understanding of wave propagation behaviors. However, modeling of wave scattering phenomenon by conventional numerical techniques such as finite elements requires very fine mesh and heavy computational power. To go further, an innovative implementation of a semi-analytical modeling method, called the Distributed Points Source Method (DPSM), has been developed and used. The DPSM has already shown great potentialities for the versatile and computationally efficient modeling of complex electrostatic, electromagnetic or ultrasounic problems. In this paper, we report on a new implementation of the DPSM, called differential DPSM, which shows interesting prospects for the modeling of complex eddy current problems. In parallel, an Eddy Current Imager (ECI) has been recently developed in our laboratory in the aim of imaging cracks in metallic structures. In this paper, a simplified modeling of the ECI is presented using DPSM technique, the basics of DPSM formalism being firstly developed. A comparison between experimental and computed data obtained for a millimetric surface defect is presented in

  8. Procedure for Automated Eddy Current Crack Detection in Thin Titanium Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    This procedure provides the detailed instructions for conducting Eddy Current (EC) inspections of thin (5-30 mils) titanium membranes with thickness and material properties typical of the development of Ultra-Lightweight diaphragm Tanks Technology (ULTT). The inspection focuses on the detection of part-through, surface breaking fatigue cracks with depths between approximately 0.002" and 0.007" and aspect ratios (a/c) of 0.2-1.0 using an automated eddy current scanning and image processing technique.

  9. Eddy analysis in the Eastern China Sea using altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dandi; Wang, Jianhong; Liu, Yu; Dong, Changming

    2015-12-01

    Statistical characteristics of mesoscale eddies in the Eastern China Sea (ECS) are analyzed using altimetry sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) data from 1993 to 2010. A velocity geometry-based automated eddy detection scheme is employed to detect eddies from the SSHA data to generate an eddy data set. About 1,096 eddies (one lifetime of eddies is counted as one eddy) with a lifetime longer than or equal to 4 weeks are identified in this region. The average lifetime and radius of eddies are 7 weeks and 55 km, respectively, and there is no significant difference between cyclonic eddies (CEs) and anticyclonic eddies (AEs) in this respect. Eddies' lifetimes are generally longer in deep water than in shallow water. Most eddies propagate northeastward along the Kuroshio (advected by the Kuroshio), with more CEs generated on its western side and AEs on its eastern side. The variation of the Kuroshio transport is one of the major mechanisms for eddy genesis, however the generation of AEs on the eastern side of the Kuroshio (to the open ocean) is also subject to other factors, such as the wind stress curl due to the presence of the Ryukyu Islands and the disturbance from the open ocean.

  10. Characteristics of Oceanic Eddies in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C.; Cheng, Y.; Kuo, N.; Lo, Y.; Tsao, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, oceanic eddies in the north Pacific derived from satellite altimetry are statistically analyzed. An integration filtering algorithm based on connected component labeling and the Okubo-Weiss parameter is developed. The originated area, translation speed, and propagation pathway of all identified eddies are all determined by the integration filtering algorithm. Only eddies that have longer life span more than 12 weeks are considered. The results indicate that there are quantities of eddies with tens to hundreds of kilometers in spatial scales, and tens to hundreds of days in temporal scales. The 83% of eddies are generated between 15 degree North and 40 degree North and average translation speed is 4.5±1.9 km/day. The average life span is 20±11weeks, but warm eddies have longer life span than cold eddies. There are about 300 eddies generated in this ocean per year, but numbers of eddy keeps gaining more and more with a trend of 1.7±0.4 numbers per year. More interesting thing is that cold eddies with a trend of 1.1±0.5 numbers per year are growing more than warm eddies with a trend of 0.6±0.4 numbers per year. Referring to the pathway, most eddies propagate westward with slightly equatorward and poleward deflection of cold and warm eddies, respectively in the western North Pacific but not in the eastern North Pacific.

  11. Deep Eddies in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, H. H.; Bower, A. S.; Perez-Brunius, P.; Hamilton, P.

    2014-12-01

    A major Lagrangian program is currently underway to map the deep (1500-2500 m) circulation of the entire Gulf of Mexico. Beginning in 2011, more than 120 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been released in the eastern, central and western Gulf, many in pairs and triplets. Most floats are programmed to drift for two years, obtaining position fixes and temperature/pressure measurements three times daily. More than 80 floats have completed their missions, and results from the trajectories will be described with a focus on mesoscale eddying behavior. In particular, the first-ever observations of deep energetic anticyclonic eddies (possibly lenses) forming at and separating from a northeastward-flowing boundary current west of Campeche Bank will be discussed. The existence of these eddies has major implications for exchange between the continental slope and interior Gulf. The project is being supported by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

  12. Solitonlike solutions in loop current eddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamoto, Shoichiro

    1989-01-01

    The application of the nonlinear quasi-geostrophic equations to an isolated eddy in the western continental slope region in the Gulf of Mexico is examined for a two-layer ocean model with bottom topography. In the linear limit, solutions are topographic nondispersive waves. Form-preserving solutions, or solitons, have been found. The solution is shown to be a limiting form for a nonlinear dispersive system propagating northward along the topographic waveguide in the western continental slope region in the Gulf of Mexico. Using satellite-tracked drifter data, a linear relationship is found between the amplitude of the deduced stream function of the eddy and its observed translational velocity over the continental slope, which supports the hypothesis that some mesoscale eddies interacting with the continental slope behave as solitons.

  13. Anticyclonic eddy energy and pathways in the Algerian basin (1993-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessini, Federica; Perilli, Angelo; Olita, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    use in the study area. This automated method allowed the investigation of mesoscale eddy variability using several years (1993-2007) of satellite altimetry observations. To verify the reliability of the technique, we compared the eddy pathways derived from the application of the modified Penven method with independent observations. Preliminary results suggest that AEs, moving anticlockwise within the sub-basin, complete as many as two or three laps, depending on their lifetime, following the Algerian Gyre path. We suppose that AEs acquire kinetic energy from the Algerian current, occasionally in sufficient magnitude to cause their detachment. This phenomenon mainly takes place near the Sardinian Channel. Eddies formed on the thermal front, called Frontal Anticyclonic Eddies (FAEs), remain localized in the northern part of the sub-basin and have lower energy and shorter life than AEs. They usually don't interact with AEs. Basic statistics on eddy trajectories and energy characteristics allow the evaluation of these mesoscale structures' relevance of on (sub-) basin circulation.

  14. Estimation of rainfall interception in grassland using eddy flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, A.; Miyazawa, Y.; Inoue, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall interception plays an important role in the water cycle in natural ecosystems. Interception by the forest canopies have been widely observed or estimated over various ecosystems, such as tropical rainforest, evergreen forest and deciduous forest. However interception by the short canopies, e.g. shrubby plant, grassland and crop, has been rarely observed since it has been difficult to obtain reliable precipitation measurements under the canopy. In this study, we estimated monthly and annual rainfall interception in grassland using evapotranspiration data of eddy flux measurements. Experiments were conducted in grassland (Italian ryegrass) from 2010 to 2012 growing season in Kumamoto, Japan. Evapotranspiration (latent heat flux) were observed throughout the year based on the eddy covariance technique. A three dimensional sonic anemometer and an open path CO2/H2O analyzer were used to calculate 30 min flux. Other meteorological factors, such as air temperature, humidity and solar radiation, were also observed. Rainfall interception was estimated as follows. 1) Using evapotranspiration data during dry period, environmental response of surface conductance (gc) was inversely calculated based on the big-leaf model. 2) Evapotranspiration without interception during precipitation period was estimated using above model and environmental response of gc. 3) Assuming that evaporation of intercepted rainfall is equal to the difference in evapotranspiration between above estimation and actual measurements, rainfall interception was estimated over experimental period. The account of rainfall interception in grassland using this technique will be presented at the meeting.

  15. Measuring Eddy Heat and Constituent Fluxes with High-Resolution Na and Fe Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, A. Z.; Gardner, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Turbulent mixing by eddies generated by gravity wave breaking in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) can produce substantial vertical flux of heat and atmospheric constituent. Knowledge of the magnitude, geographic distribution and seasonal variability of this flux is important to a wide range of research problems, including general circulation modelling, atmospheric chemistry modelling, thermal balance calculations, and the study of the mesospheric metal and airglow layers. Because the eddy flux is difficult to measure, it is commonly parameterized as a diffusion process to account for the vertical transport. Doppler metal lidar techniques, coupled with large-aperture telescopes, now have the capability to directly measure this key transport process. In this work, the feasibility of deducing eddy flux from high spatial and temporal resolution lidar measurement is analysed in detail. It is shown that modern Doppler lidars should be able to measure the eddy fluxes and associated eddy diffusivity profiles throughout the mesopause region, when the raw measurements are collected at resolutions comparable to the inner scale of the turbulence spectrum. Like the measurements of gravity wave fluxes, long-term averaging, on the order of several tens of hours, would be required to obtain statistically significant results.

  16. Evaluation and field validation of Eddy-Current array probes for steam generator tube inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of the Improved Eddy-Current ISI for Steam Generator Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for inservice inspection of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification, and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC`s mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report describes the design of specialized high-speed 16-coil eddy-current array probes. Both pancake and reflection coils are considered. Test results from inspections using the probes in working steam generators are given. Computer programs developed for probe calculations are also supplied.

  17. Computer programs for the acquisition and analysis of eddy-current array probe data

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, J.R.; Dodd, C.V.

    1996-07-01

    Objective of the Improved Eddy-Curent ISI (in-service inspection) for Steam Generators Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for ISI of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC`s mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report documents computer programs that were developed for acquisition of eddy-current data from specially designed 16-coil array probes. Complete code as well as instructions for use are provided.

  18. Lateral mixing in the eddying regime and a new broad-ranging formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Matthew W.; Petersen, Mark R.; Wingate, Beth A.; Hunke, Elizabeth; Maltrud, Mathew

    We survey a number of issues associated with lateral dissipation in eddy-resolving ocean models and present two effective techniques. The first is a specification of lateral viscosity that is closely related to that of Chassignet and Garraffo [2001] involving the combined application of biharmonic and Laplacian forms of viscosity. The specification can in principle be applied across a broad range of model resolution, although our testing was performed only at eddy-resolving scale where a relatively simple form suffices. The second is the implementation of the Lagrangian averaged Navier-Stokes alpha (LANS-α) subgridscale turbulence scheme in a primitive equation ocean model, with our presentation here being largely a summary of the recent work of Hecht et al., [2008] and Petersen et al. [2008]. As an inherently non-dissipative turbulence parameterization, one can understand the higher levels of eddy variability with LANS-α as coming about through an increase in the effective Rossby radius of deformation

  19. A simple osmium post-fixation paraffin-embedment technique to identify lipid accumulation in fish liver using medaka (Oryziaslatipes) eggs and eleutheroembryos as lipid rich models.

    PubMed

    Mondon, J A; Howitt, J; Tosiano, M; Kwok, K W H; Hinton, D E

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipidosis is a non-specific biomarker of effect from pollution exposure in fish. Fatty liver is often misdiagnosed or overlooked in histological assessments due to the decreasing application of specific fat procedures and stains. For example, ethanol dehydration in standard paraffin processing removes lipids, leaving vacuoles of which the precise nature is unknown. Lipids can be identified using osmium post-fixation in semi-thin resin sections or transmission electron microscopy. However, both are expensive and technically demanding procedures, often not available for routine environmental risk assessment and monitoring programs. The current emphasis to reduce and refine animal toxicity testing, requires refinement of the suite of histopathological techniques currently available to maximize information gained from using fish for toxicity testing and as bio-indicators of environmental quality. This investigation has successfully modified an osmium post-fixation technique to conserve lipids in paraffin-embedded tissues using medaka (Oryzias latipes) eleutheroembryos and eggs (embryos) as lipid rich models.

  20. Eddy parameterization challenge suite I: Eady spindown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2013-04-01

    The first set of results in a suite of eddy-resolving Boussinesq, hydrostatic simulations is presented. Each set member consists of an initially linear stratification and shear as in the Eady problem, but this profile occupies only a limited region of a channel and is allowed to spin-down via baroclinic instability. The diagnostic focus is on the spatial structure and scaling of the eddy transport tensor, which is the array of coefficients in a linear flux-gradient relationship. The advective (antisymmetric) and diffusive (symmetric) components of the tensor are diagnosed using passive tracers, and the resulting diagnosed tensor reproduces the horizontal transport of the active tracer (buoyancy) to within ± 7% and the vertical transport to within ± 12%. The derived scalings are shown to be close in form to the standard Gent-McWilliams (antisymmetric) and Redi diffusivity (symmetric) tensors with a magnitude that varies in space (concentrated in the horizontal and vertical near the center of the frontal shear) and time as the eddies energize. The Gent-McWilliams eddy coefficient is equal to the Redi isopycnal diffusivity to within ± 6%, even as these coefficients vary with depth. The scaling for the magnitude of simulation parameters is determined empirically to within ± 28%. To achieve this accuracy, the eddy velocities are diagnosed directly and used in the tensor scalings, rather than assuming a correlation between eddy velocity and the mean flow velocity where ± 97% is the best accuracy achievable. Plans for the next set of models in the challenge suite are described.

  1. Tracking the PRIME eddy using satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ian P.; Heywood, Karen J.

    The PRIME cruise to the North Atlantic during June/July 1996 surveyed and sampled an extremely vigorous and deep-reaching eddy with a significant barotropic component. Although it exhibited anticyclonic flow and featured a warm core at depth, it had been capped at some point during its lifetime, so appeared as a cold feature in the upper 500 m. Satellite-derived sea-surface temperatures (SST) showed it to have moved little during the few weeks prior to the cruise. In this paper we discuss the origin of the PRIME eddy including where and when it is likely to have formed. Consistently large amounts of cloud cover restrict the use of SST imagery to track such features. Altimetry provides a better method to trace this eddy back in time and space since microwave radiation is not significantly affected by cloud cover. Sea-level anomaly (SLA) data from the TOPEX/POSEIDON and European Remote Sensing (ERS) satellites were used. Results show that the eddy remained almost stationary in the Iceland Basin since first being detected in late 1995 and that it almost certainly formed locally, probably as a result of an instability in the current flow around the northwest of the Hatton Bank. Comparisons between satellite SLAs and hydrographic estimates of sea-surface elevation confirm that the eddy had a substantial barotropic flow. Both the altimeter data and the sea-surface height derived from the acoustic Doppler current profiler agree that the PRIME eddy had a sea-surface elevation of about 20 cm and that its diameter was about 120 km.

  2. The Fusion of Isolated Nonlinear Eddies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    conceptually replaced by a solid cylinder. Initially, the cy=iider drifts toward the eddy; subsequently, it is pushed slightly into the eddy and is then held...that a "padlock" flow is indeed established when a lens is interacting with a solid cylinder. Using the details of this process it is argued that, in...bottom) so that the with a mutual boundary along which the depth does depth variations are of 0(1) and the centrifugal accel- not vanish (Fig. We shall

  3. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-25

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  4. Parameterisation of Eddies in Coarse Resolution Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-19

    quasi-Stokes ve - varying, e.g. on seasonal scales . (Should seasonal varia- locities in parameterizations. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 31, tion be included within...length scale in Fig. 1 is proportional to eddy amplitude. For linear theory, it appears as a delta- 7 function boundary layer. When the eddies have...finite amplitude, the vertical length scale over which the two -1.5 densities differ noticeably is of order z/ ’ a IVH /-2 - 0 1 2 which is the typical

  5. Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Sean J; Hecht, Matthew W; Petersen, Mark; Strelitz, Richard; Maltrud, Mathew E; Ahrens, James P; Hlawitschka, Mario; Hamann, Bernd

    2010-10-15

    Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

  6. Discontinuous Galerkin methods for dispersive shallow water models in closed basins: Spurious eddies and their removal using curved boundary methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmoeller, D. T.; Stastna, M.; Lamb, K. G.

    2016-11-01

    Discontinuous Galerkin methods offer a promising methodology for treating nearly hyperbolic systems such as dispersion-modified shallow water equations in complicated basins. Use of straight-edged triangular elements can lead to the generation of spurious eddies when wave fronts propagate around sharp, re-entrant obstacles such as headlands. While these eddies may be removed by adding strong artificial dissipation (e.g., eddy viscosity), for nearly inviscid simulations that focus on wave phenomena this approach is not reasonable. We demonstrate that the moderate order Discontinuous Galerkin methodology may be extended to curved triangular elements provided that the integral formulations are computed with high-order quadrature and cubature rules. Simulations with the new technique do not exhibit spurious eddy generation in idealized complex domains or real-world basins as exemplified by Pinehurst Lake, Alberta, Canada.

  7. Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Staining Techniques for Cell Viability and Accumulation of PHA and polyP in Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be combined with a number of staining techniques to reveal the relationships between the microorganisms and their function in complex microbial systems with a single-cell resolution. In this chapter, we have focused on staining methods for intracellular storage compounds (polyhydroxyalkanoates, polyphosphate) and a measure for cell viability, reduction of the tetrazolium-based redox stain CTC. These protocols are optimized for the study of microorganisms in waste-water treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), but they may also be used with minor modifications in many other ecosystems.

  8. An Extensible Processing Framework for Eddy-covariance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durden, D.; Fox, A. M.; Metzger, S.; Sturtevant, C.; Durden, N. P.; Luo, H.

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of large data collecting networks has not only led to an increase of available information, but also in the complexity of analyzing the observations. Timely dissemination of readily usable data products necessitates a streaming processing framework that is both automatable and flexible. Tower networks, such as ICOS, Ameriflux, and NEON, exemplify this issue by requiring large amounts of data to be processed from dispersed measurement sites. Eddy-covariance data from across the NEON network are expected to amount to 100 Gigabytes per day. The complexity of the algorithmic processing necessary to produce high-quality data products together with the continued development of new analysis techniques led to the development of a modular R-package, eddy4R. This allows algorithms provided by NEON and the larger community to be deployed in streaming processing, and to be used by community members alike. In order to control the processing environment, provide a proficient parallel processing structure, and certify dependencies are available during processing, we chose Docker as our "Development and Operations" (DevOps) platform. The Docker framework allows our processing algorithms to be developed, maintained and deployed at scale. Additionally, the eddy4R-Docker framework fosters community use and extensibility via pre-built Docker images and the Github distributed version control system. The capability to process large data sets is reliant upon efficient input and output of data, data compressibility to reduce compute resource loads, and the ability to easily package metadata. The Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) is a file format that can meet these needs. A NEON standard HDF5 file structure and metadata attributes allow users to explore larger data sets in an intuitive "directory-like" structure adopting the NEON data product naming conventions.

  9. Ultra High Precision Laser Monitor for Oxygen Eddy Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahniser, M. S.; Nelson, D. D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Herndon, S. C.; McManus, J. B.; Jervis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric oxygen provides one of the most powerful tracers to study the carbon cycle through its close interaction with carbon dioxide. Keeling and co-workers demonstrated this at the global scale by using small variations in atmospheric oxygen content to disentangle oceanic and terrestrial carbon sinks. It would be very exciting to apply similar ideas at the ecosystem level to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere exchange and our ability to predict the response of the biosphere and atmosphere to climate change. The eddy covariance technique is perhaps the most effective approach available to quantify the exchange of gases between these spheres. Therefore, eddy covariance flux measurements of oxygen would be extremely valuable. However, this requires a fast response (0.1 seconds), high relative precision (0.001% or 10 per meg) oxygen sensor. We report recent progress in developing such a sensor using a high resolution visible laser to probe the oxygen A-band electronic transition. This sensor will enable oxygen flux measurements using eddy covariance. In addition, we will incorporate a second laser in this instrument to simultaneously determine the fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor within the same sampling cell. This will provide a direct, real time measurement of the ratio of the flux of oxygen to that of carbon dioxide. This ratio is expected to vary on short time scales and small spatial scales due to the differing stoichiometry of processes producing and consuming carbon dioxide. Thus measuring the variations in the ratio of oxygen and carbon dioxide fluxes will provide mechanistic information to improve our understanding of the crucial exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere.

