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Sample records for editorial asesor nuevos

  1. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peter Y

    2016-01-01

    This editorial discusses the history of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (JOHP), citing the various editors and the length of their editorships, as well as the support they received from the associate editors, editorial board members, reviewers, and the contributions of the authors' high quality articles. JOHP has become an international flagship journal, which plays an important role in advancing the field of occupational health psychology. The most recent impact factor and ranking reported by the American Psychological Association (2015) further supports the quality of this journal. PMID:26752239

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audoly, Basile; Castañeda, Pedro Ponte; Kuhl, Ellen; Niordson, Christian; Sharma, Pradeep; Gao, Huajian

    2016-02-01

    After 12 years of distinguished service, Kaushik Bhattacharya has decided to step down as co-editor of the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids. A new editorial team, with Huajian Gao as editor and Basile Audoly, Pedro Ponte Castañeda, Ellen Kuhl, Christian Niordson and Pradeep Sharma as Associate Editors, will take over as of January 1, 2016.

  3. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianturco, F. A.; Raimond, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of EPJ D introduces a revised list of sections and subsections, designed in close collaboration with the whole editorial board. The aim of these modifications is to reflect more faithfully the wide diversity of activities covered by our journal. A new section is introduced. Entitled “Atomic and Molecular Collisions”, it covers a large range of activities, from atom/atom or atom/molecules collisions (including the very active field of ultra-cold collisions in laser-cooled atomic or molecular gases), to electron scattering and molecular reactivity. The creation of this section reflects the increased interest of the journal for molecular and collisional physics, already apparent in the recent extension of the editorial board competence in this direction. We very much hope that this community will react positively to this trend and become a major component of the journal's life. For the other sections, we have markedly revised the list of subheadings. We think it important to make it as detailed as possible, both to indicate that EPJ D aims at being a generalist journal for AMO physics and to help our authors to find easily the proper section for their submissions. There is of course no way to describe the whole field's activity in a few subheadings. They are all to be understood with the broadest meaning. This list is by no means an exclusive one. All theoretical or experimental papers connected to atomic, molecular, plasma, quantum or optical physics are welcome. This revised section list appears almost simultaneously with the new WEB portal to all EPJ journals (www.eurphysj.org), which will be online within a few weeks. It unites the material formerly presented on our publisher's WEB sites (EDP Sciences, SIF and Springer). All the journal contents are available there (and all WEB registrations are of course valid for this portal). We offer also a free access to the highlight papers (see our editorial, Eur. Phys. J. D 29, 3 (2004) and below), for at

  4. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Toyonobu

    2013-02-01

    As the successor to Professor Teruo Kishi, the former Editor-in-Chief of Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM), I would like to share some of STAM's journal history with our readers. STAM was launched in 2000 with the financial support of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in recognition of a strong need for an international journal that would be distributed and read across the globe. Five years later, the publication of STAM was transferred to the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) under the initiative of Professor Kishi. As a result of his work, STAM is now positioned as a high-impact journal, 3.512 as listed by the ISI 2011 Science Citation Index Journal Citation Report, with a much higher and faster growth than when I was participating as a co-founder in the past. STAM is well known as a successful open-access journal since shifting from the initial subscription model in 2008. As an editor, I would like to emphasize that STAM will continue to publish with a sense of social mission as an academic journal, allowing space for researchers to contribute to the sustainable development of society and health. However, some contribution from authors would assist us in creating a sustainable journal publishing model, and further enhance services to authors and readers of STAM. With this in mind, I would like to state that STAM's editorial board is planning to introduce an article processing charge from July 2013, in addition to NIMS' continuing financial support. One of our new editorial policies is to aim for reader-oriented publishing. I believe that academic journal publishing can take the role of navigator in advancing the development of materials. Among the many other scientific journals, STAM will lead the rapid growth in materials science, inspiring research into new materials for the future and leading the next generation of materials science and technology. It is my honor to work with members of

  5. Editorial:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-02-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome the authors and readership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) to volume 17. We have enjoyed a successful 16 years of growth under the guidance of our founding Editor-in-Chief, Professor Noah Hershkowitz, resulting in PSST gaining the confidence and respect of the plasma community. PSST has established itself as the journal of choice for dissemination of research results on the fundamentals of low-temperature plasmas. It has achieved this position through its rigorous reviewing process that improves the quality of our already excellent contributions. This was accomplished with the dedicated efforts of our reviewers and cooperation of our authors, to whom I am grateful. I am hoping we can continue to count on your support. I am confident that we will build upon our past successes by continuing to improve the journal and better serve the low temperature plasma community. I am pleased to introduce Professor William G Graham (Queen's University of Belfast) and Professor M C M (Richard) van der Sanden (Eindhoven University of Technology) who have joined the leadership team as Associate Editors. I am also pleased that Professor Hershkowitz has agreed to continue to serve PSST as an Associate Editor. Bill, Richard and Noah will share the editorial duties with me in selecting referees, assessing their comments and communicating with authors. Ms Caroline Wilkinson will continue to expertly serve as our IOP Publishing contact. The Editorial Board is critically important to the continued success and growth of the journal. Their efforts in providing advice and guidance, and in suggesting (and often guest editing) special issues are greatly appreciated. As we enter our seventeenth year, it is an appropriate time to revisit the guiding principles of the journal. PSST serves a unique mission in addressing fundamental issues in the science and technology of low-temperature plasmas and so distinguishes itself from more applications

  6. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHPMP was launched in 1993 as a series of supplementary issues of the journal Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, and has been a journal in its own right since 1996. As we said in our editorial in the first issue of 1996, we saw the launch of the journal as emblematic of the coming-of-age of our discipline, the history and philosophy of modern physics. For we had seen the number and quality of articles, and of Ph.D. theses, expand enormously over the preceding years. Indeed, it seemed to us that a good deal of the best work in history and philosophy of science was being done in the area; and furthermore, this work often involved a genuine and fruitful collaboration between physicists, historians and philosophers. Since then the discipline has continued to flourish, and we like to believe SHPMP has contributed to that.

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    It is both an honour and daunting to be associated with a successful, long-lived journal. An honour because the journal already enjoys a high reputation, not only for the quality of its articles but also for the manner in which it has encouraged areas to grow and develop towards their own specialized publications. Daunting because maintaining the quality of the journal is a challenge needing constant vigilance and innovation. Moreover, I am conscious of all the work which has been done by my predecessors. Jean Zinn-Justin is the most recent and I should like to take this opportunity to thank him for all he has done so generously over the past five years. The journal relies on the partnership between its authors, its referees, the Editorial Board and the publishers. Its principal purpose is to provide, selectively, an archive for the physics community and it is essential that authors are eager to submit their papers in the knowledge that they will be treated fairly and rapidly, that the referees perform their role willingly and constructively, and that the international Editorial Board encourages both in their tasks, and solicits submissions from physicists working in budding areas. Besides co-ordinating the production of the journal, the publishers are developing ways to assist the community to perform its research. For example, the online electronic version of the journal is hugely successful with over 75,000 e-accesses in 1998. HyperCite is an exciting development which is beginning to link papers together in an unprecedented manner. It will take time to perfect this service but its use is growing apace. Moreover, approximately one half of all submissions to the journal are now via electronic means. Of course, many authors place their papers on other, freely available, electronic archives and these are valuable. Nevertheless, the sifting process provided by the referees and editorial board of a journal remains an essential part of the scientific evaluation of a

  8. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Al-Deeb, Saleh M; Khan, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Neurosciences continues to be the leading journal for Neurosciences in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. In January 2007, Neurosciences was indexed by Thomson ISI in Science Citation Index Expanded online at ISI Web of KnowledgeSM and Neurosciences Citation Index. Since then a significantly increased volume of scientific articles continues to be submitted to the journal by enthusiastic authors, a fact that enriches the scientific contents of the journal. In 2008, we had a total number of website hits of 495,625 with a monthly average of 41,000. We received a total of 155 manuscripts, with a monthly average of 13 and an average rejection rate of 29%. From these, we published a total of 100 articles, totaling 523 pages for the entire volume. Forty-nine percent of these were original articles. Fifty-eight percent of published articles were from the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), with 30% from KSA, 5% from the Gulf, and 23% from other Arab and EMR countries. The remaining 42% of published articles we received from Canada, India, Japan, Malaysia, and Turkey. The average time from received to acceptance of original articles was 4 months and 4.9 months for acceptance to publication. Reasons for rejection included unrelated topics, poor contents, or duplicate publication. In addition to our 4 regular issues in 2008, we published a supplement of abstracts presented at the 16th Saudi Neuroscience Symposium. We would like to thank the Editorial and Advisory Board Members for their significant contribution to maintain the standards of Neuroscience and looking forward to their important continued role in achieving our goals for 2009. In 2009, we aim to increase the number of issues to meet the increased load of manuscripts. Our objective is to enrich the scientific Neuroscience material presented by the journal with important topic reviews and regular neuroscience quizzes to achieve PubMed indexing. We will continue to promote our new web-based manuscript submission

  9. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    This is my last issue of Plasma Sources Science and Technology in my role as Editor-in-Chief. I would like to take this opportunity to describe the origins of what has been for me a 17-year adventure. Maureen Clarke, then responsible for commissioning new journals at IOP, first conceived of a journal devoted to low-temperature plasmas. She contacted me, and, I imagine, others in the plasma community, with a set of questions about this possible new journal. Although I've lost that letter, I still have a copy of my e-mail response to her from 2 July 1990, from which the following extracts are taken: Dear Ms. Clarke, Thank you for an opportunity to comment on your new journal—Plasma Sources and Plasma Processing. I believe that there is a currently a place for a journal which is concerned with plasma source design and characteristics related to plasma processing and that this need is likely to continue for at least 10 years or more. [ . . . ] Right now there is considerable interest in the plasma processing community on the relative advantages of ECR and other microwave sources versus 13 MHz systems and a variety of different types of both sources have been invented and more seem to be coming along each day. Helicon sources are also starting to be interesting. [ . . . ] My view is that plasma processing includes all aspects of processes which employ charged particle plasmas in manufacturing processes. This runs from ion implantation out of very low pressure (<10-4 torr) plasmas to plasma sprays at atmospheric pressure. A journal which emphasizes the role of the charged particles and which covers the full spectrum of devices would be a welcome addition to other journals now available. I am interested in the subject and I would be willing to serve on the Editorial Board. At that time, the journal was tentatively named Plasma Sources and Plasma Processing. By 6 November 1990 she had offered me the position of Editor-in-Chief. I accepted, and by early 1991, IOP had

  10. Editorial:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    I am very pleased to be assuming the Editorship of Classical and Quantum Gravity for the next five years. I hope to continue the successful policies that have made this journal well known for its openness to new developments in the field, for the efficiency of its editorial process, and for the quality and importance of its articles. Classical and Quantum Gravity has truly blossomed under the guidance of its previous Editors-in-Chief, Malcolm MacCallum, Kellogg Stelle, Gary Gibbons and Hermann Nicolai. During the past 12 months, a total of 847 manuscripts have been submitted, representing an increase of nearly 50% over the past four years alone. Beginning in 2000, the frequency of publication was increased from 12 to 24 issues per year. The rate of full-text downloads is now 7200 per month, nearly a three-fold increase over four years. For regular manuscripts, the average time between receipt and first decision now stands at only 59 days, the receipt-to-acceptance time is now only 72 days, and the receipt-to-online publication time is only 116 days. The corresponding times for letters are 36 days, 44 days and 62 days, respectively. Much of the improvement in refereeing and publication times can be directly attributed to the state-of-the art Web-based refereeing system, maintained by the able administration of the IOP editorial team, consisting of Andrew Wray, Joe Tennant, Joanne Rowse and Susannah Bruce. Both the growth in journal size and the decrease in publication times have been accomplished without any decrease in quality. As one objective measure of this, the 'impact factor' index of Classical and Quantum Gravity has risen steadily over the past four years. Even more significantly, Classical and Quantum Gravity has undergone major intellectual growth since its founding. In 1984, modern string theory was in the process of being born, the subject of 'loop quantum gravity' did not exist at all, 'new inflation' truly was 'new', and the possibility of observing

  11. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This issue marks the end of an era for The Astrophysical Journal and for astronomical publishing. Helmut Abt is retiring as Editor-in-Chief after serving for 28 years, a period that saw enormous growth in the Journal and its transformation to the forefront of electronic scientific publishing. In February the ApJ office celebrated the receipt of manuscript number 40,000 under Helmut's tenure, a milestone that testifies to his impact on all of our careers. Although the names at the top of the masthead are changing, the rest of the ApJ team remains nearly unchanged, so the editorial transition should be barely noticeable. Much of the editorial work of the Journal will continue to be performed by our capable staff of Scientific Editors. I am also very fortunate to inherit Helmut's outstanding support staff in Tucson, ably headed by Janice Sexton. Our publications staff in Chicago, led by Julie Steffen, and our electronic publications staff, led by Evan Owens, are unmatched in their dedication and energy, and I have already begun working with them on further improvements to the Journal. And Helmut Abt will continue to serve the Journal over the coming months, overseeing the manuscripts that are still under review and editing the special centennial issue that will appear at the end of this year. In the coming months we will introduce several new features, most of them initiated under Helmut Abt's leadership. These will include an upgraded ApJ homepage, web tools for authors and referees, updated documentation and author instructions, and an attractive new version of the on-line journal itself. Over the longer term we are developing plans for streamlining the publication timescale and for expanding our capabilities for publishing and archiving electronic data. However my overriding priority, always, will be to uphold the Journal's reputation for scientific accuracy, impact, and integrity. I close with a personal note of thanks to Helmut Abt for his patient tutoring over

  12. Editorial.

    PubMed

    2000-03-01

    This editorial presents an overview of the articles contained in this issue of Gender and Development, addressing the key themes of globalization and diversity. The collection of articles recalls why the project of promoting gender-equitable development continues to be critical in the 21st century, identifies some key challenges confronting those working on gender development, and takes a brief look at some examples of innovative work. This collection begins with a group of articles examining economic, political, and social changes associated with globalization, and analyzing their positive and negative impacts on different men and women. The ways in which specific aspects of globalization affect gender relations and shape the choices and chances of men and women are traced. In particular, writers highlight the failure of governments and development agencies to challenge fully the false assumptions about the nature of the role of men and women in society upon which global activity is based. Drawing on insights from academic research and feedback from practitioners, the second group of articles presents the basic concepts and terminology used in gender and development work. Lastly, the third group of articles offers innovative case studies of current gender-sensitive development work. Emphasis is placed on topical issues, including acknowledgment of sexuality as a development issue, critique on the assumption of entrepreneurship as gender neutral, and the assertion of the need for mainstream institutions, including government and development funders to work with women's organizations. PMID:12349634

  13. Editorial.

    PubMed

    2000-03-01

    This editorial presents an overview of the articles contained in this issue of Gender and Development, addressing the key themes of globalization and diversity. The collection of articles recalls why the project of promoting gender-equitable development continues to be critical in the 21st century, identifies some key challenges confronting those working on gender development, and takes a brief look at some examples of innovative work. This collection begins with a group of articles examining economic, political, and social changes associated with globalization, and analyzing their positive and negative impacts on different men and women. The ways in which specific aspects of globalization affect gender relations and shape the choices and chances of men and women are traced. In particular, writers highlight the failure of governments and development agencies to challenge fully the false assumptions about the nature of the role of men and women in society upon which global activity is based. Drawing on insights from academic research and feedback from practitioners, the second group of articles presents the basic concepts and terminology used in gender and development work. Lastly, the third group of articles offers innovative case studies of current gender-sensitive development work. Emphasis is placed on topical issues, including acknowledgment of sexuality as a development issue, critique on the assumption of entrepreneurship as gender neutral, and the assertion of the need for mainstream institutions, including government and development funders to work with women's organizations.

  14. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1989-04-01

    Even as I write this editorial, the Ides of March approach rapidly. This is unnerving and depressing because it signals that, in the United States, April Fool's Day is only a month away. I realize that some of you will quickly seize the opportunity to expose my error and point out that April 1st is only two weeks after March 15th-not a month. While I cannot disagree that April 1st occurs only two weeks after March 15th, I must nevertheless claim that April Fool's Day really falls on April 15,* the day we are called upon to account for our income-producing activities of the previous year. Yes, that is the day we are required by the IRS (Incentive Reduction System) to pay for our financial indiscretions of accum ulating wealth the old-fashioned way-by earning it. At least we can take comfort in knowing that the process of paying our taxes was made much simpler and more equitable when the 1986 Tax Reform Act l" went into effect.

  15. Editorial:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Alastair I. M.

    2004-01-01

    In this issue, we publish a new version of the Journal Scope, which has been developed following a discussion at the meeting of the Editorial Board in September 2003. The new scope makes it clear that in future the primary mission of the journal is `to assist in maintaining and improving the standard of taught physics in universities and other institutes of higher education'. In addition, authors submitting papers in future will be expected `to indicate the usefulness of their material to physics education and make clear the level of readership'. We believe that, although more explicit, the new scope is consistent with the statement that has previously appeared on the inside front cover of the journal and mainly reflects an evolution over recent years in the nature of our papers. We hope that this change will help us attract more papers that fall within our purview as well as deflect some of those that are not. If the character of the journal changes slightly, this will only be because the papers we accept will fall more clearly into the areas we have always intended to operate in. Any changes will not become fully apparent for an issue or two as we shall not be applying our new criteria to papers currently being processed or under consideration.

  16. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, C

    1995-02-01

    This editorial introduces a journal devoted to examination of the implications of cultural issues on gender and development work. The secondary status of women is one of the few universals in the world, with biology used as an excuse (yet the only constraints placed upon a woman by biology are when she is pregnant or breast feeding). Constraints differ among societies, and cultural practices which appeal to tradition reinforce the power of men. Patriarchal societies foster the notion of an ideal woman to insure the paternity of children and preserve the families. Because women have primary responsibility for children, they are also perceived as the guardians of the very culture which reduces their status. Rape and domestic violence are used to enforce women's conformity to a traditional role. Violence against women is also used as a weapon of warfare while religious fundamentalists manipulate religious texts to insure women's subordination. Participation in development efforts, however, can allow women to question their marginalization and to become positive role models for other women. The arts and the media can also be used to challenge the status quo. The views of women from southern nations have also been marginalized by the north, and people with formal education wield more power than those with experience but no qualifications. Multicultural ideals require development agencies to listen to historically ignored voices, to make a longterm commitment to cultural change, and to employ local people. Charges of cultural imperialism can be refuted if the aspirations of southern women are included on the development agenda.

  17. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Evers, B

    1993-10-01

    This editorial introduces an issue of a journal which contains articles on the themes of 1) macroeconomic policy and gender relations and 2) income generation projects and empowerment. The opening paper dispels the myth that economic policies are gender-neutral. Another article uses the effects of structural adjustment policies in the Caribbean to illustrate how such policies increase women's burdens because of cuts in social services and pressures on women to provide cheap labor to create export goods. A third article depicts the adverse consequences of a macroeconomic policy in India which favors exports over domestic production. This theme is developed in a paper which challenges the notion that export-oriented development strategies provide a "trickle down" benefit to the poor. Specific reversals in development advances in Tanzania are linked to the adjustment experience, and the policy of debt repayment at all costs in the Philippines is shown to have an adverse effect on the poor. Other papers from Albania, India, Tanzania, Chile, and Bangladesh highlight how market-oriented reforms have created conditions which are detrimental to women's health. Further research reveals that the touted "feminization of employment" has actually turned out to be a "feminization of unemployment" as gender discrimination in the labor market continues. Papers on income-generating projects spotlight what has been learned about developing a successful income-generation project which recognizes women's "reproductive labor" time demands. Other articles explore barriers faced by women to access to finance and entrepreneurship. By looking beyond economic jargon and false assumptions, the authors of these papers explore how gender relationships are shaped by economic policies and affect policy outcomes and how women are organizing to improve their lives and the health of their communities. PMID:12320726

  18. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Evers, B

    1993-10-01

    This editorial introduces an issue of a journal which contains articles on the themes of 1) macroeconomic policy and gender relations and 2) income generation projects and empowerment. The opening paper dispels the myth that economic policies are gender-neutral. Another article uses the effects of structural adjustment policies in the Caribbean to illustrate how such policies increase women's burdens because of cuts in social services and pressures on women to provide cheap labor to create export goods. A third article depicts the adverse consequences of a macroeconomic policy in India which favors exports over domestic production. This theme is developed in a paper which challenges the notion that export-oriented development strategies provide a "trickle down" benefit to the poor. Specific reversals in development advances in Tanzania are linked to the adjustment experience, and the policy of debt repayment at all costs in the Philippines is shown to have an adverse effect on the poor. Other papers from Albania, India, Tanzania, Chile, and Bangladesh highlight how market-oriented reforms have created conditions which are detrimental to women's health. Further research reveals that the touted "feminization of employment" has actually turned out to be a "feminization of unemployment" as gender discrimination in the labor market continues. Papers on income-generating projects spotlight what has been learned about developing a successful income-generation project which recognizes women's "reproductive labor" time demands. Other articles explore barriers faced by women to access to finance and entrepreneurship. By looking beyond economic jargon and false assumptions, the authors of these papers explore how gender relationships are shaped by economic policies and affect policy outcomes and how women are organizing to improve their lives and the health of their communities.

  19. Editorial.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    This editorial introduces a journal devoted to the issues surrounding women and their rights. As the development debate moves from women's need to their rights and to an understanding of the cultural roots of legal systems and the effects of the mass media in presenting alternative life styles as possibilities, the immense implications of using rights-based language in development emerge. This debate moves women from being the recipients of welfare to a state of empowerment. Women must be afforded individual rights which are linked to community rights. In addition, rights must be granted to women in their public and private domains. The dangers of using a rights-based language to assert women's claims to economic, political, and social equality in economic, political, and social life arise from the reality that the social position of men will usually place men at an advantage with the law. Legal processes which stress dichotomies may fail to improve real social situations. Also, the language of human rights may pit one set of rights (a woman's right to choose abortion) against another (the fetuses' right to live) to women's disadvantage. Areas governed by both customary and civil law pose other difficulties, especially since they require women to understand the law in order to use it. Development efforts which stress rights hope to meet immediate needs and to achieve a strategic end. Nongovernmental organizations can play an important role in asserting and enforcing the freedom of individuals and groups within groups. They can also build capacity at all levels of society and explore linkages between women's economic participation, decision-making within the home, and wider political participation. PMID:12290122

  20. Editorial.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    This editorial introduces a journal devoted to the issues surrounding women and their rights. As the development debate moves from women's need to their rights and to an understanding of the cultural roots of legal systems and the effects of the mass media in presenting alternative life styles as possibilities, the immense implications of using rights-based language in development emerge. This debate moves women from being the recipients of welfare to a state of empowerment. Women must be afforded individual rights which are linked to community rights. In addition, rights must be granted to women in their public and private domains. The dangers of using a rights-based language to assert women's claims to economic, political, and social equality in economic, political, and social life arise from the reality that the social position of men will usually place men at an advantage with the law. Legal processes which stress dichotomies may fail to improve real social situations. Also, the language of human rights may pit one set of rights (a woman's right to choose abortion) against another (the fetuses' right to live) to women's disadvantage. Areas governed by both customary and civil law pose other difficulties, especially since they require women to understand the law in order to use it. Development efforts which stress rights hope to meet immediate needs and to achieve a strategic end. Nongovernmental organizations can play an important role in asserting and enforcing the freedom of individuals and groups within groups. They can also build capacity at all levels of society and explore linkages between women's economic participation, decision-making within the home, and wider political participation.

  1. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Georg; Reiter, Günter

    2005-01-01

    represented in the journal, contributions from chemistry and biology are still rather sparse. Thus, one of our goal is to make the journal also more attractive for chemists and biologist interested in soft matter concepts. The future of EPJE Soft Matter In 2005, EPJE Soft Matter will see several organisational changes. First of all, the number of Editors-in-Chief will be reduced from four to two. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Athene Donald, Jean-François Joanny and Martin Möller for their enthusiastic efforts and personal engagements in setting up and raising EPJE Soft Matter to the place it takes up now. We believe that only because of their intense and excellent work EPJE Soft Matter has become a leading multidisciplinary journal. In the future, EPJE Soft Matter will continue to stimulate discussions and to publish also controversial ideas and views as long as they are based on the well-established scientific rules. EPJE Soft Matter will evolve towards a journal which is willing and capable to adapt to the needs of the involved communities. The Editors-in-Chief, together with their editorial board members, will always have an open ear for the problems colleagues may encounter in publishing their work. We will assure that requests and suggestions are treated in the most appropriate way and to the full satisfaction of authors and readers. We wish you a happy and productive New Year 2005!

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  3. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  4. EDITORIAL: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, M. J.

    2008-02-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome the authors and readership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) to volume 17. We have enjoyed a successful 16 years of growth under the guidance of our founding Editor-in-Chief, Professor Noah Hershkowitz, resulting in PSST gaining the confidence and respect of the plasma community. PSST has established itself as the journal of choice for dissemination of research results on the fundamentals of low-temperature plasmas. It has achieved this position through its rigorous reviewing process that improves the quality of our already excellent contributions. This was accomplished with the dedicated efforts of our reviewers and cooperation of our authors, to whom I am grateful. I am hoping we can continue to count on your support. I am confident that we will build upon our past successes by continuing to improve the journal and better serve the low temperature plasma community. I am pleased to introduce Professor William G Graham (Queen's University of Belfast) and Professor M C M (Richard) van der Sanden (Eindhoven University of Technology) who have joined the leadership team as Associate Editors. I am also pleased that Professor Hershkowitz has agreed to continue to serve PSST as an Associate Editor. Bill, Richard and Noah will share the editorial duties with me in selecting referees, assessing their comments and communicating with authors. Ms Caroline Wilkinson will continue to expertly serve as our IOP Publishing contact. The Editorial Board is critically important to the continued success and growth of the journal. Their efforts in providing advice and guidance, and in suggesting (and often guest editing) special issues are greatly appreciated. As we enter our seventeenth year, it is an appropriate time to revisit the guiding principles of the journal. PSST serves a unique mission in addressing fundamental issues in the science and technology of low-temperature plasmas and so distinguishes itself from more applications

  5. EDITORIAL: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, M. J.

    2009-02-01

    To open this first issue of 2009 I would like to update you on the current state of the Journal and to look ahead to our plans and goals for the year ahead. I am delighted to report that Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) is in excellent health and in 2008 enjoyed the highest number of annual submissions in its history. The number of papers downloaded from our online services increased by 25% compared with the previous year, indicating that the Journal is reaching a wider audience than ever before. Our Impact Factor (2.12) remains high and very competitive with other journals in the field. The success of the Journal is of course a reflection of the excellent research which is being conducted by the plasma physics community. I extend my thanks to our authors for continuing to choose PSST as a forum to report on for their outstanding work and to our referees, whose insightful comments and constructive criticism are instrumental in maintaining the quality of our publication. My many thanks also go to Richard van de Sanden, Bill Graham and Noah Hershkowitz and to the team at IOP Publishing who have supported me through my first full year as Editor-in-Chief. I particularly thank Caroline Wilkinson for her mentoring guidance. At the beginning of 2008 we introduced a revised Editorial Policy which emphasized the need for all papers submitted in PSST to focus on fundamental plasma properties (http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/-page=scope/0963-0252 link to scope page). Our intention was to re-affirm the original guiding principles of the Journal and to strengthen its identity as a unique destination for research into the fundamental science of low temperature plasmas. The task of enforcing this policy---while remaining responsive to new areas of research---has proven to be quite a challenge. On occasion deciding whether a submission falls within or outside of the editorial policy comes down to a 'judgement-call' on the part of the editorial team. It is in cases like

  6. EDITORIAL: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2005-03-01

    I am delighted to be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics for the next five years. J. Phys. G is at an exciting juncture in its history, with 2005 marking the journal's 31st year of publication. In the past few years the journal has truly blossomed under the guidance of its previous Editors, Lee Schroeder and Horst Stöcker, and I look forward to building on their excellent work towards developing the journal to its full potential. Since 2001, article submissions have increased by 55% and the average time from receipt of a paper to a first decision has decreased to only 45 days. Last year J. Phys. G redrafted its scope to strengthen its support for physicists working in the interface areas where nuclear physics, particle physics and astrophysics meet, sharing common goals and language, as well as instrumentation techniques. J. Phys. G has been very successful in attracting papers in these interface areas, especially in quark matter physics by developing close relationships with this community. As Editor, I plan to continue to broaden the spectrum covered and especially to strengthen our coverage in the areas of neutrino physics and fundamental symmetries, whilst keeping the coverage of hadron physics and quark matter strong. I will work closely with our distinguished Editorial Board and excellent editorial team to ensure that we continue raising the quality of accepted papers in the journal and keep processing times to a minimum. With this team in place, I am confident that J. Phys. G will continue to go from strength to strength. Finally, a journal's success depends very much on the efforts of the volunteer referees and I thank them for all their hard work.

  7. QSR editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Wallace, Colin V.

    2016-06-01

    After a period of almost eight and a half years I have made the difficult decision to stand down as Editor-in-Chief of Quaternary Science Reviews. The purpose of this editorial is to introduce my successor and to provide some reflective thoughts as editor on publishing and editing Quaternary Science Reviews. The decision to stand down is based on the fundamental view that the role of Editor-in-Chief should be shared as it helps maintain a dynamic journal with fresh ideas and evolving scientific perspectives.

  8. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, F.; Ommen Kloeke, E.

    2015-07-01

    With this editorial note we would like to update you on the performance of the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation (JAG) and inform you about changes that have been made to the composition of the editorial team. Our Journal publishes original papers that apply earth observation data for the management of natural resources and the environment. Environmental issues include biodiversity, land degradation, industrial pollution and natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods and landslides. As such the scope is broad and ranges from conceptual and more fundamental work on earth observation and geospatial sciences to the more problem-solving type of work. When I took over the role of Editor-in-Chief in 2012, I together with the Publisher set myself the mission to position JAG in the top-3 of the remote sensing and GIS journals. To do so we strived at attracting high quality and high impact papers to the journal and to reduce the review turnover time to make JAG a more attractive medium for publications. What has been achieved? Have we reached our ambitions? We can say that: The submissions have increased over the years with over 23% for the last 12 months. Naturally not all may lead to more papers, but at least a portion of the additional submissions should lead to a growth in journal content and quality.

  9. Editorial statement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-10-01

    We are pleased to present this Second Special Issue on Interdisciplinary Aspects of Piezoelectric Technologies in Integrated Systems. The first issue of this series was published in March 2013 (MSSP, vol. 36(1)) and contained chosen articles presented at the International Conference on Mechatronic Systems and Materials as well as regular papers on this subject. This first issue contained 17 articles presenting the state of the art regarding the control and practical use of piezoelectric materials. It should be noted that the development of science in this area is very rapid, has a multidisciplinary character and encompasses many areas of science. Thus the decision to publish a new issue from the 'Piezoelectricity' series, to sum up recent works in this area. Similarly to the first issue, some the articles were based on presentations at the 8th International Conference 'Mechatronic Systems and Materials' held in July 2014 in Opole, Poland, and others having been submitted as regular articles to the editorial office. For this Special Issue, 12 articles were chosen, being thematically divided according to the following issues: piezoelectric actuators (5 articles), design and control issues regarding piezoelectric transducers (2 articles), detection of damage in the laboratory and technical scale (3 articles), modeling of discrete systems using piezoelectric materials (1 article), and the construction and control of measurement systems based on piezoelectric sensors (1 article). A brief summary about the content of the articles has been presented below.

  10. Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, P. B.

    We summarized the main events in the creation of the Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino (NOVA) and its objectives. We also discuss the present advances and the goals for the near future. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  11. Editorial Reviewers for 2004

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics thanks the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 2003, through June 30, 2004. We extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers in this time period.

  12. Editorial Reviewers for 2000

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics would like to thank the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 1999, through June 30, 2000. We would like to extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers during this time period.

  13. [REBEn's golden editorials].

    PubMed

    Dias, L P; Monticelli, M; Nazário, N O

    1998-01-01

    The present work has been prepared having as its source a renewed reading of the Editorials from REBEn written in the years of 1970 to 1980. To the intention of plucking from in-between lines motivations, attitudes, values, beliefs, inclinations, ideologies, and principles, not always so clearly seen when the product of a reading destituted from the systematic effort of method, we have coupled the option of contents analysis considered to be an aggregate of techniques. Methodology encompassed three stages in the analysis work: preanalysis, analytical description, and inferential interpretation. Expected results included moving beyond the manifest contents, and gave rise to the visualization of latent contents. Such an inferential dimension allowed to recognize how bright or "golden" (Dourados) these Editorials are, above all because they irradiate real values, in addition to the formal ones. These interpretations have not discharged the use of the subjective dimension when establishing the relation between the Golden of the Editorial's author and what issues from the ensemble of the analyzed Editorial production.

  14. Editorial Reviewers for 2002

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics would like to thank the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 2001, through June 30, 2002. We would like to extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers in this time period.

  15. Editorial Reviewers for 2003

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The editorial staff of The American Journal of Human Genetics would like to thank the following scientists for their invaluable assistance in reviewing manuscripts from July 1, 2002, through June 30, 2003. We would like to extend special recognition to the following for reviewing five or more papers in this time period.

  16. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  17. Editorial behaviors in peer review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Kong, Xiangjie; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhen; Xia, Feng; Wang, Xianwen

    2016-01-01

    Editors play a critical role in the peer review system. How do editorial behaviors affect the performance of peer review? No quantitative model to date allows us to measure the influence of editorial behaviors on different peer review stages such as, manuscript distribution and final decision making. Here, we propose an agent-based model in which the process of peer review is guided mainly by the social interactions among three kinds of agents representing authors, editors and reviewers respectively. We apply this model to analyze a number of editorial behaviors such as decision strategy, number of reviewers and editorial bias on peer review. We find out that peer review outcomes are significantly sensitive to different editorial behaviors. With a small fraction (10 %) of biased editors, the quality of accepted papers declines 11 %, which indicates that effects of editorial biased behavior is worse than that of biased reviewers (7 %). While several peer review models exist, this is the first account for the study of editorial behaviors that is validated on the basis of simulation analysis. PMID:27386349

  18. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  19. EDITORIAL: Happy New Year!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-ming

    2006-02-01

    As many of you are aware that Chinese science is at the crucial stage of development. We are now seeing more and more high quality works being produced by Chinese scientists working in China. However, high quality scientific works are rarely published in Chinese scientific journals so far. Therefore, the development of scientific journals publishing in China now becomes a more and more important indication of the science development in China. In the development of the chemical physics research field in China, the Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics (CJCP) has made significant contributions in the past 18 years. Since CJCP is primarily a Journal published in Chinese previously, its impact in the international scientific community has been quite limited. At this moment, we believe CJCP should increase its impact in the international community. We believe that making CJCP an English journal is a crucial step to increase its influence internationally. Therefore, upon the recommendation of senior editorial members, we now change CJCP into an full English journal from this issue on. We have also formed a high quality editorial board to help the editorial matters in CJCP, and a prestigious advisory board to advise us of the future development. I am very honored to be selected as the new Editor-in-Chief for the next four years. I hope by the end of my term, the impact of this journal is significantly improved through the efforts of our editorial team. Building a high quality scientific journal is not an easy task. I hope that every member of our chemical physics community can provide strong support to this journal by sending your high quality research papers in the future. We are also thinking about adding new sections of this journal to attract more readers. With the support of our community, I am confident that we can make this journal a more successful one. Here, I want to take this opportunity to thank the great leadership provided by the Editor-in-Chief since the

  20. EDITORIAL: Announcement of closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    Distributed Systems Engineering has proved a valuable resource for those involved in the applied aspects of distributed and networked systems engineering. However, even during the life of the journal, what was once a niche area of research has undergone tremendous development, both technically and academically. The emphasis of the subject has shifted to such an extent that the positioning of the journal is now inappropriate. This then is the final issue of Distributed Systems Engineering, as the journal ceases publication at the end of 1999. The publication of Distributed Systems Engineering also represented a major step forward for three of the UK's leading learned societies, in pursuing a common interest in distributed engineering. Distributed Systems Engineering has been instrumental in bringing these organizations together on a number of other issues of mutual interest. We thank all those who have submitted papers, whether published or not, during the lifetime of our journal. To our Editorial Advisory Board, Guest Editors and the many referees who have supported this endeavour we owe a special debt of gratitude. And of course we are grateful to the readers of Distributed Systems Engineering for their support and for many kind comments during the past six years. To all of you we say: your many and various contributions have helped to make the journal an important source of information for those involved in the practical engineering aspects of distributed and networked systems. The publishers would like to thank the Editors, Morris Sloman and David Hutchison, and the members of the Editorial Board, whose commitment to the journal has resulted in the publication of consistently high quality research, including a number of commissioned special issues in areas of topical interest. As a service to the distributed systems community, the full electronic archive of the journal will be maintained, with free availability to all, at http://www.iop.org/Journals/ds David

  1. Reflections on our Model Validation editorial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bredehoeft, John D.; Konikow, Leonard F.

    2012-01-01

    This reprinted editorial from 1993 helps to celebrate the legacy of ideas that have influenced generations of hydrogeologists. Drs. Bredehoeft and Konikow kindly provided the following reflections on their editorial.

  2. 15 CFR 10.12 - Editorial changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Editorial changes. 10.12 Section 10.12... PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.12 Editorial changes. The Department may, without prior notice, make such editorial or other minor changes as it deems necessary to reduce ambiguity or to improve clarity in...

  3. 15 CFR 10.12 - Editorial changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Editorial changes. 10.12 Section 10.12... PRODUCT STANDARDS § 10.12 Editorial changes. The Department may, without prior notice, make such editorial or other minor changes as it deems necessary to reduce ambiguity or to improve clarity in...

  4. Editorial: In Memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1986-03-01

    At 10:30 a.m. EST on January 28, 1986, 73 seconds after liftoff from its Cape Canaveral launch pad, the space shuttle Challenger was destroyed by a catastrophic explosion and the seven crew members aboard were killed. I wish to dedicate this editorial to the memory of her crew: Francis R. Scobee-Shuttle Commander, Michael J. Smith-Shuttle Pilot, Ronald E. McNair-Mission Specialist, Ellison S. Onizuka-Mission Specialist, Judith A. Resnik-Mission Specialist, Gregory B. Jarvis-Payload Specialist, Christa McAuliffe-Space Flight Participant. I believe that I am speaking for all the officers, governors, members, and staff of SPIE in expressing our heartfelt sorrow to the families and friends of these seven dedicated space pioneers. I also trust that I am speaking for all of us in SPIE in encouraging the United States to press ahead with its space program and to ensure that the Challenger's crew did not give their lives in vain.

  5. EDITORIAL: On plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Simon; Webb, Steve; Hendee, William R.

    2008-03-01

    Plagiarism Plagiarism is, we are pleased to observe, not a common occurrence in Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB); however, like those responsible for all scientific journals, we are concerned about plagiarism, and very keen to prevent it. The Publications Committee of the International Organization of Medical Physics (IOMP) has prepared a generic editorial on plagiarism. The editorial is reproduced here (with permission of the IOMP), with slight modifications to enhance its relevance to the audience of PMB, along with our procedures for dealing with any cases of plagiarism should they ever arise. Plagiarism (from the Latin 'plagiare', 'to kidnap') is defined as 'the appropriation or imitation of the language, ideas, and thoughts of another author, and representation of them as one's original work' (the Random House Dictionary of the English Language—unabridged). Plagiarism is a serious breach of research ethics that, if committed intentionally, is considered research misconduct. Plagiarism in its most serious form is the passing off of all, or large sections, of another author's published paper as one's original work. If, following appropriate confidential investigation (see below), such a plagiarism is established, this will result in heavy sanctions including retraction of the article, up to a 5 year publication ban from PMB, and informing of employers and/or professional bodies (even after one offence). This may result in loss of research funding, loss of professional stature, and even termination of employment of the plagiarizing author(s). Plagiarism undermines the authenticity of research manuscripts and the journals in which they are published, and compromises the integrity of the scientific process and the public regard for science. Plagiarism violates the literary rights of the individuals who are plagiarized, and the property rights of copyright holders. Violation of these rights may result in legal action against the individual(s) committing

  6. Big3. Editorial

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christoph U.; Séroussi, Brigitte; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To provide an editorial introduction into the 2014 IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics with an overview of the content, the new publishing scheme, and upcoming 25th anniversary. Methods A brief overview of the 2014 special topic, Big Data - Smart Health Strategies, and an outline of the novel publishing model is provided in conjunction with a call for proposals to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Yearbook. Results ‘Big Data’ has become the latest buzzword in informatics and promise new approaches and interventions that can improve health, well-being, and quality of life. This edition of the Yearbook acknowledges the fact that we just started to explore the opportunities that ‘Big Data’ will bring. However, it will become apparent to the reader that its pervasive nature has invaded all aspects of biomedical informatics – some to a higher degree than others. It was our goal to provide a comprehensive view at the state of ‘Big Data’ today, explore its strengths and weaknesses, as well as its risks, discuss emerging trends, tools, and applications, and stimulate the development of the field through the aggregation of excellent survey papers and working group contributions to the topic. Conclusions For the first time in history will the IMIA Yearbook be published in an open access online format allowing a broader readership especially in resource poor countries. For the first time, thanks to the online format, will the IMIA Yearbook be published twice in the year, with two different tracks of papers. We anticipate that the important role of the IMIA yearbook will further increase with these changes just in time for its 25th anniversary in 2016. PMID:24853037

  7. EDITORIAL: Editor's Farewell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The completion of Volume 26, 1989, marked the end of my tenure as Editor of Metrologia. My association with the journal, its parent body the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, its host organization the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the publishers Springer-Verlag and last (but by no means least) the Editorial Board, has been a pleasant one and I trust that the subscribers will have found the product to be generally satisfactory. There have been, it is true, some disappointments along the way and I shall mention two of these while expressing the hope that the new Editor will enjoy a greater success in their regard. First is the question of circulation, which has stayed dangerously low, although the shrinkage has tapered off in the most recent years. Because of the narrow public support, the costs of production are relatively high and this, through a consequently high subscription rate, tends to enshrine the unsatisfactory state of affairs. Modest schemes to broaden the journal's appeal and bring in a wider readership have foundered upon the first step, namely, that of procuring from staff members of the national standards laboratories the hoped-for articles which would discuss the state of the art in delivering the highest-quality measurement services to the public. However, some very interesting and bolder schemes are presently under discussion. I had also hoped to leaven the journal's content a little by regularly appearing articles on the latest developments within the great national laboratories. But, as with technical review articles, it has proven very difficult to find the right authors who can also spare the time, and only a few laboratories have found it possible to collaborate. In taking my leave, it remains for me to thank all the contributors, referees and readers for their support, to express the hope of an ever brighter future for Metrologia and to wish to the new Editor, Dr D A Blackburn, a happy and successful tenure.

  8. 49 CFR Appendix - Editorial Note:

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 16084; 28 CFR § 0.66). The Assistant Attorney General, Land and Natural Resources Division, has further.... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting appendix A to part 1, see the List of CFR Sections... determinations as to the sufficiency of titles. The Chief Counsels of the Federal Aviation...

  9. EDITORIAL: Trends in Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Antonio; Serena, Pedro A.; Saenz, Juan Jose; Welland, Mark; Reifenberger, Ron

    2004-04-01

    With effect from August 2004 the journal Nanotechnology will discontinue the `Letters to the Editor' section. The increase in publication speed achieved for all articles now means that letters have no advantage. Fully electronic publication processes including electronic submission, refereeing and proofing, ensure that all papers are processed with minimum delay and are published as soon as they are ready. The journal will continue to publish high-quality original research papers, reviews and tutorials, as well as papers on the ethical and societal implications of nanotechnology at the discretion of the Editorial Board. All submitted papers will undergo a pre-selection procedure for suitability by the Editors of the journal. If a paper is accepted for consideration by the journal it will be sent to independent experts in the field for peer review. To speed up the publication process, we encourage authors to suggest five independent experts in their field as potential referees and supply their title, name, affiliation and e-mail address. The Editors of the journal may use these names at their discretion. Authors may also request that certain people are not to be used as referees. Papers of special interest will be given the utmost priority and on acceptance will be publicized further through worldwide press releases and reviews on the Institute of Physics website and on nanotechweb.org. As a service to authors and to the international physics community, and as part of our commitment to give authors' work as much visibility as possible, all papers are freely available online for 30 days from their electronic publication date. This means open access for citations to everyone in the world. We will also send an electronic offprint of your published paper to ten colleagues of your choice, giving your article an increased chance of being cited quickly. In the meantime, we are pleased to announce an increase in the Impact Factor of the journal in 2003 to 2.304, which means

  10. EDITORIAL: Quanta and leaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-11-01

    oscillating light `waves' had to be quantized as well. Several articles in this issue of Physics Education celebrate the first year of the quantum, 1900. I am grateful and beholden to Board Member and co-editor Gren Ireson for his contacts and nomination of the various contributors. It does seem strange, however, a full century after its discovery full of its amazing success that the essential quantum nature of practically everything is still kept hidden from school students, in the UK at least. Let's see what happens in the coming century. Now for another quantum leap. This is the last issue of Physics Education that I shall have the honour of editing. In fact, I shall leap into historical obscurity as the very last honorary editor. Great efforts by your Editorial Board - over a fair number of years! - have resulted in a radical reorganizing of both the journal and the way it is produced. It's been an interesting five years, a time of falling numbers but quite radical innovations in post-16 physics education. IoPP and the IoP are working together to revitalize what may have been seen by many as a staid if respectable and authoritative publication. We shall keep the authority and even respectability but hope to liven things up a bit. The new editor is Kerry Parker of Sheffield College. She will take on a stronger role than I and my predecessors have had, and will be working at IoPP in Bristol two days a week. There are many obvious advantages in this, and I look forward to seeing the new design and approach that will start with the January 2000 issue. So, it's goodbye from me - and also from the unsung heroine of Physics Education for even longer. Managing Editor Dr Jill Membrey has been doing the really hard work at Bristol for many years, but is now moving on to other things at IoPP. I am extremely grateful for the highly professional care and support she has provided for myself and the Editorial Board over the years. The new Managing Editor is Andrea Pomroy, who arrives at

  11. EDITORIAL: Physical Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, Jane

    2004-06-01

    Physical Biology is a new peer-reviewed publication from Institute of Physics Publishing. Launched in 2004, the journal will foster the integration of biology with the traditionally more quantitative fields of physics, chemistry, computer science and other math-based disciplines. Its primary aim is to further the understanding of biological systems at all levels of complexity, ranging from the role of structure and dynamics of a single molecule to cellular networks and organisms. The journal encourages the development of a new biology-driven physics based on the extraordinary and increasingly rich data arising in biology, and provides research directions for those involved in the creation of novel bio-engineered systems. Physical Biology will publish a stimulating combination of full length research articles, communications, perspectives, reviews and tutorials from a wide range of disciplines covering topics such as: Single-molecule studies and nanobiotechnology Molecular interactions and protein folding Charge transfer and photobiology Ion channels; structure, function and ion regulation Molecular motors and force generation Subcellular processes Biological networks and neural systems Modeling aspects of molecular and cell biology Cell-cell signaling and interaction Biological patterns and development Evolutionary processes Novel tools and methods in physical biology Experts in the areas encompassed by the journal's scope have been appointed to the Editorial Scientific Committee and the composition of the Committee will be updated regularly to reflect the developments in this new and exciting field. Physical Biology is free online to everyone in 2004; you are invited to take advantage of this offer by visiting the journal homepage at http://physbio.iop.org This special print edition of Physical Biology is a combination of issues 1 and 2 of this electronic-only journal and it brings together an impressive range of articles in the fields covered, including a popular

  12. EDITORIAL: Teaching physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, Jonathan

    1998-11-01

    King's School, Canterbury, UK I'm working on the Physics joke book. So far I have only one joke.... Ah, sorry. That was the last thing I wrote for this section. It's easy to get confused. Now, let us be clear about one thing for a start. This is not some less than subtle bid to take over the Editorship of this journal (proof by induction: you write editorials, therefore you are the editor). Fear not, readers, there is no revolt in the ranks! Fans of Ken Dobson will be glad to know that he will return to this space soon. My presence on successive occasions is just an unfortunate coincidence of timing. This issue is one of our regular special features where we take a topic and dedicate the journal to its exploration. Colleagues reading this in universities or colleges of higher education will forgive (I hope) the bias of this edition to `From the Classroom'. We intend this issue to launch a column that will be regular, but not necessarily in every issue, in which ideas taken from the classroom experience of our readers are presented. With that in mind, we openly invite contributions for this column. The sort of thing we are looking for is that tip, experiment, way of explaining an idea or nice example of a principle, which may not be of your own invention but may well be new to inexperienced teachers or new recruits to the profession. It is not just limited to those at the chalk face. We will welcome contributions from Heads of Department and Heads of Science who may well have valuable advice and hints to pass on to people taking on departmental responsibilities. There are myriad problems associated with departmental budgets, examinations, management of resources and people etc that the newly promoted have to face from day one. We can all learn from the experience of others. The contributions need not be long; they can be in the form of a paper or a letter or a brief remark. The important thing is that, just because you have known about a trick of the trade for as

  13. EDITORIAL: On plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Simon; Webb, Steve; Hendee, William R.

    2008-03-01

    Plagiarism Plagiarism is, we are pleased to observe, not a common occurrence in Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB); however, like those responsible for all scientific journals, we are concerned about plagiarism, and very keen to prevent it. The Publications Committee of the International Organization of Medical Physics (IOMP) has prepared a generic editorial on plagiarism. The editorial is reproduced here (with permission of the IOMP), with slight modifications to enhance its relevance to the audience of PMB, along with our procedures for dealing with any cases of plagiarism should they ever arise. Plagiarism (from the Latin 'plagiare', 'to kidnap') is defined as 'the appropriation or imitation of the language, ideas, and thoughts of another author, and representation of them as one's original work' (the Random House Dictionary of the English Language—unabridged). Plagiarism is a serious breach of research ethics that, if committed intentionally, is considered research misconduct. Plagiarism in its most serious form is the passing off of all, or large sections, of another author's published paper as one's original work. If, following appropriate confidential investigation (see below), such a plagiarism is established, this will result in heavy sanctions including retraction of the article, up to a 5 year publication ban from PMB, and informing of employers and/or professional bodies (even after one offence). This may result in loss of research funding, loss of professional stature, and even termination of employment of the plagiarizing author(s). Plagiarism undermines the authenticity of research manuscripts and the journals in which they are published, and compromises the integrity of the scientific process and the public regard for science. Plagiarism violates the literary rights of the individuals who are plagiarized, and the property rights of copyright holders. Violation of these rights may result in legal action against the individual(s) committing

  14. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  15. 47 CFR 76.1613 - Political editorials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Political editorials. 76.1613 Section 76.1613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1613 Political editorials. Where a cable television...

  16. An Instrument to Aid in Assessing Editorials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhalter, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Presents a primary-trait scoring instrument intended for journalism teachers to use in assessing students' editorials by breaking down the analysis into three essential components: claims, data, and warrants. Applies the instrument to two student essays. (SR)

  17. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Young-Chang; Kang, Phil-Hyun; Güven, Olgun

    2016-01-01

    The 11th meeting of the 'Ionizing Radiation and Polymers' symposium, IRaP2014 was held in Jeju Island, Korea between October 5 and 9, 2014. The foundations of IRaP symposium were established more than 20 years ago, and over the years it has grown to be a well established and appreciated symposium in the field of ionizing radiation and polymers. The event was organized by the concerted efforts and generous contributions of Korean Ministry of Science ICT and Future Planning, Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, Korean Society of Radiation Industry, Korea Nuclear International Cooperation Foundation and International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA. Following the traditions of previous IRaP symposia, oral presentations were collected in daily single sessions throughout the week allowing the participants to listen to every talk. Like in previous symposia entire spectrum of the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers were elaborated by oral and poster presentations. The progress and new trends in radiation chemistry, physics and processing of polymers covering nanotechnology, nanocomposites, biopolymers, membranes, natural polymers, surface modification, lithography, medical applications, packaging materials, polymers used in NPP environments were presented and discussed. This list by no means includes all the subjects covered by the symposium and a quick look at the contents of this proceedings will reveal the titles of many interesting subjects. This is another unique aspect of IRaP symposia, one can hardly find a relatively small sized meeting including such a variety of subjects. The participants of the IRaP2014 were also fortunate to learn about the new developments on the hardware of new X-ray and E-beam devices.

  18. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Grassi, Marco; Incagli, Marco; Paoletti, Riccardo; Signorelli, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The 13th edition of Frontier Detectors for Frontier Physics was held in La Biodola, Isola d'Elba, Italy, on May 24-30, 2015. In 36 years of activity, the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors became a traditional gathering event for people involved in the design, construction and operation of particle detectors all over the world. The number of participants has been steadily increasing from about 100 of the first (1980) edition to more than 300. In parallel the Conference topics followed the trends of the field, in fact detectors and techniques originally developed for High Energy Physics experiments are now used in astro-particle physics, medical physics, archeological research and in countless, different fields.

  19. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, José

    2015-11-01

    The Ninth International Topical Meeting on Industrial Radiation and Radioisotope Measurement Applications (IRRMA-9) was organized by the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia (UPV) and held at the Paraninfo of the UPV, on the Vera Campus, Valencia (Spain) from 6 to 11 July 2014. IRRMA is a triennial event organized with the purpose of bringing together scientists and engineers, teachers and students from universities, research centres, industry, hospitals and other institutions from all over the world, who share an interest in radiation and radioisotope measurement applications. The first meeting of this series took place in Pinehurst, North Carolina, USA, in 1988. The following three conferences were organized also in North Carolina in 1992, 1996, and 1999. The fifth meeting was held in Bologna (Italy) in 2002, organized by the Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna. The McMaster University in Hamilton (Canada) organized IRRMA-6, in 2005. The Czech Technical University in Prague organized IRRMA-7, in 2008. Back to America, IRRMA-8 was organized by the Kansas State University and held in Kansas City (Missouri), in 2011.

  20. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, Mara; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Pace, Emanuele; Talamonti, Cinzia

    2015-10-01

    The 10th edition of the International Conference on Radiation Effects on Semiconductor Materials, Detectors and Devices (RESMDD) was held in Florence, at Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia on October 8-10, 2014. It has been aimed at discussing frontier research activities in several application fields as nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, medical and solid-state physics. Main topics discussed in this conference concern performance of heavily irradiated silicon detectors, developments required for the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), ultra-fast silicon detectors design and manufacturing, high-band gap semiconductor detectors, novel semiconductor-based devices for medical applications, radiation damage issues in semiconductors and related radiation-hardening technologies.

  1. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, Mara; Pace, Emanuele; Talamonti, Cinzia

    2013-12-01

    The 9th edition of the International Conference on Radiation Effects on Semiconductor Materials, Detectors and Devices (RESMDD), held in Florence, at Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia on October 9-12, 2012, was aimed at discussing frontier research activities in several application fields as in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, medical and solid-state physics. Main topics discussed in this conference are tracking performance of heavily irradiated silicon detectors, developments required for the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), radiation effects on semiconductor materials for medical (radiotherapy dosimeters, imaging devices), astrophysics (UV, X- and γ-ray detectors) and environmental applications, microscopic defect analysis of irradiated semiconductor materials and related radiation hardening technologies. On the first day the conference hosted a short course intended to introduce fundamentals in the development of semiconductor detectors for medical applications to graduate and PhD students, post-docs and young researchers, both engineers and physicists. Directors of the School were Prof. Marta Bucciolini of the University of Florence and INFN, Italy and Dr. Carlo Civinini, INFN Firenze, Italy. Emphasis was placed on the underlying physical principles, instrument design, factors affecting performance, and applications in both the clinical and preclinical applications. The School was attended by nearly 40 students/ young researchers. We warmly thank the Directors for organizing this interesting event and the professors and researchers who gave lessons, for sharing their experience and knowledge with the students.

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigato, Valentino; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Vittone, Ettore

    2015-04-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B is dedicated to the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Microprobe Technology and Applications (ICNMTA2014) and of the Workshop on Proton Beam Writing. ICNMTA2014, held in Padova (Italy) from 7th to 11th July 2014, follows the conferences in Lisbon (2012, Portugal), Leipzig (Germany, 2010), Debrecen (Hungary, 2008), Singapore (2006), Cavtat-Dubrovnik (Croatia, 2004), Takasaki (Japan, 2002), Bordeaux (2000, France), Spier Estate (1998, South Africa), Santa Fe (1996, NM, USA), Shanghai (1994, PRC), Uppsala (1992, Sweden), Melbourne (1990, Australia), Oxford (1987, UK) and Namur (1981, Belgium). The conference was organized by the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare), under the patronage of the Universities of Padova, Firenze, Torino and of the Comune di Padova, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). 135 delegates (∼15% women and ∼20% students) from 27 countries of the 5 continents attended ICNMTA2014: the first day of conference took place in the magnificent Aula Magna of the University of Padova, adjacent to the Galileo's desk, and proceeded in the historical building of the Centro Culturale San Gaetano in Padova.

  3. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keinonen, Junani

    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, British poet at the end of the 18th century, gave us a characterization of a scientist. “The first man of science was he who looked into a thing, not to learn whether it furnished him food, or shelter, or weapons, or tools, or armaments, or playwiths but who sought to know it for the gratification of knowing.” After those days the new generations of scientists have got different, less idealistic guidelines for their work. According to the Finnish science policy, Finland's economic, social and cultural development is based on knowledge and skills. It is generally accepted in our country that the consistent promotion of a national innovation system during the past ten years, has laid the foundation for the growth of knowledge and skills and their extensive utilization for the benefit of the individual and the community. The importance of benefits will be stated in the current change of the law about universities.

  4. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, Yoshinobu; Ohsugi, Takashi; Hou, Suen; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Lou, Xinchou; Zhu, Hongbo; Ouyang, Qun

    2016-09-01

    The 10th International "Hiroshima" Symposium on the Development and Application of Semiconductor Tracking Detectors (HSTD10) was held on Sep. 25-29, 2015 at the International Conference Center (also named as Nanyang Hotel) in Xi'an Jiaotong University (XJTU), Xi'an, China. The primary goal of this symposium is to bring together experts in the design, processing and applications of semiconductor tracking detectors for discussions of past experiences, lessons learned and new ideas which are still in the early stage of development.

  5. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, A A; Ismail, M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a multifaceted disease and research over decades has sequentially broadened our understanding of the mechanisms which underlie its development, progression and resistance against wide ranging molecular therapeutics. Data obtained through in-vitro studies and xenografted mice based investigations clearly suggested that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, overexpression of oncogenes, imbalance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, loss of apoptosis, dysregulation of spatio-temporally controlled intracellular signaling cascades, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, intra-tumor heterogeneity are significantly involved in regulation of different steps of cancer. Recently emerging information is also shedding light on considerable role of microRNAs in cancer and we have seen an exponential growth in the list of tumor suppressor and oncogenic miRNAs. Amirkhah et al, described how miRNAs regulated resistance mechanisms against different therapeutics in colorectal cancer. Nosheen Masood and Muhammad Zahid Qureshi emphasized on intricate interplay between Notch signaling and different miRNAs in head and neck cancer. Gasparri et al discussed new frontiers in therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer with spotlight on PARP inhibitors. Notch mediated intracellular signaling in esophageal cancer was comprehensively explained by Wang et al. Resistance mechanisms against TRAIL based therapeutics were described in detail by Limami et al. The authors gave opinion about different approaches which have been tested in preclinical trials to overcome resistance against TRAIL. Mansoor et al reported that GG genotype in death receptor 4 played protective role however, CC genotype had a causative role in colorectal cancer in Pakistani population. Larger pool of patients, sporadic mutations, expression studies will further demystify the association. Hsu et al, extensively described various strategies focusing on how post-translationally modifiable histones can be targeted for cancer treatment. Attar et al provided detailed information related to Viscum album against different cancers. Ahmadi et al studied network structure information and biological data on miRNA-and transcription factor-based gene regulation. Apoptotic cell death is a key mechanism frequently inactivated in cancer cells and different strategies have been used to re-activate/functionalize apoptotic pathway in drug resistant phenotype. We have attempted to present most recent landmarks set in cancer biology and therapeutics. Sarkar et al review summarized multifunctional roles of ASPP (apoptosis stimulating proteins of p53) family in cancer. Smina et al reported that Hesperetin, a flavonoid effectively induced apoptosis in skin cancer cell line. Chong et al experimentally verified that lipid accumulation may not only induce pro-inflammatory responses in hepatocytes but also activate CSC-like properties of hepatoma cells through NFκB activation. The present thematic issue brings to limelight most recent advancements in constantly developing field of molecular oncology. PMID:26520390

  6. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Versi, A

    1995-05-01

    The UN Social Summit was held on the heels of the 1994 UN International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) with the goal of emphasizing the currently interconnected nature of human existence. The issue was not so much poverty as it was the global consequences of poverty. Poverty is a global problem with potentially widespread ramifications. Despite the urgent need to address and reduce the extent and level of poverty worldwide, however, developed countries at the summit mounted thinly veiled resistance to commit themselves financially and politically to eradicating poverty. Attempts to persuade Western nations to write off the debts of the developing world were stiffly resisted, while the proposed 0.5% Tobin Tax on international currency transactions to fight poverty received no support. The conference was nonetheless a logical continuation of the Cairo ICPD, a validation of the holistic approach taken by the UN, and well worth the US$30 million spent, largely by the Danish government, to make it a reality. The author notes that garnering rights for women is part of alleviating poverty, and that the issue of global poverty is now firmly on the international agenda.

