Science.gov

Sample records for editors introduction special

  1. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    - the visual model - running on the client. They claim a number of benefits from this approach, including better predictability and consistency. Wolfgang Broll discusses the SmallView system which is an attempt to provide a toolkit for DVEs. One of the key features of SmallView is a sophisticated application level protocol, DWTP, that provides support for a variety of communication models. The final paper, by Chris Greenhalgh, discusses the MASSIVE system which has been used to explore the notion of awareness in the 3D space via the concept of `auras'. These auras define an area of interest for users and support a mapping between what a user is aware of, and what data update rate the communications infrastructure can support. We hope that this selection of papers will serve to provide a clear introduction to the distributed system issues faced by the DVE community and the approaches they have taken in solving them. Finally, we wish to thank Hubert Le Van Gong for his tireless efforts in pulling together all these papers and both the referees and the authors of the papers for the time and effort in ensuring that their contributions teased out the interesting distributed systems issues for this special issue. † E-mail address: rodger@arch.sel.sony.com

  2. Guest Editor's Introduction: Special section on dependable distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Christof

    1999-09-01

    We rely more and more on computers. For example, the Internet reshapes the way we do business. A `computer outage' can cost a company a substantial amount of money. Not only with respect to the business lost during an outage, but also with respect to the negative publicity the company receives. This is especially true for Internet companies. After recent computer outages of Internet companies, we have seen a drastic fall of the shares of the affected companies. There are multiple causes for computer outages. Although computer hardware becomes more reliable, hardware related outages remain an important issue. For example, some of the recent computer outages of companies were caused by failed memory and system boards, and even by crashed disks - a failure type which can easily be masked using disk mirroring. Transient hardware failures might also look like software failures and, hence, might be incorrectly classified as such. However, many outages are software related. Faulty system software, middleware, and application software can crash a system. Dependable computing systems are systems we can rely on. Dependable systems are, by definition, reliable, available, safe and secure [3]. This special section focuses on issues related to dependable distributed systems. Distributed systems have the potential to be more dependable than a single computer because the probability that all computers in a distributed system fail is smaller than the probability that a single computer fails. However, if a distributed system is not built well, it is potentially less dependable than a single computer since the probability that at least one computer in a distributed system fails is higher than the probability that one computer fails. For example, if the crash of any computer in a distributed system can bring the complete system to a halt, the system is less dependable than a single-computer system. Building dependable distributed systems is an extremely difficult task. There is no

  3. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    . Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  4. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation

  5. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    be layered over both Object Services and the ORB. The OMG creates specifications, not code, but the interfaces it standardizes are always derived from demonstrated technology submitted by member companies. The specified interfaces are written in a neutral Interface Definition Language (IDL) that defines contractual interfaces with potential clients. Interfaces written in IDL can be translated to a number of programming languages via OMG standard language mappings so that they can be used to develop components. The resulting components can transparently communicate with other components written in different languages and running on different operating systems and machine types. The ORB is responsible for providing the illusion of `virtual homogeneity' regardless of the programming languages, tools, operating systems and networks used to realize and support these components. With the adoption of the CORBA 2.0 specification in 1995, these components are able to interoperate across multi-vendor CORBA-based products. More than 700 member companies have joined the OMG, including Hewlett-Packard, Digital, Siemens, IONA Technologies, Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Microsoft and IBM, which makes it the largest standards body in existence. These companies continue to work together within the OMG to refine and enhance the OMA and its components. This special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering publishes five papers that were originally presented at the `Distributed Object-Based Platforms' track of the 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), which was held in Wailea on Maui on 6 - 10 January 1997. The papers, which were selected based on their quality and the range of topics they cover, address different aspects of CORBA, including advanced aspects such as fault tolerance and transactions. These papers discuss the use of CORBA and evaluate CORBA-based development for different types of distributed object systems and architectures. The first paper, by S

  6. Guest Editor's introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-03-01

    Special Issue on Performance Modelling Distributed systems are now accepted as a cost-effective alternative to mainframe computer systems in most commercial environments. Their usage continues to become ever more widespread whilst their complexity is increasing rapidly. The essential advantage of client - server systems in particular is the splitting of an application into a client part, which comprises tasks that are executed locally on workstations such as PCs, and a server part, which executes larger scale computations on a remote mainframe or parallel computer. In this way the end-user is offered great flexibility, using a workstation for its specialist capabilities and user interface which is tailored to use by non-technical staff. However, large calculations, for example access to a large central database, can be hived off, via a network, to a central mainframe which has superior performance and is also most appropriate for managing large volumes of shared data. In short, client - server systems can effectively integrate workstations, and perhaps mid-range systems, with mainframes and supercomputers in a cost-effective and user-friendly way. Many other distributed configurations are also used, for example clusters of networked workstations. Whilst this type of partitioning offers tremendous flexibility to users in a cost-effective way, large distributed systems are highly complex, involving large numbers of components performing tasks concurrently, some of which interact. The choice of components, interconnects and software algorithms is therefore critical and the scale of the problem - often many hundreds of clients, possibly many servers which may be parallel computers themselves and several choices of interconnect - demands a design backed up by formal quantitative performance modelling. This special issue is concerned with the performance evaluation of such distributed systems, many of them client - server systems. A system may be considered as comprising

  7. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  8. Open Simulation Laboratories [Guest editors' introduction

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, Francis J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The introduction for the special issue on open simulation laboratories, the guest editors describe how OSLs will become more common as their potential is better understood and they begin providing access to valuable datasets to much larger segments of the scientific community. Moreover, new analysis tools and ways to do science will inevitably develop as a result.

  9. Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Jeff; Moffett, Jonathan

    1996-06-01

    Special Issue on Management This special issue contains seven papers originally presented at an International Workshop on Services for Managing Distributed Systems (SMDS'95), held in September 1995 in Karslruhe, Germany. The workshop was organized to present the results of two ESPRIT III funded projects, Sysman and IDSM, and more generally to bring together work in the area of distributed systems management. The workshop focused on the tools and techniques necessary for managing future large-scale, multi-organizational distributed systems. The open call for papers attracted a large number of submissions and the subsequent attendance at the workshop, which was larger than expected, clearly indicated that the topics addressed by the workshop were of considerable interest both to industry and academia. The papers selected for this special issue represent an excellent coverage of the issues addressed by the workshop. A particular focus of the workshop was the need to help managers deal with the size and complexity of modern distributed systems by the provision of automated support. This automation must have two prime characteristics: it must provide a flexible management system which responds rapidly to changing organizational needs, and it must provide both human managers and automated management components with the information that they need, in a form which can be used for decision-making. These two characteristics define the two main themes of this special issue. To satisfy the requirement for a flexible management system, workers in both industry and universities have turned to architectures which support policy directed management. In these architectures policy is explicitly represented and can be readily modified to meet changing requirements. The paper `Towards implementing policy-based systems management' by Meyer, Anstötz and Popien describes an approach whereby policy is enforced by event-triggered rules. Krause and Zimmermann in their paper `Implementing

  10. Space optics: an introduction by the editors.

    PubMed

    Breckinridge, J B; Wood, H J

    1993-04-01

    This feature of Applied Optics consists of papers on the Hubble Space Telescope and its instruments as well as other new instruments and other new optics technology for space science. Many of the papers are an outgrowth of the papers presented at the Second Space Optics Topical Meeting, October 1991, in Williamsburg, Va. This introduction provides an overview for the papers related to the Hubble Space Telescope: measurement of the error and approaches to correct for the error.

  11. Special Supplement Introduction: Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Charles; Waters, Flavie

    2014-01-01

    This Special Supplement presents reports from 11 working groups of the interdisciplinary International Consortium on Hallucination Research meeting in Durham, UK, September 2013. Topics include psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations, culture and hallucinations, hallucinations in children and adolescents, visual hallucinations, interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), AVHs in persons without need for care, a multisite study of the PSYRATS instrument, subtypes of AVHs, the Hearing Voices Movement, Research Domain Criteria for hallucinations, and cortical specialization as a route to understanding hallucinations. PMID:24936079

  12. Introduction to the Special Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lizette

    1986-01-01

    Presents a special series of seven articles dealing with biopsychosocial oncology, the role of psychology in cancer treatment. Includes an introduction by Lizette Peterson and articles by Thomas Burish and Michael Carey, Susan Jay et al., Shelley Taylor et al., David Cella and Susan Tross, Gerald Koocher, and Leonard Derogatis. (KS)

  13. Guest Editors' Introduction: Research on Direct Instruction in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Martha Abele; Kemper, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a special issue devoted to recent studies of the direct instruction reading program, providing a history of direct instruction, examining research on the effects and outcomes of direct instruction, and reviewing the studies contained in this special issue. (Contains references.) (SM)

  14. A "Situational" and "Coorientational" Measure of Specialized Magazine Editors' Perceptions of Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Dennis W.

    A study was undertaken of specialized magazine editors' perceptions of audience characteristics as well as the perceived role of their publications. Specifically, the study examines the relationship between the editors' perceptions of reader problem recognition, level of involvement, constraint recognition, and possession of reference criteria and…

  15. The politics of biofuels, land and agrarian change: editors' introduction.

    PubMed

    Borras, Saturnino M

    2010-01-01

    This introduction frames key questions on biofuels, land and agrarian change within agrarian political economy, political sociology and political ecology. It identifies and explains big questions that provide the starting point for the contributions to this collection. We lay out some of the emerging themes which define the politics of biofuels, land and agrarian change revolving around global (re)configurations; agro-ecological visions; conflicts, resistances and diverse outcomes; state, capital and society relations; mobilising opposition, creating alternatives; and change and continuity. An engaged agrarian political economy combined with global political economy, international relations and social movement theory provides an important framework for analysis and critique of the conditions, dynamics, contradictions, impacts and possibilities of the emerging global biofuels complex. Our hope is that this collection demonstrates the significance of a political economy of biofuels in capturing the complexity of the "biofuels revolution" and at the same time opening up questions about its sustainability in social and environmental terms that provide pathways towards alternatives.

  16. Editor's Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozzens, Susan E.

    1986-01-01

    Offers perspectives and ideas on a range of issues related to policy-relevant research in science studies. Identifies and discusses major challenges and problems involved in science policy studies. Presents an overview of articles that address the theme of funding and knowledge growth. (ML)

  17. Specialization and Integration: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, David

    1990-01-01

    States that intractable problems' many of which were specific to increasing specialization within individual disciplines, accompanied knowledge expansion in the West. Suggests interdisciplinary training as a solution to fragmentation. Points out that Chinese scholars have not seen specialization as a problem, and contends that they should consider…

  18. Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    Introduces the articles of this special issue focusing on randomized field trials in criminology. In spite of the overall lack of randomized field trials in criminology, some agencies and individuals are able to mount an impressive number of field trials, and these articles focus on their experiences. (SLD)

  19. Introduction to Seamount Special Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.

    1984-12-01

    This special section is the outcome of a symposium held at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory November 17-19, 1982, on the origin and evolution of seamounts. The topic for the symposium arose from the realization that although there is now a wealth of new ideas on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the ocean floor, the study of seamounts has been relatively neglected despite their great importance to plate tectonics. One of the most interesting features of the ocean floor is the large number of small volcanoes or seamounts. Usually, these features are circular in plan view and have a sharp summit. There has been extensive debate in the literature about the significance of the different morphological types of seamounts. A traditional view has been that flattopped seamounts (e.g., guyots) formed as a result of subaerial erosion when the volcanoes were above sea level. Seamounts covered by fringing reefs or sediments (e.g., atolls), on the other hand, are believed to have formed when the original volcanic foundation subsided below sea level.

  20. EDITORIAL HPJ SPECIAL ISSUE INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2011-10-01

    testing of effective cleanup technologies to reduce environmental and health risks. Based on this work, a large amount of data are now available for publication, some of which are presented in this Special Issue of the Health Physics Journal.

  1. Introduction: Special issue on Global Lesbian Cinema.

    PubMed

    Farr, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a brief introduction to this special issue on Global Lesbian Cinema. This issue particularly highlights the importance of recognizing lesbian discourse as a separate, related piece of the discourse of queer transnational and global cinema. Subsequently, brief summaries of the eight articles of this collection are provided.

  2. Introduction to the Rosetta Special Collection

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sagar D.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    The Rosetta macromolecular modeling software is a versatile, rapidly developing set of tools that are now being routinely utilized to address state-of-the-art research challenges in academia and industrial research settings. A Rosetta Conference (RosettaCon) describing updates to the Rosetta source code is held annually. Every two years, a Rosetta Conference (RosettaCon) special collection describing the results presented at the annual conference by participating RosettaCommons labs is published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS). This is the introduction to the third RosettaCon 2014 Special Collection published by PLOS. PMID:26714017

  3. Introduction to the special issue: under pressure.

    PubMed

    Howard, Yetta

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces this special issue on the theme "Under Pressure." It uses an analysis of experimental lesbian filmmaker Su Friedrich's Seeing Red (2005) to frame the issue's focus on the ways that the category "lesbian" is placed under pressure and/or the pressure "lesbian" places on twentieth- and twenty-first-century cultural production. After this overview, the introduction summarizes all seven articles in the order that they appear in the issue. These summaries also show the connections between the articles and suggest possibilities for future critical dialogues on the theme.

  4. Beliefs and expectancies in legal decision making: an introduction to the Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    McAuliff, Bradley D.; Bornstein, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    This introduction describes what the co-editors believe readers can expect in this Special Issue. After beliefs and expectancies are defined, examples of how these constructs influence human thought, feeling, and behavior in legal settings are considered. Brief synopses are provided for the Special Issue papers on beliefs and expectancies regarding alibis, children’s testimony behavior, eyewitness testimony, confessions, sexual assault victims, judges’ decisions in child protection cases, and attorneys’ beliefs about jurors’ perceptions of juvenile offender culpability. Areas for future research are identified, and readers are encouraged to discover new ways that beliefs and expectancies operate in the legal system. PMID:24348006

  5. Introduction to special section on Hydrologic Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Susan

    2006-01-23

    The Hydrological Synthesis special section presentssynthesis topics that have the potential to revolutionize hydrologicalsciences in a manner needed to meet critical water challenges that we nowface. The special section also highlights topics that are important andexciting enough to compel researchers to engage in collaborativesynthesis activities. This introductory paper provides a brief overviewof nine papers that are included in this special section, which discussthe synthesis of tools, data, concepts, theories, or approaches acrossdisciplines and scales. The wide range of topics that are exploredinclude groundwater quality, river restoration, water management,nitrogen cycling, and Earth surface dynamics. Collectively, the specialsection papers illustrate that the challenge to deal effectively withcomplex water problems is not purely a scientific, technological, orsocioeconomic one; it is instead a complex, 21st century problem thatrequires coordinated synthesis.