  10. Gulf Stream eddies - Recent observations in the western Sargasso Sea.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, P. L.; Knauss, J. A.; Strong, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    A cyclonic Gulf Stream eddy was observed in the western Sargasso Sea by satellite infrared measurements and later confirmed by ship measurements. Fourteen months of observations indicate that the eddy moved southwestward at an average rate of 1 mile per day. The evidence suggests that the eddy was absorbed by the Gulf Stream off Florida.

  11. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  12. The turbulent cascade of individual eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas-Cerdeira, Cecilia; Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Jiménez, Javier

    2014-11-01

    The merging and splitting processes of Reynolds-stress carrying structures in the inertial range of scales are studied through their time-resolved evolution in channels at Reλ = 100 - 200 . Mergers and splits coexist during the whole life of the structures, and are responsible for a substantial part of their growth and decay. Each interaction involves two or more eddies and results in little overall volume loss or gain. Most of them involve a small eddy that merges with, or splits from, a significantly larger one. Accordingly, if merge and split indexes are respectively defined as the maximum number of times that a structure has merged from its birth or will split until its death, the mean eddy volume grows linearly with both indexes, suggesting an accretion process rather than a hierarchical fragmentation. However, a non-negligible number of interactions involve eddies of similar scale, with a second probability peak of the volume of the smaller parent or child at 0.3 times that of the resulting or preceding structure. Funded by the Multiflow project of the ERC.

  13. Large-Eddy Simulation and Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout,R D; Naegle,S; Wittum,G

    2001-06-18

    A method to simulate turbulent flows with Large-Eddy Simulation on unstructured grids is presented. Two kinds of dynamic models are used to model the unresolved scales of motion and are compared with each other on different grids. Thereby the behavior of the models is shown and additionally the feature of adaptive grid refinement is investigated. Furthermore the parallelization aspect is addressed.

  14. Cycloidal meandering of a mesoscale anticyclonic eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizner, Ziv; Shteinbuch-Fridman, Biana; Makarov, Viacheslav; Rabinovich, Michael

    2017-08-01

    By applying a theoretical approach, we propose a hypothetical scenario that might explain some features of the movement of a long-lived mesoscale anticyclone observed during 1990 in the Bay of Biscay [R. D. Pingree and B. Le Cann, "Three anticyclonic slope water oceanic eddies (SWODDIES) in the southern Bay of Biscay in 1990," Deep-Sea Res., Part A 39, 1147 (1992)]. In the remote-sensing infrared images, at the initial stage of observations, the anticyclone was accompanied by two cyclonic eddies, so the entire structure appeared as a tripole. However, at later stages, only the anticyclone was seen in the images, traveling generally west. Unusual for an individual eddy were the high speed of its motion (relative to the expected planetary beta-drift) and the presence of almost cycloidal meanders in its trajectory. Although surface satellites seem to have quickly disappeared, we hypothesize that subsurface satellites continued to exist, and the coherence of the three vortices persisted for a long time. A significant perturbation of the central symmetry in the mutual arrangement of three eddies constituting a tripole can make reasonably fast cycloidal drift possible. This hypothesis is tested with two-layer contour-dynamics f-plane simulations and with finite-difference beta-plane simulations. In the latter case, the interplay of the planetary beta-effect and that due to the sloping bottom is considered.

  15. Algerian Eddies lifetime can near 3 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puillat, I.; Taupier-Letage, I.; Millot, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Algerian Current (AC) is unstable and generates mesoscale meanders and eddies. Only anticyclonic eddies can develop and reach diameters over 200 km with vertical extents down to the bottom (˜3000 m). Algerian Eddies (AEs) first propagate eastward along the Algerian slope at few kilometers per day. In the vicinity of the Channel of Sardinia, a few AEs detach from the Algerian slope and propagate along the Sardinian one. It was hypothesized that AEs then followed a counter-clockwise circuit in the eastern part of the basin. Maximum recorded lifetimes were known to exceed 9 months. Within the framework of the 1-year Eddies and Leddies Interdisciplinary Study off Algeria (ELISA) experiment (1997-1998), we exhaustively tracked two AEs, using mainly an ˜3-year time series of NOAA/AVHRR satellite images. We show that AEs lifetimes can near 3 years, exceeding 33 months at least. We also confirm the long-lived AEs preferential circuit in the eastern part of the Algerian Basin, and specify that it may include several loops (at least three).

  16. Eddy impact on the Southern Ocean ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennel, R. L.; Kamenkovich, I. V.; Fine, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the specific role of mesoscale eddies and coherent structures in the ventilation of the Southern Ocean through the analysis of Lagrangian particle trajectories in a suite of idealized numerical simulations. Being the biggest potential reservoir for heat and atmospheric gases, the Southern Ocean is of great importance in the Earth's climate system. Therefore, the understanding of ventilation, the process establishing communication between the surface mixed layer and the ocean interior, is crucial to quantify the storage of CO2 by the ocean and to improve climate change projections. Idealized numerical simulations of the Southern Ocean at 1/8o resolution are carried out using the NEMO Ocean General Circulation Model. Twin simulations with and without eddies having the same stratification and mean circulation, are considered using several definitions of eddies. The analysis of the differences between such simulations allows examination of the direct effect of eddies on ventilation of the Southern Ocean. The role played by coherent structures is also discussed by looking at the trajectories of particles specifically injected inside individual vortices.

  17. New Approach to Estimate Daytime Ecosystem Respiration From Conventional Eddy Covariance Data Using Conditional Sampling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. K.; Martin, J. G.; Siqueira, M. B.; Foken, T.; Law, B. E.; Loescher, H. W.; Katul, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    Daytime respiration from tall-forested ecosystems remains among the least understood components in the total carbon balance. These forests pose unique challenges to respiration measurements because of the large number of respiring organs, their complex vertical distribution and their high spatial variability in forest floor carbon dioxide efflux. The definition of the net vertical flux (FN) as covariance between fluctuations of vertical velocity and perturbations in carbon dioxide density using the Eddy covariance (EC) technique does not lend itself to a formal decomposition into its 'ecologically desirable' component fluxes photosynthesis (FA) and respiration (Re) at daytime. Here, a new approach based on conditional sampling methods, quadrant analysis, and Relaxed Eddy Accumulation formulation is explored on carbon dioxide, water vapor, and vertical velocity time series to arrive at independent estimates of daytime Re directly from conventional EC measurements. The conceptual framework is based on the assumption that organized updrafts carry an unambiguous imprint of different scalar sinks and sources within the canopy volume. The new method is tested against datasets from 4 coniferous and 1 deciduous sites in North America and Europe (4 AMERIFLUX, 1 FLUXNET) most of them providing multi-level EC measurements. Results from comparisons of i) daytime Re against Re = FN at night, ii) temperature sensitivity coefficients (Q10) and base respiration rates (R10) derived from soil carbon dioxide efflux chambers and the new method, and iii) intercepts of light-response curves (FN versus shortwave down-welling radiation) to bulk respiration at daytime showed the effectiveness of the proposed method at 3 out of the 5 sites. Limitations were posed by the dense canopy of the deciduous site, and possibly by a summer drought reducing the coherence of scalar exchange in the carbon dioxide and water vapor signals at one coniferous site. A predictive skill indicator based on

  18. Understanding positive feedback between PNA and synoptic eddies by eddy structure decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fang; Ren, Hong-Li; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, You

    2017-06-01

    In the upper troposphere during winter, positive synoptic eddy (SE) feedback plays an indispensible role in maintaining the Pacific-North American (PNA) pattern that dominates climate variability on inter-annual timescales over the North Pacific and downstream regions. This study shows that the eddy forcing, induced by eddy-vorticity (EV) fluxes, is not only in-phase with, but also downstream to the PNA pattern in terms of its northeast Pacific lobe. We employ the eddy structure decomposition method to understand such an observed PNA-SEs feedback, and propose a kinematic mechanism that can depict dynamical processes associated with the eddy structure change and its induced positive eddy feedback relative to the PNA flow pattern. With this method, the winter-mean PNA-related SE structures are separated into climatological (basic) and anomalous SE structures, and these two parts can be used to represent the changes in SE structure in a statistical sense and then to calculate the EV fluxes in order to further elucidate the feedback mechanism. It is demonstrated that, on one hand, the winter-mean PNA flow tends to systematically deform the structures of SEs and induce anomalous EV fluxes, and these winter-mean EV fluxes primarily converge into the PNA cyclonic center, which, in return enhances the PNA flow. On the other hand, the PNA-related northeast Pacific flow is featured by a stronger zonal wind shear in the east than the west, which can induce larger zonal-slanting eddy structure change and then stronger meridional EV fluxes that converge to form downstream feedback. This kinematic mechanism may help to deeply understand the dynamical eddy feedback between the low-frequency PNA flow and high-frequency SEs.

  19. Volume eddy-driven heat and freshwater fluxes across 47°N in the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendardo, Ilaria; Müller, Vasco; Kieke, Dagmar; Myers, Paul G.; Pennelly, Clark; Rhein, Monika; Steinfeldt, Reiner

    2017-04-01

    The western subpolar North Atlantic between 45°N and 50°N is characterized by the presence of a large amount of eddies and other mesoscale events that play an important role in the local exchange and horizontal mixing of water masses. Eddies trap water with distinguished properties like temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrients, from the region of their formation. The properties/tracers are then transported with the eddy over longer distances until the eddy gradually dissipates or abruptly decays. Thanks to eddy detection algorithms it has been possible to study the meridional transport of cold and warm water trapped within eddies as they cross 47°N and calculate the temperature fluxes across this line. In order to extend these calculations to full volume fluxes by including a vertical component, high spatial resolution temperature and salinity observations are needed. With the onset of the Argo program the number of salinity and temperature profiles dramatically increased. Although the subpolar North Atlantic is one of the most densest sampled regions in order to cope with the large seasonal to interannual variability and strong mesoscale features, the spatial and temporal coverage is not sufficient to combine each detected eddy with a respective temperature and salinity profile. However a promising method to infer high-resolution salinity and temperature data is the Gravest Empirical Mode (GEM) technique. This technique combined Argo and altimeter data to exploit the relationship between T/S profiles and dynamic height in the North Atlantic. Thanks to this method salinity and temperature time series can be determined from 1993 until nowadays with the same resolution as the altimeter data, that is daily projections onto a 1/4° Cartesian grid. The GEM method in combination with three-dimensional detection of eddies in high resolution models could help to understand the connection between eddy surface signals and the corresponding vertical structure. It also

  20. Nonlinear mixing algorithm for suppression of TSP signals in bobbin coil eddy current data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunchalam, K.; Ramuhalli, P.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S.

    2002-05-01

    Multi-frequency eddy current techniques are commonly used in inspecting steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants. The measurement usually contains dominant contributions from external tube support plates that tend to mask signals from defects. This paper proposes the use of a non-linear mixing technique using radial basis function neural networks to suppress the TSP signals. Initial results presented in this paper look very promising and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Obituary: John Allen Eddy (1931-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2011-12-01

    Jack Eddy, who was born 25 March 1931 in Pawnee City in southeastern Nebraska, died after a long battle with cancer in Tucson, Arizona, on 10 June 2009. Best known for his work on the long-term instability of the sun, described in a landmark paper in Science titled "The Maunder Minimum," he also deserves recognition as one of the triumvirate who founded the Historical Astronomy Division of the AAS. His father ran a cooperative farm store where Jack worked as a teenager; his parents were of modest means and there were concerns whether he could afford college, but one of the state senators, also from Pawnee City, nominated him for the U.S. Naval Academy. A course in celestial navigation gave him a love of the sky. After graduation in 1953, he served four years on aircraft carriers in the Pacific during the Korean War and then as a navigator and operations officer on a destroyer in the Persian Gulf. In 1957, he left the Navy and entered graduate school at the University of Colorado in Boulder, where in 1962 he received a Ph.D. in astro-geophysics. His thesis, supervised by Gordon Newkirk, dealt with light scattering in the upper atmosphere, based on data from stratospheric balloon flights. He then worked as teacher and researcher at the High Altitude Observatory in Boulder. Always adventuresome and willing to explore new frontiers, on his own time Eddy examined an Amerindian stone circle in the Big Horn mountains of Wyoming, a so-called medicine wheel, concluding that there were alignments with both the solstitial sun and Aldebaran. His conjectures became a cover story on Science magazine in June of 1974. In 1971 Jack privately reproduced for his friends a small collection of his own hilarious cartoons titled "Job Opportunities for Out-of-work Astronomers," with an abstract beginning, "Contrary to popular belief, a PhD in Astronomy/Astrophysics need not be a drawback in locating work in this decade." For example, under merchandising, a used car salesman advertises

  2. Large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The three-dimensional, time-dependent primitive equations of motion were numerically integrated for the case of turbulent channel flow. A partially implicit numerical method was developed. An important feature of this scheme is that the equation of continuity is solved directly. The residual field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model, while the large-scale field was obtained directly from the solution of the governing equations. An important portion of the initial velocity field was obtained from the solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The pseudospectral method was used for numerical differentiation in the horizontal directions, and second-order finite-difference schemes were used in the direction normal to the walls. The large eddy simulation technique is capable of reproducing some of the important features of wall-bounded turbulent flows. The resolvable portions of the root-mean square wall pressure fluctuations, pressure velocity-gradient correlations, and velocity pressure-gradient correlations are documented.

  3. Cosmological fluid mechanics with adaptively refined large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Almgren, A. S.; Braun, H.; Engels, J. F.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Schulz, J.; Mekuria, R. R.; Aspden, A. J.; Bell, J. B.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate turbulence generated by cosmological structure formation by means of large eddy simulations using adaptive mesh refinement. In contrast to the widely used implicit large eddy simulations, which resolve a limited range of length-scales and treat the effect of turbulent velocity fluctuations below the grid scale solely by numerical dissipation, we apply a subgrid-scale model for the numerically unresolved fraction of the turbulence energy. For simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we utilize a new methodology that allows us to adjust the scale-dependent energy variables in such a way that the sum of resolved and unresolved energies is globally conserved. We test our approach in simulations of randomly forced turbulence, a gravitationally bound cloud in a wind, and the Santa Barbara cluster. To treat inhomogeneous turbulence, we introduce an adaptive Kalman filtering technique that separates turbulent velocity fluctuations on resolved length-scales from the non-turbulent bulk flow. From the magnitude of the fluctuating component and the subgrid-scale turbulence energy, a total turbulent velocity dispersion of several 100 km s-1 is obtained for the Santa Barbara cluster, while the low-density gas outside the accretion shocks is nearly devoid of turbulence. The energy flux through the turbulent cascade and the dissipation rate predicted by the subgrid-scale model correspond to dynamical time-scales around 5 Gyr, independent of numerical resolution.

  4. Large eddy simulation of mechanical mixing in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2012-03-01

    A comprehensive study of anaerobic digestion requires an advanced turbulence model technique to accurately predict mixing flow patterns because the digestion process that involves mass transfer between anaerobes and their substrates is primarily dependent on detailed information about the fine structure of turbulence in the digesters. This study presents a large eddy simulation (LES) of mechanical agitation of non-Newtonian fluids in anaerobic digesters, in which the sliding mesh method is used to characterize the impeller rotation. The three subgrid scale (SGS) models investigated are: (i) Smagorinsky-Lilly model, (ii) wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity model, and (iii) kinetic energy transport (KET) model. The simulation results show that the three SGS models produce very similar flow fields. A comparison of the simulated and measured axial velocities indicates that the LES profile shapes are in general agreement with the experimental data but they differ markedly in velocity magnitudes. A check of impeller power and flow numbers demonstrates that all the SGS models give excellent predictions, with the KET model performing the best. Moreover, the performance of six Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models are assessed and compared with the LES results.

  5. Coupled circuit numerical analysis of eddy currents in an open MRI system.

    PubMed

    Akram, Md Shahadat Hossain; Terada, Yasuhiko; Keiichiro, Ishi; Kose, Katsumi

    2014-08-01

    We performed a new coupled circuit numerical simulation of eddy currents in an open compact magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Following the coupled circuit approach, the conducting structures were divided into subdomains along the length (or width) and the thickness, and by implementing coupled circuit concepts we have simulated transient responses of eddy currents for subdomains in different locations. We implemented the Eigen matrix technique to solve the network of coupled differential equations to speed up our simulation program. On the other hand, to compute the coupling relations between the biplanar gradient coil and any other conducting structure, we implemented the solid angle form of Ampere's law. We have also calculated the solid angle for three dimensions to compute inductive couplings in any subdomain of the conducting structures. Details of the temporal and spatial distribution of the eddy currents were then implemented in the secondary magnetic field calculation by the Biot-Savart law. In a desktop computer (Programming platform: Wolfram Mathematica 8.0®, Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz; OS: Windows 7 Professional; Memory (RAM): 4.00GB), it took less than 3min to simulate the entire calculation of eddy currents and fields, and approximately 6min for X-gradient coil. The results are given in the time-space domain for both the direct and the cross-terms of the eddy current magnetic fields generated by the Z-gradient coil. We have also conducted free induction decay (FID) experiments of eddy fields using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe to verify our simulation results. The simulation results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In this study we have also conducted simulations for transient and spatial responses of secondary magnetic field induced by X-gradient coil. Our approach is fast and has much less computational complexity than the conventional electromagnetic numerical simulation

  6. Dynamically consistent parameterization of mesoscale eddies. Part I: Simple model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berloff, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    This work aims at developing a framework for dynamically consistent parameterization of mesoscale eddy effects for use in non-eddy-resolving ocean circulation models. The proposed eddy parameterization framework is successfully tested on the classical, wind-driven double-gyre model, which is solved both with explicitly resolved vigorous eddy field and in the non-eddy-resolving configuration with the eddy parameterization replacing the eddy effects. The parameterization locally approximates transient eddy flux divergence by spatially localized and temporally periodic forcing, referred to as the plunger, and focuses on the linear-dynamics flow solution induced by it. The nonlinear self-interaction of this solution, referred to as the footprint, characterizes and quantifies the induced cumulative eddy forcing exerted on the large-scale flow. We find that spatial pattern and amplitude of the footprint strongly depend on the underlying large-scale and the corresponding relationships provide the basis for the eddy parameterization and its closure on the large-scale flow properties. Dependencies of the footprints on other important parameters of the problem are also systematically analyzed. The parameterization utilizes the local large-scale flow information, constructs and scales the corresponding footprints, and then sums them up over the gyres to produce the resulting eddy forcing field, which is interactively added to the model as an extra forcing. The parameterization framework is implemented in the simplest way, but it provides a systematic strategy for improving the implementation algorithm.

  7. Random-forcing model of the mesoscale oceanic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berloff, Pavel S.

    2005-04-01

    The role of mesoscale oceanic eddies in driving large-scale currents is studied in an eddy-resolving midlatitude double-gyre ocean model. The reference solution is decomposed into large-scale and eddy components in a way which is dynamically consistent with a non-eddy-resolving ocean model. That is, the non-eddy-resolving solution driven by this eddy-forcing history, calculated on the basis of this decomposition, correctly approximates the original flow. The main effect of the eddy forcing on the large-scale flow is to enhance the eastward-jet extension of the subtropical western boundary current. This is an anti-diffusive process, which cannot be represented in terms of turbulent diffusion. It is shown that the eddy-forcing history can be approximated as a space-time correlated, random-forcing process in such a way that the non-eddy-resolving solution correctly approximates the reference solution. Thus, the random-forcing model can potentially replace the diffusion model, which is commonly used to parameterize eddy effects on the large-scale currents. The eddy-forcing statistics are treated as spatially inhomogeneous but stationary, and the dynamical roles of space-time correlations and spatial inhomogeneities are systematically explored. The integral correlation time, oscillations of the space correlations, and inhomogeneity of the variance are found to be particularly important for the flow response.