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Eberhard

    2016-06-01

    This Special Section of Acta Astronautica is a collection of selected peer reviewed papers presented at the eighth International Workshop on Satellite Constellations and Formation Flying (IWSCFF). The event was, as its predecessors, organized by the Astrodynamics Committee of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) with the objective to bring together specialists in the area of astrodynamics and space mission analysis and design and to promote discussions on lessons from past missions, to present recent results, and to address challenges for future space missions. The Workshop was held at the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering of the Delft University of Technology from June 8-10, 2015. The Workshop was coordinated by its Chairs Eberhard Gill (The Netherlands) and Alfred Ng (Canada) with support from the recently established TU Delft Space Institute, an extended International Program Committee, a Local Organizing Committee and a variety of industrial and institutional sponsors.

  8. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, N.; Mendoza Jiménez, M.; Wittel, F.

    2014-10-01

    More than 30 years of scientific endeavor have brought us from programming simple models to impressive simulations of dynamic systems. Lattice models like Potts, percolation, fuse, fiber bundle, and growth models, just to name a few, are the prototypes or godfathers of statistical mechanics. With the availability of more powerful tools it became possible to develop these models and apply them on complex topologies, finding important practical applications in socio-technological systems (e.g., opinion dynamics, traffic, communication networks) and to engineering problems (e.g., fracture phenomena, mass transport). In parallel, particle models evolved from a hand full of interacting discs to three dimensional multibillion particle simulations that successfully describe interesting fracture phenomena, granular flow, and even fluid flow for engineering applications. Prof. Dr. Hans Jürgen Herrmann has dedicated his professional life to this journey.

  9. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2016-06-01

    Ground based radiation research facilities are indispensable for a better understanding of the biological principles governing the responses of living organisms to space radiation and for advancing our knowledge in space radiation dosimetry and protection. 2015 marked the 20th anniversary of the first acquisition of space radiation biology and physics data at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. Use of the BNL AGS was the product of a collaborative agreement between NASA and BNL to promote the goals of NASA to "expand human presence in the solar system and to the surface of Mars and to advance exploration, science, innovation and benefits to humanity and international collaboration". This collaborative agreement signed on April 8th, 1994 built on previous work at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Bevalac and paved the way for the approval and construction of a dedicated space radiation laboratory at BNL, the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). In this volume we present three review articles: on the history of the creation of the NSRL, by Walter Schimmerling; on the physics-related research at the AGS and NSRL, by Jack Miller and Cary Zeitlin; and on the identification and evaluation of biomarkers for modeling cancer risk after exposure to space radiation, by Janice Pluth and her colleagues. It is the hope of the editors that our readers, and especially those relatively new to the field, will find these articles to be informative and interesting and that they will foster an appreciation of the importance of ground based radiation research in protecting the health of crew members as they venture out into the solar system in the coming decades.

  10. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Ketting, E

    1995-01-01

    Adolescents have sexual relationships, even when cultural rules condemn such activity, and cause and become pregnant, have illegal abortions, engage in incest, have sex for financial compensation, and contract and transmit sexually transmitted diseases. Such activity and practice have taken place for centuries. Conditions are also changing, however, which facilitate adolescent sexual activity such as earlier puberty, later marriage, the breakdown of traditions resulting from higher mobility and urbanization, the influence of modern media, prolonged education, and many other changes. Individuals and societies around the world must adapt to these changes with the common responsibility of attempting to secure the best possible future for the current generation of adolescents. Many of the cultural strategies long used to control adolescent sexuality are no longer appropriate and effective under current, rapidly changing circumstances. Such strategies include infibulation, arranging marriage at young ages, segregating the sexes, creating and internalizing a sense of sexual self-restraint supported by moral and religious teaching, and/or allowing young people to have sex, yet without the information, education, and services they need to avoid the consequences of sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancy. Youth representatives from around the world recently spoke up at the IPPF Program Consultation on Youth in London in 1993, and at the Youth Consultation and Task Force organized by the IPPF in February 1995, to affirm the sexual nature of adolescents and youth, and claim their rights to practice that sexuality as human individuals. Youths around the world urge adults and conservatives overall to accept adolescent desires and rights to be sexually active instead of trying to control their activities.

  11. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Singh, I P; Shiva, M

    1994-06-01

    Even though India was the first country to address population, it is behind those who came later. The government of India framed population within the context of health, but it eventually shifted the approach to health and family planning. Compartmentalism and adhoc-ism removed the programs far from the people. Eventually family welfare replaced family planning. The 8 Five Year Plan document provides a framework for appropriate, positive change in addressing the population issue. Yet, contraceptive intervention, particularly tubectomy, remains the core of population issues. In fact, tubectomy increased from about 11% of total sterilizations in the late 1960s to 96% in 1994. Women remain the target of population control. In fact, female-targeted contraceptive technology has produced IUDs, oral contraceptives, tubectomy, subdermal contraceptive implants, and the injectable contraceptive. Improvement of women's health services, their status, and their economic independence has not been attempted. Before improvement can occur, female literacy; skill development; meeting of basic needs of food, water, and health care for children to survive; and safe living and working conditions are needed. Male responsibility has risen somewhat over time. India needs to work towards a shift from contraception-oriented population control to reducing births by choice (RBBC), making RBBC a grassroots movement, a holistic approach, coordination between various government agencies, addressing demographic fundamentalism (e.g., son preference and child marriage), provision of primary health care, and equitable distribution of local and global resources. Population policy must be human.

  12. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Paul A.; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The 6th Workshop of the International Precipitation Working Group (IPWG6) was held in São José dos Campos, Brazil, from 15 to 19 October 2012, at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC). It was sponsored and organized by CPTEC with the co-sponsoring of the Coordination Group for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT).

  13. Editorial.

    PubMed

    O'connell, H

    1993-06-01

    Human rights groups have traditionally monitored and publicized human rights abuses suffered mainly by men (e.g., torture, killings, and imprisonment) and have ignored abuses of women. Gender-sensitive research and women's groups have uncovered this oversight. Rape in the former Yugoslavia is now considered a war crime, requiring full investigation and punishment. Conflict and violence affect women in several ways related specifically to the gender division of rights, responsibilities, and roles. Class and ethnic differences conceal this gender related experience, however. Even in countries sympathetic to women's equality, women still are second class citizens. Women are always conscious of the ever-present threat or experience of physical and sexual violence, almost always inflicted by men. Perpetrators use violence to keep women down; to restrict opportunities for them to live, learn, work, and care a full human beings; to impede their potential to organize and demand their rights. Domestic violence against women occurs across all social groups, races, age groups, and religious and political persuasions. Violence against females begins before birth. Forced prostitution violates women's human rights. Patriarchy supports discriminatory treatment and backs violence as a legitimate means to preserve the status quo. Was has had a gender-related effect on women in Afghanistan, Chad, and Cambodia. The psychological and social impact of conflict (e.g., state-sponsored terrorism) on women is also examined. Physical ailments are often manifestations of psychological disorders. Common themes are women's increased vulnerability to rape and sexual abuse during conflict, rapid rise in the numbers of households dependent on women's labor, placing on them an excessive burden, and complete disruption of economic and social life. Further, this disruption provides opportunities for women to overcome some aspects of their traditional roles. More than 80% of the world's refugees are women, their dependent children, and the elderly. Women are becoming leaders in armed conflict.

  14. Editorial

    PubMed Central

    Summers, R J

    2014-01-01

    This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology stems from the 7th in the series of meetings on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (MPGPCR) held at the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Melbourne Australia from the 6th–8th December 2012. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24575818

  15. Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Leach, Martin J.

    2007-12-01

    To address the need for additional high-resolution urban dispersion data sets, the U.S. Departments of Defense, Energy and Homeland Security joined together to fund the Joint Urban 2003 (JU03) atmospheric dispersion study. This major urban study was conducted from June 28 through July 31, 2003, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, with the participation of over 150 scientists and engineers from over 20 U.S. and foreign institutions. Through mid-2006 over 125 papers and presentations have been given on scientific findings and model evaluations based on the field study results. The official JU03 data archive is accessible through the internet by requesting an account at https://ju2003-dpg.dpg.army.mil/. The JU03 study included several integrated scientific components necessary to describe and understand the physical processes governing dispersion within and surrounding an urban area and into and within building environments. These components included characterizing: 1) the urban boundary layer; 2) flows within a street canyon, including the effects of traffic on turbulence; 3) flows within and downwind of the tall-building core; 4) the surface energy balance within an urban area; 5) dispersion of tracer into, out of, and within buildings; and 6) dispersion of tracer throughout the downtown core and out to four kilometers downwind from the release. The scientific elements of the study were accomplished using state-of-the-art meteorological and tracer instruments, including lidars, sodars, radars, sonic anemometers, airplane-based meteorological sensors, fast-response tracer analyzers, and helicopter-based remote tracer detectors. Winds and other meteorological quantities were measured continuously at nearly 100 locations in and around downtown OKC. Tracer was released on 10 days during the experiment period and included both puff and continuous releases. The tracer was sampled using over 200 integrated samplers and 25 fast response analyzers. Vertical measurements of tracer were made by placing samplers on the tops of nearly 20 buildings and by sampling tracer at seven levels on a 90-m crane. The twelve papers in this special issue provide a cross-section of the scientific investigations pursued using JU03 data. Half the papers focus on using observations to characterize winds, turbulence and dispersion in the boundary layer above the city and into a downtown Oklahoma City street canyon (Park Avenue). The remaining papers discuss model evaluations using JU03 data and our improved understanding of processes governing dispersion in urban areas using models and observations. The combination of a dense network of measurements with state-of-the-art instruments allowed for an unparalleled investigation of transport and diffusion in an urban environment. We expect the Joint Urban 2003 data set will be used for many years for model development and validation efforts, and for refining our understanding of flow and dispersion in urban areas including the exchange of contaminants between outdoor and indoor and environments.

  16. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-04-01

    Nonlinear models are important to rationalize and understand self-organization, pattern formation and emergent behavior in molecular and cell biological systems. This special issue focuses on recent developments, that go beyond the classical modeling ideas of biochemical reactions and diffusion processes by including several effects identified recently as being crucial, for instance: elasticity/deformablity, anisotropy, multi-phase flow and 'active' behavior.

  17. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, C

    1996-06-01

    A gender perspective requires examining how gender roles affect the ways in which various family members can participate in the wider community, economy, and state. It is important to recognize the disparity between perceptions about the family as a benign institution and the reality that many families consist of a paradoxical blend of love, support, friction, domination, and even cruelty. Definitions of family reveal the social implications of the belief that families are centered on children and the need of patriarchs to control female sexuality. Notions about households are generally more concrete, and many households include people who are not family members and are not nuclear in nature. Many development initiatives have floundered because of the assumption that households distribute resources according to individual needs. Instead, household members use bargaining power to get their way, and women are generally in weaker bargaining positions than men. Linking men solely with production and women solely with reproduction ignores the realities of most women's lives, although the unpaid reproductive work women do influences their access to paid employment. In order to assure family stability and to find ways to provide social welfare, women's workload in the family must be reduced. Family life must not be hidden in a "private" sphere where injustices and violence are ignored. Unconscious biases against families of various types must be rooted out and overcome, and policy-makers must recognize that families evolve to meet changing needs. Finally, the notion of the nuclear family as the ideal family type must be challenged. PMID:12291311

  18. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-12-01

    Graphene displays a unique combination of properties that could make it suitable for many products, generating new technologies or novel graphene structures and devices for variety of applications including composites, electronics and optoelectronics. After more than 10 years from its first isolation where minuscule flakes of graphene were used for basic physics experiments and the first graphene-based devices, today we have a reached a stage where graphene can be produced in high volumes for a number of applications with properties approaching the needed performance requirements.

  19. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    The Topical Meeting (One Day Seminar) on Frontier Research in Nanoscience and Technology-2009, held the first time in Thailand in this areas, brings together colleagues from the areas of nanoscience and related areas, especially, from Singapor, Malaysia, Thailand, China and Japan.

  20. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    In December 2002 we announced some changes to Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics: an extended scope to highlight the wide range of articles published in the journal and a new definition of Letters to the Editor. As always, comments and suggestions are welcome and should be sent to jphysb@iop.org. Extended scope of J. Phys. B J. Phys. B covers all aspects of atomic, molecular and optical physics. We publish articles on the study of atoms, ions, molecules, condensates or clusters, from their structure and interactions with particles, photons, fields and surfaces to all aspects of spectroscopy. Quantum optics, non-linear optics, laser physics, astrophysics, plasma physics, chemical physics, optical cooling and trapping and other investigations where the objects of study are the elementary atomic, ionic or molecular properties of processes are also included. With the introduction of the BEC Matters! portal and IOP Select, J. Phys. B, one of the major contributors, offers authors of articles in this research area wider visibility and more flexible publication with the opportunity to display multimedia attachments or web links to key groups and results. The recent papers listed below reflect the wide scope of J. Phys. B: Calculation of cross sections for very low-energy hydrogen-antihydrogen scattering using the Kohn variational method E A G Armour and C W Chamberlain J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 22 (28 November 2002) L489-L494 Imaging the electron transfer reaction of Ne2+ with Ar using position-sensitive coincidence spectroscopy Sarah M Harper, Wan-Ping Hu and Stephen D Price J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 21 (14 November 2002) 4409-4423 Ultraviolet-infrared wavelength scalings for strong field induced L-shell emissions from Kr and Xe clusters Alex B Borisov, Xiangyang Song, Fabrizio Frigeni, Yang Dai, Yevgeniya Koshman, W Andreas Schroeder, Jack Davis, Keith Boyer and Charles K Rhodes J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 21 (14 November 2002) L461-L467 A Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice J Hecker Denschlag, J E Simsarian, H Häffner, C McKenzie, A Browaeys, D Cho, K Helmerson, S L Rolston and W D Phillips J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 14 (28 July 2002) 3095-3110 Locality of a class of entangled states I R Senitzky J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 14 (28 July 2002) 3029-3039 Solitons and vortices in ultracold fermionic gases Tomasz Karpiuk, Miroslaw Brewczyk and Kazimierz Rzazewski J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 14 (28 July 2002) L315-L321 Stable islands in chaotic atom-optics billiards, caused by curved trajectories M F Andersen, A Kaplan, N Friedman and N Davidson J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 9 (14 May 2002) 2183-2190 Emission probability and photon statistics of a coherently driven mazer Jin Xiong and Zhi-Ming Zhang J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 9 (14 May 2002) 2159-2172 The Li+-H2 system in a rigid-rotor approximation: potential energy surface and transport coefficients I Røeggen, H R Skullerud, T H Løvaas and D K Dysthe J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 7 (14 April 2002) 1707-1725 The stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation C W Gardiner, J R Anglin and T I A Fudge J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 6 (28 March 2002) 1555-1582 Oxygen ion impurity in the TEXTOR tokamak boundary plasma observed and analysed by Zeeman spectroscopy J D Hey, C C Chu, S Brezinsek, Ph Mertens and B Unterberg J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 6 (28 March 2002) 1525-1553 Electron-hexafluoropropene (C3F6) scattering at intermediate energies Czeslaw Szmytkowski, Pawel Mozejko and Stanislaw Kwitnewski J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 5 (14 March 2002) 1267-1274 High-resolution investigations of C2 and CN optical emissions in laser-induced plasmas during graphite ablation S Acquaviva and M L De Giorgi J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Vol 35, No 4 (28 February 2002) 795-806 New definition of a Letter to the Editor A Letter to the Editor should present new results, likely to stimulate further research and be of interest to the wider atomic, molecular and optical physics community. Above all the results should be sufficiently new and important to merit rapid publication as a Letter, which implies accelerated refereeing procedures. This should be made clear either in the body of the Letter, if appropriate, or with a supporting cover letter from the author on submission to the journal. Letters will have an upper limit of eight journal pages and, as an additional quality check, two referees instead of one will be used to review them. The Board will be asked to make a final publication decision in the event of two conflicting reports. With these measures in place it is hoped that the important new results will receive the exposure they deserve as a Letter. If you have any questions or comments on this or anything relating to J. Phys. B please contact Nicola Gulley, Publisher, J. Phys. B (E-mail: jphysb@iop.org).

  1. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1987-07-01

    When the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) began calling itself PIE hie International Society for Optical Engineering in 19811, an important motivating factor was the desire of the Society's Governors to reflect a rise in the membership from countries other than the United States and to foster an increase in cooperative activities with the optical engineering communities within those countries. At a time when the Society's technical focus had drifted away from photographic instrumentation and toward optical engineering, its membership had become less exclusively comprised of individuals from the U.S. and was beginning to develop a much more international flavor.

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1982-12-01

    Your editor was fortunate to have an interview with the man who, along with Emmett Leith and Juris Upatnieks at the University of Michigan, was responsible for the rebirth of holography in the early 1960s. Professor Denisyuk is seldom seen in the West so I would like to share parts of the conversation that I had with him at the Volvilov Optical Institute, Leningrad, this October 1982. He is a vigorous and enthusiastic man with a great deal of personal charm. Our conversa-tions were of special interest to me because they supported my suspicion that truly great scientists are not merely smarter and harder working than the rest of us, but also are skilled at formulating both questions and answers in starkly simple ways.

  3. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Dominika; Sobański, Jerzy A; Klasa, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Dear Readers, In no time, we are almost halfway through 2015. Currently many issues concern psychiatrists, and does not fill them with optimism: an uncertain future implementation of the National Mental Health Protection Programme, or the recent amendment of criminal law, entering into force on 01.07.2015, on the significant enlargement of implementation of treatment and precautionary measures in psychiatric institutions. Prof. J.K. Gierowski [1] wrote in Psychiatria Polska about the misunderstanding and even conflict in this matter, between politicians, lawyers and psychiatric community, almost one and a half year ago. Several tragic, dramatic events (German Wings plane crash, the recent murder in Tworki) creates a bad social attitude towards the mentally ill. Our environment does not remain indifferent and is actively involved in the discussion - it is expressed by Letters to Editor, written by Elwira Marszałkowska-Krześ and Andrzej Brodziak, published in the current issue of the magazine. We are all aware of our responsibility - on the one hand for a safe environment for patients while ensuring adequate treatment to the ill, and on the other for creating the image of psychiatry and psychiatrists [2, 3]. (...).

  4. Editorial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    The fractal properties of isoconcentration surfaces in a smoke plume are studied in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. Instantaneous high-resolution two-dimensional images of the fine particle concentration at Schmidt number Sc were obtained in three plume cross sections with a video imaging technique. The fractal dimension D of isoconcentration contours is estimated with box-counting and area-perimeter methods; the range of thresholds is 0.5 c(/ 1.5, where is the mean particle concentration for a particular image and c( is the threshold. Using the box-counting method, the local values of D = d(log N)/d(log ) are found to be constant over variations in that are more than a decade, where N, is the number of boxes with size required to cover an isoconcentration curve. Using the area-perimeter method, the fractal dimension is estimated with the relation P AD/2, where P and A denote the perimeter and area of the individual closed isoconcentration curves. The noise influence on the measured values of D is evaluated with a newly developed method based on synthetically generated noise. A new technique of noise filtering is proposed, based on the area threshold. The effect of spatial resolution is studied using video image smoothing in physical space.The present investigation demonstrates that isoconcentration surfaces in a smoke plume are self-similar fractals over the range of thresholds 0.5 c(/ 1.5 and that their fractal dimension D for all images analyzed is found to be 1.41 ± 0.06 and 1.45 ± 0.08 for the box-counting and area-perimeter methods, respectively.

  5. Editorial

    DOE PAGES

    Whittle, K. R.; Edmondson, P. D.

    2015-07-01

    The development of nuclear materials for the next generation of reactor technology, e.g. GenIV and fusion, is at a critical juncture, with an increasing body of research into the long-term effects of radiation damage on materials being examined. As it is hopefully evident from the papers in this journal issue, there are many pertinent and challenging topics for research in this exciting and challenging area of research, driving forward the development of new materials and the next generation of nuclear reactor technologies.

  6. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, John W.; Gaddis, Lisa; Petro, Noah E.

    2016-07-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission has forever changed our understanding of the Moon, Earth's nearest neighbor in space. By returning a comprehensive data set focused on supporting the extension of a human presence in the Solar System, LRO helps identify and characterize sites with high scientific and exploration value, favorable terrain, and an environment suitable for supporting future lunar missions. As seen in this special issue, LRO data are invaluable for improving our knowledge of fundamental aspects of the Moon and the Solar System, and paving the way for a safe human and robotic return to the Moon.

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-02-01

    Every teacher in England is a member of the General Teaching Council (GTC). Membership is compulsory. The GTC is an independent professional body with a governing council of 64 members. Forty-four council members are practising teachers, including 25 elected teachers. There are representatives from the teacher unions and associations, equality bodies, local government, governors and parents. The GTC regularly produce 25 leaflets about professional issues and the spring issue of 2003 began with the title 'Keeping teachers in teaching'. A number of key aspects were highlighted: 'Placing learning at the centre', 'Teachers as leaders of learning', 'Retention--what teachers want', 'Research of the month', 'GTC seeks new ways to recognise teachers' professionalism' and 'GTC response to workload reform'. An interesting section entitled 'Some key findings' revealed data that should disturb even the most optimistic politician. Fifty per cent of teachers nationally are aged over 45 years, 22% of teachers are aged 35-44 years, and 73% of teachers are women. The significance of the last point was not discussed. Also, retention data were not included.

  8. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshio; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Hoshino, Kazuo; Ito, Atsushi; Kajita, Shin; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Lee, Heun Tae; Nakano, Tomohide; Tokitani, Masayuki

    2015-08-01

    The 21st International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices (PSI-21) was held in Kanazawa, Ishikawa prefecture, Japan from the 26th to the 30th of May 2014. This conference was hosted by National Institute for Fusion Science and supported by Nagoya University, Kanazawa University, Osaka University and Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

  9. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Gerstorf, Denis; Bertram, Lars; Lindenberger, Ulman; Pawelec, Graham; Demuth, Ilja; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gert G

    2016-01-01

    Human aging is characterized by large differences between and within older adults. Numerous factors are known to contribute to these differences, including genetic and immunological, somatic and medical, cognitive and behavioral, psychosocial and experiential, as well as socioeconomic and geospatial conditions. Continuing and expanding the scientific objectives of the Berlin Aging Study, the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II) seeks to comprehensively describe phenomena associated with aging and old age and to better understand the multiple different underlying factors and their interactions. To this end, BASE-II was established as a multi-institutional project combining and integrating interdisciplinary perspectives ranging from molecular genetics and immunology, geriatric medicine and psychology, to sociology and economics. In this Special Issue, we have compiled seven empirical analyses that feature examples of interdisciplinary insights that BASE-II provides by linking data across multiple levels of analyses at which human functioning and development occur in old age. Here, we provide an overview of the study, note commonalities between BASE-II and earlier studies, and highlight some of its unique qualities. PMID:26820471

  10. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraberg, Alexandra C.; Wiltshire, Karen Helen

    2015-11-01

    Collecting long-term data series is time intensive: 10 years ago, a special issue celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Helgoland Roads time series was published. The resulting articles described not only the diverse collected data, excellent scientific output, and long-term collaborations due to these data, but also the many challenges to running such a complex time series.

  11. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasthi, D. K.; Tripathi, A.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, D.; Trautmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The Eighteenth International Conference on Radiation Effects in Insulators (REI-18) was held during October 26-31, 2015 in Jaipur, India. The conference was organized jointly by Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, Malviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, Vivekanand Global University, Jaipur in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Vienna and was supported by the Ion Beam Society of India.

  12. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, Volker

    2015-05-01

    The year 2015 will likely have a unique place in the history books for the optics and photonics community, since it is paired with various events that are exciting for this field. For one it is the 125th birthday of the Optical Society (OSA), and in addition, the United Nations declared 2015 to be the Year Of Light. The first special issue of this year is dedicated to the topic of "Emerging Materials on Nanophotonics". While the field of nanophotonics has seen tremendous momentum through the support of plasmonics, opto-mechanics, and quantum photonics, it often are both the breakthroughs and continuing developments of materials that bring enabling opportunities for this field. For instance, the area of 2D materials has grown out of its infancy being focused on Graphene into a crossdisciplinary subject area. Here, both scientific and engineering potential are seen in a) novel physical effects, b) higher functionality, and c) smaller form factors all found in one material option. Coincidentally, theUSNational Science Foundation recently held a path findingworkshop on 2D materials Beyond Graphene, and followed through with a dedicated two-year program to fund engineering innovations of the same. Here, the bandgap tunability of trimetal Dichalcogenides (TMD) has found to bear rich bandgap tunability via composition, alloying, and altering design options such as substrate choices or stress, thus providing a large variety of functions. In this context it is interesting to note, that with the many material choices for TMDs, the importance of targeted approaches towards accelerated material-to-marketwas raised in theMaterial Genome Initiative by the US White House. However, with the fundamental challenge of nanophotonics - weak interactions between light and matter - the choice of materials as both device building block and functionality delivery option needs to be synergistically considered. In this regard metal optics is seen as an emerging field that is able to contribute to this design evolution of devices and systems with ever growing constrains. However, materials with new functionalities and *Corresponding Author: Volker Sorger: E-mail: sorger@email.gwu.edu form factors allow utilizing field enhancement techniques in an unprecedented way. This, for instance, enables subwavelength scale photonic and opto-electronic devices with performance improvements such as utilized by the Purcell effect in light emitters, detectors, or electro-optic switching devices. On the other hand, certain novel materials are able to clearly outperform any existing option; for instance transparent-conductive-oxides (TCO) have been found to be able to alter its refractive index by unity. Lastly, with the maturing of silicon photonics as an on-chip optics platform, higher integration options are considered in this special issue; passive devices such as waveguides made out of the electro-optically active Lithium Niobate aid highfunctionality systems on-chip. However, these novel materials and subsequent devices and systems need to be compared and benchmarked in order to be a guide for the next phase of opto-electronic integration and other technologies as carried out by some contributions of this special issue.As the festivities around this Year Of Light continue, this special issue summarizes some of the interesting work around the emerging materials for nanophotonics. Concluding, I would like to thank for the input and help of the fellow Guest Editors, Jenifer Dionne, Alexandra Boltasseva, and Luke Sweatlock along with the Nanophotonics staff, Dennis Couwenberg and Tara Dorrian. Sincerely

  13. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Eberly, J

    2000-07-01

    Validation-by-competition has arrived. Collaboration and incubation are next. This appears be the breakout year. I've mentioned previously the electronic publishing plans and projects of the Institute of Physics in the U.K., of the American Acoustical Society and of the American Physical Society. As of July 1, 2000, all of them will have in operation free-standing, all-electronic, peer-reviewed journals. The New Journal of Physics, Acoustic Research Letters Online, and Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams, respectively, are the names of these competitors of Optics Express. They go by the acronyms NJP, ARLO and STAB.

  14. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.; Ferrini-Mundy, Joan

    1997-01-01

    Recalls the launch of Sputnik in the history of science and mathematics education. Discusses whether anything has changed or any progress in science and mathematics education has been made. (Author/ASK)

  15. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjeltorp, A. T.; Helgesen, G.

    2014-09-01

    Soft condensed matter is characterized by the weak interactions between polyatomic constituents, by important thermal fluctuation effects, by mechanical softness and by a rich range of behavioursDefinition taken from the introduction to "Phase Transitions in Soft Condensed Matter", edited by Tormod Riste and David Sherrington, Plenum Press, 1989 (New York), the proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute held in Geilo, Norway in 1989. This may have been the first time the term "soft condensed matter" was used in an official capacity. http://www.softbio.ox.ac.uk/ . Examples include complex liquids, colloids, granular materials, foams, polymers, gels and various biological materials. These materials thus share an important common feature in that predominant physical behaviors occur at an energy scale comparable with room temperature thermal energy.

  16. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzig, J.; Zivin, J. Graff; Abarbanel, H. D. I.; Kocarev, L.; Kurths, J.

    2016-05-01

    This topical issue collects contributions to the interdisciplinary study of the interacting global systems of public health, energy production, and climate change, in order to provide physicists with an opportunity to explore these fields of application of great societal importance.

  17. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerma, Dirk O.; Climent-Font, Aurelio; Respaldiza, Miguel Ángel

    2006-08-01

    The IBA conference has taken place in different countries from all over the world. It started in the United States in 1973, and since then has been held biennially without interruption, becoming the reference meeting on ion beam analysis and related methods and techniques. In its 17th edition, two Spanish laboratories, one from the Universidad de Sevilla and one from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid had the honour and responsibility of organizing the conference. These two laboratories are, so far, the only ones in the country equipped with accelerators dedicated to ion beam analysis; the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Seville and the Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM) in Madrid. We took up this task enthusiastically, conscious that Spain has only very recently been equipped with IBA techniques and that this event would highlight to the scientific community of our country the importance and involvement of IBA techniques in new scientific and technological developments. The conference was held at the Melia Sevilla Hotel in Seville, Spain from 26 June-1 July 2005. This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the published proceedings of the conference.

  18. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskill, Jack D.

    1988-02-01

    After a year in which United States presidential candidates, supreme court nominees, and television evangelists offered confession after confession, I have begun to feel that by not confessing something, have not fulfilled my duties as Editor of Optical Engineering. As a result, even if it does rule out any future political aspirations I might have, I have decided that I must confess a shameful deed: I allowed myself to be "bought." That's right! In return for certain favors, I authorized the publication of a paper that otherwise might never have scattered any optical radiation to the eyes of the reader.

  19. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianmin; Gao, Fei; Hu, Wangyu; Lai, Wensheng; Lu, Guang-Hong; Zu, Xiaotao

    2009-09-01

    The Ninth International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids (COSIRES 2008) was hosted by Beihang University in Beijing, China from 12 to 17 October 2008. Started in 1992 in Berlin, Germany, this conference series has been held biennially in Santa Barbara, CA, USA (1994); Guildford, UK (1996); Okayama, Japan (1998); State College, PA, USA (2000); Dresden, Germany (2002); Helsinki Finland (2004); and Richland, WA USA (2006). The COSIRES conferences are the foremost international forum on the theory, development and application of advanced computer simulation methods and algorithms to achieve fundamental understanding and predictive modeling of the interaction of energetic particles and clusters with solids. As can be noticed in the proceedings of the COSIRES conferences, these computer simulation methods and algorithms have been proven to be very useful for the study of fundamental radiation effect processes, which are not easily accessible by experimental methods owing to small time and length scales. Moreover, with advance in computing power, they have remarkably been developed in the different scales ranging from meso to atomistic, and even down to electronic levels, as well as coupling of the different scales. They are now becoming increasingly applicable for materials processing and performance prediction in advance engineering and energy-production technologies.

  20. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasthi, D. K.; Bolse, W.

    2006-03-01

    The Indo-German workshop on "Synthesis and modification of nano-structured materials by energetic ion beams" (a joint venture of Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (now renamed to Inter University Accelerator Centre, IUAC) and Stuttgart University), which was held at the auditorium of the "International Centre of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology" in New Delhi, India, from 20th until 24th of February 2005, was dedicated to the unique capabilities of energetic ions as a powerful tool in nano-science and -technology, both for generating and processing of nano-structured materials. Ions in different energy regimes play a different role in the field of nano-structure creation. A unique feature of the energetic ion is that it can excite the solid quasi-instantaneously in a nano-scale volume to very high levels and create extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure), well-localized both in space and time. By the energy dissipation into the cold ambient quenching rates of up to 1014 K/s may be achieved and structures and phases far away from equilibrium may be formed on a nanometer scale. The non-equilibrium conditions may further result in non-linear behavior and instabilities, which may drive self-assembly and nm-pattern formation on large areas. Hence, ion beams appear as an ideal tool for nano-technology. The aim of the Indo-German workshop was to summarize the on-going applications of ion beams in the nano-sciences and -technology in both countries and to explore further the perspectives of energetic ions for the preparation and processing of functional nano-structures, in order to initiate and strengthen common research in this field.

  1. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English.

  2. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Reardon, G

    1993-02-01

    The focus on gender and the environment highlighted important features of articles included in this issue. The general concern was that women are not considered in the thinking about economic development and environmental issues. The Joan Davison article noted the close relationship of women to their surroundings and degradation, which was affected by debt and structural adjustment, trade, aid, war, and the social structure. Women's access to land and their marginal role in society, law, and economic life needs to be addressed by the environmentally aware. The Judy Adoko article reported on the outrageous criticism by development workers in Uganda of women using wood for fuel, when little attention is focused on the commercialization of firewood. The important communication was that women are limited in their choices and make the most of what they have out of necessity, and not out of a short-term solution compromising their children's future. Environmental stability can be achieved in part through removal of the causes of women's poverty. Women's time and energy are tightly constrained; Irene Guijt's views reflected the concern about assumptions that women's participation in environmental protection can be secured without direct benefit to them. The problem of women's health was considered by Joanne Harnmeijer and Ann Waters-Bayer, who focused on increased agricultural productivity projects which have not taken into account the increased burden of work in time or effort or in terms of the impact of children, both as producers and as a demand on time, energy, and health. Population control has been justified because of its impact on consumption of natural resources in developing countries, without due consideration of developed countries consumption patterns. Hazards in the environment and work place have increased with increasing international trade and industrialization. Industry attracting women workers has been established without concern for sanitation, disease, pollution, or social services. Women plantation workers have often been given the most hazardous jobs with agrochemicals. Rasheda Begum detailed the impact of natural disasters on women. Environmental solutions must be tailored to specific conditions, rather than at the expense of global unification and self-evident assumptions. Acceptability and sustainability for women must be a feature of environmental protection. PMID:12287128

  3. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villain, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    This issue of the C. R. Physique is thin, but should attract readers, since it gathers articles written by laureates of the prizes of the French Academy of Sciences in the last three years. In these articles they explain their work to non-specialists, as Nobel laureates do in their Nobel lectures.

  4. Editorial.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Webb, Paul

    2016-03-01

    This Special Issue on the topic of "Orphan Nuclear Receptors" should help to cement the long held view that orphan members of the Nuclear Receptor superfamily play crucial roles in development, physiology and multiple pathologies and that some are attractive druggable targets. Focusing on selected orphans, this issue highlights recent developments in orphan receptor action and addresses questions about function, ligand recognition, strategies for drug development and applications for such drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Orphan Nuclear Receptors". PMID:26791250

  5. Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J; Brown, T; Buchholz, B; Finkel, B; Guilderson, T; Kashgarian, M; Nimz, G; Ognibene, T; Tumey, S; Vogel, J

    2007-08-13

    The Tenth International Conference on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS-10) was held from September 5-10 at the University of California, Berkeley campus. The conference attracted 305 attendees from 26 countries who gave 144 platform presentations and presented a total of 170 posters. The conference opened with a special tribute to the late Roy Middleton, which was followed by a companion session on 'ion sourcery'. A plenary talk by Wally Broecker on his '53 years in the Radiocarbon Trenches', provided thought-provoking challenges to commonly accepted paradigms. A workshop on issues in the estimation of isotopic ratios and evaluations of activities from AMS measurements preceded the conference and a workshop on AMS in low-dose bioscience concluded it. Conference attendees had ample opportunity to sample local sights and mid-week excursions to the Napa Valley wine region and the Monterey Bay Aquarium were well attended. The social highlight of the conference was a dinner cruise on San Francisco Bay aboard the San Francisco Belle, which toured the bay on a clear evening and afforded spectacular views of the city front as well as the Bay and Golden Gate bridges. The proceedings of AMS-10 contain 140 peer-reviewed papers that detail recent developments in AMS technology and a broad range of scientific applications. The editors worked to ensure that these contributions represent original research that has not been published elsewhere. We are grateful to the many outside reviewers who provided thoughtful consideration and suggestions in their reviews of these manuscripts. The staff of the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory wishes to thank the many members of the international AMS community in allowing us to organize this conference. We are particularly grateful to the University of California's Toxic Substances Research Program, which provided key assistance with conference administration.

  6. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Sérgio P.; de Pinho Guimarães, Ignez; de Oliveira, Elson Paiva

    2015-03-01

    The Borborema Province is part of a large orogenic realm that extends from northeastern Brazil to western Africa in reconstructions of the supercontinent Pangea. As such, understanding its tectonic evolution is crucial to place constraints on the history of growth and amalgamation of West Gondwana. In 1995, a special issue of the Journal of South American Earth Sciences was dedicated to the Borborema Province (vol. 8, nos 8/9) and the current issue encompasses several papers that provide a state-of-the-art assessment of several themes pertaining to its geological evolution. These papers highlight the large increase in the geological knowledge of this region attained in the last 20 years. The papers collected in this special issue originate from talks presented at the 3rd Borborema Symposium, held together with the 25th Symposium of Geology of the Northeast at the city of Gravatá in November 2013. The symposia were sponsored by the northeastern branch of the Brazilian Geological Society.

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Mike

    2015-07-01

    Magmatic degassing plays a key role in the dynamics of volcanic activity and also in contributing to the carbon, water and sulphur volatile cycles on Earth. Quantifying the fluxes of magmatic gas emitted from volcanoes is therefore of fundamental importance in Earth Science. This has been recognised since the beginning of modern volcanology, with initial measurements of volcanic SO2 flux being conducted with COrrelation SPECtrometer instruments from the late seventies. While COSPEC measurements continue today, they have been largely superseded by compact grating spectrometers, which were first introduced soon after the start of the 21st Century. Since 2006, a new approach to measuring fluxes has appeared, that of quantitative imaging of the SO2 slant column amount in a volcanic plume. Quantitative imaging of volcanic plumes has created new opportunities and challenges, and in April 2013 an ESF-funded MeMoVolC workshop was held, with the objectives of bringing together the main research groups, create a vibrant, interconnected, community, and examine the current state of the art of this new research frontier. This special issue of sixteen papers within the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research is the direct result of the discussions, intercomparisons and results reported in that workshop. The papers report on the volcanological objectives of the plume imaging community, the state of the art of the technology used, intercomparisons, validations, novel methods and results from field applications. Quantitative plume imaging of volcanic plumes is achieved by using both infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths, with each wavelength offering a different trade-off of strengths and weaknesses, and the papers in this issue reflect this wavelength flexibility. Gas compositions can also be imaged, and this approach offers much promise in the quantification of chemical processing within plumes. One of the key advantages of the plume imaging approach is that we can achieve gas flux measurements at 1-10 Hz frequencies, allowing direct comparisons with geophysical measurements, opening new, interdisciplinary opportunities to deepen our understanding of volcanological processes. Several challenges still can be improved upon, such as dealing with light scattering issues and full automation of data processing. However, it is clear that quantitative plume imaging will have a lasting and profound impact on how volcano observatories operate, our ability to forecast and manage volcanic eruptions, our constraints of global volcanic gas fluxes, and on our understanding of magma dynamics.

  8. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, T.

    2011-03-01

    The two articles in this issue of the European Physical Journal Special Topics cover topics in Econophysics and GPU computing in the last years. In the first article [1], the formation of market prices for financial assets is described which can be understood as superposition of individual actions of market participants, in which they provide cumulative supply and demand. This concept of macroscopic properties emerging from microscopic interactions among the various subcomponents of the overall system is also well-known in statistical physics. The distribution of price changes in financial markets is clearly non-Gaussian leading to distinct features of the price process, such as scaling behavior, non-trivial correlation functions and clustered volatility. This article focuses on the analysis of financial time series and their correlations. A method is used for quantifying pattern based correlations of a time series. With this methodology, evidence is found that typical behavioral patterns of financial market participants manifest over short time scales, i.e., that reactions to given price patterns are not entirely random, but that similar price patterns also cause similar reactions. Based on the investigation of the complex correlations in financial time series, the question arises, which properties change when switching from a positive trend to a negative trend. An empirical quantification by rescaling provides the result that new price extrema coincide with a significant increase in transaction volume and a significant decrease in the length of corresponding time intervals between transactions. These findings are independent of the time scale over 9 orders of magnitude, and they exhibit characteristics which one can also find in other complex systems in nature (and in physical systems in particular). These properties are independent of the markets analyzed. Trends that exist only for a few seconds show the same characteristics as trends on time scales of several months. Thus, it is possible to study financial bubbles and their collapses in more detail, because trend switching processes occur with higher frequency on small time scales. In addition, a Monte Carlo based simulation of financial markets is analyzed and extended in order to reproduce empirical features and to gain insight into their causes. These causes include both financial market microstructure and the risk aversion of market participants.

  9. Editorial.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    Many people who are relative newcomers to the field of healthcare research are often wary about seeking to have their findings published in a journal. Ask them why, and they are likely to tell you that the articles they read in peer-reviewed journals bear little relationship to their own, flawed studies.

  10. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäppling, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Physicists generally and our readers in particular are only too aware that the availability of scientific material on the Internet has both advantages and disadvantages. The ease with which a scientist can retrieve information from his/her office has greatly assisted the publication process since references, for example, can be searched for, checked for relevance or cross references with increasing ease. At the same time, however, it has become much easier to use materials without giving credit to the originators and this form of scientific misconduct is of growing concern to the publication process. With this in mind I would like to mention that the facility for retrieving information via the Internet is further developing so that major search engines like Google will be directly usable for retrieving, for example, a Physica Scripta article. Non-subscribers gaining access only to title and abstract whilst subscribers can access the full text in the same way as previously—through libraries and publishers. Physica Scripta has been in the vanguard of electronic development and has many thousands of accesses per day to its full on-line archive. These developments, together with some recent cases of scientific fraud, has led to an increased demand for guidelines for proper ethical conduct in the process of science publishing and, to this end, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, IUPAP, is working on a recommendation that I expect to be able to display here once adopted.

  11. Curiosity --El nuevo robot explorador de Marte

    NASA Video Gallery

    El nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte llamado Curiosity tiene grandes preguntas que responder una vez que llegue a Marte. Infórmese sobre la misión con el analista de trayectoria de la NASA Fern...

  12. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2008-01-01

    To begin, I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors a successful and happy 2008 and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2007. I took over the editorship of Nuclear Fusion in January, and the year has been one in which the community as a whole has been busier than ever with a variety of duties associated with the ITER project. It was with pride that we published the Progress in the ITER Physics Basis in the June issue of the journal (stacks.iop.org/NF/47/i=6). The task undertaken by the coordinators, authors and referees was a daunting one but one which led to an outstandingly successful issue. The response from readers has been phenomenal and there were in the region of 10 000 downloads of papers in the first month following publication. Looking to 2008 and beyond, the journal will endeavour to continue to support the work of the fusion community. Refereeing As we have done since January 2005, we would like to thank our top ten most loyal referees who have helped the journal with its double-referee peer-review procedure in the past year. At the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office we are fully aware of the load we put on the shoulders of our referees. At the end of 2004 the Editorial Board decided that a gesture of gratitude should be made to our most loyal referees. We offer them a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least three different manuscripts during the period from summer 2006 to the end of 2007. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the top ten in the last two years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! H.L. Berk (Texas University, USA) J.S. DeGrassie (GAT, USA) C. Deutsch (Paris University, France) N. Hayashi (JAEA

  13. EDITORIAL: 50th anniversary issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddoe, Alun H.

    2006-07-01

    In July 1956, 50 years ago, the first issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) was published. It was subtitled The Journal of the Hospital Physicists' Association and published in association with the Philosophical Magazine by Taylor and Francis. Subscriptions were £1 per part or £3 10s for an annual subscription. The Editor, Professor J E Roberts, prefaced the first issue with a cautious editorial noting: The appearance of a new journal is usually greeted with mixed feelings by scientific workers, a common response being that there are far too many journals already. Justification for a new publication is only possible if there is a clearly defined gap in the publishing facilities available to workers in a particular scientific field.... Professor Roberts ended by seeking support from the scientific community for the new venture. He certainly got it! From a tentative few hundred pages in four issues a year for the first few years, the journal is now issued twice monthly with nearly 8000 pages expected in volume 51. In this anniversary issue we have invited some 28 senior authors to submit papers on a range of subjects spanning the discipline. We decided that to be an author one had to be old, but age was not to be the only criterion! Indeed readers will recognize all names as major contributors to both the development of medical physics and the success of PMB. Authors were not asked to write formal topical reviews of the state-of-the-art of the sub-disciplines which make up medical physics, but rather to present short historical reviews, didactic in style, perhaps highlighting the role of PMB in the development of their fields. Nevertheless, other than a page limit (which many subsequently ignored!) no formal format was imposed on authors, so what follows is a range of contributions from the almost conversational, personal statement to the more formal and familiar scientific paper. Whatever the writing style we are confident that readers will gain some

  14. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included

  15. The Return of the Sun. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogl, Robert; Vogl, Sonia

    1994-01-01

    Editorializes briefly upon general progress in solar energy with a focus on electricity generated by a range of solar technologies. Suggests a major educational effort is essential to increase public's awareness of benefits and limitations of solar electricity. Briefly describes a multidisciplinary solar energy education kit for grade levels from…

  16. Popularizing Features in English Journal Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannoni, Davide Simone

    2008-01-01

    Journal editorials allow readers to select the most deserving contributions in the literature and adopt approaches or procedures endorsed by an authority in the field; they act as gatekeepers to the community of practice and at the same time allow editors to connect directly with their readership. Following a number of studies on the structure and…

  17. Constructive Criticisms of Methodological and Editorial Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Thomas R.; Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.

    2001-01-01

    Critiques some of the strong positions taken by Bruce Thompson on a variety of methodological issues. Provides alternative views, and discusses the role of editorial policy in research reporting. Focuses on: (1) stepwise methods; (2) context specificity; (3) weights and structure coefficients; (4) reliability as a characteristic of scores and not…

  18. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2010-07-01

    This editorial opens the second special section on physics competitions in European Journal of Physics. In the first section last year, we asked for feedback on the idea of such a section and on the content of the articles. We received no answer whatsoever, which can be interpreted in two ways: the section is not interesting enough to raise motivation for feedback, or the reader is satisfied. Having no indication which scenario is the correct one, we are optimistic and favour the second. The section at hand contains three articles. Again, as last year, the organizer of the annual Olympiad reports on tasks and outcomes of this competition. The Olympiad took place in Merida, Mexico, and was by far the largest event with 316 contestants from 68 countries. Again, the predominance of Asian/Chinese students was manifest, showing how serious the training is taken by both their authorities and students. Unfortunately, the winners of the last International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT), the team from Korea, did not accept the offer to report on their prize-winning contribution. We are thankful that two students from Austria, who achieved second place with their team, took over and reported on the task which they presented in the finals of the competition. It connects the fields of sport and physics and explains a special move in skateboarding. The third contribution introduces a different competition, 'International Conference of Young Scientists'. On one hand, as in the Olympiad, it addresses individuals, not teams. On the other, as in the IYPT, students have several months to prepare and also the quality of the presentation is an important element of the judgment. In fact, this competition comes closer to real scientific research compared to the other events. Finally and again, we hope that this section will serve several purposes: To show the competitions as a very important tool in the support of gifted students. To raise awareness amongst university teachers, and

  19. EDITORIAL: Cluster issue on microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chih C.; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Chang, Juu-En

    2008-10-01

    -phase discharges in liquid capillaries (P Bruggeman et al) and biomedical applications by antibacterial treatment (K D Weltmann et al). Industrial applications include on-chip microplasma reactors (A Agiral et al), miniaturized atmospheric pressure plasma jets (J Schäfer et al and A V Pipa et al) and microplasma stamps (N Lucas et al). All of these represent important findings and advances in microplasma research and applications. We would like to thank the Publisher of the journal, Sarah Quin, and the editorial staff for their support and management of the publication. It is sincerely hoped that the contents of this Cluster Issue will promote understanding of microplasmas and microdischarges, and inspire further research towards industrial applications.

  20. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The end of 2008 cannot pass without remarking that the economic news has repeatedly strengthened the case for nuclear fusion; not perhaps to solve the immediate crises but to offer long-term security of energy supply. Although temporary, the passage of the price of oil through 100 per barrel is a portent of things to come and should bolster our collective determination to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. It is with great pride, therefore, that I can highlight the contributions that the Nuclear Fusion journal has made to the research programme and the consolidation of its position as the lead journal in the field. Of course, the journal would be nothing without its authors and referees and I would like to pass on my sincere thanks to them all for their work in 2008 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2009. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most loyal referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least two different manuscripts during the period from November 2007 to November 2008 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! T. Hino (Hokkaido University, Japan) M. Sugihara (ITER Cadarache, France) M. Dreval (Saskatchewan University, Canada) M. Fenstermacher (General Atomics, USA) V.S. Marchenko (Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine) G.V. Pereverzev (Max-Planck-Institut fuer

  1. Editorial on Future Jet Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The jet engine is the prime flight controller in post-stall flight domains where conventional flight control fails, or when the engine prevents catastrophes in training, combat, loss of all airframe hydraulics (the engine retains its own hydraulics), loss of one engine, pilot errors, icing on the wings, landing gear and runway issues in takeoff and landing and in bad-whether recoveries. The scientific term for this revolutionary technology is "jet-steering", and in engineering practice - "thrust vectoring", or "TV". Jet-Steering in advanced fighter aircraft designs is integrated with stealth technology. The resulting classified Thrust-Vectoring-Stealth ("TVS") technology has generated a second jet-revolution by which all Air-&-Sea-Propulsion Science and R&D are now being reassessed. Classified F-22, X-47B/C and RQ-180 TVS-vehicles stand at the front of this revolution. But recent transfers of such sensitive technologies to South Korea and Japan [1-5], have raised various fundamental issues that are evaluated by this editorial-review. One, and perhaps a key conclusion presented here, means that both South Korea and Japan may have missed one of their air-&-sea defenses: To develop and field low-cost unmanned fleets of jet-drones, some for use with expensive, TVS-fighter aircraft in highly congested areas. In turn, the U.S., EU, Russia and China, are currently developing such fleets at various TVS levels and sizes. China, for instance, operates at least 15,000 drones ("UAVs") by 2014 in the civilian sector alone. All Chinese drones have been developed by at least 230 developers/manufacturers [1-16]. Mobile telecommunication of safe links between flyers and combat drones ("UCAVs") at increasingly deep penetrations into remote, congested areas, can gradually be purchased-developed-deployed and then operated by extant cader of tens of thousands "National Champion Flyers" who have already mastered the operation of mini-drones in free-to-all sport clubs under national

  2. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapetek, P.; Koenders, L.

    2011-09-01

    contributions and their valuable comments, and the whole Editorial Board of Measurement Science and Technology for their support.

  3. EDITORIAL: New developments for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welland, Mark

    2007-01-01

    In this first issue of Nanotechnology for 2007 the journal has taken another step forward in its extraordinary growth and development of the past 5 years. The reader will notice two important changes that have been introduced primarily in response to the exponential rise in submissions to the journal: the contents have been restructured into sections and publication will now be weekly. These latest changes, however, are not the only ones that have been made to the journal and its service to authors and readers. A modern journal has many tools at its disposal that journals of even 10 years ago simply did not. Electronic submission and refereeing, web-based publication, author services such as free electronic reprints and an email alerting service, to name but a few. Published by a learned society, Nanotechnology has constantly responded to the needs of authors and readers alike drawing upon the extensive experience and tools of IOP Publishing. Nanotechnology is of course an exploding field and it is therefore perhaps unsurprising to see a growth in the number of submissions to the journal. However, an inspection of the data surrounding submissions over the past 4 years reveals a disproportionate growth in the success of the journal itself. In 2002 there were 419 submitted papers of which 208 were accepted and published in 6 issues. In 2005 we received 75% more submissions over 2002, had a reduced acceptance rate of 44% and published 12 issues. 2006 showed, in just one year, a growth over 2005 of greater than 50% in the number of submissions. This growth of course does present challenges. The paper issues of the journal have been increasing in mass, hence a move to weekly publishing, and the sheer number of papers means that finding an article on a specific topic can be difficult for readers and authors, hence the move to sections. Sections will also help the Editorial Board in ensuring that the journal has a balanced portfolio of papers reflecting the broad

  4. EDITORIAL: Permanent revolution - or evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1998-03-01

    Honorary Editor It was that temporary Bolshevik Leon Trotsky who developed the principle of `permanent revolution', a principle that perhaps characterizes the recent history of education in (south) Britain more than does, say, principles traditionally associated with the Conservative or Labour parties. As this editorial is being written, changes are being made to primary school education, and the long-awaited details of the post-Dearing reorganizing of post-16 education are yet to hit the overful bookshelves and filing cabinets of school heads and examination board officials. But something unique has happened recently which might have surprised even Trotsky. The Secretary of State for Education has set up targets for primary school pupils' attainment and threatened (or promised) to resign if they are not met within the lifetime of our newly elected parliament. Of course, if Mr Blunkett is still in a position to resign at that stage he will have been the longest serving Secretary of State since time immemorial. But we should not carp: this is truly a revolutionary idea. Not the promise to resign - although this idea is not so fashionable now as it once was. The revolutionary idea is that a major change to an educational process is actually being made that carries with it a predicted and testable outcome. By contrast, when school physics was refreshed a generation ago by the introduction of Nuffield courses at both pre- and post-16 stages, no `targets' were set. I and many other physics teachers certainly preferred teaching these to teaching their predecessor syllabuses, and might even dare to assert that the pupils liked them too. But we still don't really know whether or not they learned more - or even better - physics. Very little happened as far as the outside world was concerned: the usual fraction of students gave up physics at the usual ages, and those who were examined didn't really get a better reward for their more up-to-date and more enjoyably learned

  5. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Marella de Angelis and her colleagues on precision gravimetry using atomic sensors and from Dr Peter Becker on determination of the Avogadro constant via enriched silicon-28. I recommend setting up a free e-mail alert so that you can read them as soon as they are published! As many of you are already aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen again to 1.297. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Of course the publication of high quality articles in the journal is dependent both on you the authors who trust us with the publication of your best work and on our referees and Editorial Board Members who we depend on to maintain the high standards you have grown to expect. I must also thank our referees for their rapid response when asked to review papers for Measurement Science and Technology. On average, authors receive a decision on their article in 45 days. Therefore I would like to end this message by saying thank you again to all those who have contributed to our success in the past year, and wish you all the best for a successful 2009!

  6. Editorial: the changing face of pathology.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S

    2001-02-01

    As the journal advances into its 33rd volume of publication and into the new millennium, significant developments in information technology have allowed restructuring of the format, review and publishing procedures of the journal, Pathology. This in turn enables rapid publication of timely and significant articles of interest to both diagnostic and research pathologists. There is an emphasis to develop the educational and professional development aspects of the journal while maintaining a rigorous peer review process to ensure publication of high quality research and review articles. A number of changes that will facilitate these processes are outlined. The journal is also available on-line on the web in PDF format and there are considerations made to further exploit this avenue of communication for the publication of supplementary material. The Editor and Editorial Board encourages Fellows of the Royal College of Pathologists, readers and authors to communicate their views on these and other future developments with the Editorial Office. PMID:11280608

  7. New Editors, Editorial Advisory Board for Eos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2010-11-01

    Eos has two new editors and, with this issue, a revitalized Editorial Advisory Board. Christina M. S. Cohen, of the California Institute of Technology, is the new editor for space sciences. She succeeds Manuel Grande, who had served since 2006. Carol A. Stein, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, is the new editor for solid Earth. She succeeds John W. Geissman, who has been solid Earth editor since 2001; he will continue through the end of 2010.

  8. Innovations in healthcare and medicine editorial.

    PubMed

    Graña, Manuel; Chyzhyk, Darya; Toro, Carlos; Rios, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    This special issue editorial begins with a brief discussion on the current trends of innovations in healthcare and medicine driven by the evolution of sensing devices as well as the information processing techniques, and the social media revolution. This discussion aims to set the stage for the actual papers accepted for the special issue which are extensions of the papers presented at the InMed 2014 conference held in San Sebastian, Spain, in July 2014. PMID:27000205

  9. Tutorials: an introduction from the Editorial Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Board, Editorial

    2013-06-01

    The Editorial Board of Laser Physics is very pleased to announce that we have started publishing our new tutorial paper series. The first tutorial, 'Theory of atoms: basics of quantum statistics' by V I Yukalov (2013 Laser Phys. 23 062001), presents the basic techniques of quantum statistics that are necessary for the correct description of cold atomic systems. This introductory article is intended to be followed by further tutorials on the same topic, where general techniques will be illustrated by practical applications to finite quantum systems with Bose-Einstein condensate and applications to degenerate Fermi systems with pairing. Special attention will be paid to the description of cold trapped atoms. We hope that this tutorial will be interesting and useful to all scholars, researchers, postdoctoral fellows and students involved in research dealing with the physics of cold trapped atoms and molecules, the theory of finite quantum systems and various related applications. The Editorial Board would like to encourage our readers to provide us with your feedback and requests for future tutorials in areas of your particular interest. Please forward all your comments, suggestions and requests to editor@lasphys.com. With our best wishes, The Editorial Board

  10. EDITORIAL: Crisis management - and creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-11-01

    yet more unknown persons. But we live in a democracy, and the new core will be put out for consultation. This will take place between November 1st and 20th, and so will be over, more or less, by the time you read this Editorial. Ordinary teachers of physics are unlikely to be asked for opinions. However, the Institute's informal rapid response team will do their best to represent the interests not only of its members but of the wider physics community. The question remains, however, as to why such rapid reactions are necessary. Surely now is the time to reflect upon the consequences of the rushed initiatives of the past eight years or so in education, and indeed undertake a professional, independent evaluation of them. But our rulers seem incapable of doing other than create crises, and then managing the crises they create by creating even more. There are of course alternatives to this, as could easily be discovered by looking north of Hadrian's Wall, where change is taking placed in a managed, courteous fashion, and where the numbers of students studying physics post-16 is gently increasing. The Scottish Office Education Department has recently taken part in an OECD study of curriculum innovation in 13 countries. The department reports some key findings in the Scottish initiative which are in fact common to all the successful initiatives reported [1, 2]. The message is clear: curriculum change will fail - either completely or at least in reaching the anticipated outcome fully - if certain requirements are not met. The most significant of these, reported in the OECD study, are: Teachers will respond to challenges to become involved in curriculum innovation and to acquire new skills and competences if they are given encouragement and reassurance that they will be well supported in their efforts. Innovation must be systemic, i.e. showing an awareness that many aspects of education are interrelated (so that a change in one affects others). Teacher involvement is vital

  11. EDITORIAL: The present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2006-09-01

    Neural engineering has grown substantially in the last few years and it is time to review the progress of the first journal in this field. Journal of Neural Engineering (JNE) is a quarterly publication that started in 2004. The journal is now in its third volume and eleven issues, consisting of 114 articles in total, have been published since its launch. The editorial processing times have been kept to a minimum, the receipt to first decision time is 41 days, on average, and the time from receipt to publication has been maintained below three months. It is also worth noting that it is free to publish in Journal of Neural Engineering—there are no author fees—and once published the articles are free online for the first month. The journal has been listed in Pubmed® since 2005 and has been accepted by ISI® in 2006. Who is reading Journal of Neural Engineering? The number of readers of JNE has increased significantly from 8050 full-text downloads in 2004 to 14 900 in 2005 and the first seven months of 2006 have already seen 12 800 downloads. The top users in 2005 were the Microsoft Corporation, Stanford University and the University of Michigan. The list of top ten users also includes non-US institutions: University of Toronto, University of Tokyo, Hong Kong Polytechnic, National Library of China and University College London, reflecting the international flavor of the journal. What are the hot topics in neural engineering? Based on the number of downloads and citations for 2004-2005, the top three topics are: (1) Brain-computer interfaces (2) Visual prostheses (3) Neural modelling Several other topics such as microelectrode arrays, neural signal processing, neural dynamics and neural circuit engineering are also in the top ten. Where are Journal of Neural Engineering articles cited? JNE articles have reached a wide audience and have been cited in of some of the best journals in physiology and neuroscience such as Nature Neuroscience, Journal of Neuroscience

  12. EDITORIAL: Crisis management - and creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-11-01

    yet more unknown persons. But we live in a democracy, and the new core will be put out for consultation. This will take place between November 1st and 20th, and so will be over, more or less, by the time you read this Editorial. Ordinary teachers of physics are unlikely to be asked for opinions. However, the Institute's informal rapid response team will do their best to represent the interests not only of its members but of the wider physics community. The question remains, however, as to why such rapid reactions are necessary. Surely now is the time to reflect upon the consequences of the rushed initiatives of the past eight years or so in education, and indeed undertake a professional, independent evaluation of them. But our rulers seem incapable of doing other than create crises, and then managing the crises they create by creating even more. There are of course alternatives to this, as could easily be discovered by looking north of Hadrian's Wall, where change is taking placed in a managed, courteous fashion, and where the numbers of students studying physics post-16 is gently increasing. The Scottish Office Education Department has recently taken part in an OECD study of curriculum innovation in 13 countries. The department reports some key findings in the Scottish initiative which are in fact common to all the successful initiatives reported [1, 2]. The message is clear: curriculum change will fail - either completely or at least in reaching the anticipated outcome fully - if certain requirements are not met. The most significant of these, reported in the OECD study, are: Teachers will respond to challenges to become involved in curriculum innovation and to acquire new skills and competences if they are given encouragement and reassurance that they will be well supported in their efforts. Innovation must be systemic, i.e. showing an awareness that many aspects of education are interrelated (so that a change in one affects others). Teacher involvement is vital

  13. EDITORIAL: The present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2006-09-01

    Neural engineering has grown substantially in the last few years and it is time to review the progress of the first journal in this field. Journal of Neural Engineering (JNE) is a quarterly publication that started in 2004. The journal is now in its third volume and eleven issues, consisting of 114 articles in total, have been published since its launch. The editorial processing times have been kept to a minimum, the receipt to first decision time is 41 days, on average, and the time from receipt to publication has been maintained below three months. It is also worth noting that it is free to publish in Journal of Neural Engineering—there are no author fees—and once published the articles are free online for the first month. The journal has been listed in Pubmed® since 2005 and has been accepted by ISI® in 2006. Who is reading Journal of Neural Engineering? The number of readers of JNE has increased significantly from 8050 full-text downloads in 2004 to 14 900 in 2005 and the first seven months of 2006 have already seen 12 800 downloads. The top users in 2005 were the Microsoft Corporation, Stanford University and the University of Michigan. The list of top ten users also includes non-US institutions: University of Toronto, University of Tokyo, Hong Kong Polytechnic, National Library of China and University College London, reflecting the international flavor of the journal. What are the hot topics in neural engineering? Based on the number of downloads and citations for 2004-2005, the top three topics are: (1) Brain-computer interfaces (2) Visual prostheses (3) Neural modelling Several other topics such as microelectrode arrays, neural signal processing, neural dynamics and neural circuit engineering are also in the top ten. Where are Journal of Neural Engineering articles cited? JNE articles have reached a wide audience and have been cited in of some of the best journals in physiology and neuroscience such as Nature Neuroscience, Journal of Neuroscience

  14. Under-Representation of Women on Dental Journal Editorial Boards

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Effie; Rosania, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Each journal’s editorial and advisory board plays a critical role in resolving gender bias in the peer-review and publication process. Thus, this study aimed to quantify women’s participation in editorial and advisory boards of major dental journals. Gender data on editorial and advisory boards were extracted from major dental journals, which were then categorized by journal specialty focus. The gender of the editor-in-chief and associate editor-in-chief was noted to assess the effect of journal leadership on women’s participation in journal boards. For comparison purposes, data were also obtained regarding the percentage of women faculty for each dental specialty. Results Overall, in the major 69 dental journals, 14.8% of editorial board members were women. An one-way ANOVA analysis revealed statistically significant gender differences between journal specialty categories (p = 0.003) with some dental specialties’ journals demonstrating a relatively high participation of women as editorial board members. There was a significant positive correlation for various dental specialties between women’s representation in editorial and advisory boards and women in similar dental academic specialties (p = 0.02, r2 = 0.55). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the presence of women in journal editorial leadership and the percentage of women serving as advisory board members (p = 0.03). Our results confirmed that the under-representation of women on dental journal editorial boards was significantly different between dental science specialties. When there were more women in journal editorial leadership positions, there was a higher participation of women as editorial and advisory board members. Journals should increase the numbers of women on editorial boards in order to secure diversity, improve publication quality and recognize women’s contribution to dental science. PMID:25635691

  15. Editorializing in L2: The Case of Philippine English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayag, Danilo T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the discourse structure of newspaper editorials in Philippine English in terms of their macrostructure and their lexico-grammatical features. Data were taken from three leading English-language newspapers in the Philippines. Toulmin's framework is used in analyzing the macrostructure of the editorials. The study posits that the…

  16. The Composition of the Editorial Boards of General Marketing Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Yue; Zhang, Jason Q.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the diversity issues in corporate governance, the diversity in top academic positions (e.g., editorial boards of academic journals in business) is rather underresearched. The editorial boards of academic marketing journals are important gatekeepers and trendsetters in the creation and dissemination of marketing knowledge. Membership on…

  17. Dogmatism, Intelligence, and the Understanding/Appreciation of Editorial Satire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Charles R.