  6. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  7. Introduction to Special Issue on Overschooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterbeek, Hessel

    2000-01-01

    This special issue was inspired by Greg Duncan and Saul Hoffman's 1981 article on the "incidence and wage effects of overeducation." These researchers used a Mincer earnings equation to determine that a substantial number of American workers were over- or under-educated for their chosen occupations. (MLH)

  8. Special Article: Ronald D. Miller: tribute to a past editor-in-chief.

    PubMed

    Tuman, Kenneth J

    2012-12-01

    For anesthesiologists around the world who have practiced or trained in the past 4 decades, the name Ronald Miller, MD, has been synonymous with a commitment to excellence that has been evident in all aspects of his remarkable career as a distinguished clinician-scientist, editor, writer, and educator. Dr. Miller's contributions as Editor-in-Chief of Anesthesia & Analgesia (1991-2006) have stimulated this salutation of his career and of his influence on transforming the Journal.

  9. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: inhomogeneous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkebir, Kamal; Saillard, Marc

    2005-12-01

    This special section deals with the reconstruction of scattering objects from experimental data. A few years ago, inspired by the Ipswich database [1 4], we started to build an experimental database in order to validate and test inversion algorithms against experimental data. In the special section entitled 'Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data' [5], preliminary results were reported through 11 contributions from several research teams. (The experimental data are free for scientific use and can be downloaded from the web site.) The success of this previous section has encouraged us to go further and to design new challenges for the inverse scattering community. Taking into account the remarks formulated by several colleagues, the new data sets deal with inhomogeneous cylindrical targets and transverse electric (TE) polarized incident fields have also been used. Among the four inhomogeneous targets, three are purely dielectric, while the last one is a `hybrid' target mixing dielectric and metallic cylinders. Data have been collected in the anechoic chamber of the Centre Commun de Ressources Micro-ondes in Marseille. The experimental setup as well as the layout of the files containing the measurements are presented in the contribution by J-M Geffrin, P Sabouroux and C Eyraud. The antennas did not change from the ones used previously [5], namely wide-band horn antennas. However, improvements have been achieved by refining the mechanical positioning devices. In order to enlarge the scope of applications, both TE and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations have been carried out for all targets. Special care has been taken not to move the target under test when switching from TE to TM measurements, ensuring that TE and TM data are available for the same configuration. All data correspond to electric field measurements. In TE polarization the measured component is orthogonal to the axis of invariance. Contributions A Abubakar, P M van den Berg and T M

  10. Subduction & orogeny: Introduction to the special volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Bosch, D.; Guillot, S.; de Sigoyer, J.; Martinod, J.; Agard, P.; Yamato, P.

    2016-05-01

    Subduction processes play a major role in plate tectonics and the subsequent geological evolution of Earth. This special issue focuses on ongoing research in subduction dynamics to a large extent (oceanic subduction, continental subduction, obduction…) for both past and active subduction zones and into mountain building processes and the early evolution of orogens. It puts together various approaches combining geophysics (imaging of subduction zones), petrology/geochemistry (metamorphic analysis of HP-UHP rocks, fluid geochemistry and magmatic signal, geochronology), seismology and geodesy (present-day evolution of subduction zones, active tectonics), structural geology (structure and evolution of mountain belts), and numerical modelling to provide a full spectrum of tools that can be used to constrain the nature and evolution of subduction processes and orogeny. Studies presented in this special issue range from the long-term (orogenic cycle) to short-term (seismic cycle).

  11. Editors' Introduction to the Thematic Issue: Mad about Methods? Teaching Research Methods in Political Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adriaensen, Johan; Kerremans, Bart; Slootmaeckers, Koen

    2015-01-01

    The contributors to this special issue all seek to address the challenge of teaching research methods to political science students. This introduction aims to provide a concise framework for the various innovations presented throughout this issue, situating them in the wider literature. Particular emphasis is placed on the factors that distinguish…

  12. Introduction to the Special Section on Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Lester, Barry M; Conradt, Elisabeth; Marsit, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics provides the opportunity to revolutionize our understanding of the role of genetics and the environment in explaining human behavior, although the use of epigenetics to study human behavior is just beginning. In this introduction, the authors present the basics of epigenetics in a way that is designed to make this exciting field accessible to a wide readership. The authors describe the history of human behavioral epigenetic research in the context of other disciplines and graphically illustrate the burgeoning of research in the application of epigenetic methods and principles to the study of human behavior. The role of epigenetics in normal embryonic development and the influence of biological and environmental factors altering behavior through epigenetic mechanisms and developmental programming are discussed. Some basic approaches to the study of epigenetics are reviewed. The authors conclude with a discussion of challenges and opportunities, including intervention, as the field of human behavioral epigenetics continue to grow.

  13. Introduction to the Special Section on Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Barry M.; Conradt, Elisabeth; Marsit, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics provides the opportunity to revolutionize our understanding of the role of genetics and the environment in explaining human behavior, although the use of epigenetics to study human behavior is just beginning. In this introduction, the authors present the basics of epigenetics in a way that is designed to make this exciting field accessible to a wide readership. The authors describe the history of human behavioral epigenetic research in the context of other disciplines and graphically illustrate the burgeoning of research in the application of epigenetic methods and principles to the study of human behavior. The role of epigenetics in normal embryonic development and the influence of biological and environmental factors altering behavior through epigenetic mechanisms and developmental programming are discussed. Some basic approaches to the study of epigenetics are reviewed. The authors conclude with a discussion of challenges and opportunities, including intervention, as the field of human behavioral epigenetics continue to grow. PMID:26822440

  14. Guest Editor's introduction: Selected papers from the 4th USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sventek, Joe

    1998-12-01

    Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA Introduction The USENIX Conference on Object-Oriented Technologies and Systems (COOTS) is held annually in the late spring. The conference evolved from a set of C++ workshops that were held under the auspices of USENIX, the first of which met in 1989. Given the growing diverse interest in object-oriented technologies, the C++ focus of the workshop eventually became too narrow, with the result that the scope was widened in 1995 to include object-oriented technologies and systems. COOTS is intended to showcase advanced R&D efforts in object-oriented technologies and software systems. The conference emphasizes experimental research and experience gained by using object-oriented techniques and languages to build complex software systems that meet real-world needs. COOTS solicits papers in the following general areas: application of, and experiences with, object-oriented technologies in particular domains (e.g. financial, medical, telecommunication); the architecture and implementation of distributed object systems (e.g. CORBA, DCOM, RMI); object-oriented programming and specification languages; object-oriented design and analysis. The 4th meeting of COOTS was held 27 - 30 April 1998 at the El Dorado Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Several tutorials were given. The technical program proper consisted of a single track of six sessions, with three paper presentations per session. A keynote address and a provocative panel session rounded out the technical program. The program committee reviewed 56 papers, selecting the best 18 for presentation in the technical sessions. While we solicit papers across the spectrum of applications of object-oriented technologies, this year there was a predominance of distributed, object-oriented papers. The accepted papers reflected this asymmetry, with 15 papers on distributed objects and 3 papers on object-oriented languages. The papers in this special issue are

  15. Resilience in Youth and Families Living With Pediatric Health and Developmental Conditions: Introduction to the Special Issue on Resilience

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Nabors, Laura; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Psychology showcases a growing area of research with a collection of 16 contemporary studies of resilience in youth with chronic medical or developmental conditions and their families. The research reported in this special issue covers a broad range of pediatric populations, including cancer, type 1 diabetes, and chronic pain, among others, ranging in age from early childhood through early adulthood. This introduction to the special issue reviews the various ways the articles' authors conceptualize and define risk and resilience; most analyze protective processes in relation to resilient outcomes, including both achievement of explicitly positive experiences and avoidance of dysfunction or disruption. Challenges with measurement of resilience-related constructs is reviewed. Finally, the special issue editors offer a definition of resilience in the context of pediatric and health psychology. PMID:26275974

  16. Guest Editor's Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danaher, Patrick Alan

    2000-01-01

    Examines the field of international traveler and nomadic education research and argues for the need to extend the boundaries of this "field" significantly. Research on the education of travelers and nomads is mobile and fluid, but the approach used in this collection, the mapping and celebration of international diversity, is needed to…

  17. Introduction to special section on Colloid Transport in Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiers, James E.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2006-12-01

    The Water Resources Research special section on Colloid Transport in Subsurface Environments presents new knowledge that is critical to solving problems related to groundwater pollution by microbial pathogens and hazardous chemicals. This introduction to the special section surveys fourteen manuscripts that advance current understanding of the transport of biocolloids (e.g., bacteria, viruses, and protozoa), mineral colloids, and colloid-associated contaminants in the vadose zone and in groundwater. These papers present new techniques for elucidating mechanisms that govern colloid mobility, propose mathematical models appropriate for quantifying colloid and colloid-associated contaminant transport, and report pore-scale and column-scale observations requisite for evaluating these models. Together, the papers of this special section illuminate the complexity of the colloid transport problem and describe progress toward understanding this complexity.

  18. Notes towards a 'social aesthetic': Guest editors' introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Olcese, Cristiana; Savage, Mike

    2015-12-01

    There is an emerging 'aesthetic turn' within sociology which currently lacks clear focus. This paper reviews the different issues feeding into this interest and contributes to its development. Previous renderings of this relationship have set the aesthetic up against sociology, as an emphasis which 'troubles' conventional understandings of sociality and offers no ready way of reconciling the aesthetic with the social. Reflecting on the contributions of recent social theorists, from figures including Bourdieu, Born, Rancière, Deleuze, and Martin, we argue instead for the value of a social aesthetic which critiques instrumentalist and reductive understandings of the social itself. In explicating what form this might take, the latter parts of the paper take issue with classical modernist conceptions of the aesthetic which continue to dominate popular and sociological understandings of the aesthetic, and uses the motif of 'walking' to show how the aesthetic can be rendered in terms of 'the mundane search' and how this search spans everyday experience and cultural re-production. We offer a provisional definition of social aesthetics as the embedded and embodied process of meaning making which, by acknowledging the physical/corporeal boundaries and qualities of the inhabited world, also allows imagination to travel across other spaces and times. It is hoped that this approach can be a useful platform for further inquiry.

  19. Editor's Introduction: Special Issue on the Next Big Questions in Psychology.

    PubMed

    Diener, Ed

    2009-07-01

    In this issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science, we learn what 18 leading psychologists believe are the next big research questions in their respective fields. I invited about 20 of our most outstanding scholars to tell us what they believe are the most important questions to be asked in the upcoming decade. Not unexpectedly, the contributions are wide ranging both in content and in the way the authors framed the question of what is important. The range of articles, from psychoneuroimmunology to human-android interactions, clearly indicates the enormous scope of psychology. My hope is that both freshly minted and senior scientists alike might gain from these insights into the research they should pursue in the years ahead.

  20. Introduction to the Special Issue: Public Health Genetics and Genomics.

    PubMed

    McWalter, Kirsty; Gaviglio, Amy

    2015-06-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Genetic Counseling is dedicated to public health genetics and genomics. The seventeen papers featured in this issue span such topics as genetic counselors in public health roles, newborn screening, population screening, ethics, and health beliefs and behaviors. In this introduction to the special issue, we review some history of public health genetics and genomics, present the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "10 Essential Public Health Services" with associated genetics specific recommendations and priorities, and briefly overview how each article ties into the world of public health genetics and genomics. We hope this issue encourages genetic counselors to visualize their ever expanding and important roles in public health genetics and genomics, as well as their contributions to improving population health.

  1. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to a special issue of the journal General and Comparative Endocrinology dedicated to Insect Endocrinology. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequences ...

  2. Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Pamela

    2014-06-01

    Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Agnieszka Kobeliak discusses how structural deficits in the epidermal barrier intersect with the NFkB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Farah Sheikh reviews the specialized junctional components in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system and Robert Gourdie discusses how molecular complexes between sodium channels and gap junction proteins within the perijunctional microdomains within the intercalated disc facilitate conduction. Glenn Radice evaluates the role of N-cadherin in heart. Andre Kleber and Chris Chen explore new approaches to study junctional mechanotransduction in vitro with a focus on the effects of connexin ablation and the role of cadherins, respectively. To complement this series of reviews, we have interviewed Werner Franke, whose systematic documentation the tissue-specific complexity of desmosome composition and pioneering discovery of the cardiac area composita junction greatly facilitated elucidation of the role of desmosomal components in the pathophysiology of human heart disease.

  3. Power and environmental assessment: Introduction to the special issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Matthew; Richardson, Tim

    2013-02-15

    The significance of politics and power dynamics has long been recognised in environmental assessment (EA) research, but there has not been sustained attention to power, either theoretically or empirically. The aim of this special issue is to encourage the EA community to engage more consistently with the issue of power. The introduction represents a ground-clearing exercise intended to clarify the terms of the debate about power in the EA field, and to contribute to the development of a research agenda. Research trends in the field are outlined, and potential analytic and normative lines of inquiry are identified. The contributions to this special issue represent contrasting conceptual and methodological approaches that navigate the analytical and normative terrain of power dynamics in EA. Together, they demonstrate that power cannot be removed from EA policy or practices, and is a necessary research focus for the development of the field. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Introduces the themed section on power Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provides an overview of the papers in the themed section Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifies research trends and directions for future research.

  4. Big data in psychology: Introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Lisa L; Oswald, Frederick L

    2016-12-01

    The introduction to this special issue on psychological research involving big data summarizes the highlights of 10 articles that address a number of important and inspiring perspectives, issues, and applications. Four common themes that emerge in the articles with respect to psychological research conducted in the area of big data are mentioned, including: (a) The benefits of collaboration across disciplines, such as those in the social sciences, applied statistics, and computer science. Doing so assists in grounding big data research in sound theory and practice, as well as in affording effective data retrieval and analysis. (b) Availability of large data sets on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites that provide a psychological window into the attitudes and behaviors of a broad spectrum of the population. (c) Identifying, addressing, and being sensitive to ethical considerations when analyzing large data sets gained from public or private sources. (d) The unavoidable necessity of validating predictive models in big data by applying a model developed on 1 dataset to a separate set of data or hold-out sample. Translational abstracts that summarize the articles in very clear and understandable terms are included in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms relevant to big data research discussed in the articles is presented in Appendix B. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Primate spatial strategies and cognition: introduction to this special issue.

    PubMed

    Garber, Paul A; Dolins, Francine L

    2014-05-01

    Wild primates face significant challenges associated with locating resources that involve learning through exploration, encoding, and recalling travel routes, orienting to single landmarks or landmark arrays, monitoring food availability, and applying spatial strategies that reduce effort and increase efficiency. These foraging decisions are likely to involve tradeoffs between traveling to nearby or distant feeding sites based on expectations of resource productivity, predation risk, the availability of other nearby feeding sites, and individual requirements associated with nutrient balancing. Socioecological factors that affect primate foraging decisions include feeding competition, intergroup encounters, mate defense, and opportunities for food sharing. The nine research papers in this Special Issue, "Primate Spatial Strategies and Cognition," address a series of related questions examining how monkeys, apes, and humans encode, internally represent, and integrate spatial, temporal, and quantity information in efficiently locating and relocating productive feeding sites in both small-scale and large-scale space. The authors use a range of methods and approaches to study wild and captive primates, including computer and mathematical modeling, virtual reality, and detailed examinations of animal movement using GPS and GIS analyses to better understand primate cognitive ecology and species differences in decision-making. We conclude this Introduction by identifying a series of critical questions for future research designed to document species-specific differences in primate spatial cognition.