  8. Anatomy of three warm-core Leeuwin Current eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Rosemary; Fang, Fangxin; Fieux, Michele; Molcard, Robert

    2003-07-01

    The vertical structures of three warm-core Leeuwin Current eddies are described, as well as their temporal evolution determined from altimetric data. These warm-core eddies have large positive sea-level anomalies, although their surface temperature fields are not necessarily warmer than the ambient waters. These eddies were observed some 350 km offshore from the Leeuwin Current in September 2000, around 25-30°S, and their vertical structure and temporal evolution show they were formed at the coast in May, when the Leeuwin Current is strongest. After separation from the current, the warm-core eddies drifted WNW following isopycnal contours, and were strongly steered by bathymetry. These eddies penetrated to at least 1500 m depth; the strongest eddy, Eddy B, influenced isopycnals to 2500 m. Eddy B appeared to be trapped and intensified by a Leeuwin Current squirt that directed warm, low-salinity water offshore from August to October. The average annual eddy heat and salt fluxes for waters warmer than 8°C are estimated at 0.004 PW and 3×10 5 kg s -1, respectively. The magnitude of these eddy fluxes is 20-30% of the annual mean poleward heat and salt flux in the eastern Indian Ocean, and is within the range of values observed for Agulhas eddies entering the South Atlantic.

  9. Projected changes to Tasman Sea eddies in a future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Eric C. J.; O'Kane, Terence J.; Holbrook, Neil J.

    2015-11-01

    The Tasman Sea is a hot spot of ocean warming, that is linked to the increased poleward influence of the East Australian Current (EAC) over recent decades. Specifically, the EAC produces mesoscale eddies which have significant impacts on the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Tasman Sea. To effectively consider and explain potential eddy changes in the next 50 years, we use high-resolution dynamically downscaled climate change simulations to characterize the projected future marine climate and mesoscale eddies in the Tasman Sea through the 2060s. We assess changes in the marine climate and the eddy field using bulk statistics and by detecting and tracking individual eddies. We find that the eddy kinetic energy is projected to increase along southeast Australia. In addition, we find that eddies in the projected future climate are composed of a higher proportion of anticyclonic eddies in this region and that these eddies are longer lived and more stable. This amounts to nearly a doubling of eddy-related southward temperature transport in the upper 200 m of the Tasman Sea. These changes are concurrent with increases in baroclinic and barotropic instabilities focused around the EAC separation point. This poleward transport and increase in eddy activity would be expected to also increase the frequency of sudden warming events, including ocean temperature extremes, with potential impacts on marine fisheries, aquaculture, and biodiversity off Tasmania's east coast, through direct warming or competition/predation from invasive migrating species.

  10. Zooplankton biomass and indices of feeding and metabolism in island-generated eddies around Gran Canaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-León, S.; Almeida, C.; Gómez, M.; Torres, S.; Montero, I.; Portillo-Hahnefeld, A.

    2001-08-01

    Zooplankton biomass and indices of grazing (gut fluorescence), respiration (electron transfer system, ETS), ammonia excretion (glutamate dehydrogenase, GDH) and growth (aspartate transcarbamylase, ATC) were studied around the island of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands) during the so-called "late winter bloom". Four size classes (100-200, 200-500, 500-1000 and >1000 μm) were studied to assess the contribution of each size fraction to the mesoscale plankton distribution around the island. Cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies were observed downstream the island transporting and entraining water rich in chlorophyll. Zooplankton biomass showed a high variability around the island but it was dramatically lower in the core of the cyclonic eddy induced by the island, probably due to the divergent effect produced by the physical structure. A filament of relatively cold-water was also found reaching the island from the upwelling area off northwest Africa. High zooplankton biomass was observed in association with the filament water and in the vicinity of the anticyclonic eddy shed by the island. Specific gut content showed higher values in the boundaries of the cyclonic structures, while ETS and GDH activities where higher windward of the island, in both the cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies depending on the size fraction considered. With the restrictions of using those indices, control of primary production by grazing was 11-22% and up to 41% of the calculated ingestion from the indices of metabolism and growth could be supported by nonpigmented food. Calculated excretion rates could support about 8% of primary production. The low impact of zooplankton on autotrophic production, the low values of the index of growth and the distribution of biomass in relation to the presence of eddies downstream of Gran Canaria suggest that accumulation was the causative mechanism for the presence of high zooplankton biomass leeward of the island.

  11. Do East Australian Current anticyclonic eddies leave the Tasman Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Gabriela S.; Oke, Peter R.; Rykova, Tatiana; Coleman, Richard; Ridgway, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Using satellite altimetry and high-resolution model output we analyze the pathway of large, long-lived anticyclonic eddies that originate near the East Australian Current (EAC) separation point. We show that 25-30% of these eddies propagate southward, around Tasmania, leave the Tasman Sea, and decay in the Great Australian Bight. This pathway has not been previously documented owing to poor satellite sampling off eastern Tasmania. As eddies propagate southward, they often "stall" for several months at near-constant latitude. Along the pathway eddies become increasingly barotropic. Eddy intensity is primarily influenced by merging with other eddies and a gradual decay otherwise. Surface temperature anomaly associated with anticyclonic eddies changes as they propagate, while surface salinity anomaly tends to remain relatively unchanged as they propagate.

  12. Biogeochemical properties of eddies in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenillat, Fanny; Franks, Peter J. S.; Combes, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    The California Current System (CCS) has intense mesoscale activity that modulates and exports biological production from the coastal upwelling system. To characterize and quantify the ability of mesoscale eddies to affect the local and regional planktonic ecosystem of the CCS, we analyzed a 10 year-long physical-biological model simulation, using eddy detection and tracking to isolate the dynamics of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies. As they propagate westward across the shelf, cyclonic eddies efficiently transport coastal planktonic organisms and maintain locally elevated production for up to 1 year (800 km offshore). Anticyclonic eddies, on the other hand, have a limited impact on local production over their ~6 month lifetime as they propagate 400 km offshore. At any given time ~8% of the model domain was covered by eddy cores. Though the eddies cover a small area, they explain ~50 and 20% of the transport of nitrate and plankton, respectively.

  13. Eddy-Memory mode of decadal ocean variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manucharyan, G. E.; Thompson, A. F.; Spall, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Most low-resolution ocean models use mesoscale eddy parameterizations that determine the amplitude of eddy fluxes at a particular point in time and space from large-scale state of the ocean at the same point in time and space. However, observations show that eddies can persist in the open ocean for months to years, propagating large distances from their formation regions. Thus, a field of mesoscale eddies can carry a finite memory of past ocean states. Here, we explore the large-scale effects of this memory and introduce an improvement to the Gent-McWilliams (GM) eddy parameterization that relaxes the assumption of the temporal locality of eddy fluxes. We use an idealized eddy-resolving ocean model to demonstrate that the memory directly leads to an emergence of a multi-decadal ocean variability mode. Validating our new eddy parameterization with the model simulations, we show that the mode has a period T = 2π √ {Te γ } with a damping time scale 2γ , where γ is the eddy memory time scale that can be diagnosed from the model, Te ˜ R2/K is the eddy diffusion time scale, K is the eddy diffusivity, and R is the spatial scale of the current. For a gyre driven by time-dependent Ekman pumping, the eddy memory mode leads to a significant increase of isopycnal slope variance mainly on decadal time scales. The increase is by a fraction of γ /Te ≈ 50% that is relatively constant across a wide range of forcing. Since the GM-parameterization essentially filters out the eddy memory mode, we conclude that low-resolution climate models may be underestimating the decadal variability of ocean currents in regions rich with mesoscale eddies.

  14. Sand deposition in shoreline eddies along five Wild and Scenic Rivers, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.; Vincent, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    depositions, which represent more than 40% of all material deposited over the Lochsa River 21.9 km eddy, occurred in the years with the seven largest instantaneous annual peak floods. Beach area and volume for most beaches, however, are less variable year-to-year than the variation in annual deposition would indicate. Accumulative 10-year weighed deposition rate was computed to estimate the effective variability of beach deposition. Although less variable than the annual deposition, the cumulative 10-year deposition calculated for the longest hydrologic records, 71 years, existing on the Idaho Wild and Scenic Rivers varied by more than an order of magnitude from less than 20 cm to more than 220 cm.

  15. Influence of mesoscale eddies on the distribution of nitrous oxide in the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, D. L.; Kock, A.; Löscher, C. R.; Schmitz, R. A.; Stramma, L.; Bange, H. W.

    2015-06-01

    Recent observations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) demonstrated the key role of meso- and submesoscale processes (e.g. eddies) in shaping its hydrographic and biogeochemical properties. Off Peru, elevated primary production from coastal upwelling in combination with sluggish ventilation of subsurface waters fuels a prominent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Given that nitrous oxide (N2O) production/consumption processes on the water column are sensitive to oxygen (O2) concentrations, the ETSP is a region of particular interest to investigate its source-sink dynamics. To date, no detailed surveys linking mesoscale processes and N2O distributions as well as their relevance to nitrogen (N) cycling are available. In this study, we present the first measurements of N2O across three mesoscale eddies (two mode water or anticyclonic and one cyclonic) which were identified, tracked and sampled during two surveys carried out in the ETSP in November-December 2012. A "two peak" structure was observed for N2O, wherein the two maxima coincide with the upper and lower boundaries of the OMZ, indicating active nitrification and partial denitrification. This was further supported by the abundances of the key gene for nitrification amoA and the gene marker for N2O production during denitrification, nirS. Conversely, we found strong N2O depletion in the core of the OMZ (O2 < 5 μmol L-1) to be consistent with nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and low levels of nitrate (NO3-), thus suggesting active denitrification. N2O depletion within the OMZ's core was substantially higher in the center of mode water eddies, supporting the view that eddy activity enhances N-loss processes off Peru, in particular near the shelf break where nutrient-rich, productive waters from upwelling are trapped before being transported offshore. Analysis of eddies during their propagation towards the open ocean showed that, in general, "aging" of mesoscale eddies tends to decrease N2O concentrations through the

  16. Influence of mesoscale eddies on the distribution of nitrous oxide in the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Martínez, Damian L.; Kock, Annette; Löscher, Carolin R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Stramma, Lothar; Bange, Hermann W.

    2016-02-01

    Recent observations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) have shown the key role of meso- and submesoscale processes (e.g. eddies) in shaping its hydrographic and biogeochemical properties. Off Peru, elevated primary production from coastal upwelling in combination with sluggish ventilation of subsurface waters fuels a prominent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Given that nitrous oxide (N2O) production-consumption processes in the water column are sensitive to oxygen (O2) concentrations, the ETSP is a region of particular interest to investigate its source-sink dynamics. To date, no detailed surveys linking mesoscale processes and N2O distributions as well as their relevance to nitrogen (N) cycling are available. In this study, we present the first measurements of N2O across three mesoscale eddies (two mode water or anticyclonic and one cyclonic) which were identified, tracked, and sampled during two surveys carried out in the ETSP in November-December 2012. A two-peak structure was observed for N2O, wherein the two maxima coincide with the upper and lower boundaries of the OMZ, indicating active nitrification and partial denitrification. This was further supported by the abundances of the key gene for nitrification, ammonium monooxygenase (amoA), and the gene marker for N2O production during denitrification, nitrite reductase (nirS). Conversely, we found strong N2O depletion in the core of the OMZ (O2 < 5 µmol L-1) to be consistent with nitrite (NO2-) accumulation and low levels of nitrate (NO3-), thus suggesting active denitrification. N2O depletion within the OMZ's core was substantially higher in the centre of mode water eddies, supporting the view that eddy activity enhances N-loss processes off Peru, in particular near the shelf break where nutrient-rich, productive waters from upwelling are trapped before being transported offshore. Analysis of eddies during their propagation towards the open ocean showed that, in general, "ageing" of mesoscale eddies

  17. Effects of eddy initial conditions on nonlinear forcing of planetary scale waves by amplifying baroclinic eddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    The previous study of Young and Villere concerning growth of planetary scale waves forced by wave-wave interactions of amplifying intermediate scale baroclinic eddies is extended to investigate effects of different eddy initial conditions. A global, spectral, primitive equation model is used for the calculations. For every set of eddy initial conditions considered, growth rates of planetary modes are considerably greater than growth rates computed from linear instability theory for a fixed zonally independent basic state. However, values of growth rates ranged over a factor of 3 depending on the particular set of eddy initial conditions used. Nonlinear forcing of planetary modes via wave-wave coupling becomes more important than baroclinic growth on the basic state at small values of the intermediate-scale modal amplitudes. The relative importance of direct transfer of kinetic energy from intermediate scales of motion to a planetary mode, compared to baroclinic conversion of available potential energy to kinetic energy within that planetary mode, depends on the individual case. In all cases, however, the transfer of either kinetic or available potential energy to the planetary modes was accomplished principally by wave-wave transfer from intermediate scale eddies, rather than from the zonally averaged state. The zonal wavenumber 2 planetary mode was prominent in all solutions, even in those for which eddy initial conditions were such that a different planetary mode was selectively forced at the start. General characteristics of the structural evolution of the planetary wave components of total heat and momentum flux, and modal structures themselves, were relatively insensitive to variations in eddy initial conditions, even though quantitative details varied from case to case.

  18. Towards a consistent eddy-covariance processing: an intercomparison of EddyPro and TK3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, G.; Mauder, M.

    2014-07-01

    A comparison of two popular eddy-covariance software packages is presented, namely, EddyPro and TK3. Two approximately 1-month long test data sets were processed, representing typical instrumental setups (i.e., CSAT3/LI-7500 above grassland and Solent R3/LI-6262 above a forest). The resulting fluxes and quality flags were compared. Achieving a satisfying agreement and understanding residual discrepancies required several iterations and interventions of different nature, spanning from simple software reconfiguration to actual code manipulations. In this paper, we document our comparison exercise and show that the two software packages can provide utterly satisfying agreement when properly configured. Our main aim, however, is to stress the complexity of performing a rigorous comparison of eddy-covariance software. We show that discriminating actual discrepancies in the results from inconsistencies in the software configuration requires deep knowledge of both software packages and of the eddy-covariance method. In some instances, it may be even beyond the possibility of the investigator who does not have access to and full knowledge of the source code. Being the developers of EddyPro and TK3, we could discuss the comparison at all levels of details and this proved necessary to achieve a full understanding. As a result, we suggest that researchers are more likely to get comparable results when using EddyPro (v5.1.1) and TK3 (v3.11) - at least with the setting presented in this paper - than they are when using any other pair of EC software which did not undergo a similar cross-validation. As a further consequence, we also suggest that, to the aim of assuring consistency and comparability of centralized flux databases, and for a confident use of eddy fluxes in synthesis studies on the regional, continental and global scale, researchers only rely on software that have been extensively validated in documented intercomparisons.

  19. Optimizing Scrum Mesoscale Eddy Forecasts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    complementary to the Kalman filter techniques being developed by Rutgers scientists. Our long-term scientific goal is to model and predict the mesoscale...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...adjoint-ready". The code resulting from the adjoint compiler must be further modified by hand to make it work . It will also need to be tested against the

  20. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randerson, J.T.; Chapin, F. S.; Harden, J.W.; Neff, J.C.; Harmon, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual framework used by ecologists and biogeochemists must allow for accurate and clearly defined comparisons of carbon fluxes made with disparate techniques across a spectrum of temporal and spatial scales. Consistent with usage over the past four decades, we define "net ecosystem production" (NEP) as the net carbon accumulation by ecosystems. Past use of this term has been ambiguous, because it has been used conceptually as a measure of carbon accumulation by ecosystems, but it has often been calculated considering only the balance between gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration. This calculation ignores other carbon fluxes from ecosystems (e.g., leaching of dissolved carbon and losses associated with disturbance). To avoid conceptual ambiguities, we argue that NEP be defined, as in the past, as the net carbon accumulation by ecosystems and that it explicitly incorporate all the carbon fluxes from an ecosystem, including autotrophic respiration, heterotrophic respiration, losses associated with disturbance, dissolved and particulate carbon losses, volatile organic compound emissions, and lateral transfers among ecosystems. Net biome productivity (NBP), which has been proposed to account for carbon loss during episodic disturbance, is equivalent to NEP at regional or global scales. The multi-scale conceptual framework we describe provides continuity between flux measurements made at the scale of soil profiles and chambers, forest inventories, eddy covariance towers, aircraft, and inversions of remote atmospheric flask samples, allowing a direct comparison of NEP estimates made at all temporal and spatial scales.

  1. Eddy current signal comparison for tube identification

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S. W. E-mail: Ratko.Vojvodic@areva.com; Vojvodic, R. E-mail: Ratko.Vojvodic@areva.com

    2015-03-31

    Inspection of nuclear power plant steam generator tubes is required to justify continued safe plant operation. The steam generators consist of thousands of tubes with nominal diameters of 15 to 22mm, approximately 1mm wall thickness, and 20 to 30m in length. The tubes are inspected by passing an eddy current probe through the tubes from tube end to tube end. It is critical to know exactly which tube identification (row and column) is associated with each tube's data. This is controlled by a precision manipulator that provides the tube ID to the eddy current system. Historically there have been some instances where the manipulator incorrectly reported the tube ID. This can have serious consequences including lack of inspection of a tube, or if a pluggable indication is detected, the tube is likely to be mis-plugged thereby risking a primary to secondary leak.

  2. Eddy current signal comparison for tube identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, S. W.; Vojvodic, R.

    2015-03-01

    Inspection of nuclear power plant steam generator tubes is required to justify continued safe plant operation. The steam generators consist of thousands of tubes with nominal diameters of 15 to 22mm, approximately 1mm wall thickness, and 20 to 30m in length. The tubes are inspected by passing an eddy current probe through the tubes from tube end to tube end. It is critical to know exactly which tube identification (row and column) is associated with each tube's data. This is controlled by a precision manipulator that provides the tube ID to the eddy current system. Historically there have been some instances where the manipulator incorrectly reported the tube ID. This can have serious consequences including lack of inspection of a tube, or if a pluggable indication is detected, the tube is likely to be mis-plugged thereby risking a primary to secondary leak.

  3. Contoured Surface Eddy Current Inspection System

    DOEpatents

    Batzinger, Thomas James; Fulton, James Paul; Rose, Curtis Wayne; Perocchi, Lee Cranford

    2003-04-08

    Eddy current inspection of a contoured surface of a workpiece is performed by forming a backing piece of flexible, resiliently yieldable material with a contoured exterior surface conforming in shape to the workpiece contoured surface. The backing piece is preferably cast in place so as to conform to the workpiece contoured surface. A flexible eddy current array probe is attached to the contoured exterior surface of the backing piece such that the probe faces the contoured surface of the workpiece to be inspected when the backing piece is disposed adjacent to the workpiece. The backing piece is then expanded volumetrically by inserting at least one shim into a slot in the backing piece to provide sufficient contact pressure between the probe and the workpiece contoured surface to enable the inspection of the workpiece contoured surface to be performed.