    In a study of satire as persuasion, two experiments were conducted--one to determine whether dogmatism affected the understanding and appreciation of editorial satire, the second to determine the same about intelligence as measured by the Scholastic Aptitude Test. In the first experiment, 116 college students read three satirical editorials. After…

  18. Good editorial practice: editors as educators.

    PubMed

    Marusić, M; Marusić, A

    2001-04-01

    There may be valuable research going on in the developing and financially less-privileged countries, but it usually does not reach international visibility, in spite of a large number of scientific journals in these countries. Such journals are not only invisible but, by perpetuating a vicious circle of inadequacy, may be directly damaging to the local science and research culture. We call for an international action to help journal editors in less privileged countries. International associations of editors may be leaders of these activities by defining, promoting, and perhaps controlling good editorial practice, as a main criterion for international recognition of a journal. However, the editors of small journals have the power and moral obligation to become a stronghold of quality and advancement in their scientific community. Their educational "tools" are editorial integrity and author-friendly policy. Editors can teach the authors study design, statistical analysis, precision, punctuality, research integrity, style and format of writing, and other aspects of scientific communication. The editors of "big", mainstream scientific journals can act as global educators, teaching and providing guidance to editors of small journals. The editors from developed countries as leaders, and editors from less advantageous environments as teachers are the key figures in shaping research communication in less privileged scientific communities.

  19. Editorial "The Interdisciplinary Nature of SOIL"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, E. C.; Cerdá, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Pereg, L.; Quinton, J. N.; Six, J.; Van Oost, K.

    2014-09-01

    The holistic study of soils requires an interdisciplinary approach involving biologists, chemists, geologists, and physicists amongst others, something that has been true from the earliest days of the field. This approach has been strengthened and reinforced as current research continues to use experts trained in both soil science and related fields and by the wide array of issues impacting the world's biosphere that require an in-depth understanding of soils. Of fundamental importance amongst these issues are biodiversity, biofuels/energy security, climate change, ecosystem services, food security, human health, land degradation, and water security, each representing a critical challenge for research. In order to establish a benchmark for the type of research we seek to highlight in each issue of SOIL, here in this editorial, we outline the interdisciplinary nature of soil science research that we are seeking for in SOIL, with a focus on the myriad ways soil science can be used to expand investigation into a more holistic and therefore richer approach to soil research. In addition, we provide a selection of invited review papers in the first issue of SOIL that address the study of soils and the ways in which soil investigations are essential to other related fields. We hope that both this editorial and the first issue will serve as examples of the kinds of topics we would like to see published in SOIL and will stimulate excitement among our readers and authors to participate in this new venture.

  20. EDITORIAL: Five years of development and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-02-01

    The last issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics under my editorship has recently been published. During the last five years, since its change of title, the journal has significantly modified its targets. Starting from a balanced mix of quantum optics and semiclassical optics, new topics have been brought within the scope of the journal, such as atom optics, degenerate quantum gases, quantum computation and quantum information, representing the growing role played by lasers within our technologically oriented society. Furthermore, the journal has greatly expanded the number of Special Issues and has introduced PhD Tutorials. While many authors do not have time to invest in preparing review articles, we have found the review-style PhD Tutorials to be very popular. Looking back over the evolution of the journal, the most obvious criterion of its development, at least from the point of view of the prospective contributing author, has been the gratifying increase in the impact factor measured by ISI, reflecting the leading position of Journal of Optics B as a European journal devoted exclusively to optics research. It is most rewarding to report that the number of printed pages has increased by 77% since 1999 and by more than 20% in the last year, far above the target planned by the publisher. Furthermore, from an Editorial point of view, the high standing of the journal is demonstrated by the very high quality ratings given by referees to the top fraction of submitted manuscripts and by the large number of full text web downloads reported for those papers. Special Issues also attract high numbers of web downloads, demonstrating the special attention these issues attract within the scientific community. Such results have been achieved only through teamwork, and I wish to express my gratitude to all those who contributed to this result over the years: Françoise Chavel from the European Optical Society secretariat in Paris, John Haynes, Tom Spicer

  1. Guest Editorial: The Science and Politics of Nutrition Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gussow, Joan Dye

    1980-01-01

    This editorial addresses the problem of science and politics as viewed from the presidency of the Society for Nutrition Education. Of special concern is the conflict arising from differing segments of the nutrition profession. (CS)

  2. [The editorial process for Radiología].

    PubMed

    Corral de la Calle, M A

    2011-01-01

    Radiología is the official journal of the Spanish Society of Diagnostic Imaging. It aims to contribute to the education of Spanish-speaking radiologists and to disseminate radiological research and knowledge in Spanish. The journal has an Editorial Board organized into areas or sections, and material published in the journal is chosen and improved through peer review. This article discusses the model of the scientific journal Radiología and the characteristics of its Editorial Board, comparing Radiología with official general radiology journals of other scientific societies. Moreover, the details of the journal's editorial process are revealed, including the editorial circuit, the reviewers' work, and the technical aspects of the final edition process. Finally, the article lists qualitative and quantitative data about the material that Radiología receives and publishes.

  3. Editorial: A Note on Good Research Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-07-01

    Good scientific practice and research misconduct have been concerns of mine for more than a decade (Dooley and Kerch, 2000) and in my role as an editor of the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, I feel it is time to speak up and at the very least share my concerns and suggestions as they relate to the integrity of the research published in this journal. Rather than wait to write an editorial on good research practices in response to a major incident, I thought it might be best to be proactive and address some of the trends we see in submissions to this peer reviewed journal and to offer some suggestions for improvement improving the level of scholarship in some – but by no means all – of the papers submitted.

  4. Editorial Independence in the Electronic Age: New Threats, Old Owners?

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, John

    2008-01-01

    Editorial independence is crucial for the intellectual life of a scientific journal. A journal exists only as an idea created by authors and readers, with some editorial orchestration. Editorial independence can be compromised by pressure put on editors by their owners–whether commercial publishers or professional organizations. Both types of owners rely heavily on income from paid advertising in their print journals. Yet, the massive expansion of journal readership that has resulted due to the development of the Web has effected a marked shift in the readership of the journal, both geographically and intellectually, producing a new community of users who see only electronic versions of the journal. Commercial pressures on owners to satisfy the interests of the (mainly national and professional) print readership conflict with the editorial independence needed to respond to the vast Web constituency. This is a major source for compromise of editorial independence. Reduction of commercial pressures by transferring editorial costs to authors and by other cost-reducing models are discussed in this article. PMID:22013360

  5. EDITORIAL: The end of an era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. W.

    2003-12-01

    December 2003 marks the end of an era in the world of metrology with the retirement of Terry Quinn FRS, Director of the BIPM since 1988. Terry's contribution to the field of metrology has been long and distinguished, both as a physicist and administrator; a long list of awards and honours bears testimony to the fact. From the standpoint of physics, his contributions have been numerous and important: in the field of thermometry he pioneered the use of cryogenic radiometers, instruments that are now employed as standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) worldwide; his experiments to measure the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, the least well known of the fundamental constants, are characterized by elegant techniques and novel approaches; and as an example from the field of mass measurement, a definitive experiment at the BIPM ruled out the existence of the so-called 'fifth force'. As Director of the BIPM, Terry Quinn has been the driving force behind many of the initiatives undertaken in metrology in recent years. As any delegate to conferences or meetings at the BIPM will testify, his knowledge and grasp of complex issues are formidable, abilities that are particularly demonstrated at meetings of the Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures (CGPM), where many questions of a technical or diplomatic nature are often raised. The signing of the Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) at the CGPM in Paris in 1999 by the directors of the NMIs of the industrialized states of the world was largely due to his efforts. In paying tribute to Terry, it would be remiss not to mention the part played by his charming wife, Renée. She has graciously hosted innumerable functions at the Quinn home over these years and has always made visitors to the BIPM feel most welcome. On behalf of Metrologia, its readers and Editorial Board, I take this opportunity to wish the Quinns a long and happy retirement. At the same time our best wishes go to Terry's successor, Professor Andrew

  6. EDITORIAL: Computational materials science Computational materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Kresse, Georg

    2011-10-01

    Special issue in honour of Jürgen Hafner On 30 September 2010, Jürgen Hafner, one of the most prominent and influential members within the solid state community, retired. His remarkably broad scientific oeuvre has made him one of the founding fathers of modern computational materials science: more than 600 scientific publications, numerous contributions to books, and a highly cited monograph, which has become a standard reference in the theory of metals, witness not only the remarkable productivity of Jürgen Hafner but also his impact in theoretical solid state physics. In an effort to duly acknowledge Jürgen Hafner's lasting impact in this field, a Festsymposium was held on 27-29 September 2010 at the Universität Wien. The organizers of this symposium (and authors of this editorial) are proud to say that a large number of highly renowned scientists in theoretical condensed matter theory—co-workers, friends and students—accepted the invitation to this celebration of Hafner's jubilee. Some of these speakers also followed our invitation to submit their contribution to this Festschrift, published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, a journal which Jürgen Hafner served in 2000-2003 and 2003-2006 as a member of the Advisory Editorial Board and member of the Executive Board, respectively. In the subsequent article, Volker Heine, friend and co-worker of Jürgen Hafner over many decades, gives an account of Hafner's impact in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics. Computational materials science contents Theoretical study of structural, mechanical and spectroscopic properties of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) D Tunega, H Pašalić, M H Gerzabek and H Lischka Ethylene epoxidation catalyzed by chlorine-promoted silver oxide M O Ozbek, I Onal and R A Van Santen First-principles study of Cu2ZnSnS4 and the related band offsets for photovoltaic applicationsA Nagoya, R Asahi and G Kresse Renormalization group study of random quantum magnetsIstván A Kovács and

  7. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  8. The Mexican Meteorite Nuevo Mercurio (H5): Characteristics of Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-de La Cruz, K. E.; Ortega-Gutiérrez, F.

    2006-03-01

    A study of the chondrules of Nuevo Mercurio (H5). There are some primary characteristics that can be observed, such as the relationship between chondrule size and their texture, and presence of opaque minerals (troilite and/or Fe-Ni alloys).

  9. Time for gender mainstreaming in editorial policies.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Shirin; Eckert, Mirjam J; Kippax, Susan; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Sow, Papa Salif; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-03-08

    The HIV epidemic has been continuously growing among women, and in some parts of the world, HIV-infected women outnumber men. Women's greater vulnerability to HIV, both biologically and socially, influences their health risk and health outcome. This disparity between sexes has been established for other diseases, for example, autoimmune diseases, malignancies and cardiovascular diseases. Differences in drug effects and treatment outcomes have also been demonstrated. Despite proven sex and gender differences, women continue to be underrepresented in clinical trials, and the absence of gender analyses in published literature is striking. There is a growing advocacy for consideration of women in research, in particular in the HIV field, and gender mainstreaming of policies is increasingly called for. However, these efforts have not translated into improved reporting of sex-disaggregated data and provision of gender analysis in published literature; science editors, as well as publishers, lag behind in this effort.Instructions for authors issued by journals contain many guidelines for good standards of reporting, and a policy on sex-disaggregated data and gender analysis should not be amiss here. It is time for editors and publishers to demonstrate leadership in changing the paradigm in the world of scientific publication. We encourage authors, peer reviewers and fellow editors to lend their support by taking necessary measures to substantially improve reporting of gender analysis. Editors' associations could play an essential role in facilitating a transition to improved standard editorial policies.

  10. Time for gender mainstreaming in editorial policies.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Shirin; Eckert, Mirjam J; Kippax, Susan; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Sow, Papa Salif; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    The HIV epidemic has been continuously growing among women, and in some parts of the world, HIV-infected women outnumber men. Women's greater vulnerability to HIV, both biologically and socially, influences their health risk and health outcome. This disparity between sexes has been established for other diseases, for example, autoimmune diseases, malignancies and cardiovascular diseases. Differences in drug effects and treatment outcomes have also been demonstrated. Despite proven sex and gender differences, women continue to be underrepresented in clinical trials, and the absence of gender analyses in published literature is striking. There is a growing advocacy for consideration of women in research, in particular in the HIV field, and gender mainstreaming of policies is increasingly called for. However, these efforts have not translated into improved reporting of sex-disaggregated data and provision of gender analysis in published literature; science editors, as well as publishers, lag behind in this effort.Instructions for authors issued by journals contain many guidelines for good standards of reporting, and a policy on sex-disaggregated data and gender analysis should not be amiss here. It is time for editors and publishers to demonstrate leadership in changing the paradigm in the world of scientific publication. We encourage authors, peer reviewers and fellow editors to lend their support by taking necessary measures to substantially improve reporting of gender analysis. Editors' associations could play an essential role in facilitating a transition to improved standard editorial policies. PMID:21385405

  11. Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

    2011-02-01

    This editorial introduces readers and contributors to a new online journal. Through the publication of articles ranging from peer-reviewed research papers and short communications, to editorials and interviews on greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this journal will disseminate research results and information that address the global crisis of anthropogenic climate change. The scope of the journal includes the full spectrum of research areas from capture and separation of greenhouse gases from flue gases and ambient air, to beneficial utilization, and to sequestration in deep geologic formations and terrestrial (plant and soil) systems, as well as policy and technoeconomic analyses of these approaches.

  12. Nuevos sistemas de frecuencia intermedia para el IAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalde, J. C.; Perilli, D.; Larrarte, J. J.

    Se presenta el diagrama en bloques de los nuevos sistemas de Frecuencia Intermedia para los dos radiómetros instalados en el IAR. Entre las características más importantes del sistema podemos mencionar la posibilidad de conectar cualquiera de las dos antenas a los ``backend" disponibles: analizador espectral de alta resolución (META II) de 0,05 Hz, autocorrelador de 1008 canales y contínuo. Se incorporan al sistema nuevos sintetizadores de frecuencia implementados con PLL y la moderna técnica de síntesis digital directa. Por último, el conjunto del sistema es susceptible de ser configurado por las computadoras de adquisición de datos, supervisadas por otra, que entrega el estado de funcionamiento actual y evita la selección de configuraciones incorrectas por parte del usuario.

  13. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens’ access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit “crowd-sourced” information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world’s most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit’s survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active. PMID:26331611

  14. Some Editorial Games for the Magazine Editing or Writing Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Hugh; Scott, Byron T.

    Two exercises that can be used with journalism students to help them clarify and think through the editorial process are the repertory grid and the coorientation model. A technique developed in England by the followers of psychologist George Kelly, the repertory grid asks students to rank ten or twelve authors on criteria such as social…

  15. Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems - Editorial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The special issue of Ecological complexity journal on Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems contains representative examples of the status and evolution of data-driven research into fractals and scaling in complex natural systems. The editorial discusses contributions to understanding rela...

  16. The Description and Indexing of Editorial Cartoons: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landbeck, Christopher Ryan

    2013-01-01

    While access to images in general has improved in the last 20 years, due to both advances in electronic storage and dissemination and to improvements in the intellectual provisions of them, access to editorial cartoons lags behind access to other types of images. While there have been piecemeal or ad hoc efforts to organize large cartoon…

  17. Editorial Involvement in Regional/Split Run Editions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuss, Carol

    This document is a preliminary study of the listings of a wide variety of regional/split-run editorial practices of major American periodicals. Publications chosen for the study were selected from the tenth edition of "Magazine Regional and Split-Run Advertising," published by the Magazine Advertising Bureau of the Magazine Publishers Association.…

  18. A Contrastive Analysis of the American and Persian Newspaper Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homayounzadeh, Maryam; Mehrpour, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Based on the principles of critical discourse analysis this contrastive study sought to investigate the effect of culture on the journalistic style and the strategies used to report news in the American and Persian newspaper editorials. To this end, articles were selected from the New York Times, the Washington Post, Kayhan and Ettelaat,…

  19. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Joshua L; Aronow, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens' access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit "crowd-sourced" information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world's most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit's survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active.

  20. Post-assassination Newspaper Editorial Eulogies: Analysis and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldzwig, Steven R.; Sullivan, Patricia A.

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes postassassination newspaper editorials eulogizing John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy. Argues that they fulfill four rhetorical functions: providing a public space for symbolic catharsis, celebrating individual virtues and mythic constructions of those virtues, attempting to reknit communal bonds, and calling…

  1. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  2. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  3. Editorial: Letter from the Board of Directors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandqvist, Aage

    2004-10-01

    New policy concerning expanded European and non-European A&A memberships: It is now thirty-five years since the scientific journal Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) was founded by the merging of six national journals from four European nations, namely France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden; Belgium and the other Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland and Norway, also participated. They were subsequently joined by five other western European nations, namely Austria, Greece, Italy, Spain and Switzerland (Norway later withdrew). A&A has no international legal status as such but is represented by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which also manages its financial transactions. In the early nineteen-nineties, A&A with great foresight took an important step - which the European Union would follow more than a decade later - by incorporating eastern European countries into its sponsoring membership: the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and the Slovak Republic; Estonia became a full member in 1998. A&A was now truly ``A European Journal", as then stated on the front cover. In the meantime, A&A grew in importance as a vehicle for world-wide dissemination of astronomical research and an ever-increasing number of high-quality papers began streaming into the A&A Editorial offices from non-European countries, as well as from other European non-member countries. It became obvious to us that A&A no longer was merely a European Journal and in 2001 we removed the ``A European Journal'' from the front cover. Eventually, some of these non-European countries began approaching us with queries about potential membership in A&A and in 2002 we admitted the first such country, Argentina, with an observer status. Meanwhile, the Board intensified its study of the financial and administrative consequences of a wider expansion including the admission of member countries beyond Europe - a special subcommittee was appointed. The Board of Directors, at its meeting in Tartu, Estonia on 8 May

  4. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the 2008 volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puers, R.

    2008-01-01

    It is my pleasure to address these few lines to you all on the occasion of the start of the 2008 volume of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, the journal's eighteenth year, and my eleventh year of service as Editor-in-Chief. As in previous years, I would like to take the opportunity to reflect on the achievements of the past year. The number of submissions to the journal continues to grow, to almost 800 in 2007. Importantly, the journal's ISI® impact factor remains at a solid 2.321. This is an achievement we can all be proud of. In 2007, an incredible 350 000 papers were downloaded, which clearly reflects the visibility and appreciation of our research work. These excellent results are entirely due to the fact that more of you are choosing to submit your high-quality work to the journal, and because more of you are also choosing to cite recent papers published within the journal. I would like to take this opportunity to thank each one of you: readers, authors and referees alike. To cope with the steadily increasing number of incoming papers, the review process had to be expanded. In 2007, more than 700 experts selected from 35 countries agreed to our requests to referee. In the name of the entire team, I would like to express my thanks to all our referees for their careful and well constructed reports, which are of paramount importance in maintaining the quality standards of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. The average time to produce an individual report is a mere 19 days, contributing towards a very favourable overall processing time which is an attractive feature of the journal. Of course all this would not be possible without the constant hard work of the publishing, production and marketing staff in Bristol. In the name of the Editorial Board, contributing authors and readers, I wish to thank them for their support. Finally, I believe we have established a clear and distinct profile in the broad spectrum of journals in our field

  5. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the New Year!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampshire, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    of all journals specialising in superconductivity. Further improvements, implemented from this January issue onwards, include: The introduction of article numbering which will speed up the publication process. Papers in different issues can be published online as soon as they are ready, without having to wait for a whole issue or section to be allocated page numbers. This will improve submission to publication times. Bringing the journal into line with other IOP journals so that reports from two referees are required for each paper prior to an acceptance/rejection decision. Refreshing the design of SuST's cover, modernising the typography and creating a consistent look and feel across the range of journals. Naturally we have also been asking how SuST and IOP Publishing can help the superconductivity community meet the challenges of the future and maintain the broad international readership that supports SuST. Clearly a specialist journal like SuST has a very different role in our community from general science journals such as Science and Nature. However the superconductivity community would benefit if publication in SuST brought with it the prestige of a yet higher impact factor, comparable to the very best physics, chemistry and engineering journals. In this context, I have identified the following aims for the Editorial Board: To increase the impact factor of SuST; To broaden the scope and size of the journal by increasing its profile and publishing the best papers in superconductivity— both in basic science and in technology; To improve the refereeing process by eliminating the tail of low impact papers submitted to SuST and reducing the time from submission to online availability; To make SuST the natural place to publish invited papers from the best of the community's pure and applied conferences and workshops; To improve the effectiveness of the Editorial Board; To improve the services that IOP Publishing provides for the superconductivity community. I am

  6. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  7. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  8. EDITORIAL: George W Series Memorial Essays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    tuneable lasers, generally with the emphasis on understanding the underlying physics rather than accumulating data. He had a highly original mind, which showed both in his choice of research topics and in his method of approach. He did not follow fashion; his instinct for an interesting problem was at odds with the modem policy of direct funding and the identification of "growth areas". His applications for research grants were often unsuccessful, despite his high international standing and integrity. He was never interested in building up a large research team, and had comparatively few research students, but his enthusiasm and commitment to the quality of his science attracted a succession of overseas visitors to his laboratory. Following my own year at the Clarendon, and some subsequent visits both to Oxford and to Reading, there was a continuing strong association between the Clarendon and Otago Physics that continues until today. George Series was the William Evans Visiting Professor to Otago University in 1972. He never lost his interest in the fundamentals of physics inspired by his first researches into the structure of the hydrogen atom; he wrote on the Rydberg constant, the physics of spontaneous emission, and on the fine-structure constant α = e2/hc. He donated a garden seat to St Edmund Hall (Oxford), of which he was a Fellow. On it he placed a plaque* in recognition of the ubiquitous nature of this constant; it almost had magical significance for him. He served physics in many ways outside research. He was for a number of years the Editor of the European Journal of Physics and was also Editor of the Journal of Physics B: Atomic and Molecular Physics, He was also on the Editorial Board of a number of journals. He was elected to Fellowship of a number of physics societies. The Editorial Board of these Memorial Essays dedicate them to George's memory, and to his wife Annette and his family.

  9. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    meeting were asked if they were interested in rewriting and extending their contributions as a submission to Nuclear Fusion. Technology papers were accepted because of the very nature of the subject. The submissions underwent the regular double-referee peer-review process, and the accepted articles are grouped together in this special issue with a sequence given by the following subjects: Beam line and large source development Small sources and source modelling Source diagnostics development ITER N-NBI design and development I hope that this special issue will document in sufficient detail the present state of the art of negative ion based neutral beam injection systems. Message from the Editor, F.C. Schüller Now that the construction of ITER has become a reality the consequence is that fusion research will gradually shift in its focus from plasma physics alone to more technological issues.The Editorial Board of Nuclear Fusion has recognized this trend and therefore wants to give more prominence in the journal to heating methods and related techniques. Therefore we are happy to bring negative ion based neutral beam injection to the foreground with this special issue. We have found a dedicated Guest Editor in the person of Ron Hemsworth.

  10. EDITORIAL: Tropical deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Holly K.; Herold, Martin

    2007-10-01

    's tropical forests that can provide key consistency and prioritization for national-level efforts. Gibbs et al calculate a range of national-level forest carbon stock estimates that can be used immediately, and also review ground-based and remote sensing approaches to estimate national-level tropical carbon stocks with increased accuracy. These papers help illustrate that methodologies and tools are indeed available to estimate emissions from deforestation. Clearly, important technical challenges remain (e.g. quantifying degradation, assessing uncertainty, verification procedures, capacity building, and Landsat data continuity) but we now have a sufficient technical base to support REDD early actions and readiness mechanisms for building national monitoring systems. Thus, we enter the COP 13 in Bali, Indonesia with great hope for a more inclusive climate policy encompassing all countries and emissions sources from both land-use and energy sectors. Our understanding of tropical deforestation and carbon emissions is improving and with that, opportunities to conserve tropical forests and the host of ecosystem services they provide while also increasing revenue streams in developing countries through economic incentives to avoid deforestation and degradation. References Gullison R E et al 2007 Tropical forests and climate policy Science 316 985 6 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007 Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis: Summary for Policymakers http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar4/wg1/ar4-wg1-spm.pdf Santilli M et al 2005 Tropical deforestation and the Kyoto Protocol: an editorial essay Clim. Change 71 267 76 Focus on Tropical Deforestation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Pan-tropical monitoring of deforestation F Achard, R DeFries, H Eva, M Hansen, P Mayaux and H-J Stibig Monitoring and estimating tropical forest carbon

  11. Opening editorial 2016: Changes in scope and structure.

    PubMed

    Kazak, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    This issue of American Psychologist (AP) marks historic changes in the editorial structure and leadership of AP and related shifts in the refinement of the mission of AP and the types of papers AP will publish. As the new editor-in-chief (EIC) of AP, I am enthusiastic about psychology and the many ways that psychological knowledge can improve our lives and the societies in which we live. AP will continue to reflect the whole of psychology and welcomes the input and involvement of individuals from all areas of the field. In this editorial, I offer readers a brief overview of current journal activities and procedures for the flagship journal of the American Psychological Association (APA). (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26766761

  12. Gender Representation on Journal Editorial Boards in the Mathematical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; Sen, Shilad

    2016-01-01

    We study gender representation on the editorial boards of 435 journals in the mathematical sciences. Women are known to comprise approximately 15% of tenure-stream faculty positions in doctoral-granting mathematical sciences departments in the United States. Compared to this group, we find that 8.9% of the 13067 editorships in our study are held by women. We describe group variations within the editorships by identifying specific journals, subfields, publishers, and countries that significantly exceed or fall short of this average. To enable our study, we develop a semi-automated method for inferring gender that has an estimated accuracy of 97.5%. Our findings provide the first measure of gender distribution on editorial boards in the mathematical sciences, offer insights that suggest future studies in the mathematical sciences, and introduce new methods that enable large-scale studies of gender distribution in other fields.

  13. Gender Representation on Journal Editorial Boards in the Mathematical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; Sen, Shilad

    2016-01-01

    We study gender representation on the editorial boards of 435 journals in the mathematical sciences. Women are known to comprise approximately 15% of tenure-stream faculty positions in doctoral-granting mathematical sciences departments in the United States. Compared to this group, we find that 8.9% of the 13067 editorships in our study are held by women. We describe group variations within the editorships by identifying specific journals, subfields, publishers, and countries that significantly exceed or fall short of this average. To enable our study, we develop a semi-automated method for inferring gender that has an estimated accuracy of 97.5%. Our findings provide the first measure of gender distribution on editorial boards in the mathematical sciences, offer insights that suggest future studies in the mathematical sciences, and introduce new methods that enable large-scale studies of gender distribution in other fields. PMID:27536970

  14. Gender Representation on Journal Editorial Boards in the Mathematical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We study gender representation on the editorial boards of 435 journals in the mathematical sciences. Women are known to comprise approximately 15% of tenure-stream faculty positions in doctoral-granting mathematical sciences departments in the United States. Compared to this group, we find that 8.9% of the 13067 editorships in our study are held by women. We describe group variations within the editorships by identifying specific journals, subfields, publishers, and countries that significantly exceed or fall short of this average. To enable our study, we develop a semi-automated method for inferring gender that has an estimated accuracy of 97.5%. Our findings provide the first measure of gender distribution on editorial boards in the mathematical sciences, offer insights that suggest future studies in the mathematical sciences, and introduce new methods that enable large-scale studies of gender distribution in other fields. PMID:27536970

  15. Women on professional society and journal editorial boards.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Melinda J.; Sonnad, Seema S.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Membership on a professional medical society or journal editorial board is a marker of influence and prestige for those in academic medicine. This study presents the first comprehensive quantification of women on these boards and the implications for women in medicine. METHODS: The numbers of women and men on professional society and journal editorial boards across 28 specialties (March 2004) were counted. The number of women holding multiple roles on these boards and the number of women holding top leadership positions on these boards were counted, and these proportions were compared. RESULTS: Three-thousand-four-hundred-seventy-three individuals on 39 professional medical society boards and 54 journal editorial boards were included. Eighty-three percent (2,884) of board members were male. Men occupied > 80% of top leadership positions on these boards. Thirty-five of the 589 women in the study held multiple roles. Anesthesiology (p < 0.0025), pediatrics (p < 0.0001), dermatology (p = 0.0001), obstetrics/ gynecology (p = 0.05), medical genetics (p < 0.015) and rehabilitation medicine (p < 0.03) had significantly lower proportions of women on boards in comparison to the total women in the specialty. Internal medicine, plastic surgery, cardiology and general surgery had nearly equivalent proportions; in otolaryngology and family medicine, female board members slightly exceeded the proportion of women in the field. CONCLUSION: Women's representation on society and editorial boards does not always reflect their presence in medical specialties, and it is critically lacking in certain specialties. Efforts should be made to attain parity of women leaders on these boards. Further efforts should be made to eliminate barriers to women's leadership in medicine. PMID:17668642

  16. Creative Speech Technology: editorial introduction to this special issue.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Alistair D N; Newell, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    CreST is the Creative Speech Technology Network, a research network which brought together people from a wide variety of backgrounds spanning arts technology and beyond. The papers in this volume represent some of the outcomes of that collaboration. This editorial introduces the background of the network and each of the papers. In conclusion we demonstrate that this work helped to realize many of the objectives of the network.

  17. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from ICO XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consortini, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.

    2003-09-01

    contains a selection (less than one tenth of those presented at the Congress) of papers based on presentations given at ICO XIX or, in one or two cases, related works by congress participants. Despite the rigorous selection criteria necessary to maintain an optimum size of this special issue (for which we express our regret to the authors of those papers which did not rank in the top group), we believe that this issue is well representative of the current work in optics, both on a topical and a geographical basis. We take this occasion to thank the sponsors of the Congress, who contributed to make ICO XIX a successful event, the editorial office of Institute of Physics Publishing, and in particular Claire Bedrock whose hard work made this issue feasible, all the authors for their valuable contributions and, last but not least, the members of the Advisory and Program Committees as well as all the reviewers for their dedicated work.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on Physical Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, David

    1994-01-01

    the base and derived units of physics still being open to debate. Giving weight and coherence to this issue is the collective experience of the authors. Individually, they have made important contributions to measurement, have taken part in the operations of national standards laboratories and in the work in which such laboratories collaborate. They are members of the committees which negotiate terms for the use and recognition, at national, regional and international level, of the units which industrial laboratories maintain. Just under half of them are members of the Comité Consultatif des Unites (CCU), the committee to which the Comité International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM), itself turns when it looks for advice on issues affecting the use of units. This issue deals with topics which are central to the decisions of the CIPM. This is an appropriate place, therefore, to mention the close interest which two members of the Comité International have taken in Metrologia and the unfailing support they have given it: Professor Dieter Kind and Professor Jan de Boer. As President of the Comité International, Professor Kind greatly influenced the decision that the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures should purchase Metrologia and did much to create the spirit of independent commentary in which the journal operates. Now that his retirement from his principal post as President of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, approaches, I take this opportunity, on behalf of Metrologia, its readers and its Editorial Board, to wish him a happy retirement and hope that in the future he will still find time to take an interest in the affairs of the journal. Professor de Boer's contribution to measurement is long and distinguished. His membership of the CIPM began in 1954 and he was its Secretary from 1962 to 1989. He thus took part in the debate which resulted in the decision to launch Metrologia in 1965. As the sole person to hold office as President of the

  19. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND... media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by...

  20. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND... media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by...

  1. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND... media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by...

  2. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the...

  3. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND... media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by...

  4. 11 CFR 100.132 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.132 Section 100.132 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND... media. Any cost incurred in covering or carrying a news story, commentary, or editorial by...

  5. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the...

  6. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the...

  7. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the...

  8. 11 CFR 100.73 - News story, commentary, or editorial by the media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News story, commentary, or editorial by the media. 100.73 Section 100.73 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.73 News story, commentary, or editorial by the...

  9. A Thematic Analysis of Edwin L. Godkin's Editorials in the "Nation," 1865-1899.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Richard W.

    This thematic analysis of Edward L. Godkin's editorials appearing in the "Nation" seeks to reveal the major themes on which he wrote and then, by quantitative analysis, to provide some order to the themes and to study the interaction of the themes. Five hundred and twelve editorials, written over a period of 35 years and representing one-third of…

  10. An Analysis of Eye Movement and Cognitive Load about the Editorial Design in Elementary Science Textbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seong-un; Lim, Sung-man; Kim, Eun-ae; Yang, Il-ho

    2016-01-01

    This study is for the implication of editorial design in science textbooks which are designed for student-centered instruction, when the elements of the editorial design are different, we focus on how the students' eye movement and cognitive load change. For this, we produced a new book for 5th grade students in elementary school that is modified…

  11. Information Sources as a Persuasive Strategy in Editorials: Le Monde and the New York Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    The media, which includes editorials, have been shown to play an important role in the definition of priorities in public agenda. In the domain of international matters, the public relies heavily on the media, and editorials play an even greater role. This article examines how explicit mentions of external sources of information function in the…

  12. Hierarchical Collaboration in the Revision of Text: Constructing Perceptions of Editorial Conferences in the News Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Janet

    This study of editorial conferences in a university news laboratory examined the connections between dialogues about revision and the interpretations of dialogues by reporters and the editor in this journalism culture. The editorial conferences of two reporters with varying experience in publication and employment settings were analyzed, and the…

  13. Arguing in L2: Discourse Structure and Textual Metadiscourse in Philippine Newspaper Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrayo, Veronico N.; Duque, Marie Claire T.

    2011-01-01

    This study described the discourse structure and textual metadiscourse in newspaper editorials in the Philippines where English is used as a second language or L2. Specifically, it sought answers to the following questions: (1) What discourse features characterize the structure of the following parts of Philippine newspaper editorials--orientation…

  14. Newspaper Editorial Response to California's Post-Proposition 227 Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindo, Rene

    2004-01-01

    The press media has taken an active role in the debates over bilingual education through editorial analysis and policy recommendations. The editorials' policy recommendations are influential because they are directed at the political elite as well as to the general public, both of which have a limited understanding of bilingual education.…

  15. Philosophic Thinking in Social Work: An Analysis of 30 Years of "Social Work" Editorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Brawley, Emilia E.; Zorita, Paz M-B

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at 30 years of editorial perspectives and trends in social work as a profession through the analysis of editorials from the journal "Social Work." It identifies the wax and wane of philosophic (intellectual or scholarly) questions in social work thinking in the past three decades. It defines what philosophic thinking…

  16. Dogmatism: A Factor in the Understanding and Appreciation of Editorial Satire?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Charles R.

    In order to test the hypothesis that dogmatism is related to the understanding and appreciation of editorial satires, 116 University of Georgia speech students read and reacted to three editorial satires (two by Art Hoppe and one by Art Buchwald) arranged in booklets in three different orders. Students were asked to choose from a list of five…

  17. A blood pressure survey in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Caamano, A G; Cooper, R; Cedres, L; Barriero, L A; Dominquez, R C

    1982-01-01

    A blood pressure survey was carried out in 1976 in the city of Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, which involved 6,351 persons 30-69 years old. The study sample was recruited so as to represent an approximation of the overall distribution of occupational classes in the urban population. Members of the population sample were relatively young and of low educational attainment. To the extent that comparisons among surveys are feasible, mean blood pressure levels and hypertension rates were roughly comparable to those found in the white population of the United States. Although no firm conclusions can be drawn from the survey, a trend toward somewhat higher hypertension rates within the professional and managerial class was observed in some age groups in Laredo. PMID:7063591

  18. [North-South relations in scientific publications: editorial racism?].

    PubMed

    Victora, Cesar G; Moreira, Carmen B

    2006-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to comment on the possible existence of editorial prejudice among the editors of scientific journals from Northern countries against Southern authors. We highlight that a study using bibliometric methods documented an important imbalance in terms of the international scientific production of health researchers from high-income countries (the "North") and those from low and middle-income countries (the "South"). In a survey of Brazilian researchers, three in every four blamed this imbalance, at least in part, on prejudice among international editors. This is supported by the fact that a very small percentage of editorial board members of international journals come from the South. Although prejudice can explain part of the imbalance, there are also specific measures that may increase the likelihood of a paper from the South being accepted in international journals. These include the need to invest in the quality of the written text, and to show empathy with editors and readers, emphasizing the contribution of the manuscript to the international literature. Finally, we discuss whether research carried out in the South should be published in national or international journals, and suggest that there are at least six dimensions to this choice. These include language and target audience; type of contribution to knowledge; generalizability; citation index; speed of publication; and open access. The rapid growth in the number of Brazilian contributions to the international health literature shows that editorial prejudice, although often present, can be effectively offset by research with solid methodology and good-quality presentation.

  19. Conceptual Commitments of AGI Systems: Editorial, Commentaries, and Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-06-01

    Editorial: Conceptual Commitments of AGI Systems Haris Dindo / James Marshall / Giovanni Pezzulo 23 General Problems of Unified Theories of Cognition, and Another Conceptual Commitment of LIDA Benjamin Angerer / Stefan Schneider 26 LIDA, Committed to Consciousness Antonio Chella 28 The Radical Interactionism Conceptual Commitment Olivier L. Georgeon / David W. Aha 31 Commitments of the Soar Cognitive Architecture John E. Laird 36 Conceptual Commitments of AGI Projects Pei Wang 39 Will (dis)Embodied LIDA Agents be Socially Interactive? Travis J. Wiltshire / Emilio J. C. Lobato / Florian G. Jentsch / Stephen M. Fiore 42 Author's Response to Commentaries Steve Strain / Stan Franklin 48

  20. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    I am honoured to take on the leadership of Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST) as the successor to Professor Mark J Kushner, with whom I have had the pleasure to work on the journal for many years. Under Mark's insightful and energetic leadership over the last six years, PSST has cemented its position as the journal of choice within its subject area and is now one of the most successful journals in the field. In this first issue of 2014, I would like to reflect on some of the events and achievements of 2013. At the start of the year the PSST Editorial Board, recognizing the vital importance of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) data to low-temperature plasma physics, agreed that PSST would accept papers reporting such new data, generated through both experiment and theory. Jonathan Tennyson joined the Editorial Board to represent this area. In March Anne Bourdon joined the Associate Editor team and has since then played a key part in the journal's review process alongside our other Editors. During the autumn, PSST moved to a new editorial management system. In December Deborah O'Connell was awarded the 2013 Hershkowitz Early Career Award and Review and joins the Editorial Board as of 2014. I would also like to thank Miles Turner for his work in leading the drafting of a guide on the details necessary in the reporting of the results of computer simulations; the main conclusions of this report have been incorporated into the journal policy. Overall 2013 has been another successful year for PSST; paper submissions were up by 8% on the previous year and there was the highest ever number of downloads of PSST papers in one year. Another noteworthy feature of 2013 was the continuing improvement in publication times while maintaining our high standards for acceptance and providing expert feedback coupled with encouragement particularly to younger researchers and groups. Largely as a result of the hard work of our referees and Associate Editors, the average time

  1. Las características más fascinantes del nuevo Robot

    NASA Video Gallery

    impresionante es la palabra que describe perfectamente al nuevo robot Curiosity por su tamaño, sus instrumentos científicos y la manera en que la NASA planifica hacerlo aterrizar en Marte de forma ...

  2. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    On 1 January, 2004, I assumed the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics. I will start by saying that I will do my best to justify the confidence of the journal management and publishing staff in my abilities. I was fortunate to have been able to work, as an Editorial Board member, with my predecessor, the previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Allister Ferguson. Allister has provided a high degree of intellectual stewardship for the journal in the last five years. He has made the job appear a worthy challenge for me. I therefore take this opportunity to thank Allister on behalf of the Editorial Board and publishing staff of the journal. Several other factors contributed to my decision to accept this position. The first is the group of people who actually go about the business of publishing. The Senior Publisher, Nicola Gulley (and her predecessor Sophy Le Masurier); the Managing Editor, Jill Membrey; the Publishing Administrators, Nina Blakesley and Sarah Towell; the Production Editor, Katie Gerrard and their office staff form an amazing group and have managed to make the operation of the journal incredibly efficient. An index of this is the speed with which incoming manuscripts are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and its web publication, if accepted, is 130 days. This is three to five times shorter than for most other journals. A factor that contributes to this success is a responsive pool of referees that the publishing staff have as a valuable resource. Ultimately, the standard bearers of any journal are the referees. Therefore, a grateful `thank you' is due from all of us at J. Phys. D to all our referees, who diligently perform this honourable task. The Associate Editors of the journal, Professors Lawler, Margaritondo and O'Grady, also provide immense scientific leadership. They help in defining new directions for the journal and in the publishing process. Last, but not least, a remarkable asset of

  3. EDITORIAL AND PUBLISHER'S NOTE: BIPM to Publish Metrologia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D.

    1990-01-01

    Beginning in January of next year Metrologia will be published by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. This does not mean that a new journal is being created: externally the journal may have changed a little, but internally any changes will be of form rather than of substance. Metrologia was intended originally as a vehicle that would permit the metrological community to communicate progress in fundamental scientific measurements, to report original experiments and techniques in the area of secondary measurement, to review work in specialist fields and to disseminate the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures. The promotion of these activities remains the central objective of editorial policy. The separation from our friends in Springer-Verlag is one we view with some regret and not a little trepidation. On the days when things were not going well in the editorial office at the BIPM it was always a source of comfort to remember the willingness and professionalism with which our colleagues at Springer-Verlag supported the production and distribution of the journal. For some time, however, it has been felt at the BIPM that the Bureau should take direct responsibility for all aspects of Metrologia. This feeling led to discussions on the future of the journal and in June to the decision to separate. For those of us at the BIPM, the change represents an occasion to review the activities and priorities of the journal and so to revivify it. Our hope is to retain the best features of the existing Metrologia and to add to them others which will both expand the readership and bring to the journal a yet greater fraction of the finest articles on the topic of precise measurement. Publisher's Note The first issue of Metrologia was published in 1965. That issue, as have been all others since, was published by Springer-Verlag "under the Auspices of the International Committee for Weights and Measures". This phrase is the public expression of what

  4. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  5. Une strategie locale: La lecture des editoriaux. (A Local Strategy: Reading Editorials.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacco, Jean-Claude

    1983-01-01

    Potential uses of newspaper editorials for French instruction are presented, including interpretation of such elements as type style, layout, writing style, grammar, vocabulary and word usage, and punctuation as well as content and context. (MSE)

  6. Student Press Responds with Barrage of Stories Ranging from Tearjerkers to Editorials about the Gulf Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricchiardi, Sherry

    1991-01-01

    Describes how the student press across the United States responded to the Gulf war with a barrage of stories ranging from tearjerkers about alumni who died to editorials condemning anti-Arab sentiment. (SR)

  7. Editorial: Citation of the Serbian Astronomical Journal in the Period 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbutina, B.

    2010-06-01

    This editorial provides results of research on the Serbian Astronomical Journal citation. We give full information on citation for the last three years, and the impact factors calculated for the period 2003-2009.

  8. Potential conflicts of interest of editorial board members from five leading spine journals.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stein J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Dhert, Wouter; de Kleuver, Marinus; Oner, F Cumhur; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts of interest arising from ties between pharmaceutical industry and physicians are common and may bias research. The extent to which these ties exist among editorial board members of medical journals is not known. This study aims to determine the prevalence and financial magnitude of potential conflicts of interest among editorial board members of five leading spine journals. The editorial boards of: The Spine Journal; Spine; European Spine Journal; Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine; and Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques were extracted on January 2013 from the journals' websites. Disclosure statements were retrieved from the 2013 disclosure index of the North American Spine Society; the program of the 20th International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques; the program of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Scoliosis Research Society; the program of the AOSpine global spine congress; the presentations of the 2013 Annual Eurospine meeting; and the disclosure index of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Names of the editorial board members were compared with the individuals who completed a disclosure for one of these indexes. Disclosures were extracted when full names matched. Two hundred and ten (29%) of the 716 identified editorial board members reported a potential conflict of interest and 154 (22%) reported nothing to disclose. The remaining 352 (49%) editorial board members had no disclosure statement listed for one of the indexes. Eighty-nine (42%) of the 210 editorial board members with a potential conflict of interest reported a financial relationship of more than $10,000 during the prior year. This finding confirms that potential conflicts of interest exist in editorial boards which might influence the peer review process and can result in bias. Academia and medical journals in particular should be aware of this and strive to improve transparency of the review process. We emphasize recommendations that contribute to achieving this goal.

  9. Advanced voice function assessment: editorial introduction to this special issue.

    PubMed

    Barney, Anna; Kob, Malte

    2015-04-01

    ICT COST Action 2103 was an EU-funded collaborative network of speech processing engineers, laryngologists, and phoniatricians that started on 19 December 2006 and ended on 18 June 2011. The main objectives were to improve the clinical assessment of voice using new technologies; to encourage clinicians and technologists to work closely together to understand the needs and limitations of each other's fields and, in parallel, to acquire new data with a view to elaborating better voice production models. The papers in this special issue represent some of the outcomes of that partnership. This editorial introduces the background and context for COST Action 2103 and each of the papers. In conclusion we discuss the impact of the Action and what aspects of it may have a lasting effect on practice.

  10. Data base development and research and editorial support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Life Sciences Bibliographic Data Base was created in 1981 and subsequently expanded. A systematic, professional system was developed to collect, organize, and disseminate information about scientific publications resulting from research. The data base consists of bibliographic information and hard copies of all research papers published by Life Sciences-supported investigators. Technical improvements were instituted in the database. To minimize costs, take advantage of advances in personal computer technology, and achieve maximum flexibility and control, the data base was transferred from the JSC computer to personal computers at George Washington University (GWU). GWU also performed a range of related activities such as conducting in-depth searches on a variety of subjects, retrieving scientific literature, preparing presentations, summarizing research progress, answering correspondence requiring reference support, and providing writing and editorial support.

  11. Diabetes Dictating Policy: An Editorial Commemorating World Health Day 2016

    PubMed Central

    Takian, Amirhossein; Kazempour-Ardebili, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The 21st century is an era of great challenge for humankind; we are combating terrorism, climate change, poverty, human rights issues and last but not least non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The burden of the latter has become so large that it is being recognized by world leaders globally as an area that it is in need of much greater attention. In light of this concern, the World Health Organization (WHO) dedicated this year’s World Health Day (held on April 7, 2016) to raising international awareness on diabetes, the fastest growing NCD in the world. This editorial is an account of the macro politics in place for fighting diabetes, both internationally and nationally. PMID:27694647

  12. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A.; Smith, Geoffrey R.; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed. PMID:27408562

  13. Amphibians and Reptiles of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Espinal, Julio A; Smith, Geoffrey R; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We compiled a check list of the herpetofauna of Nuevo León. We documented 132 species (23 amphibians, 109 reptiles), representing 30 families (11 amphibians, 19 reptiles) and 73 genera (17 amphibians, 56 reptiles). Only two species are endemic to Nuevo León. Nuevo León contains a relatively high richness of lizards in the genus Sceloporus. Overlap in the herpetofauna of Nuevo León and states it borders is fairly extensive. Of 130 native species, 102 are considered species of Least Concern in the IUCN red list, four are listed as Vulnerable, five are listed as Near Threatened, and four are listed as Endangered. According to SEMARNAT, 78 species are not of conservation concern, 25 are subject to Special Protection, 27 are Threatened, and none are listed as in Danger of Extinction. Given current threats to the herpetofauna, additional efforts to understand the ecology and status of populations in Nuevo León are needed. PMID:27408562

  14. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-04-01

    Physica status solidi was founded in 1961 by a number of eminent solid state physicists as an attempt to overcome the iron curtain, which then separated East and West, at least in the field of science. Since that time our world has changed quite a bit, and so have the boundary conditions of science publishing. However, one thing has not changed: then as now, the general policy and development of a respectable scientific journal should be determined by a board of independent scientists, who volunteer to assume responsibility for the scientific content of the journal, to assure a fair and critical peer review process for all submitted manuscripts, and, in cases of conflict, to finally decide which papers will be published and which will not.As a matter of fact, an international Board of Editors which consists of scientists coming from different countries and continents, with a good reputation in their respective community, and without any conflict of interest with the Publisher of the journal is, in my opinion, these days more important than ever. As our daily scientific work becomes increasingly specialized, but at the same time also increasingly interdisciplinary, we are more and more forced to trust the quality and reliability of published scientific results in the literature, without really having a chance to come to an independent opinion on our own. This is one of the reasons why the many recent cases of plagiarism, scientific misconduct, or outright fraud have caused such a high level of public awareness. It is quite clear that without a serious peer review there would be an even larger number of such cases in the literature, and that without the responsible action taken by concerned Journal Editors, many of the revealed cases probably would have remained under the carpet.It is, therefore, a particular pleasure for me to introduce to you on the following pages the current Editorial Board of physica status solidi (b) in the form of a brief curriculum vitae, a

  15. Editorial: phys. stat. sol. (a) 201/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-04-01

    Physica status solidi was founded in 1961 by a number of eminent solid state physicists as an attempt to overcome the iron curtain, which then separated East and West, at least in the field of science. Since that time our world has changed quite a bit, and so have the boundary conditions of science publishing. However, one thing has not changed: then as now, the general policy and development of a respectable scientific journal should be determined by a board of independent scientists, who volunteer to assume responsibility for the scientific content of the journal, to assure a fair and critical peer review process for all submitted manuscripts, and, in cases of conflict, to finally decide which papers will be published and which will not.As a matter of fact, an international Board of Editors which consists of scientists coming from different countries and continents, with a good reputation in their respective community, and without any conflict of interest with the Publisher of the journal is, in my opinion, these days more important than ever. As our daily scientific work becomes increasingly specialized, but at the same time also increasingly interdisciplinary, we are more and more forced to trust the quality and reliability of published scientific results in the literature, without really having a chance to come to an independent opinion on our own. This is one of the reasons why the many recent cases of plagiarism, scientific misconduct, or outright fraud have caused such a high level of public awareness. It is quite clear that without a serious peer review there would be an even larger number of such cases in the literature, and that without the responsible action taken by concerned Journal Editors, many of the revealed cases probably would have remained under the carpet.It is, therefore, a particular pleasure for me to introduce to you on the following pages the current Editorial Board of physica status solidi (a) in the form of a brief curriculum vitae, a

  16. Editorial: Special issue on resources for the computer security and information assurance curriculum: Issue 1Curriculum Editorial Comments, Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Frincke, Deb; Ouderkirk, Steven J.; Popovsky, Barbara

    2006-12-28

    This is a pair of articles to be used as the cover editorials for a special edition of the Journal of Educational Resources in Computing (JERIC) Special Edition on Resources for the Computer Security and Information Assurance Curriculum, volumes 1 and 2.

  17. EDITORIAL: Changes to the journal Changes to the journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2010-01-01

    It is a privilege to be Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Optics at this exciting time when the use of light spearheads the development of new technologies in telecommunications, green energy, manufacturing, medicine and defence, just to mention a few. These technological advances, seen by many as the next photonic technological revolution, are underpinned by fundamental and applied research in the following key directions: Nanophotonics and plasmonics Metamaterials and structured photonic materials Nonlinear and ultrafast optics Photonics at the life science interface Information and communication optics Integrated optics systems and devices Material processing with light Propagation, diffraction and scattering This is where Journal of Optics focuses its attention. This editorial marks the first issue of the journal published under the abbreviated name (shortened from Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics). The name change is just one of a series of changes introduced in the last year, along with the 8 subject sections listed above and the appointment of Section Editors. With the name change, we will also update the look of the journal by introducing colour cover images which will feature some of the most exciting research in the journal. We have retained many of the journal's original selling points: we are found in thousands of libraries around the world, and will continue our policy of free web access to all papers for 30 days after publication, ensuring broad and unrestricted dissemination of your research results. We will also continue our strong and well respected special issue and topical review programmes and we are always grateful to receive new suggestions for special issues or review articles. Along with the Editorial Board, I would like to thank the authors, referees and readers who have contributed to the success of Journal of Optics. The increasing quality and visibility of the journal, as demonstrated by the dramatic increase in its impact factor

  18. Women are underrepresented on the editorial boards of journals in environmental biology and natural resource management.

    PubMed

    Cho, Alyssa H; Johnson, Shelly A; Schuman, Carrie E; Adler, Jennifer M; Gonzalez, Oscar; Graves, Sarah J; Huebner, Jana R; Marchant, D Blaine; Rifai, Sami W; Skinner, Irina; Bruna, Emilio M

    2014-01-01

    Despite women earning similar numbers of graduate degrees as men in STEM disciplines, they are underrepresented in upper level positions in both academia and industry. Editorial board memberships are an important example of such positions; membership is both a professional honor in recognition of achievement and an opportunity for professional advancement. We surveyed 10 highly regarded journals in environmental biology, natural resource management, and plant sciences to quantify the number of women on their editorial boards and in positions of editorial leadership (i.e., Associate Editors and Editors-in-Chief) from 1985 to 2013. We found that during this time period only 16% of subject editors were women, with more pronounced disparities in positions of editorial leadership. Although the trend was towards improvement over time, there was surprising variation between journals, including those with similar disciplinary foci. While demographic changes in academia may reduce these disparities over time, we argue journals should proactively strive for gender parity on their editorial boards. This will both increase the number of women afforded the opportunities and benefits that accompany board membership and increase the number of role models and potential mentors for early-career scientists and students.

  19. Women are underrepresented on the editorial boards of journals in environmental biology and natural resource management

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Alyssa H.; Johnson, Shelly A.; Schuman, Carrie E.; Adler, Jennifer M.; Gonzalez, Oscar; Graves, Sarah J.; Huebner, Jana R.; Marchant, D. Blaine; Rifai, Sami W.; Skinner, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite women earning similar numbers of graduate degrees as men in STEM disciplines, they are underrepresented in upper level positions in both academia and industry. Editorial board memberships are an important example of such positions; membership is both a professional honor in recognition of achievement and an opportunity for professional advancement. We surveyed 10 highly regarded journals in environmental biology, natural resource management, and plant sciences to quantify the number of women on their editorial boards and in positions of editorial leadership (i.e., Associate Editors and Editors-in-Chief) from 1985 to 2013. We found that during this time period only 16% of subject editors were women, with more pronounced disparities in positions of editorial leadership. Although the trend was towards improvement over time, there was surprising variation between journals, including those with similar disciplinary foci. While demographic changes in academia may reduce these disparities over time, we argue journals should proactively strive for gender parity on their editorial boards. This will both increase the number of women afforded the opportunities and benefits that accompany board membership and increase the number of role models and potential mentors for early-career scientists and students. PMID:25177537

  20. Women are underrepresented on the editorial boards of journals in environmental biology and natural resource management.

    PubMed

    Cho, Alyssa H; Johnson, Shelly A; Schuman, Carrie E; Adler, Jennifer M; Gonzalez, Oscar; Graves, Sarah J; Huebner, Jana R; Marchant, D Blaine; Rifai, Sami W; Skinner, Irina; Bruna, Emilio M

    2014-01-01

    Despite women earning similar numbers of graduate degrees as men in STEM disciplines, they are underrepresented in upper level positions in both academia and industry. Editorial board memberships are an important example of such positions; membership is both a professional honor in recognition of achievement and an opportunity for professional advancement. We surveyed 10 highly regarded journals in environmental biology, natural resource management, and plant sciences to quantify the number of women on their editorial boards and in positions of editorial leadership (i.e., Associate Editors and Editors-in-Chief) from 1985 to 2013. We found that during this time period only 16% of subject editors were women, with more pronounced disparities in positions of editorial leadership. Although the trend was towards improvement over time, there was surprising variation between journals, including those with similar disciplinary foci. While demographic changes in academia may reduce these disparities over time, we argue journals should proactively strive for gender parity on their editorial boards. This will both increase the number of women afforded the opportunities and benefits that accompany board membership and increase the number of role models and potential mentors for early-career scientists and students. PMID:25177537

  1. Editorial: Robust Detection of Heart Beats in Multimodal Data

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Behar, Joachim; Johnson, Alistair; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D.; Moody, George B.

    2015-01-01

    This editorial reviews the background issues, the design, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology (CinC) 2014 Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Our major focus was to accelerate the development and facilitate the comparison of robust methods for locating heart beats in long-term multi-channel recordings. A public (training) database consisting of 151,032 annotated beats was compiled from records that contained ECGs as well as pulsatile signals that directly reflect cardiac activity, and other signals that may have few or no observable markers of heart beats. A separate hidden test data set (consisting of 152,478 beats) is permanently stored at PhysioNet, and a public framework has been developed to provide researchers the ability to continue to automatically score and compare the performance of their algorithms. A scoring criteria based on the averaging of gross sensitivity, gross positive predictivity, average sensitivity, and average positive predictivity is proposed. The top three scores (as of March 2015) on the hidden test data set were 93.64%, 91.50%, and 90.70%. PMID:26217894

  2. "Ebony's" Civil Rights Focus: A Study of Editorial Policy before and after the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwater, Tony

    A comprehensive analysis of articles and editorials was performed on "Ebony" magazine editions published two years before and after the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The writings of the publisher were also studied, as were personal interviews with the editors of "Ebony." Editorial content was analyzed with respect to the major racial trends in the…

  3. Analysis of High School Newspaper Editorials Before and After "Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier:" A Content Analysis Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomicky, Carol S.