  6. Introduction (to Special Issue on Refugees: Issues and Directions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Examines current trends in mass international immigration and refugee resettlement and discusses related legal and humanitarian concerns. Briefly reviews the articles which follow in this special issue. (GC)

  7. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-11-01

    A year has passed since Raymond left us, but for many of us it seems like it was yesterday. Indeed, since his departure last July, not a week or even a day has gone by without his former collaborators, students, colleagues having a thought for him. Some initiatives have already been taken in order to celebrate Raymond's memory. The special day for Raymond organized at CERN last December was an opportunity to celebrate this exceptional man. In Annecy, with the implication of CERN and Marseille and thanks to a spontaneous and generous gift of Raymond's wife Marie-Françoise and their children Olivier and Thierry, the opening of a special room containing a huge collection of scientific books of Raymond is almost completed. It is in the same spirit that the present editors decided to dedicate a special issue of Nuclear Physics in memory of Raymond. In the following pages, some important problems Raymond was interested in are presented, discussed and sometimes solved. The diversity of topics in this issue reflects well the extent of Raymond's interests in Physics and Mathematics. Raymond was not only a gifted man for the so-called theoretical sciences, mathematics and physics, but he was also passionate about arts, music, drawing and of course literature, just as he was a leader always ready to bring his help and share his deep knowledge in physics and mathematics with others. Many people were deeply touched by Paul Sorba's tribute during Raymond's funeral. This is why we asked Paul to translate his speech, originally given in French, which seemed to us a perfect Prolegomena for this special volume of Nuclear Physics. The volume "Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Field Theory" is organized as follows:

  8. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion

  9. Introduction to the Special Series on Participatory Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hyun-Sook; Meyer, Luanna; Goetz, Lori

    1998-01-01

    This introductory article discusses the benefits of participatory action research (PAR), including the empowerment of participants in research and the research process, the difficulties PAR presents, and summarizes following articles in a special series on the facets of PAR. (CR)

  10. Introduction to special issue on carbon and landscape dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    In October, 2013, at the Geological Society of America annual meeting, a theme session focused on carbon and landscape dynamics.  That event led to interest in producing a special issue in ESPL compiling papers on this subject.  The 13 papers collected for this special issue reflect the diversity of recent geomorphic research, across a range of climatic and geomorphic settings, addressing some aspect of carbon dynamics.

  11. Introduction to the Special Section on Epigenetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Barry M.; Conradt, Elisabeth; Marsit, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics provides the opportunity to revolutionize our understanding of the role of genetics and the environment in explaining human behavior, although the use of epigenetics to study human behavior is just beginning. In this introduction, the authors present the basics of epigenetics in a way that is designed to make this exciting field…

  12. New Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    It is an honour and a challenge to take up the editorship of the Messenger at this time of ESO's expanding role in European and worldwide astronomy. In order to mark the change, we have made a few adjustments to the appearance without departing from the overall style that Peter Shaver had evolved during his term as editor. I would like to thank Peter for gen-tly coaching me into the position and Jutta Boxheimer, the technical editor, for the high quality of the layout.

  13. An Introduction to the Special Issue on Internal Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    can be vital for transporting nutrient- rich fluid into coastal ecosystems such as coral reefs . Below, we provide a very brief introduction to some...of warm and/or fresh water overlying either cool and/or salty water. Perturbations cause the fluid to move up or down, and these perturbations...implicated to cascade low-mode energy to scales where instability can produce turbulence. The advent of global -scale sea surface altimetry resulted in

  14. Introduction to the MSATT special section, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, Robert M.

    1993-06-01

    This is the second issue of JGE-Planets containing a special section of papers that were stimulated by the Martial Surface Atmosphere Through Time (MSATT) workshop held in Boulder, Colorado, September 23-25, 1991. The first collection of papers was published in the February issue of JGR-Planets. MSATT is the last in a series of 3-year Mars data analysis programs that have focused on specific scientific themes. The program was inaugurated at the Boulder workshops, and the 15 papers contained in this special section raise to 38 the total number of papers it produced.

  15. Special section on LGBT resilience across cultures: introduction.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Christopher R; Jenkins, Richard A; Valenti, Maria

    2015-03-01

    This special section addresses a gap area of resilience and LGBT well-being. Although comprehensive global diversity regarding LGBT resilience was challenging to find, the special section includes representation from outside the US (Israel and Hong Kong), ethnic/racially diverse domestic populations, immigration, and one population for which LGBT identities might be considered marginalized-Christians in the US. The full range of LGBT identities are represented in the issue along with persons identifying as queer or questioning, although transgendered people were less well represented than lesbian, gay or bisexual identities.

  16. Introduction to Special Issue on Education and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiker, B. F.

    1998-01-01

    Introduces a special issue devoted to education-health linkages. The scope of coverage is quite broad. Papers treat education's connections with specific health-related behaviors, full-time employees' health insurance coverage, medical care/lifestyle choices, nurses' wage profiles, low birthweight children's capabilities, smoking decisions,…

  17. Introduction to Special Issue on Adolescent Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Kurt A.

    2004-01-01

    This special issue of Behavior Modification is designed to add to the literature on the behavioral assessment and treatment of CP displayed by adolescents. Contained in this issue are six empirical articles dealing with important issues on the topic. They provide examples of the richness of clinical problems classified as "conduct problems"…

  18. Introduction to This Special Issue on Context-Aware Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Thomas P.; Dourish, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Discusses pervasive, or ubiquitous, computing; explains the notion of context; and defines context-aware computing as the key to disperse and enmesh computation into our lives. Considers context awareness in human-computer interaction and describes the broad topic areas of the essays included in this special issue. (LRW)

  19. Introduction to the special issue on joint modelling techniques.

    PubMed

    Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2014-02-01

    Joint modelling techniques have seen great advances in the recent years, with several types of joint models having been developed in literature that can handle a wide range of applications. This special issue of Statistical Methods in Medical Research presents some recent developments from this field. This introductory article contains some background material and highlights the contents of the contributions.

  20. Cognitive neuroscience of synesthesia: Introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This Special Issue of Cognitive Neuroscience showcases the latest theories and findings in research on synesthesia. The various contributions are discussed in relation to three broad themes: Models and neural mechanisms; new types of synesthesia; and cognitive profile and demographic characteristics.

  1. Introduction to Special Section on How Volcanoes Work: Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1988-12-01

    The nine papers in this issue represent the third, and final, part of the special section on "How Volcanoes Work." Part 1 of this special section was published in the December 1987 [Tilling, 1987] and part 2 in May 1988 [Tilling, 1988] all three parts will be published together as a separate volume titled "How Volcanoes Work" by the American Geophysical Union. In its entirety, the special section gives a good sampling of the nearly 300 papers presented at an international symposium of the same name held in Hilo, Hawaii, in January 1987 in commemoration of the Diamond Jubilee (75th Anniversary) of the founding of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory [Wright and Decker, 1987]. The breadth of topics covered in all three parts of the special section (Table 1) amply attests to the multidisciplinary nature of modern studies of volcanic phenomena. Collectively, these studies also comprise a most fitting tribute to Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., who founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912 and was a dominant force in quantifying the science of volcanology. Not only was Jaggar a scientific visionary, but he also stressed that the scientific knowledge on volcanoes must be applied to reduce death and destruction from volcanic hazards. It is clear from the papers contained in the special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research that great strides have been made in our scientific understanding of how volcanoes work since Jaggar's time. But the destructive eruptions at Mount St. Helens (United States, May 1980), E1 Chichón (Mexico, March-April 1982), and Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia, November 1985), each causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of each of these countries [Tilling and Newhall, 1987] are tragic reminders that commensurate advances in reducing volcanic risk on a global basis have not yet been achieved.

  2. Editor's note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umapathy, Siva

    2017-01-01

    This is an editor's note related to the publication 'Biologically active and thermally stable polymeric Schiff base and its metal polychelates: Their synthesis and spectral aspects' by Raza Rasool and Sumaiya Hasnain, which appeared in Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy 148 (2015) 435-443.

  3. Introduction to the Special Issue on Purinergic Receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-02-22

    In this Introduction to the series of papers that follow about purinergic receptors, there is a brief history of the discovery of purinergic signalling, the identity of purinoceptors and the current recognition of P1, P2X and P2Y subtypes. An account of key functions mediated by purinoceptors follows, including examples of both short-term and long-term (trophic) signalling and a table showing the selective agonists and antagonists for the purinoceptor subtypes. References to evolution and roles of purinoceptors in pathological conditions are also presented.

  4. Pattern perception and computational complexity: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh; Friederici, Angela D; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-07-19

    Research on pattern perception and rule learning, grounded in formal language theory (FLT) and using artificial grammar learning paradigms, has exploded in the last decade. This approach marries empirical research conducted by neuroscientists, psychologists and ethologists with the theory of computation and FLT, developed by mathematicians, linguists and computer scientists over the last century. Of particular current interest are comparative extensions of this work to non-human animals, and neuroscientific investigations using brain imaging techniques. We provide a short introduction to the history of these fields, and to some of the dominant hypotheses, to help contextualize these ongoing research programmes, and finally briefly introduce the papers in the current issue.

  5. Pattern perception and computational complexity: introduction to the special issue

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Friederici, Angela D.; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Research on pattern perception and rule learning, grounded in formal language theory (FLT) and using artificial grammar learning paradigms, has exploded in the last decade. This approach marries empirical research conducted by neuroscientists, psychologists and ethologists with the theory of computation and FLT, developed by mathematicians, linguists and computer scientists over the last century. Of particular current interest are comparative extensions of this work to non-human animals, and neuroscientific investigations using brain imaging techniques. We provide a short introduction to the history of these fields, and to some of the dominant hypotheses, to help contextualize these ongoing research programmes, and finally briefly introduce the papers in the current issue. PMID:22688630

  6. Introduction to Special Section on the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G. R.

    1986-05-01

    With the aid of a Penrose Conference in 1974 and an international rift conference held in 1978 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Rio Grande rift has become widely recognized as a major Cenozoic continental rift zone. As a result of the 1978 Santa Fe meeting, the American Geophysical Union published a special volume of papers concerned with the Rio Grande rift [Riecker, 1979], and the New Mexico Geological Society recently published another volume focused on this rift [Baldridge et al., 1984]. These volumes are a manifestation of the research activity which lead to the formation of the Rio Grande rift consortium whose purpose is to foster rift-related research and communication. This organization has sponsored several special sessions at geological and geophysical meetings and has generally increased the awareness of this important feature.

  7. Introduction to the special issue—zoogeomorphology and ecosystem engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, David R.; Sawyer, Carol F.

    2012-07-01

    The 42nd Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium convened on October 21-23, 2011, in Mobile, Alabama, USA. The topic of the meeting was zoogeomorphology and ecosystem engineering. Speakers represented a variety of perspectives from the disciplines of geomorphology and ecology, and 21 posters were also presented covering a wide range of topics in biogeomorphology. This special issue presents the 15 invited papers presented at the symposium.

  8. Introduction to special issue: moving forward in pediatric neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Daly, Brian P; Giovannetti, Tania; Zabel, T Andrew; Chute, Douglas L

    2011-08-01

    This special issue of The Clinical Neuropsychologist focuses on advances in the emerging subspecialty of pediatric neuropsychology. The national and international contributions in this issue cover a range of key clinical, research, training, and professional issues specific to pediatric neuropsychology. The genesis for this project developed out of a series of talks at the Philadelphia Pediatric Neuropsychology Symposium in 2010, hosted by the Stein Family Fellow, the Department of Psychology of the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University, and the Philadelphia Neuropsychology Society. Articles that explore clinical practice issue focus on the assessment of special medical populations with congenital and/or acquired central nervous system insults. Research articles investigate the core features of developmental conditions, the use of technology in neuropsychological research studies, and large sample size genomic, neuropsychological, and imaging studies of under-represented populations. The final series of articles examine new considerations in training, advocacy, and subspecialty board certification that have emerged in pediatric neuropsychology. This introductory article provides an overview of the articles in this special issue and concluding thoughts about the future of pediatric neuropsychology.

  9. Introduction to the special series: Technology and disabilities in education.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Brian R; Seok, Soonhwa

    2016-09-30

    In the nearly 30 years since the passage of the Technology-Related Assistance to Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988, technology-mediated instruction has been implemented successfully with both students without disabilities and students with a range of disabilities to help them meet the demands of instruction. In this special issue of Assistive Technology, a number of noted scholars contribute research findings designed to add to the growing body of knowledge validating the use of assistive and instructional technology in the classroom.

  10. Parenting and homelessness: overview and introduction to the Special Section.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Kristen; Bassuk, Ellen L

    2009-07-01

    This overview of parenting and homelessness includes the characteristics and needs of families who are homeless, with a focus on the unique challenges faced by mothers, fathers, and children. In addition, the authors discuss how homeless families are narrowly defined based on the family members who present at shelters and other service programs. In order to fully support parents and their children as they exit homelessness, homeless service programs should consider the broader context of the nontraditional family system and support networks. The overview also includes common challenges to parenting while homeless, a summary of the articles in the Special Section, and recommendations for research, practice, and policy.

  11. Personality and politics: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lauren E; Peterson, Bill E; Zurbriggen, Eileen L

    2010-12-01

    This special issue of Journal of Personality brings together 10 original articles addressing the intersection of personality and politics. Articles build on classic traditions in political psychology by presenting both idiographic and nomothetic work on the motivational, cognitive, ideological, attitudinal, and identity correlates of many different aspects of political behavior. This work is used to understand political activism and leadership as well as everyday political behavior. We hope this collection of articles will inspire our readers to explore new investigations in personality and political psychology.

  12. HIV prevention research ethics: an introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Celia B

    2014-02-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics represents a sampling of projects fostered through the NIDA-funded Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Institute. The first three articles employ processes of co-learning to give voice to the experiences of individuals recovering from substance abuse and engaged in sex work who have participated in HIV prevention studies in the United States, India, and the Philippines. The fourth article describes a unique community-based approach to the development of research ethics training modules designed to increase participation of American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) tribal members as partners in research on health disparities. The last two articles focus a critical scholarly lens on two underexamined areas confronting IRB review of HIV research: The emerging and continuously changing ethical challenges of using social media sites for recruitment into HIV prevention research, and the handling of research-related complaints from participants involving perceived research harms or research experiences that do not accord with their initial expectations. Together, the articles in this special issue identify key ethical crossroads and provide suggestions for best practices that respect the values and merit the trust of research participants.