  4. Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Bo

    2014-07-18

    Oceanic transports of heat, salt, fresh water, dissolved CO2, and other tracers regulate global climate change and the distribution of natural marine resources. The time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely by migrating mesoscale eddies. By combining available satellite altimetry and Argo profiling float data, we showed that the eddy-induced zonal mass transport can reach a total meridionally integrated value of up to 30 to 40 sverdrups (Sv) (1 Sv = 10(6) cubic meters per second), and it occurs mainly in subtropical regions, where the background flows are weak. This transport is comparable in magnitude to that of the large-scale wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    Application to an HCCI Engine . Proceedings of the 4th Joint Meeting of the U.S. Sections of the Combustion Institute, 2005. [34] K. Fieweger...LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT COMBUSTION Principle Investigator: Heinz Pitsch Flow Physics and Computation Department of Mechanical Engineering ...burners and engines found in modern, industrially relevant equipment. In the course of this transition of LES from a scientifically interesting method

  6. Large eddy simulation - The next five years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferziger, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The prospect of major improvements in the performance of computers in the next five years means that large eddy simulation (LES), which has until now been strictly a research tool, may become a top-of-the-line engineering tool. In this paper, the historical development and past contributions of LES are reviewed. Then a discussion of the potential for applications of LES in new areas and of the developments needed to make LES a tool for the practicing engineer is given.

  7. INNOVATIVE EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR MICRO DEFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaca, Pedro; Quintino, Luisa; Santos, Jorge dos; Rosado, Luis

    2010-02-22

    This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

  8. HYCOM High-resolution Eddying Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    number of vertical profiles of temperature and salinity in place of XBT temperature profiles. The reanalysis was completed in February 2014. As noted...10.1016/j.ocemod.2011.02.011. Metzger, E. J., and Coauthors, 2014a: US Navy operational global ocean and Arctic ice prediction systems. Oceanography...has collaborated on developing and demonstrating the performance and application of eddy-resolving, real-time global and basin-scale ocean prediction

  9. Eddy current inspection of weld defects in tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katragadda, G.; Lord, W.

    1992-01-01

    An approach using differential probes for the inspection of weld defects in tubing is studied. Finite element analysis is used to model the weld regions and defects. Impedance plane signals are predicted for different weld defect types and compared wherever possible with signals from actual welds in tubing. Results show that detection and sizing of defects in tubing is possible using differential eddy current techniques. The phase angle of the impedance plane trajectory gives a good indication of the sizing of the crack. Data on the type of defect can be obtained from the shape of the impedance plane trajectory and the phase. Depending on the skin depth, detection of outer wall, inner wall, and subsurface defects is possible.

  10. Development of eddy current probes based on magnetoresistive sensors arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Decitre, J.-M.; Fermon, C.; Pelkner, M.; Reimund, V.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2014-02-01

    Eddy Current Technique is a powerful method for detection of surface notches and of buried flaws during inspection of metallic parts. Recent EC array probes have demonstrated a fast and efficient control of large surfaces. Nevertheless, when the size of flaws decreases or the defect is rather deep, traditional winding coil probes turn out to be useless. Magnetoresistive sensors present the advantages of flat frequency response and micron size. These sensors are hence very attractive for the detection of buried defects that require low frequencies because of skin depth effect. An optimization of the probe with magnetoresistive sensors as receivers has been made by simulations using CIVA software and finite elements methods with OPERA. EC probes for buried flaw detection have been designed. Experimental results have been compared with simulations.

  11. Gas turbine coatings eddy current quantitative and qualitative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribichini, Remo; Giolli, Carlo; Scrinzi, Erica

    2017-02-01

    Gas turbine blades (buckets) are among the most critical and expensive components of the engine. Buckets rely on protective coatings in order to withstand the harsh environment in which they operate. The thickness and the microstructure of coatings during the lifespan of a unit are fundamental to evaluate their fitness for service. A frequency scanning Eddy Current instrument can allow the measurement of the thickness and of physical properties of coatings in a Non-Destructive manner. The method employed relies on the acquisition of impedance spectra and on the inversion of the experimental data to derive the coating properties and structure using some assumptions. This article describes the experimental validation performed on several samples and real components in order to assess the performance of the instrument as a coating thickness gage. The application of the technique to support residual life assessment of serviced buckets is also presented.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Cryogenic Injection Processes at Supercritical Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper highlights results from the first of a series of hierarchical simulations aimed at assessing the modeling requirements for application of the large eddy simulation technique to cryogenic injection and combustion processes in liquid rocket engines. The focus is on liquid-oxygen-hydrogen coaxial injectors at a condition where the liquid-oxygen is injected at a subcritical temperature into a supercritical environment. For this situation a diffusion dominated mode of combustion occurs in the presence of exceedingly large thermophysical property gradients. Though continuous, these gradients approach the behavior of a contact discontinuity. Significant real gas effects and transport anomalies coexist locally in colder regions of the flow, with ideal gas and transport characteristics occurring within the flame zone. The current focal point is on the interfacial region between the liquid-oxygen core and the coaxial hydrogen jet where the flame anchors itself.

  13. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Anisotropic Mesoscale Eddy Transport in Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Dennis, J.; Danabasoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    Modern climate models are limited to coarse-resolution representations of large-scale ocean circulation that rely on parameterizations for mesoscale eddies. The effects of eddies are typically introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically in general circulation models. Thus, only a single parameter, namely the eddy diffusivity, is used at each spatial and temporal location to impart the influence of mesoscale eddies on the resolved flow. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion, potential vorticity barriers, oceanic turbulence, and instabilities, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters to three: a major diffusivity, a minor diffusivity, and the principal axis of alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the newly introduced parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces global temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved even further by parameterizing the anisotropic transport mechanisms in the ocean.

  15. Interface Exchange as an Indicator for Eddy Heat Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Mark R.; Williams, Sean J.; Hecht, Matthew W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Hamann, Bernd; Patchett, John M.; Ahrens, James P.

    2012-06-12

    The ocean contains many large-scale, long-lived vortices, called mesoscale eddies, that are believed to have a role in the transport and redistribution of salt, heat, and nutrients throughout the ocean. Determining this role, however, has proven to be a challenge, since the mechanics of eddies are only partly understood; a standard definition for these ocean eddies does not exist and, therefore, scientifically meaningful, robust methods for eddy extraction, characterization, tracking and visualization remain a challenge. In order to shed light on the nature and potential roles of eddies, we have combined our previous research on eddy identification and tracking, and have used those approaches as the basis for analysis-driven computational experiments on the nature of eddies. Based on the resulting visualizations of eddy behavior, we have devised a new metric to characterize the transfer of water into and out of eddies across their boundary, and have developed visualization methods for this new metric to provide clues about the role eddies play in the global ocean and, potentially, climate change.

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Transitional Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2009-11-01

    A sixth order compact finite difference code is employed to investigate compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of subharmonic transition of a spatially developing zero pressure gradient boundary layer, at Ma = 0.2. The computational domain extends from Rex= 10^5, where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and sub-harmonic modes, to fully turbulent stage at Rex= 10.1x10^5. Numerical sponges are used in the neighborhood of external boundaries to provide non-reflective conditions. Our interest lies in the performance of the dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) model [1] in the transition process. It is observed that in early stages of transition the eddy viscosity is much smaller than the physical viscosity. As a result the amplitudes of selected harmonics are in very good agreement with the experimental data [2]. The model's contribution gradually increases during the last stages of transition process and the dynamic eddy viscosity becomes fully active and dominant in the turbulent region. Consistent with this trend the skin friction coefficient versus Rex diverges from its laminar profile and converges to the turbulent profile after an overshoot. 1. Moin P. et. al. Phys Fluids A, 3(11), 2746-2757, 1991. 2. Kachanov Yu. S. et. al. JFM, 138, 209-247, 1983.

  17. Eddy current inspection tool. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, R.R.; Van Lue, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A miniaturized inspection tool, for testing and inspection of metal objects in locations with difficult accessibility, which comprises eddy current sensing equipment with a probe coil, and associated coaxial coil cable, oil energizing means, and circuit means responsive to impedance changes in the coil as effected by induced eddy currents in a test object to produce a data output signal proportional to such changes. The coil and cable are slideably received in the utility channel of the flexible insertion tube of a fiberoptic scope. The scope is provided with light transmitting and receiving fiberoptics for viewing through the flexible tube, and articulation means for articulating the distal end of the tube and permitting close control of coil placement relative to a test object. The eddy current sensing equipment includes a tone generator for generating audible signals responsive to the data output signal. In one selected mode of operation, the tone generator responsive to the output signal above a selected level generates a constant single frequency tone for signalling detection of a discontinuity and, in a second selected mode, generates a tone whose frequency is proportional to the difference between the output signal and a predetermined selected threshold level.

  18. Ocean Modeling in an Eddying Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Matthew W.; Hasumi, Hiroyasu

    This monograph is the first to survey progress in realistic simulation in a strongly eddying regime made possible by recent increases in computational capability. Its contributors comprise the leading researchers in this important and constantly evolving field. Divided into three parts, • Oceanographic Processes and Regimes: Fundamental Questions • Ocean Dynamics and State: From Regional to Global Scale, and • Modeling at the Mesoscale: State of the Art and Future Directions the volume details important advances in physical oceanography based on eddy resolving ocean modeling. It captures the state of the art and discusses issues that ocean modelers must consider in order to effectively contribute to advancing current knowledge, from subtleties of the underlying fluid dynamical equations to meaningful comparison with oceanographic observations and leading-edge model development. It summarizes many of the important results which have emerged from ocean modeling in an eddying regime, for those interested broadly in the physical science. More technical topics are intended to address the concerns of those actively working in the field.

  19. Erosion of a California Undercurrent eddy by bottom topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Hector S.; Gomez-Valdes, Jose

    2017-05-01

    Subsurface eddies are ubiquitous features in eastern boundary current systems. These phenomena tend to modulate the across-shore distribution of heat and biogeochemical tracers. A California Undercurrent eddy was detected by shipboard observations in October 2009 off the northern Baja California continental slope. The spatiotemporal variation in the California Undercurrent eddy is investigated by using a mesoscale-resolving hindcast ocean simulation. A poleward coastal current that is driven by an upwelling-wind relaxation event and the coastline geometry instigated the separation of the California Undercurrent from the slope, forming a meander-like structure, which evolved as a mesoscale eddy-like structure. The latter structure evolved as a subsurface eddy with a warm anomaly core, a distinctive feature of eddies that form from the California Undercurrent. During the initial stage, the subsurface eddy presented a cone-shape form, with the maximum amplitude of the relative vorticity in the upper section. The inviscid effect of the irregular bottom topography altered both the initial direction of propagation and the initial eddy shape: the propagation direction of the eddy changed from north-south to southwest, and the shape changed from a cone shape to a subsurface lens shape. The strong eddy-topography interactions triggered a sign change in the heat flux direction from the environment toward the eddy and vice versa through the horizontally divergent component of the velocity field, which accelerated the eddy's decay. This study shows the relevance of the synoptic wind stress events and the irregularity of the bottom topography on the mesoscale eddy activity in the southern portion of the California Current.

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is combined with a turbine model to investigate the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) in a three dimensional turbulent flow. Two methods are used to model the subgrid-scale (SGS) stresses: (a) the Smagorinsky model, and (b) the modulated gradient model. To parameterize the effects of the VAWT on the flow, two VAWT models are developed: (a) the actuator surface model (ASM), in which the time-averaged turbine-induced forces are distributed on a surface swept by the turbine blades, i.e. the actuator surface, and (b) the actuator line model (ALM), in which the instantaneous blade forces are only spatially distributed on lines representing the blades, i.e. the actuator lines. This is the first time that LES is applied and validated for simulation of VAWT wakes by using either the ASM or the ALM techniques. In both models, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces on the blades. The results are compared with flow measurements in the wake of a model straight-bladed VAWT, carried out in the Institute de Méchanique et Statistique de la Turbulence (IMST) water channel. Different combinations of SGS models with VAWT models are studied and a fairly good overall agreement between simulation results and measurement data is observed. In general, the ALM is found to better capture the unsteady-periodic nature of the wake and shows a better agreement with the experimental data compared with the ASM. The modulated gradient model is also found to be a more reliable SGS stress modeling technique, compared with the Smagorinsky model, and it yields reasonable predictions of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics of a VAWT wake using its theoretically-determined model coefficient. Keywords: Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs); VAWT wake; Large-eddy simulation; Actuator surface model; Actuator line model; Smagorinsky model; Modulated gradient model

  1. Reduction of lift-off effect in high-frequency apparent eddy current conductivity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.

    2017-05-01

    Eddy current spectroscopy is capable of mapping conductivities and thicknesses of layered structures due to its frequency-dependent penetration depth. High-frequency apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC) spectroscopy applications typically mandate covering a frequency range beyond 10 MHz to capture depth-dependent conductivity profiles. Following the standard four-point linear system calibration method beyond 10 MHz makes it difficult to achieve accurate AECC measurements due to spurious self- and stray-capacitive effects where complex eddy current coil impedance variation with lift-off becomes more nonlinear. In this study, two different approaches are presented to reduce AECC measurement sensitivity to lift-off. First, a nonlinear lift-off correction is developed as a function of measured apparent eddy current lift-off. Second, a semi-quadratic system calibration is developed to capture the lift-off curvature as a function of frequency and hence minimizes the measurement sensitivity to lift-off variations. Presented calibration techniques allow more robust AECC measurements up to 80-100 MHz with one-order of magnitude improvement in accuracy in comparison to the use of standard four-point linear system calibration in a lift-off range of  ±25.4 µm.

  2. Eddy Covariance Method for CO2 Emission Measurements: CCS Applications, Principles, Instrumentation and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, George; Madsen, Rod; Feese, Kristin

    2013-04-01

    The Eddy Covariance method is a micrometeorological technique for direct high-speed measurements of the transport of gases, heat, and momentum between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. Gas fluxes, emission and exchange rates are carefully characterized from single-point in-situ measurements using permanent or mobile towers, or moving platforms such as automobiles, helicopters, airplanes, etc. Since the early 1990s, this technique has been widely used by micrometeorologists across the globe for quantifying CO2 emission rates from various natural, urban and agricultural ecosystems [1,2], including areas of agricultural carbon sequestration. Presently, over 600 eddy covariance stations are in operation in over 120 countries. In the last 3-5 years, advancements in instrumentation and software have reached the point when they can be effectively used outside the area of micrometeorology, and can prove valuable for geological carbon capture and sequestration, landfill emission measurements, high-precision agriculture and other non-micrometeorological industrial and regulatory applications. In the field of geological carbon capture and sequestration, the magnitude of CO2 seepage fluxes depends on a variety of factors. Emerging projects utilize eddy covariance measurement to monitor large areas where CO2 may escape from the subsurface, to detect and quantify CO2 leakage, and to assure the efficiency of CO2 geological storage [3,4,5,6,7,8]. Although Eddy Covariance is one of the most direct and defensible ways to measure and calculate turbulent fluxes, the method is mathematically complex, and requires careful setup, execution and data processing tailor-fit to a specific site and a project. With this in mind, step-by-step instructions were created to introduce a novice to the conventional Eddy Covariance technique [9], and to assist in further understanding the method through more advanced references such as graduate-level textbooks, flux networks guidelines, journals

  3. Eddy Flux and Leaf-level Measurements of Biogenic VOC Emissions from two Savannas in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J.; Guenther, A.; Harley, P.; Otter, L.; Veenendaal, E.; Hewitt, N.; James, T.; Owens, S.

    2001-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions of isoprene and terpenes were measured in 2 savannas of southern Africa: a mopane woodland (>95% Colophospermum mopane), near Maun, Botswana and a Combretum savanna (45% Combretum apiculatum, the remainder mostly Acacia nilotica, Zizphus mucronata, Sclerocarya birrea, Grewia bicolor, and Acacia nigrescens), near Skukuza, Republic of South Africa. These 2 landscapes contain most of the dominant woody plant species found in southern Africa; mopane woodlands are a monospecific landscape occurring over a large area across southern Africa. These studies were made in January-February 2001 as part of SAFARI 2000. Over 100 species were examined at the leaf level using cuvette techniques. In addition, relaxed eddy accumulation measurements of BVOC fluxes were made on towers in each location. Large, light dependent emissions of terpenes (mostly alpha-pinene) were observed from mopane. Of the major species in the Combretum savanna, only Acacia nigrescens emitted significant amounts of isoprene; none emitted terpenes. However, several minor species (Lonchocarpus capassa, Spirostachys africana) emitted isoprene. Net CO2 emissions were measured simultaneously on each tower; the diurnal BVOC emissions were integrated and compared with net CO2 flux measurements made simultaneously on the same tower. The contribution of these and other BVOC emissions to net ecosystem carbon exchange will be discussed. In addition, the implications of these emissions to regional atmospheric chemistry and landscape change will be examined.

  4. Tone burst eddy current thermography for estimation of corrosion defects in aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libin, M. N.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Engelbart, Roger

    2012-05-01

    Tone Burst Eddy Current Thermography (TBET) technique was used for the evaluation of corrosion type damage in Aluminum plate like structures. Both flat and curved components were considered. The effect of the parameters affecting the eddy current generation of head in the metal, including excitation frequency, electrical conductivity, standoff distances, etc were considered in optimizing the heat generation. The thermal diffusivity and thickness of the metal structure were considered while selecting the detection of the signal using a thermal sensitive IR Camera. The experiments were conducted using test samples that had simulated defects with different wall thickness losses. The experiments were supported by a multiphysics 3D Finite Element Model (FEM) using COMSOL. The results were compared with the experimental results. It was determined that this technique has some advantages for the inspection aircraft structural components compared to other modalities, particularly in curved regions.

  5. Harmonics suppression of vacuum chamber eddy current induced fields with application to the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Low Energy Booster (LEB) Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1991-12-04

    This memo presents the formulation of an expression for eddy currents induced in a thin-walled conductor due to a time-dependent electromagnet field excitation. Then follows an analytical development for prediction of vacuum chamber eddy current induced field harmonics in iron-core electromagnets. A passive technique for harmonics suppression is presented with specific application to the design of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Low Energy B (LEB) Magnets.

  6. Ocean eddies generated by seamounts in the north pacific.

    PubMed

    Royer, T C

    1978-03-10

    Small-scale (diameters of about 37 kilometers) fluctuations in dynamic topography north of Hawaii along 158 degrees W are well correlated with upstream seamounts. The fluctuations are subsurface but are manifested as baroclinic eddies at the sea surface. These eddies are confirmed by direct observations and supported by theoretical considerations. The eddies cause small-scale variability in the currents and hydrographic structures in this area, and they should be considered in any sampling programs of the region.

  7. A new gauge-invariant method for diagnosing eddy diffusivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, J.; Maddison, J. R.; Marshall, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Coarse resolution numerical ocean models must typically include a parameterisation for mesoscale turbulence. A common recipe for such parameterisations is to invoke mixing of some tracer quantity, such as potential vorticity or buoyancy. However, it is well known that eddy fluxes include large rotational components which necessarily do not lead to any mixing; eddy diffusivities diagnosed from unfiltered fluxes are thus contaminated by the presence of these rotational components. Here a new methodology is applied whereby eddy diffusivities are diagnosed directly from the eddy force function. The eddy force function depends only upon flux divergences, is independent of any rotational flux components, and is inherently non-local and smooth. A one-shot inversion procedure is applied, minimising the mis-match between parameterised force functions and force functions derived from eddy resolving calculations. This enables diffusivities associated with the eddy potential vorticity and Gent-McWilliams coefficients associated with eddy buoyancy fluxes to be diagnosed. This methodology is applied to multi-layer quasi-geostrophic ocean gyre simulations. It is found that: (i) a strictly down-gradient scheme for mixing potential vorticity and quasi-geostrophic buoyancy has limited success in reducing the mis-match compared to one with no sign constraint on the eddy diffusivity or Gent-McWilliams coefficient, with prevalent negative signals around the time-mean jet; (ii) the diagnostic is successful away from the jet region and wind-forced top layer; (iii) the locations of closed mean stream lines correlate with signals of positive eddy potential vorticity diffusivity; (iv) there is indication that the magnitude of the eddy potential vorticity diffusivity correlates well with the eddy energy. Implications for parameterisation are discussed in light of these diagnostic results.