    2000-01-01

    In "Hazelwood" the U.S. Supreme Court said public school officials can censor school-sponsored expression for legitimate educational purposes. A content-analysis case study of student-written newspaper editorials found that more than three times as many editorials of criticism were published prior to the Court's decision. Argues that since the…

  4. "Vogue," 1892-1928: An Historical Look at the Evolution of One Magazine's Editorial-Advertising-Design Mix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Marcia R.

    The careful integration of editorial content, graphic design, and advertising to create a successful magazine package is not a phenomenon of the last half of the twentieth century. As early as the 1890s, the first publishers of "Vogue" magazine had established an editorial-advertising-design mix in the fashion magazine that was calculated to…

  5. Genre Variations and the Interpersonal Features: An SFL Study of the Indian and the British Editorials and News-Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Charanjit; Singh, Sukhdev

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors present a discussion on the genre of editorial as distinct from that of news-reports in that its language is more loaded with attitudes and more indeterminate and hedged than that in the genre of news-report. Another distinctiveness the authors point out is that the genre of editorial is not only concerned with the…

  6. Comprehensive Education Bolivarian-Style: The Alternative School in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Mike

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author traces revolutionary developments in an alternative school in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Mérida, in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, a school that caters for students between 4 and 14. He begins by recounting some fieldwork done at the school on his behalf by Edward Ellis in 2010. He goes on to discuss a video made at…

  7. Exploración del Nuevo Laboratorio Científico de Marte

    NASA Video Gallery

    Únase a Fernando Abilleira, un analista de trayectoria de la NASA para la Oficina de Exploración de Marte, y conozca las nuevas tecnologías que el nuevo robot Curiosity del Laboratorio Científico d...

  8. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its second year of Title VII funding, James Monroe High Schools's Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) served 344 limited-English-speaking recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean, in grades 9 through 12. The program has built on the strengths of the high school's extensive computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program,…

  9. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, a 3-year Title VII-funded bilingual education program, serves 287 Spanish speaking students at James Monroe High School (Bronx, New York). This report evaluates the project's first year of operation, 1985-86. The report contains an introduction describing the school and project goals; information on student…

  10. Nuevos Horizontes, James Monroe High School, 1987-1988. Evaluation Section Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Lista, Carlos

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) at James Monroe High School (New York City) served 328 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in grades 9-12 during the final year of a 3-year funding cycle. The project's purpose was to build on the strengths of the school's extensive computer-assisted instructional program in order to…

  11. Future Directions in Computer Graphics and Visualization: From CG&A's Editorial Board

    SciTech Connect

    Encarnacao, L. M.; Chuang, Yung-Yu; Stork, Andre; Kasik, David; Rhyne, Theresa-Marie; Avila, Lisa; Kohlhammer, Jorn; LaViola, Joseph; Tory, Melanie; Dill, John; Domik, Gitta; Owen, G. Scott; Wong, Pak C.

    2015-01-01

    With many new members joining the CG&A editorial board over the past year, and with a renewed commitment to not only document the state of the art in computer graphics research and applications but to anticipate and where possible foster future areas of scientific discourse and industrial practice, we asked editorial and advisory council members about where they see their fields of expertise going. The answers compiled here aren’t meant to be all encompassing or deterministic when it comes to the opportunities computer graphics and interactive visualization hold for the future. Instead, we aim to accomplish two things: give a more in-depth introduction of members of the editorial board to the CG&A readership and encourage cross-disciplinary discourse toward approaching, complementing, or disputing the visions laid out in this compilation.

  12. EDITORIAL: Is it a bird? Is it a plane...?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Ken

    1997-11-01

    Honorary Editor Neither. But what exactly is Physics Education? What is its role? Such questions exercised the combined wit and wisdom of the Editorial Board at its recent meeting in October. Some facts. Among the core readership of the journal are teachers of physics in UK secondary schools, nearly all of whom teach A-level physics. Many of these who are not already Institute of Physics members benefit from a reduced subscription via membership of the Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges Affiliation Scheme or the Association for Science Education. But some readers worldwide subscribe at the full annual individual rate. In addition the journal is bought by over a thousand institutions (colleges, universities, schools) - and most of these are abroad, in North America especially. A typical issue shows a broad geographical spread of authors. Less than half of the papers submitted for publication come from the UK, the rest come from our foreign readership, with the USA in the lead. Each issue contains about eleven papers - currently we receive an average of ten articles a month, of which about 60% are ultimately published. This creditable figure hides the fact that 90% of UK submissions are accepted, whilst two thirds of 'foreign' articles are rejected by the referees. Linguistic fluency is significant here, of course. But some are rejected because they are seen as too limited in their appeal to our readers; often there is too much physics and not enough education. These decisions are made by the referees, who are all members of the Editorial Board. The main topic of discussion at the October Board meeting was whether the journal does satisfy the needs of its readership. It was generally agreed that the main question referees and editors should ask themselves is: Will this article/issue help to improve the teaching and learning of physics? We were worried that there is not enough in the journal that teachers can use in their everyday tasks of planning or

  13. EDITORIAL: The 2nd International Symposium on Functional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; Lai, M. O.

    2007-12-01

    Following the success of the 1st International Symposium on Functional Materials held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 5-8 December 2005, the second symposium was held in the beautiful city of Hangzhou, People's Republic of China, 16-19 May 2007. The latter symposium was a gathering of about 200 renowned researchers from 16 countries around the world. The conference consisted of 24 symposia, 5 keynote papers, 21 invited papers, 108 oral presentations and about 160 poster papers covering the frontier areas of materials science and technology of functional materials. They included topics such as energy storage materials, ferroelectric materials, ferromagnetic materials, ferroelectric thin films, applications of functional materials, nanofabrication, computational design, shape memory alloys, application of shape memory materials, ferroelectrics and thermoelectrics, advances in characterizations, magneto-optical materials, Zn and Ti oxides, synthesis of nanopowders and wires, and many other advanced functional materials. With the receipt of more than 396 abstracts, this conference was a gathering of great minds in one place to discuss the research frontiers and discoveries in functional materials. The Organizing Committee would like to express its sincere thanks to the members of the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable contributions to the symposium. The committee is also grateful for the generous support from the many sponsors. A word of sincere thanks needs to go to Professor Roger Wäppling, Editor-in-Chief and the editorial staff of IOP Publishing for the publication of selected papers in this special issue of Physica Scripta. Finally, our deepest gratitude should be directed to the National University of Singapore, Zhejiang University and the General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, People's Republic of China for, without their support, the conference would not have been a success.

  14. EDITORIAL: Message from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, R.

    2005-01-01

    On 1 January 2005 I become Editor-in-Chief of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. I look forward to assisting contributors, referees and the Board in maintaining the high standards of this international journal, whose bibliometric impact factor has consistently matched or exceeded that of other journals in the field. The robust, good health of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion reflects that of its user communities. With a decision to proceed to the construction of ITER apparently imminent, magnetic confinement fusion research is preparing to take a major step forwards. A new generation of laser-plasma interaction facilities for inertial fusion research is also rising at key sites around the world. Technical progress in our field is underpinned by scientific excellence, and the publication of results in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion will, I hope, continue to play its part. The journal will continue to offer the benefits of refereeing by two experts, combined with the rapid turnaround achieved by the highly efficient editorial office at the Institute of Physics Publishing in Bristol. Looking elsewhere, there may be opportunities for gentle incremental broadening of the scientific scope of the journal, in the medium term. One looks in particular to those branches of plasma physics that, in recent years, have become more strongly represented in the series of conferences organized by the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society. The recent special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 (2004) B1--592) provides an indication. Finally, it is a pleasure to thank my predecessor, Professor Ian Hutchinson of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for handing on his role with the journal in such promising condition.

  15. EDITORIAL: Bio-dielectrics: theories, mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethig, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    This special cluster in Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics comprises papers submitted by participants at the 2006 conference of the Institute of Physics Dielectrics Group, held at the University of Leicester during 10-12 April 2006. The conference focused on the interaction of non-ionizing electromagnetic (EM) fields with biological materials at all scales (tissues down to molecules) and at all frequencies. The use of dielectric techniques and theories in biological studies and in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries is increasing, and we hope that this conference helped to facilitate this trend and to further an understanding of the value of dielectric studies in biology—both in science and in applications in industry and medicine. An important policy of the Dielectrics Group is to promote the multidisciplinary nature of dielectric studies, and so we welcomed and received papers and posters from biologists, chemists, engineers, industrialists, medical professionals and physicists in the biotechnology and health care fields. The programme comprised 32 oral presentations, including the keynote opening address `Bio-dielectrics and bio-impedance' by Dr Ø G Martinson of the University of Oslo, and 7 papers given by invited speakers. 27 high-quality posters were also exhibited. The Mansel Davies Award, for the best presentation by a young researcher under the age of 30, was bestowed on Mr Sun Tao from the University of Southampton. His work, describing time domain analysis applied to dielectric spectroscopy of single cells, forms the subject matter of the first paper in this cluster. The remaining papers are presented in order of the session themes, namely Dielectric Spectroscopy and Techniques, Theory and Modelling, and Electrokinetics. On behalf of the Dielectrics Group, I thank the authors for their contributions, and the Institute of Physics for excellent administrative and editorial assistance.

  16. EDITORIAL: Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.

    2006-04-01

    There has been remarkable progress made in the research of structure formation by turbulence in nonequilibrium plasmas. One of the highlights has been the physics of zonal flow and drift wave turbulence in toroidal plasmas. Extensive theoretical as well as computational studies have revealed the various mechanisms in the system of turbulence and zonal flows, as highlighted in the recent review paper `Zonal flows in plasma—a review' by P H Diamond et al (2005 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion} 47 R35). There has also been increasing research in experimental studies of zonal flows, geodesic acoustic modes, and the generation of global electric field by turbulence. In recognition of this a cluster Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion occasionally publishes a small collection of articles on a specific topic. These special sections highlight a specific area of research that is of importance to the journal either as a new or growing research area. The subjects are selected by the Editorial Board and managed by a Guest Editor, Professor Itoh in this case. of 15 papers on `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence' is presented in this issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. Each paper in this special cluster describes the present research status and new scientific knowledge/results on the authors' machine involved, on the subject of experimental studies of zonal flows, electric field and nonlinear interactions with turbulence (including studies of Reynolds-Maxwell stresses, etc). Readers of, and contributors to, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion have been facing a new phase of plasma physics, with the expanding application of plasma physics to the explosive growth of our knowledge of the astronomical, space and laboratory plasmas, and the approach of ITER. The evolution of modern plasma physics into the new arena is backed up by extensive research as illustrated by this cluster of papers and review papers. We believe that this group of articles will

  17. EDITORIAL: The 18th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 18th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 07), which took place at the University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal from 16-18 September 2007. Since the first workshop at the University of Twente in 1989 the field of micromechanics has grown substantially and new fields have been added: optics, RF, biomedical, chemistry, and in recent years the emergence of nanotechnology. This year an extensive programme was scheduled with contributions from new materials research to new manufacturing techniques. In addition, the invited speakers presented a review of the state-of-the-art in several main trends in current research, with the focus on micro/nanosystems in the ICT Work Programme in EC FP7. As ever, the two day workshop was attended by delegates from all over Europe, the USA, Brazil, Egypt, Japan and Canada. A total of 96 papers were accepted for presentation and there were a further five keynote presentations. The workshop provides a forum for young researchers to learn about new experimental methods and to enhance their knowledge of the field. This special issue presents a selection of 17 of the best papers from the workshop. The papers highlight fluidic and optical devices, energy scavenging microsystems, neural probe arrays and microtechnology fabrication techniques. All the papers went through the regular reviewing procedure of IOP Publishing, and I am grateful to all the referees for their excellent work. I would also like to extend my thanks to Professor Robert Puers for advice on the final selection of papers and to Ian Forbes of IOP Publishing for managing the entire process. My thanks also go to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. I believe that this special issue will provide a good overview of the topics presented at the workshop and I hope you enjoy reading it.

  18. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    This year Nuclear Fusion celebrates its fiftieth anniversary. This has been marked by the January special edition, containing papers presented at the plenary and celebratory evening session of the 22nd Fusion Energy Conference at Geneva. These papers underline the enormous progress that has been made in the last 50 years both in experiment and theory. Whilst the technical challenges that we face are still formidable, they are largely concerned with engineering a fusion reactor rather than fundamental plasma physics. In my editorial of a year ago, I remarked on the price of oil and the incentive that it gives to develop nuclear fusion into a viable energy source. This last year, attention has shifted somewhat from the markets to the environment and the Copenhagen climate summit in particular. The timescale for action on the environment is much shorter than we can possibly match and so we can only play our part towards developing long term solutions. Our responsibility is to present a programme that has the clear goal in developing a sustainable source of energy and, as the next step, make an unambiguous success of ITER. The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2009 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2010. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, seven of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2008 to

  19. EDITORIAL: The Nuclear Fusion Award The Nuclear Fusion Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Award ceremony for 2009 and 2010 award winners was held during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. This time, both 2009 and 2010 award winners were celebrated by the IAEA and the participants of the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. The Nuclear Fusion Award is a paper prize to acknowledge the best distinguished paper among the published papers in a particular volume of the Nuclear Fusion journal. Among the top-cited and highly-recommended papers chosen by the Editorial Board, excluding overview and review papers, and by analyzing self-citation and non-self-citation with an emphasis on non-self-citation, the Editorial Board confidentially selects ten distinguished papers as nominees for the Nuclear Fusion Award. Certificates are given to the leading authors of the Nuclear Fusion Award nominees. The final winner is selected among the ten nominees by the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board voting confidentially. 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award nominees For the 2009 award, the papers published in the 2006 volume were assessed and the following papers were nominated, most of which are magnetic confinement experiments, theory and modeling, while one addresses inertial confinement. Sabbagh S.A. et al 2006 Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas Nucl. Fusion 46 635-44 La Haye R.J. et al 2006 Cross-machine benchmarking for ITER of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by electron cyclotron current drive Nucl. Fusion 46 451-61 Honrubia J.J. et al 2006 Three-dimensional fast electron transport for ignition-scale inertial fusion capsules Nucl. Fusion 46 L25-8 Ido T. et al 2006 Observation of the interaction between the geodesic acoustic mode and ambient fluctuation in the JFT-2M tokamak Nucl. Fusion 46 512-20 Plyusnin V.V. et al 2006 Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 277-84 Pitts R.A. et al 2006 Far SOL ELM ion energies in JET Nucl. Fusion 46 82-98 Berk H.L. et al 2006

  20. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support for ITER. Such political visibility is good news, of course, but it brings with it the obligation to perform. Fortunately, good performance was much in evidence in the papers presented at the conference, of which a significant proportion contain 'ITER' in the title. Given this importance of ITER and the undertaking by the Nuclear Fusion journal to publish papers associated with Fusion Energy Conference presentations, the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board has decided to adopt a simplified journal scope that encompasses technology papers more naturally. The scope is available from http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Journal%20information but is reproduced here for clarity: Nuclear Fusion publishes articles making significant advances to the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The journal scope includes: the production, heating and confinement of high temperature plasmas; the physical properties of such plasmas; the experimental or theoretical methods of exploring or explaining them; fusion reactor physics; reactor concepts; fusion technologies. The key to scope acceptability is now '....significant advances....' rather than any particular area of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is hoped that this will make scope decisions easier for the Nuclear Fusion office, the referees and the Editor.The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. This is underlined by the fact that Nuclear Fusion has received an impact factor of 4.270, as listed in ISI's 2009 Science Citation

  1. EDITORIAL: Celebrating one year of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2008-03-01

    The one-year anniversary is a critical milestone for a new journal. At that point there are enough articles published to begin to define the scope and readership, yet generally not enough of a track-record for the full community to regard the new entrant as a fixture and a source of 'must read' material. Environmental Research Letters (ERL) has set itself a particularly large and interesting challenge: to help connect the vast community of environmental researchers, practitioners, activists, and interested informed observers. ERL and its partner online resource base and community website, environmentalresearchweb, fills a major void: a single locus for rapid publication of peer-reviewed and highly interdisciplinary material spanning literally every aspect of environmental research and thought. The wide range of material that falls squarely into the purview of ERL—from restoration ecology to global change science and politics, to toxicology and environmental justice, to environmental and social impacts of energy conversion—illustrate just how diverse a 'community' we hope to serve. Thanks to an exceptional editorial staff and board, and a diverse range of fascinating contributed papers, ERL is off to a particularly fast start. ERL has both a small advisory board and a larger editorial board. The board serves several functions, beginning with the traditional one of taking the lead on reviews of papers in such a dizzying array of areas. This task alone is a challenge because of the commitment ERL has made to exceptionally rapid publication: a goal of 90 days from submission to online publication for accepted papers. This goal, which we have generally met, includes the publication of complementary (but not always complimentary) 500 1000 word commentaries on a number of papers. To accomplish this alone the editorial board, and the reviewers, have been heroic, and deserve a huge round of applause. IOP Publishing too, has been truly wonderful in making this happen

  2. The Relationship Between Editorial and Advertising Content about Tobacco and Alcohol in United States Newspapers

    PubMed Central

    Rouner, Donna; Slater, Michael; Long, Marilee; Stapel, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Using a nationally representative sample, this study examined the relationship between amount of alcohol and tobacco advertising and related news-editorial content. This study found less tobacco and alcohol advertising in newspapers than did previous research and no relationship between coverage and number of advertisements. PMID:21499450

  3. A Comparison of Career Attitudes of News-Editorial and Ad-PR Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ron F.

    1987-01-01

    Assesses the attitudes that news-editorial students have toward careers in public relations and advertising and the attitudes that public relations-advertising students have toward news careers. Finds that news-ed students saw careers in public relations as being less useful to society and having less prestige in the community than their careers.…

  4. Minutes of the First International Editorial Board Meeting of Chinese Journal of Traumatology.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuan-Yuan; Tian, Y

    2016-06-01

    The First International Editorial Board Meeting of Chinese Journal of Traumatology was held in Guiyang, China on August 16, 2015. Totally 32 domestic and 20 foreign professors from America, Europe, Asia and Oceania attended the panel discussion about the future of this journal. Some experience from globally excellent journals was proposed.

  5. Editorial: Assessment Issues and Long-Term Effects of Childhood Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David P. H.

    1997-01-01

    This editorial reviews and comments on three recent studies: two on assessment issues or areas of diagnostic difficulty for pediatricians concerned with child abuse and neglect, and one on the long-term effects of childhood abuse and experiences of early attachment. (DB)

  6. EDITORIAL: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering (WC2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    2004-08-01

    The World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering was held in Sydney on 24--29 August 2003. This special issue contains a selection of papers that serve as a snapshot of the state of the art in medical physics today, as represented in WC2003. The PDF file contains the full text of this editorial.

  7. Registration of all rehabilitation clinical trials: an ethical and editorial imperative.

    PubMed

    Wade, Derick

    2016-03-01

    Registration of randomized controlled trials is essential to reduce the risk of biased data being used when judging the effectiveness of an intervention. This journal will in future require that all randomized trials submitted are registered on a recognized register. This editorial explains why.

  8. When Counter Narratives Meet Master Narratives in the Journal Editorial-Review Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Christine A.

    2007-01-01

    The author shares her experiences with the editorial-review process while publishing a qualitative research study on the teaching experiences of African American faculty members at two predominantly White research universities. She likens the experiences of African American faculty members to counter narratives, troubles master narratives in the…

  9. 75 FR 47632 - Thomson Reuters Legal, Legal Editorial Operations, Cleveland Office, Including Workers Whose...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ..., Ohio. The notice was published in the Federal Register on July 7, 2010 (75 FR 39047). At the request of..., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through West Services, Inc., Independence..., Legal Editorial Operations, Cleveland Office had their wages reported under a separated...

  10. Why Science? Members of PSR Editorial Board Explain What Drew Them to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primary Science Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Members of "Primary Science Review" Editorial Board explain what drew them to science. Alan Peacock, "PSR" Editor, emphasises the need to preserve children's sense of wonderment about the world. Robert Collins, a science educator in the Faculty of Education, University of Strathclyde, thinks people are "secret science superstars" and reminds one…

  11. [2015 through the eyes of the Bulletin of Cancer editorial board].

    PubMed

    Magné, Nicolas; Massard, Christophe; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; André, Thierry; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Orbach, Daniel; Wislez, Marie; Thariat, Juliette; Penel, Nicolas; Rancoule, Chloé; Vignot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Congresses in oncology took place worldwide. A selection by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer of the best-rated abstracts and published papers was presented including diverse oncology topics by organ location specificity. These highlights are a summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the major meetings dedicated in oncology.

  12. 47 CFR 76.209 - Fairness doctrine; personal attacks; political editorials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fairness doctrine; personal attacks; political editorials. 76.209 Section 76.209 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.209 Fairness...

  13. The Effect of Changing American Social Values on the Editorial Content, Style and Management of Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Donna Roman

    An examination of the "Los Angeles Times," the "Long Beach Independent Press-Telegram," the "Register," and the "Herald Examiner" as well as personal interviews conducted at the editorial and management levels reveal the effect of changing American social values. Changing values can be marked by such broad indicators as graphic renovation,…

  14. Intelligence: A Factor in the Understanding and Appreciation of Editorial Satire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Charles R.

    A study involving 59 undergraduate speech communication students investigated relationships between intelligence, understanding of editorial satire, and appreciation of satire. The students were asked to read three satirical essays and then to pick one of five statements that best described the thesis as intended by the author. Then each satire…

  15. Editorial: Social Support and Coping Strategies as Mediators of the Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David P. H.

    1997-01-01

    This editorial discusses two studies in this journal issue that explore mediating functions of coping strategies and social support in long-term outcomes of child abuse and neglect. It is argued that these studies provide empirical evidence of interest to social workers and mental health practitioners by identifying specific factors and strategies…

  16. EDITORIAL: Thank you and farewell from the Founding Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskes, Mike

    2005-07-01

    I have been involved with Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering (MSMSE) from the very beginning when it was merely an idea, over 14 years ago, to the current journal that is well supported by the community. During my time as Editor there have been many changes in the journal, including the introduction of electronic submissions, web-based services and free printed colour where it is essential to the article, as well as completely free colour online. The journal has seen excellent growth in the number and quality of submissions and the number of articles published continues to rise, enabling us to expand the journal to eight issues in 2005. Web accesses and downloads have greatly surpassed even my wildest dreams. In my opinion, the emergence of MSMSE as a top materials modelling journal has confirmed the vision of Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) and the Executive Board that this area of science and engineering was ripe for a specialized journal. I feel that, having seen the journal through the early years and watched it grow into a successful arena for multidisciplinary materials research, it is now an appropriate time for me to hand over the reins. The journal has a great foundation for future growth and development and is supported by an excellent Editorial Board, who have given me a great deal of help and advice over the years. I feel sure that they will continue to support the journal when Bill Curtin, Brown University, takes over on 1 July 2005. Bill has the diverse experience in modelling at the atomic, dislocation, and continuum levels to lead the journal to new heights. Finally I would like to thank all of the readers, authors and referees who have greatly contributed to MSMSE over the years. Thank you for your support and help, and I hope you will continue to support the journal. Last, but not least, I would like to thank the staff at IOPP. Without their expert assistance, the journal could not have been as successful as it is

  17. EDITORIAL: Celebrating one year of Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2008-03-01

    The one-year anniversary is a critical milestone for a new journal. At that point there are enough articles published to begin to define the scope and readership, yet generally not enough of a track-record for the full community to regard the new entrant as a fixture and a source of 'must read' material. Environmental Research Letters (ERL) has set itself a particularly large and interesting challenge: to help connect the vast community of environmental researchers, practitioners, activists, and interested informed observers. ERL and its partner online resource base and community website, environmentalresearchweb, fills a major void: a single locus for rapid publication of peer-reviewed and highly interdisciplinary material spanning literally every aspect of environmental research and thought. The wide range of material that falls squarely into the purview of ERL—from restoration ecology to global change science and politics, to toxicology and environmental justice, to environmental and social impacts of energy conversion—illustrate just how diverse a 'community' we hope to serve. Thanks to an exceptional editorial staff and board, and a diverse range of fascinating contributed papers, ERL is off to a particularly fast start. ERL has both a small advisory board and a larger editorial board. The board serves several functions, beginning with the traditional one of taking the lead on reviews of papers in such a dizzying array of areas. This task alone is a challenge because of the commitment ERL has made to exceptionally rapid publication: a goal of 90 days from submission to online publication for accepted papers. This goal, which we have generally met, includes the publication of complementary (but not always complimentary) 500 1000 word commentaries on a number of papers. To accomplish this alone the editorial board, and the reviewers, have been heroic, and deserve a huge round of applause. IOP Publishing too, has been truly wonderful in making this happen

  18. Ano Nuevo to Santa Cruz, California : a photographic tour of the coastline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chezar, Henry; Wong, Florence L.

    2000-01-01

    This interactive CD ROM contains over 500 overlapping photographic images of the California coastline from A?o Nuevo to Santa Cruz. The images were taken from the R/V David Johnston to illustrate the coastal geology adjacent to part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The introductory home page starts a series of links to a regional map, more detailed area maps, and finally the individual photographic images.

  19. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    At the time of writing, the construction of ITER is making, quite literally, visible progress; buildings have gone up, the tokamak pit has been equipped with the seismic pads and pylons have been put in place for the high tension input to the power supplies. Most of the main procurement arrangements have been let and we will see an increasing volume of deliveries to the ITER site over the coming years. In addition, the National Ignition Facility has started full operation and will undoubtedly see important results coming from it in 2012. These projects are important reminders of what a monumental endeavour we are all engaged in and the potential of nuclear fusion to improve the long-term condition of the human race. We can be proud, therefore, that the Nuclear Fusion journal makes such an important contribution to controlled fusion programmes and is maintaining its position as the leading journal in the field. More than 350 articles are submitted each year from over 40 countries. Nuclear Fusion continues to be the most highly cited journal in the field, with an impact factor of 3.303, as listed in the ISI 2010 Science Citation Index. The journal depends on its authors and referees for its success and so I would like to thank them all for their hard work in 2011, which should maintain the level of readership and the citation indices for years to come. I sincerely hope that 2012 will be as good. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, three of the top referees have reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2010 to November 2011 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our

  20. EDITORIAL: Northern Hemisphere high latitude climate and environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber

    2007-10-01

    funded projects (always with international participation) in the United States, Russian Federation, China, European Union, Japan, and Canada have been mutually united to explore the scientifically significant Northern Eurasian region. NEESPI scientists have been quite productive during the past two years (2005 2006) publishing more than 200 books, book chapters, and papers in refereed journals. NEESPI sessions at international conferences are open to everyone who works on environmental and climate change problems in Northern Eurasia and the circumpolar boreal zone. This thematic issue brings together articles from the authors who presented their latest results at the Annual Fall American Geophysical Union Meeting in San Francisco (December 2006). The research letters in this issue are preceded by two editorial papers (Leptoukh et al and Sherstyukov et al) devoted to informational support of research in the NEESPI domain that is critical to the success of the Initiative. The following papers are quite diverse and are assembled into five groups devoted to studies of climate and hydrology, land cover and land use, the biogeochemical cycle and its feedbacks, the cryosphere, and human dimensions in the NEESPI domain and the circumpolar boreal zone. Focus on Northern Hemisphere High Latitude Climate and Environmental Change Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Editorials NASA NEESPI Data and Services Center for Satellite Remote Sensing Information Gregory Leptoukh, Ivan Csiszar, Peter Romanov, Suhung Shen, Tatiana Loboda and Irina Gerasimov NEESPI Science and Data Support Center for Hydrometeorological Information in Obninsk, Russia B G Sherstyukov, V N Razuvaev, O N Bulygina and P Ya Groisman Climate and hydrology Changes in the fabric of the Arctic's greenhouse blanket Jennifer A Francis and Elias Hunter Spatial variations of summer precipitation trends in South Korea, 1973 2005 Heejun

  1. EDITORIAL: Imaging Systems and Techniques Imaging Systems and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George; Yang, Wuqiang; Petrou, M.; Nikita, K. S.; Pastorino, M.; Amanatiadis, A.; Zentai, G.

    2011-10-01

    wide spectrum of technological areas, such as medical imaging, pharmaceutical industry, analytical instrumentation, aerospace, remote sensing, lidars and ladars, surveillance, national defense, corrosion imaging and monitoring, sub-terrestrial and marine imaging. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios, and demanding design parameters such as speed, signal-to-noise ratio, high specificity, high contrast and spatial resolution, high-scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environment, necessitate the development of a multifunctional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, operating on diverse detection and imaging principles. Finally, pattern recognition and image processing algorithms can significantly contribute to enhanced detection and imaging, including object classification, clustering, feature selection, texture analysis, segmentation, image compression and color representation under complex imaging scenarios, with applications in medical imaging, remote sensing, aerospace, radars, defense and homeland security. We feel confident that the exciting new contributions of this special feature on Imaging Systems and Techniques will appeal to the technical community. We would like to thank all authors as well as all anonymous reviewers and the MST Editorial Board, Publisher and staff for their tremendous efforts and invaluable support to enhance the quality of this significant endeavor.

  2. Images of cloning and stem cell research in editorial cartoons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Giarelli, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Through semiotic analysis of manifest and latent meanings in editorial cartoons, the author uncovers how cloning and stem cell research are represented in a popular mass medium. She identified 86 editorial cartoons published in the United States between 2001 and 2004 that referred to cloning and 20 that referred to stem cell research. Cartoonists portrayed people individually 224 times and 4 times in groups of more than 10. Men were portrayed in 64% of cartoons. Stem cell research was depicted as having a potential positive value, and cloning was depicted negatively. Some major messages are that cloning will lead to the mass production of evil, cloning creates monsters, and politics will influence who or what will be cloned. Analyzing popular images can allow access to public understanding about genetic technology and evaluation of public beliefs, preconceptions, and expectations as the public is educated on the use and value of services.

  3. Editorial - A Matter of Continuity, of People, of Ethics, of Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Andre

    2012-08-01

    This editorial presents the book as a continuation, with more emphasis on people, of the earlier prize-winning series "Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (OSA)", the seven volumes of which described how astronomy research lives: how it is planned, funded and organized, how it interacts with other disciplines and the rest of the world, how it communicates, etc. All those books are a unique medium for scientists and non-scientists (sometimes from outside astronomy) to describe their experience, often for the first time at such a level, on non-purely scientific matters, many of them of fundamental importance for the efficient conduct astronomy-related activities. The editorial tackles also issues regarding ethics and management of people, stressing the need for managers with ad hoc training and a long-term vision of the role of astronomers towards the society at large.

  4. Annual Review of Editorial Committee Activities in Power and Energy Society, IEE of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Editorial Committee Of Power; Energy Society

    The Editorial Committee is working in planning and editing of the publication of Power and Energy Society. In this article, activities of the committee of the last term are reported, and recent trend and future problems are also discussed. The process of planning and editing of the publication, and the challenges to reduce the necessary months for reviewing papers and to increase the number of submitted papers are shown.

  5. Recent advances in endocrine metabolic immune disorders drug targeting: an editorial overview.

    PubMed

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    This editorial overview is aimed at reviewing all the work published by the Journal Endocrine Metabolic Immune Disorders-Drug Targets over the period 2012-2014. The main body of publications has been divided either into a section based on special issues and meeting proceedings or various specific sections according to different types of pathologies related to the field of endocrine metabolic immune disorder-drug targeting.

  6. Another quasi-experimental study of understanding/appreciation of editorial satire.

    PubMed

    Gruner, C R; Gruner, M W; Travillion, L J

    1991-12-01

    College students completed a 17-item scale measuring the "propensity to argue controversial topics" and 7 other nominal-scale independent variables. They then read three editorial satires and checked which of five statements was the intended thesis of each satire's author. They also rated each satire on interestingness and funniness. Analysis indicated dependence between understanding of satire and sex and regular readership of "The Far Side."

  7. EDITORIAL: Why we need a new journal in neural engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2004-03-01

    laboratory but also in the publication of scientific papers. We do, therefore, need a new journal that provides a platform for this emerging interdisciplinary field of neural engineering where neuroscientists, neurobiologists and engineers can publish their work in one periodical that spans the disciplines. Journal of Neural Engineering will provide this platform. The new journal will publish full-length articles of the highest quality and importance in the field of neural engineering at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. The scope of Journal of Neural Engineering encompasses experimental, computational and theoretical aspects of neural interfacing, neuroelectronics, neuromechanical systems, neuroinformatics, neuroimaging, neural prostheses, artificial and biological neural circuits, neural control, neural tissue regeneration, neural signal processing, neural modeling and neuro-computation. The scope of the journal has both depth and breadth in areas relevant to the interface between neuroscience and engineering. There will be two Editors-in-Chief, with expertise covering both engineering and neuroscience. Experts in the areas encompassed by the journal's scope have been identified for the Editorial Board and the composition of the board will be continually updated to address the developments in this new and exciting field. The first issue of this new journal covers a variety of topics that combine neuroscience and engineering: mental state recognition from EEG signals, analysis of body motion in Parkinson's patients, non-linear dynamics of the respiratory system, automatic identification of saccade-related visual evoked potentials, multiple electrode stimulators, algorithms to estimate the causal relationship between brain sources, diffusion tensor imaging in the brain and phase synchronization of neural activity in vitro. This broad array of manuscripts focusing on neural imaging, neurophysiology, neural signal processing, neuroelectronics and neuro-dynamics can

  8. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    This editorial serves as the preface to a special issue of New Journal of Physics, which collects together solicited papers on a common subject, x-ray beams with high coherence. We summarize the issue's content, and explain why there is so much current interest both in the sources themselves and in the applications to the study of the structure of matter and its fluctuations (both spontaneous and driven). As this collection demonstrates, the field brings together accelerator physics in the design of new sources, particle physics in the design of detectors, and chemical and materials scientists who make use of the coherent beams produced. Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence Contents Femtosecond pulse x-ray imaging with a large field of view B Pfau, C M Günther, S Schaffert, R Mitzner, B Siemer, S Roling, H Zacharias, O Kutz, I Rudolph, R Treusch and S Eisebitt The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent x-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system and applications E Allaria, C Callegari, D Cocco, W M Fawley, M Kiskinova, C Masciovecchio and F Parmigiani Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Anders Madsen, Robert L Leheny, Hongyu Guo, Michael Sprung and Orsolya Czakkel The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Sébastien Boutet and Garth J Williams Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Andrei Fluerasu, Pawel Kwasniewski, Chiara Caronna, Fanny Destremaut, Jean-Baptiste Salmon and Anders Madsen Exploration of crystal strains using coherent x-ray diffraction Wonsuk Cha, Sanghoon Song, Nak Cheon Jeong, Ross Harder, Kyung Byung Yoon, Ian K Robinson and Hyunjung Kim Coherence properties of the European XFEL G Geloni, E Saldin, L Samoylova, E Schneidmiller, H Sinn, Th Tschentscher and M Yurkov Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging: treatment and analysis of data G J

  9. Editorial: New Publishing Information for The Astrophysical Journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishniac, Ethan; Sneden, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    reader requests rather than in bulk. As part of this transformation, Letters will be posted as they become ready, rather than waiting for an entire issue to ready. This allows us to shorten the lag between acceptance and publication. Both of these changes are meant to point the way for the main journal, which will adopt these measures in the near future if they prove successful and if the different nature of the main journal does not pose a problem for these changes. This has ramifications for ApJ Letters in regard to the ways that submitted content is measured. Criteria for Letters will continue to be scientific immediacy and brevity. However, with the emphasis on electronic ApJ Letters delivery, the traditional 4.00 printed page limit has become obsolete. We will instead impose a content-counting system that is intended to follow the spirit of the 4 page limit, while being more transparent to authors. A similar system will be implemented for page charges in the main journal if we move to a print-on-demand publishing model there as well. In the midst of such rapid evolution we must rely heavily on our readers and authors to let us know which changes are welcome and where problems have arisen. We hope that everyone feels free to write to us with their concerns. SPECIFIC ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERS The new length limits for ApJ Letters manuscripts will be as follows; these criteria will apply to all submissions beginning 2008 October 15. Manuscript SectionMaximum Abstract length250 words Manuscript length3500 words References50 Figures and tables5 total Machine-readable tables1 These length metrics have been designed to try to mimic as closely as possible the spirit of the 4 page limit. The specific new limits have been set up with AASTeX-using authors in mind (thus covering about 95% of ApJ Letters submissions). Editorial judgment will be exercised in individual cases that do not easily match the criteria given here. Additionally, the

  10. Characterization of the dengue outbreak in Nuevo Leon state, Mexico, 2010.

    PubMed

    Leduc-Galindo, D; Gloria-Herrera, U; Rincón-Herrera, U; Ramos-Jiménez, J; Garcia-Luna, S; Arellanos-Soto, D; Mendoza-Tavera, N; Tavitas-Aguilar, I; Garcia-Garcia, E; Galindo-Galindo, E; Villarreal-Perez, J; Fernandez-Salas, I; Santiago, G A; Muñoz-Jordan, J; Rivas-Estilla, A M

    2015-04-01

    We studied serotypes circulating dengue virus (DENV) cases, entomological Breteau index, rain-fall index and epidemiology of groups affected during the 2010 outbreak in Nuevo Leon, Mexico. From 2,271 positive cases, 94% were dengue classic and 6% dengue hemorrhagic fever; DENV1 was mainly isolated (99%) (Central-American lineage of American-African-genotype). We found correlation between two environmental phenomena (Increment of rainfall and vector-indexes) (p ≤ 0.05) with epidemiological, clinical and risk of DENV-1 ongoing transmission.

  11. Editorial: The publication of geoscientific model developments v1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Executive Editors, GMD

    2015-10-01

    Version 1.0 of the editorial of the EGU (European Geosciences Union) journal, Geoscientific Model Development (GMD), was published in 2013. In that editorial an assessment was made of the progress the journal had made since it started, and some revisions to the editorial policy were introduced. After 2 years of experience with this revised editorial policy there are a few required updates, refinements and clarifications, so here we present version 1.1 of the editorial. The most significant amendments relate to the peer-review criteria as presented in the Framework for GMD manuscript types, which is published as an appendix to this paper and also available on the GMD manuscript types webpage. We also slightly refine and update the Publication guide and introduce a self-contained code and data policy. The changes are summarised as follows: - All manuscript types are now required to include code or data availability paragraphs, and model code must always be made available (in the case of copyright or other legal issues, to the editor at a minimum). - The role of evaluation in GMD papers is clarified, and a separate evaluation paper type is introduced. Model descriptions must already be published or in peer review when separate evaluation papers are submitted. - Observationally derived data should normally be published in a data journal rather than in GMD. Syntheses of data which were specifically designed for tasks such as model boundary conditions or direct evaluation of model output may, however, be published in GMD. - GMD publishes a broad range of different kinds of models, and this fact is now more explicitly acknowledged. - The main changes to the Publication guide are the addition of guidelines for editors when assessing papers at the initial review stage. Before sending papers for peer review, editors are required to make sure that papers comply with the Framework for GMD paper types and to carefully consider the topic of plagiarism. - A new appendix, the GMD

  12. EDITORIAL: The need and challenge for Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2006-11-01

    will make it a truly unique resource for scholars in developed and developing nations, as well as for environmental non-governmental groups, public servants, businesses and industry groups, and anyone who would not normally find their way, or have the financial means, to access an academic journal. Our goal to remain open-access will require that ERL secure a commitment of financial support—ideally from a foundation, individual, or a national or international research agency—so that the journal can publish in this fashion without the support of significant article publication charges. In this area we call on you to consider supporting, or to direct our editorial staff to groups who want to support, this venture. Exceptionally fast publication. As it gears up for regular publication, ERL is committed to a 90 day turn-around from article submission through to online publication for accepted Letters. Outstandingly high article visibility. ERL's open-access publishing model will guarantee its authors high article visibility, capturing a wide audience that includes both specialists and the wider community. The journal will serve its broad readership by publishing Perspectives that put disciplinary papers in a wider context, and explore the intellectual and policy impacts of broader, cross-disciplinary papers. A significant fraction of the research articles published in ERL will appear with 500 1000 word commentary pieces—solicited from not only leading scholars, but also leading political, business, legal, and community leaders—that extend and expand the dialog of the papers. Several articles published in the inaugural issue of the journal will be accompanied by such Perspectives. ERL will also link academic to professional development. In addition to primary research, the journal and its forthcoming accompanying community website will include: Special issues, focusing on fast-changing environmental issues. For 2007, we already have issues planned on 'Environmental

  13. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  14. Rainfall thresholds for the initiation of shallow landslides in Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Castillo, L. R. M.; Kubota, T.; Cantu Silva, I.; Hasnawir, H.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of rainfall on the occurrence of landslides depends on many factors such as landslide dimensions, kinematics or material involved. It is widely recognized that shallow landslides are usually triggered by short intense storms. Nuevo Leon state located in northeast Mexico is highly prone to the occurrence of this kind of slope failures due to its geologic, geomorphologic, climatic attributes and location, being targeted by tropical cyclones during the Atlantic hurricane season. A database of rainfall events that have resulted in shallow landslides on the region was compiled; the data indicated that there is a coincidence between the occurrence of shallow landslides and extreme rainfall events. A threshold curve in the form of I= αD-β was established to describe the threshold in where I is the rainfall intensity by rainfall event in mm/day and D is the duration of rainfall event in days. Duration of the rainfall events that triggered shallow landslides ranged from 2 to 5 days, with maximum intensity of 236 mm/day and a minimum intensity of 57.7 mm/day. From the data analyzed we could obtain a regression value of I = 109.77D-1.76 and established a new minimum rainfall intensity-duration threshold for the initiation of rainfall-induced shallow landslides that can be used for the development of a early warning system in Nuevo Leon, Mexico

  15. Assessing biodiversity in Nuevo Leon, Mexico: Are nature reserves the answer?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cantu, C.; Wright, R.G.; Scott, J.M.; Strand, Espen

    2004-01-01

    The Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, located in the northeastern portion of the country, currently has 26 state and three federal nature reserves covering approximately 4.5% of its land area. These reserves were established for a variety of reasons not necessarily related to conservation purposes. In 2000 in response to a growing concern about the lack of organized conservation reserve planning to protect the important biological and physical features of Mexico, the Mexican Commission for Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity proposed 12 new terrestrial reserves for Nuevo Leon. The new reserves, if established, would increase the proportion of protected lands in the state to almost 24% of the state's land area. We compiled a Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis using digital thematic maps of physical and ecological features to examine how well the existing and proposed reserves incorporated the major biological and physical features of the state. The existing reserves are located primarily in regions with elevations > 1,000-1,500 m, on less productive soils, and are dominated by pine and oak forest cover types. As a result, the state's dominant biotic region - low elevation coastal plain with xeric scrub vegetation - is disproportionately under represented in the current reserve system. The new reserves would expand the protection of biophysical resources throughout the state. However, the inclusion of important resources in the low elevation coastal lands would still be limited.

  16. I publish in I edit?--Do editorial board members of urologic journals preferentially publish their own scientific work?

    PubMed

    Mani, Jens; Makarević, Jasmina; Juengel, Eva; Ackermann, Hanns; Nelson, Karen; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2013-01-01

    Scientists who are members of an editorial board have been accused of preferentially publishing their scientific work in the journal where they serve as editor. Reputation and academic standing do depend on an uninterrupted flow of published scientific work and the question does arise as to whether publication mainly occurs in the self-edited journal. This investigation was designed to determine whether editorial board members of five urological journals were more likely to publish their research reports in their own rather than in other journals. A retrospective analysis was conducted for all original reports published from 2001-2010 by 65 editorial board members nominated to the boards of five impact leading urologic journals in 2006. Publications before editorial board membership, 2001-2005, and publications within the period of time as an editorial board member, 2006-2010, were identified. The impact factors of the journals were also recorded over the time period 2001-2010 to see whether a change in impact factor correlated with publication locality. In the five journals as a whole, scientific work was not preferentially published in the journal in which the scientists served as editor. However, significant heterogeneity among the journals was evident. One journal showed a significant increase in the amount of published papers in the 'own' journal after assumption of editorship, three journals showed no change and one journal showed a highly significant decrease in publishing in the 'own' journal after assumption of editorship.

  17. I Publish in I Edit? - Do Editorial Board Members of Urologic Journals Preferentially Publish Their Own Scientific Work?

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Jens; Makarević, Jasmina; Juengel, Eva; Ackermann, Hanns; Nelson, Karen; Bartsch, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Scientists who are members of an editorial board have been accused of preferentially publishing their scientific work in the journal where they serve as editor. Reputation and academic standing do depend on an uninterrupted flow of published scientific work and the question does arise as to whether publication mainly occurs in the self-edited journal. This investigation was designed to determine whether editorial board members of five urological journals were more likely to publish their research reports in their own rather than in other journals. A retrospective analysis was conducted for all original reports published from 2001–2010 by 65 editorial board members nominated to the boards of five impact leading urologic journals in 2006. Publications before editorial board membership, 2001–2005, and publications within the period of time as an editorial board member, 2006–2010, were identified. The impact factors of the journals were also recorded over the time period 2001–2010 to see whether a change in impact factor correlated with publication locality. In the five journals as a whole, scientific work was not preferentially published in the journal in which the scientists served as editor. However, significant heterogeneity among the journals was evident. One journal showed a significant increase in the amount of published papers in the ‘own’ journal after assumption of editorship, three journals showed no change and one journal showed a highly significant decrease in publishing in the ‘own’ journal after assumption of editorship. PMID:24386258

  18. An Analysis of Editorial Freedom and Administrative Control of the Student Newspaper in the Four-Year Colleges and Universities in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howells, Ronald Frederick

    The study was designed to investigate judicial decisions of state and federal courts concerning editorial freedom of the college and university student press to determine emerging legal rules, precedents, and trends in judicial decisions and to analyze the extent of editorial freedom and administrative control of the student press as perceived by…

  19. EDITORIAL: 80 Years of Plasma 80 Years of Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, R. N.; Braithwaite, N. St J.

    2009-02-01

    of all 12 volumes in a library so that they may be accessible to future scholars on request. As Appendix II shows, those of interest to modern day plasma physicists are contained in volumes 3, 4 and 5. Postscript (added December 2008) Following the October 2008 online publication of our Editorial, we are grateful to Professor Manfred Hellberg of the University of KwaZulu-Natal (Durban, South Africa) for drawing our attention to a letter by H M Mott-Smith, one of Langmuir's co-workers, published in 1971 (Nature 233 219). In this letter Mott-Smith makes clear his recollection that Langmuir was struck by the analogy between 'the way blood plasma carries around red and white corpuscles and germs' and the way that the ' . . . "equilibrium" part of the discharge acted as a sort of sub-stratum carrying particles of special kinds, like high-velocity electrons from thermionic filaments, molecules and ions of gas impurities'. We thus conclude that this now settles the origin of the term.

  20. PSYCHOLOGY IN FRENCH ACADEMIC PUBLISHING IN THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY: ALFRED BINET, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR AT THE SCHLEICHER PUBLISHING HOUSE.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge

    2015-01-01

    To date, historians of psychology have largely ignored the role of academic publishing and the editorial policies of the late nineteenth century. This paper analyzes the role played by academic publishing in the history of psychology in the specific case of France, a country that provides a very interesting and unique model. Up until the middle of the 1890s, there was no collection specifically dedicated to psychology. Alfred Binet was the first to found, in 1897, a collection of works specifically dedicated to scientific psychology. He chose to work with Reinwald-Schleicher. However, Binet was soon confronted with (1) competition from other French publishing houses, and (2) Schleicher's management and editorial problems that were to sound the death knell for Binet's emerging editorial ambitions. The intention of this paper is to encourage the efforts of the pioneers of modern psychology to have their work published and disseminated.

  1. PSYCHOLOGY IN FRENCH ACADEMIC PUBLISHING IN THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY: ALFRED BINET, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR AT THE SCHLEICHER PUBLISHING HOUSE.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge

    2015-01-01

    To date, historians of psychology have largely ignored the role of academic publishing and the editorial policies of the late nineteenth century. This paper analyzes the role played by academic publishing in the history of psychology in the specific case of France, a country that provides a very interesting and unique model. Up until the middle of the 1890s, there was no collection specifically dedicated to psychology. Alfred Binet was the first to found, in 1897, a collection of works specifically dedicated to scientific psychology. He chose to work with Reinwald-Schleicher. However, Binet was soon confronted with (1) competition from other French publishing houses, and (2) Schleicher's management and editorial problems that were to sound the death knell for Binet's emerging editorial ambitions. The intention of this paper is to encourage the efforts of the pioneers of modern psychology to have their work published and disseminated. PMID:25975358

  2. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    contributions and the referees for their time and their thoroughness. Our sincerest thanks go to Solange Guéhot in the EPJ D editorial office for very efficiently taking care of all administrative matters. Jürgen Eschner, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria Alessandra Gatti, Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unitá di Como, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como, Italy Agnàs Maītre, Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France Giovanna Morigi, Abteilung Quantenphysik, Universitát Ulm, Albert-Einstein Allee 11, 89069 Ulm, Germany

  3. Learning Styles and Attitudes toward Online Education in Four Universities in the State of Nuevo Leon, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez de Monarrez, Patricia; Korniejczuk, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to find the relation-ship between the predominant learning styles among university online students and their attitude toward online education. Data were collected from 385 students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs from four universities in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Significant effects of…

  4. Thermal response to the surface heat flux in a macrotidal coastal region (Nuevo Gulf, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Andrés L.; Pisoni, Juan P.; Dellatorre, Fernando G.

    2016-07-01

    At mid-latitudes, sea water temperature shows a strong seasonal cycle forced by the incident surface heat flux. As depth decreases, the heat flux incidence is damped by the horizontal flux, which prevents the indefinite growth of the seasonal temperature range. In the present work, cross-shore transport in the west coast of Nuevo Gulf (Argentina) was analyzed. Processes tending to cool the coastal waters in summer and to warm the coastal waters in winter, were identified through temperature measurements, surface heat flux and tidal height. The simplified models proposed here provide a feedback mechanism that links changes in surface heat flux with changes in the horizontal heat flux during both seasons. On shorter time scales, tide produces significant variations in the height of the water column, therefore influencing temperature fluctuations and the direction of the horizontal flow.

  5. Ethnobotany in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Eduardo; Villarreal, José A; Cantú, César; Cabral, Ismael; Scott, Laura; Yen, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Background An ethnobotanical study in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park (CMNP), Nuevo Leon, Mexico was conducted. In spite of the large area (1,773.7 km2), heterogeneous physiography, contrasting plant communities and high species diversity of the CMNP, very little was previously known about its useful plants. Based on 95 interviews with inhabitants of the region who were 35 years old or older, we recorded ethnobotanical data of 240 species (comprising 170 genera and 69 botanical families), and 146 different uses. Most of the cited uses (98) were found to be medicinal ones. Methods Ninety five inhabitants 35 years old and oldest were interviewed to know what are the main plant uses in the Cumbres de Monterrey National Park. Results and discussion Two hundred and forty species, 170 genera, and 69 families of useful plants and 146 different uses were recorded. We found most of the uses to be medicinal (98), while the rest (48) represent various purposes. Herbaceous plants are the most used, followed by shrubs and trees. PMID:17263889

  6. Editorial independence and the editor-owner relationship: good editors never die, they just cross the line.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, J F

    2009-12-01

    The concept of editorial freedom or independence is examined in the light of the editor-owner relationship. Like individual and national freedom or independence, it is a rhetorical concept whose realisation flows from internal achievement as much as it depends on external validation. This freedom entails roles and responsibilities embodied in specific codes of practice for editors, such as the guidelines espoused by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Association of Medical Editors. The calling to embody these guidelines makes editing a vocation that demands isolation and distancing, separation and solitude. It involves bracketing one's biases, prejudgments and preconceptions. With such detachment comes real freedom; one that requires a moral fibre and trustworthiness that uphold truth and right, whether in full view of public scrutiny, or in the aloneness of private secrecy. The stereotypical tension between academic and commercial concerns highlights the editor-owner relationship, and bears directly on editorial independence. In practice, journal owners overstep their prerogatives. The absence of clear contracts defining editorial independence and the lack of established mechanisms governing the editor-owner relationship affect many small- to medium-sized journals in developing countries. Even large journals in developed and democratic nations or totalitarian states and societies are not spared. At the end of the day, editorial freedom exists only insofar as it is tolerated, or until editors cross the line. PMID:20087545

  7. A Cross-Cultural Approach to the Negotiation of Individual and Group Identities: Parliamentary Debates and Editorial Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on interactional pragmatics and a cross-cultural approach (UK, France, Spain) to investigate the negotiation of individual and group identities in two different speech events, parliamentary debates and editorial meetings. The cross-cultural examination of the use of linguistic resources for signalling "social role, boundaries…

  8. Trends in Female Authorships, Editorial Board Memberships, and Editorships in Educational Psychology Journals from 2003 to 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Carlton J.; Yoo, Julia H.; Jones, Sara J.; Torres, Laura G.; Decker, Mark Lowry

    2009-01-01

    Robinson, McKay, Katayama, and Fan ("Contemporary Educational Psychology," 23, 331-343, 1998) reported that women were underrepresented in terms of authorships, editorial board memberships, and editorships in the field of educational psychology based on membership trends. More recently, Evans, Hsieh, and Robinson ("Educational Psychology Review,"…

  9. History and the Study of "Administration" (LAMPS) in Education: A Reflection on an Editorial for a Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbins, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The special edition of JEAH published in August 2006 on "Administration and Leadership in Education: A Case for History?" argued that history has been seriously undervalued in the study of administration and leadership in education. My introductory editorial explained why this mattered and outlined the framework in which the papers it contained…

  10. "I Wouldn't Have Said It that Way": Mediating Professional Editorial Comments in a Secondary School Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohnen, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of a videotaped lecture from a secondary school science classroom. The students in this class had drafted science journalism articles and submitted them for professional editorial review and possible publication in a science newsmagazine for a teenage audience. Before allowing her students to see the editorial…

  11. Exploring the APA Fifth Edition "Publication Manual"'s Impact on the Analytic Preferences of Journal Editorial Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capraro, Mary Margaret; Capraro, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Studied the reporting preferences of editorial board members of four scholarly journals in education and psychology with regard to analytic practices in the fifth edition of the American Psychological Association "Publication Manual." Responses of 106 board members show the movement toward reform in research reporting practices. (SLD)

  12. The Editorial Policy as a Mirror of Petrine Reforms: Textbooks and Their Translators in Early 18th Century Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouzevitch, Irina

    2006-01-01

    Peter I's editorial policy appears as a starting point in the birth of secular Russian textbooks. Since the printing production was then organized on a massive scale as a response to the needs of European-like modernization, it should be safely suggested that nearly "all" books produced during this pioneering period focused teaching objectives. To…

  13. [Major advances in Oncology in 2013: the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer point of view].

    PubMed

    Vignot, Stéphane; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; André, Thierry; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Massard, Christophe; Orbach, Daniel; Wislez, Marie; Thariat, Juliette; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Many data are presented each year during the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting and others international major meetings. This article is proposed by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer as a synthesis of important new data. The purpose is to identify in these results those who may have an immediate impact on our clinical practices.

  14. [Effects of reforestation on tree pollen sensitization in inhabitants of Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Palma-Gómez, Samuel; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Amaro-Vivian, Laura Elizabeth; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el cambio climático tiene consecuencias en la salud, el medio ambiente y la sociedad. Las áreas verdes urbanas son importantes en la planeación de las ciudades para promover la interacción de los ciudadanos con el ambiente y la salud. La falta de planeación y diseño de estas áreas y la mala selección de árboles han contribuido a aumentar la incidencia de alergia al polen entre la población. Con frecuencia los programas de reforestación ambiental no toman en cuenta el potencial alergénico de algunas especies. El gobierno de Nuevo León en los últimos cuatro años ha plantado cerca de 18 mil árboles de la especie Quercus, además de un número indeterminado de árboles de la especie Fraxinus, cuyo polen es alergénico. Objetivo: identificar el cambio en la sensibilización al polen de árboles de acuerdo con los programas de reforestación ambiental. Material y método: estudio restrospectivo y descriptivo en el que se analizaron las pruebas cutáneas positivas para polen de árboles de los últimos cuatro años, correlacionando entre la especie de árbol utilizada para la reforestación y el aumento de la sensibilidad a ésta. Resultados: se encontró un incremento estadísticamente significativo en la sensibilización al polen de las especies con las que se reforestó Nuevo León, además de disminución en la sensibilización a las especies con las que no se reforesta. Conclusiones: la reforestación contribuye, en cierta medida, al cambio en el patrón de la positividad de las pruebas cutáneas y puede traer como consecuencia exacerbaciones más frecuentes de enfermedades respiratorias. Es una actividad que debe ser regulada y asesorada siempre por expertos.

  15. Ethnobotany in Rayones, Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trough collections of plants and interviews with 110 individuals, an ethnobotanical study was conducted in order to determine the knowledge and use plant species in Rayones, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. The aim of this study was to record all useful plants and their uses, to know whether differences exist in the knowledge about the number of species and uses between women and men, and to know if there is a correlation between the age of individuals and knowledge of species and their uses. Methods A total of 110 persons were interviewed (56 men, 56 women). Semistructured interviews were carried out. The data were analyzed by means of Student t test and the Pearson Correlation Coeficient. Results A total of 252 species, 228 genera and 91 families of vascular plants were recorded. Astraceae, Fabaceae and are the most important families with useful species and Agave and Opuntia are the genera with the highest number of useful species. One hundred and thirty six species are considered as medicinal. Agave, Acacia and Citrus are the genera with the highest number of medicinal species. Other uses includes edible, spiritual rituals, construction and ornamentals. There was a non-significant correlation between the person’s age and number of species, but a significant very low negative correlation between the person’s age and number of uses was found. Conclusions Knowing their medicinal uses is an important issue for the people of Rayones. Boiling and preparing infusions are the main ways of using plants by residents. The leaves, the branches, and the fruits are the most commonly used parts. Almost 18% of the flora is used for wood and construction purposes. Several uses such as cosmetic, shampoo, firming skin tonics and health hair products recorded in Rayones has not been reported for other areas in the state of Nuevo León. In Rayones, women have a greater knowledge about plants and their uses than men, particularly, medicinal plants, but, men have a greater

  16. Editorial policies and background in editing Macedonian Medical Review and BANTAO journal.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce

    2014-01-01

    Even in as small a country as R. Macedonia with limited resources allocated for science, there are many journals trying to establish good editorial practices and policies in publishing the scientific work achieved. Among the currently existing medical journals Macedonian Medical Review (MMR), ISSN 0025-1097, deserves to be elaborated as the oldest journal with continuous publication since its first appearance as the journal of the Macedonian Medical Association (MMA). Since its first issue, published in 1946, there has been an opus of some 4500 peer-reviewed published papers in more than 210 issues and some 80 supplements from various congresses and meetings. In this regard, great respect should be paid not only to the editorial boards, but also to the collaborators who have contributed to its successful continuity in all previous years. In line with the needs for further development of the journal and possibilities for access to world databases, the Editorial Board of MMR has made every effort to improve and modernize its work as well as the technical quality of the journal. Hence, MMA has signed a contract with De Gruyter Open as leading publisher of Open Access academic content for further improvement and promotion of the journal and facilitation of the Medline application, so we do hope for the further success of the journal. BANTAO Journal is published on behalf of the Balkan Cities Association of Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation and Artificial Organs (BANTAO), ISSN 1312-2517. The first issue was published in 2003, ten years after BANTAO was born. Its appearance was an extremely important event in the existence of BANTAO. The first official editor of the journal was Dimitar Nenov, Varna (2003-2005), followed by Ali Basci (Izmir, Turkey) and Goce Spasovski (Skopje, Macedonia) as editor-in-chief since 2009. Over the years, the Journal has been included in the EBSCO, DOAJ and SCOPUS/SCIMAGO databases. The journal is published biannually. Until now, 345

  17. Editorial policies and background in editing Macedonian Medical Review and BANTAO journal.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce

    2014-01-01

    Even in as small a country as R. Macedonia with limited resources allocated for science, there are many journals trying to establish good editorial practices and policies in publishing the scientific work achieved. Among the currently existing medical journals Macedonian Medical Review (MMR), ISSN 0025-1097, deserves to be elaborated as the oldest journal with continuous publication since its first appearance as the journal of the Macedonian Medical Association (MMA). Since its first issue, published in 1946, there has been an opus of some 4500 peer-reviewed published papers in more than 210 issues and some 80 supplements from various congresses and meetings. In this regard, great respect should be paid not only to the editorial boards, but also to the collaborators who have contributed to its successful continuity in all previous years. In line with the needs for further development of the journal and possibilities for access to world databases, the Editorial Board of MMR has made every effort to improve and modernize its work as well as the technical quality of the journal. Hence, MMA has signed a contract with De Gruyter Open as leading publisher of Open Access academic content for further improvement and promotion of the journal and facilitation of the Medline application, so we do hope for the further success of the journal. BANTAO Journal is published on behalf of the Balkan Cities Association of Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation and Artificial Organs (BANTAO), ISSN 1312-2517. The first issue was published in 2003, ten years after BANTAO was born. Its appearance was an extremely important event in the existence of BANTAO. The first official editor of the journal was Dimitar Nenov, Varna (2003-2005), followed by Ali Basci (Izmir, Turkey) and Goce Spasovski (Skopje, Macedonia) as editor-in-chief since 2009. Over the years, the Journal has been included in the EBSCO, DOAJ and SCOPUS/SCIMAGO databases. The journal is published biannually. Until now, 345

  18. Editorial and Introduction of the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Benson, Sally M.; Karimjee, Anhar; Rubin, Edward S.