  13. Health psychology meets behavioral economics: introduction to special issue.

    PubMed

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Finkelstein, Eric Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Introduces the special issue of Health Psychology, entitled Health Psychology Meets Behavioral Economics. Psychologists have long been interested in understanding the processes that underlie health behaviors and, based on health behavior models that they have developed, have devised a spectrum of effective prevention and treatment programs. More recently, behavioral economists have also provided evidence of effective behavior change strategies through nonprice mechanisms in a variety of contexts, including smoking cessation, weight loss, and illicit drug use. Yet, although all are addressing similar issues, surprisingly little cross-fertilization has taken place between traditional economists, behavioral economists, and psychologists. This special issue is rooted in the assumption that collaboration between economists and psychologists can promote the development of new methodologies and encourage exploration of novel solutions to enduring health problems. The hope is that readers will be intrigued and inspired by the methodologies used in the different articles and will explore whether they might be applicable to the problems they are addressing. Collaborative efforts, although challenging and at times risky, are a promising way to produce more innovative studies, results, and interventions.

  14. TOAD Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1993-01-01

    Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) computer program (LAR-13755), implements format designed to facilitate transfer of data across communication networks and dissimilar host computer systems. Any data file conforming to TOAD format standard called TOAD file. TOAD Editor is interactive software tool for manipulating contents of TOAD files. Commonly used to extract filtered subsets of data for visualization of results of computation. Also offers such user-oriented features as on-line help, clear English error messages, startup file, macroinstructions defined by user, command history, user variables, UNDO features, and full complement of mathematical statistical, and conversion functions. Companion program, TOAD Gateway (LAR-14484), converts data files from variety of other file formats to that of TOAD. TOAD Editor written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. WRR editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New editors of AGU's Water Resources Research journal will be Soroosh Sorooshian and Roger E. Smith.Soroosh Sorooshian was born in Kerman, Iran. He received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, in 1971. He received his M.S. degree in operations research in 1973 and his Ph.D. degree in water resources systems engineering in 1978, both from the University of California, Los Angeles.

  16. MPS Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and

  17. Introduction to the special issue on molecular spectroscopy in traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, Stephan; Willitsch, Stefan; Steimle, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Trapping is a very versatile tool in many aspects of physics and chemistry. Trapping techniques are very well suited for spectroscopy studies due to the localization of the species of interest. As a result the particle density and the interaction times with photons are substantially increased with respect to other techniques. Therefore, both sensitivity and resolution benefit from this peculiar environment. Buffer gas or sympathetic cooling and mass selection are additional features applied in many trapping experiments. Thanks to these possibilities the number of spectroscopy publications based on these techniques increased substantially in the last decade. This special issue brings together some of the recent advancements in the field of molecular spectroscopy, mainly in ion traps, and demonstrates the large variety of applications, the very broad range of frequency coverage and the great potential for the field of molecular spectroscopy in general.

  18. Introduction to Special Issue: The Retirement Career Phase across Cultures.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Megan C

    2015-06-01

    Increasingly, older workers in the United States remain in the workforce beyond retirement age, meaning the term "retirement" might include at least some form of workforce participation. Although the proportions of women and individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups working past the age of 65 has significantly increased (Wegman & McGee, 2004); few scholars have examined the retirement career phase from a multicultural perspective. This special issue will critically review vocational literature as well as provide specific recommendations for research and practice with the aim of helping scholars and practitioners conceptualize the current concerns older adults across cultures (e.g., women and racial/ethnic minorities, among others) face during retirement planning.

  19. Introduction to the Special Issue: Invited Papers from the 2015 APAHC Conference.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Laura A; Shahane, Amit A

    2015-12-01

    The 7th biennial National Conference of APAHC, the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers, was held in Atlanta, Georgia, February 5-7, 2015. Speakers were invited to contribute manuscripts based on their conference presentations, and many submitted manuscripts for this special edition of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings. Some papers will appear in the December 2015 issue of JCPMS; others will appear in the March 2016 issue. All papers have undergone a rigorous peer review process. The Conference Co-Chairs, Drs. Laura Shaffer and Amit Shahane, are Guest Editors for the special issue. In this article, they provide an overview of the conference's major themes, and also discuss some aspects of conference planning.

  20. Introduction to the Special Issue: Halophytes in a changing world

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Timothy J.; Muscolo, Adele

    2015-01-01

    Climate change will bring about rising sea levels and increasing drought, both of which will contribute to increasing salinization in many regions of the world. There will be consequent effects on our crops, which cannot withstand significant salinization. This Special Issue looks at the roles that can be played by halophytes, extremophiles that do tolerate salinities toxic to most plants. In an ecological context, papers deal with the conservation of a rare species, the effects of rising concentrations of CO2 and flooding on coastal vegetation, and the consequences of tree planting in inland plains for salinization. Physiological studies deal with the different effects of chlorides and sulfates on the growth of halophytes, the ability of some parasitic plants to develop succulence when growing on halophytic hosts and the interesting finding that halophytes growing in their natural habitat do not show signs of oxidative stress. Nevertheless, spraying with ascorbic acid can enhance ascorbic acid-dependent antioxidant enzymes and growth in a species of Limonium. Enzymes preventing oxidative stress are expressed constitutively as is the case with the vacuolar H-ATPase, a key enzyme in ion compartmentation. A comparison of salt-excreting and non-excreting grasses showed the former to have higher shoot to root Na+ ratios than the latter. A particularly tolerant turf grass is described, as is the significance of its ability to secrete ions. A study of 38 species showed the importance of the interaction of a low osmotic potential and cell wall properties in maintaining growth. From an applied point of view, the importance of identifying genotypes and selecting those best suited for the product required, optimizing the conditions necessary for germination and maximizing yield are described. The consequence of selection for agronomic traits on salt tolerance is evaluated, as is the use of halophytes as green manures. Halophytes are remarkable plants: they are rare in

  1. Introduction to the Special Issue: Halophytes in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Timothy J; Muscolo, Adele

    2015-03-10

    Climate change will bring about rising sea levels and increasing drought, both of which will contribute to increasing salinization in many regions of the world. There will be consequent effects on our crops, which cannot withstand significant salinization. This Special Issue looks at the roles that can be played by halophytes, extremophiles that do tolerate salinities toxic to most plants. In an ecological context, papers deal with the conservation of a rare species, the effects of rising concentrations of CO2 and flooding on coastal vegetation, and the consequences of tree planting in inland plains for salinization. Physiological studies deal with the different effects of chlorides and sulfates on the growth of halophytes, the ability of some parasitic plants to develop succulence when growing on halophytic hosts and the interesting finding that halophytes growing in their natural habitat do not show signs of oxidative stress. Nevertheless, spraying with ascorbic acid can enhance ascorbic acid-dependent antioxidant enzymes and growth in a species of Limonium. Enzymes preventing oxidative stress are expressed constitutively as is the case with the vacuolar H-ATPase, a key enzyme in ion compartmentation. A comparison of salt-excreting and non-excreting grasses showed the former to have higher shoot to root Na(+) ratios than the latter. A particularly tolerant turf grass is described, as is the significance of its ability to secrete ions. A study of 38 species showed the importance of the interaction of a low osmotic potential and cell wall properties in maintaining growth. From an applied point of view, the importance of identifying genotypes and selecting those best suited for the product required, optimizing the conditions necessary for germination and maximizing yield are described. The consequence of selection for agronomic traits on salt tolerance is evaluated, as is the use of halophytes as green manures. Halophytes are remarkable plants: they are rare in

  2. Introduction to the special issue on college drinking games.

    PubMed

    Zamboanga, Byron L; Tomaso, Cara C

    2014-09-01

    Drinking games are high-risk, social drinking activities comprised of rules that promote participants' intoxication and determine when and how much alcohol should be consumed. Despite the negative consequences associated with drinking games, this high-risk activity is common among college students, with participation rates reported at nearly 50% in some studies. Empirical research examining drinking games participation in college student populations has increased (i.e. over 40 peer-reviewed articles were published in the past decade) in response to the health risks associated with gaming and its prevalence among college students. This Special Issue of The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse seeks to advance the college drinking games literature even further by addressing understudied, innovative factors associated with the study of drinking games, including the negative consequences associated with drinking games participation; contextual, cultural, and psychological factors that may influence gaming; methodological concerns in drinking games research; and recommendations for intervention strategies. This Prologue introduces readers to each article topic-by-topic and underscores the importance of the continued study of drinking games participation among college students.

  3. Introduction to the special issue: The field tradition in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Marston, Richard A.

    2013-10-01

    In recognition of the critical role of field observations in the ongoing development of our discipline, the 43rd annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium (BGS) celebrated The Field Tradition in Geomorphology. By organizing a conference devoted to this theme, we sought to honor the contributions of pioneering, field-based geomorphologists and to encourage our community to contemplate how field work might continue to provide unique insight into a new, more technologically-driven era. For example, given recent advances in remote sensing methods such as LiDAR, what kind of added value can field work provide? Similarly, how can field-based studies contribute to societally relevant, large-scale questions related to climate change and sustainable management of the Earth system? Motivated by such questions, the 2012 BGS was convened in Jackson Hole, WY, a new, Western location that enabled participation by Rocky Mountain and west coast research groups underrepresented at previous Binghamton symposia. Also, in keeping with the field tradition theme, the 2012 BGS emphasized field trips, including a rafting excursion down the Snake River and an overview of the tectonic and glacial history of Jackson Hole. The on-site portion of the symposium consisted of invited oral and poster presentations and contributed posters, including many by graduate students. Topics ranged from an historical overview of the development of geomorphic thinking to long-term sediment tracer studies to a commentary on the synergy between LiDAR and field mapping. This special issue of Geomorphology consists of papers by invited authors from the 2012 BGS, and this overview provides some context for these contributions. Looking forward, we hope that the 43rd annual BGS will stimulate further discussion of the role of field work as the discipline of geomorphology continues to evolve, carrying on the field tradition into the future.

  4. Introduction to special issue on 'Cosmology and Time' for SHPMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosholz, Emily

    2015-11-01

    This collection of essays stems from the Workshop on Cosmology and Time held at the Pennsylvania State University on April 16-17, 2013, with support from the Department of Philosophy, the Schreyer Honors College, and the Center for Fundamental Theory/Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos. My thanks to Shannon Sullivan and Susan Welch, Arun Upneja and Christian Brady, and Abhay Ashtekar, Murat Gunaydin and Randi Neshteruk. I'd also like to acknowledge helpful counsel from Gordon Fleming (Professor of Physics Emeritus, Penn State), who has been generous with his time and expertise, and John Norton (Director, Center for History and Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh), who not only contributed to the workshop but also introduced me to the work of two of his graduate students. The original intention of the workshop was to pair younger scholars with older, more established scholars; during the workshop, we listened to exchanges between Bryan Roberts and Abhay Ashtekar, William Nelson and Sarah Shandera, Thomas Pashby and Gordon Fleming, David Sloan and Kurt Gibble, Elie During and myself, and Alexis de Saint-Ours and John Norton. Though some of these exchanges did not persist through the creation of this collection of essays, those that did were further developed in useful ways. I also wanted to bring philosophers and scientists together, as well as colleagues from Europe and North America. The latter intention was strengthened by the later addition of responses or essays by Jeremy Butterfield, Julian Barbour, Klaus Mainzer, and Lee Smolin, to complement the 'overview' essays by Abhay Ashtekar and John Norton that begin and end the second part. Though the thoughtful and stimulating essays and responses by William Nelson, Sarah Shandera, Kurt Gibble, Elie During and Klaus Mainzer did not survive the process of assembling this special issue, because they were too technical or did not fit in structurally or could not be revised in time, their contributions

  5. Introduction to the 2012-2013 Tolbachik eruption special issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin R.; Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Volynets, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The Tolbachik volcanic complex in central Kamchatka holds a special place in global volcanological studies. It is one of 4 areas of extensive historic volcanic activity in the northern part of the Central Kamchatka Depression (the others being Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Shiveluch), and is part of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group, which is one of the most active areas of volcanism on Earth. Tolbachik is especially well-known due largely to the massive 1975-1976 eruption that became known as the Great Tolbachik Fissure eruption (GTFE; Fedotov, 1983; Fedotov et al., 1984). This was one of the first eruptions in Russia to be predicted based on precursory seismic activity, based on M5 earthquakes approximately one week before the eruption started, and was intensively studied during its course by a large number of Russian scientists. A summary of those studies was published, first in Russian and then in English, and it became widely read for many reasons. One in particular is that the eruption was somewhat unusual for a subduction zone setting; although many subduction zone stratovolcanoes have associated basaltic tephra cone-lava fields, this was the first such Hawaiian-style eruption to be widely observed. After the end of the eruption in 1976, the complex showed no signs of activity until 27 November 2012, when increased seismic activity was registered by the Kamchatka Branch of the Russian Geophysical Survey and a red glow from the eruption site was first noticed through the snowstorm haze. This prompted them, and then the Kamchatka Volcanic Emergency Response Team (KVERT) to issue an alert that activity was coming from the south flank of Plosky Tolbachik volcano, the younger of two volcanic edifices (the older is Ostry Tolbachik) that together make up the bulk of the complex along with tephra cone-lava fields that lie along a NE-SW fissure zone that transects Plosky Tolbachik. The new eruption lasted for more than 250 days and, like the 1975-1976 eruption, was

  6. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission: Introduction to Special Session

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Werner, M.; Kobrick, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies. The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60^o north and 56^o south latitude. The DEM has 30 m horizontal resolution and better than 15 m vertical errors. Two ortho-rectified C-band image mosaics are also produced. SRTM used a modification of the radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Radar Laboratory that flew twice on the Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the interferometric data, a 60 m mast, additional C-band antenna, and improved tracking and navigation devices were added. A second X-band antenna was also added by the German Space Agency, and produced higher resolution topographic measurements in strips nested within the full, C-band coverage. First results indicate that the radars and ancillary instruments worked very well. Data played back to the ground during the flight were processed to DEMs and preliminary products released hours after acquisition. Precision processing of the C-band data was completed at the end of 2002. An extensive program for calibration and verification of the SRTM data is now underway. Data have been released so far for the US and a few test areas for scientific analysis. Public release of the data will occur in stages throughout 2003. Products are being transferred to the US Geological Survey's EROS Data Center for civilian archive and distribution. NIMA will handle Department of Defense distribution. X-band data are being processed at the German and Italian Space Agencies. As of late 2002, Europe and Africa had been completed and the remaining continents were on schedule to be completed by the end of 2003. This special session will highlight applications of this new high-resolution view of the

  7. Introduction to This Special Issue on Geostatistics and Geospatial Techniques in Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, Peter; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The germination of this special Computers & Geosciences (C&G) issue began at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) (RGS-IBG) annual meeting in January 1997 held at the University of Exeter, UK. The snow and cold of the English winter were tempered greatly by warm and cordial discussion of how to stimulate and enhance cooperation on geostatistical and geospatial research in remote sensing 'across the big pond' between UK and US researchers. It was decided that one way forward would be to hold parallel sessions in 1998 on geostatistical and geospatial research in remote sensing at appropriate venues in both the UK and the US. Selected papers given at these sessions would be published as special issues of C&G on the UK side and Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing (PE&RS) on the US side. These issues would highlight the commonality in research on geostatistical and geospatial research in remote sensing on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. As a consequence, a session on "Geostatistics and Geospatial Techniques for Remote Sensing of Land Surface Processes" was held at the RGS-IBG annual meeting in Guildford, Surrey, UK in January 1998, organized by the Modeling and Advanced Techniques Special Interest Group (MAT SIG) of the Remote Sensing Society (RSS). A similar session was held at the Association of American Geographers (AAG) annual meeting in Boston, Massachusetts in March 1998, sponsored by the AAG's Remote Sensing Specialty Group (RSSG). The 10 papers that make up this issue of C&G, comprise 7 papers from the UK and 3 papers from the LIS. We are both co-editors of each of the journal special issues, with the lead editor of each journal issue being from their respective side of the Atlantic. The special issue of PE&RS (vol. 65) that constitutes the other half of this co-edited journal series was published in early 1999, comprising 6 papers by US authors. We are indebted to the International Association for Mathematical

  8. STE - The Software Tools Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Software tools is an excellent book written by B. W. Kernighan and P. J. Plauger, published by Addison-Wesley. In it the authors discuss how to write programs that make good tools, and how to program well in the process. One of the tools they develop is a fairly powerful editor, written in Ratfor (a structured form of FORTRAN IV). This program has been implemented on the UCL Starlink VAX (with a few modifications and extensions) and is recommended as the editor to use on the VAX. This note gives a brief introduction to, and description of, the editor which has been abstracted from the book (which you are recommended to buy). There are some short command summary sections at the end of this note. After reading this note you may like to print these short files and use them for reference when using the editor.