  8. On the relationship between Southern Ocean eddies and phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenger, Ivy; Münnich, Matthias; Gruber, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Effects on phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean are crucial for the global ocean nutrient and carbon cycles. Such effects potentially arise from mesoscale eddies which are omnipresent in the region. Eddies are known to affect phytoplankton through either advection and mixing, or the stimulation/suppression of growth. Yet, the climatological relationship between Southern Ocean eddies and phytoplankton has not been quantified in detail. To provide an estimate of this relationship, we identified more than100,000 eddies in the Southern Ocean and determined associated phytoplankton anomalies using satellite-based chlorophyll-a (chl) measurements. The eddies have a very substantial impact on the chl levels, with eddy associated chl differing by more than 10% from the background over wide areas. The structure of these anomalies is largely zonal, with positive anomalies north of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and negative anomalies within the circumpolar belt of the ACC for cyclonic eddies. The pattern is similar but of opposite sign for anticyclonic eddies. The seasonality of this signal is weak north to the ACC, but pronounced in the vicinity of the ACC. The spatial structure and seasonality of the signal can be explained largely by advection, i.e., the eddy-circulation driven lateral transport of anomalies across large-scale gradients. We conclude this based on the shape of local chl anomalies of eddies and ambient chl gradients. In contrast, ACC winter anomalies are consistent with an effect of eddies on the light exposure of phytoplankton. The clear impact of eddies on chl implies a downstream effect on Southern Ocean biogeochemical properties.

  9. Application of large eddy interaction model to a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1989-01-01

    The large eddy interaction model (LEIM) is a statistical model of turbulence based on the interaction of selected eddies with the mean flow and all of the eddies in a turbulent shear flow. It can be utilized as the starting point for obtaining physical structures in the flow. The possible application of the LEIM to a mixing layer formed between two parallel, incompressible flows with a small temperature difference is developed by invoking a detailed similarity between the spectra of velocity and temperature.

  10. Unsupervised Classification of Surface Defects in Wire Rod Production Obtained by Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Saludes-Rodil, Sergio; Baeyens, Enrique; Rodríguez-Juan, Carlos P.

    2015-01-01

    An unsupervised approach to classify surface defects in wire rod manufacturing is developed in this paper. The defects are extracted from an eddy current signal and classified using a clustering technique that uses the dynamic time warping distance as the dissimilarity measure. The new approach has been successfully tested using industrial data. It is shown that it outperforms other classification alternatives, such as the modified Fourier descriptors. PMID:25938201

  11. Eddy Current System for Material Inspection and Flaw Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachnak, R.; King, S.; Maeger, W.; Nguyen, T.

    2007-01-01

    Eddy current methods have been successfully used in a variety of non-destructive evaluation applications including detection of cracks, measurements of material thickness, determining metal thinning due to corrosion, measurements of coating thickness, determining electrical conductivity, identification of materials, and detection of corrosion in heat exchanger tubes. This paper describes the development of an eddy current prototype that combines positional and eddy-current data to produce a C-scan of tested material. The preliminary system consists of an eddy current probe, a position tracking mechanism, and basic data visualization capability. Initial test results of the prototype are presented in this paper.

  12. Mesoscale eddies in the Gulf of Alaska: Observations and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovegno, Peter

    Mesoscale eddies in the Gulf of Alaska are thought to contribute to the shelf-slope exchange of nutrients and plankton, enhancing biological production. We report on a study of two anticyclonic mesoscale eddies in this region observed through in situ sampling during August and September 2007. Both eddies exhibited in their cores theta-S profiles with warmer, fresher water relative to the properties of the ambient basin water between 150 and 300 m depth. Hydrographic properties and satellite altimetry data were analyzed to identify likely formation regions for each feature. One eddy, sampled near Yakutat, Alaska, originated in the Sitka formation region (221-223° E); the second eddy, sampled south of Kodiak Island, originated near the Kenai Peninsula, southeast of the Kennedy and Stevenson entrances to Cook Inlet—an area not previously studied as a formation region. Subsequent analysis of 16 years of satellite altimeter data (from 1992 to 2008) with an algorithm designed to identify and track eddies revealed approximately 6 Kenai eddies that have formed in this region. Although this number constitutes only 3.2% of the 188 eddies identified by the algorithm during this period, it represents 15.4% of the 39 eddies that formed in or propagated westward into the Alaskan Stream.

  13. A daily global mesoscale ocean eddy dataset from satellite altimetry

    PubMed Central

    Faghmous, James H.; Frenger, Ivy; Yao, Yuanshun; Warmka, Robert; Lindell, Aron; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscale ocean eddies are ubiquitous coherent rotating structures of water with radial scales on the order of 100 kilometers. Eddies play a key role in the transport and mixing of momentum and tracers across the World Ocean. We present a global daily mesoscale ocean eddy dataset that contains ~45 million mesoscale features and 3.3 million eddy trajectories that persist at least two days as identified in the AVISO dataset over a period of 1993–2014. This dataset, along with the open-source eddy identification software, extract eddies with any parameters (minimum size, lifetime, etc.), to study global eddy properties and dynamics, and to empirically estimate the impact eddies have on mass or heat transport. Furthermore, our open-source software may be used to identify mesoscale features in model simulations and compare them to observed features. Finally, this dataset can be used to study the interaction between mesoscale ocean eddies and other components of the Earth System. PMID:26097744

  14. Tidal generation of large sub-mesoscale eddy dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callendar, W.; Klymak, J. M.; Foreman, M. G. G.

    2011-04-01

    Numerical simulations of tidal flow past Cape St. James on the south tip of Haida Gwai (Queen Charlotte Islands) are presented that indicate mesoscale dipoles are formed from coalescing tidal eddies. Observations in this region demonstrate robust eddy generation at the Cape, with the primary process being flow separation of buoyant or wind driven outflows forming large anti-cyclonic, negative potential vorticity, Haida Eddies. However, there are other times where dipoles are observed in satellites, indicating a source of positive potential vorticity must also be present. The simulations here build on previous work that implicates oscillating tidal flow past the cape in creating the positive vorticity. Small headland eddies of alternating vorticity are created each tide. During certain tidal cycles, the headland eddies coalesce and self organize in such a way as to create large >20-km diameter eddies that then self-advect into deep water. The self advection speed is faster than the beta drift of anti-cyclones, and the propagation direction appears to be more southerly than typical Haida Eddies, though the model contains no mean wind-driven flows. These eddies are smaller than Haida Eddies, but given their tidal origin, may represent a more consistent source of coastal water that is injected into to the interior of the subpolar gyre.

  15. Tidal generation of large sub-mesoscale eddy dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callendar, W.; Klymak, J. M.; Foreman, M. G. G.

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulations of tidal flow past Cape St. James on the south tip of Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) are presented that indicate mesoscale dipoles are formed from coalescing tidal eddies. Observations in this region demonstrate robust eddy generation at the Cape, with the primary process being flow separation of buoyant or wind driven outflows forming large anti-cyclonic, negative potential vorticity, Haida Eddies. However, there are other times where dipoles are observed in satellites, indicating a source of positive potential vorticity must also be present. The simulations here build on previous work that implicates oscillating tidal flow past the cape in creating the positive vorticity. Small headland eddies of alternating vorticity are created each tide. During certain tidal cycles, the headland eddies coalesce and self organize in such a way as to create large >20-km diameter eddies that then self-advect into deep water. The self advection speed is faster than the beta drift of anti-cyclones, and the propagation direction appears to be more southerly than typical Haida Eddies, though the model contains no mean wind-driven flows. These eddies are smaller than Haida Eddies, but given their tidal origin, may represent a more consistent source of coastal water that is injected into the interior of the subpolar gyre.

  16. Film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes using large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, Yulia V.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of the present study is to investigate numerically the physics of the flow, which occurs during the film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes, Film cooling is a technique used in gas turbine industry to reduce heat fluxes to the turbine blade surface. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed modeling a realistic film cooling configuration, which consists of a large stagnation-type reservoir, feeding an array of discrete cooling holes (film holes) flowing into a flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Special computational methodology is developed for this problem, involving coupled simulations using multiple computational codes. A fully compressible LES code is used in the area above the flat plate, while a low Mach number LES code is employed in the plenum and film holes. The motivation for using different codes comes from the essential difference in the nature of the flow in these different regions. Flowfield is analyzed inside the plenum, film hole and a crossflow region. Flow inside the plenum is stagnating, except for the region close to the exit, where it accelerates rapidly to turn into the hole. The sharp radius of turning at the trailing edge of the plenum pipe connection causes the flow to separate from the downstream wall of the film hole. After coolant injection occurs, a complex flowfield is formed consisting of coherent vortical structures responsible for bringing hot crossflow fluid in contact with the walls of either the film hole or the blade, thus reducing cooling protection. Mean velocity and turbulent statistics are compared to experimental measurements, yielding good agreement for the mean flowfield and satisfactory agreement for the turbulence quantities. LES results are used to assess the applicability of basic assumptions of conventional eddy viscosity turbulence models used with Reynolds-averaged (RANS) approach, namely the isotropy of an eddy viscosity and thermal diffusivity. It is shown here that these assumptions do not hold

  17. Eddy-driven sediment transport in the Argentine Basin: Is the height of the Zapiola Rise hydrodynamically controlled?

    DOE PAGES

    Weijer, Wilbert; Maltrud, Mathew E.; Homoky, William B.; ...

    2015-03-27

    In this study, we address the question whether eddy-driven transports in the Argentine Basin can be held responsible for enhanced sediment accumulation over the Zapiola Rise, hence accounting for the existence and growth of this sediment drift. To address this question, we perform a 6 year simulation with a strongly eddying ocean model. We release two passive tracers, with settling velocities that are consistent with silt and clay size particles. Our experiments show contrasting behavior between the silt fraction and the lighter clay. Due to its larger settling velocity, the silt fraction reaches a quasisteady state within a few years,more » with abyssal sedimentation rates that match net input. In contrast, clay settles only slowly, and its distribution is heavily stratified, being transported mainly along isopycnals. Yet, both size classes display a significant and persistent concentration minimum over the Zapiola Rise. We show that the Zapiola Anticyclone, a strong eddy-driven vortex that circulates around the Zapiola Rise, is a barrier to sediment transport, and hence prevents significant accumulation of sediments on the Rise. We conclude that sediment transport by the turbulent circulation in the Argentine Basin alone cannot account for the preferred sediment accumulation over the Rise. We speculate that resuspension is a critical process in the formation and maintenance of the Zapiola Rise.« less

  18. Eddy current simulation in thick cylinders of finite length induced by coils of arbitrary geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Poole, Michael; Crozier, Stuart

    2010-12-01

    Eddy currents are inevitably induced when time-varying magnetic field gradients interact with the metallic structures of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The secondary magnetic field produced by this induced current degrades the spatial and temporal performance of the primary field generated by the gradient coils. Although this undesired effect can be minimized by using actively and/or passively shielded gradient coils and current pre-emphasis techniques, a residual eddy current still remains in the MRI scanner structure. Accurate simulation of these eddy currents is important in the successful design of gradient coils and magnet cryostat vessels. Efficient methods for simulating eddy currents are currently restricted to cylindrical-symmetry. The approach presented in this paper divides thick conducting cylinders into thin layers (thinner than the skin depth) and expresses the current density on each as a Fourier series. The coupling between each mode of the Fourier series with every other is modeled with an inductive network method. In this way, the eddy currents induced in realistic cryostat surfaces by coils of arbitrary geometry can be simulated. The new method was validated by simulating a canonical problem and comparing the results against a commercially available software package. An accurate skin depth of 2.76 mm was calculated in 6 min with the new method. The currents induced by an actively shielded x-gradient coil were simulated assuming a finite length cylindrical cryostat consisting of three different conducting materials. Details of the temporal-spatial induced current diffusion process were simulated through all cryostat layers, which could not be efficiently simulated with any other method. With this data, all quantities that depend on the current density, such as the secondary magnetic field, are simply evaluated.

  19. Eddy-covariance methane flux measurements over a European beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentsch, Lydia; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The role of forests in global methane (CH4) turnover is currently not well constrained, partially because of the lack of spatially integrative forest-scale measurements of CH4 fluxes. Soil chamber measurements imply that temperate forests generally act as CH4 sinks. Upscaling of chamber observations to the forest scale is however problematic, if the upscaling is not constrained by concurrent 'top-down' measurements, such as of the eddy-covariance type, which provide sufficient integration of spatial variations and of further potential CH4 flux components within forest ecosystems. Ongoing development of laser absorption-based optical instruments, resulting in enhanced measurement stability, precision and sampling speed, has recently improved the prospects for meaningful eddy-covariance measurements at sites with presumably low CH4 fluxes, hence prone to reach the flux detection limit. At present, we are launching eddy-covariance CH4 measurements at a long-running ICOS flux tower site (Hainich National Park, Germany), located in a semi natural, unmanaged, beech dominated forest. Eddy-covariance measurements will be conducted with a laser spectrometer for parallel CH4, H2Ov and CO2 measurements (FGGA, Los Gatos Research, USA). Independent observations of the CO2 flux by the FGGA and a standard Infrared Gas Analyser (LI-7200, LI-COR, USA) will allow to evaluate data quality of measured CH4 fluxes. Here, we want to present first results with a focus on uncertainties of the calculated CH4 fluxes with regard to instrument precision, data processing and site conditions. In future, we plan to compare eddy-covariance flux estimates to side-by-side turbulent flux observations from a novel eddy accumulation system. Furthermore, soil CH4 fluxes will be measured with four automated chambers situated within the tower footprint. Based on a previous soil chamber study at the same site, we expect the Hainich forest site to act as a CH4 sink. However, we hypothesize that our

  20. Toward a Mexican eddy covariance network for carbon cycle science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Rodrigo; Yépez, Enrico A.

    2011-09-01

    First Annual MexFlux Principal Investigators Meeting; Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, 4-8 May 2011; The carbon cycle science community has organized a global network, called FLUXNET, to measure the exchange of energy, water, and carbon dioxide (CO2) between the ecosystems and the atmosphere using the eddy covariance technique. This network has provided unprecedented information for carbon cycle science and global climate change but is mostly represented by study sites in the United States and Europe. Thus, there is an important gap in measurements and understanding of ecosystem dynamics in other regions of the world that are seeing a rapid change in land use. Researchers met under the sponsorship of Red Temática de Ecosistemas and Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT) to discuss strategies to establish a Mexican eddy covariance network (MexFlux) by identifying researchers, study sites, and scientific goals. During the meeting, attendees noted that 10 study sites have been established in Mexico with more than 30 combined years of information. Study sites span from new sites installed during 2011 to others with 9 to 6 years of measurements. Sites with the longest span measurements are located in Baja California Sur (established by Walter Oechel in 2002) and Sonora (established by Christopher Watts in 2005); both are semiarid ecosystems. MexFlux sites represent a variety of ecosystem types, including Mediterranean and sarcocaulescent shrublands in Baja California; oak woodland, subtropical shrubland, tropical dry forest, and a grassland in Sonora; tropical dry forests in Jalisco and Yucatan; a managed grassland in San Luis Potosi; and a managed pine forest in Hidalgo. Sites are maintained with an individual researcher's funds from Mexican government agencies (e.g., CONACYT) and international collaborations, but no coordinated funding exists for a long-term program.

  1. Relating Surfzone Eddy Scales to the Eddy Diffusivity Using a Wave-resolving Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spydell, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Two-dimensional horizontal surfzone eddies are responsible for surfzone diffusion. However, how the eddy diffusivity is related to Eulerian properties of the turbulence is not understood. Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics of surfzone eddies are calculated using wave-resolving simulations (with the model funwaveC) of observed SandyDuck conditions. For strong alongshore currents, the model has been validated by comparing modeled and observed Eulerian frequency-wavenumber spectra [Feddersen, 2013]. Here, the model is further validated by comparing observed and modeled characteristic turbulent length and time scales. These Eulerian time TE and length LE scales are found from the moments of the frequency-wavenumber spectra and time-space lagged correlation functions. Lagrangian time TL and length scales LL are also calculated from statistics of virtual drifters advected by the modeled velocity fields. As the turbulent diffusivity K depends on these Lagrangian statistics, K = u2 TL where u2 is the turbulent velocity variance, surfzone eddy diffusivities are also calculated. The cross-shore dependence of both Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics (e.g. TL, LL, TE, LE) are determined and the validity of homogeneous surfzone diffusion is addressed. The relationship between surfzone Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics is also explored and the feasibility of parameterizing surfzone diffusion from incident wave conditions is discussed.

  2. An Angular Momentum Eddy Detection Algorithm (AMEDA) applied to coastal eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vu, Briac; Stegner, Alexandre; Arsouze, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present a new automated eddy detection and tracking algorithm based on the computation of the LNAM (Local and Normalized Angular Momentum). This method is an improvement of the previous method by Mkhinini et al. (2014) with the aim to be applied to multiple datasets (satellite data, numerical models, laboratory experiments) using as few objective criteria as possible. First, we show the performance of the algorithm for three different source of data: a Mediterranean 1/8° AVISO geostrophic velocities fields based on the Absolute Dynamical Topography (ADT), a ROMS idealized simulation and a high resolution velocity field derived from PIV measurements in a rotating tank experiment. All the velocity fields describe the dynamical evolution of mesoscale eddies generated by the instability of coastal currents. Then, we compare the results of the AMEDA algorithm applied to regional 1/8° AVISO Mediterranean data set with in situ measurements (drifter, ARGO, ADCP…). This quantitative comparisons with few specific test cases enables us to estimate the accuracy of the method to quantify the eddies features: trajectory, size and intensity. We also use the AMEDA algorithm to identify the main formation areas of long-lived eddies in the Mediterranean Sea during the last 15 years.

  3. Phytoplankton bloom triggered by an anticyclonic eddy: The combined effect of eddy-Ekman pumping and winter mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingyou; Zhan, Haigang; Shuai, Yiping; Cai, Shuqun; Li, Qian P.; Huang, Gaolong; Li, Junmin

    2017-06-01

    Recent composite based researches reveal that anticyclonic eddies facilitate the growth of phytoplankton in the subtropical gyres. Two dynamical mechanisms, eddy-Ekman pumping and winter mixing, have been examined individually, but their relative and combined effects remain unclear. Using satellite observations and model simulations, this study investigated the process of a distinct phytoplankton bloom generated in an anticyclonic eddy in the nutrient-depleted southeastern Indian Ocean. The bloom propagated westward along with the eddy for more than 600 km from late April to August in 2010. The peak of surface chlorophyll concentration in the eddy is 2.2 times larger than the mean value of the ambient. The development of the bloom is dominated by the winter deepening of mixed layer, whose velocity in vertical nutrient flux is on average 3 times larger than that of eddy-Ekman pumping. The results of a 1-D physical-biogeochemical model demonstrate that the role of eddy-Ekman pumping is also indispensable, because it not only transports extra nutrients into the mixed layer, but also results in significant chlorophyll enrichment in subsurface water. The superposition of eddy-Ekman pumping on winter mixing triples the chlorophyll both at the surface and in the upper layer, and the entrainment of subsurface phytoplankton into the mixed layer contributes significantly to the surface bloom, especially in its initial stage. Both the satellite observations and model simulation show that eddy-Ekman pumping can lead to an early occurrence of the bloom for more than 2 weeks.

  4. Compact, intrathermocline eddies in the Sargasso Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, J.P.; Mied, R.P.; Mignerey, P.C.; Schuetz, A.F.