    2010-03-01

    Short one page editorial to introduce the +30 peer reviewed papers contained within the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

  19. Analysis of the dispersion of air pollutants from a factory Asphalt in Nuevo Vallarta, Nay., Mex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Gonzalez, F. M.; Gaitán-Rodríguez, M.; Cornejo-López, V. M.; Morales-Hernández, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    An asphalt factory has operated intermittently near the urban area of Nuevo Vallarta on Banderas Bay, Nayarit, Mex. This factory has emissions that can affect the health of people living in the colonies nearest are Valle Dorado and San Vicente. The dispersion of emissions depends on the wind (sea breeze-land breeze) and the roof of the inversion, these phenomena determined by the density and temperature of the lower layers of the atmosphere. Asphalts are dark colored binder materials, formed by a complex non-volatile hydrocarbon chains and high molecular weight. Asphalts are produced from petroleum, but by a process of evaporation of the volatiles, leaving the asphalt alone. Therefore, the material emitted by the fireplace are mainly low molecular weight hydrocarbons known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Emergency Response Guide 2008 developed by various agencies in Canada, U.S. and Mexico mentions that the hydrocarbon gas can have health effects. Animal studies have shown that PAHs can cause harmful effects to the skin, body fluids and some PAHs are carcinogenic. An analysis of the wind field, monthly and seasonal averages for the years 2010 and 2011, recorded in AWS administered by the CEMCO and other stations located near the study area.

  20. [Diagnosis of health needs of the elderly population of a community of Puerto Nuevo].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Cordero, B M; Figueroa Negrón, C; Pérez Vigo, M C; Anadón Vázquez, D; Oliver Vázquez, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the health needs of the non-institutionalized population, 65 years and over, residing in a sector of the community of Puerto Nuevo. This was the first urbanization established in Puerto Rico in the early 50's. The "snowball" technique was use to identify all the residents 65 year and over of the mentioned sector. Eighty five elderly persons were interviewed to gather data of the following variables: demographics, health conditions, preventive measures, activities of daily living (ADLs, IADLs), health services utilization, psychosocial aspects and use of programs and services available for the elderly population. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures and chi-square. Results revealed a population with a higher education and economic level than the average for this age group in Puerto Rico. People over 75 years over reported more functional limitations than the 65-74 years interviewees did. In comparison with men, women were less educated and presented a higher percent of widows, persons living alone and functional limitations. In almost all the interviewees, help was available in case of need. The majority expressed satisfaction with their family and social lives. Very few utilized programs and services available for elderly persons. It is concluded that in order to improve their quality of life, this population needs to be managed in an holistic mode to address their biopsychosocial needs and to be educated in health promotion issues to prevent further functional limitations. They also need education about the available services for elderly persons.

  1. Editorial: The publication of geoscientific model developments v1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Executive Editors, GMD

    2013-08-01

    In 2008, the first volume of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) journal Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) was published. GMD was founded because we perceived there to be a need for a space to publish comprehensive descriptions of numerical models in the geosciences. The journal is now well established, with the submission rate increasing over time. However, there are several aspects of model publication that we believe could be further improved. In this editorial we assess the lessons learned over the first few years of the journal's life, and describe some changes to GMD's editorial policy, which will ensure that the models and model developments are published in such a way that they are of maximum value to the community. These changes to editorial policy mostly focus on improving the rigour of the review process through a stricter requirement for access to the materials necessary to test the behaviour of the models. Throughout this editorial, "must" means that the stated actions are required, and the paper cannot be published without them; "strongly encouraged" means that we encourage the action, but papers can still be published if the criteria are not met; "may" means that the action may be carried out by the authors or referees, if they so wish. We have reviewed and rationalised the manuscript types into five new categories. For all papers which are primarily based on a specific numerical model, the changes are as follows: - The paper must be accompanied by the code, or means of accessing the code, for the purpose of peer-review. If the code is normally distributed in a way which could compromise the anonymity of the referees, then the code must be made available to the editor. The referee/editor is not required to review the code in any way, but they may do so if they so wish. - All papers must include a section at the end of the paper entitled "Code availability". In this section, instructions for obtaining the code (e.g. from a supplement, or from a

  2. Joint editorial: Fostering innovation and improving impact assessment for journal publications in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Blöschl, Günter; Bárdossy, András.; Cudennec, Christophe; Hughes, Denis; Montanari, Alberto; Neuweiler, Insa; Savenije, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Editors of several journals in the field of hydrology met during the Assembly of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences—IAHS (within the Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics—IUGG) in Prague in June 2015. This event was a follow-up of a similar meeting held in July 2013 in Gothenburg (as reported by Blöschl et al. [2014]). These meetings enable the group of editors to review the current status of the journals and the publication process, and share thoughts on future strategies. Journals were represented in the 2015 meeting through their editors, as shown in the list of authors. The main points on fostering innovation and improving impact assessment in journal publications in hydrology are communicated in this joint editorial published in the above journals.

  3. Improved reporting of statistical design and analysis: guidelines, education, and editorial policies.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Madhu; Banerjee, Samprit; Van Epps, Heather L

    2010-01-01

    A majority of original articles published in biomedical journals include some form of statistical analysis. Unfortunately, many of the articles contain errors in statistical design and/or analysis. These errors are worrisome, as the misuse of statistics jeopardizes the process of scientific discovery and the accumulation of scientific knowledge. To help avoid these errors and improve statistical reporting, four approaches are suggested: (1) development of guidelines for statistical reporting that could be adopted by all journals, (2) improvement in statistics curricula in biomedical research programs with an emphasis on hands-on teaching by biostatisticians, (3) expansion and enhancement of biomedical science curricula in statistics programs, and (4) increased participation of biostatisticians in the peer review process along with the adoption of more rigorous journal editorial policies regarding statistics. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these issues with emphasis to the field of molecular biology and highlight the need for continuing efforts on all fronts.

  4. Editorial: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a continuing challenge to researchers, practitioners and carers.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2015-06-01

    This editorial introduces a collection of research papers and a review on ADHD, highlighting the continuing challenge that ADHD poses in research and practice. The articles include a Practitioner Review providing a comprehensive review focusing on current knowledge about barriers and facilitators operating at the individual, organisational and societal level; a study reporting a randomised controlled trial of parent training for ADHD pre-schoolers; an empirical paper on sex differences in ADHD symptom severity; a study of the co-development of ADHD and externalizing behaviour across the lifespan; a study of the genetic architecture of neurocognitive abilities in the general population; and finally a study examining the differential association among three behavioural dimensions leading to early-onset conduct problems. PMID:25968452

  5. [Metamorphoses of commentary. Editorial projects and formation of anatomical knowledge in the 16th century].

    PubMed

    Mandressi, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    The new anatomical knowledge, which began to come into existence in the first half of the 16th century, generated intellectual and material tools for the acquisition and transmission of knowledge on the basis of a methodological program which reworked the relationship between the written word of the authorities and sensorial observations. The reception and critical evaluation of inherited texts was carried out through the adoption and transformation of modes of writing and editorial devices put into the service of the new relationships to the past history of the discipline in the formation of knowledge of the body. The traditional form of commentary and the techniques which are associated with it, initially adopted by Berengario da Carpi and which are then to be found at the base of Andreas Vesalius' work, played a central role in this sense. PMID:16689078

  6. Commentary on the new sex and gender editorial policy of the Canadian Journal of Public Health.

    PubMed

    Gahagan, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    While the concepts of both "sex" and "gender" are widely recognized as important considerations in health research, the presence of these and other key determinants of health in research findings remains quite variable in the published literature. In an effort to close this knowledge gap in relation to the implications of both sex and gender in the public health research evidence base, the Canadian Journal of Public Health (CJPH) has recently adopted an editorial policy requiring authors to ensure that their manuscripts speak to these concepts, where applicable. In keeping with the international trend in sex and gender reporting in health research, the aim of this policy shift is for CJPH to continue to advance excellence in the field of public health research, policy and practice in Canada and internationally.

  7. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the 2013 volume Welcome to the 2013 volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2013-01-01

    Welcome to 2013; another great year for technology in our journal, Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Last year, SMS grew by some 11% while maintaining a high Impact Factor above 2 and a rejection rate of 60%. The Editorial Board and I are pleased with this outcome, as it's indicative of the relevance and vibrancy of SMS to our research community. SMS continues to have a leading role within our community of researchers in the field of smart materials and smart systems technology. As always the quality of SMS is something that the Editorial Board takes very seriously. I have instructed the Editorial Board and our reviewers to scrutinize manuscripts, not only for originality and contributions to the field of smart materials and structures, but to consider the potential impact on the technology. In addition, we are doing more to architect the content of our issues, creating a conduit for exciting developments, developing review topics, and publishing focus issues that cover current technological trends. We would like to promote SMS as a medium to accelerate the promotion of the latest technology. Toward this end, SMS has instituted the Fast Track Communication (FTC). FTCs are short, urgent announcements reporting new and timely developments in the field. They benefit from extra post-publication promotion and accelerated peer review. SMS also has a strong program of topical review articles. Many of us are professors, involved with the training of new researchers to our field, and the value of review articles to education and training cannot be overstated. Such articles allow a reader to 'get up to speed' quickly in a new area, whether they be new graduate students or seasoned technologists deciphering what smart materials has to offer a particular application. Review topics are considered by me and the Editorial Board for content. If approved, SMS will commission a writer to prepare the article for which they will receive a fee in appreciation for the service they

  8. Joint editorial - Fostering innovation and improving impact assessment for journal publications in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Blöschl, Günter; Bárdossy, András; Cudennec, Christophe; Hughes, Denis; Montanari, Alberto; Neuweiler, Insa; Savenije, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    Editors from several journals in the field of hydrology met during the Assembly of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences-IAHS (within the Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics-IUGG) in Prague in June 2015. This event was a follow-up of a similar meeting in July 2013 in Gothenburg (as reported by Blöschl et al. (2014)). In these meetings the group of editors reviewed the current status of the journals and the publication process, and shared thoughts on future strategies. Journals were represented in the meeting through their editors, as shown in the list of authors. The main points on fostering innovation and improving impact assessment in journal publications in hydrology are communicated in this joint editorial published in journals that participated in the meeting.

  9. Misconduct, Marginality and Editorial Practices in Management, Business and Economics Journals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The paper presents data on the two problems of misconduct and marginality in management, business and economics (MBE) journals and their practices to combat these problems. Design Data was collected in three phases. First, all publicly retracted papers in MBE journals were identified through keywords searches in 7 major databases (n = 1329 journals). Second, a focused survey was distributed to editors involved in such retractions (n = 64; response rate = 28%). Finally, a survey was administered to all active journals in the seven databases to collect data on editors’ perceptions and practices related to the two problems (n = 937, response rate = 31.8%). Frequency analyses, cross tabulations, and qualitative analyses of open answers were used to examine the data. Results 184 retracted papers in MBE journals were identified in 2005–2015 (no retraction was found before 2005). From 2005–2007 to 2012–2015, the number of retractions increased by a factor ten with an all-time high in 2015. The survey to journals with reported retractions illustrates how already a few cases of suspected misconduct put a strain on the editorial workload. The survey to all active journals revealed that 42% of the respondents had started to use software to screen all submitted papers, and that a majority recognized the problem of marginality, as indicated by salami-style submissions. According to some editors, reviewers easily spot such submissions whereas others argued that authors may submit thinly sliced papers in parallel to several journals, which means that this practice is only discovered post-publication. The survey question on ways to support creative contributions stimulated a rich response of ideas regarding editorial vision, engaged boards and developmental approaches. The study uses data from three specialized fields, but its findings may be highly relevant to many journals in the social sciences. PMID:27454761

  10. Editorial introduction.

    PubMed

    Gelso, Charles J

    2007-09-01

    Introduces the special section in the current issue of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. This section contains a reprint of Carl R. Rogers' (1957) seminal paper on the necessary and sufficient conditions for constructive personality change, as well as 11 reaction papers from some of the best psychotherapy theoreticians and researchers of our time. The reaction papers address the impact of Rogers' paper on the field of psychotherapy in general and therapy of the commenter's persuasion in particular, limitations of Rogers' viewpoints, the most important and enduring aspects of Rogers' theoretical statement, and how Rogers' ideas may exhibit themselves directly and indirectly in the current psychotherapy scene. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Editorial: Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Cliff; Swartz, Barb

    1983-01-01

    Discusses an accompanying centerfold which not only combines physics and history but also focuses on the matter of perspective. Names of scientists and their accomplishments as well as cultural and political milestones are included in the centerfold. (JN)

  12. Guest Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, Padmanapan; Babu, Dhanakotti Rajan; Chelvane, Jeyaramane Arout; Vizhi, Rajasekaran Ezhil

    2016-11-01

    This special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (JMMM) is a collection of selected papers presented at the International Conference on Magnetic Materials and Applications (ICMAGMA-2015), held at VIT University, Vellore, India during December 2 - 4, 2015. The papers were screened and selected for publication after an intensive peer review, with a minimum of two reviewers for every paper. The editors would like to place on record the unstinted support received from over 100 reviewers which culminated in the selection of 49 manuscripts for publication. We take this opportunity to thank everyone for participating in the ICMAGMA-2015.

  13. PREFACE: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strikhanov, Mikhail N.; Pivovarov, Yury L.

    2010-04-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at 8th International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS'09), which was held in Zvenigorod, Moscow Region, Russia, from 7 to 11 September 2009, organized jointly by National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk), Russia. University MEPhI (Moscow) and Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk), Russia. RREPS was founded in September 1993 by an initiative of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russia, with the intention of strengthening basic and applied research focused on radiation from relativistic particles in natural and artificial periodic structures. Since then, the symposium has developed into a forum attracting scientists from different fields and from many countries all over the world. RREPS'09 followed previous successful series of biennial RREPS symposia at Tomsk (1993, 1995, 1997, 2003), Baikal Lake (1999), Aya Lake (Altai, Russia, 2001) and Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic, 2007). Five NIMB topical issues (V 145 No 1-2, October 1998; V 173 No 1-2, January 2001; V 201(1) January 2003; V 227, Issues 1-2, January 2005; V 266, Issue 17, September 2008) have been published as outgrowth of these symposia. Traditionally, the RREPS program includes following topics: General Properties of Electromagnetic Radiation from Relativistic Particles Transition Radiation Parametric X- Radiation Diffraction Radiation and Smith-Purcell Effect Coherent Bremsstrahlung and Channeling Radiation Crystal- Assisted Processes Applications of Monochromatic X- and Gamma- Beams Produced at Electron Accelerators The present RREPS'09 Symposium was dedicated to the modern problems in radiation from relativistic electrons in crystals and other periodic structures, as well as to new applications of photon and electron beams. During the last few decades, electromagnetic radiation from relativistic particles, both in external fields and in matter, has always been an interesting field for investigation. Every kind of radiation reflects specific processes of fundamental atomic physics, classical or quantum electrodynamics and might have specific applications in accelerator physics (beam diagnostics), nuclear physics (hard photon sources), material science and medicine (X-Ray sources). Nowadays, electromagnetic radiation studies cover electron energies from a few MeV up to hundreds of GeV in many laboratories throughout the world. The goal is to study the physics of generation of various kinds of radiation and their interplay or combined effects and to find successful applications for them. New photon sources, which use new types of radiation at new accelerators (e.g. tabletop synchrotrons), may be considered complementary to conventional photon sources based on synchrotron radiation, undulator radiation and free electron lasers. We express our thanks to the members of the International Program Committee for their suggestions during the preparation of the scientific program of the workshop. We warmly thank the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow) and the Tomsk Polytechnic University (Tomsk) for the financial and administrative support. We also acknowledge the valuable financial contributions by Russian Fund for Basic Research and "Dynasty" Foundation. Editors Mikhail N. Strikhanov National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Yury L. Pivovarov Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia

  14. Editorial Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    As from January 2016, Dr. Andrew Barry and Dr. Andrea Rinaldo have retired as Editors of Advances in Water Resources. Dr Barry has been a long serving Editor for 14 years, beginning this role on January 1, 2002. During this time he has served the science community with dedication, commitment, and diligence while bringing to the journal a strong vision and a wealth of knowledge that has tremendously improved the visibility and impact of Advances in Water Resources. Throughout this period he has also broadened the scope of the journal by adapting to the new emerging needs of the field through proactively seeking and promoting numerous special issues, which have now become a hallmark of the journal. The importance of obtaining high quality reviews and timeliness in decision-making, have always been a priority under Dr Barry's Editorship. It is clear that Advances in Water Resources and the community which it serves, has benefited enormously under Andrew's tenure and we will miss his energy, enthusiasm and passion for hydrologic science.

  15. Editorial introduction.

    PubMed

    Gelso, Charles J

    2007-09-01

    Introduces the special section in the current issue of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. This section contains a reprint of Carl R. Rogers' (1957) seminal paper on the necessary and sufficient conditions for constructive personality change, as well as 11 reaction papers from some of the best psychotherapy theoreticians and researchers of our time. The reaction papers address the impact of Rogers' paper on the field of psychotherapy in general and therapy of the commenter's persuasion in particular, limitations of Rogers' viewpoints, the most important and enduring aspects of Rogers' theoretical statement, and how Rogers' ideas may exhibit themselves directly and indirectly in the current psychotherapy scene. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122244

  16. Editorial - A Matter of Quality of Life, of DOBEs and MEEPs, of Appropriate Recognition, of Targeted Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, Andre

    2013-01-01

    This editorial presents the book as a continuation of the first volume, both OPSA volumes being themselves in the line, with more emphasis on people, of the earlier prize-winning series "Organizations and Strategies in Astronomy (OSA)", the seven volumes of which described how astronomy research lives: how it is planned, funded and organized, how it interacts with other disciplines and the rest of the world, how it communicates, etc. All those books are a unique medium for scientists and non-scientists (sometimes from outside astronomy) to describe their experience, often for the first time at such a level, on non-purely scientific matters, many of them of fundamental importance for the efficient conduct astronomy-related activities. The editorial tackles also issues regarding ethics and management of people, stressing the need for managers with ad hoc training and a long-term vision of the role of astronomers towards the society at large.

  17. Estudio del comportamiento tribologico y de las interacciones de superficie de nuevos nanofluidos ionicos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Rodriguez, Tulia

    tribocorrosion processes. The formation of a coating layer on magnesium alloys from phosphonate imidazolium ionic liquids by immersion and by chronoamperometry has been described. The new coatings reduce the abrasive wear in the magnesium-aluminium alloy but they are not effective in the magnesium-zinc alloy, which prevent the formation of continuous coatings. Los liquidos ionicos son sales liquidas a temperatura ambiente o bajas temperaturas que presentan excelentes propiedades fisico-quimicas. En el presente trabajo se estudian como lubricantes en problemas tribologicos complejos como la lubricacion de metales contra si mismos, el desarrollo de lubricantes base agua y de nuevas superficies autolubricadas. Cuando no es posible reducir la friccion y desgaste mediante lubricacion, como en las aleaciones de magnesio, los liquidos ionicos se han estudiado como precursores de recubrimientos protectores. Se han determinado las interacciones superficiales y los procesos de corrosion sobre cobre y sobre acero con diferentes liquidos ionicos proticos y aproticos para desarrollar nuevos lubricantes y aditivos. En el contacto cobre/cobre, excepto el liquido ionico protico derivado del oleato, todos los liquidos ionicos estudiados presentan mejor comportamiento tribologico que el lubricante comercial Polialfaolefina 6. En el contacto acero/zafiro, los nuevos liquidos ionicos proticos son buenos lubricantes cuando se utilizan en estado puro, y, como aditivos en agua, generan peliculas adsorbidas sobre la superficie del metal reduciendo la friccion y el desgaste tras la evaporacion del agua. Para evitar el periodo de alta friccion inicial en presencia de agua, se han generado peliculas superficiales de liquido ionico sobre el acero en condiciones estaticas. El mejor comportamiento lubricante tanto en el contacto cobre/cobre como en el contacto acero/zafiro se obtiene para el liquido ionico protico derivado del anion adipato, con dos grupos carboxilicos. Las interacciones de los grupos

  18. [Major advances in oncology in 2014: the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer point of view].

    PubMed

    Massard, Christophe; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; André, Thierry; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Orbach, Daniel; Wislez, Marie; Thariat, Juliette; Magné, Nicolas; Vignot, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Results of many clinical trials are presented each year during the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting, ESMO meeting and other international major meetings. This article is proposed by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer as a synthesis of new important results in clinical trials concerning cancer patients treated for hematology cancer or solid tumors. The goal of this review is to highlight the main results that may have an immediate impact on our clinical practices for physicians and patients.

  19. Representations of people with HIV and hepatitis C in editorials of medical journals: discourses and interdiscursive relations.

    PubMed

    Körner, Henrike; Treloar, Carla

    2006-01-01

    HIV and hepatitis C are blood-borne viruses that cause chronic diseases and affect (in parts of the developed world) predominantly groups that are marginalized and discriminated against: gay men and injecting drug users, respectively. This paper compares the representation of people with HIV and hepatitis C in editorials of medical journals between 1989 and 2001. Analysis is informed by critical discourse analysis and systemic functional linguistics. Hepatitis C editorials draw almost exclusively on the discourse of biomedicine, and patients are either absent or objects in medical procedures. In HIV editorials, a variety of other discourses are integrated into the discourse of biomedicine, thereby creating multidimensional representations of people with HIV as patients and agents in medical procedures, involved in decision making, affected by economic factors, social and cultural issues. The paper discusses the role of the gay community in discursive change and argues that discursive diversity in the representation of people infected with HIV and hepatitis C in medical journals is necessary for health policy, the professional development of healthcare providers, and media reporting to the general public. PMID:16808422

  20. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2006 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2006 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics The article 'Molecular tagging velocimetry and thermometry and its application to the wake of a heated circular cylinder' by Hui Hu and Manoochehr Koochesfahani, published in volume 17, issue 6, pp 1269-1281, was selected by the cognizant Editorial Board Members as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2006. This consensus selection was accompanied by the collective judgment that a number of other very strong contributions were published in 2006. These other papers have been added to the 2006 Highlights in the electronic version of the journal. The paper by Hu and Koochesfahani is recognized for its contribution to the use of molecular tagging techniques in the service of velocity and temperature measurements. The paper clearly articulates the prior state-of-the-art in this area and it communicates the required equipment and procedures to utilize this experimental tool. The capabilities of their technique are made apparent by the simultaneous (u,v,T) observations in the wake of a circular cylinder. The normalized heat flux vectors, (\\overline{u_j'T'})/U\\Delta T, demonstrate one of the beneficial results of obtaining a whole-field view of the velocity and temperature distributions. The authors also have carefully noted the intrinsic limitations of their technique. 2006 Award Winners—Measurement Science The

  1. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  2. NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) cancer information summaries: history, editorial processes, influence, and reach.

    PubMed

    Manrow, Richard E; Beckwith, Margaret; Johnson, Lenora E

    2014-03-01

    In the National Cancer Act of 1971, the Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) was given a mandate to "Collect, analyze, and disseminate all data useful in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer, including the establishment of an International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) to collect, catalog, store, and disseminate insofar as feasible the results of cancer research undertaken in any country for the use of any person involved in cancer research in any country" (National Cancer Act of 1971, S 1828, 92nd Congress, 1st Sess (1971)). In subsequent legislation, the audience for NCI's information dissemination activities was expanded to include physicians and other healthcare professionals, patients and their families, and the general public, in addition to cancer researchers. The Institute's response to these legislative requirements was to create what is now known as the Physician Data Query (PDQ®) cancer information database. From its beginnings in 1977 as a database of NCI-sponsored cancer clinical trials, PDQ has grown to include extensive information about cancer treatment, screening, prevention, supportive and palliative care, genetics, drugs, and more. Herein, we describe the history, editorial processes, influence, and global reach of one component of the PDQ database, namely its evidence-based cancer information summaries for health professionals. These summaries are widely recognized as important cancer information and education resources, and they further serve as foundational documents for the development of other cancer information products by NCI and other organizations.

  3. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  4. Electronic submission of academic works: a survey of current editorial practices of radiologic journals.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G W; Davidson, H C; Wiggins, R H; Harnsberger, H R

    2001-06-01

    Computers are nearly ubiquitous in academic medicine, and authors create and compile much of their work in the electronic environment, yet the process of manuscript submission often fails to utilize the advantages of electronic communication. The purpose of this report is to review the submission policies of major academic journals in the field of radiology and assess current editorial practices relating to electronic submission of academic works. The authors surveyed 16 radiologic journals that are indexed in the Index Medicus and available in our medical center library. They compared the manuscript submission policies of these journals as outlined in recent issues of the journals and the corresponding worldwide web sites. The authors compared the journals on the following criteria: web site access to instructions; electronic submission of text, both with regard to initial submission and final submission of the approved document; text hardcopy requirements; word processing software restrictions; electronic submission of figures, figure hardcopy requirements; figure file format restrictions; and electronic submission media. Although the trend seems to be toward electronic submission, there currently is no clear-cut standard of practice. Because all of the journals that accept electronic documents also require a hardcopy, many of the advantages gained through electronic submission are nullified. In addition, many publishers only utilize electronic documents after a manuscript has been accepted, thus utilizing the benefits of digital information in the printing process but not in the actual submission and peer-review process.

  5. Peer review versus editorial review and their role in innovative science.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Georg; Adlassnig, Wolfram; Risch, Jesaka Ahau; Anderlini, Serena; Arguriou, Petros; Armendariz, Aaron Zolen; Bains, William; Baker, Clark; Barnes, Martin; Barnett, Jonathan; Baumgartner, Michael; Baumgartner, Thomas; Bendall, Charles A; Bender, Yvonne S; Bichler, Max; Biermann, Teresa; Bini, Ronaldo; Blanco, Eduardo; Bleau, John; Brink, Anthony; Brown, Darin; Burghuber, Christopher; Calne, Roy; Carter, Brian; Castaño, Cesar; Celec, Peter; Celis, Maria Eugenia; Clarke, Nicky; Cockrell, David; Collins, David; Coogan, Brian; Craig, Jennifer; Crilly, Cal; Crowe, David; Csoka, Antonei B; Darwich, Chaza; Del Kebos, Topiciprin; Derinaldi, Michele; Dlamini, Bongani; Drewa, Tomasz; Dwyer, Michael; Eder, Fabienne; de Palma, Raúl Ehrichs; Esmay, Dean; Rött, Catherine Evans; Exley, Christopher; Falkov, Robin; Farber, Celia Ingrid; Fearn, William; Felsmann, Sophie; Flensmark, Jarl; Fletcher, Andrew K; Foster, Michaela; Fountoulakis, Kostas N; Fouratt, Jim; Blanca, Jesus Garcia; Sotelo, Manuel Garrido; Gittler, Florian; Gittler, Georg; Gomez, Juan; Gomez, Juan F; Polar, Maria Grazia Gonzales; Gonzalez, Jossina; Gösselsberger, Christoph; Habermacher, Lynn; Hajek, Michael; Hakala, Faith; Haliburton, Mary-Sue; Hankins, John Robert; Hart, Jason; Hasslberger, Sepp; Hennessey, Donalyn; Herrmann, Andrea; Hersee, Mike; Howard, Connie; Humphries, Suzanne; Isharc, Laeeth; Ivanovski, Petar; Jenuth, Stephen; Jerndal, Jens; Johnson, Christine; Keleta, Yonas; Kenny, Anna; Kidd, Billie; Kohle, Fritz; Kolahi, Jafar; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Kostova, Lyubov; Kumar, Arunachalam; Kurosawa, Alejandro; Lance, Tony; Lechermann, Michael; Lendl, Bernhard; Leuchters, Michael; Lewis, Evan; Lieb, Edward; Lloyd, Gloria; Losek, Angelika; Lu, Yao; Maestracci, Saadia; Mangan, Dennis; Mares, Alberto W; Barnett, Juan Mazar; McClain, Valerie; McNair, John Sydney; Michael, Terry; Miller, Lloyd; Monzani, Partizia; Moran, Belen; Morris, Mike; Mößmer, Georg; Mountain, Johny; Phuthe, Onnie Mary Moyo; Muñoz, Marcos; Nakken, Sheri; Wambui, Anne Nduta; Neunteufl, Bettina; Nikolić, Dimitrije; Oberoi, Devesh V; Obmode, Gregory; Ogar, Laura; Ohara, Jo; Rybine, Naion Olej; Owen, Bryan; Owen, Kim Wilson; Parikh, Rakesh; Pearce, Nicholas J G; Pemmer, Bernhard; Piper, Chris; Prince, Ian; Reid, Terence; Rindermann, Heiner; Risch, Stefan; Robbins, Josh; Roberts, Seth; Romero, Ajeandro; Rothe, Michael Thaddäus; Ruiz, Sergio; Sacher, Juliane; Sackl, Wolfgang; Salletmaier, Markus; Sanand, Jairaj; Sauerzopf, Clemens; Schwarzgruber, Thomas; Scott, David; Seegers, Laura; Seppi, David; Shields, Kyle; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Singh, Beldeu; Sithole, Sibusio; Six, Florian; Skoyles, John R; Slofstra, Jildou; Sole, Daphne Anne; Sommer, Werner F; Sonko, Mels; Starr-Casanova, Chrislie J; Steakley, Marjorie Elizabeth; Steinhauser, Wolfgang; Steinhoff, Konstantin; Sterba, Johannes H; Steppan, Martin; Stindl, Reinhard; Stokely, Joe; Stokely, Karri; St-Pierre, Gilles; Stratford, James; Streli, Christina; Stryg, Carl; Sullivan, Mike; Summhammer, Johann; Tadesse, Amhayes; Tavares, David; Thompson, Laura; Tomlinson, Alison; Tozer, Jack; Trevisanato, Siro I; Trimmel, Michaela; Turner, Nicole; Vahur, Paul; van der Byl, Jennie; van der Maas, Tine; Varela, Leo; Vega, Carlos A; Vermaak, Shiloh; Villasenor, Alex; Vogel, Matt; von Wintzigerode, Georg; Wagner, Christoph; Weinberger, Manuel; Weinberger, Peter; Wilson, Nick; Wolfe, Jennifer Finocchio; Woodley, Michael A; Young, Ian; Zuraw, Glenn; Zwiren, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    Peer review is a widely accepted instrument for raising the quality of science. Peer review limits the enormous unstructured influx of information and the sheer amount of dubious data, which in its absence would plunge science into chaos. In particular, peer review offers the benefit of eliminating papers that suffer from poor craftsmanship or methodological shortcomings, especially in the experimental sciences. However, we believe that peer review is not always appropriate for the evaluation of controversial hypothetical science. We argue that the process of peer review can be prone to bias towards ideas that affirm the prior convictions of reviewers and against innovation and radical new ideas. Innovative hypotheses are thus highly vulnerable to being "filtered out" or made to accord with conventional wisdom by the peer review process. Consequently, having introduced peer review, the Elsevier journal Medical Hypotheses may be unable to continue its tradition as a radical journal allowing discussion of improbable or unconventional ideas. Hence we conclude by asking the publisher to consider re-introducing the system of editorial review to Medical Hypotheses. PMID:23054375

  6. Editorial Perspective: Pathological social withdrawal during in adolescence: a culture-specific or a global phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Li, Tim M H; Wong, Paul W C

    2015-10-01

    Impairing patterns of long-term adolescent social withdrawal and self-exclusion, including nonattendance at school or work, and minimal social contact, have been identified as a significant clinical and social problem in Japan since the late 1990s, where it is termed hikikomori. As well clinical impairment for the withdrawn youths and burden for the families, hikikomori has brought societal and health service costs in Japan. Since its first identification, similar cases have been reported in other countries. Socially withdrawn youths, unfortunately, are difficult to identify and their risks can be 'invisible' because of their withdrawn nature and the traditional perspective of what is perceived as at-risk youth. Understanding of the issue including its causes, risks, and outcomes is very limited. In this editorial perspective, we highlight how youth social withdrawal is becoming a clinical and social concern in some parts of the world and respond to the lack of research on this issue by synthesizing some of the basic research findings, and suggesting future directions for research and practice relating to this emerging youth phenomenon in middle-and-high-income countries in the hope of bringing more attention to this issue.

  7. Editorial Perspective: Pathological social withdrawal during in adolescence: a culture-specific or a global phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Li, Tim M H; Wong, Paul W C

    2015-10-01

    Impairing patterns of long-term adolescent social withdrawal and self-exclusion, including nonattendance at school or work, and minimal social contact, have been identified as a significant clinical and social problem in Japan since the late 1990s, where it is termed hikikomori. As well clinical impairment for the withdrawn youths and burden for the families, hikikomori has brought societal and health service costs in Japan. Since its first identification, similar cases have been reported in other countries. Socially withdrawn youths, unfortunately, are difficult to identify and their risks can be 'invisible' because of their withdrawn nature and the traditional perspective of what is perceived as at-risk youth. Understanding of the issue including its causes, risks, and outcomes is very limited. In this editorial perspective, we highlight how youth social withdrawal is becoming a clinical and social concern in some parts of the world and respond to the lack of research on this issue by synthesizing some of the basic research findings, and suggesting future directions for research and practice relating to this emerging youth phenomenon in middle-and-high-income countries in the hope of bringing more attention to this issue. PMID:26076984

  8. Mathematical Psychology: Prospects For The 21st Century1: A Guest Editorial

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The twenty-first century is certainly in progress by now, but hardly well underway. Therefore, I will take that modest elasticity in concept as a frame for this essay. This frame will serve as background for some of my hopes and gripes about contemporary psychology and mathematical psychology’s place therein. It will also act as platform for earnest, if wistful thoughts about what might have (and perhaps can still) aid us in forwarding our agenda and what I see as some of the promising avenues for the future. I loosely structure the essay into a section about mathematical psychology in the context of psychology at large and then a section devoted to prospects within mathematical psychology proper. The essay can perhaps be considered as in a similar spirit, although differing in content, to previous editorial-like reviews of general or specific aspects of mathematical psychology such as Estes (1975), Falmagne (2005), Luce (1997) that have appeared in this journal. PMID:19802342

  9. Editorial political cartoons in Australia: social representations & and the visual depiction of essentialism.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Gail; Holtz, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Six million migrants from over 170 countries have resettled in Australia since 1945 ensuring religious diversity is now a hallmark of Australia's population. However, not all religious groups are perceived in the same way. In this paper, we explore how representational processes differentially essentialise religious groups, in particular how some groups are ascribed an underlying nature that irrevocably defines who they are and how they will behave, whilst other groups are conveyed merely as coherent entities with similarity in goals and structure. We elucidate this through an analysis of the depiction of religious markers in Australian Editorial political cartoons. We mirror the near-exclusive focus on the Muslim and Christian religions, in the religious cartoons we sampled, to present an analysis of 6 exemplar cartoons. Drawing from visual analysis techniques (van Leeuwen 2001) and social representations theory (Moscovici 1984) we highlight how essentialist perceptions of religious groups are unwittingly fostered in everyday media communications. We discuss the implications of our analysis for the transnationalisation of religion.

  10. Peer review versus editorial review and their role in innovative science.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Georg; Adlassnig, Wolfram; Risch, Jesaka Ahau; Anderlini, Serena; Arguriou, Petros; Armendariz, Aaron Zolen; Bains, William; Baker, Clark; Barnes, Martin; Barnett, Jonathan; Baumgartner, Michael; Baumgartner, Thomas; Bendall, Charles A; Bender, Yvonne S; Bichler, Max; Biermann, Teresa; Bini, Ronaldo; Blanco, Eduardo; Bleau, John; Brink, Anthony; Brown, Darin; Burghuber, Christopher; Calne, Roy; Carter, Brian; Castaño, Cesar; Celec, Peter; Celis, Maria Eugenia; Clarke, Nicky; Cockrell, David; Collins, David; Coogan, Brian; Craig, Jennifer; Crilly, Cal; Crowe, David; Csoka, Antonei B; Darwich, Chaza; Del Kebos, Topiciprin; Derinaldi, Michele; Dlamini, Bongani; Drewa, Tomasz; Dwyer, Michael; Eder, Fabienne; de Palma, Raúl Ehrichs; Esmay, Dean; Rött, Catherine Evans; Exley, Christopher; Falkov, Robin; Farber, Celia Ingrid; Fearn, William; Felsmann, Sophie; Flensmark, Jarl; Fletcher, Andrew K; Foster, Michaela; Fountoulakis, Kostas N; Fouratt, Jim; Blanca, Jesus Garcia; Sotelo, Manuel Garrido; Gittler, Florian; Gittler, Georg; Gomez, Juan; Gomez, Juan F; Polar, Maria Grazia Gonzales; Gonzalez, Jossina; Gösselsberger, Christoph; Habermacher, Lynn; Hajek, Michael; Hakala, Faith; Haliburton, Mary-Sue; Hankins, John Robert; Hart, Jason; Hasslberger, Sepp; Hennessey, Donalyn; Herrmann, Andrea; Hersee, Mike; Howard, Connie; Humphries, Suzanne; Isharc, Laeeth; Ivanovski, Petar; Jenuth, Stephen; Jerndal, Jens; Johnson, Christine; Keleta, Yonas; Kenny, Anna; Kidd, Billie; Kohle, Fritz; Kolahi, Jafar; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Kostova, Lyubov; Kumar, Arunachalam; Kurosawa, Alejandro; Lance, Tony; Lechermann, Michael; Lendl, Bernhard; Leuchters, Michael; Lewis, Evan; Lieb, Edward; Lloyd, Gloria; Losek, Angelika; Lu, Yao; Maestracci, Saadia; Mangan, Dennis; Mares, Alberto W; Barnett, Juan Mazar; McClain, Valerie; McNair, John Sydney; Michael, Terry; Miller, Lloyd; Monzani, Partizia; Moran, Belen; Morris, Mike; Mößmer, Georg; Mountain, Johny; Phuthe, Onnie Mary Moyo; Muñoz, Marcos; Nakken, Sheri; Wambui, Anne Nduta; Neunteufl, Bettina; Nikolić, Dimitrije; Oberoi, Devesh V; Obmode, Gregory; Ogar, Laura; Ohara, Jo; Rybine, Naion Olej; Owen, Bryan; Owen, Kim Wilson; Parikh, Rakesh; Pearce, Nicholas J G; Pemmer, Bernhard; Piper, Chris; Prince, Ian; Reid, Terence; Rindermann, Heiner; Risch, Stefan; Robbins, Josh; Roberts, Seth; Romero, Ajeandro; Rothe, Michael Thaddäus; Ruiz, Sergio; Sacher, Juliane; Sackl, Wolfgang; Salletmaier, Markus; Sanand, Jairaj; Sauerzopf, Clemens; Schwarzgruber, Thomas; Scott, David; Seegers, Laura; Seppi, David; Shields, Kyle; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Singh, Beldeu; Sithole, Sibusio; Six, Florian; Skoyles, John R; Slofstra, Jildou; Sole, Daphne Anne; Sommer, Werner F; Sonko, Mels; Starr-Casanova, Chrislie J; Steakley, Marjorie Elizabeth; Steinhauser, Wolfgang; Steinhoff, Konstantin; Sterba, Johannes H; Steppan, Martin; Stindl, Reinhard; Stokely, Joe; Stokely, Karri; St-Pierre, Gilles; Stratford, James; Streli, Christina; Stryg, Carl; Sullivan, Mike; Summhammer, Johann; Tadesse, Amhayes; Tavares, David; Thompson, Laura; Tomlinson, Alison; Tozer, Jack; Trevisanato, Siro I; Trimmel, Michaela; Turner, Nicole; Vahur, Paul; van der Byl, Jennie; van der Maas, Tine; Varela, Leo; Vega, Carlos A; Vermaak, Shiloh; Villasenor, Alex; Vogel, Matt; von Wintzigerode, Georg; Wagner, Christoph; Weinberger, Manuel; Weinberger, Peter; Wilson, Nick; Wolfe, Jennifer Finocchio; Woodley, Michael A; Young, Ian; Zuraw, Glenn; Zwiren, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    Peer review is a widely accepted instrument for raising the quality of science. Peer review limits the enormous unstructured influx of information and the sheer amount of dubious data, which in its absence would plunge science into chaos. In particular, peer review offers the benefit of eliminating papers that suffer from poor craftsmanship or methodological shortcomings, especially in the experimental sciences. However, we believe that peer review is not always appropriate for the evaluation of controversial hypothetical science. We argue that the process of peer review can be prone to bias towards ideas that affirm the prior convictions of reviewers and against innovation and radical new ideas. Innovative hypotheses are thus highly vulnerable to being "filtered out" or made to accord with conventional wisdom by the peer review process. Consequently, having introduced peer review, the Elsevier journal Medical Hypotheses may be unable to continue its tradition as a radical journal allowing discussion of improbable or unconventional ideas. Hence we conclude by asking the publisher to consider re-introducing the system of editorial review to Medical Hypotheses.

  11. Genetic structure of the populations migrating from San Luis Potosi and Zacatecas to Nuevo León in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Kshatriya, G K; Barton, S A; Leal-Garza, C H; Garza-Chapa, R; Schull, W J; Chakraborty, R

    1991-06-01

    The Mexicans residing in the Monterrey metropolitan area in Nuevo León, Mexico, were grouped by generation and birthplace [Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA), San Luis Potosi (SLP), and Zacatecas (ZAC)] of the four grandparents to determine the extent of genetic variation within this population and the genetic differences, if any, between the natives living in the MMA and the immigrant populations from SLP and ZAC. Nine genetic marker systems were analyzed. The genetic distance analysis indicates that SLP and ZAC are similar to the MMA, irrespective of birthplace and generation. Gene diversity analysis (GST) suggests that more than 96% of the total gene diversity (HT) can be attributed to individual variation within the population. The genetic admixture analysis suggests that the Mexicans of the MMA, SLP, and ZAC, stratified by birthplace and generation, have received a predominantly Spanish contribution (78.5%), followed by a Mexican Indian contribution (21.5%). Similarly, admixture analysis, conducted on the population of Nuevo León and stratified by generation, indicates a substantial contribution from the MMA (64.6%), followed by ZAC (22.1%) and SLP (13.3%). Finally, we demonstrate that there is no nonrandom association of alleles among the genetic marker systems (i.e., no evidence of gametic disequilibrium) despite the Mestizo origin of this population.

  12. EDITORIAL: Welcome to the 2013 volume Welcome to the 2013 volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2013-01-01

    Welcome to 2013; another great year for technology in our journal, Smart Materials and Structures (SMS). Last year, SMS grew by some 11% while maintaining a high Impact Factor above 2 and a rejection rate of 60%. The Editorial Board and I are pleased with this outcome, as it's indicative of the relevance and vibrancy of SMS to our research community. SMS continues to have a leading role within our community of researchers in the field of smart materials and smart systems technology. As always the quality of SMS is something that the Editorial Board takes very seriously. I have instructed the Editorial Board and our reviewers to scrutinize manuscripts, not only for originality and contributions to the field of smart materials and structures, but to consider the potential impact on the technology. In addition, we are doing more to architect the content of our issues, creating a conduit for exciting developments, developing review topics, and publishing focus issues that cover current technological trends. We would like to promote SMS as a medium to accelerate the promotion of the latest technology. Toward this end, SMS has instituted the Fast Track Communication (FTC). FTCs are short, urgent announcements reporting new and timely developments in the field. They benefit from extra post-publication promotion and accelerated peer review. SMS also has a strong program of topical review articles. Many of us are professors, involved with the training of new researchers to our field, and the value of review articles to education and training cannot be overstated. Such articles allow a reader to 'get up to speed' quickly in a new area, whether they be new graduate students or seasoned technologists deciphering what smart materials has to offer a particular application. Review topics are considered by me and the Editorial Board for content. If approved, SMS will commission a writer to prepare the article for which they will receive a fee in appreciation for the service they

  13. The relationship between manuscript title structure and success: editorial decisions and citation performance for an ecological journal

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Charles W; Burns, C Sean

    2015-01-01

    A poorly chosen article title may make a paper difficult to discover or discourage readership when discovered, reducing an article's impact. Yet, it is unclear how the structure of a manuscript's title influences readership and impact. We used manuscript tracking data for all manuscripts submitted to the journal Functional Ecology from 2004 to 2013 and citation data for papers published in this journal from 1987 to 2011 to examine how title features changed and whether a manuscript's title structure was predictive of success during the manuscript review process and/or impact (citation) after publication. Titles of manuscripts submitted to Functional Ecology became marginally longer (after controlling for other variables), broader in focus (less frequent inclusion of genus and species names), and included more humor and subtitles over the period of the study. Papers with subtitles were less likely to be rejected by editors both pre- and post-peer review, although both effects were small and the presence of subtitles in published papers was not predictive of citations. Papers with specific names of study organisms in their titles fared poorly during editorial (but not peer) review and, if published, were less well cited than papers whose titles did not include specific names. Papers with intermediate length titles were more successful during editorial review, although the effect was small and title word count was not predictive of citations. No features of titles were predictive of reviewer willingness to review papers or the length of time a paper was in peer review. We conclude that titles have changed in structure over time, but features of title structure have only small or no relationship with success during editorial review and post-publication impact. The title feature that was most predictive of manuscript success: papers whose titles emphasize broader conceptual or comparative issues fare better both pre- and post-publication than do papers with organism

  14. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2007 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2007 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics An adaptive sampling and windowing interrogation method in PIV R Theunissen, F Scarano and M L Riethmuller von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Sint-Genesius Rode, Belgium and Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, PO Box 5058, 2600 GB Delft, The Netherlands The co-authored paper [1] has been selected as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2007. This paper provides a strategy whereby the placement and the size of the interrogation regions are adapted to the image signal strength (seeding density) and the spatial variations of the velocity magnitudes. Two, quite distinct, test cases demonstrate the efficacy of their method: a shockwave- boundary layer interaction and an aircraft vortex wake. The Selection Committee—Drs T Fansler, J Foss, I Marusic, S Morris, K Okamoto and M Wernet—selected this paper from a strongly competitive shortlist of four candidates. Their selection process was influenced by the perceived utility of the contribution to the numerous investigators who utilize PIV methods. 2007 Award Winners—Measurement Science Broadband single cell impedance spectroscopy using maximum length sequences: theoretical analysis and practical considerations Tao Sun, Shady Gawad, Catia Bernabini, Nicolas G Green and Hywel Morgan

  15. EDITORIAL: Groundwater resources, climate and vulnerability Groundwater resources, climate and vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovolo, C. Isabella; Parkin, Geoff; Sophocleous, Marios

    2009-09-01

    Groundwater is an important component of the freshwater system and its role is becoming even more prominent as the more accessible surface water resources become increasingly exploited to support increasing populations and development. Yet despite its significance, there has been comparatively little research conducted on groundwater relative to surface water resources, particularly in the context of climate change impact assessment. This focus issue has therefore been assembled to expand upon the currently limited knowledge of groundwater systems and their links with climate. Many of the papers included here explore the interrelated issues of groundwater resources, climate-related changes and vulnerabilities at a regional scale in different continents and globally. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Groundwater Resources, Climate and Vulnerability Contents Groundwater: from mystery to management T N Narasimhan Simulated response of groundwater to predicted recharge in a semi-arid region using a scenario of modelled climate change M W Toews and D M Allen Long-term climatic change and sustainable ground water resources management Hugo A Loáiciga Climate change and groundwater: India's opportunities for mitigation and adaptation Tushaar Shah Vulnerability to the impact of climate change on renewable groundwater resources: a global-scale assessment Petra Döll Influence of soil heterogeneity on evapotranspiration under shallow water table conditions: transient, stochastic simulations Stefan J Kollet Nutrient cycling and N2O emissions in a changing climate: the subsurface water system role Georgia Destouni and Amélie Darracq Rainfall intensity and groundwater recharge: empirical evidence from the Upper Nile Basin M Owor, R G Taylor, C Tindimugaya and D Mwesigwa This focus issue is not yet complete, there are still letters at press and in review.

  16. EDITORIAL: Groundwater resources, climate and vulnerability Groundwater resources, climate and vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovolo, C. Isabella; Parkin, Geoff; Sophocleous, Marios

    2009-09-01

    Groundwater is an important component of the freshwater system and its role is becoming even more prominent as the more accessible surface water resources become increasingly exploited to support increasing populations and development. Yet despite its significance, there has been comparatively little research conducted on groundwater relative to surface water resources, particularly in the context of climate change impact assessment. This focus issue has therefore been assembled to expand upon the currently limited knowledge of groundwater systems and their links with climate. Many of the papers included here explore the interrelated issues of groundwater resources, climate-related changes and vulnerabilities at a regional scale in different continents and globally. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Groundwater Resources, Climate and Vulnerability Contents Groundwater: from mystery to management T N Narasimhan Simulated response of groundwater to predicted recharge in a semi-arid region using a scenario of modelled climate change M W Toews and D M Allen Long-term climatic change and sustainable ground water resources management Hugo A Loáiciga Climate change and groundwater: India's opportunities for mitigation and adaptation Tushaar Shah Vulnerability to the impact of climate change on renewable groundwater resources: a global-scale assessment Petra Döll Influence of soil heterogeneity on evapotranspiration under shallow water table conditions: transient, stochastic simulations Stefan J Kollet Nutrient cycling and N2O emissions in a changing climate: the subsurface water system role Georgia Destouni and Amélie Darracq Rainfall intensity and groundwater recharge: empirical evidence from the Upper Nile Basin M Owor, R G Taylor, C Tindimugaya and D Mwesigwa

  17. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    A brief overview of the ongoing climatic and environmental changes in Northern Eurasia serves as an editorial introduction to this, the second, special Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Climatic changes in Northern Eurasia over the last hundred years are reflected in numerous atmospheric and terrestrial variables. Many of these are noticeably significant above the confidence level for 'weather' or other (fire regime, ecosystem change) noise and thus should be further investigated in order to adapt to their impacts. In this focus issue, we introduce assorted studies of different aspects of contemporary change in Northern Eurasia. Most of these have been presented at one of the NEESPI workshops (for more information see neespi.org) and/or American Geophysical Union and European Geosciences Union NEESPI open sessions during the past year. These studies are diverse, representing the diversity of climates and ecosystems across Northern Eurasia. Some of these are focused on smaller spatial scales and/or address only specific aspects of the global change implications across the subcontinent. But the feeling (and observational evidence) that these changes have already been quite rapid and can have global implications inspires us to bring this suite of papers to the readers' attention. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climatic and Environmental Change in Northern Eurasia Contents Preface Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative Pavel Groisman and Amber J Soja Editorial Siberia integrated regional study: Multidisciplinary investigations of interrelation between Siberia environment dynamics and global climate change E P Gordov and E A Vaganov Studies of the energy and water cycles in Northern Eurasia Comparison and evaluation of gridded radiation products across northern Eurasia T J Troy and E F Wood Reanalysis data underestimate significant changes in growing

  18. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2006 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2006 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics The article 'Molecular tagging velocimetry and thermometry and its application to the wake of a heated circular cylinder' by Hui Hu and Manoochehr Koochesfahani, published in volume 17, issue 6, pp 1269-1281, was selected by the cognizant Editorial Board Members as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2006. This consensus selection was accompanied by the collective judgment that a number of other very strong contributions were published in 2006. These other papers have been added to the 2006 Highlights in the electronic version of the journal. The paper by Hu and Koochesfahani is recognized for its contribution to the use of molecular tagging techniques in the service of velocity and temperature measurements. The paper clearly articulates the prior state-of-the-art in this area and it communicates the required equipment and procedures to utilize this experimental tool. The capabilities of their technique are made apparent by the simultaneous (u,v,T) observations in the wake of a circular cylinder. The normalized heat flux vectors, (\\overline{u_j'T'})/U\\Delta T, demonstrate one of the beneficial results of obtaining a whole-field view of the velocity and temperature distributions. The authors also have carefully noted the intrinsic limitations of their technique. 2006 Award Winners—Measurement Science The

  19. Medicinal plants in the southern region of the State of Nuevo León, México

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the flora of the State of Nuevo León is well known, there are few records of ethnobotancial information. An ethnobotanical study was undertaken in order to know the medicinal plants used by people living at the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas in the southern Nuevo León. Collection of plants specimens and interviews were carried out among the people of the municipalities of Aramberri, Galeana, and Zaragoza. Since former studies in the region are scarce, the aim of this work was to record the medicinal species and their uses in the scrublands and oak-pine forest areas, of southern Nuevo León, Mexico, and also to know if there are differences in the number of species and number of uses knowledge by people. Methods Field work was carried out over a 2 years period; useful plants were collected and a total of 105 people from 46 different villages were interviewed. A database was compiled using data collected by means of semi structured interviews. The data were analyzed by means of non-parametric statistics, using goodness-of-fit test (Chi-squared) (number of species known by people of each municipality, number of uses known by people of each municipality), Chi-squared modified to incorporate the Yates Correction (number of species known by people living at scrublands and oak-pine forest); the Kruskall-Wallis test (number of species known by women and men of the three municipalities), and the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (age and number of species known, and age and number of uses). Results A total of 163 medicinal plant species were recorded in the study area, comprising 108 wild and 55 cultivated plants. A total of 117 species were recorded in the oak-pine forest, and 111 in the scrublands area, a total of 68 were recorded in both areas; 68 medicinal species are used in all three municipalities, 40 wild and 28 cultivated. We documented 235 different medicinal uses. The most common plant parts used for medicinal purposes were

  20. Persistent Organic Pollutants and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Soil from the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Carrizalez-Yáñez, Leticia; Varela-Silva, José Antonio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia Guadalupe; Torres-Dosal, Arturo; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, and lead) in outdoor surface soils (50 samples) collected from the metropolitan area of Monterrey in Mexico. Total PBDEs levels ranged from 1.80 to 127 µg/kg, with mean total PBDEs level of 14.2 ± 21.5 µg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the mean total level in the studied soils was 23.5 ± 20.2 µg/kg (range 4.0-65.5 µg/kg). An important finding in our study was that all soil samples (100%) had detectable levels of the metabolite p,p'-DDE. Moreover, the mean total DDT level (∑p'p-DDT and p'p-DDE) was approximately 132 ± 175 µg/kg. The mean levels for arsenic, cadmium, and lead in soil were 5.30 ± 1.35 (range 1.55-7.85) mg/kg, 2.20 ± 1.20 (range 0.65-6.40) mg/kg, and 455 ± 204 (range 224-1230) mg/kg, respectively. Our study has several limitations, the most notable of which is the small sample of soils evaluated. However, this screening study provided concentration data for the occurrence of POPs and four heavy metals in soil from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and taking into consideration that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon is deemed necessary. PMID:26577448

  1. Persistent Organic Pollutants and Heavy Metal Concentrations in Soil from the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Carrizalez-Yáñez, Leticia; Varela-Silva, José Antonio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia Guadalupe; Torres-Dosal, Arturo; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, and lead) in outdoor surface soils (50 samples) collected from the metropolitan area of Monterrey in Mexico. Total PBDEs levels ranged from 1.80 to 127 µg/kg, with mean total PBDEs level of 14.2 ± 21.5 µg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the mean total level in the studied soils was 23.5 ± 20.2 µg/kg (range 4.0-65.5 µg/kg). An important finding in our study was that all soil samples (100%) had detectable levels of the metabolite p,p'-DDE. Moreover, the mean total DDT level (∑p'p-DDT and p'p-DDE) was approximately 132 ± 175 µg/kg. The mean levels for arsenic, cadmium, and lead in soil were 5.30 ± 1.35 (range 1.55-7.85) mg/kg, 2.20 ± 1.20 (range 0.65-6.40) mg/kg, and 455 ± 204 (range 224-1230) mg/kg, respectively. Our study has several limitations, the most notable of which is the small sample of soils evaluated. However, this screening study provided concentration data for the occurrence of POPs and four heavy metals in soil from the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and taking into consideration that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon is deemed necessary.

  2. Estimation of nonpaternity in the Mexican population of Nuevo Leon: a validation study with blood group markers.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Barton, S A; Marty-Gonzalez, L F; Rivas, F; Chakraborty, R

    1999-07-01

    A method for estimating the general rate of nonpaternity in a population was validated using phenotype data on seven blood groups (A1A2BO, MNSs, Rh, Duffy, Lutheran, Kidd, and P) on 396 mother, child, and legal father trios from Nuevo León, Mexico. In all, 32 legal fathers were excluded as the possible father based on genetic exclusions at one or more loci (combined average exclusion probability of 0.694 for specific mother-child phenotype pairs). The maximum likelihood estimate of the general nonpaternity rate in the population was 0.118 +/- 0.020. The nonpaternity rates in Nuevo León were also seen to be inversely related with the socioeconomic status of the families, i.e., the highest in the low and the lowest in the high socioeconomic class. We further argue that with the moderately low (69.4%) power of exclusion for these seven blood group systems, the traditional critical values of paternity index (PI > or = 19) were not good indicators of true paternity, since a considerable fraction (307/364) of nonexcluded legal fathers had a paternity index below 19 based on the seven markers. Implications of these results in the context of genetic-epidemiological studies as well as for detection of true fathers for child-support adjudications are discussed, implying the need to employ a battery of genetic markers (possibly DNA-based tests) that yield a higher power of exclusion. We conclude that even though DNA markers are more informative, the probabilistic approach developed here would still be needed to estimate the true rate of nonpaternity in a population or to evaluate the precision of detecting true fathers. PMID:10407460

  3. IJBNPA in 2016: Strategy for advancing the science of behavior change in nutrition and physical activity, and associated editorial priorities.

    PubMed

    Jago, Russell; Wood, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (IJBNPA) is to be the leading diet and physical activity journal. To achieve this aim we embrace and publish a number of different research designs from small, but in depth, qualitative studies to large scale cohort studies. IJBNPA prioritises research based on randomised controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews (with or without meta-analyses, as appropriate), and well conducted observational studies that expand knowledge and understanding of the area. IJBNPA will also consider and publish other study designs that are of sufficient quality such as strong or ground-breaking methodological papers, rigorous qualitative studies, debate papers and commentaries. However, due to the demands on the journal, we publish pilot studies only in exceptional circumstances and we do not publish protocol papers or letters to the editors. The goal of this editorial is to highlight to our readers and authors the process by which we identify which papers to review and publish along with our editorial priorities. PMID:27396235

  4. Weighing women down: messages on weight loss and body shaping in editorial content in popular women's health and fitness magazines.

    PubMed

    Willis, Laura E; Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to idealized body images has been shown to lower women's body satisfaction. Yet some studies found the opposite, possibly because real-life media (as opposed to image-only stimuli) often embed such imagery in messages that suggest thinness is attainable. Drawing on social cognitive theory, the current content analysis investigated editorial body-shaping and weight-loss messages in popular women's health and fitness magazines. About five thousand magazine pages published in top-selling U.S. women's health and fitness magazines in 2010 were examined. The findings suggest that body shaping and weight loss are a major topic in these magazines, contributing to roughly one-fifth of all editorial content. Assessing standards of motivation and conduct, as well as behaviors promoted by the messages, the findings reflect overemphasis on appearance over health and on exercise-related behaviors over caloric reduction behaviors and the combination of both behaviors. These accentuations are at odds with public health recommendations.

  5. You've Come a Long Way, Baby--Or Have You? Women's Magazines, Cigarette Advertisements, Health Articles and Editorial Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesterman, Vicki

    A study examined how three major women's magazines handled cigarette advertisements and editorial copy about smoking-related health problems. Examined were issues of "Ms.,""Good Housekeeping," and "Seventeen" magazines from 1972, one year after the ban on television advertisements and the year "Ms." began publication, through 1979, when cigarette…

  6. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2005 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2006-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, in 2005 the Editorial Board decided to present 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2005 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics The Fluid Mechanics working group, chaired by Professor John Foss, was unanimous in its recommendation for the paper authored by J Chen and J Katz (Johns Hopkins University, USA) 'Elimination of peak-locking error in PIV analysis using the correlation mapping method', published in volume 16, issue 8, pp 1605 1618. The essence of the following citation was provided by Board Member Dr Mark Wernet: The paper of Chen and Katz describes a technique for eliminating the 'peak locking' bias error endemic to estimating the PIV correlation peak location. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used widely in both fundamental and applied fluid mechanics. In essence, a two-dimensional velocity map is extracted from two successive high-resolution images of light scattered by minute tracer particles. The incident light is derived from two laser beams which have been expanded into sheets. A precise time delay is imposed between the two laser light sheets. The cross-correlation of the scattered light intensity within corresponding small interrogation regions in the two images gives the displacement of the particles and hence the local velocity. Typically, in PIV processing, the correlation peak location is determined by fitting a curve through the correlation peak. This process is known to suffer from a bias error where the estimated

  7. EDITORIAL: Ongoing climatic change in Northern Eurasia: justification for expedient research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel; Soja, Amber J.