  9. Introduction to this Special Issue on Geostatistics and Scaling of Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    The germination of this special PE&RS issue began at the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers)(RCS-IBC) annual meeting in January, 1997 held at the University of Exeter in Exeter, England. The cold and snow of an England winter were greatly tempered by the friendly and cordial discussions that ensued at the meeting on possible ways to foster both dialog and research across "the Big Pond" between geographers in the US and the UK on the use of geostatistics and geospatial techniques for remote sensing of land surface processes. It was decided that one way to stimulate and enhance cooperation on the application of geostatistics and geospatial methods in remote sensing was to hold parallel sessions on these topics at appropriate meeting venues in 1998 in both the US and the UK Selected papers given at these sessions would be published as a special issue of PE&RS on the US side, and as a special issue of Computers and Geosciences (C&G) on the UK side, to highlight the commonality in research on geostatistics and geospatial methods in remote sensing and spatial data analysis on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. As a consequence, a session on "Ceostatistics and Geospatial Techniques for Remote Sensing of Land Surface Processes" was held at the Association of American Geographers (AAG) annual meeting in Boston, Massachusetts in March, 1998, sponsored by the AAG's Remote Sensing Specialty Group (RSSG). A similar session was held at the RGS-IBG annual meeting in Guildford, Surrey, England in January 1998, organized by the Modeling and Advanced Techniques Special Interest Group (MAT SIG) of the Remote Sensing Society (RSS). The six papers that in part, comprise this issue of PE&RS, are the US complement to such a dual journal publication effort. Both of us are co-editors of each of the journal special issues, with the lead editor of each journal being from their respective side of the Atlantic where the journals are published. The special

  10. Introduction to the special issue: GIS-based mineral potential targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Mahyar; Nykänen, Vesa

    2017-04-01

    Mineral potential targeting using geographical information system is an efficient technique to delimit a study area for further exploration of mineral deposits. This introduction presents an overview of the mineral potential modeling methods and future perspectives of research in the fields of target generation and summarizes the papers that have been incorporated into this Special Issue of the Journal of African Earth Sciences.

  11. Introduction to the special issue on lesbians of African descent: contemporary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bianca D M; Johnson, Verlena L

    2011-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the special issue entitled, "Lesbians of African Descent: Contemporary Perspectives." We briefly discuss our framing of this collection as a contemporary contribution to the canon of Black lesbian writing and art, and identify themes that appear to transcend both earlier and current works of lesbians of African descent.

  12. Introduction to Special Issue: Understanding the Nature-Nurture Interactions in Language and Learning Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berninger, Virginia Wise

    2001-01-01

    The introduction to this special issue on nature-nurture interactions notes that the following articles represent five biologically oriented research approaches which each provide a tutorial on the investigator's major research tool, a summary of current research understandings regarding language and learning differences, and a discussion of…

  13. A standard syntax-directed editor for hyperprogramming systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhogolev, E.A.; Kuz`menkova, E.A.; Mailingova, O.L.; Poprygaev, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The main operations of a syntax-directed editor are considered. The requirements to the standard syntax-directed editor are stated. The structure of the standard syntax-directed editor and the functions of its components are discussed. The language base properties needed for syntax-directed editor development are described. Methods for transforming the standard syntax-directed editor into a specialized one are carried out.

  14. Journal Editors Celebrated at Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    At the Fall Meeting, the premiere social event for AGU's many journal editors is the annual Editors' Evening, an opportunity for members to celebrate and to recognize the efforts of retiring editors. At the event, AGU president Carol Finn welcomed all those in attendance and thanked them for volunteering their time for the benefit of AGU and the wider research community.

  15. Shedding light on the dark side of identity: Introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Beyers, Wim; Çok, Figen

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this special issue is to shed light in the dark side of identity formation in adolescence and emerging adulthood, that is, to provide some understanding in what exactly can go wrong in identity development. After summarizing the recent developments in identity development literature, in this introduction the main findings of all thirteen empirical papers are summarized into three overarching themes: (1) lack of identity integration as a risk factor, (2) reconsideration of commitment as a sign of identity uncertainty, and (3) ruminative exploration as another risk factor undermining healthy identity development. Finally, given that all papers in this special issue are based on conference presentations at the 14th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), some more information on that conference is included in this introduction.

  16. Introduction to Special Section on Results of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vondrak, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Since 2009 the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has made comprehensive measurements of the Moon and its environment. The seven LRO instruments use a variety of primarily remote sensing techniques to obtain a unique set of observations. The analyses of the LRO data sets have overturned previous beliefs and deepened our appreciation of the complex nature of our nearest neighbor. This introduction to the special section describes the LRO mission and summarizes some of the science results in the papers that follow.

  17. Introduction to the special issue: drugs, wars, military personnel, and veterans.

    PubMed

    Golub, Andrew; S Bennett, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    This special issue examines major structural, sociocultural, and behavioral issues surrounding substance use and misuse among U.S. military personnel and veterans who served in recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This introduction provides a brief historical review of the US's experiences of the linkages between war and substance use, misuse, and abuse. It then describes how the various topics covered in this issue span the military-veteran life course and explains the significance of each contribution.

  18. The Seemingly Quixotic Pursuit of a Cumulative Psychological Science: Introduction to the Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    The following manuscript is the final accepted manuscript. It has not been subjected to the final copyediting, fact-checking, and proofreading required for formal publication. It is not the definitive, publisher-authenticated version. The American Psychological Association and its Council of Editors disclaim any responsibility or liabilities for errors or omissions of this manuscript version, any version derived from this manuscript by NIH, or other third parties. The published version is available at www.apa.org/journals/met. The goal of any empirical science is to pursue the construction of a cumulative base of knowledge upon which the future of the science may be built. However, there is mixed evidence that the science of psychology can accurately be characterized by such a cumulative progression. Indeed, some argue that the development of a truly cumulative psychological science is not possible using the current paradigms of hypothesis testing in single-study designs. The author explores this controversy as a framework to introduce the six papers that make up this special issue that is focused on the integration of data and empirical findings across multiple studies. The author proposes that the methods and techniques described in this set of papers can significantly propel us forward in our ongoing quest to build a cumulative psychological science. PMID:19485622

  19. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Index. The journal depends entirely on its authors and referees and so I would like to thank them all for their work in 2010 and look forward to a continuing, successful collaboration in 2011. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office understands how much effort is required of our referees. The Editorial Board decided that an expression of thanks to our most loyal referees is appropriate and so, since January 2005, we have been offering the top ten most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. This year, two of the top referees have reviewed four or more manuscripts in the period November 2009 to November 2010 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their special issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Osamu Naito, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Japan Masahiro Kobayashi, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan Duccio Testa, Lausanne Federal Polytechnic University, Switzerland Vladimir Pustovitov, Russian Research Centre, Kurchatov Insitute, Russia Christopher Holland, University of California at San Diego, USA Yuri Gribov, ITER International Organisation, Cadarache, France Eriko Jotaki, Kyushu University, Japan Sven Wiesen, Jülich Research Centre, Germany Viktor S. Marchenko, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine Richard Stephens, General Atomics, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2010. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award was J.E. Rice et al for the paper entitled 'Inter-machine comparison of

  20. Introduction to the Special Issue on the U.S. Response to the Fukushima Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2012-05-01

    Provides an introduction to the May 2012 issue of Health Physics, based on a special session at the 2011 Health Physics Society (HPS) annual meeting that focused on the United States' radiological response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This introduction outlines the papers in this important issue and describes the activities of the U.S. response participants, including the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Department of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other organizations. Observations are provided and the stage is set for the articles in this issue which document many of the activities undertaken during the Fukushima accident and which describe challenges faced and valuable lessons learned.

  1. The language of written language: an introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stephen R

    2002-01-01

    This special issue includes five articles dealing with selected aspects of writing disorders, crafted by key contributors to the literature on written language. Articles addressing definitional issues and diagnostic questions, assessment strategies, selected neurodevelopmental components of written expression, the manifestation of writing problems in children and young adults, direct intervention, training for elementary teachers in the early grades in the area of literacy, and brain-behavior linkages are presented. This introduction provides an overview of these articles tied to specific issues confronting the field of written language. Some thoughts and directions for the future are articulated.

  2. Developing an effective multimedia in education for special education (MESE): An introduction to arithmetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Kusnendar, Jajang; Rahmadhani

    2016-02-01

    This research aims to develop and test the effectiveness of multimedia in education for special education (MESE) of students with cognitive disabilities in introducing Arithmetic. Students with cognitive disabilities are those who have a level of intelligence under the normal ones. They think concretely and tend to have a very limited memory, switched concentration and forgot easily. The mastery of words is minimal, and also requires a long time to learn. These limitations will interfere in introduction learning to Arithmetic, with the material of numbers 1 to 10. The study resulted that MESE is worth to be used and enhanced the ability of the students.

  3. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction to the second edition of the Compendium of Apple and Pear Diseases contains a general description of genus and species of commercial importance, some general information about growth and fruiting habits as well as recent production statistics. A general description of major scion c...

  4. Introduction to the Special Issue on Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Thornbush, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this introduction to the Special Issue on Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences is a focus on the participation of women in traditionally male-dominated professions, with geography as an exemplary academic subject. The Special Issue stems from the Commission of Gender and Geoethics as part of the International Association of Geoethics, and endeavors to bring together efforts at various spatial scales that examine the position of women in science and engineering in particular, as conveyed in engineering geology, disaster management sciences, and climate change adaptation studies. It has been discovered, for instance, that men are more active and personally prepared at the community level (in Atlantic Canada coastal communities), and more action is still required in developing countries especially to promote gender equality and empower women. Studies contained in this Special Issue also reveal that tutoring and mentoring by other women can promote further involvement in non-traditional professions, such as professional engineering geology, where women are preferring more traditional (less applied) approaches that may circumscribe their ability to find suitable employment after graduation. Moreover, the hiring policy needs to change in many countries, such as Canada, where there are fewer women at entry-level and senior ranks within geography, especially in physical geography as the scientific part of the discipline. The exclusion of women in traditionally male-dominated spheres needs to be addressed and rectified for the ascent of women to occur in scientific geography and in other geosciences as well as science and engineering at large. PMID:27043609

  5. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    may appear to the casual observer that progress in the field of EPR is much slower than in NMR, but this is not actually the case: EPR is technically much more demanding than NMR, due to the six orders-of-magnitude shorter relaxation times encountered in EPR. Indeed, considerable progress has been made in the technology and applications of EPR-based methods over the last five years, and the field has now developed sufficiently to enable useful biomedical applications to be investigated. The papers presented in this topical issue represent a broad cross-section of the work being carried out in developing and applying EPR and Overhauser techniques in biology and medicine. A number of papers describe recent advances in technology and methods, including continuous-wave, longitudinally detected and pulsed EPR, and Overhauser imaging. Others focus on applications including those using both endogenous and exogenous free radicals. Two of the most promising areas are in the detection of nitric oxide, a ubiquitous, naturally occurring free radical, and in the measurement of local oxygen concentrations by EPR. Both of these topics are covered in this issue. It is both timely and appropriate that Physics in Medicine and Biology, with its strong reputation in the field of physics applied to medicine and biology, should publish a topical issue on this subject, at a time when rapid improvements in technology are being made, and when useful applications are starting to emerge. The guest editors hope that this summary of the state-of-the-art will act as a comprehensive reference work for those in the field, and will encourage others to develop new applications for the techniques, which we believe have a valuable role to play in biomedical research. David J Lurie Antonello Sotgiu Guest Editors

  6. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, E. G. D.

    Lecture notes are organized around the key word dissipation, while focusing on a presentation of modern theoretical developments in the study of irreversible phenomena. A broad cross-disciplinary perspective towards non-equilibrium statistical mechanics is backed by the general theory of nonlinear and complex dynamical systems. The classical-quantum intertwine and semiclassical dissipative borderline issue (decoherence, "classical out of quantum") are here included . Special emphasis is put on links between the theory of classical and quantum dynamical systems (temporal disorder, dynamical chaos and transport processes) with central problems of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics like e.g. the connection between dynamics and thermodynamics, relaxation towards equilibrium states and mechanisms capable to drive and next maintain the physical system far from equilibrium, in a non-equilibrium steady (stationary) state. The notion of an equilibrium state - towards which a system naturally evolves if left undisturbed - is a fundamental concept of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Taken as a primitive point of reference that allows to give an unambiguous status to near equilibrium and far from equilibrium systems, together with the dynamical notion of a relaxation (decay) towards a prescribed asymptotic invariant measure or probability distribution (properties of ergodicity and mixing are implicit). A related issue is to keep under control the process of driving a physical system away from an initial state of equilibrium and either keeping it in another (non-equilibrium) steady state or allowing to restore the initial data (return back, relax). To this end various models of environment (heat bath, reservoir, thermostat, measuring instrument etc.), and the environment - system coupling are analyzed. The central theme of the book is the dynamics of dissipation and various mechanisms responsible for the irreversible behaviour (transport properties) of open systems on

  7. Baseline studies in the Elwha River ecosystem prior to dam removal: Introduction to the special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Jeffrey J.; Freilich, Jerry; Schreiner, Edward G.

    2008-01-01

    The planned removal of two dams that have been in place for over 95 years on the Elwha River provides a unique opportunity to study dam removal effects. Among the largest dams ever considered for removal, this project is compelling because 83% of the watershed lies undisturbed in Olympic National Park. Eighteen million cubic meters of sediment have accumulated in and will be released from the reservoirs, and there is potential for rehabilitating depressed Pacific salmon runs. Researchers from academia, non-profit organizations, federal and state governments, and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe are currently assessing baseline ecological conditions of the Elwha River as part of dam removal studies. We introduce dam removal topics, provide a brief history of the dams, and summarize the ecology of the Elwha River basin as an introduction to a special issue devoted to research in the watershed.