    1982-01-20

    We report observations of isolated lenses of constant-temperature water embedded in the permanent thermocline in the Sargasso Sea. These features are observed to have vertical extents of < or approx. =220 m horizontal dimensions of < or approx. =65 km, and residence depths near 700 m. A dynamic model is constructed which permits balance among the pressure gradient. Coriolis, and cyclostrophic forces and maintains the lens against gravitational collapse. A results that anticyclonic rim velocities approaches 20 cm s/sup -1/ are permitted and that these eddies have finite radii of the order of 50 km, at which their thicknesses fall to zero.

  5. A transport equation for eddy viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.; Yang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    A transport equation for eddy viscosity is proposed for wall bounded turbulent flows. The proposed model reduces to a quasi-homogeneous form far from surfaces. Near to a surface, the nonhomogeneous effect of the wall is modeled by an elliptic relaxation model. All the model terms are expressed in local variables and are coordinate independent; the model is intended to be used in complex flows. Turbulent channel flow and turbulent boundary layer flows with/without pressure gradient are calculated using the present model. Comparisons between model calculations and direct numerical simulation or experimental data show good agreement.

  6. Eddy current measurement of tube element spacing

    DOEpatents

    Latham, Wayne Meredith; Hancock, Jimmy Wade; Grut, Jayne Marie

    1998-01-01

    A method of electromagnetically measuring the distance between adjacent tube elements in a heat exchanger. A cylindrical, high magnetic permeability ferrite slug is placed in the tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. A bobbin or annular coil type probe operated in the absolute mode is inserted into a second tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. From prior calibrations on the response of the eddy current coil, the signals from the coil, when sensing the presence of the ferrite slug, are used to determine the spacing between the tubes.

  7. Eddy current X-Y scanner system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Nondestructive Evaluation Branch of the Materials and Processes Laboratory became aware of a need for a miniature, portable X-Y scanner capable of performing eddy current or other nondestructive testing scanning operations such as ultrasonic, or small areas of flat plate. The technical description and operational theory of the X-Y scanner system designed and built to fulfill this need are covered. The scanner was given limited testing and performs according to its design intent, which is to scan flat plate areas of approximately 412 sq cm (64 sq in) during each complete cycle of scanning.

  8. Stochastic Large Eddy Simulation of Geostrophic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiga, B.; Livescu, D.; McKay, C. Q.

    2005-05-01

    Results are presented of (fine-scale) eddy-resolving simulations of different instances of turbulent quasi-geostrophic ocean circulation. A stochastic model for the effects of neglected subgrid degrees-of-freedom in coarse-scale simulations is proposed and the results compared to the fine simulations results as well as with existing models. As a precursor to the introduction of the models, we also study various aspects of the nonlinear rectification of stochastic forcing in quasi-geostrophic models of ocean circulation.

  9. Variable-Force Eddy-Current Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Variable damping achieved without problems of containing viscous fluids. Eddy-current damping obtained by moving copper or aluminum conductors through magnetic fields. Position of magnet carrier determines amount of field engagement and, therefore, amount of damping. Three advantages of concept: Magnitudes of stiffness and damping continously varied from maximum to zero without bringing rotor or shaft to stop; used in rotating machines not having viscous fluids available such as lubricating oils; produces sizable damping forces in machines that pump liquid hydrogen at - 246 degrees C and liquid oxygen at - 183 degrees C and are compact in size.

  10. Large eddy simulation in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, Alberto

    2010-12-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is a relative newcomer to oceanography. In this review, both applications of traditional LES to oceanic flows and new oceanic LES still in an early stage of development are discussed. The survey covers LES applied to boundary layer flows, traditionally an area where LES has provided considerable insight into the physics of the flow, as well as more innovative applications, where new SGS closure schemes need to be developed. The merging of LES with large-scale models is also briefly reviewed.

  11. Eddy diffusivity in the ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Castilla, Robert; Platonov, Alexei

    2010-05-01

    In order to measure eddy diffusivity in the ocean using a scaling that includes the thickness of the surf zone as well as the depth and the wave period[1,2]. Measurements in the Mediterranean are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than in the Pacific coast. On a larger scale, and further away from the coast the relevant eddy diffusivities are much larger, because large eddies often scale on the Rossby deformation radius, LR. Direct measurements of the diffusion and the horizontal velocity field were performed at several sites in the coastal areas of Spain. The diffusion coeficients were calculated by evaluation from video images of the area of milk and fluoresceine blobs released at different positions and with different wave heights, wind speeds and tidal induced currents[1-3]. There are instances with either low hipo-diffusivity or high hyper-diffusivity and local measurements in both cases indicate that spectra deviate strongly from an equilibrium spectrum. A generalized Richardson law [3,4] deduced from Kinematic Simulation (KS) numerical models may be applied also to coastal diffusion[5]. The eddy viscosity values show a complex behaviour that depends on wind friction, wave induced Reynolds number and flow topology. The results of more than 100 experiments show that there is a dependence of the maximum diffusivity on a Reynolds number derived from the wave height[1]. The increase of diffusivity with wave height only occurs for large enough wave Reynolds numbers. Other important factors are wind speed and tidal currents. The horizontal diffusivity shows also a marked anisotropy and spectral dependence [4,6]. [1] M. Diez, M. O. Bezerra, C. Mosso, R. Castilla and J. M. Redondo,Experimental measurements and diffusion in harbor and coastal zones. Il Nuovo Cimento Vol. 31 C, N. 5-6 Settembre-Dicembre (2008), 843. [2] Carrillo A., Sanchez M. A., Platonov A. and Redondo J. M., Phys. Chem. Earth B, 26. 4 (2001) 305. [3] Redondo J. M., Sanchez M. A. and Castilla R

  12. Development of a 3D Electromagnetic Model for Eddy Current Tubing Inspection: Application to Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Pichenot, G.; Premel, D.; Sollier, T.; Maillot, V.

    2004-02-26

    In nuclear plants, the inspection of heat exchanger tubes is usually carried out by using eddy current nondestructive testing. A numerical model, based on a volume integral approach using the Green's dyadic formalism, has been developed, with support from the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, to predict the response of an eddy current bobbin coil to 3D flaws located in the tube's wall. With an aim of integrating this model into the NDE multi techniques platform CIVA, it has been validated with experimental data for 2D and 3D flaws.

  13. Development of a 3D Electromagnetic Model for Eddy Current Tubing Inspection: Application to Steam Generator Tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichenot, G.; Prémel, D.; Sollier, T.; Maillot, V.

    2004-02-01

    In nuclear plants, the inspection of heat exchanger tubes is usually carried out by using eddy current nondestructive testing. A numerical model, based on a volume integral approach using the Green's dyadic formalism, has been developed, with support from the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, to predict the response of an eddy current bobbin coil to 3D flaws located in the tube's wall. With an aim of integrating this model into the NDE multi techniques platform CIVA, it has been validated with experimental data for 2D and 3D flaws.

  14. Bio-optical footprints created by mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Peterson, P.; McGillicuddy, D. J., Jr.; Maritorena, S.; Nelson, N. B.

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the bio-optical footprints made by mesoscale eddies in the Sargasso Sea and the processes that create them through an eddy-centric approach. Many (>10,000) eddies are identified and followed in time using satellite altimetry observations and the spatial ocean color patterns surrounding each eddy are assessed. We find through a sequence of statistical hypothesis tests that not one but several mechanisms (i.e., eddy pumping, eddy advection and eddy-Ekman pumping) are responsible for the spatial-temporal ocean color patterns following individual eddies. Both eddy pumping and the eddy-Ekman pumping mechanisms alter subsurface nutrient distributions thereby driving biogeochemical cycles, while the eddy advection mechanism to first order stirs existing horizontal gradients in bio-optical properties. This work illustrates both the promise and some of the limitations of satellite observations for assessing the biogeochemical impacts of mesoscale eddies.

  15. Recent Ship, Satellite and Autonomous Observations of Southern Ocean Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutton, P. G.; Moreau, S.; Llort, J.; Phillips, H. E.; Patel, R.; Della Penna, A.; Langlais, C.; Lenton, A.; Matear, R.; Dawson, H.; Boyd, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is the area of greatest uncertainty regarding the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. It is also a region of abundant energetic eddies that significantly impact circulation and biogeochemistry. In the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, cyclonic eddies are unusual in that they are upwelling favorable, as for cyclonic eddies elsewhere, but during summer they are low in silicate and phytoplankton biomass. The reverse is true for anticyclonic eddies in that they have counter-intuitive positive chlorophyll anomalies in summer. Similar but less obvious patterns occur in the Pacific and Atlantic sectors. Using ship, satellite and autonomous observations in the region south of Australia, the physical and biogeochemical signatures of both types of eddies were documented in 2016. A cyclonic eddy that lived for seven weeks exhibited doming isopycnals indicative of upwelling. However, low surface silicate and chlorophyll concentrations appeared to be characteristic of surface waters to the south where the eddy formed. Higher chlorophyll was confined to filaments at the eddy edge. Surface nitrate and phosphate concentrations were more than sufficient for a bloom of non-siliceous phytoplankton to occur. Acoustic observations from a high resolution TRIAXUS transect through the eddy documented high zooplankton biomass in the upper 150m. It is hypothesized that a non-diatom bloom was prevented by grazing pressure, but light may have also been an important limiting resource in late summer (April). Two SOCCOM floats that were deployed in the eddy field continued to monitor the physics, nitrate and bio-optics through the transition to winter. These observations across complementary platforms have identified and then explained the reason for these unexpected biological anomalies in an energetic and globally important region of the global ocean. Understanding the role of eddies in this region will be critical to the representation of mesoscale

  16. Modeling Mesoscale Eddies in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi

    1999-01-01

    Ocean modeling plays an important role in understanding the current climatic conditions and predicting the future climate change. Modeling the ocean at eddy-permitting and/or eddy resolving resolutions (1/3 degree or higher) has a two-fold objective. One part is to represent the ocean as realistically as possible, because mesoscale eddies have an impact on the large-scale circulation. The second objective is to learn how to represent effects of mesoscale eddies without explicitly resolving them. This is particularly important for climate models which cannot be run at eddy-resolving resolutions because of the computational constraints. At JPL, a 1/6 degree latitude by 1/6 degree longitude with 37 vertical levels Atlantic Ocean model has been developed. The model is based on the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Using the 256-processor Cray T3D, we have conducted a 40-year integration of this Atlantic eddy-resolving ocean model. A regional analysis demonstrate that many observed features associated with the Caribbean Sea eddies can be realistically simulated by this model. Analysis of this Atlantic eddy-resolving ocean model further suggests that these Caribbean Sea eddies are connected with eddies formed outside the Caribbean Sea at the confluence of the North Brazil Current (NBC) and the North Equatorial Countercurrent. The diagram of the model simulated surface current shows that the Caribbean eddies ultimately originate in the NBC retroflection region, traveling more than a year from the North Brazil coast through the Lesser Antilles into the Caribbean Sea and eventually into the Gulf of Mexico. Additional information is contained in the original.

  17. Turbulent eddy diffusion models in exposure assessment - Determination of the eddy diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuan; Ramachandran, Sandhya; Arnold, Susan; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2017-03-01

    The use of the turbulent eddy diffusion model and its variants in exposure assessment is limited due to the lack of knowledge regarding the isotropic eddy diffusion coefficient, DT. But some studies have suggested a possible relationship between DT and the air changes per hour (ACH) through a room. The main goal of this study was to accurately estimate DT for a range of ACH values by minimizing the difference between the concentrations measured and predicted by eddy diffusion model. We constructed an experimental chamber with a spatial concentration gradient away from the contaminant source, and conducted 27 3-hr long experiments using toluene and acetone under different air flow conditions (0.43-2.89 ACHs). An eddy diffusion model accounting for chamber boundary, general ventilation, and advection was developed. A mathematical expression for the slope based on the geometrical parameters of the ventilation system was also derived. There is a strong linear relationship between DT and ACH, providing a surrogate parameter for estimating DT in real-life settings. For the first time, a mathematical expression for the relationship between DT and ACH has been derived that also corrects for non-ideal conditions, and the calculated value of the slope between these two parameters is very close to the experimentally determined value. The values of DT obtained from the experiments are generally consistent with values reported in the literature. They are also independent of averaging time of measurements, allowing for comparison of values obtained from different measurement settings. These findings make the use of turbulent eddy diffusion models for exposure assessment in workplace/indoor environments more practical.

  18. Towards a consistent eddy-covariance processing: an intercomparison of EddyPro and TK3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, G.; Mauder, M.

    2014-03-01

    A comparison of two popular eddy-covariance (EC) software packages is presented, namely EddyPro and TK3. Two about one-month long test datasets were processed, representing typical instrumental setups, i.e. CSAT3/LI-7500 above grassland and Solent R3/LI-6262 above a forest. The resulting fluxes and quality flags were compared. Achieving a satisfying agreement and understanding residual discrepancies required several iterations and interventions of different nature, spanning from simple software reconfiguration to actual code manipulations. In this paper, we document our comparison exercise and show that the two software packages can provide utterly satisfying agreement when properly configured. Our main aim, however, is to stress the complexity of performing a rigorous comparison of EC software. We show that discriminating actual discrepancies in the results from inconsistencies in the software configuration requires deep knowledge of both software packages and of the eddy-covariance method itself. In some instances, it may be even beyond the possibility of the investigator who does not control the source code. Being the developers of EddyPro and TK3, we could discuss the comparison at all levels of details and this proved necessary to achieve a full understanding. As a further consequence, we also suggest that, to the aim of assuring consistency and comparability of centralized flux databases, and for a confident use of eddy fluxes in synthesis studies on the regional, continental and global scale, researchers rely on established software, notably those that have been extensively validated in documented intercomparisons.

  19. On the influence of eddy aging processes on colliding East Australian Current warm core eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, M.; Dietrich, D.; Sanderson, B.

    2003-04-01

    DieCAST, a 4th-order-accurate numerical model of the East Australian Current (EAC), having low total dissipation and numerical dispersion, is used to study the kinematics and dynamics of the collisions and mergings of previously pinched-off EAC anticyclonic eddies. Earlier studies show that eddies which extrude and reside for months to the south of the EAC retroflection region east of Sydney, a) naturally tend to become more barotropic and less buoyant under quasi-geostrophic dynamics with near-surface energy propagating to deeper levels; and b) by having been modified through air-sea exchange in cooler, more southern latitudes (especially after a winter season) are even less buoyant and more nearly barotropic. During merging, less dense surface water from younger eddies arriving from the north has been observed by Cresswell to override the less buoyant water of the older eddies. This process is being theoretically and numerically investigated. The high-resolution model is nested in a Southwest Pacific Ocean regional model that provides realistic upstream conditions for the East Australian Current. In order to address the nature and function of frontal eddies and other small-scale features which form around the edges of the main anticyclones during water-mass transformations, the model uses physically-based surface heat fluxes and E-P. These are derived using a new method that does not damp small-scale surface features by restoring to climatology, while leading to (by construction) the ensemble-mean annual cycle while converging to the observed annual surface cycle climatology as time progresses.

  20. An efficient 3-D eddy-current solver using an independent impedance method for transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    De Geeter, Nele; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Dupre, Luc

    2011-02-01

    In many important bioelectromagnetic problem settings, eddy-current simulations are required. Examples are the reduction of eddy-current artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and techniques, whereby the eddy currents interact with the biological system, like the alteration of the neurophysiology due to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). TMS has become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. A widely applied method for simulating the eddy currents is the impedance method (IM). However, this method has to contend with an ill conditioned problem and consequently a long convergence time. When dealing with optimal design problems and sensitivity control, the convergence rate becomes even more crucial since the eddy-current solver needs to be evaluated in an iterative loop. Therefore, we introduce an independent IM (IIM), which improves the conditionality and speeds up the numerical convergence. This paper shows how IIM is based on IM and what are the advantages. Moreover, the method is applied to the efficient simulation of TMS. The proposed IIM achieves superior convergence properties with high time efficiency, compared to the traditional IM and is therefore a useful tool for accurate and fast TMS simulations.

  1. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  2. Eddy Current Assessment of Duplex Metallic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzywosz, K. J.

    2004-02-01

    EPRI is involved in a multi-year program with the Department of Energy to test, evaluate, and develop a field-deployable eddy current NDE system for life assessment of blade coatings for advanced gas turbines. The coatings evaluated from these advanced GE engines include CoCrAlY (GT 29) and NiCoCrAlY (GT 33) bond coats followed by top aluminide overlay coatings. These duplex metallic coatings commonly referred to as GT 29+ and GT 33+ coatings, respectively. In general, during cycling and continuous operation at higher operating temperature, coatings fail due to spallation of protective oxide layers, leading to consumption of protective coating by oxidation and to eventual failure of blades. To extend service life of these critical rotating components, an inspection-based condition assessment program has been initiated to help establish more optimum inspection intervals that are not dependent on time-in-service maintenance approach. This paper summarizes the latest results obtained to date using the state-of-the-art frequency-scanning eddy current tester with a built-in three-layer inversion analysis algorithm. Significant progress has been made in assessing and discriminating the duplex metallic coatings as normal, degraded, and/or cracked. In addition, quantitative assessment was conducted by estimating various coating and substrate conductivity values.

  3. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  4. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  5. Eddy generation in the Mediterranean undercurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Nuno; Ambar, Isabel

    In the framework of the European Union MAST III project Canary Islands Gibraltar Azores Observations, 24 RAFOS floats were deployed in the Mediterranean Water (MW) undercurrent off south Portugal between September 1997 and September 1998. A preliminary analysis of this Lagrangian approach, complemented with XBT and current-meter data, show some of the major aspects of the flow associated with the undercurrent as well as associated eddy activity. Floats that stayed in the undercurrent featured a downstream deceleration and a steering by bottom topography. Three meddy formations at Cape St. Vincent could be isolated from the float data. The dynamical coupling of meddies and cyclones was observed for a considerable period of time. The generation of two dipolar structures in the Portimão Canyon region also was observed with the float data. A major bathymetric relief—Gorringe Bank—was not only an important constraint to the eddy trajectories and of the flow at the MW levels but also a site for meddy formation.

  6. Large-Eddy Simulation of Subsonic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, Ville; Wehrfritz, Armin; Yu, Jingzhou; Kaario, Ossi; Larmi, Martti; Boersma, Bendiks Jan

    2011-12-01

    The present study deals with development and validation of a fully explicit, compressible Runge-Kutta-4 (RK4) Navier-Stokes solver in the opensource CFD programming environment OpenFOAM. The background motivation is to shift towards explicit density based solution strategy and thereby avoid using the pressure based algorithms which are currently proposed in the standard OpenFOAM release for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). This shift is considered necessary in strongly compressible flows when Ma > 0.5. Our application of interest is related to the pre-mixing stage in direct injection gas engines where high injection pressures are typically utilized. First, the developed flow solver is discussed and validated. Then, the implementation of subsonic inflow conditions using a forcing region in combination with a simplified nozzle geometry is discussed and validated. After this, LES of mixing in compressible, round jets at Ma = 0.3, 0.5 and 0.65 are carried out. Respectively, the Reynolds numbers of the jets correspond to Re = 6000, 10000 and 13000. Results for two meshes are presented. The results imply that the present solver produces turbulent structures, resolves a range of turbulent eddy frequencies and gives also mesh independent results within satisfactory limits for mean flow and turbulence statistics.