    2009-12-01

    A brief overview of the ongoing climatic and environmental changes in Northern Eurasia serves as an editorial introduction to this, the second, special Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Climatic changes in Northern Eurasia over the last hundred years are reflected in numerous atmospheric and terrestrial variables. Many of these are noticeably significant above the confidence level for 'weather' or other (fire regime, ecosystem change) noise and thus should be further investigated in order to adapt to their impacts. In this focus issue, we introduce assorted studies of different aspects of contemporary change in Northern Eurasia. Most of these have been presented at one of the NEESPI workshops (for more information see neespi.org) and/or American Geophysical Union and European Geosciences Union NEESPI open sessions during the past year. These studies are diverse, representing the diversity of climates and ecosystems across Northern Eurasia. Some of these are focused on smaller spatial scales and/or address only specific aspects of the global change implications across the subcontinent. But the feeling (and observational evidence) that these changes have already been quite rapid and can have global implications inspires us to bring this suite of papers to the readers' attention. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climatic and Environmental Change in Northern Eurasia Contents Preface Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative Pavel Groisman and Amber J Soja Editorial Siberia integrated regional study: Multidisciplinary investigations of interrelation between Siberia environment dynamics and global climate change E P Gordov and E A Vaganov Studies of the energy and water cycles in Northern Eurasia Comparison and evaluation of gridded radiation products across northern Eurasia T J Troy and E F Wood Reanalysis data underestimate significant changes in growing

  8. Editorial: subjective perceptions of memory functioning in old age - nature, correlates, and developmental trajectories.

    PubMed

    Hülür, Gizem; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints are often used as diagnostic criteria for several neurocognitive disorders. Although a number of studies have examined subjective memory and its associations with memory functioning in adulthood and old age, it is still an open question whether subjective perceptions of one's memory indicate actual memory functioning or whether they are rather derived from factors other than memory, such as depressive symptoms. The studies in this special section examine subjective perceptions of memory functioning and their associations with objectively measured memory performance in general and in clinical populations. The four articles adopt cross-sectional and longitudinal methodologies and offer key insights into the nature, correlates, and developmental trajectories of subjective memory. To begin with, the studies compiled in this special section demonstrate that changes in subjective memory perceptions are indeed associated with changes in memory performance [Zimprich and Kurtz, this issue, pp. 223-231], but the size of associations between levels of and changes in subjective memory and memory performance is in part modulated by personality characteristics and depressive symptoms [Hülür et al., this issue, pp. 232-240]. Second, the studies compiled here show that factors other than memory are also closely associated with memory perceptions, including functional health as well as domain-general and health-specific control beliefs [Luszcz et al., this issue, pp. 241-250]. Third, the study by Thompson et al. [this issue, pp. 251-257] shows that self- and informant-reports of retrospective and prospective memory difficulties are not associated with performance-based measures and does not sufficiently differentiate between healthy controls and patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or dementia. In our editorial, we put these findings in perspective and discuss implications for research and practice. To extend our knowledge, we conclude by

  9. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2007 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2007 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics An adaptive sampling and windowing interrogation method in PIV R Theunissen, F Scarano and M L Riethmuller von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Sint-Genesius Rode, Belgium and Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, PO Box 5058, 2600 GB Delft, The Netherlands The co-authored paper [1] has been selected as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2007. This paper provides a strategy whereby the placement and the size of the interrogation regions are adapted to the image signal strength (seeding density) and the spatial variations of the velocity magnitudes. Two, quite distinct, test cases demonstrate the efficacy of their method: a shockwave- boundary layer interaction and an aircraft vortex wake. The Selection Committee—Drs T Fansler, J Foss, I Marusic, S Morris, K Okamoto and M Wernet—selected this paper from a strongly competitive shortlist of four candidates. Their selection process was influenced by the perceived utility of the contribution to the numerous investigators who utilize PIV methods. 2007 Award Winners—Measurement Science Broadband single cell impedance spectroscopy using maximum length sequences: theoretical analysis and practical considerations Tao Sun, Shady Gawad, Catia Bernabini, Nicolas G Green and Hywel Morgan

  10. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As a journal that reports advances in atomic, molecular and optical science (AMO), Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) provides the AMO research community with three unique fora: topical reviews, tutorials and special issues. Developed under the leadership of editor Jan Michael Rost and his Editorial Board, these sections have cemented J. Phys. B's reputation as a major journal showcasing the AMO community's advances. For me, an AMO scientist, it is therefore a special pleasure to be entrusted with continuing the tradition of excellence established by Jan Michael and the Editorial Board. I intend to build on this foundation by ensuring that the journal makes full use of these tools. Topical reviews: a unique focus When J. Phys. B becomes the first journal you turn to for initial reviews about important emerging areas in your field, we as an Editorial Board will have succeeded. To us, a topical review is different from a traditional review—a topical review focuses on emerging sub-fields of AMO physics. Its function is to alert and educate our readers about emerging opportunities. Topical reviews can also serve a closely related function for readers: keeping us up-to-date with critical technologies that lie slightly outside our own fields, such as advances in free-electron lasers science, (which will surely affect our field). Our overall goal is to make your research more productive because of the topical reviews you read within the journal. Tutorials J. Phys. B tutorials are aimed at graduate students or researchers venturing into a new field. Just as in my own research group I encourage all graduate students to write their theses in a way that will be useful to both future graduate students and the larger community beyond my group, J. Phys. B has designed tutorials to fill this function on the journal scale. Thus, tutorial authors are able to write in greater depth than can be included in a paper in nature, science or in the

  11. Parasitological examination for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.) in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) at Año Nuevo State Reserve, California (2012).

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Kuzmina, T A; Spraker, T R; Jaggi, N; Costa, D P; Crocker, D E; Tolliver, S C; Tift, M S

    2012-10-01

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris Gill, 1866), inhabiting rookeries on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve in central California, were investigated in 2012 for presence of hookworms (Uncinaria spp.). Material collected and examined for hookworms included: blubber (n = 15), stomach and intestines (n = 21) from dead pups; feces from the rectum of weaned pups (n = 23); sand containing apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 28) and sand without apparent feces in areas of weaned pups (n = 54); milk from females (n =23) at 5 days and about 23 to 26 days postpartum; and placenta from one female. Evidence of hookworm presence was not detected in any of the samples examined. Possible reasons why hookworms were not found in northern elephant seals on the mainland of Año Nuevo State Reserve are discussed.

  12. Swath Bathymetry Surveys of the Monterey Bay Area from Point Ano Nuevo to Moss Landing, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes swath bathymetry and backscatter data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the continental shelf within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary between Point A?o Nuevo and Moss Landing, in San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, Calif. The survey was done for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), in field activities S-7-09-MB and S-10-09-MB, by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data were aquired in two seperate surveys: (1) between August 13, 2009 and September 3, 2009, personnel from WCMG completed field activity S-7-09-MB, from Point A?o Nuevo south to Table Rock, as well as a block west of Soquel Canyon; (2) between October 12 and December 16, 2009, WCMG conducted field activity S-10-09-MB, surveying between Table Rock and Moss Landing.

  13. EDITORIAL: Review Articles Devoted to the Metrology of Electrical Units and Related Physical Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental physical constants and the base units of measurement occupy positions of great importance in physics, not only through their foundation role in the edifice of science but through their interplay with the most advanced research in measurement science and in basic science, both theoretical and experimental. Not infrequently has one found the precision of experiments limited by that of the standard used in the realization of the pertinent unit(s) and new research is thereby stimulated to improve (or even replace) the existing standard(s). The periodic adjustment of the physical constants sometimes reveals inconsistencies that call for new measurement, new theory, or both. Discoveries in basic research are from time to time developed into new means for realizing the base units, as well as contributing to the consistency evaluation work. Physicists in general, and readers of Metrologia in particular, can therefore find it immensely rewarding to remain abreast of all such developments; to this end, Metrologia makes an important contribution by publishing both research papers and seminal review articles. It was with the latter particularly in mind that L Bliek and V Kose of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) proposed making a special effort to publish selected review papers from a session on Quantum Metrology and Electronic Methods in Fundamental Constants at the XXIInd General Assembly of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI), held in Tel Aviv, Israel, from August 24th to September 2nd 1987. This suggestion and a concomitant offer to recruit authors and furnish major editorial assistance were accepted with enthusiasm and alacrity. As the outcome, we foresee publishing some seven or eight review articles devoted to the metrology of electrical units and related physical constants. These will appear in successive issues of Metrologia, commencing with the present one, two or three at a time. The first three comprise: Precision

  14. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  15. EDITORIAL: The 28th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simek, Milan; Sunka, Pavel

    2008-05-01

    -equilibrium Plasmas and Micro-plasmas at High Pressures', reflecting new trends in the field. Important parts of the conference were two workshops focused on specific themes. The workshop 'Pulsed electrical discharges in water: fundamentals and applications', organized by Professor Pavel Sunka, reviewed the scientific challenges related to fundamentals of pulsed discharges initiated in slightly conductive liquid water solutions. The workshop 'Physics and applications of pulsed high-current capillary discharges', organized by Dr Karel Kolácek, addressed scientific challenges and technological applications of high-current capillary discharges pinching into a nearly uni-dimensional dense plasma column composed of a quasi-neutral mixture of very hot electrons and multiply charged ions. All ICPIG speakers were invited to prepare peer-reviewed articles based on their conference lectures for the journal Plasma Sources Sciences and Technology (PSST) in the form of either reviews or original works. A selection of invited papers is published in this special issue. We would like to thank all authors for their effort in preparing interesting articles for the readers of PSST. We would like to thank once more all members of the International Scientific Committee chaired by Professor Jerzy Mizeraczyk as well as the members of the Local Organizing Committee and the National Advisory Board for their considerable contributions to the success of the conference. We are particularly grateful to the Editorial Board of Plasma Sources Science and Technology for the opportunity to bring the 28th ICPIG to a wider audience.

  16. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale phenomena in hydrogen storage Nanoscale phenomena in hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajo, John; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-05-01

    structures and catalyst systems that enhance diffusion. These and other issues concerning both molecularly and chemically bound hydrogen storage materials have begun to be addressed through an understanding of their behavior and their manipulation on the nanoscale. This special issue of Nanotechnology provides a current survey of this endeavor. The themes covered in this issue include the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials at the nanoscale; the structure of nanoporous adsorbents; the structure of hydrogen adsorbed in nanosized pores, and the behavior of nanoparticulate, nanocrystalline and nanoconfined metal and complex hydrides, including the form and effects of catalysts. These themes are addressed through theoretical, computational and experimental approaches. Although an ideal hydrogen storage material has not yet been identified, the papers in this issue indicate that the ideal material will likely be highly structured on the nanometer scale. To optimize the capacity and interaction energy of adsorbents, the pore size, shape and volume will need to be carefully controlled. Similarly, the diffusion lengths in hydride materials will need to be matched to crystallite and particle size. Furthermore, the diffusion lengths themselves will need to be tailored through the use of dopants, placement of catalysts and control of interface energies. We are grateful to the contributors for the high quality of their submissions. We also thank the editorial and production staff for their efficient and professional work and their guidance in the production of this issue.

  17. EDITORIAL: The Earth radiation balance as driver of the global hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Liepert, Beate

    2010-06-01

    absorbed solar and net thermal radiative exchanges at the Earth's surface. Globally averaged, this surface radiation balance is positive, since radiative absorption, scattering and emission in the climate system act to generate an energy surplus at the surface and an energy deficit in the atmosphere (Liepert 2010). Evaporation, or more precisely its energy equivalent, the latent heat flux, is the main process that compensates for this imbalance between surface and atmosphere, since the latent heat dominates the convective energy flux over sensible heating. The radiative energy surplus at the surface is thus mainly consumed by evaporation and moist convection and subsequently released in the atmosphere through condensation. This implies that any alterations in the available radiative energy will induce changes in the water fluxes. Our focus in this editorial is therefore on the surface radiation balance as the principal driver of the global hydrological cycle. Note that this energetic view is in agreement with that of Richter and Xie (2008) who argue that the spatial and temporal behaviour of the process of evaporation is controlled by surface and atmospheric properties such as atmospheric stability, wind speed, moisture deficit and moisture availability. From radiation theory it is expected that with increasing radiative absorption due to abundance of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and consequent warming, the emission of thermal energy from the atmosphere towards the surface is increasing (known as downward thermal radiation). This enhances the radiative energy surplus at the surface, and, where surface water is not limited, fuels evaporation besides warming the Earth's surface. The enhanced greenhouse effect therefore tends to accelerate the hydrological cycle, as also shown in many climate model simulations with increasing levels of greenhouse gases (e.g., IPCC 2007, but also see Yang et al 2003, Andrews et al 2009). We can assume that the increase in

  18. EDITORIAL: Are higher quality papers cited more often? Are higher quality papers cited more often?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael S.; Harris, Simon

    2009-09-01

    retrospectively by dividing the papers published in each year into five citation quintiles. A paper of the highest quality (Q1) was about ten times more likely to be found in the most-cited quintile than in the least-cited. While it is reassuring to find that the best papers in PMB are, indeed, cited more often on average, we cannot discount the hypothesis that both measures might be influenced by an extrinsic factor, such as the reputation of the authors. We suggest that a study similar to ours be performed for a journal that utilizes a system of double-blind peer review. Michael S Patterson Editorial Board Member Simon Harris Publisher References West R and McIlwaine A 2002 What do citation counts count for in the field of addiction? An empirical evaluation of citation counts and their link with peer ratings of quality Addiction 97 501-4 Patterson M S and Harris S 2009 The relationship between reviewers' quality-scores and number of citations for papers published in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology from 2003-2005 Scientometrics 80 343-9

  19. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Nature Mat. 8 229 [9] Tsuruoka T, Terabe K, Hasegawa T, and Aono M 2010 Nanotechnology 21 425205 [10] Waser R and Aono M 2007 Nature Mat. 6 833 [11] Sawa A 2008 Materials Today 11 28 [12] Strukov D B, Snider G S, Stewart D R and Williams R S 2008 Nature 453 80 Changes were made to this Editorial on 16 May 2011. An author was added to the Editorial.

  20. Interferon Gamma-Based Detection of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Border States of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Eyal; Alatorre-Izaguirre, Gabriela; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Moreno-Treviño, Maria Guadalupe; Garcialuna-Martinez, Javier; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nearly one-third of the world’s population is infected with latent tuberculosis (LTBI). Tuberculosis (TB) rates in the border states are higher than national rates in both the US and Mexico, with the border accounting for 30% of total registered TB cases in both countries. However, LTBI rates in the general population in Mexican border states are unknown. In this region, LTBI is diagnosed using the tuberculin skin test (TST). New methods of detection more specific than TST have been developed, although there is currently no gold standard for LTBI detection. Our objective is to demonstrate utility of the Quantiferon TB gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test compared with the TST to detect LTBI among border populations. This is an observational, cross-sectional study carried out in border areas of the states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants (n = 210) provided a TST and blood sample for the QFT-GIT. Kappa coefficients assessed the agreement between TST and QFT-GIT. Participant characteristics were compared using Fisher exact tests. Thirty-eight percent of participants were diagnosed with LTBI by QFT-GIT. The proportion of LTBI detected using QFT-GIT was almost double [38% (79/210)] that found by TST [19% (39/210)] (P < 0.001). Concordance between TST and QFT-GIT was low (kappa = 0.37). We recommend further studies utilizing the QFT-GIT test to detect LTBI among border populations. PMID:26484340

  1. The Ni, Fe and CO contents of metal phases in the Allende, Holbrook and Nuevo Mercurio chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Smith, D. G. W.; Launspach, S.

    1983-12-01

    The Ni, Fe and Co contents of metal phases in the Allende, Holbrook and Nuevo Mercurio chondrites have been obtained using an automated electron microprobe fitted with both wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometers. Co contents of kamacite in these chondrites are inconsistent with those reported previously, but the general tendency of Co to increase in the kamacite in chondrites from H, L to LL groups, is supported by the study. Although the variation patterns of Ni-Co observed so far for L4, H5 and CV3 chondrites are simple, six L6 chondrites, including those reported previously, show significant difference in Co contents and the concentration and abundance charcateristics of Ni-Fe-Co patterns of the metal phases. The great similarity of composition of each region of these patterns obtained from two samples of Holbrook and two samples of Allende which came from different collections, indicate that the variation patterns of Ni-Co in the metal phases provide a means of characterizing or 'fingerprinting', as do the great differences in the variation patterns of Fe-Ni-Co which occur from one chondrite to another or even within the same group and petrologic type.

  2. Turning scientific approaches into practical conservation actions: the case of Comunidad Indigena de Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, A; Bocco, G; Torres, A

    2001-05-01

    Optimum natural resource management and biodiversity conservation are desirable goals. These, however, often exclude each other, since maximum economic benefits have promoted drastic reductions in biodiversity throughout the world. This dilemma confronts local stakeholders, who usually go for maximizing economic inputs, whereas other social (e.g., academic) sectors are favor conservation practices. In this paper we describe the way two scientific approaches--landscape and participatory research--were used to develop sound and durable land use scenarios. These two approaches included expert knowledge of both social and environmental conditions in indigenous communities. Our major emphasis was given to detect spatially explicit land use scenarios and capacity building in order to construct a decision support system operated by stakeholders of the Comunidad Indigena de Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro in Mexico. The system for decision-making was fed with data from inventories of both abiotic and biotic biodiversity components. All research, implementation, and monitoring activities were conducted in close collaboration with members of the indigenous community. As a major result we obtained a number of forest alternative uses that favor emerging markets and make this indigenous community less dependent on a single market. Furthermore, skilled members of the community are now running the automated system for decision-making. In conclusion, our results were better expressed as products with direct benefits in local livelihoods rather than pure academic outputs.

  3. [The processes of manuscript evaluation and publication in Medicina Clínica. The editorial committee of Medicina Clínica].

    PubMed

    Ribera, Josep M; Cardellach, Francesc; Selva, Albert

    2005-12-01

    The decision-making process includes a series of activities undertaken in biomedical journals from the moment a manuscript is received until it is accepted or rejected. Firstly, the manuscript is evaluated by the members of the Editorial Board, who analyze both its suitability for the journal and its scientific quality. After this initial evaluation, the article is evaluated by peer reviewers, an essential process to guarantee its scientific validity. Both the Editorial Board and the peer reviewers usually use checklists which are of enormous help in this task. Once the biomedical article has been accepted, the publication process is started, which in turn includes a series of steps, beginning with technical and medical review of the article's contents and ending with the article's publication in the journal. The present article provides a detailed description of the main technical and ethical issues involved in the processes of decision-making and publication of biomedical articles.

  4. [The processes of manuscript evaluation and publication in Medicina Clínica. The editorial committee of Medicina Clínica].

    PubMed

    Ribera, Josep M; Cardellach, Francesc; Selva, Albert

    2005-12-01

    The decision-making process includes a series of activities undertaken in biomedical journals from the moment a manuscript is received until it is accepted or rejected. Firstly, the manuscript is evaluated by the members of the Editorial Board, who analyze both its suitability for the journal and its scientific quality. After this initial evaluation, the article is evaluated by peer reviewers, an essential process to guarantee its scientific validity. Both the Editorial Board and the peer reviewers usually use checklists which are of enormous help in this task. Once the biomedical article has been accepted, the publication process is started, which in turn includes a series of steps, beginning with technical and medical review of the article's contents and ending with the article's publication in the journal. The present article provides a detailed description of the main technical and ethical issues involved in the processes of decision-making and publication of biomedical articles. PMID:16464420

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on High Energy Cosmic Rays FOCUS ON HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshima, Masahiro; Watson, Alan A.

    2009-06-01

    regard to the energy spectrum of the highest energy cosmic rays. The remaining contributions are of a more theoretical nature and discuss propagation (T Stanev), the time structure of multi-messenger signals (G H W Sigl), ultra-high energy cosmic ray production near black holes (A Yu Neronov, D V Semikoz and I I Tkachev), production in jets associated with black holes (C D Dermer, S Razzaque, J Finke and A Atoyan) and emission from a specific object, Cen A (M Kachelriess, S S Ostapchenko and R Tomas). Additionally the potential of high energy cosmic rays to give information about features of hadronic interactions, specifically the cross-section for p-air collisions, is discussed in the paper by R Ulrich et al. We thank all our authors most sincerely for their efforts and Tim Smith and his editorial team for their hard work. We believe that this collection of articles will be of great value to workers in the field: further contributions to this focus issue will be published during the course of 2009. Focus on High Energy Cosmic Rays Contents The cosmic ray energy spectrum as measured using the Pierre Auger Observatory Giorgio Matthiae The northern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory Johannes Blümer and the Pierre Auger Collaboration Searching for new physics with ultrahigh energy cosmic rays Floyd W Stecker and Sean T Scully On the measurement of the proton-air cross section using air shower data R Ulrich, J Blümer, R Engel, F Schüssler and M Unger High energy radiation from Centaurus A M Kachelrieß, S Ostapchenko and R Tomàs Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays from black hole jets of radio galaxies C D Dermer, S Razzaque, J D Finke and A Atoyan Ultra-high energy cosmic ray production in the polar cap regions of black hole magnetospheres A Yu Neronov, D V Semikoz and I I Tkachev Time structure and multi-messenger signatures of ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources Günter Sigl Propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays Todor Stanev Search for the end of the energy

  6. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon magnetic anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Wilt, M.J.; Corrigan, D.J.

    1982-10-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed tham to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. the suite of igneous rocks was probably passively emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotitic-gabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6 to 11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  7. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon Magnetic Anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Corrigan, D.J.; Wilt, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I power plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3-3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 x 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analysed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed them to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. The suite of igneous rocks was probably emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by en echelon strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotiticgabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6-11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  8. A Participatory Modeling Application of a Distributed Hydrologic Model in Nuevo Leon, Mexico for the 2010 Hurricane Alex Flood Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baish, A. S.; Vivoni, E. R.; Payan, J. G.; Robles-Morua, A.; Basile, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    A distributed hydrologic model can help bring consensus among diverse stakeholders in regional flood planning by producing quantifiable sets of alternative futures. This value is acute in areas with high uncertainties in hydrologic conditions and sparse observations. In this study, we conduct an application of the Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN)-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) in the Santa Catarina basin of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, where Hurricane Alex in July 2010 led to catastrophic flooding of the capital city of Monterrey. Distributed model simulations utilize best-available information on the regional topography, land cover, and soils obtained from Mexican government agencies or analysis of remotely-sensed imagery from MODIS and ASTER. Furthermore, we developed meteorological forcing for the flood event based on multiple data sources, including three local gauge networks, satellite-based estimates from TRMM and PERSIANN, and the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Remotely-sensed data allowed us to quantify rainfall distributions in the upland, rural portions of the Santa Catarina that are sparsely populated and ungauged. Rural areas had significant contributions to the flood event and as a result were considered by stakeholders for flood control measures, including new reservoirs and upland vegetation management. Participatory modeling workshops with the stakeholders revealed a disconnect between urban and rural populations in regard to understanding the hydrologic conditions of the flood event and the effectiveness of existing and potential flood control measures. Despite these challenges, the use of the distributed flood forecasts developed within this participatory framework facilitated building consensus among diverse stakeholders and exploring alternative futures in the basin.

  9. Population data of 24 STRs in Mexican-Mestizo population from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Northeast, Mexico) based on Powerplex(®) Fusion and GlobalFiler(®) kits.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Benito; Aguilar-Velázquez, José Alonso; Chávez-Briones, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Chavarría, Juan Ramón; Alfaro-Lopez, Elizabeth; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    The STR loci included into new commercial human identification kits compels geneticists estimating forensic parameters for interpretation purposes in forensic casework. Therefore, we studied for the first time in Mexico the GlobalFiler(®) and Powerplex(®) Fusion systems in 326 and 682 unrelated individuals, respectively. These individuals are resident of the Monterrey City of the Nuevo Leon state (Northeast, Mexico). Population data from 23 autosomal STRs and the Y-STR locus DYS391 are reported and compared against available STR data from American ethnic groups and the unique Mexican population studied with Powerplex(®) Fusion.

  10. Population data of 24 STRs in Mexican-Mestizo population from Monterrey, Nuevo Leon (Northeast, Mexico) based on Powerplex(®) Fusion and GlobalFiler(®) kits.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Benito; Aguilar-Velázquez, José Alonso; Chávez-Briones, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Chavarría, Juan Ramón; Alfaro-Lopez, Elizabeth; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    The STR loci included into new commercial human identification kits compels geneticists estimating forensic parameters for interpretation purposes in forensic casework. Therefore, we studied for the first time in Mexico the GlobalFiler(®) and Powerplex(®) Fusion systems in 326 and 682 unrelated individuals, respectively. These individuals are resident of the Monterrey City of the Nuevo Leon state (Northeast, Mexico). Population data from 23 autosomal STRs and the Y-STR locus DYS391 are reported and compared against available STR data from American ethnic groups and the unique Mexican population studied with Powerplex(®) Fusion. PMID:26747399

  11. TH-D-16A-01: Medical Physics Workshop: Editorial Vision and Guidance On Writing and Reviewing Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J; Das, S; Goodsitt, M

    2014-06-15

    On January 1, 2014, editorial leadership of Medical Physics passed from esteemed long-time Editor Bill Hendee to a collective editorial group composed of the three presenters listed above. In this presentation, we would like to outline our vision for the future of Medical Physics and review recent work-in-progress initiatives to implement this vision. Finally, we will close with guidance to authors on how to write a good Medical Physics paper. Vision for Medical Physics and current initiatives: Jeff Williamson, Editor-in-Chief We cannot improve on Dr. Hendee's succinct vision statement “to continue the Journal's tradition of publishing the very best science that propels our discipline forward and improves our contribution to patient care.” More concretely, the Journal should be s the preeminent forum for electronic exchange of cutting edge medical physics science. We seek to identify the best contributions in (a) high impact clinical physics innovations; (b) clinical translation and validation of basic science innovations; or (c) cutting edge basic science developments with potential for patient care improvements. Among the challenges and opportunities we face are: are electronic-only and open access publishing; trends towards more interactive, social-media based scientific communities; and diversification of the medical physics research, authorship, and readership domains, including clinical applications quite foreign to core ABR clinical competencies. To address these issues over the next 3 years, we have reduced the size of our Editorial Board and focused its efforts on improving the Journal's impact through 4 working groups (WGs): WG-1: Review process quality and selectivity Creation of 120 member Board of Associate Editors to improve review uniformity by placing Ms. management in fewer hands New reviewer guidelines and templates Answer: “what is the scope of medical physics research?” Recursive taxonomy for tagging review expertise and article contents

  12. [Profile of sensitization to allergens in children with atopic dermatitis assisting to Allergology Service of University Hospital, Nuevo Leon, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; Palma-Gómez, Samuel; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: la sensibilización a alergenos observada en la dermatitis atópica aumenta el riesgo del niño a padecer rinitis alérgica y asma. Los estudios recientes indican que entre mayor actividad de proteasas haya en los alergenos a los que se está sensibilizado, hay mayor defecto en la barrera cutánea y mayor gravedad de la enfermedad. Objetivos: conocer el patrón de sensibilización a los alergenos en niños con dermatitis atópica atendidos en el Servicio de Alergología del Hospital Universitario de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León y conocer si estos niños tienen mayor sensibilización a los antígenos con actividad proteolítica. Material y método: estudio retrospectivo en el que revisamos los reportes de las pruebas cutáneas por punción realizadas en nuestro servicio a niños de 5 meses a 16 años de edad, con diagnóstico de dermatitis atópica, de enero de 2012 a enero de 2014. Evaluamos la frecuencia de sensibilización a aeroalergenos y alimentos, así como el tamaño de la roncha en la respuesta cutánea para cada alergeno en particular. Resultados: se incluyeron los reportes de pruebas cutáneas de 66 niños, 30 hombres y 36 mujeres. Cuarenta y seis pacientes estaban sensibilizados a aeroalergenos y 38 a alimentos. Los ácaros del polvo de casa (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus/Dermatophagoides farinae) fueron los alergenos con mayor frecuencia de respuesta positiva en las pruebas cutáneas. De los niños con sensibilización a alimentos, sólo los niños sensibilizados a la leche de vaca, al huevo y al pescado tuvieron una roncha mayor de 6 mm de diámetro. CONCLUSIÓN: en los niños con dermatitis atópica es común la sensibilización a aeroalergenos con alta actividad de proteasas y la polisensibilización es muy común. La sensibilización a alimentos es común en estos pacientes, pero sólo un pequeño porcentaje de ellos muestra respuestas cutáneas lo suficientemente grandes para relacionarlas con gravedad de la enfermedad.

  13. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    technological solution in the early to late 1990s of confining atmospheric plasmas in a small volume of plasma generation (i.e. with a small volume-to-surface ratio) and then extending it towards a downstream sample [7]-[9]. These are among the first low-temperature atmospheric plasmas aimed particularly at the exploitation of their ability to invoke the active and rich reactive chemistry close to ambient temperature. The main applications of these early devices are precision surface modification of low-temperature dielectric materials, for example thin film deposition and etching [7]-[9]. Variations of the early plasma jets include atmospheric plasma sheet jets [10] for the treatment of largely planar objects (e.g. polymeric sheets) as well as large arrays of many plasma jets for the treatment of complex-structured objects (e.g. surgical tools and open human wounds) [11]. As a material processing technology, the sub-100oC atmospheric-pressure plasma jet has benefited over the years from many innovations. Whilst a detailed account and analysis of these is clearly outside the scope of this Editorial, it is worth stating that there are different avenues with which to maintain a moderate electron density at the plasma core so as to keep the gas temperature at the sample point below a ceiling level. Most of the early studies employed excitation at radio frequencies above 10 MHz, at which electrons are largely confined in the plasma generation region, and this limits the current flow to and gas heating in the plume region of the plasma jet. Other techniques of current limitation have since been shown to be effective, including the use of dielectric barriers across a very large frequency range of 1 kHz--50 MHz, sub-microsecond pulses sustained at kHz frequencies, pulse-modulated radio frequencies and dual-frequency excitation [12]-[15]. These and other techniques have considerably advanced the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet technology. The period of some 15 years since the above

  14. Causes of death in preweaned northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866), Año Nuevo State Reserve, California, 2012.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Lyons, Eugene T; Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Tift, Michael S; Raverty, Stephen; Jaggi, Nicole; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    During an ongoing physiological ecology study on pups and adult female northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866) on the mainland rookery at Año Nuevo State Reserve (California), an opportunity was afforded to collect fresh dead pups for parasitology and necropsy. The investigation was undertaken to delineate the causes of death of northern elephant seals recovered from Año Nuevo State Reserve. Prior to this study, there was no evidence of increased mortality or health problems on this rookery. Necropsies, histology, and ancillary diagnostic studies were conducted on 21 fresh dead preweaned pups. Ages ranged from 1 stillbirth to pups approximately 2 weeks of age. Gross lesions included varying degrees of bruising, hemorrhage, lacerations, and fractures attributed to blunt force trauma to the head, chest, and/or abdomen in 16 pups; starvation in 6 pups; bite wounds in 2 pups; generalized icterus in 2 pups; presumptive drowning in 2 pups; and 1 stillbirth. Most pups had multiple gross lesions. Following light microscopic examination, pups could be assigned into 4 general diagnostic categories: 1) trauma, 2) nutritional status, 3) infectious conditions, and 4) congenital anomalies. This investigation of preweaned pup mortality of northern elephant seals in California further refines diagnostic categories for perinatal pup mortality.

  15. Causes of death in preweaned northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866), Año Nuevo State Reserve, California, 2012.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Lyons, Eugene T; Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Tift, Michael S; Raverty, Stephen; Jaggi, Nicole; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    During an ongoing physiological ecology study on pups and adult female northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris, Gill, 1866) on the mainland rookery at Año Nuevo State Reserve (California), an opportunity was afforded to collect fresh dead pups for parasitology and necropsy. The investigation was undertaken to delineate the causes of death of northern elephant seals recovered from Año Nuevo State Reserve. Prior to this study, there was no evidence of increased mortality or health problems on this rookery. Necropsies, histology, and ancillary diagnostic studies were conducted on 21 fresh dead preweaned pups. Ages ranged from 1 stillbirth to pups approximately 2 weeks of age. Gross lesions included varying degrees of bruising, hemorrhage, lacerations, and fractures attributed to blunt force trauma to the head, chest, and/or abdomen in 16 pups; starvation in 6 pups; bite wounds in 2 pups; generalized icterus in 2 pups; presumptive drowning in 2 pups; and 1 stillbirth. Most pups had multiple gross lesions. Following light microscopic examination, pups could be assigned into 4 general diagnostic categories: 1) trauma, 2) nutritional status, 3) infectious conditions, and 4) congenital anomalies. This investigation of preweaned pup mortality of northern elephant seals in California further refines diagnostic categories for perinatal pup mortality. PMID:24590664

  16. EDITORIAL: New materials with high spin polarization: half-metallic Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felser, Claudia; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2007-03-01

    thin film Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 262503 [6] Thomas A, Meyners D, Ebke D, Liu N-N, Sacher M D, Schmalhorst J, Reiss G, Ebert H, and Hütten A 2006 Inverted spin polarization of Heusler alloys for spintronic devices Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 012502 [7] Hillebrands B and Felser C 2006 Editorial: High-spin polarization of Heusler alloys J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 issue 5 http://stacks.iop.org/0022-3727/39/i=5 [8] Galanakis I, Mavropoulos Ph and Dederichs P H 2006 Electronic structure and Slater-Pauling behaviour in half-metallic Heusler alloys calculated from first principles J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 765 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 765 [9] Kandpal H C, Felser C and Seshadri R 2006 Covalent bonding and the nature of band gaps in some half-Heusler compounds J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 776 [10] Kallmayer M, Elmers H J, Balke B, Wurmehl S, Emmerling F, Fecher G H and Felser C 2006 Magnetic properties of Co2Mn1-xFexSi Heusler alloys J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 786 [11] Attema J J, de Wijs G A and de Groot R A 2006 The continuing drama of the half-metal/semiconductor interface J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 793 [12] Leziac M, Mavropoulos Ph, Bihlmayer G and Blügel S 2006 Scanning tunnelling microscopy of surfaces of half-metals: an ab-initio study on NiMnSb(001) J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 797 [13] Wurmehl S, Fecher G H, Kroth K, Kronast F, Dürr H A, Takeda Y, Saitoh Y, Kobayashi K, Lin H-J, Schönhense G and Felser C 2006 Electronic structure and spectroscopy of the quaternary Heusler alloy Co2Cr1-xFexAl J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 803 [14] Inomata K, Okamura S, Miyazaki A, Kikuchi M, Tezuka N, Wojcik M and Jedryka E 2006 Structural and magnetic properties and tunnel magnetoresistance for Co2(Cr,Fe)Al and Co2FeSi full-Heusler alloys J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 816 [15] Yamamoto M, Marukame T, Ishikawa T, Matsuda K, Uemura T and Arita M 2006 Fabrication of fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions using cobalt-based full-Heusler alloy thin film and their tunnel magnetoresistance

  17. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    As I begin my tenure as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM), I look upon this opportunity as both an honour and a real challenge. The journal is in great shape thanks to the work of my predecessors, Marshall Stoneham and David Ferry. The journal's solid reputation is based largely on the work these gentlemen have done over the past decade. The other main reason for the success of JPCM is the amazing staff in Bristol; keep up the good work, please. When discussing the journal with scientists from all corners of the globe, one thing is always mentioned—JPCM is a very reliable journal with well-written, high-quality papers, and a fast but rigorous peer-review process that provides fair, detailed and constructive referee reports for the benefit of authors. This is due almost entirely to our great authors and referees; we rely on them every day—thank you. As the new Editor-in-Chief I hope to continue to improve still further the journal's status in condensed matter science. As mentioned above, our reputation is excellent, but the reality is that we live in a world of bibliometrics and rankings. Over the past few years JPCM has been repositioned as a journal at the forefront of condensed matter physics, and the impact of the journal should increase further as a result of continued emphasis on commissioning in cutting-edge areas identified by the Editorial Board and the journal team. In addition to regular papers, JPCM has a number of other content streams that authors and readers can benefit from. Fast track communications (FTCs) offer exceptionally fast publication for work of the highest impact and urgency. By their select nature, FTCs benefit from personal treatment by the Editorial Board and the average receipt-to-first-decision time is just 11 days (the average receipt-to-publication time is just 45 days). Topical reviews in JPCM make the journal one of the most authoritative sources of review content for condensed matter physics

  18. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  19. EDITORIAL: The Earth radiation balance as driver of the global hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Liepert, Beate

    2010-06-01

    absorbed solar and net thermal radiative exchanges at the Earth's surface. Globally averaged, this surface radiation balance is positive, since radiative absorption, scattering and emission in the climate system act to generate an energy surplus at the surface and an energy deficit in the atmosphere (Liepert 2010). Evaporation, or more precisely its energy equivalent, the latent heat flux, is the main process that compensates for this imbalance between surface and atmosphere, since the latent heat dominates the convective energy flux over sensible heating. The radiative energy surplus at the surface is thus mainly consumed by evaporation and moist convection and subsequently released in the atmosphere through condensation. This implies that any alterations in the available radiative energy will induce changes in the water fluxes. Our focus in this editorial is therefore on the surface radiation balance as the principal driver of the global hydrological cycle. Note that this energetic view is in agreement with that of Richter and Xie (2008) who argue that the spatial and temporal behaviour of the process of evaporation is controlled by surface and atmospheric properties such as atmospheric stability, wind speed, moisture deficit and moisture availability. From radiation theory it is expected that with increasing radiative absorption due to abundance of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and consequent warming, the emission of thermal energy from the atmosphere towards the surface is increasing (known as downward thermal radiation). This enhances the radiative energy surplus at the surface, and, where surface water is not limited, fuels evaporation besides warming the Earth's surface. The enhanced greenhouse effect therefore tends to accelerate the hydrological cycle, as also shown in many climate model simulations with increasing levels of greenhouse gases (e.g., IPCC 2007, but also see Yang et al 2003, Andrews et al 2009). We can assume that the increase in

  20. Desarrollo de un instrumento para medir percepciones sobre el contexto de construccion del conocimiento cientifico de estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ramirez, Jaime Antonio

    En esta investigacion, se desarrollo un instrumento que permite medir percepciones relacionadas al contexto de constriccion del conocimiento cientifico. Se examinaron instrumentos existentes y se encontro que el VOSTS (Views on science, technology, and society), instrumento desarrollado empiricamente en Canada por Aikenhead, Ryan y Fleming, podia traducirse y validarse en el contexto cultural puertorriqueno. El instrumento es extenso, consta de 113 reactivos, cada uno con una premisa basica relacionada a la tematica ciencia, tecnologia y sociedad y un numero de alternativas relacionadas a la premisa que oscila entre siete y trece. Se delimito su utilizacion a los quince reactivos identificados por los autores como relacionados a la construccion social del conocimiento cientifico. Metodologicamente, se procedio a utilizar el modelo de adaptacion intercultural, que permite que el instrumento desarrollado satisfaga las dimensiones de equivalencia semantica, de contenido, tecnica, de criterio y conceptual, atemperado asi al instrumento original. Se cumplio con este proposito mediante la traduccion de la version original en ingles al espanol y viceversa. Se utilizaron comites para examinar la traduccion y la retro-traduccion del instrumento. Se realizo una prueba piloto con estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso, utilizando el instrumento traducido para asegurar su intelegibilidad. La confiabilidad del instrumento se determino mediante la intervencion de un panel de expertos quienes clasificaron las distintas posiciones dentro de cada reactivo en: realista, con merito e ingenua; se transformaron estas opciones en valores numericos lo que permitio establecer una escala Likert para cada una. Se suministro el instrumento a una muestra de estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso con caracteristicas similares a las de la poblacion puertorriquena en cuanto a ejecucion en las pruebas de aptitud verbal y matematica del College Board. Los resultados de sus contestaciones

  1. EDITORIAL: Selected Papers from OMS'07, the 2nd Topical Meeting of the European Optical Society on Optical Microsystems (OMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendina, Ivo; Fazio, Eugenio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2008-06-01

    papers presented at OMS'07 has been collected, reporting progress in the different aspects of microsystems design, production, characterization and application. The papers embrace most of the various topics that were debated during the conference. Abstracts for the presentations given at the conference can be found on the OMS'07 website at http://www.inoa.it/oms07/. We would like to thank all the members of the scientific and industrial committees of OMS'07 for the high scientific content of the meeting, the European Optical Society for the irreplaceable support given to the conference organization and the editorial staff at Journal of Optics A for the invaluable work done in preparing the special issue.

  2. EDITORIAL: Integrated assessments of environmental change on the Tibetan Plateau Integrated assessments of environmental change on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei; Yao, Tandong

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is one of the Earth's most sensitive regions in responding to climate change due to its extremely high altitude and the presence of permafrost and glaciers. The cryosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere of the plateau have been undergoing significant changes. Due to the low human population density, environmental changes on the plateau are largely driven by natural processes. Thus, the plateau provides a unique and comprehensive site for global change studies. This focus issue on Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau aims to address both paleo and recent environmental changes across the plateau to facilitate our understanding of this remote and under-studied area. We invited a wide spectrum of contributions to address climate change, permafrost degradation, glacier/snow/ice dynamics, lake dynamics, land- cover/land-use changes, and their interactions on the plateau. Collectively, the diverse contributions in this special issue are expected to present the recent advancement of the above topics and beyond. See the PDF for the full text of the editorial. Focus on Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau Contents Does a weekend effect in diurnal temperature range exist in the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau? Qinglong You, Shichang Kang, Wolfgang-Albert Flügel, Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo, Yuping Yan, Yanwei Xu and Jie Huang Diurnal variations of summertime precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau in relation to orographically-induced regional circulations Xiaodong Liu, Aijuan Bai and Changhai Liu Lake-level fluctuations since the Last Glaciation in Selin Co (lake), Central Tibet, investigated using optically stimulated luminescence dating of beach ridges Dewen Li, Yingkui Li, Baoqi Ma, Guocheng Dong, Liqiang Wang and Junxiang Zhao Recent changes in Imja Glacial Lake and its damming moraine in the Nepal Himalaya revealed by in situ surveys and multi-temporal ASTER imagery Koji Fujita, Akiko Sakai, Takayuki Nuimura, Satoru Yamaguchi and Rishi R Sharma Changes

  3. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2013-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award the Roberts prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 is awarded to Michel Defrise, Ahmadreza Rezaei and Johan Nuyts from the Vrije Universiteit Brussels and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium for their breakthrough paper that describes how the information needed for attenuation correction in PET imaging can be extracted, to within a constant, from time-of-flight emission data: Time-of-flight PET data determine the attenuation sinogram up to a constant 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 885 Michel Defrise1, Ahmadreza Rezaei2 and Johan Nuyts2 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium This paper represents an important and timely contribution to the literature as time-of-flight PET scanners are now offered by several manufacturers. In hybrid PET/CT scanners, the PET attenuation correction, necessary for quantitative reconstruction of the tracer distribution, can be derived directly from the CT data. Sometimes, however, the PET and CT scans may be poorly aligned due to patient motion and other approaches are needed. In addition, hybrid PET/MRI scanners also, have been developed recently, and in

  4. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  5. EDITORIAL: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2003 awarded to Paul Lauterbur and Peter Mansfield for discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Martin O.

    2004-02-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine recognizes discoveries concerning the use of magnetic resonance to visualize different structures. The Assembly's decision to recognize the discoveries underpinning efficient spatial mapping of biological properties reflects the singular importance of imaging to the medical application of this technique. Without this, abnormalities in morphology cannot be recognized. Equally, the wealth of physiological information that can be obtained by manipulation of the magnetic resonance signal is of little value unless localized to identified organs, pathology or areas of tissue. Based on these early discoveries, a wide range of imaging and measurement techniques, together with enabling instrumentation, have been developed over the last 30 years. Commercial equipment became available in the early 1980s, and some 60 million MRI examinations are now performed each year. The power of the technique, and the range of applications, continues to develop rapidly. The full text of this editorial is given in the PDF file below.

  6. [52th Commemoration of French Journal of Plastic Aesthetic Surgery (1956-2007). Fifty-four years of editorial; five Editors-in-chief].

    PubMed

    Cariou, J-L

    2007-08-01

    The french Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery (SOF.CPRE) is born December 3th 1952. Initially without "aesthetic", this "key-word" is agreed in 1983 and the symbols are advanced since: SFCPR, SFCPRE, SOF.CPRE. Its official organ, formerly included in Annales de chirurgie (1954-1955), become Annales de chirurgie plastique in 1956, Annales de chirurgie plastique et esthétique in 1983 and finally Annales de chirurgie plastique esthétique (ACPE) in 1992. Since the origin, five Editors-in-chief succeded: Claude Dufourmentel, Raymond Vilain, Jean-Pierre Lalardrie, Claude Lê-Quang, Jean-Luc Cariou. Four of them are alive, Raymond Vilain is dead. The author relate here the natural story of these five editors who had all a triple route: personnal, surgical and editorial.

  7. Media Coverage, Journal Press Releases and Editorials Associated with Randomized and Observational Studies in High-Impact Medical Journals: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael T. M.; Bolland, Mark J.; Gamble, Greg; Grey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Publication of clinical research findings in prominent journals influences health beliefs and medical practice, in part by engendering news coverage. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) should be most influential in guiding clinical practice. We determined whether study design of clinical research published in high-impact journals influences media coverage. Methods and Findings We compared the incidence and amount of media coverage of RCTs with that of observational studies published in the top 7 medical journals between 1 January 2013 and 31 March 2013. We specifically assessed media coverage of the most rigorous RCTs, those with >1000 participants that reported ‘hard’ outcomes. There was no difference between RCTs and observational studies in coverage by major newspapers or news agencies, or in total number of news stories generated (all P>0.63). Large RCTs reporting ‘hard’ outcomes did not generate more news coverage than small RCTs that reported surrogate outcomes and observational studies (all P>0.32). RCTs were more likely than observational studies to attract a journal editorial (70% vs 46%, P = 0.003), but less likely to be the subject of a journal press release (17% vs 50%, P<0.001). Large RCTs that reported ‘hard’ outcomes did not attract an editorial more frequently than other studies (61% vs 58%, P>0.99), nor were they more likely to be the subject of a journal press release (14% vs 38%, P = 0.14). Conclusions The design of clinical studies whose results are published in high-impact medical journals is not associated with the likelihood or amount of ensuing news coverage. PMID:26701758

  8. EDITORIAL: 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems 18th European Conference on Dynamics of Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandas, A. J. C.

    2011-08-01

    (Bovino et al 028103, and Hankel et al 028102) and statistical reaction dynamics using a model based on the long-range interaction potential (McCarroll 028106). A contribution on gas-surface interactions is also included (Sahoo et al 028105) as well as first-principles ab initio calculations to explore the hydrogen-graphene interaction (Irving et al 028108). These articles reflect the recent progress made in this field and constructively build on work described in the previous three MOLEC special sections of CAMOP published in Physica Scripta. I thank, on behalf of the scientific organizing committee of MOLEC, all the authors who contributed and Physica Scripta for providing a platform for the publication of this special section dedicated to MOLEC 2010. A special thanks goes to the CAMOP Editor, Harold Linarz, for the excellent guidance in handling the editorial work. I hope that the articles catalyze the attention of the readers towards the topics covered and contribute in attracting them to attend MOLEC 2012 in Oxford, UK.

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit FOCUS ON MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AT THE QUANTUM LIMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Schwab, Keith

    2008-09-01

    The last five years have witnessed an amazing development in the field of nano- and micromechanics. What was widely considered fantasy ten years ago is about to become an experimental reality: the quantum regime of mechanical systems is within reach of current experiments. Two factors (among many) have contributed significantly to this situation. As part of the widespread effort into nanoscience and nanofabrication, it is now possible to produce high-quality nanomechanical and micromechanical resonators, spanning length scales of millimetres to nanometres, and frequencies from kilohertz to gigahertz. Researchers coupled these mechanical elements to high-sensitivity actuation and readout systems such as single-electron transistors, quantum dots, atomic point contacts, SQUID loops, high-finesse optical or microwave-cavities etc. Some of these ultra-sensitive readout schemes are in principle capable of detection at the quantum limit and a large part of the experimental effort is at present devoted to achieving this. On the other hand, the fact that the groups working in the field come from various different physics backgrounds—the authors of this editorial are a representative sample—has been a constant source of inspiration for helpful theoretical and experimental tools that have been adapted from other fields to the mechanical realm. To name just one example: ideas from quantum optics have led to the recent demonstration (both in theory and experiment) that coupling a mechanical resonator to a high-finesse optical cavity can be fully analogous to the well-known sideband-resolved laser cooling of ions and hence is capable in principle of cooling a mechanical mode into its quantum ground state. There is no doubt that such interdisciplinarity has been a crucial element for the development of the field. It is interesting to note that a very similar sociological phenomenon occurred earlier in the quantum information community, an area which is deeply enriched by the

  10. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2010 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 is awarded to M M Paulides et al from Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, for their paper on hyperthermia treatment: The clinical feasibility of deep hyperthermia treatment in the head and neck: new challenges for positioning and temperature measurement M M Paulides, J F Bakker, M Linthorst, J van der Zee, Z Rijnen, E Neufeld, P M T Pattynama, P P Jansen, P C Levendag and G C van Rhoon 2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 2465 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Alonzo-Proulx O, Packard N, Boone J M, Al-Mayah A, Brock K K, Shen S Z and Yaffe M J 2010 Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms Phys. Med. Biol. 55 3027 Bian J, Siewerdsen J H, Han X, Sidky E Y, Prince J L, Pelizzari C A and Pan X 2010 Evaluation of sparse-view reconstruction from flat-panel-detector cone-beam CT Phys. Med. Biol. 55 6575 Brun M-A, Formanek F, Yasuda A, Sekine M, Ando N

  11. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 12th Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop (GWDAW 12), Cambridge, MA, USA, 13 16 December 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S.; Katsavounidis, E.

    2008-09-01

    and particle spectrum, from what is expected to be common sources of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation as well as neutrinos, have created great excitement, lively discussions and have given birth to collaborations for joint analyses and observations. A special thank you to our non-gravitational wave presenters and participants for making the time to join us. We hope this will be the beginning of a long tradition for this workshop. In this workshop we also introduced the student prize for the best poster. Twenty student posters participated in this competition. Pinkesh Patel of Caltech was the prize winner on a 'Resampling Technique to Calculate the F-statistic', co-authored with X Siemens and R Dupuis. We are grateful to the MIT Kavli Institute for providing the financial support for the cash prize that accompanied this. We would like to thank the local and international organizing committees for putting together a great scientific program, all the conference presenters and participants and finally the CQG editorial staff for making this conference proceeding volume happen.

  12. EDITORIAL: Theory of Quantum Gases and Quantum Coherence: The Cortona BEC Workshop, 29 October-2 November 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzi, Pablo; Chitra, R.; Menotti, Chiara; Minguzz, Anna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2006-05-01

    opportunity to thank all the participants of ICOMP-X, and in particular the contributors to this issue, for the high quality of science presented at the conference and in this journal. The success of the conference would not have been possible without the program committee which included D Charalambidis, L Cocke, R Freeman, Y Fujimura, S Goreslavsky, A L'Huillier, F Krausz, R Levis, S H Lin, A Maquet, J Marangos, K Midorikawa, G Mourou, P Salieres, W Sandner, K Schafer, A Scrinzi, A M Sergeev, H Stapelfeldt, A Starace, J Ullrich, M Vrakking, and K Yamanouchi. A particularly lively atmosphere in the discussions was ensured by many students who were able to participate in the conference, in part due to generous support of the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations (CIPI) to the Canadian, and of the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences to the American students. Additional support to the conference was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), Pfeiffer Vacuum, Femtolasers Produktions GmbH, Roentdek Handels GmbH, Coherent Laser Products, and Amplitude Technologies. Last but not least, the guest editors of this special issue would like to acknowledge the tremendous amount of work done by the staff of J. Phys. B in handling all aspects of the publication process. In particular, we would like to thank Isabelle Auffret-Babak, Alice Malhador and Joanna Dingley from the editorial team, Katie Gerrard in production and the Editor-in-Chief, Professor J-M Rost.

  13. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2010-07-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2009 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have a clear, and very worthy, winner this year. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the 2009 Roberts Prize is awarded to E Z Zhang et al from University College London for their paper on photoacoustic tomography. In vivo high resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging of superficial vascular anatomy E Z Zhang, J G Laufer, R B Pedley and P C Beard 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1035-46 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Cheng Y-C N , Neelavalli J and Haacke E M 2009 Limitations of calculating field distributions and magnetic susceptibilities in MRI using a Fourier based method Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1169-89 Cho S, Ahn S, Li Q and Leahy R M 2009 Exact and approximate Fourier rebinning of PET data from time-of-flight to non time-of-flight 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 467-84 Davidson S R H, Weersink R A, Haider M A, Gertner M R, Bogaards A, Giewercer D, Scherz A, Sherar M D, Elhilali M, Chin J L, Trachtenberg J and Wilson B C 2009 Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial

  14. EDITORIAL: Progress in applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine Progress in applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Grady, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    within their own areas of the field. Because that field is moving rapidly and has now become a major subject of study, we believe that a collection of updated reviews would be highly appropriate and beneficial to the community. We have been fortunate in getting the same authors to provide six-year updates of their original works. This offers continuity and also allows those who may be new to this area to refer back to the original reviews for a full description of the basic science. In the interests of economy and to avoid repetition, this new set of reviews should be read in conjunction with the original works. The Editorial Board of J. Phys D is particularly grateful to the authors for agreeing to write a second work for our journal. We are aware that the production of reviews is an onerous task and acknowledge their efforts in making available such clear and high quality papers. We trust these new works will prove as beneficial to readers and as successful for their authors as were their original reviews.

  15. Randomized Controlled Trial of Nuevo Amanecer: A Peer-delivered Stress Management Intervention for Spanish-speaking Latinas with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nápoles, Anna María; Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Ortiz, Carmen; Gregorich, Steven; Lee, Howard E.; Duron, Ysabel; Graves, Kristi; Luce, Judith A.; McGuire, Peggy; Díaz-Méndez, Marynieves; Stewart, Anita L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Latinas with breast cancer suffer symptom and psychosocial health disparities. Effective interventions have not been developed for or tested in this population. Purpose We describe community-based participatory research methods used to develop and implement the Nuevo Amanecer program, a culturally tailored, peer-delivered cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention for low-income Spanish-speaking Latinas with breast cancer, and unique considerations in implementing a randomized controlled trial to test the program in community settings. Methods We applied an implementation science framework to delineate the methodological phases used to develop and implement the Nuevo Amanecer program and trial, emphasizing community engagement processes. Results In phase 1, we established project infrastructure: academic and community Co-Principal Investigators, community partners, community advisory board, steering committee, and funding. In phase 2, we identified three program inputs: formative research, a community best practices model, and an evidence-based intervention tested in non-Latinas. In phase 3, we created the new program by integrating and adapting intervention components from the three sources, making adaptations to accommodate low-literacy, Spanish language, cultural factors, community context, and population needs. In phase 4, we built community capacity for the program and trial by training field staff (recruiters and interventionists embedded in community sites), compensating field staff, and creating a system for identifying potential participants. In phase 5, we implemented and monitored the program and trial. Engaging community partners in all phases has resulted in a new, culturally tailored program that is suitable for newly diagnosed Latinas with breast cancer and a trial that is acceptable and supported by community and clinical partners. Lessons Learned Engagement of community-based organizations and cancer survivors as research

  16. [Teaching-inservice integration in primary care. Experience of the Facultad de Enfermería de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Castillo, M A; Espinoza de Benavides, S; Rodríguez Aguilar, L; Martínez Maldonado, J M

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the reasons which justify the need to integrate teaching in-service and health care delivery in nursing, and the mechanisms to achieve efficiency in health programs. In 1976 the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon (Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León), as an educational and training center and as a means for scientific and humanistic endeavor to foster the development of the community it serves, began a joint experimental project with the health sector, by means of the Guadalupe Health Program and the Nursing Development Program, with the participation of the Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Dentistry. Special importance is attached to the objectives and organization of these nursing programs, the teaching in-service methodology, and the functions and responsibilities of teachers, students and support staff. The achievements of eleven years of work are reported.

  17. EDITORIAL: Wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Morthorst, Poul-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also addressed within the issue is how much conventional power production can be replaced by the ceaseless wind, with the question of how Greece's target of 29% renewables by 2020 is to be met efficiently. Other topics include an innovative way to determine the power curve of a turbine experimentally more accurately, the use of fluid dynamics tools to investigate the implications of placing vortex generators on wind turbine blades (thereby possibly improving their efficiency) and a study of the perception of wind turbine noise. It turns out that a small but significant fraction of wind turbine neighbours feel that turbine generated noise impairs their ability to rest. The annoyance is correlated with a negative attitude towards the visual impact on the landscape, but what is cause and effect is too early to say. As mentioned there is a rush for wind turbines in many countries. However, this positive development for the global climate is currently limited by practical barriers. One bottleneck is the difficulties for the sub-suppliers of gears and other parts to meet the demand. Another is the difficulties to meet the demand for engineers specialized in wind. For that reason the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) recently launched the world's first Wind Energy Masters Program. Here and elsewhere in the world of wind education and research we should really speed up now, as our chances of contributing to emission free energy production and a healthier global climate have never been better. Focus on Wind Energy Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Wind turbines—low level noise sources interfering with restoration? Eja Pedersen and Kerstin Persson Waye On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit in Greece George Caralis, Yiannis Perivolaris, Konstantinos Rados and Arthouros Zervos Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake A Jimenez, A Crespo, E Migoya and J Garcia How to improve the estimation of power curves fo

  18. Editorial: Reducing adolescent suicide.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Michael H

    2016-07-01

    Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death in young people ages 10-19 (CDC, 2015). Current statistics suggest that in the US one in every seven youths has seriously considered or made a plan to commit suicide and one in every 13 youths has attempted suicide in the previous year (CDC, 2015). Suicide represents a - if not the - major public health problem in adolescents. PMID:27320365

  19. Problem Based Learning: Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. B.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that if students are to study enzyme kinetics they should do more than just gloss over the surface. Adequate time should be given for the student to thoroughly study the mechanisms to development a complete understanding. (MVL)

  20. EDITORIAL: Nanometrology Nanometrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mitsuru; Baba, Tetsuya; Postek, Michael T.

    2011-02-01

    Nanomanufacturing is an essential bridge between the discoveries of nanoscience and real-world nanotech products and is the vehicle by which the world will realize the promise of major technological innovation across a spectrum of products that will affect virtually every industrial sector. For micro and nanotech products to achieve the broad impacts envisioned, they must be manufactured in market-appropriate quantities in a reliable, repeatable, economical and commercially viable manner. In addition, they must be manufactured so that environmental and human health concerns are met, worker safety issues are appropriately assessed and handled, and liability issues are addressed. Critical to this realization of robust manufacturing at the nanoscale is the development of the necessary instrumentation, metrology and standards, i.e. nanometrology. The National Measurement Laboratories are committed to developing the required metrology. Integration of the instruments, their interoperability and appropriate information management are also critical elements that must be considered for viable micro and nanomanufacturing. Advanced instrumentation, metrology and standards will allow the physical dimensions, properties, functionality and purity of the materials, processes, tools, systems, products and emissions that will constitute micro and nanomanufacturing to be measured and characterized. This will in turn enable production to be scalable, controllable, predictable and repeatable to meet market needs. If a product cannot be measured it cannot be manufactured; if that product cannot be made safely it should not be manufactured, and finally, if the metrology is not in place how would you know? The articles in this special feature can be classified into three categories: dimensional metrology (8 papers and one technical design note), density of particles (2 papers) and metrology of thermal properties (3 papers). The articles on dimensional metrology include scanning probe microscope dimensional metrology, the through focus scanning optical (TSOM) imaging method, scatterfield optical microscopy, helium ion microscopy, metrology and combinations of these microscopy and imaging techniques applied to nanostructures and particles such as cellulose nanocrystals, and targeted liposome-based delivery systems. Dimensional metrology covers grating pitch measurement by optical diffraction, measurement of the thickness of silicon oxide by synchrotron radiation x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) analysis and determination of pore size distribution of porous low-dielectric-constant films by x-ray scattering. The two papers on particle density present number concentration standards for aerosol nanoparticles of larger diameter than about 10 nm and liquid-borne particles in the range of 10-20 µm diameter, respectively. The three papers on metrology of thermal properties present recent innovative progress in thermophysical metrology of thin films by the ultrafast laser flash methods required for understanding of the thermal science at nanoscales and thermal design of nanodevices. The first paper improves the technology applicable under high pressures in a diamond anvil cell. The second extends this technology to thin films on silicon substrates. The third reports the first observation of non-diffusive heat transfer across thin films at low temperatures. In order to guarantee reliability and traceability of developed measurement methods for nanomaterials, a technical infrastructure for nanomaterials such as metrological standards, reference materials and document standards for measurement methods is important. We hope this special feature will be the first step in a collaboration towards a global harmonization of nanometrology.