  8. The phonetics of talk in interaction--introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Richard

    2012-03-01

    This overview paper provides an introduction to work on naturally-occurring speech data, combining techniques of conversation analysis with techniques and methods from phonetics. The paper describes the development of the field, highlighting current challenges and progress in interdisciplinary work. It considers the role of quantification and its relationship to a qualitative methodology. It presents the conversation analytic notion of sequence as a version of context, and argues that sequences of talk constrain relevant phonetic design, and so provide one account for variability in naturally occurring speech. The paper also describes the manipulation of speech and language on many levels simultaneously. All of these themes occur and are explored in more detail in the papers contained in this special issue.

  9. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans

  10. Guest editorial: Introduction to the special issue on modern control for computer games.

    PubMed

    Argyriou, Vasileios; Kotsia, Irene; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Petrou, Maria

    2013-12-01

    A typical gaming scenario, as developed in the past 20 years, involves a player interacting with a game using a specialized input device, such as a joystic, a mouse, a keyboard, etc. Recent technological advances and new sensors (for example, low cost commodity depth cameras) have enabled the introduction of more elaborated approaches in which the player is now able to interact with the game using his body pose, facial expressions, actions, and even his physiological signals. A new era of games has already started, employing computer vision techniques, brain-computer interfaces systems, haptic and wearable devices. The future lies in games that will be intelligent enough not only to extract the player's commands provided by his speech and gestures but also his behavioral cues, as well as his/her emotional states, and adjust their game plot accordingly in order to ensure more realistic and satisfactory gameplay experience. This special issue on modern control for computer games discusses several interdisciplinary factors that influence a user's input to a game, something directly linked to the gaming experience. These include, but are not limited to, the following: behavioral affective gaming, user satisfaction and perception, motion capture and scene modeling, and complete software frameworks that address several challenges risen in such scenarios.

  11. The current state of knowledge about shatter cones: Introduction to the special issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratoux, David; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Shatter cones are a fracture phenomenon that is exclusively associated with shock metamorphism and has also been produced in the laboratory in several shock experiments. The occurrence of shatter cones is the only accepted meso- to macroscopic recognition criterion for impact structures. Shatter cones exhibit a number of geometric characteristics (orientation, apical angles, striation angles, sizes) that can be best described as varied, from case to case. Possible links between geometric properties with impact or crater parameters have remained controversial and the lack of understanding of the mechanism of formation of shatter cones does not offer a physical framework to discuss or understand them. A database of shatter cone occurrences has been produced for this introduction paper to the special issue of Meteoritics and Planetary Science on shatter cones. Distribution of shatter cones with respect to crater size and lithology suggests that shatter cones do not occur in impact craters less than a few kilometers in diameter, with a few, currently questionable exceptions. All pertinent hypotheses of formation are presented and discussed. Several may be discarded in light of the most recent observations. The branching fracture mechanism and the interference models proposed, respectively, by Sagy et al. (2002) and Baratoux and Melosh (2003) require further evaluation. New observations, experiments, or theoretical considerations presented in this special issue promise an important step forward, based on a renewed effort to resolve the enigmatic origin of these important features.

  12. Writing Disabilities in Spanish-Speaking Children: Introduction to the Special Series.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan E

    2016-05-10

    This special issue of the Journal of Learning Disabilities focuses on studies of writing disabilities in Spanish-speaking children. The World Health Organization (2001) included writing difficulties as one of the problems considered to constitute an impediment to school participation, a significant element in the normal developmental process of the child. In this introduction, I describe the background of a larger project promoted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). This special series offers recent findings on writing disabilities in Spanish-Speaking children within the UNESCO project. The pilot study was carried out in the Canary Islands, an autonomous Spanish region located between three continents and composed of seven islands in the Atlantic Ocean. Most of the current empirical evidence on writing disabilities comes from English, a language with deep orthography; therefore, it is very relevant to investigate the writing process in Spanish, a language with shallow, fine-grained orthography. Included are a number of articles that form a conspectus on writing disabilities in the Spanish language. Topics center on early grade writing assessment, prevalence of writing disabilities, handwriting and keyboarding, transcription and text generation, graphonomic and handwriting analysis, and instructional practices with an learning disabled population.

  13. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  14. Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Taussig, Karen-Sue; Gibbon, Sahra Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    We introduce this special issue of Medial Anthropology Quarterly on public health genomics by exploring both the unique contribution of ethnographic sensibility that medical anthropologists bring to the study of genomics and some of the key insights offered by the essays in this collection. As anthropologists, we are concerned with the power dynamics and larger cultural commitments embedded in practices associated with public health. We seek to understand, first, the broad significance of genomics as a cultural object and, second, the social action set into motion as researchers seek to translate genomic knowledge and technology into public health benefits. PMID:24214906

  15. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    This special issue of Applied Surface Science is a compilation of papers inspired by the symposium on 'Surface/Interfaces Characterization and Renewable Energy' held at the 2013 MRS Fall Meeting. Practical uses of renewable energy are one of the greatest technical challenges today. The symposium explored a number of surface and interface-related questions relevant to this overarching theme. Topics from fuel cells to photovoltaics, from water splitting to fundamental and practical issues in charge generation and storage were discussed. The work presented included the use of novel experimental spectroscopic and microscopic analytical techniques, theoretical and computational understanding of interfacial phenomena, characterization of intricate behavior of charged species, as well as molecules and molecular fragments at surfaces and interfaces. It emphasized fundamental understanding of underlying processes, as well as practical devices design and applications of surface and interfacial phenomena related to renewable energy. These subjects are complicated by the transport of photons, electrons, ions, heat, and almost any other form of energy. Given the current concerns of climate change, energy independence and national security, this work is important and of interest to the field of Applied Surface Science. The sixteen papers published in this special issue have all been refereed.

  16. Introduction:

    PubMed Central

    Rabier, Christelle

    2013-01-01

    The special issue "Fitting for Health" offers a critical inquiry into the co-construction of medicine and technology in the early industrial age. It investigates the "social life" of medical things, through their material configuration, invention, improvement, and diversification, the sites of their deployment, their status as both novelties and less spectacular objects of everyday use, and the challenges they faced in fitting themselves into people's lives and European res publica. The set of articles (on steel trusses, medical electricity, anatomical models, and trade catalogs) heuristically uses "technology" to analyze how medicine and its material processes were crafted, endowed with meaning, and woven into European societies. Opening the medical "black box"—circumventing its tendency to be ignored as a mediating tool—provides a significant common point of entry for the four enquiries, triggering further analysis of the relationship between humans and non-humans as shaped in medical knowledge and practice. PMID:27057070

  17. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Pedro C.; Juurlink, Ben; Darte, Alain; Karl, Wolfgang

    This topic deals with architecture design and compilation for high performance systems. The areas of interest range from microprocessors to large-scale parallel machines; from general-purpose platforms to specialized hardware (e.g., graphic coprocessors, low-power embedded systems); and from hardware design to compiler technology. On the compilation side, topics of interest include programmer productivity issues, concurrent and/or sequential language aspects, program analysis, transformation, automatic discovery and/or management of parallelism at all levels, and the interaction between the compiler and the rest of the system. On the architecture side, the scope spans system architectures, processor micro-architecture, memory hierarchy, and multi-threading, and the impact of emerging trends.

  18. Introduction*

    PubMed Central

    Peay, Wayne J.; Rockoff, Maxine L.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This paper introduces the special supplement to the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA) that documents the proceedings of the “Symposium on Community-based Health Information Outreach” held on December 2 and 3, 2004, at the National Library of Medicine (NLM). The goal of the symposium was to explore new models of health information outreach that are emerging as technology dramatically changes the abilities of medical and health services libraries to provide resources and services beyond their traditional institutional boundaries, with particular concern for consumer health information outreach through community-based organizations. The symposium's primary objectives were to learn about successful and promising work that had already been done as well as to develop a vision for the future that could inform the NLM's next National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) contract. Another objective was to review and assess the NLM's Strategic Plan to Reduce Health Disparities with special emphasis on Native Americans. Method: The paper describes the background events and rationale that led to the NLM's decision to convene the symposium and summarizes the supplement's ten other papers, some of which were presented at the symposium and some of which were written afterward to capture the symposium's working sessions. Results: The symposium convened approximately 150 invited participants with a wide variety of perspectives and experience. Sessions were held to present exemplary outreach projects, to review the NLM's Strategic Plan to Reduce Health Disparities, to summarize the research underpinnings for evaluating outreach projects, and to provide a futurist's perspective. A panel of community representatives gave voice to the participants in outreach projects, and sixteen posters describing outreach projects were available, many of them with community representatives on hand to explain the work. Implications: This JMLA supplement provides a

  19. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Luigi

    This chapter introduces the context, objectives and structure of the book. This book aims both to contribute to disseminate the knowledge about the scientific research conducted in space and to promote new exploitation of existing data in this field. While space experiments are characterised by a long time for preparation, high costs and few opportunities, significant scientific value is expected from the resulting data for almost scientific disciplines. In this context, ISS is a unique experimental environment for research. As part of its Seventh Framework Programme, the European Commission intends to support further exploitation and valorisation of space experimental data. This book was realised as part of the ULISSE project, co-funded by the European Union. The book intends to provide an introduction to space research with a focus on the experiments performed on the ISS and related disciplines. The book also intends to be a useful guide, not only for scientists but also for teachers, students and newcomers to space research activities.

  20. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  1. New frontiers in building mental, emotional and behavioral health in children and youth: Introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mary E; Bruns, Eric J; Armstrong, Mary I; Hodges, Sharon; Hernandez, Mario

    2016-03-01

    The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA; 2010) has had tremendous influence on behavioral health in the United States (Alker & Chester, 2015). Shortly after its passage, the editors of this special section became interested in examining the provisions of the ACA related to care for mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders in children and youth and synthesizing their implications in the context of other contemporary trends in children's behavioral health promotion. We first developed a white paper with the goal of increasing our own understanding of these issues and their possible influence on the status quo of designing, implementing, financing, and evaluating behavioral health services for children and their families. From our discussions came the idea of developing a special section in the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry featuring input from researchers who have been exploring these issues and who have tangible and relevant examples of "new frontiers" in building mental, emotional, and behavioral health for children and youth. The result is the current special section, the purpose of which is to highlight the importance of prevention in behavioral health and to explore examples of efforts that have used a broad public health approach to prevention and early intervention in mental, emotional, and substance use disorders in children and youth. Before introducing the seven articles in this special section, we describe in detail our foundational thinking about building mental, emotional, and behavioral health for children and youth, as expressed in our initial white paper on this topic. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Introduction to a special section on ecohydrology of semiarid environments: Confronting mathematical models with ecosystem complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoray, Tal; Assouline, Shmuel; Katul, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Current literature provides large number of publications about ecohydrological processes and their effect on the biota in drylands. Given the limited laboratory and field experiments in such systems, many of these publications are based on mathematical models of varying complexity. The underlying implicit assumption is that the data set used to evaluate these models covers the parameter space of conditions that characterize drylands and that the models represent the actual processes with acceptable certainty. However, a question raised is to what extent these mathematical models are valid when confronted with observed ecosystem complexity? This Introduction reviews the 16 papers that comprise the Special Section on Eco-hydrology of Semiarid Environments: Confronting Mathematical Models with Ecosystem Complexity. The subjects studied in these papers include rainfall regime, infiltration and preferential flow, evaporation and evapotranspiration, annual net primary production, dispersal and invasion, and vegetation greening. The findings in the papers published in this Special Section show that innovative mathematical modeling approaches can represent actual field measurements. Hence, there are strong grounds for suggesting that mathematical models can contribute to greater understanding of ecosystem complexity through characterization of space-time dynamics of biomass and water storage as well as their multiscale interactions. However, the generality of the models and their low-dimensional representation of many processes may also be a "curse" that results in failures when particulars of an ecosystem are required. It is envisaged that the search for a unifying "general" model, while seductive, may remain elusive in the foreseeable future. It is for this reason that improving the merger between experiments and models of various degrees of complexity continues to shape the future research agenda.

  3. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graauw, T.

    2010-01-01

    First of all, I would like to wish all of you an happy New Year, which I sincerely hope will bring you success, happiness and interesting new opportunities. For us in ALMA, the end of 2009 and the beginning of 2010 have been very exciting and this is once more a special moment in the development of our observatory. After transporting our third antenna to the high altitude Chajnantor plateau, at 5000 meters above sea level, our team successfully combined the outputs of these antennas using "phase closure", a standard method in interferometry. This achievement marks one more milestone along the way to the beginning of Commissioning and Science Verification, CSV, which, once completed, will mark the beginning of Early Science for ALMA. There was an official announcement about this milestone at the AAS meeting early January and we also wanted to share this good news with you through this newsletter, which contains the content of the announcement. In another area, this newsletter contains the progress on site and a presentation of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA). This is the second part of a two part series on antennas, a continuation of the article in the last newsletter. The ACA plays a crucial part in the imaging of extended sources with ALMA. Without the ACA, the ability to produce accurate images would be very restricted. Finally, as you know, we like to show the human face of this great endeavour we are building and this time, we decided to highlight the Department of Technical Services, another fundamental piece working actively to make ALMA the most powerful radio observatory ever built.

  4. Introduction to the Culture, Health & Sexuality Virtual Special Issue on sex, sexuality and sex work.

    PubMed

    Allman, Dan; Ditmore, Melissa Hope

    2016-05-18

    This article provides an editorial introduction to a virtual special issue on sex work and prostitution. It offers a brief history of sex work studies as published in the journal Culture, Health & Sexuality; reflects on the breadth and scope of papers the journal has published; considers the contribution of the journal's papers to the wellbeing and sexuality of people who sell sex; and envisions future areas of inquiry for sex work studies. As authors, we identify major themes within the journal's archive, including activism, agency, context, discourse, hazard, health, legalisation, love, place, power, race, relationships, stigma and vulnerabilities. In particular, we reflect on how HIV has created an environment in which issues of culture, health and sexuality have come to be disentangled from the moral agendas of earlier years. As a venue for the dissemination of a reinvigorated scholarship, Culture, Health & Sexuality provides a platform for a community of often like-minded, rigorous thinkers, to provide new and established perspectives, methods and voices and to present important developments in studies of sex, sexuality and sex work.

  5. Fire and worker health and safety: an introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard; Levenstein, Charles

    2015-02-01

    One century ago, the landmark fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City claimed the lives of 146 garment workers and helped spur the adoption of fire safety measures and laws targeting dangerous working conditions. Since that time, continuing advances have been made to address the threat of fire-in workplace fire safety practices and regulations, in training and safety requirements for firefighters and first responders, and in hazard communication laws that enhance disaster planning and response. Recent high profile events, including the West, Texas fertilizer plant explosion, derailments of fuel cargo trains, and garment factory fires in Bangladesh, have brought renewed attention to fire as a workplace health and safety issue and to the unevenness of safety standards and regulatory enforcement, in the United States as well as internationally. In this article, we provide an overview of fire as a workplace health and safety hazard and an introduction to the essays included in this special issue of New Solutions on fire and work.