  7. Developing large eddy simulation for turbomachinery applications.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Simon J; Tucker, Paul G; Xia, Hao; Klostermeier, Christian

    2009-07-28

    For jets, large eddy resolving simulations are compared for a range of numerical schemes with no subgrid scale (SGS) model and for a range of SGS models with the same scheme. There is little variation in results for the different SGS models, and it is shown that, for schemes which tend towards having dissipative elements, the SGS model can be abandoned, giving what can be termed numerical large eddy simulation (NLES). More complex geometries are investigated, including coaxial and chevron nozzle jets. A near-wall Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model is used to cover over streak-like structures that cannot be resolved. Compressor and turbine flows are also successfully computed using a similar NLES-RANS strategy. Upstream of the compressor leading edge, the RANS layer is helpful in preventing premature separation. Capturing the correct flow over the turbine is particularly challenging, but nonetheless the RANS layer is helpful. In relation to the SGS model, for the flows considered, evidence suggests issues such as inflow conditions, problem definition and transition are more influential.

  8. Multiscale Eddy Simulation for Moist Atmospheric Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stechmann, Samuel; Stevens, Bjorn

    2013-11-01

    A multiscale computational framework is designed for simulating atmospheric convection and clouds. In this multiscale framework, large eddy simulation (LES) is used to model the coarse scales of 100 m and larger, and a stochastic, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to represent the fine scales of 100 m and smaller. Coupled and evolving together, these two components provide a multiscale eddy simulation (MES). Through its fine-scale turbulence and moist thermodynamics, MES allows coarse grid cells to be partially cloudy and to encompass cloud-clear air mixing on scales down to 1 m; in contrast, in typical LES such fine-scale processes are not represented or are parameterized using bulk deterministic closures. To illustrate MES and investigate its multiscale dynamics, a shallow cumulus cloud field is simulated. In comparison to LES, many statistical mean quantities are essentially the same in MES, which indicates that the bulk properties of the cloud fields are similar in LES and MES. However, MES has significantly larger turbulent kinetic energy and variance. To illustrate the fine-scale variability, an individual cloud is considered in detail, and partially cloudy grid cells are seen to be prominent near the cloud edges. Partially supported by grant NSF DMS 1209409.

  9. Generalized Combinatoric Accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Dae Hyun; Seo, Jae Woo; Lee, Pil Joong

    The accumulator was introduced as a decentralized alternative to digital signatures. While most of accumulators are based on number theoretic assumptions and require time-consuming modulo exponentiations, Nyberg's combinatoric accumulator dose not depend on any computational assumption and requires only bit operations and hash function evaluations. In this article, we present a generalization of Nyberg's combinatoric accumulator, which allows a lower false positive rate with the same output length. Our generalization also shows that the Bloom filter can be used as a cryptographic accumulator and moreover excels the Nyberg's accumulator.

  10. A Circuit Equation as a Limit of Eddy Current Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirat, Youcef; Touzani, Rachid

    2017-06-01

    We consider a three-dimensional time-harmonic eddy current problem formulated in terms of the magnetic field. We prove that in the case of one thin toroidal conductor, eddy current equations have as a limit Kirchhoff's algebraic equation for circuits. This approximation is valid in the case of small resistivity and voltage.

  11. Significant sink of ocean-eddy energy near western boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaoming; Johnson, Helen L.; Marshall, David P.

    2010-09-01

    Ocean eddies generated through instability of the mean flow are a vital component of the energy budget of the global ocean. In equilibrium, the sources and sinks of eddy energy have to be balanced. However, where and how eddy energy is removed remains uncertain. Ocean eddies are observed to propagate westwards at speeds similar to the phase speeds of classical Rossby waves, but what happens to the eddies when they encounter the western boundary is unclear. Here we use a simple reduced-gravity model along with satellite altimetry data to show that the western boundary acts as a `graveyard' for the westward-propagating ocean eddies. We estimate a convergence of eddy energy near the western boundary of approximately 0.1-0.3TW, poleward of 10° in latitude. This energy is most probably scattered into high-wavenumber vertical modes, resulting in energy dissipation and diapycnal mixing. If confirmed, this eddy-energy sink will have important implications for the ocean circulation.

  12. Eddy properties in the Subtropical Countercurrent, Western Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramp, S. R.; Colosi, J. A.; Worcester, P. F.; Bahr, F. L.; Heaney, K. D.; Mercer, J. A.; Van Uffelen, L. J.

    2017-07-01

    An array of six oceanographic moorings with acoustic and environmental sensors was deployed in the central Philippine Sea from April 2010 to April 2011. The location spanned 18-23°N, 124 - 130°E in the Subtropical Countercurrent (STCC). The most prominent feature of the data set was a densely-packed eddy field with about equal numbers of cyclones and anticyclones moving westward at 6-12 km d-1. Eddies of either sign displaced the thermocline about ±50 m and had surface velocities exceeding 110 cm s-1. While warm eddies were slightly larger than cold eddies, the distance to maximum radial velocity was similar for both at about 65 km, close to the local Rossby radius of deformation. The steepness parameter U/c in the eddies ranged from 3 to 10, accompanied by relative vorticity of order 0.1-0.3 f, suggesting nonlinear, quasigeostrophic features with trapped cores rather than linear waves. This was borne out by the water mass analysis which showed high salinity, high spice North Pacific Tropical Water (NPTW) being transported westward in the warm eddy cores. The total KE and APE in eddies of both signs was about 1×1015 J with 85% of the APE and 74% of the KE located above 250 m depth. This equipartitioning of energy suggests mature eddies near equilibrium, that had been evolving for some time as they propagated into the area from the east.

  13. Eddy Current System and Method for Crack Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An eddy current system and method enables detection of sub-surface damage in a cylindrical object. The invention incorporates a dual frequency, orthogonally wound eddy current probe mounted on a stepper motor-controlled scanning system. The system is designed to inspect for outer surface damage from the interior of the cylindrical object.

  14. Eddy Currents: Levitation, Metal Detectors, and Induction Heating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouch, G.; Lord, A. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A simple and accessible calculation is given of the effects of eddy currents for a sphere in the field of a single circular loop of alternating current. These calculations should help toward the inclusion of eddy current effects in upper undergraduate physics courses. (BB)

  15. Water mass structure and transport in the Tourbillon eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, John; Glynn, Simon

    1985-06-01

    CTD data collected during the Tourbillon Experiment have been used to identify the water masses present in a mesoscale eddy in the eastern North Atlantic, and their transports during the 50-day period of the Experiment. The core of the eddy was found to comprise North Atlantic Central Water within the temperature range 10 to 11°C, and evidence of downward movement of this water between 150 and 700 db and upward movement between 750 and 820 db is presented. Mediterranean Water (MW) was drawn around the eddy in a tongue which broke into separate patches during the Experiment. There is evidence of this MW having a dynamical role in the eddy: whilst it was present as a continuous tongue it did not progress around the eddy as fast as other water. There is also an indication of upward movement of this MW. The distribution of Labrador Sea Water showed some positive relationship to the location of the eddy centre, whilst low concentrations were noted beneath the MW tongue. Both θ-S analysis and charts of the planetary component of potential vorticity are used in an attempt to identify the source region of the eddy; it is concluded that the eddy had not moved far (perhaps 200 km) from its place of origin, and that the homogeneous water in its core may have been formed by deep winter convection somewhere between north and west of the area where the Experiment was conducted.

  16. A Circuit Equation as a Limit of Eddy Current Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirat, Youcef; Touzani, Rachid

    2017-10-01

    We consider a three-dimensional time-harmonic eddy current problem formulated in terms of the magnetic field. We prove that in the case of one thin toroidal conductor, eddy current equations have as a limit Kirchhoff's algebraic equation for circuits. This approximation is valid in the case of small resistivity and voltage.

  17. Eddy Currents: Levitation, Metal Detectors, and Induction Heating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouch, G.; Lord, A. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A simple and accessible calculation is given of the effects of eddy currents for a sphere in the field of a single circular loop of alternating current. These calculations should help toward the inclusion of eddy current effects in upper undergraduate physics courses. (BB)

  18. Effect of the surface film electric resistance on eddy current detectability of surface cracks in Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Saario, T.; Paine, J.P.N.

    1995-12-31

    The most widely used technique for NDE of steam generator tubing is eddy current. This technique can reliably detect cracks grown in sodium hydroxide environment only at depths greater than 50% through wall. However, cracking caused by thiosulphate solutions have been detected and sized at shallower depths. The disparity has been proposed to be caused by the different electric resistance of the crack wall surface films and corrosion products in the cracks formed in different environments. This work was undertaken to clarify the role of surface film electric resistance on the disparity found in eddy current detectability of surface cracks in alloy 600 tubes. The proposed model explaining the above mentioned disparity is the following. The detectability of tightly closed cracks by the eddy current technique depends on the electric resistance of the surface films of the crack walls. The nature and resistance of the films which form on the crack walls during operation depends on the composition of the solution inside the crack and close to the crack location. During cooling down of the steam generator, because of contraction and loss of internal pressurization, the cracks are rather tightly closed so that exchange of electrolyte and thus changes in the film properties become difficult. As a result, the surface condition prevailing at high temperature is preserved. If the environment is such that the films formed on the crack walls under operating conditions have low electric resistance, eddy current technique will fail to indicate these cracks or will underestimate the size of these cracks. However, if the electric resistance of the films is high, a tightly closed crack will resemble an open crack and will be easily indicated and correctly sized by eddy current technique.

  19. Novel eddy current field modulation of magneto-optic garnet films for real-time imaging of fatigue cracks and hidden corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Gerald L.; Thome, David K.; Skaugset, Richard L.; Shih, Eric Y.; Shih, William C.

    1993-12-01

    A new magneto-optic/eddy current imaging technology promises to revolutionize the nondestructive inspection of aging aircraft and also to provide new ways to inspect unlikely materials such as non-metallic composites. As the name implies, the technology is a hybrid of magneto-optic imaging techniques and novel eddy current excitation methods. The result, a device we call a magneto-optic/eddy current imager, or MOI, allows one to inspect such things as aircraft lap joints for both cracks and hidden corrosion in approximately one tenth the time it would take with conventional eddy current inspection equipment. The device produces realistic, real-time images of both cracks and corrosion and has proven to be a reliable in-service tool. The MOI has been approved for the inspection of Boeing, Douglas, and Lockheed commercial aircraft. It is also currently being used by the U.S. Air Force, NASA, and many other organizations.

  20. Nonlinear inertial oscillations of a multilayer eddy: An analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotsenko, S. F.; Rubino, A.

    2008-06-01

    Nonlinear axisymmetric oscillations of a warm baroclinic eddy are considered within the framework of an reduced-gravity model of the dynamics of a multilayer ocean. A class of exact analytical solutions describing pure inertial oscillations of an eddy formation is found. The thicknesses of layers in the eddy vary according to a quadratic law, and the horizontal projections of the velocity in the layers depend linearly on the radial coordinate. Owing to a complicated structure of the eddy, weak limitations on the vertical distribution of density, and an explicit form of the solution, the latter can be treated as a generalization of the exact analytical solutions of this form that were previously obtained for homogeneous and baroclinic eddies in the ocean.

  1. Biogeochemical Properties of Eddies in the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenillat, Fanny; Franks, Peter J. S.; Combes, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    The California Current System (CCS) is a coastal upwelling system characterized by intense mesoscale activity. This mesoscale activity plays a critical role in modulating biological production and exporting coastal biogeochemical materials offshore. To characterize and quantify the ability of mesoscale eddies to affect local and regional planktonic ecosystems in the CCS, we analyzed a 10-year-long physical-biological model simulation - with 5km horizontal resolution - using eddy detection and tracking to isolate the dynamics in cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies. At any given time, ~8% of the model domain was covered by eddies, and this small area belies ~50% of the cross-shelf biological transport. As they propagate westward across the shelf, cyclonic eddies efficiently transport coastal planktonic organisms, and maintain locally elevated production, Anticyclones, on the other hand, have a limited impact on local production.

  2. The Energetics of Transient Eddies in the Martian Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Joseph Michael; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark T.

    2016-10-01

    The energetics of northern hemisphere transient waves in the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation is analyzed. Three periods between the fall and spring equinoxes (Ls=200°-230°, 255°-285°, and 330°-360°) during three Mars Years are selected to exemplify the fall, winter, and spring wave activity. Fall and spring eddy energetics is similar with some inter-annual and inter-seasonal variability, but winter eddy kinetic energy and its transport are strongly reduced in intensity as a result of the solsticial pause in eddy activity. Barotropic energy conversion acts as a sink of eddy kinetic energy throughout the northern hemisphere eddy period with little reduction in amplitude during the solsticial pause. Baroclinic energy conversion acts as a source in fall and spring but disappears during the winter period as a result of the stabilized vertical shear profile of the westerly jet around winter solstice.

  3. Movements of foraging king penguins through marine mesoscale eddies

    PubMed Central

    Cotté, Cédric; Park, Young-Hyang; Guinet, Christophe; Bost, Charles-André

    2007-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that marine predators associate with mesoscale eddies, how these marine features influence foraging movements is still unclear. This study investigates the relationship of at-sea movements of king penguins to mesoscale eddies using oceanographic remote sensing and movement data from 43 individual trips over 4 years. Simultaneous satellite measurements provided information on gradients of sea surface temperature and currents associated with eddies determined from altimetry. Penguins tended to swim rapidly with currents as they travelled towards foraging zones. Swimming speed indicative of foraging occurred within mesoscale fronts and strong currents associated with eddies at the Polar Front. These results demonstrate the importance of mesoscale eddies in directing foraging efforts to allow predators to rapidly get to rich areas where high concentrations of prey are likely to be encountered. When returning to the colony to relieve the incubating partner or to feed the chick, the birds followed a direct and rapid path, seemingly ignoring currents. PMID:17669726

  4. Chamber and eddy covariance comparisons of alternate wetting and drying and continuous flood irrigation in mid-South rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reba, M. L.; Fong, B.; Adviento-Borbe, A.; Runkle, B.

    2016-12-01

    The subtropical humid mid-south region produces nearly 75% of US rice. Rice cultivation contributes higher amounts of GHG emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) due to flooded field conditions. Accurate measurements of gas fluxes are important to regional and global climate models. A comparison between eddy covariance and static vented flux chamber measurement techniques is presented. These measurements were collected in two NE Arkansas commercial rice fields in 2015 and 2016 production seasons under two irrigation treatments: Alternate Wetting and Drying (AWD) and continuous flood (CF) irrigation. AWD can reduce GHG emissions and water use compared to CF by introducing aerobic conditions that reduce methanogen activity and drained conditions decrease water loss due to seepage or evapotranspiration. N2O was measured only with vented chambers, while CO2 and CH4 were measured with both techniques. In the vented flux chamber technique, headspace gas sampling occurred at least once a week every 20 minutes for one hour of chamber closure. Gas Chromatograph equipped with ECD and FID were used to analyze gas concentrations. Eddy covariance used high frequency measurements wind and concentration measurements to determine fluxes. Chamber measurements were found to be more sensitive during seedling and early vegetative growth while eddy covariance was more sensitive after canopy closure during mid-vegetative to reproductive growth. Unlike eddy covariance which measured net CO2 exchange, flux chamber method measured only CO2 ecosystem respiration because flux measurements occurred using an opaque chamber material.

  5. Large eddy simulation of mixing between hot and cold sodium flows - comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneau, J.P.; Noe, H.; Menant, B.

    1995-09-01

    The large eddy simulation is becoming a potential powerful tool for the calculation of turbulent flows. In nuclear liquid metal cooled fast reactors, the knowledge of the turbulence characteristics is of great interest for the prediction and the analysis of thermal stripping phenomena. The objective of this paper is to give a contribution in the evaluation of the large eddy simulation technique is an individual case. The problem chosen is the case of the mixing between hot and cold sodium flows. The computations are compared with available sodium tests. This study shows acceptable qualitative results but the simple model used is not able to predict the turbulence characteristics. More complex models including larger domains around the fluctuating zone and fluctuating boundary conditions could be necessary. Validation works are continuing.

  6. Pulsed Eddy Current Non-destructive Testing and Evaluation: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophian, Ali; Tian, Guiyun; Fan, Mengbao

    2017-05-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) has been around for some time and it is still attracting extensive attention from researchers around the globe, which can be witnessed through the reports reviewed in this paper. Thanks to its richness of spectral components, various applications of this technique have been proposed and reported in the literature covering both structural integrity inspection and material characterization in various industrial sectors. To support its development and for better understanding of the phenomena around the transient induced eddy currents, attempts for its modelling both analytically and numerically have been made by researchers around the world. This review is an attempt to capture the state-of-the-art development and applications of PEC, especially in the last 15 years and it is not intended to be exhaustive. Future challenges and opportunities for PEC NDT&E are also presented.

  7. Correcting eddy-covariance flux underestimates over a grassland.

    SciTech Connect

    Twine, T. E.; Kustas, W. P.; Norman, J. M.; Cook, D. R.; Houser, P. R.; Meyers, T. P.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Wesely, M. L.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; DOE; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationoratory

    2000-06-08

    Independent measurements of the major energy balance flux components are not often consistent with the principle of conservation of energy. This is referred to as a lack of closure of the surface energy balance. Most results in the literature have shown the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes measured by eddy covariance to be less than the difference between net radiation and soil heat fluxes. This under-measurement of sensible and latent heat fluxes by eddy-covariance instruments has occurred in numerous field experiments and among many different manufacturers of instruments. Four eddy-covariance systems consisting of the same models of instruments were set up side-by-side during the Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment and all systems under-measured fluxes by similar amounts. One of these eddy-covariance systems was collocated with three other types of eddy-covariance systems at different sites; all of these systems under-measured the sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The net radiometers and soil heat flux plates used in conjunction with the eddy-covariance systems were calibrated independently and measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux showed little scatter for various sites. The 10% absolute uncertainty in available energy measurements was considerably smaller than the systematic closure problem in the surface energy budget, which varied from 10 to 30%. When available-energy measurement errors are known and modest, eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes should be adjusted for closure. Although the preferred method of energy balance closure is to maintain the Bowen-ratio, the method for obtaining closure appears to be less important than assuring that eddy-covariance measurements are consistent with conservation of energy. Based on numerous measurements over a sorghum canopy, carbon dioxide fluxes, which are measured by eddy covariance, are underestimated by the same factor as eddy covariance evaporation

  8. Spatio-Temporal Data Mining for Scalable Ocean Eddy Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhaeuser, K.; Faghmous, J.; Boriah, S.; Liess, S.; Vikebo, F.; Mesquita, M. D.; Kumar, V.

    2012-12-01

    Rotating coherent structures of water, known as ocean eddies are the oceanic analog of storms in the atmosphere and a crucial component of ocean dynamics. In addition to dominating the ocean's kinetic energy, eddies play a significant role in the transport of water, salt, heat, nutrients, and carbon uptake. Therefore, understanding current and future eddy activity is a central climate challenge to address future sustainability of marine ecosystems. The emergence of sea surface height observations from satellite radar altimeter has recently enabled researchers to track eddies at a global scale. The majority of studies that identify eddies from observational data employ highly parametrized connected component algorithms using expert filtered data, effectively making reproducibility and scalability challenging. In this paper, we improve upon the state of the art connected component eddy monitoring algorithms to track eddies globally. This work makes three main contributions: first, we do not pre-process the data therefore minimizing the risk of wiping out important signals within the data. Second, we employ a physically-consistent convexity requirement on eddies based on theoretical and empirical studies to improve accuracy effectively reducing the computational complexity from quadratic to linear time in the size of each eddy. Finally, we are able to effectively break-up merged eddies, which existing methods cannot accomplish. We compare our results to those of the state-of-the-art method and discuss the impact of our improvements on the difference in results. Acknowledgments: This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant IIS-1029711.