  1. EDITORIAL: Photonic Crystal Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

    2007-05-01

    The engineering of electromagnetic modes at optical frequencies in artificial dielectric structures with periodic and random variation of the refractive index, enabling control of the radiative properties of the materials and photon localization, was first proposed independently by Yablonovitch and John in 1987. It is possible to control the flow of light in the periodic dielectric structures, known as photonic crystals (PC). As light waves scatter within the photonic crystal, destructive interference cancels out light of certain wavelengths, thereby forming a photonic bandgap, similar to the energy bandgap for electron waves in a semiconductor. Photons whose energies lie within the gap cannot propagate through the periodic structure. This property can be used to make a low-loss cavity. If a point defect, such as one or more missing periods, is introduced into the periodic structure a region is obtained within which the otherwise forbidden wavelengths can be locally trapped. This property can be used to realize photonic microcavities. Similarly, a line of defects can serve as a waveguide. While the realization of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals received considerable attention initially, planar two-dimensional (2D) structures are currently favoured because of their relative ease of fabrication. 2D photonic crystal structures provide most of the functionality of 3D structures. These attributes have generated worldwide research and development of sub-μm and μm size active and passive photonic devices such as single-mode and non- classical light sources, guided wave devices, resonant cavity detection, and components for optical communication. More recently, photonic crystal guided wave devices are being investigated for application in microfludic and biochemical sensing. Photonic crystal devices have been realized with bulk, quantum well and quantum dot active regions. The Cluster of articles in this issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics provides a glimpse of some of the most recent advances in the application of photonic crystals. The modelling of PC defect-mode cavities are described by Zhou et al. Ye and co-authors describe the concept and realization of a novel 3D silicon-based spiral PC. It is, in fact, the only article on 3D PCs. The design and realization of ultra-high Q heterostructure PC nanocavities are described by Song and co-authors. The concept of self-collimation of light in PCs and its applications are presented by Prather and co-workers. Experimental and numerical studies on the negative refraction related phenomenon in 2D PCs are the subject of the next article by Ozbay and co-authors. The emerging subject of slow light generation, control and propagation in PCs is presented in the next two articles by Baba and Mori and by Krauss. Finally, the progress made in the development of PC microcavity lasers and electrically injected microcavity light emitters and arrays is described, respectively, by O'Brien et al and by Chakravarty et al. It is hoped that readers will get a sense of the exciting developments and the possibilities presented by heterostructure photonic crystals and their devices from reading the articles in this Cluster.

  2. EDITORIAL: Publisher's Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlashan, Yasmin

    2006-12-01

    In addition to offering an excellent service to authors, referees and readers of the journal, one of the goals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) is to support the plasma community. We sponsor a number of prizes each year, usually focused on students' contributions to conferences. The poster prize winners from the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be found in Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 48 B1-B506 along with the invited talks from the conference. Other prizes include: A poster prize at the CCLRC-organised High Power Laser Science Christmas meeting, held in Abingdon, UK, in December 2005. The winning poster was: `Implicit Vlasov Fokker Planck simulations including hydrodynamic ion motion' Christopher Ridgers (Imperial College London). The second prize went to C Cecchitti (Queens University of Belfast), and the third prize to John Howe (University of York). For the first time in 2006 PPCF also sponsored a prize for the best poster presented at the International Workshop on Frontiers of Plasma Physics, held from 21 August-1 September 2006 at the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy. The winner of this prize was Dr Bhaskar Chaudhury (Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, India), for his work on `Plasma stealth technology: reduction of radar cross section of plasma shrouded objects'. Thank you to everyone who participated in these prizes, and congratulations to the winners and runners-up. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the authors and referees of PPCF for all their hard work and support in making the journal a success in 2006 and to wish you all a successful 2007.

  3. Non-editorial Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, John

    1974-01-01

    In his position as retiring chief of the Workers' Education Branch of the International Labour Office (ILO), Paul B. J. Chu is interviewed on worker education, the ILO organization and tole, personal disappointments and satisfactions, future educational developments in which the ILO will be involved, and problems facing workers' education. (AG)

  4. Not Without Value. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, George H.

    2002-01-01

    To reverse the decline in volunteerism in education, administrators must understand the difference between true volunteering and participation coerced under the guise of volunteering. Appreciation is essential for promoting volunteerism, for no one wishes to be considered without value. But if coercion and exploitation are part of the growing…

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Ribeiro, Ricardo M.

    2009-09-01

    Graphene physics is currently one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics. Countless theoretical and experimental studies have already been performed, targeting electronic, magnetic, thermal, optical, structural and vibrational properties. Also, studies that modify pristine graphene, aiming at finding new physics and possible new applications, have been considered. These include patterning nanoribbons and quantum dots, exposing graphene's surface to different chemical species, studying multilayer systems, and inducing strain and curvature (modifying in this way graphene's electronic properties). This focus issue includes many of the latest developments on graphene research. Focus on Graphene Contents Electronic properties of graphene and graphene nanoribbons with 'pseudo-Rashba' spin-orbit coupling Tobias Stauber and John Schliemann Strained graphene: tight-binding and density functional calculations R M Ribeiro, Vitor M Pereira, N M R Peres, P R Briddon and A H Castro Neto The effect of sublattice symmetry breaking on the electronic properties of doped graphene A Qaiumzadeh and R Asgari Interfaces within graphene nanoribbons J Wurm, M Wimmer, I Adagideli, K Richter and H U Baranger Weak localization and transport gap in graphene antidot lattices J Eroms and D Weiss Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices J A Fürst, J G Pedersen, C Flindt, N A Mortensen, M Brandbyge, T G Pedersen and A-P Jauho Splitting of critical energies in the n=0 Landau level of graphene Ana L C Pereira Double-gated graphene-based devices S Russo, M F Craciun, M Yamamoto, S Tarucha and A F Morpurgo Pinning and switching of magnetic moments in bilayer graphene Eduardo V Castro, M P López-Sancho and M A H Vozmediano Electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons Katsunori Wakabayashi, Yositake Takane, Masayuki Yamamoto and Manfred Sigrist Many-body effects on out-of-plane phonons in graphene J González and E Perfetto Graphene zigzag ribbons, square lattice models and quantum spin chains Mahdi Zarea and Nancy Sandler On the universal ac optical background in graphene V P Gusynin, S G Sharapov and J P Carbotte Heat conduction in graphene: experimental study and theoretical interpretation S Ghosh, D L Nika, E P Pokatilov and A A Balandin Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities D M Basko Electronic transport in bilayer graphene Mikito Koshino Magnetic Kronig-Penney model for Dirac electrons in single-layer graphene M Ramezani Masir, P Vasilopoulos and F M Peeters Electrical transport in high-quality graphene pnp junctions Jairo Velasco Jr, Gang Liu, Wenzhong Bao and Chun Ning Lau Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene N M R Peres, Ling Yang and Shan-Wen Tsai Gaps and tails in graphene and graphane B Dóra and K Ziegler Quasi-ferromagnet spintronics in the graphene nanodisc-lead system Motohiko Ezawa Range and correlation effects in edge disordered graphene nanoribbons Alessandro Cresti and Stephan Roche Remarks on the tight-binding model of graphene Cristina Bena and Gilles Montambaux

  6. Editorial: Redefining Length

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2011-07-15

    Technological changes have moved publishing to electronic-first publication where the print version has been relegated to simply another display mode. Distribution in HTML and EPUB formats, for example, changes the reading environment and reduces the need for strict pagination. Therefore, in an effort to streamline the calculation of length, the APS journals will no longer use the printed page as the determining factor for length. Instead the journals will now use word counts (or word equivalents for tables, figures, and equations) to establish length; for details please see http://publish.aps.org/authors/length-guide. The title, byline, abstract, acknowledgment, and references will not be included in these counts allowing authors the freedom to appropriately credit coworkers, funding sources, and the previous literature, bringing all relevant references to the attention of readers. This new method for determining length will be easier for authors to calculate in advance, and lead to fewer length-associated revisions in proof, yet still retain the quality of concise communication that is a virtue of short papers.

  7. EDITORIAL: Politically correct physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople Deputy Editor, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    If you were a caring, thinking, liberally minded person in the 1960s, you marched against the bomb, against the Vietnam war, and for civil rights. By the 1980s, your voice was raised about the destruction of the rainforests and the threat to our whole planetary environment. At the same time, you opposed discrimination against any group because of race, sex or sexual orientation. You reasoned that people who spoke or acted in a discriminatory manner should be discriminated against. In other words, you became politically correct. Despite its oft-quoted excesses, the political correctness movement sprang from well-founded concerns about injustices in our society. So, on balance, I am all for it. Or, at least, I was until it started to invade science. Biologists were the first to feel the impact. No longer could they refer to 'higher' and 'lower' orders, or 'primitive' forms of life. To the list of undesirable 'isms' - sexism, racism, ageism - had been added a new one: speciesism. Chemists remained immune to the PC invasion, but what else could you expect from a group of people so steeped in tradition that their principal unit, the mole, requires the use of the thoroughly unreconstructed gram? Now it is the turn of the physicists. This time, the offenders are not those who talk disparagingly about other people or animals, but those who refer to 'forms of energy' and 'heat'. Political correctness has evolved into physical correctness. I was always rather fond of the various forms of energy: potential, kinetic, chemical, electrical, sound and so on. My students might merge heat and internal energy into a single, fuzzy concept loosely associated with moving molecules. They might be a little confused at a whole new crop of energies - hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal and tidal - but they could tell me what devices turned chemical energy into electrical energy, even if they couldn't quite appreciate that turning tidal energy into geothermal energy wasn't part of the same game. In today's PC physics, no such complications arise because all forms of energy are equal and unlabelled. I accept the reasoning behind this - that understanding processes is more important than attaching labels - but what am I supposed to call ½mv2, mgh and mcΔθ? On which subject.... What am I allowed to say about heat? It seems that objects can be heated up. I can switch on the central heating. But I cannot get heat from a Bunsen burner. In PC physics, heat is banned - at least as a noun. Instead, I have to talk about 'energy transferred because of a temperature difference'. And I must stop saying 'transferred' in circumstances where I really mean 'transformed'. I find it difficult to argue with the logic behind the new approach to energy, but the loss of such an elegantly simple word as 'heat' is proving a severe restriction on my use of language. The loss is especially galling because engineers will go on talking about heat engines, heat pumps and heat sinks. In primary schools, saucepans will still conduct heat, and the Sun will continue to give off heat and light. Moreover, I suspect that most teachers will be using 'heat' in the privacy of the classroom, even if they won't admit to it in public. We shall all become closet heatists. Before PC physics takes over by stealth, we need a full and open debate on what is or isn't conceptually acceptable for students at different stages. Perhaps we need a conference. If so, I will be there at the back with my banner. But this time, it won't read 'Save the whale' or 'Save the rainforests'. It will read 'Save heat', or maybe 'Save all forms of energy'.

  8. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert M.

    2004-07-01

    Industrial process tomography remains a multidisciplinary field with considerable interest for many varied participants. Indeed this adds greatly to its appeal. It is a pleasure and a privilege to once again act as guest editor for a special feature issue of Measurement Science and Technology on industrial process tomography, the last being in December 2002. Those involved in the subject appreciate the efforts of Measurement Science and Technology in producing another issue and I thank the journal on their behalf. It can be seen that there are considerable differences in the composition of material covered in this issue compared with previous publications. The dominance of electrical impedance and electrical capacitance techniques is reduced and there is increased emphasis on general utility of tomographic methods. This is encompassed in the papers of Hoyle and Jia (visualization) and Dierick et al (Octopus). Electrical capacitance tomography has been a core modality for industrial applications. This issue includes new work in two very interesting aspects of image reconstruction: pattern matching (Takei and Saito) and simulated annealing (Ortiz-Aleman et al). It is important to take advantage of knowledge of the process such as the presence of only two components, and then to have robust reconstruction methods provided by pattern matching and by simulated annealing. Although crude reconstruction methods such as approximation by linear back projection were utilized for initial work on electrical impedance tomography, the techniques published here are much more advanced. The paper by Kim et al includes modelling of a two-component system permitting an adaption-related approach; the paper by Tossavainen et al models free surface boundaries to enable the estimation of shapes of objects within the target. There are clear improvements on the previous crude and blurred reconstructions where boundaries were merely inferred rather than estimated as in these new developments. Interest in magnetic induction tomography has evolved recently and I am pleased to note the inclusion of new work in that modality by Casanova et al. Note that this work also makes full use of prior information to improve reconstruction results. A modality that is relatively new to industrial applications is featured by Holstein et al, namely acoustic tomography. The novelty is provided by using measurements of the speed of sound in gas (air) to identify temperature distributions. Two well chosen applications illustrate the technique. Hard-field tomography, that is the modalities of x-ray and gamma-ray tomography, has always been of interest for some industrial applications. Often this has been for the high resolution of reconstructions available with these techniques, but there application has been restricted due to concerns about use of ionizing radiation. Cattle et al include an application to a process where the material to be imaged is a gamma emitter, i.e. only passive sources are used. The novelty here is that both source and attenuation information is used concurrently to obtain reconstructions. I thank the authors for a fascinating collection of papers that reflect current interest in the subject of industrial process tomography.

  9. EDITORIAL: Wind energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Morthorst, Poul-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also addressed within the issue is how much conventional power production can be replaced by the ceaseless wind, with the question of how Greece's target of 29% renewables by 2020 is to be met efficiently. Other topics include an innovative way to determine the power curve of a turbine experimentally more accurately, the use of fluid dynamics tools to investigate the implications of placing vortex generators on wind turbine blades (thereby possibly improving their efficiency) and a study of the perception of wind turbine noise. It turns out that a small but significant fraction of wind turbine neighbours feel that turbine generated noise impairs their ability to rest. The annoyance is correlated with a negative attitude towards the visual impact on the landscape, but what is cause and effect is too early to say. As mentioned there is a rush for wind turbines in many countries. However, this positive development for the global climate is currently limited by practical barriers. One bottleneck is the difficulties for the sub-suppliers of gears and other parts to meet the demand. Another is the difficulties to meet the demand for engineers specialized in wind. For that reason the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) recently launched the world's first Wind Energy Masters Program. Here and elsewhere in the world of wind education and research we should really speed up now, as our chances of contributing to emission free energy production and a healthier global climate have never been better. Focus on Wind Energy Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Wind turbines—low level noise sources interfering with restoration? Eja Pedersen and Kerstin Persson Waye On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit in Greece George Caralis, Yiannis Perivolaris, Konstantinos Rados and Arthouros Zervos Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake A Jimenez, A Crespo, E Migoya and J Garcia How to improve the estimation of power curves for wind turbines Julia Gottschall and Joachim Peinke

  10. Editorial and Broadcasting Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broido, Arnold; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the jobs of the music publisher and editor, music magazine and book editor, film music editor, and music critic. Educational requirements, job availability, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. A tear-out chart of ten music career areas, listing salaries and personal and educational qualifications, is included. (AM)

  11. Reductio ad absurdum. Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, George H.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, universities and other research institutions have increased the number of regulations concerning research "ethics." Driven by fears of litigation or political unpopularity and acting in an authoritarian manner, many institutional ethics boards are exceeding their purpose and are threatening both the validity of their faculty's research…

  12. EDITORIAL: Dearing strikes again!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-05-01

    Extra-territorial readers of this journal must surely hover between amazement and boredom at the periodic references to the time and energy spent in England in reviewing, changing, re-reviewing and re-changing its educational programmes from ages 5-18. (Scotland has its own educational system and seems to be doing quite well, thank you.) Recently, Sir Ron Dearing, the Government's educational trouble-shooter, who in a few short months managed to sort out the 5-16 curriculum to the satisfaction (more or less) of both Establishment and politicians, was given the task of redefining the principles underlying the education of 16-19 year-olds. In March 1996 he produced a report that has been greeted, initially at least, with the universal approval of the press and politicians of all parties. The main and century-old problem with the English educational system is the deep divide between academic (pre-university) and vocational education. This may reflect the broad division between `gentlemen' and players (artisans) that seems to be a feature of English society, and which may be too wide for a mere education system to bridge. A second problem has been the perceived narrowness, due to overspecialization into just three subjects, of pre-university courses, which has tended to produce yet another divide - between arts graduates (interesting, lively, well-read, cultured) and science graduates (boring, uncouth, illiterate). However, the rather boringly titled Review of Qualifications for 16-19 Year Olds, Summary ReportFootnote is at least clear in its intentions of bridging both gaps. It reviews the continuing decline in the popularity of mathematics and science subjects as pre-university (A-level) courses, and records that the parallel vocational courses (GNVQ) in science do not yet match their status and their acceptance by employers, and people in general. It accepts the failure of Advanced Supplementary courses to provide a broadening of the 16-19 curriculum. It makes many recommendations which will need very careful and intelligent management if they are to be both workable and beneficial; unfortunately recent history tells us that the Government's agencies responsible for educational management are insensitive to the advice of practitioners and work to hidden political agendas based on prejudgement if not downright prejudice. The Report's recommendations certainly provide a challenge for post-16 physics, especially for A-level. It is to be hoped that the new structures and initiatives of the Institute of Physics will be able to play a full part in ensuring that changes are beneficial and workable. Firstly, Sir Ron wants A-levels to provide opportunities and contexts for the development of some general skills, identified as communication (both written and oral), numeracy and in information technology, with a less clear reference to an ability to work as part of a team. Challenge 1: find good contexts in physics for these - and a valid assessment system. Secondly, the curriculum should be broadened by a kind of two-phase approach to post-16 studies. Potential A-level students would spend a year studying as many as six Advanced Subsidiary level subjects, chosen from four main areas: science, maths and technology; modern languages; arts and humanities; `the way the community works' (business, economics, law, psychology etc). Each new-style AS would be the first half of an A-level course. The second phase would allow specialization into, say, three A-levels as at present, or to a combination of A and AS courses. Challenge 2: design a half course that makes sense, and is as useful to potential lawyers as to potential physicists. Thirdly, there should be an increase in the size of the A-level subject cores. Challenge 3: design such an extended core that is less boringly old-fashioned than the current one (not too difficult, that) and is capable of useful fission (see Challenge 2). This is a good opportunity to consider the nature of a `core' in physics for such a wide variety of intended learners. A sheer increase in content would be

  13. Editorial: Reducing adolescent suicide.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Michael H

    2016-07-01

    Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death in young people ages 10-19 (CDC, 2015). Current statistics suggest that in the US one in every seven youths has seriously considered or made a plan to commit suicide and one in every 13 youths has attempted suicide in the previous year (CDC, 2015). Suicide represents a - if not the - major public health problem in adolescents.

  14. EDITORIAL: Dearing strikes again!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-05-01

    Extra-territorial readers of this journal must surely hover between amazement and boredom at the periodic references to the time and energy spent in England in reviewing, changing, re-reviewing and re-changing its educational programmes from ages 5-18. (Scotland has its own educational system and seems to be doing quite well, thank you.) Recently, Sir Ron Dearing, the Government's educational trouble-shooter, who in a few short months managed to sort out the 5-16 curriculum to the satisfaction (more or less) of both Establishment and politicians, was given the task of redefining the principles underlying the education of 16-19 year-olds. In March 1996 he produced a report that has been greeted, initially at least, with the universal approval of the press and politicians of all parties. The main and century-old problem with the English educational system is the deep divide between academic (pre-university) and vocational education. This may reflect the broad division between `gentlemen' and players (artisans) that seems to be a feature of English society, and which may be too wide for a mere education system to bridge. A second problem has been the perceived narrowness, due to overspecialization into just three subjects, of pre-university courses, which has tended to produce yet another divide - between arts graduates (interesting, lively, well-read, cultured) and science graduates (boring, uncouth, illiterate). However, the rather boringly titled Review of Qualifications for 16-19 Year Olds, Summary ReportFootnote is at least clear in its intentions of bridging both gaps. It reviews the continuing decline in the popularity of mathematics and science subjects as pre-university (A-level) courses, and records that the parallel vocational courses (GNVQ) in science do not yet match their status and their acceptance by employers, and people in general. It accepts the failure of Advanced Supplementary courses to provide a broadening of the 16-19 curriculum. It makes many recommendations which will need very careful and intelligent management if they are to be both workable and beneficial; unfortunately recent history tells us that the Government's agencies responsible for educational management are insensitive to the advice of practitioners and work to hidden political agendas based on prejudgement if not downright prejudice. The Report's recommendations certainly provide a challenge for post-16 physics, especially for A-level. It is to be hoped that the new structures and initiatives of the Institute of Physics will be able to play a full part in ensuring that changes are beneficial and workable. Firstly, Sir Ron wants A-levels to provide opportunities and contexts for the development of some general skills, identified as communication (both written and oral), numeracy and in information technology, with a less clear reference to an ability to work as part of a team. Challenge 1: find good contexts in physics for these - and a valid assessment system. Secondly, the curriculum should be broadened by a kind of two-phase approach to post-16 studies. Potential A-level students would spend a year studying as many as six Advanced Subsidiary level subjects, chosen from four main areas: science, maths and technology; modern languages; arts and humanities; `the way the community works' (business, economics, law, psychology etc). Each new-style AS would be the first half of an A-level course. The second phase would allow specialization into, say, three A-levels as at present, or to a combination of A and AS courses. Challenge 2: design a half course that makes sense, and is as useful to potential lawyers as to potential physicists. Thirdly, there should be an increase in the size of the A-level subject cores. Challenge 3: design such an extended core that is less boringly old-fashioned than the current one (not too difficult, that) and is capable of useful fission (see Challenge 2). This is a good opportunity to consider the nature of a `core' in physics for such a wide variety of intended learners. A sheer increase in content would be a primitive and profoundly unsmart response. A fourth recommendation is that the number of physics syllabuses should be reduced. Challenge 4: design criteria for the selection of syllabuses thought worthy to survive. There are in fact quite a few other interesting recommendations, in particular dealing with mathematics and mathematics for physics, and a whole set of recommendations for a new national award system, recognizing achievement at all levels from sub-GCSE to A-level/GNVQ/NVQ Level 3. It's all very interesting and might indeed be very good. But can the bureaucrats manage it? ...Report ISBN 1 85838 1029, SCAA Publications, PO Box 235, Hayes, Middlesex UB3 1HF.

  15. EDITORIAL: Photonic terahertz technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisauskas, Alvydas; Löffler, Torsten; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, when reading newspapers and journals or watching TV, one has been able to find feature presentations dealing with the prospects of terahertz (THz) technology and its potential impact on market applications. THz technology aims to fill the THz gap in the electro-magnetic spectrum in order to make the THz frequency regime, which spans the two orders of magnitude from 100 GHz to 10 THz, accessible for applications. From the lower-frequency side, electronics keeps pushing upwards, while photonic approaches gradually improve our technological options at higher frequencies. The popular interest reflects the considerable advances in research in the THz field, and it is mainly advances in the photonic branch, with the highlight being the development of the THz quantum cascade laser, which in recent years have caught the imagination of the public, and of potential users and investors. This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides an overview of key scientific developments which currently represent the cutting edge of THz photonic technology. In order to be clear about the implications, we should define exactly what we mean by 'THz photonic technology', or synonymously 'THz photonics'. It is characterized by the way in which THz radiation (or a guided THz wave) is generated, namely by the use of lasers. This may be done in one of two fundamentally different schemes: (i) by laser action in the terahertz frequency range itself (THz lasers), or (ii) by down-conversion processes (photomixing) involving the radiation of lasers which operate in the visible, near-infrared or infrared spectral ranges, either in pulsed or continuous-wave mode. The field of THz photonics has grown so considerably that it is out of the question to cover all its aspects in a single special issue of a journal. We have elected, instead, to focus our attention on two types of development with a potentially strong impact on the THz field: first, on significant advances of the technology itself, and second, on specific applications considered capable of fostering the transmutation of THz technology as a whole into a market technology. We decided for reasons of conciseness to leave out technologies which require more than table-top equipment (free-electron lasers, THz sources based on electrons accelerated to relativistic speed, etc) as well as fairly mature techniques (such as backward-wave oscillators which, although they are not strictly lasers, also exhibit gain). More difficult was the decision not to consider fascinating ideas for novel sources and detectors which until now have existed only on paper or have just entered the process of fundamental investigation. As we ourselves are working on such a concept (the Bloch-gain laser), we are fully aware of the fact that some of these ideas may have a strong impact on the field of THz photonics in the near future. After selection of the topics we wanted to cover, we contacted colleagues who are prominent in their respective fields of research and are grateful that most of them responded positively, expressing their willingness to share their knowledge with the readers of this journal. They took care not only to describe their own work but to give ample reference to the status of their respective specialized field of work. Before summarizing the contributions, we want to address all colleagues in the field who feel that they should have been asked to contribute but were not. To you we want to apologize. We can only hope for your understanding of the constraints of this endeavour. The collection of invited contributions is grouped into five topics. The first is entitled 'Pulsed THz Systems' and contains four papers dealing with the state of the art in source and detector development of measurement systems employing femtosecond Ti:sapphire lasers. The first paper, by Planken et al, describes the state of the art of the most common types of optoelectronic THz systems, namely those with femtosecond lasers operating at high repetition rate (~100 MHz). The system described by Planken et al was initially optimized for high-speed pixel-by-pixel THz imaging, which they do not describe here but rather focus on developments in THz microscopy. The second paper, by Kübler et al, presents pioneering work towards ultra-wide-bandwidth THz pulses which exhibit spectral content reaching far into the mid-IR, tremendously widening the covered frequency range, and hence shortening the time resolution, of THz spectroscopy. The third paper, by Löffler et al, deals with the state of the art in THz measurement systems relying on amplified laser pulses. Finally, Krotkus et al focus on low-temperature-grown (LT) GaAs, arguably the most important material for ultrafast optoelectronic switching and present in many THz sources and detectors, and in other emerging materials of similar kind. This leads directly to the second topic of this collection of papers, 'Continuous-Wave Photomixing Technology', based on THz-wave generation by down-conversion of continuous-wave (cw) laser radiation. This newer branch of THz photonics opens the possibility of obtaining tunable narrow-band THz radiation and of detecting it with high signal-to-noise ratio at room temperature. CW photomixing has received much attention over the last few years mainly because it has the potential to provide the compact and low-cost THz measurement systems needed for market applications beyond the scientific realm, with the sources of light for mixing being semiconductor (or fibre) lasers with or without optical amplifiers. Six papers outline recent developments in this subfield. We should also point towards a seventh paper, by Kawase et al, which is to be found in the section on 'Chemical and Biochemical Recognition', and which discusses an interesting hybrid approach generating tunable quasi-cw THz radiation with the help of nanosecond laser pulses. Of the six papers mentioned, the first, by Tani et al, summarizes the state of the art which relies on single-point LT-GaAs photoconductive antennae as THz sources and detectors driven by semiconductor lasers operating at wavelengths around 0.8 m. As laser-induced damage to the sources currently limits the achievable output power, researchers have early-on tried to develop travelling-wave mixers with distributed THz-power generation. Michael describes the status quo of this approach. The replacement of lifetime-limited photoconductive antennae with transit-time-limited p-i-n photomixers can be another way towards higher conversion efficiency if the RC frequency roll-off can be controlled. Döhler et al introduce a novel lumped-element device, a quasi-ballistic cascaded p-i-n photomixer, which promises a significantly better conversion efficiency than standard LT-GaAs photomixers at all frequencies. At laser wavelengths in the telecommunication windows, especially at 1.55 m, where InP-based compound semiconductors exhibit an extremely favourable electron mobility, p-i-n mixers have already established themselves as a powerful THz source. The group of Ito et al have set the standards here and describe their achievements in the fourth paper of this subtopic. The challenge remains to develop a similarly effective optoelectronic detector for these operating wavelengths. This, as Brown et al show in their contribution, turns out to be mainly a materials research issue, and as novel ultrafast materials such as those containing ErAs clusters emerge, so do sensitive detectors and photoconductive sources. The section closes with a paper by Hoffmann et al, which is more speculative in its scope but targets a fascinating goal: THz photomixing directly in a dual-colour semiconductor laser itself, and thus the ultimate miniaturization of a THz source based on photomixing. The third topic is 'THz Laser Technology' and addresses direct laser action at THz frequencies. Hübers et al guide the reader into the topic with a paper presenting the state of the art and the potential of lasers based on germanium and silicon. Tredicucci et al then review their development of the THz quantum cascade laser, the THz radiation source which more than any other currently transforms the field of THz technology. Their paper and the following one by Hu et al, who have introduced major improvements of the laser scheme and the waveguiding technology, present the state of the art of these lasers and discuss their future potential. One of the main challenges will be to raise the operation temperature further, and to bring it as close to room temperature as possible. These improvements will require a more advanced theoretical understanding of how these lasers work. The papers of Hu et al and the following one by Indjin et al address this question and describe the present status of theory. With this, we leave THz sources and detectors and come to research targeting the application of THz radiation. We have, given the space restraints and the fact that the focus of this journal is on semiconductor technology, decided to address only a single field of strong current interest, 'Chemical and Biochemical Recognition'. Other developing areas, such as THz radar and tomography, aiming at the sensing and diagnostics of surfaces and the inner structure of THz-transparent objects, or semiconductor wafer diagnostics and various other THz measurement modalities, are not covered. Not at all because we might consider them to be less important; quite on the contrary we are certain that they will make a big impact in real-world applications. The field of chemical and biochemical recognition was singled out because in the recent past there was controversial discussion as to what THz spectroscopic signatures to expect, especially from soft and solid chemical or biochemical matter, and the time seems to have come now to review some of the hard data obtained in the mean time. The topic covers the identification and analysis of chemical and biochemical substances, with a strong motivation stemming from the fact that the knowledge gained by this research opens up broad application areas in such lucrative markets as pharmaceutics, genetics, medical imaging and security screening. It may be interesting to note that until one or two years ago, a buzzword of applications-related research would have been 'biomedical imaging', especially of cancerous tissue or teeth, but for whatever reason none of the researchers contacted by us were interested to represent this subfield here, which seems to indicate that it is not considered to be a hot topic at present. The first two papers in this section, by Fischer et al and Shen et al, set the stage with an overview of chemical recognition in absorption and reflection spectroscopy, respectively. Kawase et al then demonstrate drug identification with their unique quasi-cw parametric THz system. While the scope of this paper is already security-oriented, Federici et al go further along this line by discussing not only drug detection but also sensing of explosives and weapons. The section closes with a paper by Nagel et al on the detection of DNA-binding states and on the system improvements implemented by this group on the way towards cost-effective sensing. This brings us to the final theme, 'THz Microscopy, Imaging, and Photonic Crystals'. The three papers in this section deal with three different aspects of THz technology which represent current progress in the use of THz radiation. The first paper, by Cho et al, as well as the one by Planken et al in the section on 'Pulsed THz Systems', discusses developments aiming towards THz microscopy, and reviews the latest results in achieving ultrahigh spatial resolution at THz frequencies. The next paper, by Karpowicz et al, comes back to the issue of THz imaging, which was already addressed by authors of papers in the preceding section, and presents a systematic comparison between two imaging and sensing modalities, time-domain optoelectronic imaging and more conventional GHz all-electronic imaging. This study of high practical interest is followed by the final contribution, by Jian et al, which discusses the development and characterization of photonic crystals for THz frequencies. We hope that this special issue will provide the readers of this journal with a good overview of the current status of THz photonics. We also hope that we, the Guest Editors and the authors of the papers, will succeed in conveying the fascination of this field of research which comes equally from its interdisciplinarity and from the fact that fundamental and applied research go hand in hand, strongly impacting on each other. For those working in this field it is highly gratifying to help make the last under-used window of the electro-magnetic spectrum accessible for applications.

  16. EDITORIAL: Electroactive polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Kim, Kwang J.; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Madden, John D. W.

    2007-04-01

    Imitating nature's mechanisms offers enormous potential for the improvement of our lives and the tools we use. This field of the study and imitation of, and inspiration from, nature's methods, designs and processes is known as biomimetics. Artificial muscles, i.e. electroactive polymers (EAPs), are one of the emerging technologies enabling biomimetics. Polymers that can be stimulated to change shape or size have been known for many years. The activation mechanisms of such polymers include electrical, chemical, pneumatic, optical and magnetic. Electrical excitation is one of the most attractive stimulators able to produce elastic deformation in polymers. The convenience and practicality of electrical stimulation and the continual improvement in capabilities make EAP materials some of the most attractive among activatable polymers (Bar-Cohen Y (ed) 2004 Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Actuators as Artificial Muscles—Reality, Potential and Challenges 2nd edn, vol PM136 (Bellingham, WA: SPIE Press) pp 1-765). As polymers, EAP materials offer many appealing characteristics that include low weight, fracture tolerance and pliability. Furthermore, they can be configured into almost any conceivable shape and their properties can be tailored to suit a broad range of requirements. These capabilities and the significant change of shape or size under electrical stimulation while being able to endure many cycles of actuation are inspiring many potential possibilities for EAP materials among engineers and scientists in many different disciplines. Practitioners in biomimetics are particularly excited about these materials since they can be used to mimic the movements of animals and insects. Potentially, mechanisms actuated by EAPs will enable engineers to create devices previously imaginable only in science fiction. For many years EAP materials received relatively little attention due to their poor actuation capability and the small number of available materials. In the last fifteen years, a series of new materials have emerged that exhibit large displacement in response to electrical stimulation. This capability is making them highly attractive as actuators for their operational similarity to biological muscles, particularly their resilience, quiet operation, damage tolerance and ability to induce large actuation strains (stretching, contracting or bending). The application of these materials as actuators involves multi-disciplines including materials, electromechanics, chemistry, computers and electronics. Even though the force of actuation of existing EAP materials and their robustness requires further improvement, there has already been a series of reported successes in the development of EAP-actuated mechanisms. Using EAP to replace existing actuators may be a difficult challenge and therefore it is highly desirable to identify a niche application where EAP materials would not need to compete with existing technologies. EAP materials can be divided into two major groups based on their activation mechanism: ionic or electronic. Electronic EAPs, such as electrostrictive, electrostatic, piezoelectric and ferroelectric, are driven by Coulomb forces. These types of EAP material can be made to hold the induced displacement while activated under a DC voltage, allowing them to be considered for robotic applications. These materials have high mechanical energy density and they can be operated in air with no major constraints. However, electronic EAPs require high activation fields (>10 V/μm) that are close to the breakdown level. In contrast to electronic EAPs, ionic EAPs are materials that involve the transport of ions and they consist of two electrodes and an electrolyte. The activation of ionic EAPs can be achieved by voltages as low as 1-2 volts. Examples of ionic EAPs include gels, polymer-metal composites, conducting polymers and carbon nanotubes. Their disadvantages are a need to maintain wetness and their low electromechanical coupling. Turning EAP materials into actuators-of-choice requires a well established infrastructure. This involves improving the understanding of the basic principles that drive the various EAP materials. It is also necessary to develop a comprehensive material science, as well as effective electro-mechanics analytical tools and material processing techniques. Efforts are underway to study the parameters that control EAP electro-activation force and deformation and many successes have been reported. The processes of synthesizing, fabricating, electroding, shaping and handling are being refined to maximize the actuation capability and robustness of EAP materials. Methods of reliably characterizing the response of these materials are being developed and efforts are being made to establish a database with documented material properties in order to support design engineers who are considering the use of these materials. Grand challenge for the development of EAP-actuated robotics. The technology of artificial muscles is still in its emerging stages but the increased resources, growing number of investigators conducting research related to EAP, and improved collaboration among developers, users and sponsors are leading to rapid advances in this field. In 1999, in an effort to promote worldwide development towards the realization of the potential of EAP materials, Yoseph Bar-Cohen posed an arm-wrestling challenge (http://ndeaa.jpl.nasa.gov/nasa-nde/lommas/eap/EAP-armwrestling.htm). A graphic rendering of this challenge is illustrated in the above figure. In posing this challenge, he is seeking to see an EAP-activated robotic arm win against a human in a wrestling match in order to provide a gauge of the level of advances in the development of these materials. Success in wrestling against humans will enable capabilities that are currently considered impossible. It would allow applying EAP materials to improve many aspects of our life where some of the possibilities include effective implants and prosthetics, active clothing and realistic biologically inspired robots, as well as fabricating products with unmatched capabilities and dexterity. The first arm-wrestling match against a human (a 17 year-old female high school student) was held on 7 March 2005 as part of the EAP-in-Action session of SPIE's EAPAD conference. Three robotic arms participated in the contest and the girl won against all these arms. Subsequent contests are now focusing on measuring the performance of the robotic arms compared to the student performance that was recorded in the 2006 contest. In a future conference, once advances in developing such arms reach a sufficiently high level, a professional wrestler will be invited for the next human/machine wrestling match. This issue of the journal is dedicated to publishing recent research advances in the field of EAPs and is the first such dedicated issue ever to be published. The included papers cover the whole spectrum of elements considered critical to the development of the EAP technology infrastructure. The issue ends with a paper from the research group at EMPA describing their work on one of the first three arms that participated in the first historical arm-wrestling match. In the coming year the editors are hoping to see a significant growth in the amount of research and related publications addressing the many challenges that this field still poses.

  17. EDITORIAL: SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A foremost goal in biology is understanding the molecular basis of single cell behavior, as well as cell interactions that result in functioning tissues. Accomplishing this goal requires quantitative analysis of multiple, specific macromolecules (e.g. proteins, ligands and enzyme...

  18. Tails and Ties. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, A.; Kaniadakis, G.; Scarfone, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    The study of behavioural and social phenomena has experienced a surge of interest over the last decade. One reason for this great attention is the huge amount of high quality data made available by the internet technologies. The many studies spanning concepts and problems belonging to economics, biology, ecology, physics and computer science, clearly indicates increasing interdisciplinary cross-fertilization, commonalities in the different approaches and communication across these disciplines. This issue of The European Physical Journal B is devoted to the interdisciplinary field of Sociophysics. The papers have been selected from the contributions presented at the 5th International Conference on “Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis" (APFA5) held in Torino from June 29th to July 1st 2006 ( http://www.polito.it/apfa5). The synergy and richness of results obtained from the investigation of problems belonging to the area of complexity science from different perspectives clearly indicates future directions and research methodologies in this field.

  19. Editorial: biodegradable materials.

    PubMed

    Schaschke, Carl; Audic, Jean-Luc

    2014-11-21

    This Special Issue "Biodegradable Materials" features research and review papers concerning recent advances on the development, synthesis, testing and characterisation of biomaterials. These biomaterials, derived from natural and renewable sources, offer a potential alternative to existing non-biodegradable materials with application to the food and biomedical industries amongst many others. In this Special Issue, the work is expanded to include the combined use of fillers that can enhance the properties of biomaterials prepared as films. The future application of these biomaterials could have an impact not only at the economic level, but also for the improvement of the environment.

  20. Plant Systems Biology (editorial)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In June 2003, Plant Physiology published an Arabidopsis special issue devoted to plant systems biology. The intention of Natasha Raikhel and Gloria Coruzzi, the two editors of this first-of-its-kind issue, was ‘‘to help nucleate this new effort within the plant community’’ as they considered that ‘‘...

  1. EDITORIAL: Molecular Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Keisuke; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-06-01

    'Molecular Imaging Technology' focuses on image-based techniques using nanoscale molecules as sensor probes to measure spatial variations of various species (molecular oxygen, singlet oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitric monoxide, etc) and physical properties (pressure, temperature, skin friction, velocity, mechanical stress, etc). This special feature, starting on page 1237, contains selected papers from The International Workshop on Molecular Imaging for Interdisciplinary Research, sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in Japan, which was held at the Sendai Mediatheque, Sendai, Japan, on 8 9 November 2004. The workshop was held as a sequel to the MOSAIC International Workshop that was held in Tokyo in 2003, to summarize the outcome of the 'MOSAIC Project', a five-year interdisciplinary project supported by Techno-Infrastructure Program, the Special Coordination Fund for Promotion of Science Technology to develop molecular sensor technology for aero-thermodynamic research. The workshop focused on molecular imaging technology and its applications to interdisciplinary research areas. More than 110 people attended this workshop from various research fields such as aerospace engineering, automotive engineering, radiotechnology, fluid dynamics, bio-science/engineering and medical engineering. The purpose of this workshop is to stimulate intermixing of these interdisciplinary fields for further development of molecular sensor and imaging technology. It is our pleasure to publish the seven papers selected from our workshop as a special feature in Measurement and Science Technology. We will be happy if this issue inspires people to explore the future direction of molecular imaging technology for interdisciplinary research.

  2. EDITORIAL: Interesting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-01-01

    `May you live in interesting times' - old Chinese curse. First, many thanks to John Avison, the retiring Honorary Editor, for his hard work over the last five years, and the steady development in style and content under his stewardship. I can only hope to live up to the standards that he set. The next five years will take us into a new millenium, an event preceded - in England and Wales at least - by a period of stability, reflection and consolidation in education. Or so we are told - but whether such a self-denying ordinance will actually be maintained by the Government both before and after an election in 1997 remains to be seen. Nevertheless, we shall be thankful for any mercies, however small, that permit forward thinking rather than instant response. One of the things that readers of a journal called Physics Education should be thinking about is the continued decline in the numbers of students studying physics post-16. This is not a purely local phenomenon; most European countries are finding a similar decline. There are exceptions, of course: in Scotland numbers studying physics for Highers are increasing. Is such a decline a good thing or a bad thing? Only a minority of post-16 physics students go on to use the bulk of what they have learned in further studies or vocations. Does a knowledge and understanding of physics contribute to the mental well-being and cultural level - let alone material comfort - of any except those who use physics professionally? Is physics defensible as a contribution to the mental armoury of the educated citizen - compared with chemistry, biology - or Latin, say? Or should one rephrase that last question as `Is physics as we teach it today defensible...?' Such questions, and many others no doubt, may well be in the mind of the new Curriculum Officer appointed by the Institute of Physics `to engage in a wide-ranging consultation throughout the entire physics community on the nature and style of post-16 physics programmes, with a view to establishing a major curriculum development exercise on the scale of the Nuffield programmes of the 1960s'. The person appointed in this challenging role is the redoubtable Bryan Chapman (see his letter on page 14). I feel that readers of this journal constitute a well-informed section of the physics community and should be able to make a significant contribution to his work. I intend to use part of the July issue of Physics Education as a forum for views on the nature and style of post-16 (and even relevant pre-l6) physics programmes, both as they are and as they should be. The aim of the forum is not to provide solutions presented in lengthy, fully researched and well-argued articles but to raise ideas (and even expectations), to stimulate debate and set physics educators thinking creatively and radically about what might be an appropriate education in physics for the 2lst century. So send in your views - brief and to the point, trenchant and opinionated (all the more likely to be appreciated by Bryan C), anecdotal and theoretical, but preferably impregnated with the smell of chalk, wet blackboards, the sounds of wobbly-wheeled mechanics trolleys, quietly sizzling resistors and where necessary the heat of close encounters with the National Curriculum (version X) and/or GNVQs and the Subject Core for A-levels. Overseas readers - and Scots - may like to proffer advice based on their own, possibly less rebarbative, experiences. Don't hesitate: there is not a moment to be lost!

  3. Why Review Books? Editorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ree, Malcolm J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the book review as both science and art, the result of critical evaluation mixed with the expertise and predilections of the reviewer. Notes that there is no accounting for taste, but there is identifying and acknowledging it. (SLD)

  4. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton Johansen, Geir; Wang, Mi

    2008-09-01

    There has been tremendous development within measurement science and technology over the past couple of decades. New sensor technologies and compact versatile signal recovery electronics are continuously expanding the limits of what can be measured and the accuracy with which this can be done. Miniaturization of sensors and the use of nanotechnology push these limits further. Also, thanks to powerful and cost-effective computer systems, sophisticated measurement and reconstruction algorithms previously only accessible in advanced laboratories are now available for in situ online measurement systems. The process industries increasingly require more process-related information, motivated by key issues such as improved process control, process utilization and process yields, ultimately driven by cost-effectiveness, quality assurance, environmental and safety demands. Industrial process tomography methods have taken advantage of the general progress in measurement science, and aim at providing more information, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on multiphase systems and their dynamics. The typical approach for such systems has been to carry out one local or bulk measurement and assume that this is representative of the whole system. In some cases, this is sufficient. However, there are many complex systems where the component distribution varies continuously and often unpredictably in space and time. The foundation of industrial tomography is to conduct several measurements around the periphery of a multiphase process, and use these measurements to unravel the cross-sectional distribution of the process components in time and space. This information is used in the design and optimization of industrial processes and process equipment, and also to improve the accuracy of multiphase system measurements in general. In this issue we are proud to present a selection of the 145 papers presented at the 5th World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography in Bergen, September 2007. Interestingly, x-ray technologies, one of the first imaging modalities available, keep on moving the limits on both spatial and temporal measurement resolution; experimental results of less than 100 nm and several thousand frames/s are reported, respectively. Important progress is demonstrated in research and development on sensor technologies and algorithms for data processing and image reconstruction, including unconventional sensor design and adaptation of the sensors to the application in question. The number of applications to which tomographic methods are applied is steadily increasing, and results obtained in a representative selection of applications are included. As guest editors we would like express our appreciation and thanks to all authors who have contributed and to IOP staff for excellent collaboration in the process of finalizing this special feature.

  5. Editorial: Biodegradable Materials

    PubMed Central

    Schaschke, Carl; Audic, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue “Biodegradable Materials” features research and review papers concerning recent advances on the development, synthesis, testing and characterisation of biomaterials. These biomaterials, derived from natural and renewable sources, offer a potential alternative to existing non-biodegradable materials with application to the food and biomedical industries amongst many others. In this Special Issue, the work is expanded to include the combined use of fillers that can enhance the properties of biomaterials prepared as films. The future application of these biomaterials could have an impact not only at the economic level, but also for the improvement of the environment. PMID:25421242

  6. Editorial: Which Wei Wang?

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Gene D.

    2007-12-01

    The APS journals receive manuscripts from scientists all over the world. For authors whose names cannot be expressed in Latin characters, their names in the byline must be transliterated, a process that is not necessarily bidirectionally unique. For example, the eight Chinese names all transliterate as Wei Wang. To remove some of the ambiguity arising from this unfortunate degeneracy of names, APS will allow some authors the option to include their names in their own language in parentheses after the transliterated name, such as Wei Wang. The option to present names in the article byline in this manner is an experiment initially offered to Chinese, Japanese, and Korean authors, whose names can be expressed in Unicode characters. An example of a Japanese name is Tadanori Minamisono and a Korean name is Chang Kee Jung. In the English text the given name precedes the family name, while the reverse is true for the characters. As we gain experience, we may be able to broaden this offer to other languages. Authors who wish to try this option will need to prepare their manuscripts by following the special instructions at http://authors.aps.org/names.html.

  7. EDITORIAL: Materially speaking!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Malcolm G.

    1997-05-01

    We live in a highly materialistic age. This is true not only for our spiritual outlook - or lack of it - but undeniably so for the physical world in which we live. Materials, which are the feature of this special issue, provide literally the fabric on which the modern world is built. Materials science is the systematic study of the physical properties and behaviour of solids with practical applications and importance (if the utility of the material is not explicit or important we are probably in the realm of solid state physics!). Materials in this sense are the stuff of which cars and computers, jet aircraft and washing machines, tower blocks and saucepans, bridges and golf clubs are made. The science of materials therefore encompasses most of the things that form the infrastructure of modern life. But perhaps it is its very ubiquity that removes the mystique, the glamour, the 'zing' from the subject. In contrast, anything cosmological, astronomical or 'fundamental' (as in 'particle'), i.e. of little or no practical significance to our day-to-day lives, excites the curiosity of many able young people. Witness the profusion of books about galaxies and black holes, and quarks and GUTs which strain the popular science shelves of the bookshops. I'm probably being heretical, but perhaps the over-hyping of the very large and the very small has indeed attracted the able few into the serious study of physics, but because of its inherent mathematical complexity and esoteric remoteness maybe it has put off the average youngster who would nevertheless enjoy and succeed in physics-based higher education (and, not incidentally, help fill the seriously depleted lecture theatres in many university physics - and engineering - departments). Materials science on the other hand deals with an intermediate range of things which, give or take an order of magnitude or three, are person-sized as well as person useful. It is - therefore? - undoubtedly one of the less glamorous of the areas of physics-based science and technology. Can materials science be made intellectually more exciting and mind-stretching for our students? In this special issue we present several articles by researchers in less-than-familiar but important areas of materials science and technology. Following a review by Mathew Philip of some of the basic atomic theory which underlies materials science, Jose Silva looks at how artificial diamonds can be made and at how we can apply this exotic material (other than on fingers and around necks). Alan Piercy reviews the field of giant magnetostrictive materials, which, when magnetized, change dimensions hundreds or even thousands of times more than traditional ferromagnetics. David Pettifor provides a nicely interdisciplinary overview of how computer simulations, from the subatomic to the macroscopic level, can be used to help in the design of new materials for such things as turbine blades. Adrian Rennie offers a much-requested written version of the entertaining 1995/6 IOP Schools Lecture on the physics of polymers. (We had hoped to include an article by Professor Colin Gough of Birmingham University on High Temperatue Superconductors, but for technical reasons this has had to be postponed until a future issue.) Finally, there are two articles describing an initiative which will have a direct practical impact on the teaching and learning of `Materials' in the UK. Karen Davies describes the exciting new Materials Gallery due to be opened at the Science Museum as this issue goes to press in May 1997 (no coincidence!), and David Sang provides details of how the new gallery has been linked directly with the GNVQ curriculum, and can certainly be exploited more widely in our physics and technology teaching. Perhaps this can help provide the missing 'zing' that materials science at present seems to lack.

  8. EDITORIAL: Polarization Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Jari; Friesem, Asher A.; Friberg, Ari T.

    2004-03-01

    This special issue on Polarization Optics contains one review article and 23 research papers, many of which are based on presentations at the International Commission for Optics Topical Meeting on Polarization Optics, held in Polvijärvi, Finland, between 30 June and 3 July 2003. While this issue should not in any sense be considered as a `proceedings' of this meeting, the possibility of submitting papers to it was widely advertised during the meeting, which was attended by a large fraction of prominent scientists in the field of polarization optics. Thus the quality of papers in this special issue is high. In announcing both the meeting and this special issue, we emphasized that the concept of `polarization optics' should be understood in a wide sense. In fact, all contributions dealing with the vectorial nature of light were welcome. As a result, the papers included here cover a wide range of different aspects of linear and nonlinear polarization optics. Both theoretical and experimental features are discussed. We are pleased to see that the conference and this special issue both reflect the wide diversity of important and novel polarization phenomena in optics. The papers in this special issue, and other recently published works, demonstrate that even though polarization is a fundamental property of electromagnetic fields, interest in it is rapidly increasing. The fundamental relations between partial coherence and partial polarization are currently under vigorous research in electromagnetic coherence theory. In diffractive optics it has been found that the exploitation of the vectorial nature of light can be of great benefit. Fabrication of sophisticated, spatially variable polarization-control elements is becoming possible with the aid of nanolithography. Polarization singularities and the interplay of bulk properties and topology in nanoscale systems have created much enthusiasm. In nonlinear optics, the second harmonic waves generated on reflection and transmission of intense light enable research into the chirality of nanogratings. Pump-probe techniques allow one to visualize the effects of the nanostructure topology on the surface mode excitation. In quantum optics the coherent control of polarization may lead to new and fascinating applications. Some authors of invited papers at the conference have written review-type introductory sections—they were encouraged to do so—but all contributions are genuine research papers with original results, and were judged according to the normal publication criteria of the journal. It is our pleasure to thank all authors for making this a splendid special issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics.

  9. Percepcion de los profesores universitarios acerca del concepto cultura cientifica y de sus implicaciones en el nuevo bachillerato del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Pastrana, Nilsa

    El Senado Academico del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico aprobo en el ano academico 2005-2006 la Certificacion 46, que contiene los lineamientos de un nuevo bachillerato. Este nuevo bachillerato introdujo cambios significativos en el curriculo tradicional. Entre ellos se encuentra la reduccion del componente de educacion general y el de Ciencias Biologicas en particular. La reduccion de creditos en el componente de Ciencias Biologicas ha obligado a reevaluar el concepto de cultura cientifica que desarrollan esos cursos. El proposito del estudio consistio en auscultar las percepciones de los profesores de las Facultades de Administracion de Empresas, Humanidades, Ciencias Sociales, Ciencias Naturales, Educacion y Estudios Generales del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico en torno al concepto de cultura cientifica, los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas y la reduccion de creditos en el nuevo bachillerato. Las preguntas que guiaron la investigacion fueron: ¿cuales son las percepciones que tienen los profesores de las Facultades de Administracion de Empresas, Ciencias Sociales, Estudios Generales, Ciencias Naturales, Humanidades y Educacion, en torno al concepto de cultura cientifica y los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas? ¿cuales son las percepciones que tienen los profesores de Ciencias Biologicas en torno al concepto cultura cientifica y los contenidos disciplinares del curso de Ciencias Biologicas? ¿existen diferencias significativas por facultad, genero, experiencia, rango y nombramiento en las percepciones que tienen los profesores del Recinto de Rio Piedras de la Universidad de Puerto Rico sobre los elementos que caracterizan la cultura cientifica y los contenidos biologicos que deben tener los egresados del Recinto? ¿que implicaciones curriculares tienen estos testimonios en el desarrollo del concepto de cultura cientifica en el nuevo bachillerato? Para realizar la

  10. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Special scientific session of the Editorial Board of the journal "Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk" honoring Vitalii Lazarevich Ginzburg on his 90th birthday (3 October 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    A Special scientific session of the Editorial Board of the journal Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (an oral issue of the journal UFN) was held in the Conference Hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow), on 3 October 2006. Several topical physical problems from the list given by Vitalii Lazarevich Ginzburg in his Nobel Lecture (Ginzburg's list) were discussed [in the order of the problems appeared on Ginzburg's list (see p. 332)].

  11. EDITORIAL: The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics The 18th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Soto, Luis L.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2012-02-01

    to the proceedings of the 15th CEWQO (Physica Scripta 2009 T135 011005). The 18th edition of CEWQO (CEWQO11) was held in Madrid in 2011. There were about 250 participants, from practically every European country. Many colleagues from other continents also joined the event, including well-established researchers in the field. This is a clear demonstration that these meetings provide an excellent chance to hear about the latest results and new directions of research. The organization of CEWQO11 was carried out by a committee consisting of members active in this topic in Madrid. From Universidad Complutense, Alberto Galindo and Luis L Sánchez-Soto from Universidad Autónoma, Jose Calleja and Carlos Tejedor; from Universidad Politécnica, Enrique Calleja; from Universidad Carlos III, Alberto Ibort; and from the National Research Council (CSIC), Juan León and Juan J García-Ripoll. Special thanks go to the Spanish Ministry for Science and Innovation, Universidad Complutense and the Quitemad Consortium for financial support. The proceedings of the 16th CEWQO held at the University of Turku, Finland and the 17th CEWQO held at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK are also available (Physica Scripta 2010 T140 and Physica Scripta 2011 T143). The present Topical Issue is a collection of papers presented in Madrid; they represent an illustrative sample of the major achievements and trends in this area. In turn, they reflect the wide range of interests in this rapidly evolving field. Some collaborators from different scientific centres who could not, due to different reasons, come to Madrid, but participated in previous CEWQOs and plan to participate in future CEWQOs, also contributed to this issue. The papers are arranged alphabetically by the name of the first author. Special thanks goes to Roger Wäppling, the Managing Editor of Physica Scripta, and Graeme Watt, the Publisher, for the opportunity to publish CEWQO11. From a Physica Scripta Editorial Board meeting it was

  12. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2012-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2011 is awarded to Matthew Hough et al from the University of Florida, the Francis Marion University and the National Cancer Institute, USA for their paper on a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of skeletal tissues in the adult male: An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male—internal electron sources 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309 Matthew Hough1, Perry Johnson1, Didier Rajon2, Derek Jokisch3, Choonsik Lee4 and Wesley Bolch1,5 1Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC, USA 4Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Bone marrow is one of the more radiosensitive tissues in the human body and is housed within a complex structure of bone. This paper describes a comprehensive model of energy deposition by internal electron or beta particle emitters for the ICRP reference adult male based upon ex vivo CT and microCT images of

  13. Near Surface Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault, Point Año Nuevo, San Mateo County, California, from Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, L.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Weber, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The San Gregorio Fault Zone (SGFZ) is one of the major faults of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in the San Francisco Bay region of California. The SGFZ is nearly 200 km long, trends subparallel to the SAF, and is located primarily offshore with two exceptions- between Point Año Nuevo and San Gregorio Beach and between Pillar Point and Moss Beach. It has a total width of 2 to 3 km and is comprised of seven known fault strands with Quaternary activity, five of which also demonstrate late Holocene activity. The fault is clearly a potential source of significant earthquakes and has been assigned a maximum likely magnitude of 7.3. To better understand the structure, geometry, and shallow-depth P-wave velocities associated with the SGFZ, we acquired a 585-m-long, high-resolution, combined seismic reflection and refraction profile across the Frijoles strand of the SGFZ at Point Año Nuevo State Park. Both P- and S-wave data were acquired, but here we present only the P-wave data. We used two 60-channel Geometrics RX60 seismographs and 120 40-Hz single-element geophones connected via cable to record Betsy Seisgun seismic sources (shots). Both shots and geophones were approximately co-located and spaced at 5-m intervals along the profile, with the shots offset laterally from the geophones by 1 m. We measured first-arrival refractions from all shots and geophones to develop a seismic refraction tomography velocity model of the upper 70 m. P-wave velocities range from about 600 m/s near the surface to more than 2400 m/s at 70 m depth. We used the refraction tomography image to infer the depth to the top of the groundwater table on the basis of the 1500 m/s velocity contour. The image suggests that the depth, along the profile, to the top of groundwater varies by about 18 m, with greater depth on the west side of the fault. At about 46 m depth, a 60- to 80-m-wide, low-velocity zone, which is consistent with faulting, is observed southwest of the Frijoles strand of the

  14. Antibody profile to Borrelia burgdorferi in veterinarians from Nuevo León, Mexico, a non-endemic area of this zoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner-Taylor, Cassandra M.; Salinas, José A.; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Galán-Wong, Luis J.; Maldonado, Guadalupe; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease caused by infections with Borrelia. Persons infected with Borrelia can be asymptomatic or can develop disseminated disease. Diagnosis and recognition of groups at risk of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is of great interest to contemporary rheumatology. There are a few reports about Borrelia infection in Mexico, including lymphocytoma cases positive to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto by PCR and a patient with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Veterinarians have an occupational risk due to high rates of tick contact. The aim of this work was to investigate antibodies to Borrelia in students at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Zootechnics, at Nuevo León, Mexico, and determine the antibody profile to B. burgdorferi antigens. Material and methods Sera were screened using a C6 ELISA, IgG and IgM ELISA using recombinant proteins from B. burgdorferi, B. garinii and B. afzelii. Sera with positive or grey-zone values were tested by IgG Western blot to B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. Results All volunteers reported tick exposures and 72.5% remembered tick bites. Only nine persons described mild Lyme disease related symptoms, including headaches, paresthesias, myalgias and arthralgias. None of the volunteers reported erythema migrans. Nine samples were confirmed by IgG Western blot. The profile showed 89% reactivity to OspA, 67% to p83, and 45% to BmpA. Conclusions Positive sera samples shared antibody reactivity to the markers of late immune response p83 and BmpA, even if individuals did not present symptoms of Lyme arthritis or post-Lyme disease. The best criterion to diagnose Lyme disease in our country remains to be established, because it is probable that different strains coexist in Mexico. This is the first report of antibodies to B. burgdorferi in Latin American veterinarians. Veterinarians and high-risk people should be alert to take precautionary measures to prevent tick-borne diseases. PMID:27504018

  15. EDITORIAL: Instrumentation and Methods for Neutron Scattering—papers from the 4th European Conference on Neutron Scattering in Lund, Sweden, June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Adrian R.

    2008-03-01

    components such as detectors, polarizers, focusing devices and sample environments. The organizers and participants are extremely grateful to numerous sponsors that helped to make the conference a great success. An equal debt of gratitude is due to the Institute of Physics and the editorial and publishing staff for agreeing to publish these papers and organizing the refereeing and editorial process efficiently and promptly in a friendly way.