  6. Nonpoint source pollution, environmental quality, and ecosystem health in China: introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghua; Xu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The rapid economic and industrial growth of China, exemplified by a 10-fold increase in its gross domestic product in the past 15 years, has lifted millions of its citizens out of poverty but has simultaneously led to severe environmental problems. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 2.4 million deaths in China per year could be attributed to degraded environmental quality. Much of China's soil, air, and water are polluted by xenobiotic contaminants, such as heavy metals and organic compounds. In addition, soil quality is degraded by erosion, desertification, and nutrient runoff. Air quality is further compromised by particulates, especially in heavily populated areas. Research shows that 80% of urban rivers in China are significantly polluted, and poor water quality is a key contributor to poverty in rural China. Economic and industrial growth has also greatly expanded the demand for water sources of appropriate quality; however, pollution has markedly diminished usable water resource quantity. Desertification and diminishing water resources threaten future food security. In recent years, China's government has increased efforts to reverse these trends and to improve ecosystem health. The Web of Science database showed that the percentage of articles on China devoting to environmental sciences increased dramatically in recent years. In addition, the top 25 institutes publishing the papers in environmental sciences were all in China. This special issue includes seven articles focusing on nonpoint source pollution, environmental quality, and ecosystem health in China. The major issues, and results of these studies, are discussed in this introduction.

  7. Introduction to the special section on the neural substrate of analogical reasoning and metaphor comprehension.

    PubMed

    Bassok, Miriam; Dunbar, Kevin N; Holyoak, Keith J

    2012-03-01

    The special section on the neural substrate of relational reasoning includes 4 articles that address the processes and brain regions involved in analogical reasoning (Green, Kraemer, Fugelsang, Gray, & Dunbar, 2011; Maguire, McClelland, Donovan, Tillman, & Krawczyk, 2011) and in metaphor comprehension (Chettih, Durgin, & Grodner, 2011; Prat, Mason, & Just, 2011). We see this work as an example of how neuroscience approaches to cognition can lead to increased understanding of cognitive processes. In this brief introduction, we first situate the 4 articles in the context of prior cognitive neuroscience work on relational reasoning. We then highlight the main issues explored in these articles: different sources of complexity and difficulty in relational processing, potential differences between the roles of the 2 hemispheres, and the impact of individual differences in various cognitive abilities. The 4 articles illustrate a range of methodologies, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI; Green et al., 2011; Prat et al., 2011), event-related potentials (ERPs; Maguire et al., 2011), and different types of semantic priming (Chettih et al., 2011; Prat et al., 2011). They highlight the connections between research on analogy and on metaphor comprehension and suggest, collectively, that a cognitive neuroscience approach to relational reasoning can lead to converging conclusions.

  8. Children's Elementary School Social Experience and Executive Functions Development: Introduction to a Special Section.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Pol A C; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2016-01-01

    Children's executive functions, encompassing inhibitory control, working memory and attention are vital for their self-regulation. With the transition to formal schooling, children need to learn to manage their emotions and behavior in a new and complex social environment that with age increases in the intensity of social interactions with peers and teachers. Stronger executive functions skills facilitate children's social development. In addition, new experiences in the social environments of school also may influence executive function development. The focus of this special section is on this potential impact of elementary school social experiences with peers and teacher on the development of children's executive functions. The collection of papers encompass various aspects of peer and teacher social environments, and cover broad as well as specific facets and measures of executive functions including neural responses. The collection of papers sample developmental periods that span preschool through mid-adolescence. In this introduction, we summarize and highlight the main findings of each of the papers, organized around social interactions with peers and interactions with teachers. We conclude our synopsis with implications for future research, and a specific focus on prevention and intervention.

  9. Immigrants' adaptation to different cultural settings: A contextual perspective on acculturation: Introduction for the special section on immigration.

    PubMed

    Titzmann, Peter F; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    In modern multicultural societies more and more individuals deal with 2 or more cultures due to the unprecedented increase in international migration. This special section brings together research about immigrants' adaptation to various life domains, about the demands of dealing with different cultural scripts and about how immigrants can successfully bridge different cultural demands. This introduction to the special section provides a broader theoretical framework that links the different studies of the special section and demonstrates areas for further research. It also clearly illustrates the growing necessity for research in increasingly diverse societies.

  10. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Cees; Develder, Chris; Jukan, Admela; Mambretti, Joe

    throughput. The second session groups 3 papers presenting methods, protocols and architectures that enhance capacities in the Networks. The paper titled: “NIC-assisted Cache-Efficient Receive Stack for Message Passing over Ethernet” presents the addition of multiqueue support in the Open-MX receive stack so that all incoming packets for the same process are treated on the same core. It then introduces the idea of binding the target end process near its dedicated receive queue. In general this multiqueue receive stack performs better than the original single queue stack, especially on large communication patterns where multiple processes are involved and manual binding is difficult. The authors of: “A Multipath Fault-Tolerant Routing Method for High-Speed Interconnection Networks” focus on the problem of fault tolerance for high-speed interconnection networks by designing a fault tolerant routing method. The goal was to solve a certain number of link and node failures, considering its impact, and occurrence probability. Their experiments show that their method allows applications to successfully finalize their execution in the presence of several faults, with an average performance value of 97% with respect to the fault-free scenarios. The paper: “Hardware implementation study of the Self-Clocked Fair Queuing Credit Aware (SCFQ-CA) and Deficit Round Robin Credit Aware (DRR-CA) scheduling algorithms” proposes specific implementations of the two schedulers taking into account the characteristics of current high-performance networks. A comparison is presented on the complexity of these two algorithms in terms of silicon area and computation delay. Finally we selected one paper for the special paper session: “A Case Study of Communication Optimizations on 3D Mesh Interconnects”. In this paper the authors present topology aware mapping as a technique to optimize communication on 3-dimensional mesh interconnects and hence improve performance. Results are presented

  11. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, J. V.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-03-01

    Conviviality''. However, it was the academic menu of ICGC-1987 that took precedence over anything else. The Scientific Organizing Committee, consisting of Vishveshwara (Vishu, if your tongue is not up to pronouncing the full name) as the Chairman, and Ashtekar, Barrow, Bertotti, Brill, Carr, Hartle, Hu, Iyer, MacCallum, Narlikar, Novikov, Penrose, and Sciama reflected a nice international mix as well as a mix of active branches of Gravitation and Cosmology. Later meetings The original intention of meeting every four years in some part of India was honoured by the community, and accordingly, the ICGC met in Ahmedabad (1991), Pune (1995), Kharagpur (2000), Cochin (2004), and Pune (2007) before reconvening in Goa in 2011. These meetings were more modestly planned, and instead of trying to cover many fields, each meeting was limited to some specialized topics. Thus, the Kharagpur meeting had highlighted gravitational waves, while the Pune (1995) meeting had emphasized the Raychaudhuri equation and the singularity theorems. These conferences did help to put India firmly on the map of GR and Cosmology, to the extent that the GR-15 was held successfully in Pune with Naresh Dadhich from IUCAA playing the main coordinator's role. It has been a pleasure to see young blood being attracted to these areas of research. Two major developments are on the horizon at the time of writing this piece. The LIGO is planning to set up an extra detector of gravitational waves in India with local help, both in hardware and software. Likewise, steps are being taken for India to join the TMT mega-telescope project as an international partner. These heartening developments help us to bear the loss of old doyens like, V V Narlikar, P C Vaidya, and A K Raychaudhuri. Though 'small is beautiful' is a truism, the decision was taken to return to Goa with a wider and richer academic menu to recall and celebrate the first ICGC. This is how we all find ourselves in Goa and its pleasant surroundings. As they say

  12. Landing the Job: How Special Libraries Can Support Career Research Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Heather

    2017-01-01

    "Special Libraries, Special Challenges" is a column dedicated to exploring the unique public services challenges that arise in libraries that specialize in a particular subject, such as law, medicine, business, and so forth. In each column, the author will discuss public service dilemmas and opportunities that arise in special libraries.…

  13. Introduction to the Special Issue: Advances in island plant biology since Sherwin Carlquist's Island Biology.

    PubMed

    Traveset, Anna; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Kueffer, Christoph; Bellingham, Peter J; Morden, Clifford; Drake, Donald R

    2015-12-31

    Sherwin Carlquist's seminal publications-in particular his classic Island Biology, published in 1974-formulated hypotheses specific to island biology that remain valuable today. This special issue brings together some of the most interesting contributions presented at the First Island Biology Symposium hosted in Honolulu on 7-11 July 2014. We compiled a total of 18 contributions that present data from multiple archipelagos across the world and from different disciplines within the plant sciences. In this introductory paper, we first provide a short overview of Carlquist's life and work and then summarize the main findings of the collated papers. A first group of papers deals with issues to which Carlquist notably contributed: long-distance dispersal, adaptive radiation and plant reproductive biology. The findings of such studies demonstrate the extent to which the field has advanced thanks to (i) the increasing availability and richness of island data, covering many taxonomic groups and islands; (ii) new information from the geosciences, phylogenetics and palaeoecology, which allows us a more realistic understanding of the geological and biological development of islands and their biotas; and (iii) the new theoretical and methodological advances that allow us to assess patterns of abundance, diversity and distribution of island biota over large spatial scales. Most other papers in the issue cover a range of topics related to plant conservation on islands, such as causes and consequences of mutualistic disruptions (due to pollinator or disperser losses, introduction of alien predators, etc.). Island biologists are increasingly considering reintroducing ecologically important species to suitable habitats within their historic range and to neighbouring islands with depauperate communities of vertebrate seed dispersers, and an instructive example is given here. Finally, contributions on ecological networks demonstrate the usefulness of this methodological tool to

  14. The VAST Challenge: History, Scope, and Outcomes: An introduction to the Special Issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Kristin A.; Grinstein, Georges; Whiting, Mark A.

    2014-10-01

    Visual analytics aims to facilitate human insight from complex data via a combination of visual representations, interaction techniques, and supporting algorithms. To create new tools and techniques that achieve this goal requires that researchers have an understanding of analytical questions to be addressed, data that illustrates the complexities and ambiguities found in realistic analytic settings, and methods for evaluating whether the plausible insights are gained through use of the new methods. However, researchers do not, generally speaking, have access to analysts who can articulate their problems or operational data that is used for analysis. To fill this gap, the Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) Challenge has been held annually since 2006. The VAST Challenge provides an opportunity for researchers to experiment with realistic but not real problems, using realistic synthetic data with known events embedded. Since its inception, the VAST Challenge has evolved along with the visual analytics research community to pose more complex challenges, ranging from text analysis to video analysis to large scale network log analysis. The seven years of the VAST Challenge have seen advancements in research and development, education, evaluation, and in the challenge process itself. This special issue of Information Visualization highlights some of the noteworthy advancements in each of these areas. Some of these papers focus on important research questions related to the challenge itself, and other papers focus on innovative research that has been shaped by participation in the challenge. This paper describes the VAST Challenge process and benefits in detail. It also provides an introduction to and context for the remaining papers in the issue.

  15. Introduction to the Special Issue: Advances in island plant biology since Sherwin Carlquist's Island Biology

    PubMed Central

    Traveset, Anna; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Kueffer, Christoph; Bellingham, Peter J.; Morden, Clifford; Drake, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Sherwin Carlquist's seminal publications—in particular his classic Island Biology, published in 1974—formulated hypotheses specific to island biology that remain valuable today. This special issue brings together some of the most interesting contributions presented at the First Island Biology Symposium hosted in Honolulu on 7–11 July 2014. We compiled a total of 18 contributions that present data from multiple archipelagos across the world and from different disciplines within the plant sciences. In this introductory paper, we first provide a short overview of Carlquist's life and work and then summarize the main findings of the collated papers. A first group of papers deals with issues to which Carlquist notably contributed: long-distance dispersal, adaptive radiation and plant reproductive biology. The findings of such studies demonstrate the extent to which the field has advanced thanks to (i) the increasing availability and richness of island data, covering many taxonomic groups and islands; (ii) new information from the geosciences, phylogenetics and palaeoecology, which allows us a more realistic understanding of the geological and biological development of islands and their biotas; and (iii) the new theoretical and methodological advances that allow us to assess patterns of abundance, diversity and distribution of island biota over large spatial scales. Most other papers in the issue cover a range of topics related to plant conservation on islands, such as causes and consequences of mutualistic disruptions (due to pollinator or disperser losses, introduction of alien predators, etc.). Island biologists are increasingly considering reintroducing ecologically important species to suitable habitats within their historic range and to neighbouring islands with depauperate communities of vertebrate seed dispersers, and an instructive example is given here. Finally, contributions on ecological networks demonstrate the usefulness of this methodological tool to

  16. Neurodynamics and schizophrenia research: editors' introduction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R E; McGlashan, T H

    1993-01-01

    The term, "neurodynamics," refers to interactions of large numbers of neurons that, in the short term, transform input information derived from their environments into meaningful outputs and, in the long term, use this information to alter their own architectures. This general concept may be useful in framing and investigating research questions that could advance our understanding of the nature, course, and treatment of schizophrenia. The mechanism of action of neuroleptics, the anatomic localization of schizophrenia, the stability of associated brain disturbances over time, and the distinction of state versus trait variables are briefly discussed as examples of issues whose understanding may be enhanced by a neurodynamic perspective.

  17. Optical computing: introduction by the feature editors.

    PubMed

    Hinton, H S; Soffer, B; Tooley, F A; Yukimatsu, K

    1994-03-10

    This feature of Applied Optics: Information Processing on optical computing comprises thirty papers. Most of the papers evolved from papers presented at the Fifth Topical Meeting on Optical Computing held in March 1993 in Palm Springs, California.

  18. Guest Editors' Introduction--Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Thomas, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The information revolution is upon us, and it is guaran-teed to change our lives and the way we conduct our daily business. The fact that we have to deal with not just the size but also the variety and complexity of this in-formation makes it a real challenge to survive the revolu-tion. Enter Visual Analytics, a contemporary and proven approach to combine the art of human intuition and the science of mathematical deduction to directly perceive patterns and derive knowledge and insight from them.