  9. On the interactions between planetary geostrophy and mesoscale eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian; Julien, Keith; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2011-04-01

    Multiscale asymptotics are used to derive three systems of equations connecting the planetary geostrophic (PG) equations for gyre-scale flow to a quasigeostrophic (QG) equation set for mesoscale eddies. Pedlosky (1984), following similar analysis, found eddy buoyancy fluxes to have only a small effect on the large-scale flow; however, numerical simulations disagree. While the impact of eddies is relatively small in most regions, in keeping with Pedlosky's result, eddies have a significant effect on the mean flow in the vicinity of strong, narrow currents. First, the multiple-scales analysis of Pedlosky is reviewed and amplified. Novel results of this analysis include new multiple-scales models connecting large-scale PG equations to sets of QG eddy equations. However, only introducing anisotropic scaling of the large-scale coordinates allows us to derive a model with strong two-way coupling between the QG eddies and the PG mean flow. This finding reconciles the analysis with simulations, viz. that strong two-way coupling is observed in the vicinity of anisotropic features of the mean flow like boundary currents and jets. The relevant coupling terms are shown to be eddy buoyancy fluxes. Using the Gent-McWilliams parameterization to approximate these fluxes allows solution of the PG equations with closed tracer fluxes in a closed domain, which is not possible without mesoscale eddy (or other small-scale) effects. The boundary layer width is comparable to an eddy mixing length when the typical eddy velocity is taken to be the long Rossby wave phase speed, which is the same result found by Fox-Kemper and Ferrari (2009) in a reduced gravity layer.

  10. Large eddy simulation of a pumped- storage reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, Marina; Leite Ribeiro, Marcelo; Roman, Federico; Armenio, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The last decades have seen an increasing number of pumped-storage hydropower projects all over the world. Pumped-storage schemes move water between two reservoirs located at different elevations to store energy and to generate electricity following the electricity demand. Thus the reservoirs can be subject to important water level variations occurring at the daily scale. These new cycles leads to changes in the hydraulic behaviour of the reservoirs. Sediment dynamics and sediment budgets are modified, sometimes inducing problems of erosion and deposition within the reservoirs. With the development of computer performances, the use of numerical techniques has become popular for the study of environmental processes. Among numerical techniques, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has arisen as an alternative tool for problems characterized by complex physics and geometries. This work uses the LES-COAST Code, a LES model under development in the framework of the Seditrans Project, for the simulation of an Upper Alpine Reservoir of a pumped-storage scheme. Simulations consider the filling (pump mode) and emptying (turbine mode) of the reservoir. The hydraulic results give a better understanding of the processes occurring within the reservoir. They are considered for an assessment of the sediment transport processes and of their consequences.

  11. Improved eddy-current inspection for steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.; Allen, J.D. Jr.; Allen , Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Computer programs have been written to allow the analysis of different types of eddy-current probes and their performance under different steam generator test conditions. The probe types include the differential bobbin probe, the absolute bobbin probe, the pancake probe and the reflection probe. The generator test conditions include tube supports, copper deposits, magnetite deposits, denting, wastage, pitting, cracking and IGA. These studies are based mostly on computed values, with the limited number of test specimens available used to verify the computed results. The instrument readings were computed for a complete matrix of the different test conditions, and then the test conditions determined as a function of the readings by a least-squares technique. A comparison was made of the errors in fit and instrument drift for the different probe types. The computations of the change in instrument reading due to the defects have led to an inversion'' technique in which the defect properties can be computed from the instrument readings. This has been done both experimentally and analytically for each of these probe types. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The prospect of using large eddy and detached eddy simulations in engineering design, and the research required to get there

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Johan; Wang, Qiqi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we try to look into the future to envision how large eddy and detached eddy simulations will be used in the engineering design process about 20–30 years from now. Some key challenges specific to the engineering design process are identified, and some of the critical outstanding problems and promising research directions are discussed. PMID:25024421

  13. The prospect of using large eddy and detached eddy simulations in engineering design, and the research required to get there.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Johan; Wang, Qiqi

    2014-08-13

    In this paper, we try to look into the future to envision how large eddy and detached eddy simulations will be used in the engineering design process about 20-30 years from now. Some key challenges specific to the engineering design process are identified, and some of the critical outstanding problems and promising research directions are discussed.

  14. Effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification with eddy dissipation concept - Sub-grid scale reaction model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juhui; Yin, Weijie; Wang, Shuai; Meng, Cheng; Li, Jiuru; Qin, Bai; Yu, Guangbin

    2016-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) approach is used for gas turbulence, and eddy dissipation concept (EDC)-sub-grid scale (SGS) reaction model is employed for reactions in small eddies. The simulated gas molar fractions are in better agreement with experimental data with EDC-SGS reaction model. The effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification is emphatically analyzed with EDC-SGS reaction model. The distributions of the SGS reaction rates which represent the reactions in small eddies with particles concentration and temperature are analyzed. The distributions of SGS reaction rates have the similar trend with those of total reactions rates and the values account for about 15% of the total reactions rates. The heterogeneous reaction rates with EDC-SGS reaction model are also improved during the biomass gasification process in bubbling fluidized bed.

  15. A tale of two eddies: The biophysical characteristics of two contrasting cyclonic eddies in the East Australian Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roughan, M.; Keating, S. R.; Schaeffer, A.; Cetina Heredia, P.; Rocha, C.; Griffin, D.; Robertson, R.; Suthers, I. M.

    2017-03-01

    Mesoscale cyclonic eddies are known to be highly productive. Less well-known are the dynamics and productivity of smaller cyclonic eddies, known as frontal eddies, that form on the landward side of western boundary currents. In this study, we investigate the physical and biogeochemical properties of two contrasting cyclonic eddies in the East Australian Current (EAC). The first ("Murphy"), a mesoscale cyclonic eddy that formed at ˜28°S with a diameter of ˜160 km and high surface chlorophyll-a concentrations, which lived ˜47 days. The second ("Freddy"), a smaller frontal eddy (˜35 km diameter) that formed from a shelf water billow ˜7 days prior to sampling at ˜31.5°S and was advected off the shelf along the EAC front (from ˜200 m to 4000 m of water). Both eddies were at least 1000 m deep with a similar steric height anomaly. We introduce and employ "the method of closest approach" using shipboard ADCP velocities to estimate the eddy centers, which reveals significant tilting through the water column. We estimate rotation rates of 4-10 days and 1-9 days and Rossby numbers 0.25-0.1 and 0.6-0.1, from the surface to 600 m for Murphy and Freddy, respectively. High-resolution altimetry measurements from the SARAL/AltiKA satellite provide estimates of the ageostrophic component of rotation. Our results show that the frontal eddy is significantly more ageostrophic, energetic, and productive than the mesoscale cyclone, despite its small size and short life (˜4 weeks). We suggest that frontal eddies have potential to contribute significantly to the net productivity of the Tasman Sea region.

  16. Soil Respiration in Eddy Covariance Footprints using Forced Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, N.; Gabriel, C. E.; Creelman, C.

    2016-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) has been widely used across the globe for more than 20 years, offering researchers invaluable measurements of parameters including Net Ecosystem Exchange and ecosystem respiration. However, research suggests that EC assumptions and technical obstacles can cause biased gas exchange estimates. Measurements of soil respiration (RS) at the ground level may help alleviate these biases; for example, by allowing researchers to reconcile nocturnal EC flux data with RS or by providing a means to inform gap-filling models. RS measurements have been used sparingly alongside EC towers because of the large cost required to scale chamber systems to the EC footprint and data integration and processing burdens. Here we present the Forced Diffusion (FD) method for the measurement of RS at EC sites. The FD method allows for inexpensive and autonomous measurements, providing a scalable approach to matching the EC footprint compared to other RS systems. A pilot study at the Howland Forest AmeriFlux site was carried out from July 15, 2016 to Dec., 2016 using EC, custom-made automated chambers, and FD chambers in tandem. These results emphasize how RS measurements, like those from the eosFD, can identify decoupling of above and below canopy air masses and assist in informing and parameterizing gap-filling techniques. Uncertainty in nocturnal EC fluxes has been extensively characterized at Howland Forest with EC measurements spanning more than 20 years. Similarly, long term automated measurements of RS are also made at Howland, and have already been used to inform EC gap-filling models, making Howland the ideal site for such a study. This study has been designed to reproduce previous findings from Howland using the FD approach, aiming to demonstrate that the measurements taken using the eosFD correlate well with the existing chamber systems and can be used with equal efficacy to inform gap filling models or for other other eddy covariance QA/QC procedures, including

  17. Pulsed eddy current inspection of CF-188 inner wing spar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Peter Francis

    Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CF-188 Hornet aircraft engineering authorities have stated a requirement for a Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) technique to detect Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in the inner wing spars without fastener or composite wing skin removal. Current radiographic inspections involve significant aircraft downtime, and Pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) inspection is proposed as a solution. The aluminum inner wing spars of CF-188 Hornet aircraft may undergo stress corrosion cracking (SCC) along the spar between the fasteners that secure carbon-fiber/ epoxy composite skin to the wing. Inspection of the spar through the wing skin is required to avoid wing disassembly. The thickness of the wing skin varies between 8 and 20 mm (0.3 to 0.8 inch) and fasteners may be either titanium or ferrous. PEC generated by a probe centered over a fastener, demonstrates capability of detecting simulated cracks within spars with the wing skin present. Comparison of signals from separate sensors, mounted to either side of the excitation coil, is used to detect differences in induced eddy current fields, which arise in the presence of cracks. To overcome variability in PEC signal response due to variation in 1) skin thickness, 2) fastener material and size, and 3) centering over fasteners, a large calibration data set is acquired. Multi-dimensional scores from a Modified Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the data are reduced to one dimension (1D) using a Discriminant Analysis method. Under inspection conditions, calibrated PCA scores combined with discriminant analysis permit rapid real time go/no-go PEC detection of cracks in CF-188 inner wing spar. Probe designs using both pickup coils and Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors were tested on samples with the same ferrous and titanium fasteners found on the CF-188. Flaws were correctly detected at lift-offs of up to 21mm utilizing a variety of insulating skin materials simulating the carbon-fibre reinforced polymer

  18. Isopycnal eddy mixing across the Kuroshio Extension: Stable versus unstable states in an eddying model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ru; Gille, Sarah T.; McClean, Julie L.

    2017-05-01

    The Kuroshio Extension (KE) jet transitions between stable and unstable states on interannual time scales. Cross-jet eddy mixing in the two states is contrasted in the KE region (28°-40°N, 125°-165°E), using a global eddying 0.1° configuration of the Parallel Ocean Program with online numerical particles. The 4 year period chosen (June 1994 to May 1998) covers a full cycle of the stable state, unstable state and the transition period. Large values of cross-jet eddy diffusivities within the KE jet are concentrated in the upper 1000 m. In the upper ocean, elevated cross-jet mixing within the KE jet is mainly concentrated in the downstream part of the KE jet, where the jet is weak but eddy activity is strong. The simulated time-mean KE jet is more intense and extends further east in the stable state than in the unstable state. Consequently, strong cross-jet mixing within the KE jet is located west of 150°E during June 1996 to May 1997 (a typical unstable state), but east of 150°E during June 1995 to May 1996 (a typical stable state). However, average mixing within the KE jet is indistinguishable in the typical stable and unstable states. In the deep ocean, mixing is strongly influenced by topography, and thus their horizontal structures have less inter-annual variability than in the upper ocean. One caveat is that results here cover one representative cycle of the two states. To obtain the climate mean mixing structures for the stable or unstable state, one would need numerical output covering a period much longer than 4 years.

  19. Large eddy simulations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grete, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Supersonic, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to play an important role in many processes - especially in astrophysics, where detailed three-dimensional observations are scarce. Simulations can partially fill this gap and help to understand these processes. However, direct simulations with realistic parameters are often not feasible. Consequently, large eddy simulations (LES) have emerged as a viable alternative. In LES the overall complexity is reduced by simulating only large and intermediate scales directly. The smallest scales, usually referred to as subgrid-scales (SGS), are introduced to the simulation by means of an SGS model. Thus, the overall quality of an LES with respect to properly accounting for small-scale physics crucially depends on the quality of the SGS model. While there has been a lot of successful research on SGS models in the hydrodynamic regime for decades, SGS modeling in MHD is a rather recent topic, in particular, in the compressible regime. In this thesis, we derive and validate a new nonlinear MHD SGS model that explicitly takes compressibility effects into account. A filter is used to separate the large and intermediate scales, and it is thought to mimic finite resolution effects. In the derivation, we use a deconvolution approach on the filter kernel. With this approach, we are able to derive nonlinear closures for all SGS terms in MHD: the turbulent Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, and the turbulent electromotive force (EMF). We validate the new closures both a priori and a posteriori. In the a priori tests, we use high-resolution reference data of stationary, homogeneous, isotropic MHD turbulence to compare exact SGS quantities against predictions by the closures. The comparison includes, for example, correlations of turbulent fluxes, the average dissipative behavior, and alignment of SGS vectors such as the EMF. In order to quantify the performance of the new nonlinear closure, this comparison is conducted from the

  20. Eddy-current-damped microelectromechanical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Polosky, Marc A.

    2007-10-30

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) device is disclosed that includes a shuttle suspended for movement above a substrate. A plurality of permanent magnets in the shuttle of the MEM device interact with a metal plate which forms the substrate or a metal portion thereof to provide an eddy-current damping of the shuttle, thereby making the shuttle responsive to changes in acceleration or velocity of the MEM device. Alternately, the permanent magnets can be located in the substrate, and the metal portion can form the shuttle. An electrical switch closure in the MEM device can occur in response to a predetermined acceleration-time event. The MEM device, which can be fabricated either by micromachining or LIGA, can be used for sensing an acceleration or deceleration event (e.g. in automotive applications such as airbag deployment or seat belt retraction).

  1. Eddy-current-damped microelectromechanical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Polosky, Marc A.

    2009-12-15

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) device is disclosed that includes a shuttle suspended for movement above a substrate. A plurality of permanent magnets in the shuttle of the MEM device interact with a metal plate which forms the substrate or a metal portion thereof to provide an eddy-current damping of the shuttle, thereby making the shuttle responsive to changes in acceleration or velocity of the MEM device. Alternately, the permanent magnets can be located in the substrate, and the metal portion can form the shuttle. An electrical switch closure in the MEM device can occur in response to a predetermined acceleration-time event. The MEM device, which can be fabricated either by micromachining or LIGA, can be used for sensing an acceleration or deceleration event (e.g. in automotive applications such as airbag deployment or seat belt retraction).

  2. Material condition assessment with eddy current sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil J. (Inventor); Washabaugh, Andrew P. (Inventor); Sheiretov, Yanko K. (Inventor); Schlicker, Darrell E. (Inventor); Lyons, Robert J. (Inventor); Windoloski, Mark D. (Inventor); Craven, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tsukernik, Vladimir B. (Inventor); Grundy, David C. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Eddy current sensors and sensor arrays are used for process quality and material condition assessment of conducting materials. In an embodiment, changes in spatially registered high resolution images taken before and after cold work processing reflect the quality of the process, such as intensity and coverage. These images also permit the suppression or removal of local outlier variations. Anisotropy in a material property, such as magnetic permeability or electrical conductivity, can be intentionally introduced and used to assess material condition resulting from an operation, such as a cold work or heat treatment. The anisotropy is determined by sensors that provide directional property measurements. The sensor directionality arises from constructs that use a linear conducting drive segment to impose the magnetic field in a test material. Maintaining the orientation of this drive segment, and associated sense elements, relative to a material edge provides enhanced sensitivity for crack detection at edges.

  3. Large eddy simulation of cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanaskandan, Aswin; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2014-11-01

    Large eddy simulation on unstructured grids is used to study hydrodynamic cavitation. The multiphase medium is represented using a homogeneous equilibrium model that assumes thermal equilibrium between the liquid and the vapor phase. Surface tension effects are ignored and the governing equations are the compressible Navier Stokes equations for the liquid/vapor mixture along with a transport equation for the vapor mass fraction. A characteristic-based filtering scheme is developed to handle shocks and material discontinuities in non-ideal gases and mixtures. A TVD filter is applied as a corrector step in a predictor-corrector approach with the predictor scheme being non-dissipative and symmetric. The method is validated for canonical one dimensional flows and leading edge cavitation over a hydrofoil, and applied to study sheet to cloud cavitation over a wedge. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  4. Large eddy simulations in 2030 and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, U

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction, in the early 1970s, large eddy simulations (LES) have advanced considerably, and their application is transitioning from the academic environment to industry. Several landmark developments can be identified over the past 40 years, such as the wall-resolved simulations of wall-bounded flows, the development of advanced models for the unresolved scales that adapt to the local flow conditions and the hybridization of LES with the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations. Thanks to these advancements, LES is now in widespread use in the academic community and is an option available in most commercial flow-solvers. This paper will try to predict what algorithmic and modelling advancements are needed to make it even more robust and inexpensive, and which areas show the most promise. PMID:25024415

  5. Statistical Ensemble of Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, Daniele; Rogers, Michael M.; Wray, Alan A.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A statistical ensemble of large eddy simulations (LES) is run simultaneously for the same flow. The information provided by the different large scale velocity fields is used to propose an ensemble averaged version of the dynamic model. This produces local model parameters that only depend on the statistical properties of the flow. An important property of the ensemble averaged dynamic procedure is that it does not require any spatial averaging and can thus be used in fully inhomogeneous flows. Also, the ensemble of LES's provides statistics of the large scale velocity that can be used for building new models for the subgrid-scale stress tensor. The ensemble averaged dynamic procedure has been implemented with various models for three flows: decaying isotropic turbulence, forced isotropic turbulence, and the time developing plane wake. It is found that the results are almost independent of the number of LES's in the statistical ensemble provided that the ensemble contains at least 16 realizations.

  6. Large-eddy simulation of propeller noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Jacob; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    We will discuss our ongoing work towards developing the capability to predict far field sound from the large-eddy simulation of propellers. A porous surface Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy, with a dynamic endcapping method (Nitzkorski and Mahesh, 2014) is developed for unstructured grids in a rotating frame of reference. The FW-H surface is generated automatically using Delaunay triangulation and is representative of the underlying volume mesh. The approach is validated for tonal trailing edge sound from a NACA 0012 airfoil. LES of flow around a propeller at design advance ratio is compared to experiment and good agreement is obtained. Results for the emitted far field sound will be discussed. This work is supported by ONR.

  7. Trends in Southern Ocean Eddy Kinetic Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Don

    2016-04-01

    A recent study by Hogg et al. (JGR, 2015) has demonstrated a 20-year trend in eddy kinetic energy (EKE) computed from satellite altimetry data. However, this estimate is based on an averaging over large spatial areas. In this study, we use the same methods to examine regional EKE trends throughout the Southern Ocean, from 1993-2015. We do find significant positive trends in several areas of the Southern Ocean, mainly in regions with high mean EKE associated with interactions between jets and bathymetry. At the same time, however, there are also regions with significant negative trends. Overall, EKE in the majority of the Southern Ocean has not changed. These results suggest that the estimates of Hogg et al. may have been biased by these regional extremes, and that more work is needed to quantify climatic changes in EKE.

  8. Autonomic Closure for Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ryan; Hamlington, Peter; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    2015-11-01

    A new autonomic subgrid-scale closure has been developed for large eddy simulation (LES). The approach poses a supervised learning problem that captures nonlinear, nonlocal, and nonequilibrium turbulence effects without specifying a predefined turbulence model. By solving a regularized optimization problem on test filter scale quantities, the autonomic approach identifies a nonparametric function that represents the best local relation between subgrid stresses and resolved state variables. The optimized function is then applied at the grid scale to determine unknown LES subgrid stresses by invoking scale similarity in the inertial range. A priori tests of the autonomic approach on homogeneous isotropic turbulence show that the new approach is amenable to powerful optimiz