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit FOCUS ON MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AT THE QUANTUM LIMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Schwab, Keith

    2008-09-01

    The last five years have witnessed an amazing development in the field of nano- and micromechanics. What was widely considered fantasy ten years ago is about to become an experimental reality: the quantum regime of mechanical systems is within reach of current experiments. Two factors (among many) have contributed significantly to this situation. As part of the widespread effort into nanoscience and nanofabrication, it is now possible to produce high-quality nanomechanical and micromechanical resonators, spanning length scales of millimetres to nanometres, and frequencies from kilohertz to gigahertz. Researchers coupled these mechanical elements to high-sensitivity actuation and readout systems such as single-electron transistors, quantum dots, atomic point contacts, SQUID loops, high-finesse optical or microwave-cavities etc. Some of these ultra-sensitive readout schemes are in principle capable of detection at the quantum limit and a large part of the experimental effort is at present devoted to achieving this. On the other hand, the fact that the groups working in the field come from various different physics backgrounds—the authors of this editorial are a representative sample—has been a constant source of inspiration for helpful theoretical and experimental tools that have been adapted from other fields to the mechanical realm. To name just one example: ideas from quantum optics have led to the recent demonstration (both in theory and experiment) that coupling a mechanical resonator to a high-finesse optical cavity can be fully analogous to the well-known sideband-resolved laser cooling of ions and hence is capable in principle of cooling a mechanical mode into its quantum ground state. There is no doubt that such interdisciplinarity has been a crucial element for the development of the field. It is interesting to note that a very similar sociological phenomenon occurred earlier in the quantum information community, an area which is deeply enriched by the

  17. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverlag, Marco; Kroesen, Gerrit; Ferguson, Ian

    2011-06-01

    -based light sources. However, the progress in the last few years in LED and OLED sources has been even greater. In the editorial for the LS-11 conference by previous guest editor David Wharmby, it was stated that most LED lighting was still mostly used for signalling and decorative sources. In the three years that have passed, things have changed considerably and we now see LED light sources entering every application, ranging from street lighting and parking lots to shop lighting and even greenhouses. Currently LED prices for traditional lighting applications are high, but they are dropping rapidly. The papers published in this special issue give some indications of things to come. The paper by Jamil et al deals with the possibility of using silicon wafers as substrate material instead of the now commonly used (but more expensive) sapphire substrates. This is attractive from a cost price point of view, but leads to an increased lattice mismatch and therefore strain-induced defects. In this paper it is shown that when using intermediate matching layers it is possible to retain the same electrical and optical properties as with structures on sapphire. Another aspect that directly relates to cost is efficiency and droop in green InGaN devices, which is addressed in the paper by Lee et al. They show that by providing a flow of trymethylindium prior to the growth of the quantum wells it is possible to significantly increase the internal quantum efficiency of green LEDs. Improvement of the optical out-coupling of InGaN LEDs is discussed by Mak et al, and it is found that localized plasmon resonance of metallic nanoparticles (and especially silver) can help to increase the optical out-coupling in the wavelength region of interest. Nanoparticles in the form of ZnO nanorods are described by Willander et al as a possibility for phosphor-free wavelength conversion on polymer (O)LEDs. More advanced functions besides light emission can be achieved with OLEDs and this is demonstrated in

  18. EDITORIAL: Richard Palmer: celebrating 37 years with Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter Richard Palmer: celebrating 37 years with Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, David

    2009-01-01

    It is with a great deal of both happiness and sadness that I have to announce that we are losing one of the real strengths of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM). Dr Richard Palmer, our Senior Publisher, announced his retirement, and this issue marks the first without his involvement. Of course, we are happy that he will get to enjoy his retirement, but we are sad to lose such a valuable member of our team. Richard first started work at IOP Publishing in March 1971 as an Editorial Assistant with Journal of Physics B: Atomic and Molecular Physics. After a few months, he transferred to Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics. During his first year, he was sent on a residential publishing training course and asked to sign an undertaking to stay at IOP Publishing for at least two years. Although Richard refused to sign, as he did not want to commit himself, he has remained with the journal since then. The following year, the Assistant Editor of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, Malcolm Haines, walked out without notice in order to work on his family vineyard in France, and Richard stepped into the breach. In those days, external editors had a much more hands-on role in IOP Publishing and he had to travel to Harwell to be interviewed by Alan Lidiard, the Honorary Editor of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, before being given the job of Assistant Editor permanently. I am told that in those days the job consisted mainly of editing and proofreading and peer review. There was no journal development work. At some point in the early 1980s, production and peer review were split into separate departments and Richard then headed a group of journals consisting of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics and Journal of Physics F: Metal Physics, Semiconductor Science and Technology, Superconductor Science and Technology, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, and later Nanotechnology and Modelling and Simulation

  19. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2009 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2009 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. This year also saw the introduction of a new category—Optical and Laser-based Techniques. 2009 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) robust phase correlation Adric Eckstein and Pavlos P Vlachos Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA This paper [1] represents a valuable improvement to the phase-only correlation technique (first proposed by Wernet in this journal in 2005 (Wernet M 2005 Symmetric phase-only filtering: a new paradigm for DPIV data processing Meas. Sci. Technol. 16 601-18) for particle-image-velocimetry (PIV) measurements of fluid flow. The authors establish a sound theoretical foundation and clearly describe the working principle of their robust phase correlation method. The methodology for assessing performance is excellent. Detailed results on several internationally recognized PIV test cases are presented. The robust phase correlation method is of general applicability and therefore can be expected to have substantial impact in this very active area of fluid-mechanics measurements. 2009 Award Winner—Precision Measurement A nanonewton force facility and a novel method for measurements of the air and vacuum permittivity at zero frequencies V Nesterov Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany This paper [2] describes a

  20. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even

  1. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Special session of the Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk Editorial Board celebrating the 90th anniversary of the journal(19 November 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Vitalii L.; Dremin, Igor M.; Shirkov, Dmitrii V.; Smirnov, Boris M.; Aleksandrov, Evgenii B.; Vershovskii, Anton K.; Maksimov, Evgenii G.; Fortov, Vladimir E.

    2009-06-01

    A special session of the Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (UFN) Editorial Board (UFN's oral issue) celebrating the 90th anniversary of the journal and the 50th anniversary of its English version (first under the title Soviet Physics-Uspekhi and then under the current title Physics-Uspekhi) took place on November 19, 2008 in the conference hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN) of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Ginzburg V L (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow), Aksent'eva M S (Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk, RAS, Moscow) "On the history of UFN (introductory talk)"; (2) Dremin I M (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "The physics of the Large Hadron Collider"; (3) Shirkov D V (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region) "Pair correlations and spontaneous symmetry breaking"; (4) Smirnov B M (Institute for High Temperatures, RAS, Moscow) "Modeling of gas-discharge plasma"; (5) Sadovskii M V (Institute of Electrophysics, RAS Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg) "High-temperature superconductivity in iron-based layered compounds"; (6) Aleksandrov E B (All-Russian Research Center, S I Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg) Physical limits in the metrology of a magnetic field by atomic spectroscopy techniques"; (7) Maksimov E G (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Microscopic studies of the nature of the ferroelectric transition"; (8) Fortov V E (Institute for High Energy Density, RAS, Moscow) "Extreme states of matter". Articles based on reports 1-4 and 6-8 are published below in this special issue of the Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk journal devoted to the jubilees of the Russian and English versions of the journal.

  2. EDITORIAL: Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manske, E.; Froehlich, T.

    2012-07-01

    Editorial Board of Measurement Science and Technology for their support.

  3. EDITORIAL: Siberia Integrated Regional Study: multidisciplinary investigations of the dynamic relationship between the Siberian environment and global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Vaganov, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    This is an editorial overview of the Siberia Integrated Regional Study (SIRS), which is a large-scale investigation of ongoing and future environmental change in Siberia and its relationship to global processes, approaches, existing challenges and future direction. Introduction The SIRS is a mega-project within the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), which coordinates interdisciplinary, national and international activities in Northern Eurasia that follow the Earth System Science Program (ESSP) approach. Under the direction of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP), SIRS is one of the Integrated Regional Studies (IRS) that aims to investigate environmental change in Siberia under the current environment of global change, and the potential impact on Earth system dynamics [1]. The regions of interest are those that may function as 'choke or switch points' for the global Earth system, where changes in regional biophysical, biogeochemical and anthropogenic components may have significant consequences for the Earth system at the global scale. Siberia is a large and significant region that may compel change [2]. Regional consequences of global warming (e.g. anomalous increases in cold season temperatures) have already been documented for Siberia [3]. This result is also supported by climate modeling results for the 20th-22nd centuries [4]. Future climatic change threatens Siberia with the shift of permafrost boundaries northward, dramatic changes in land cover (redistribution among boreal forest, wetlands, tundra, and steppe zones often precipitated by fire regime change) and the entire hydrological regime of the territory [5-8]. These processes feed back to and influence climate dynamics through the exchange of energy, water, greenhouse gases and aerosols [9]. Even though there have been a handful of national and international projects focused on the Siberian environment, scientists have minimal knowledge about the processes

  4. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2012 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2012 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Yacoot, Andrew; Regtien, Paul; Peters, Kara

    2013-07-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards'. This year awards were presented in the areas of 'Measurement Science' and 'Fluid Mechanics'. Although the categories mirror subject sections in the journal, the Editorial Board consider articles from all categories in the selection process. 2012 Award Winners—Measurement Science Physical characterization and performance evaluation of an x-ray micro-computed tomography system for dimensional metrology applications J Hiller1, M Maisl2 and L M Reindl3 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Produktionstorvet, Building 425, 2800 Kgs Lyngby, Denmark 2 Development Center for X-Ray Technology (EZRT), Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing (IZFP), Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany 3 Laboratory for Electrical Instrumentation, Institute for Microsystem Technology (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg, Germany This year's award goes to another paper [1] dealing with micro-measurements, using a scientific measurement technique that is both old and traditional. However, it is the advent of modern technology with computational techniques that have offered new insights into the capability of the measurement method. The paper describes an x-ray computed tomography (CT) system. Such systems are increasingly used in production engineering, where non-destructive measurements of the internal geometries of workpieces can be made with high information density. CT offers important alternatives to tactile

  5. EDITORIAL: The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008) The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 08), which took place at the RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, from 28-30 September, 2008. The workshop is a well recognized and established European event in the field of micro system technology using thin-film technologies for creating micro components, micro sensors, micro actuators, and micro systems. The first MME Workshop was held 1989 in Enschede (The Netherlands) and continued 1990 in Berlin (Germany), 1992 in Leuven (Belgium), and then was held annually in Neuchâtel (Switzerland), Pisa (Italy), Copenhagen (Denmark), Barcelona (Spain), Southampton (UK), Ulvik in Hardanger (Norway), Gif-sur-Yvette (France), Uppsala (Sweden), Cork (Ireland), Sinaia (Romania), Delft (The Netherlands), Leuven (Belgium), Göteborg (Sweden), Southampton (UK), and in Guimarães (Portugal). The two day workshop was attended by 180 delegates from 26 countries all over Europe and from Armenia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Cuba, Iran, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Turkey, and the United States of America. A total of 97 papers were accepted for presentation and there were a further five keynote presentations. I am proud to present 22 high-quality papers from MME 2008 selected for their novelty and relevance to Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. All the papers went through the regular reviewing procedure of IOP Publishing. I am eternally grateful to all the referees for their excellent work. I would also like to extend my thanks to the members of the Programme Committee of MME 2008, Dr Reinoud Wolffenbuttel, Professor José Higino Correia, and Dr Patrick Pons for pre-selection of the papers as well as to Professor Robert Puers for advice on the final selection of papers. My thanks also go to Dr Ian Forbes of IOP Publishing for managing the entire process and to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. I

  6. EDITORIAL: Challenges for first-principles based properties of defects in semiconductors and oxides Challenges for first-principles based properties of defects in semiconductors and oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    ]. One contribution discusses the challenges of translating the results at the microscale into the macroscopic response of the material in a multiscale approach [Makov et al], and the issue closes with a discussion of neglected gaps in the first-principles modelling of defects, important problems that are commonly overlooked and perhaps deserving greater attention [Stoneham]. All papers were peer-reviewed following the standard procedure established by the Editorial Board of Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering. Peter A Schultz Sandia National Laboratories, USA Guest Editor

  7. EDITORIAL: The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008) The 1st International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jack Jiqui; Fang, Fengzhou

    2009-05-01

    would like to express our sincere thanks to Dr Ian Forbes and the other members of editorial board of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering of the Institute of Physics for their help and support in making this special section. The conference was a success. We found there is a great demand for continuation of the conference, and it has been agreed by the conference committee to hold the conference biannually from now on. The 2nd International Conference on Nanomanufacturing (NanoMan2010) is to be held in Tianjin, China in 2010. On behalf of the committee we would like to take this opportunity to welcome everybody to NanoMan2010.

  8. EDITORIAL: The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics The 9th Workshop on Frontiers in Low Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS--> Nader Sadeghi, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    Boris Petrovitch Zakharchenya (1928-2005) This issue is dedicated to the memory of Boris Petrovich Zakharchenya, who died at the age of 77 in April 2005. He was an eminent scientist and a remarkable man. After studying physics at Leningrad University he joined the Physico-Technical Institute (now the A F Ioffe Institute) in 1952 and became the co-worker of Evgeny Feodorovich Gross, shortly after the exciton was discovered in his laboratory. The experiments on cuprous oxide crystals in the visible spectral range showed a hydrogen-like spectrum, which was interpreted as excitonic absorption. The concept of the exciton had been conceived some years earlier by Jacov Frenkel at the Physico-Technical Institute. Immediately after joining Gross, Zakharchenya succeeded in producing spectra of unprecedented quality. Subsequently the heavy and the light hole series were found. Also, Landau splitting was discovered when a magnetic field was applied. The interpretation of the discovery was thrown into doubt by Russian colleagues and it took some time, before the correct interpretation prevailed. Shortly before his death, Boris wrote the history of the discovery of the exciton, which has recently been published in Russian in a book celebrating the 80th anniversary of his birth [1]. The book also contains essays by Boris on various themes, not only on physics, but also on literature. Boris was a man of unusually wide interests, he was not only fascinated by physics, but also loved literature, art and music. This can be seen in the first article of this issue The Play of Light in Crystals which is an abbreviated version of his more complete history of the discovery of the exciton. It also gives a good impression of the personality of Boris. One of us (GL) had the privilege to become closely acquainted with him, while he was a guest professor at the University of Würzburg. During that time we had many discussions, and I recall his continuing rage on the wrong attribution of the priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination radiation. The major results of the systematic work on optical orientation, both experimental and theoretical, at the Ioffe Institute and the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris are documented in the book Optical Orientation, edited by F Meier and B P Zakharchenya in the series Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences [4], in which the foundations of optical orientation are comprehensively presented by renowned authors. This book is still the unsurpassed standard work in the field. If one asks what has become new since that publication in 1984 it is obviously the arrival of low-dimensional structures, two-dimensional heterostructures and zero-dimensional quantum dots. It has turned out that the quantum confinement can significantly modify the spin lifetime and the spin relaxation. The experimental work on spin alignment was done by a relative small number of researchers. However, the situation has substantially changed during the last decade. Research on spin-related phenomena has become very popular and the word 'spintronics' was coined. Spin research is no longer considered to be somewhat esoteric, since the replacement of silicon microelectronics based on the electron charge by spin-based electronics is being discussed. Whether these proposals can be realized remains to be seen. But one consequence has been a worldwide increase of high level basic research in spin phenomena. Another line of current research which has contributed to the popularity of spin-related research is quantum computing, based on spin-qubits. To be useful, solid state systems require long spin relaxation times and weak interaction with the environment. This is indispensable for low error rates. The difficulties in achieving these goals have been extensively discussed in the literature. Nowadays, because of the volume and diversity of spin-related work worldwide, a book on optical orientation like that edited by Meyer and Zakharchenya does not seem possible, so in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology we try, with examples, to give an impression of that current state of research. The articles will not be discussed individually but their titles reveal that most deal with low-dimensional systems. The study of spin relaxation plays a major role. Interface effects at the ferromagnet/semiconductor boundary are subtle and important for spin injection from a ferromagnet. Each of the contributions is a combination of review and recent results and stands by itself. The affiliations of the authors reveal that the majority come from St Petersburg, clearly indicating that the heritage of Boris Zakharchenya is alive and thriving. We would like to thank all authors for their cooperation, especially for delivering their manuscripts in a reasonable time. Claire Bedrock and Adam Day of the IOP Publishing deserve thanks for their support in the publication process. We are much indebted to Ruslana Zakharchenya for making the manuscript on the discovery of the exciton available and especially to Nina Nikolaevna Vasil'eva for her translation. References [1] Zakharchenya B P 2008 The Happiness of Creativity (St Petersburg, in Russian) [2] Rashba E I and Landwehr G (ed) 1991 Landau Level Spectroscopy (Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences vol 27) (Amsterdam: Elsevier) [3] Seisyan R B and Zakharchenya B P 1991 Landau Level Spectroscopy ed E I Rashba and G Landwehr (Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences vol 27) (Amsterdam: Elsevier) p 345 [4] Meier F and Zakharchenya B P (ed) 1984 Optical Orientation (Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences vol 8) (Amsterdam: Elsevier) An obituary of Boris Petrovich Zakharchenyia, contributed to Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk by his Russian colleagues, is available at http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/1063-7869/49/8/M09

  1. EDITORIAL: J J Thomson's Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Steve

    1997-07-01

    Westminster School, London, UK A few weeks ago David Thomson, J J Thomson's grandson, presented a Friday evening discourse at the Royal Institution. In it he traced the development of JJT's life from his early studies at Owen's College in Manchester, on to Trinity College Cambridge, his work under Rayleigh at the Cavendish, and his succession as Professor of Experimental Physics in 1884 (a post he passed on to Rutherford in 1919). These were years of heroic discoveries that shaped 20th century physics. Looking around the lecture theatre at all the bow-ties and dinner jackets, it must have been rather similar on 30 April 1897 when JJT delivered his famous discourse on 'Cathode Rays' in which he cautiously but confidently announced that his own results together with those of other experimenters (Lenard in particular):

    `....seem to favour the hypothesis that the carriers of the charges are smaller than the atoms of hydrogen.'
    In this issue articles by Leif Gerward and Christopher Cousins, and by Isobel Falconer explore the historical and philosophical context of that discovery. The sound-bites to history in many A-level courses have JJT as both the hero who single-handedly discovered the electron and the rather naive Victorian scientist who thought the atom was a plum pudding. It is valuable to see how Thomson's work pulled the threads of many experiments together and to realize that he may have been first to the post because of a difference in the philosophical approach to cathode rays in Britain compared to Europe. Experimental data must always be interpreted, and divergent philosophies can lead to quite different conclusions. The electron was, of course, the first subatomic particle to be identified. Christine Sutton's article looks at how 20th century discoveries reveal Nature's mysterious habit of repeating successful patterns---electrons for example have very close relations, the muon and the tau---but why? Perhaps the answer will come from the theoreticians. One of the greatest of these was Paul Dirac, a marvellously reticent man with an eye for mathematical beauty. David Miller, one of the winners of William Waldegrave's 'Higgs Challenge' in 1993, shows how Dirac constructed his famous equation, and how it describes the behaviour of the electron and its neutrino and led to the prediction of antimatter and the explanation of spin. He draws an interesting parallel between Dirac's negative energy electrons and the contemporary development of solid state physics. G P Thomson, JJ's son, also got in on the act: father got the Nobel Prize (1906) for showing the electron is a particle and son (1937) won it for showing it also behaves like a wave! This has had a profound impact both on the interpretation and experimental testing of quantum theory and in the way we use electrons. Electron waves are essential to understand solid state physics and wave-like properties are fundamental to the behaviour of many electronic devices. But it is not just in physics and electronics that the electron has been revolutionary, and John Squire's article reviews the use of the electron microscope in biology. Having crossed the border into biology (as so many physicists have done this century) it should be pointed out that electron physics also caused a paradigm shift in chemistry. Electronic structure made the Periodic Table comprehensible and led to a theory of bonding that accounts for the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of many materials. This is described in Peter Hughes's article. Which brings me back to JJT and those sound-bites, and the Royal Institution for that matter.... On 10 March 1905 JJT gave another of his Friday Evening Discourses. This one was called 'The Structure of the Atom'. In it he developed a model suggested by Lord Kelvin, in which negative corpuscles arrange themselves in a stable configuration within a sphere of positively charged fluid. This is the infamous `plum pudding'. There is not room to go into detail here, but he showed mathematically and using a 2D magnetic model that the electrons would arrange themselves in a series of shells which he identified with the periods in the Periodic Table and linked to reactivity. He discussed electronegativity and showed how it would increase along each period (as it does). He suggested transmutation of the elements by a rearrangement of the positive fluid and even considered electrostatic conditions which might result in fission or fusion (remember, this is long before the alpha scattering experiments of Geiger and Marsden). Even covalent and ionic bonding and crystalline structures were included, with atomic valence directions corresponding to lines of symmetry in the electron arrangement inside the atom. It is a shame that the `plum pudding model' gets such shabby treatment, and perhaps a comment on the distorted view of the history of physics we pass on to our students by ignoring the context and background to important discoveries.

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Marco; Nahata, Ajay; Akalin, Tahsin; Beruete, Miguel; Sorolla, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics is one of the growing fields in modern photonics that has garnered increasing interest over the last few years. In this focus issue, the specific challenges concerning terahertz plasmonics have been addressed and most recent advances in this specific field have been highlighted. The articles demonstrate the diversity and the opportunities of this rich field by covering a variety of topics ranging from the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on artificially structures surfaces, 2D manipulation of surface plasmons and SPPs, plasmonic focusing, plasmonic high-Q resonators for sensing applications, plasmonically enhanced terahertz antennas to terahertz field manipulation by use of plasmonic structures. The articles substantiate the impact of plasmonics and its great innovative potential for terahertz technology. In memory of Professor Mario Sorolla Ayza.

  3. Editorial: advances in therapeutic glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wenbin; Chen, Yue-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides, peptides containing sugar β-amino acids, have significant impact on medicinal chemistry research and pharmaceutical industr. In 1956, the discovery of one classic glycopeptide, vancomycin, broke the dawn of a new age for antibacterial research. Employing glycopeptides for the therapeutic purposes used to be regarded as proposals. Owing largely to the recent improvements in separation practices, characterization techniques, synthetic methods, and biological research, these proposals have been transformed into ongoing research projects in many laboratories around the world. Previously known as antibiotics, glycopeptides have been used as chemotherapeutic, antiviral, antitubercular, antifungal, antiproliferative and apoptotic agents. Nowadays they are even considered for the development of HIV and cancer vaccines. While several of them are in clinical trials, it could be expected that in the near future, treatment regimen of such difficult diseases might be reformed accordingly. Many interesting preliminary results are being produced in this emerging area. As witnesses and practitioners in this exciting area, however, we notice that the related communication in public domain is still limited due to the relatively small number of researchers involved. Thus, we feel the necessity to compile a timely issue about the special topic "Advances in Therapeutic Glycopeptides", covering state-of-the-art research papers and expert reviews from this area. We are glad that Protein & Peptide Letters is willing to realize the idea with us. The opening paper of this issue by Dr. Voglmeir and coauthor discusses three types of PNGases in respect of their general properties and applications of the commercially available PNGases in glycopeptide and glycoprotein analysis. Dr. Liu and coauthors describe current techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and mass spectrometry (MS), for the characterization of glycoproteins, with a focus on available therapeutic glycoproteins. Next three papers discuss the synthetic chemistry of glycopeptides. Dr. Zhu and coauthor describe a facile synthesis of differently protected cystathionines by the reaction of γ-bromohomoalanine with cysteine derivatives in an ethyl acetate/water biphasic system. Dr. Chen et al. report a neoglycopeptides synthesis by aqueous Suzuki-Miyaura reaction between glycosyl boronic acid and iodopeptides. Dr. Zeng et al. developed a novel strategy to prepare glycopeptide-based molecular imaging and therapy agents using fluorine-rich (fluorous) technology. The following review by Dr. Li et al. outlines a sample of mAbs currently approved for cancer treatment by the FDA, as well as antibody platforms in the research pipeline and clinic that have been engineered for greater tumor penetration, binding, and therapy efficacy. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is a high-capacity C-type lectin receptor expressed on mammalian hepatocytes. Research in this field is summarized by Dr. Lu, Dr. Yin and coauthors. Recent progresses of cationic polysomes and liposomes as effective non-viral delivery system via ASGPR are also presented by these authors. Proteoglycans (PGs), a core protein and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) chain, play important roles in amyloid-beta protein as well as tau processing, and have potential significance in Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. Next, Dr. Zeng and coworkers summarized recent advances of the chemistry and biology of glycopeptides with antibiotic activity. The last review of this issue by Dr. Ding and coworker provide the progress of PGs and GAGs in AD and their therapeutic implication. In summary, experts from different fields of therapeutic glycopeptides have showcased new results and expressed their opinions in this special thematic issue of Protein & Peptide Letters. As the guest editors, we wish that this diverse collection of valuable intellectual contributions will positively influence this emerging area and gain broad readership. At the end, we would like to express our sincerest gratitude to all authors and referees for their invaluable contribution to this issue. We would also like to extend our appreciation to Editor-in-Chief, Professor Ben M. Dunn and the staffs of Protein & Peptide Letters, especially Ms Rukhshanda Rehman, for their excellent support and for providing us with the opportunity to pursue this exciting project.

  4. EDITORIAL: Close contact Close contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The development of scanning probe techniques, such as scanning tunnelling microscopy [1], has often been touted as the catalyst for the surge in activity and progress in nanoscale science and technology. Images of nanoscale structural detail have served as an invaluable investigative resource and continue to fascinate with the fantastical reality of an intricate nether world existing all around us, but hidden from view of the naked eye by a disparity in scale. As is so often the case, the invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope heralded far more than just a useful new apparatus, it demonstrated the scope for exploiting the subtleties of electronic contact. The shrinking of electronic devices has been a driving force for research into molecular electronics, in which an understanding of the nature of electronic contact at junctions is crucial. In response, the number of experimental techniques in molecular electronics has increased rapidly in recent years. Scanning tunnelling microscopes have been used to study electron transfer through molecular films on a conducting substrate, and the need to monitor the contact force of scanning tunnelling electrodes led to the use of atomic force microscopy probes coated in a conducting layer as studied by Cui and colleagues in Arizona [2]. In this issue a collaboration of researchers at Delft University and Leiden University in the Netherlands report a new device architecture for the independent mechanical and electrostatic tuning of nanoscale charge transport, which will enable thorough studies of molecular transport in the future [3]. Scanning probes can also be used to pattern surfaces, such as through spatially-localized Suzuki and Heck reactions in chemical scanning probe lithography. Mechanistic aspects of spatially confined Suzuki and Heck chemistry are also reported in this issue by researchers in Oxford [4]. All these developments in molecular electronics fabrication and characterization provide alternative means to produce nanoscale device elements, such as carbon nanotube transistors [5] and high-density memory crossbar circuits [6]. Recently, the use of scanning tunnelling microscopes has broached a new field of research, which is currently attracting enormous interest—single molecule detection. In issue 25 of Nanotechnology researchers in Houston reported unprecedented sensitivities using localized surface plasmon resonance shifts of gold bipyramids to detect concentrations of substances down to the single molecule level [7]. In issue 26 a collaboration of researchers from the US and Czech Republic describe a different approach, namely tunnelling recognition. In their topical review they describe hydrogen-bond mediated tunnelling and the associated experimental methods that facilitate the detection of single molecules in a tunnel junction using chemically functionalized electrodes [8]. The nanoworld depicted by scanning probe microgaphs over 20 years ago may have looked as extraterrestrial as any science fiction generated alien terrain, but though study and analysis these nano-landscapes have become significantly less alien territory. The work so far to unveil the intricacies of electronic contact has been a story of progress in investigating this new territory and manipulating the mechanisms that govern it to formulate new devices and delve deeper into phenomena at the nanoscale. References [1] Binning G, Rohrer H, Gerber Ch and Weibel E 1982 Phys. Rev. Lett. 49 57-61 [2] X D Cui, X Zarate, J Tomfohr, O F Sankey, A Primak, A L Moore, T A Moore, D Gust, G~Harris and S M Lindsay 2002 Nanotechnology 13 5-14 [3] Martin C A, van Ruitenbeek J M and van der Zant S J H 2010 Nanotechnology 21 265201 [4] Davis J J and Hanyu Y 2010 Nanotechnology 21 265302 [5] Tans S J, Verschueren A R M and Dekker C 1998 Nature 393 49-52 [6] Chen Y, Jung G-Y, Ohlberg D A A, Li X, Stewart D R, Jeppesen J O, Nielsen K A, Stoddart J F and Williams R S 2003 Nanotechnology 14 462-8 [7] Mayer K M, Hao F, Lee S, Nordlander P and Hafner J H 2010 Nanotechnology 21 255503 [8] Lindsay S, He J, Sankey O, Hapala P, Jelinek P, Zhang P, Chang S and Huang S 2010 Nanotechnology 21 262001

  5. [Responses, Rejoinder, and Editorial Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Vocational Behavior, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Responses discuss the following: unanswered questions (Gerald Greenberg); thinking critically about justice judgments (E. Allan Lind); just and virtuous leaders (Naomi M. Meara); voices of injustice victims (Debra L. Shapiro); justice research and practice (M. Susan Taylor); and the need for experimental research (Kees van der Bos); with rejoinder…

  6. EDITORIAL: Focus on Attosecond Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Krausz, Ferenc; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    Investigations of light-matter interactions and motion in the microcosm have entered a new temporal regime, the regime of attosecond physics. It is a main 'spin-off' of strong field (i.e., intense laser) physics, in which nonperturbative effects are fundamental. Attosecond pulses open up new avenues for time-domain studies of multi-electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas, and solids on their natural, quantum mechanical time scale and at dimensions shorter than molecular and even atomic scales. These capabilities promise a revolution in our microscopic knowledge and understanding of matter. The recent development of intense, phase-stabilized femtosecond (10-15 s) lasers has allowed unparalleled temporal control of electrons from ionizing atoms, permitting for the first time the generation and measurement of isolated light pulses as well as trains of pulses on the attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) time scale, the natural time scale of the electron itself (e.g., the orbital period of an electron in the ground state of the H atom is 152 as). This development is facilitating (and even catalyzing) a new class of ultrashort time domain studies in photobiology, photochemistry, and photophysics. These new coherent, sub-fs pulses carried at frequencies in the extreme ultraviolet and soft-x-ray spectral regions, along with their intense, synchronized near-infrared driver waveforms and novel metrology based on sub-fs control of electron-light interactions, are spawning the new science of attosecond physics, whose aims are to monitor, to visualize, and, ultimately, to control electrons on their own time and spatial scales, i.e., the attosecond time scale and the sub-nanometre (Ångstrom) spatial scale typical of atoms and molecules. Additional goals for experiment are to advance the enabling technologies for producing attosecond pulses at higher intensities and shorter durations. According to theoretical predictions, novel methods for intense attosecond pulse generation may in future involve using overdense plasmas. Electronic processes on sub-atomic spatio-temporal scales are the basis of chemical physics, atomic, molecular, and optical physics, materials science, and even some life science processes. Research in these areas using the new attosecond tools will advance together with the ability to control electrons themselves. Indeed, we expect that developments will advance in a way that is similar to advances that have occurred on the femtosecond time scale, in which much previous experimental and theoretical work on the interaction of coherent light sources has led to the development of means for 'coherent control' of nuclear motion in molecules. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is centered on experimental and theoretical advances in the development of new methodologies and tools for electron control on the attosecond time scale. Topics such as the efficient generation of harmonics; the generation of attosecond pulses, including those having only a few cycles and those produced from overdense plasmas; the description of various nonlinear, nonperturbative laser-matter interactions, including many-electron effects and few-cycle pulse effects; the analysis of ultrashort propagation effects in atomic and molecular media; and the development of inversion methods for electron tomography, as well as many other topics, are addressed in the current focus issue dedicated to the new field of 'Attosecond Physics'. Focus on Attosecond Physics Contents Observing the attosecond dynamics of nuclear wavepackets in molecules by using high harmonic generation in mixed gases Tsuneto Kanai, Eiji J Takahashi, Yasuo Nabekawa and Katsumi Midorikawa Core-polarization effects in molecular high harmonic generation G Jordan and A Scrinzi Interferometric autocorrelation of an attosecond pulse train calculated using feasible formulae Y Nabekawa and K Midorikawa Attosecond pulse generation from aligned molecules—dynamics and propagation in H2+ E Lorin, S Chelkowski and A D Bandrauk Broadband generation in a Raman crystal driven by a pair of time-delayed linearly chirped pulses Miaochan Zhi and Alexei V Sokolov Ultrafast nanoplasmonics under coherent control Mark I Stockman Attosecond pulse carrier-envelope phase effects on ionized electron momentum and energy distributions: roles of frequency, intensity and an additional IR pulse Liang-You Peng, Evgeny A Pronin and Anthony F Starace Angular encoding in attosecond recollision Markus Kitzler, Xinhua Xie, Stefan Roither, Armin Scrinzi and Andrius Baltuska Polarization-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy with high harmonics Y Mairesse, S Haessler, B Fabre, J Higuet, W Boutu, P Breger, E Constant, D Descamps, E Mével, S Petit and P Salières Macroscopic effects in attosecond pulse generation T Ruchon, C P Hauri, K Varjú, E Mansten, M Swoboda, R López-Martens and A L'Huillier Monitoring long-term evolution of molecular vibrational wave packet using high-order harmonic generation M Yu Emelin, M Yu Ryabikin and A M Sergeev Intense single attosecond pulses from surface harmonics using the polarization gating technique S G Rykovanov, M Geissler, J Meyer-ter-Vehn and G D Tsakiris Imaging of carrier-envelope phase effects in above-threshold ionization with intense few-cycle laser fields M F Kling, J Rauschenberger, A J Verhoef, E Hasović, T Uphues, D B Milošević, H G Muller and M J J Vrakking Self-compression of optical laser pulses by filamentation A Mysyrowicz, A Couairon and U Keller Towards efficient generation of attosecond pulses from overdense plasma targets N M Naumova, C P Hauri, J A Nees, I V Sokolov, R Lopez-Martens and G A Mourou Quantum-path control in high-order harmonic generation at high photon energies Xiaoshi Zhang, Amy L Lytle, Oren Cohen, Margaret M Murnane and Henry C Kapteyn Time-resolved mapping of correlated electron emission from helium atom in an intense laser pulse C Ruiz and A Becker Pump and probe ultrafast electron dynamics in LiH: a computational study M Nest, F Remacle and R D Levine Exploring intense attosecond pulses D Charalambidis, P Tzallas, E P Benis, E Skantzakis, G Maravelias, L A A Nikolopoulos, A Peralta Conde and G D Tsakiris Attosecond timescale analysis of the dynamics of two-photon double ionization of helium Emmanuel Foumouo, Philippe Antoine, Henri Bachau and Bernard Piraux Generation of tunable isolated attosecond pulses in multi-jet systems V Tosa, V S Yakovlev and F Krausz Electron wavepacket control with elliptically polarized laser light in high harmonic generation from aligned molecules Y Mairesse, N Dudovich, J Levesque, M Yu Ivanov, P B Corkum and D M Villeneuve Tracing non-equilibrium plasma dynamics on the attosecond timescale in small clusters Ulf Saalmann, Ionut Georgescu and Jan M Rost Ionization in attosecond pulses: creating atoms without nuclei? John S Briggs and Darko Dimitrovski Angular distributions in double ionization of helium under XUV sub-femtosecond radiation P Lambropoulos and L A A Nikolopoulos Potential for ultrafast dynamic chemical imaging with few-cycle infrared lasers Toru Morishita, Anh-Thu Le, Zhangjin Chen and C D Lin Attosecond electron thermalization in laser-induced nonsequential multiple ionization: hard versus glancing collisions X Liu, C Figueira de Morisson Faria and W Becker Ion-charge-state chronoscopy of cascaded atomic Auger decay Th Uphues, M Schultze, M F Kling, M Uiberacker, S Hendel, U Heinzmann, N M Kabachnik and M Drescher Measurement of electronic structure from high harmonic generation in non-adiabatically aligned polyatomic molecules N Kajumba, R Torres, Jonathan G Underwood, J S Robinson, S Baker, J W G Tisch, R de Nalda, W A Bryan, R Velotta, C Altucci, I Procino, I C E Turcu and J P Marangos Wavelength dependence of sub-laser-cycle few-electron dynamics in strong-field multiple ionization O Herrwerth, A Rudenko, M Kremer, V L B de Jesus, B Fischer, G Gademann, K Simeonidis, A Achtelik, Th Ergler, B Feuerstein, C D Schröter, R Moshammer and J Ullrich Attosecond metrology in the few-optical-cycle regime G Sansone, E Benedetti, C Vozzi, S Stagira and M Nisoli Attosecond x-ray pulses produced by ultra short transverse slicing via laser electron beam interaction A A Zholents and M S Zolotorev

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two-dimensional cold atmospheric plasma jet array for uniform treatment of large-area surfaces for plasma medicine QY Nie, Z Cao, C S Ren, D Z Wang and M G Kong A novel plasma source for sterilization of living tissues E Martines, M Zuin, R Cavazzana, E Gazza, G Serianni, S Spagnolo, M Spolaore, A Leonardi, V Deligianni, P Brun, M Aragona, I Castagliuolo and P Brun Designing plasmas for chronic wound disinfection T Nosenko, T Shimizu and G E Morfill Plasma medicine: an introductory review M G Kong, G Kroesen, G Morfill, T Nosenko, T Shimizu, J van Dijk and J L Zimmermann

  8. Editorial: Photovoltaic Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Rupnowski, P.

    2012-01-01

    As the global energy needs grow, there is increasing interest in the generation of electricity by photovoltaics (PVs) devices or solar cells - devices that convert sunlight to electricity. Solar industry has seen an enormous growth during the last decade. The sale of PV modules has exceeded 27 GW in 2011, with significant contributions to the market share from all technologies. While the silicon technology continues to have the dominant share, the other thin film technologies (CdTe, CIGS, a-Si, and organic PV) are experiencing fast growth. Increased production of silicon modules has led to a very rapid reduction in their price and remains as benchmark for other technologies. The PV industry is in full gear to commercialize new automated equipment for solar cell and module production, instrumentation for process monitoring technologies, and for implementation of other cost-reduction approaches, and extensive research continues to be carried out in many laboratories to improve the efficiency of solar cells and modules without increasing the production costs. A large variety of solar cells, which differ in the material systems used, design, PV structure, and even the principle of PV conversion, are designed to date. This special issue contains peer-reviewed papers in the recent developments in research related to broad spectrum of photovoltaic materials and devices. It contains papers on many aspects of solar cells-the growth and deposition, characterization, and new material development.

  9. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the edge of chaos, where complex phenomena, including creativity and intelligence, may emerge'. Also in this issue R Stanley Williams and colleagues report results from simulations that demonstrate the potential for using Mott transistors as building blocks for scalable neuristor-based integrated circuits without transistors [5]. The scalability of neural chip designs is also tackled in the design reported by Narayan Srinivasa and colleagues in the US [6]. Meanwhile Carsten Timm and Massimiliano Di Ventra describe simulations of a molecular transistor in which electrons strongly coupled to a vibrational mode lead to a Franck-Condon (FC) blockade that mimics the spiking action potentials in synaptic memory behaviour [7]. The 'atomic switches' used to demonstrate synaptic behaviour by a collaboration of researchers in California and Japan also come under further scrutiny in this issue. James K Gimzewski and colleagues consider the difference between the behaviour of an atomic switch in isolation and in a network [8]. As the authors point out, 'The work presented represents steps in a unified approach of experimentation and theory of complex systems to make atomic switch networks a uniquely scalable platform for neuromorphic computing'. Researchers in Germany [9] and Sweden [10] also report on theoretical approaches to modelling networks of memristive elements and complementary resistive switches for synaptic devices. As Vincent Derycke and colleagues in France point out, 'Actual experimental demonstrations of neural network type circuits based on non-conventional/non-CMOS memory devices and displaying function learning capabilities remain very scarce'. They describe how their work using carbon nanotubes provides a rare demonstration of actual function learning with synapses based on nanoscale building blocks [11]. However, this is far from the only experimental work reported in this issue, others include: short-term memory of TiO2-based electrochemical capacitors [12]; a neuromorphic circuit composed of a nanoscale 1-kbit resistive random-access memory (RRAM) cross-point array of synapses and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) neuron circuits [13]; a WO3-x-based nanoionics device from Masakazu Aono's group with a wide scale of reprogrammable memorization functions [14]; a new spike-timing dependent plasticity scheme based on a MOS transistor as a selector and a RRAM as a variable resistance device [15]; a new hybrid memristor-CMOS neuromorphic circuit [16]; and a photo-assisted atomic switch [17]. Synaptic electronics evidently has many emerging facets, and Duygu Kuzum, Shimeng Yu, and H-S Philip Wong in the US provide a review of the field, including the materials, devices and applications [18]. In embracing the expertise acquired over thousands of years of evolution, biomimetics and bio-inspired design is a common, smart approach to technological innovation. Yet in successfully mimicking the physiological mechanisms of the human mind synaptic electronics research has a potential impact that is arguably unprecedented. That the quirks and eccentricities recently unearthed in the behaviour of nanomaterials should lend themselves so accommodatingly to emulating synaptic functions promises some very exciting developments in the field, as the articles in this special issue emphasize. References [1] von Neumann J (ed) 2012 The Computer and the Brain 3rd edn (Yale: Yale University Press) [2] Strukov D B, Snider G S, Stewart D R and Williams R S 2008 The missing memristor found Nature 453 80-3 [3] Chua L O 1971 Memristor—the missing circuit element IEEE Trans. Circuit Theory 18 507-19 [4] Chua L O 2013 Memristor, Hodgkin-Huxley, and Edge of Chaos Nanotechnology 24 383001 [5] Pickett M D and Williams R S 2013 Phase transitions enable computational universality in neuristor-based cellular automata Nanotechnology 24 384002 [6] Cruz-Albrecht J M, Derosier T and Srinivasa N 2013 Scalable neural chip with synaptic electronics using CMOS integrated memristors Nanotechnology 24 384011 [7] Timm C and Di Ventra M 2013 Molecular neuron based on the Franck-Condon blockade Nanotechnology 24 384001 [8] Sillin H O, Aguilera R, Shieh H-H, Avizienis A V, Aono M, Stieg A Z and Gimzewski J K 2013 A theoretical and experimental study of neuromorphic atomic switch networks for reservoir computing Nanotechnology 24 384004 [9] Linn E, Menzel S, Ferch S and Waser R 2013 Compact modeling of CRS devices based on ECM cells for memory, logic and neuromorphic applications Nanotechnology 24 384008 [10] Konkoli Z and Wendin G 2013 A generic simulator for large networks of memristive elements Nanotechnology 24 384007 [11] Gacem K, Retrouvey J-M, Chabi D, Filoramo A, Zhao W, Klein J-O and Derycke V 2013 Neuromorphic function learning with carbon nanotube-based synapses Nanotechnology 24 384013 [12] Lim H, Kim I, Kim J-S, Hwang C S and Jeong D S 2013 Short-term memory of TiO2-based electrochemical capacitors: empirical analysis with adoption of a sliding threshold Nanotechnology 24 384005 [13] Park S, Noh J, Choo M-L, Sheri A M, Chang M, Kim Y-B, Kim C J, Jeon M, Lee B-G, Lee B H and Hwang H 2013 Nanoscale RRAM-based synaptic electronics: toward a neuromorphic computing device Nanotechnology 24 384009 [14] Yang R, Terabe K, Yao Y, Tsuruoka T, Hasegawa T, Gimzewski J K and Aono M 2013 Synaptic plasticity and memory functions achieved in WO3-x-based nanoionics device by using principle of atomic switch operation Nanotechnology 24 384002 [15] Ambrogio S, Balatti S, Nardi F, Facchinetti S and Ielmini D 2013 Spike-timing dependent plasticity in a transistor-selected resistive switching memory Nanotechnology 24 384012 [16] Indiveria G, Linares-Barranco B, Legenstein R, Deligeorgis G and Prodromakise T 2013 Integration of nanoscale memristor synapses in neuromorphic computing architectures Nanotechnology 24 384010 [17] Hino T, Hasegawa T, Tanaka H, Tsuruoka T, Terabe K, Ogawa T and Aono M 2013 Volatile and nonvolatile selective switching of a photo-assited initialized atomic switch Nanotechnology 24 384006 [18] Kuzum D, Yu S and Wong H-S P 2013 Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications Nanotechnology 24 382001

  10. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    All matter is more or less hygroscopic. The moisture content varies with vapour concentration of the surrounding air and, as a consequence, most material properties change with humidity. Mechanical and thermal properties of many materials, such as the tensile strength of adhesives, stiffness of plastics, stoutness of building and packaging materials or the thermal resistivity of isolation materials, all decrease with increasing environmental humidity or cyclic humidity changes. The presence of water vapour may have a detrimental influence on many electrical constructions and systems exposed to humid air, from high-power systems to microcircuits. Water vapour penetrates through coatings, cable insulations and integrated-circuit packages, exerting a fatal influence on the performance of the enclosed systems. For these and many other applications, knowledge of the relationship between moisture content or humidity and material properties or system behaviour is indispensable. This requires hygrometers for process control or test and calibration chambers with high accuracy in the appropriate temperature and humidity range. Humidity measurement methods can roughly be categorized into four groups: water vapour removal (the mass before and after removal is measured); saturation (the air is brought to saturation and the `effort' to reach that state is measured); humidity-dependent parameters (measurement of properties of humid air with a known relation between a specific property and the vapour content, for instance the refractive index, electromagnetic spectrum and acoustic velocity); and absorption (based on the known relation between characteristic properties of non-hydrophobic materials and the amount of absorbed water from the gas to which these materials are exposed). The many basic principles to measure air humidity are described in, for instance, the extensive compilations by Wexler [1] and Sonntag [2]. Absorption-type hygrometers have small dimensions and can be produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate, since it uses the accurately known relation between temperature and saturation vapour pressure in air. When an object exposed to humid air is cooled down below the dew-point water vapour condenses as drops on its cold surface. The temperature can be kept exactly at the dew point by controlling the amount of dew (equilibrium between evaporation and condensation). In most dew-point hygrometers dew is detected with optical or capacitive means. In the former the dew drops on a reflective surface (chilled mirror) scatter incident light, and the capacitive method uses the change in capacitance due to the large dielectric constant of liquid water (80) compared to air (1). Kunze et al, in the fourth paper of this special feature, use another property of water to detect dew: the relatively high value of the thermal capacitance of liquid water. In traditional technology this method would not be sensitive enough, but with MEMS technology a sufficient detectivity of dew can be achieved, which is demonstrated in this paper. A control system keeps the temperature of the substrate just at the dew-point temperature, the latter being measured by an on-chip diode. The accuracy achieved is comparable with traditional dew-point hygrometers. These four papers in this issue are nice examples of research leading to significant advances in hygrometry. References [1] Wexler A (ed) 1965 Humidity and Moisture. Vol. I: Principles and Methods of Measuring Humidity in Gases; Vol. II: Applications; Vol. III: Fundamentals and Standards; Vol. IV: Principles and Methods of Measuring Moisture in Liquids and Solids (New York: Reinhold) [2] Sonntag D 1966-1968 Hygrometrie (Berlin: Akademie Verlag)

  11. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a fluid-fluid interface [2]. Together with Remco Tuinier, Henk has recently completed a book in this area which is to appear later this year. A major theme in Henk's research is that of phase transitions in lyotropic liquid crystals. Henk, together with Daan Frenkel and Alain Stroobants, realized in the 1980s that a smectic phase in dispersions of rod-like particles can be stable without the presence of attractive interactions, similar to nematic ordering as predicted earlier by Onsager [3]. Together with Gert-Jan Vroege he wrote a seminal review in this area [4]. Henk once said that 'one can only truly develop one colloidal model system in one's career' and in his case this must be that of gibbsite platelets. Initially Henk's group pursued another polymorph of aluminium hydroxide, boehmite, which forms rod-like particles [5], which already displayed nematic liquid crystal phases. The real breakthrough came when the same precursors treated the produced gibbsite platelets slightly differently. These reliably form a discotic nematic phase [6] and, despite the polydispersity in their diameter, a columnar phase [7]. A theme encompassing a wide range of soft matter systems is that of colloidal dynamics and phase transition kinetics. Many colloidal systems have a tendency to get stuck in metastable states, such as gels or glasses. This is a nuisance if one wishes to study phase transitions, but it is of great practical significance. Such issues feature in many of Henk's publications, and with Valerie Anderson he wrote a highly cited review in this area [8]. Henk Lekkerkerker has also invested significant effort into the promotion of synchrotron radiation studies of colloidal suspensions. He was one of the great supporters of the Dutch-Belgian beamline 'DUBBLE' project at the ESRF [9]. He attended one of the very first experiments in Grenoble in 1999, which led to a Nature publication [7]. He was strongly involved in many other experiments which followed and also has been a member of the beam line board. The most recent synchotron data are reported in this issue and Henk

  12. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotto, G. B.; Koenders, L.; Wilkening, G.

    2009-08-01

    Instrumentation and measurement techniques at the nanoscale play a crucial role not only in extending our knowledge of the properties of matter and processes in nanosciences, but also in addressing new measurement needs in process control and quality assurance in industry. Micro- and nanotechnologies are now facing a growing demand for quantitative measurements to support the reliability, safety and competitiveness of products and services. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments and measurement procedures as well as suitable calibration artefacts to ensure the quality of measurements and traceability to standards. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the Nanoscale 2008 seminar held at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Torino, in September 2008. This was the 4th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 8th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized by the Nanometrology Group within EUROMET (The European Collaboration in Measurement Standards), the German Nanotechnology Competence Centre 'Ultraprecise Surface Figuring' (CC-UPOB), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and INRIM. A special event during the seminar was the 'knighting' of Günter Wilkening from PTB, Braunschweig, Germany, as the 1st Knight of Dimensional Nanometrology. Günter Wilkening received the NanoKnight Award for his outstanding work in the field of dimensional nanometrology over the last 20 years. The contributions in this special issue deal with the developments and improvements of instrumentation and measurement methods for scanning force microscopy (SFM), electron and optical microscopy, high-resolution interferometry, calibration of instruments and new standards, new facilities and applications including critical dimension (CD) measurements on small and medium structures and nanoparticle characterization. The papers in the first part report on new or improved instrumentation, details of developments of metrology SFM, improvements to SFM, probes and scanning methods in the direction of nanoscale coordinate measuring machines and true 3D measurements as well as of progress of a 2D encoder based on a regular crystalline lattice. To ensure traceability to the SI unit of length many highly sophisticated instruments are equipped with laser interferometers to measure small displacements in the nanometre range very accurately. Improving these techniques is still a challenge and therefore new interferometric techniques are considered in several papers as well as improved sensors for nanodisplacement measurements or the development of a deep UV microscope for micro- and nanostructures. The tactile measurement of small structures also calls for a better control of forces in the nano- and piconewton range. A nanoforce facility, based on a disk-pendulum with electrostatic stiffness reduction and electrostatic force compensation, is presented for the measurement of small forces. In the second part the contributions are related to calibration and correction strategies and standards such as the development of test objects based on 3D silicon structures, and of samples with irregular surface profiles, and their use for calibration. The shape of the tip and its influence on measurements is still a contentious issue and addressed in several papers: use of nanospheres for tip characterization, a geometrical approach for reconstruction errors by tactile probing. Molecular dynamical calculations, classical as well as ab initio (based on density functional theory), are used to discuss effects of tip-sample relaxation on the topography and to have a better base from which to estimate uncertainties in measurements of small particles or features. Some papers report about measurements of air refractivity fluctuations by phase modulation interferometry, angle-scale traceability by laser diffractometry, and an error separation method. The development of 3D surface roughness measurement standards from scratches is considered in one contribution. Here a 2D autoregressive model was used to generate the software gauge data, which were used as a base for the manufacturing process by diamond turning. Contributions in the third part deal with applications including CD measurements on small and medium structures, the characterization of nanoparticles with a diameter less than 200 nm by electron microscopy, chemical nanoscale metrology by TXRF and a study of the strength of nanotube bundles. We would like to thank all the authors for their contributions, and the referees for their time spent reviewing all the papers and for making their valuable and helpful comments. Additional thanks are extended to all involved in the production of this issue for their help and support.

  13. Editorial: Next Generation Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Marco; Cincotti, Gabriella; Pizzinat, Anna; Vetter, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade we have seen an increasing number of operators deploying Fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) solutions in access networks, in order to provide home users with a much needed network access upgrade, to support higher peak rates, higher sustained rates and a better and more uniform broadband coverage of the territory.

  14. Editorial Introduction: Discovering the Unexpected

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Kristin A.; Earnshaw, Rae A.; Stasko, John T.

    2007-09-01

    Visualization has been the cornerstone of scientific progress throughout history. Much of modern physics is a result of the superior abstract visualization abilities of a few brilliant men. Newton visualized the effect of gravitational force fields in three dimensional space acting on the center of mass. And Einstein visualized the geometric effects of objects in relative and uniform accelerated motion, with the speed of light a constant, time part of space, and acceleration indistinguishable from gravity. Virtually all comprehension in science, technology, and even art calls on our ability to visualize. In fact, the ability to visualize is almost synonymous with understanding. We have all used the expression “I see” to mean “I understand.

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    Gravitational lensing emerged as an observational field following the 1979 discovery of a doubly imaged quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy. In the 1980s and '90s dozens of other multiply imaged systems were observed, as well as time delay measurements, weak and strong lensing by galaxies and galaxy clusters, and the discovery of microlensing in our galaxy. The rapid pace of advances has continued into the new century. Lensing is currently one of best techniques for finding and mapping dark matter over a wide range of scales, and also addresses broader cosmological questions such as understanding the nature of dark energy. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics presents a snapshot of current research in some of the exciting areas of lensing. It provides an occasion to look back at the advances of the last decade and ahead to the potential of the coming years. Just about a decade ago, microlensing was discovered through the magnification of stars in our galaxy by invisible objects with masses between that of Jupiter and a tenth the mass of the Sun. Thus a new component of the mass of our galaxy, dubbed MACHOs, was established (though a diffuse, cold dark matter-like component is still needed to make up most of the galaxy mass). More recently, microlensing led to another exciting discovery—of extra-solar planets with masses ranging from about five times that of Earth to that of Neptune. We can expect many more planets to be discovered through ongoing surveys. Microlensing is the best technique for finding Earth mass planets, though it is not as productive overall as other methods and does not allow for follow up observations. Beyond planet hunting, microlensing has enabled us to observe previously inaccessible systems, ranging from the surfaces of other stars to the accretion disks around the black holes powering distant quasars. Galaxies and galaxy clusters at cosmological distances can produce dramatic lensing effects: multiple images of background galaxies or quasars which are strongly magnified and sheared. In the last decade, double and quadruply imaged systems due to galactic lenses have been studied with optical and radio observations. An interesting result obtained from the flux ratio 'anomalies' of quadruply imaged systems is the statistical detection of dark sub-clumps in galaxy halos. More broadly, while we have learned a lot about the mass distribution in lens galaxies and improved time delay constraints on the Hubble constant, the limitations of cosmological studies with strong lensing due to uncertainties in lens mass models have also come to be appreciated. That said, progress will no doubt continue with qualitative advances in observations such as astrometric counterparts to the flux anomalies, clever ideas such as the use of spectroscopic signatures to assemble the SLACS lens sample, and combining optical imaging, spectroscopy and radio data to continue the quest for a set of golden lenses to measure the Hubble constant. Galaxy clusters are a fascinating arena for studying the distribution of dark and baryonic matter. Weak and strong lensing information can be combined with dynamical information from the spectroscopic measurements of member galaxies and x-ray/Sunyaev Zeldovich measurements of the hot ionized gas. Hubble Space Telescope observations have yielded spectacular images of clusters, such as Abell 1689, which has over a hundred multiply imaged arcs. Mass measurements have progressed to the level of 10 percent accuracy for several clusters. Unfortunately, it is unclear if one can do much better for individual clusters given inherent limitations such as unknown projection effects. The statistical study of clusters is likely to remain a promising way to study dark matter, gravity theories, and cosmology. Techniques to combine weak and strong lensing information to obtain the mass distribution of clusters have also advanced, and work continues on parameter-free techniques that are agnostic to the relation of cluster light and mass. An interesting twist in cluster lensing was provided by the post-merger Bullet Cluster (identified as 1E0657-558). In this and other merging clusters, the lensing mass is displaced from the baryonic center of mass, presenting a challenge to theories that attempt to explain away dark matter by positing a modification to the law of gravity. Detailed modeling and multi-wavelength data on these systems will provide interesting limits on dark matter as well as the possibility of a major surprise. Other advances may come from the gravitational telescope effect of galaxy clusters: regions with very high magnification can be used to image proto-galaxies at z ~ 10. Statistical studies of galaxy and cluster lenses and of invisible, diffuse large-scale structures via weak lensing have come into their own in recent years. A census of the mass distribution at low redshift has been made using the technique of galaxy galaxy lensing: the mean mass profiles of galaxies and clusters have been measured using the weak tangential shear imprinted on background galaxies. These can be correlated with a variety of luminous tracers to study galaxy/cluster properties at a level of detail not possible until recently. Equally impressive is the measurement of excess mass correlations out to ~30 Mpc from these halos, requiring measurements of shear signals below 0.01%. These measurements account for the total matter density inferred from the CMB plus other observations, thus providing a direct measure of dark matter in the present day universe. Cosmic shear refers to the more challenging measurement of shear shear correlations without the use of foreground objects to orient the shear. The first detections of such correlations were published in 2001; since then measurements from arcminute to degree scales have been made with much improved accuracy. Theoretical techniques of lensing tomography and advances in analysis methods to eliminate systematic errors have progressed rapidly. That cosmic shear is now regarded as a key element of major missions aimed at probing dark energy is a feat of scientific persuasion—a decade ago not many believed it was realistic to even detect this tiny shear signal, let alone measure it with the percent-level accuracy needed to advance dark energy measurements. If weak lensing measurements deliver on their promise, then, in combination with other imaging and spectroscopic probes, they may well impact fundamental physics and cosmology. For example they may find evidence for an evolving dark energy component or signatures of departures from general relativity. These exciting prospects rest on new optical surveys planned for the next five years which will image a thousand square degrees or more of the sky to redshifts ~1 (compared to about a hundred square degrees imaged currently). Further, through photometric redshifts based on galaxy colors, lensing tomography methods will be applied to learn about the three-dimensional distribution of dark matter. Lensing measurements in other wavelengths, such as planned 21-cm surveys and CMB lensing, would add valuable diversity to measurement techniques. The case for the next generation optical surveys from the ground and space is compelling as well: they will produce another order of magnitude in data quantity and deliver images with minimal distortions due to the atmosphere and telescope optics. The coming decade therefore has the potential for exciting discoveries in gravitational lensing. Focus on Gravitational Lensing Contents A Bayesian approach to strong lensing modelling of galaxy clusters E Jullo, J-P Kneib, M Limousin, Á Elíasdóttir, P J Marshall and T Verdugo Probing dark energy with cluster counts and cosmic shear power spectra: including the full covariance Masahiro Takada and Sarah Bridle How robust are the constraints on cosmology and galaxy evolution from the lens-redshift test? Pedro R Capelo and Priyamvada Natarajan Dark energy constraints from cosmic shear power spectra: impact of intrinsic alignments on photometric redshift requirements Sarah Bridle and Lindsay King An integral-field spectroscopic strong lens survey Adam S Bolton and Scott Burles Is there a quad problem among optical gravitational lenses? Masamune Oguri Cluster mass estimators from CMB temperature and polarization lensing Wayne Hu, Simon DeDeo and Chris Vale

  16. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    1. Physics competitions: aims and realizations One aim of physics competitions is to increase the interest of young students, primarily at upper secondary level, to physics and natural sciences in general. A competition has motivational aspects known usually from sports events or games—comparing one's own ability with others, of course with the desire to be better and to win. If competitions reach nationwide and even international levels, additional stimulation is created. Competitions provide greatest attraction to possible winners, to the group of gifted people in a particular field. This implies that science contests are excellent tools for the promotion of talented students. Traditional teaching has been shown to have problems in supporting this group of students. Very often teachers are overstretched with the demands of teaching both low- and high-level students. Extracurricular activities are therefore a good chance to relieve the teacher, and to give talented students the opportunity for appropriate training and challenge. The competitions, however, have a broader impact and address more young people than one might guess from the statements above. Training courses and selection at school level give a larger group of students extra and, to some extent, complimentary education in physics. The degree of complexity of the tasks corresponds very often to the standards of the next level of education in the school system. Interestingly, many physics competitions have their origin in countries beyond the former Iron Curtain. They started as regional and national tournaments, were joined by neighbouring countries and have grown, in some cases, to events with participants from more than 80 countries. Although the features mentioned above are common to the different competitions, there are distinct differences between them [1]. The International Physics Olympiad (IPhO) is the oldest international physics competition for students at upper secondary level [2]. It dates back to 1967, when the first Olympiad was organized in Warsaw, Poland. Today this Olympiad is a worldwide enterprise, and in the 2008 competition in Hanoi, Vietnam, students from 82 countries took part. An overview of the problems and a summary of the results of this Olympiad are given in the first paper, prepared by the organizers of the competition [3]. The students work on four or five different problems, three theoretical ones on one day, and one or two experimental tasks on another. On each day, they have five hours to accomplish their tasks. The problems are prepared by the local organizer, usually a team of physicists from universities in the home country. The level is set by an international syllabus, and the content and wording of the problems have to be agreed by a majority of the supervisors (one from each participating country) in an initial meeting. Afterwards the tasks are translated into the various languages of the competitors; the students also write their results in their own language. The number of awards (gold, silver and bronze, as well as honorable mentions) varies from competition to competition, since it depends on the number of participants. A team consists of at most five students, but they do not act as a team—they work independantly. The selection process in individual countries varies, but is usually executed in several steps, starting from school competitions and going on to regional and national ones. Training courses are often organized on the same levels. Big differences can be seen in training courses at the highest level, the duration ranging from one week to several months. The International Young Physicists Tournament (IYPT) is completely different in spirit [4]. Whereas the students work individually in the Olympiad, IYPT is a competition between teams. In addition, the 17 tasks are known almost a year in advance. The problems are very open, allow for different approaches and include experimental as well as theoretical work. The students are allowed to use any method they like, are coached by teachers, and are encouraged

  17. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Pe