  19. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  20. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  1. Understanding and Observing Children with Special Needs. A Student Worktext. Child Development 322: Introduction to the Special Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fikes, Cherryl; And Others

    The manual is designed to provide an individualized, competency-based approach to training professionals who work with special needs children. The manual is organized according to three units, each with stated purpose, objectives, and learning experiences and activities. Following a pretest of general knowledge and skills, unit I addresses the…

  2. EDITORIAL: Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, O.; Lesselier, D.

    2010-07-01

    Inverse problems in electromagnetics have a long history and have stimulated exciting research over many decades. New applications and solution methods are still emerging, providing a rich source of challenging topics for further investigation. The purpose of this special issue is to combine descriptions of several such developments that are expected to have the potential to fundamentally fuel new research, and to provide an overview of novel methods and applications for electromagnetic inverse problems. There have been several special sections published in Inverse Problems over the last decade addressing fully, or partly, electromagnetic inverse problems. Examples are: Electromagnetic imaging and inversion of the Earth's subsurface (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and T Habashy) October 2000 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2001 Electromagnetic and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and J Bowler) December 2002 Electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and W C Chew) December 2004 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: inhomogeneous targets (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2005 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: 3D targets (Guest Editors: A Litman and L Crocco) February 2009 In a certain sense, the current issue can be understood as a continuation of this series of special sections on electromagnetic inverse problems. On the other hand, its focus is intended to be more general than previous ones. Instead of trying to cover a well-defined, somewhat specialized research topic as completely as possible, this issue aims to show the broad range of techniques and applications that are relevant to electromagnetic imaging nowadays, which may serve as a source of inspiration and encouragement for all those entering this active and rapidly developing research area. Also, the

  3. MSSP Associate Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.

    2015-08-01

    MSSP is pleased to announce the appointment of three distinguished researchers, Professors Jerome Antoni, Spilios Fassois and Paolo Pennacchi, as Associate Editors. The broad coverage of MSSP research topics demands editorial expertise in several disciplines and the appointment of an editorial team of the highest quality is essential in maintaining and further enhancing the reputation of MSSP as a journal at the forefront of modern experimental mechanics that combines dynamic systems with measurement technology, signal processing and active control. Brief descriptions of the backgrounds and experience of the Associate Editors are provided in the following paragraphs.

  4. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  5. Islamic Education, Possibilities, Opportunities and Tensions: Introduction to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghid, Yusef; Davids, Nuraan

    2014-01-01

    If Islam continues to evoke skepticism, as it has done most intensely since 9/11, then it stands to reason that its tenets and education are viewed with equal mistrust, and as will be highlighted in this special issue, equal misunderstanding. The intention of this special edition is neither to counter the accusations Islam stands accused of, nor…

  6. New Research Findings on Emotionally Focused Therapy: Introduction to Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan M.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the special section "New Research Findings on Emotionally Focused Therapy." Emotionally focused couple therapy researchers have a strong tradition of outcome and process research and this special section presents new findings from three recent studies. The first study furthers the goal of determining the kinds of clients…

  7. FLAn: A Free Hypermedia Editor to Create Foreign Language Learning Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilickaya, Ferit, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Glossing words is done via special software called multimedia editors. Foreign Language Annotator (FLAn), created by Thibeault (2011), is one of these multimedia editors. FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor that works on both Macs and PCs, allows instructors to turn static texts into dynamic learning units by attaching…

  8. WRR editor Ronald Cummings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    It has been nearly a year since Ronald Cummings took over as policy sciences editor of Water Resources Research (WRR), and in that time he has worked to make the journal live up to its role as “an interdisciplinary journal integrating research in the social and natural sciences of water.” Cummings takes the “interdisciplinary” part seriously. “I'd like to see a much broader range of policy issues presented to readers,” he says. “I would hope it would then stimulate interchange between our colleagues concerning evolving issues of the '80s and '90s.”Cummings brings a solid background as a resource economist to his 4-year term as editor, which began last January and runs until December 1987. Cummings succeeds Jared Cohon as policy sciences editor. Stephen J. Burges is the WRR editor for hydrological, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Now a Professor of Economics and Director of the Program in Natural Resources Economics at the University of New Mexico, Cummings is a past president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. He has been a consultant in matters of water resources management, forestry management, and energy policy for more than a decade, working on projects in both the United States and Latin America. Since joining the faculty at New Mexico in 1975, he has, among other things, worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation'management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems.

  9. LDAP Browser/Editor

    SciTech Connect

    Gawor, Jarek; Laszewski, Gregor von

    2000-07-18

    The LDAP Browser/Editor provides a user-friendly Java-based interface to LDAP databases with tightly integrated browsing and editing capabilities. Entirely written in Java with help of the JFC (Swingset) and JNDI class libraries. It connects to any X.500, LDAP v2 and v3 servers and supports editing of multiple-value attributes.

  10. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  11. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  12. Handling Vagueness, Subjectivity, and Imprecision in Information Access: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crestani, Fabio; Pasi, Gabriella

    2003-01-01

    This special issues comprises nine papers presenting a wide selection of approaches to handling subjectivity, vagueness, and imprecision in information retrieval (IR) and database management necessary for success in designing, developing and implementing effective tools for information access. (LRW)

  13. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2008, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. This year we see the introduction of a new subject section 'Measurement techniques for bio-medical and life science applications' to facilitate browsing by readers from this community who may be less familiar with Measurement Science and Technology. We anticipate that articles falling within this section will broaden the strengths of the journal to the biological and medical arena by comprising imaging techniques for biology and medicine including tomography, microscopy, ultrasonic imaging and MRI; spectroscopic techniques in biological and medical physics; sensors for measuring biological, biochemical and medical processes and quantities; new instrumentation for measurement in biology and medicine. To highlight this section in the journal we have commissioned a review article from Professor Gerald Urban of Albert Ludwigs Universität Freiburg, on micro- and nanobiosensors which appears as the first article in this issue. This topical review covers the state of the art of microsensors for physical and chemical parameters in medical science, as well as biosensors and microtransducers. I believe it is a valuable addition to the literature and a very useful starting point for researchers. As regular readers will know, Measurement Science and Technology has a long tradition of publishing topical review articles, and this year will be no exception. As well as the article from Professor Urban, in the same issue we have an article from Professor Roy Olsson III of Sandia National Laboratories on microfabricated phononic crystal devices and applications. In future issues readers can look forward to topical reviews from Dr

  14. Introduction to special issue on animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders and substance use disorders: Progress and gaps.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Evans, Suzette M

    2017-04-01

    This is an introduction to the special issue, "Animal Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Substance Use Disorders: Progress and Gaps." This issue presents 6 original research reports describing the use of mice and rats to model neurodevelopmental disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorders. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the progress of the field and the gaps and challenges that remain. They also illustrate the range of conditions that are informed by animal models and identify the clinical populations that stand to benefit from their use in preclinical research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Sex differences in child and adolescent psychopathology: an introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Kistner, Janet A

    2009-07-01

    There are marked sex differences in the prevalence of most types of child psychopathology. Understanding the causes of these sex differences has the potential to advance causal theories of child psychopathology. The goal of this special section is to stimulate rigorous research focused on the causes of sex differences in the prevalence of child psychopathology. To provide a context for the articles included in this special section, a brief summary of recent findings of sex differences in developmental trajectories of child psychopathology is presented along with a discussion of methodological issues and promising directions for future research on sex differences.

  16. Introduction to the Special Issue: Precarious Solidarity-Preferential Access in Canadian Health Care.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lynette

    2017-01-10

    Systems of universal health coverage may aspire to provide care based on need and not ability to pay; the complexities of this aspiration (conceptual, practical, and ethical) call for normative analysis. This special issue arises in the wake of a judicial inquiry into preferential access in the Canadian province of Alberta, the Vertes Commission. I describe this inquiry and set out a taxonomy of forms of differential and preferential access. Papers in this special issue focus on the conceptual specification of health system boundaries (the concept of medical need) and on the normative questions raised by complex models of funding and delivery of care, where patients, providers, and services cross system boundaries.

  17. New research findings on emotionally focused therapy: introduction to special section.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Susan M; Wittenborn, Andrea K

    2012-06-01

    This article introduces the special section "New Research Findings on Emotionally Focused Therapy." Emotionally focused couple therapy researchers have a strong tradition of outcome and process research and this special section presents new findings from three recent studies. The first study furthers the goal of determining the kinds of clients for which EFT is effective (Denton, Wittenborn, & Golden, this issue) and the next two studies (Furrow, Edwards, Choi, & Bradley, this issue; Wittenborn, this issue) focus on the person of the therapist and provide some implications for EFT intervention and training. Together, these three studies provide valuable lessons on how to deepen our knowledge of the application of EFT for different populations and therapists.

  18. Introduction to an Updated Analysis of Planetary Protection: "Special Regions" on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaty, D. W.; Rummel, J. D.; Viola, D.

    2014-03-01

    Since the beginning of human activity in space science and exploration, there has been an appreciation of the negative consequences of transferring life from one planet to another. Given the unknown consequences of contact between two life forms and the fundamental value of studying a new form life, thoughtfulness and caution are warranted. The "special regions" concept is a component of the International Council for Science's Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Planetary Protection Policy, as it applies to Mars. These are regions "within which terrestrial organisms are likely to replicate" as well as "any region which is interpreted to have a high potential for the existence of extant martian life." Robotic missions planning to have direct contact with such special regions are given planetary protection categorization (IVc), with stringent cleanliness constraints on the portions of the mission contacting such regions. The current, quantitative definition of "special regions based on temperature and water activity limits was adopted by COSPAR in 2008 after a two-year process that included meetings of the Mars Exploration Planning and Analysis Group's (MEPAG) Special Regions Science Analysis Group (SR-SAG) and COSPAR's Panel on Planetary Protection. In this study, the MEPAG SR-SAG2 will review and update the technical information that underlie NASA's and COSPAR's definition of special regions on Mars, enabling interpretations of when and where they could occur in light of new discoveries since 2007. This will include updates of current understanding in (1) the known physical limits to life on Earth, including low temperature and low water activity, the biological capture/use of vapor-phase water, and survival over long time scales with short periods of growth; (2) observational data sets and new models from Mars that could be relevant to our understanding of the natural variations on Mars of water activity and temperature, including recurring slope lineae (RSL

  19. Introduction to the Special Series: What Can Personality Science Offer Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadel, William G.

    2004-01-01

    Personality, as a construct, has been largely ignored or misapplied in the clinical and/or cognitive-behavioral literature. This article discusses the history of the concept of personality in clinical psychology and in cognitive-behavioral approaches and provides the main rationale for this special series. The articles that comprise the series…

  20. New Directions in Developmental Emotion Regulation Research across the Life Span: Introduction to the Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Peter; Thompson, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the development of emotion regulation has become a prominent topic in developmental science covering a broad age range from infancy to old age because of its theoretical importance and practical implications. This introductory essay of this special section includes reflections on some of the conceptual themes of this research field and…

  1. Contributions to the Content Analysis of Gender Roles: An Introduction to a Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Lucy; Linz, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue on gender-related content analysis is the second of two parts (see Rudy et al. 2010b). The current special issue is more diverse than was the first in the number of countries that are represented and in the variety of media genres and content types that are included. The primary aim of this paper is to outline some of the contributions of the individual papers in this second special issue. Some of these advancements and innovations include (a) examining underresearched measures, countries, time spans, sexual orientations, and individual media programs; (b) addressing both international and intranational differences in gender-role portrayals; (c) comparing multiple content formats within the same media unit; (d) updating past findings to take into consideration the current media landscape; (e) employing established measures in novel ways and novel contexts; (f) uncovering limitations in established intercultural measures and media-effects theories; (g) suggesting variables that could predict additional differences in gender-role portrayals; (h) adopting virtually identical methods and measures across distinct content categories in order to facilitate comparisons; (i) conducting multiple tests of a given hypothesis; (j) examining, from multiple perspectives, the implications of racial differences in gender portrayals; and (k) examining the implications of underrepresentation of women and the perspectives that women hold. In addition to the original content-analytical research presented in this special issue, two reviews, one methodological and the other analytical, offer recommendations of procedures and perspectives to be implemented in future research. PMID:21423330

  2. ABA and Instruction of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Introduction to the Special Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heflin, L. Juane; Alberto, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article to this special issue on the use of applied behavior analysis (ABA) with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) notes the 40-year history of ABA strategy development, verification, and generalization. It briefly introduces the following articles, which are intended to illustrate the range of ABA applications and the depth of…

  3. Hemisphericity Modes, Learning Styles, and Environmental Preferences of Students in an "Introduction to Special Education" Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramasamy, Rangasamy; van der Jagt, Johan W.; Jacobs, Roy L.; Ghose, Chhanda; Lindsey, Jimmy D.

    This study was designed to determine whether a sample of preservice teachers had different brain hemisphere processing modes, learning styles, environmental preferences, and course-related behaviors. The study population was 90 students enrolled in an undergraduate introductory special education course. Forty-four of the students were selected to…

  4. Introduction to the Toxin Reviews Special Issue "Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, Cyclopiazonic Acid, and Biological Control"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue of Toxin Reviews, “Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, CPA and Biological Control of Aflatoxin", is different from previous publications because it focuses on solving the problem of mycotoxin contamination through the use of biological control strains of Aspergillus, which is applicable to th...

  5. Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning: Introduction to Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amin, Tamer G.; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Haglund, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of "International Journal of Science Education" is based on the theme "Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning." The idea for this issue grew out of a symposium organized on this topic at the conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA) in September 2013.…

  6. Introduction to Special Section: Biomedicine and Developmental Psychology: New Areas of Common Ground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Lewis A.; Goldson, Edward

    1996-01-01

    Introduces a special section of five articles that highlight new collaborative research opportunities for developmental psychologists and other biomedical researchers. Such research has focused on the transition from fetus to newborn, evaluation of early toxin exposure, and the behavioral phenotype associated with genetic syndromes. (MDM)

  7. Introduction to The Special Issue: Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Students with EBD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Matthew; Lochman, John; Van Acker, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in developing models of social information processing, and cognitive-behavioral processes and related interventions. While there has been limited attention to cognitive-behavioral modification (CBM) in the special education literature, the majority of the contributions have come from the fields of school,…

  8. Introduction to the Special Issue: New and Interdisciplinary Approaches to Linguistic Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Bylund, Emanuel; Casasanto, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This Special Issue of "Language Learning" presents an interdisciplinary state-of-the-art overview of current approaches to linguistic relativity. It contains empirical and theoretical studies and reflections on linguistic relativity from a variety of perspectives, such as associative learning, conceptual transfer, multilingual awareness,…

  9. Self and Identity in Early Adolescence: Some Reflections and an Introduction to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Seth J.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews contemporary issues in the study of self and identity and introduces the special issue. Particularly highlighted are the need to integrate the various currents in self and identity, the need to study the role of context in the development of self and identity, research on self and identity in ethnic minority and international…

  10. Guest Editors' Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, Peter; Miller, Wolfram; Sangwal, Keshra; Talik, Ewa

    2014-09-01

    The 17th International Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy (ICCGE-17) was held in Warsaw during 11 and 16 August 2013. The contributions during the ICCGE-17 were of three types: Invited lectures, oral presentations and poster presentions. The conference participants were also invited to submit manuscripts based on their contributions for publication in the ICCGE-17 Proceedings volume of Journal of Crystal Growth. The present volume contains manuscripts accepted by the guest editors for this conference volume.

  11. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  12. Empirical aesthetics, the beautiful challenge: An introduction to the special issue on Art & Perception

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, M. Dorothee; Wagemans, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The i-Perception special issue Art & Perception is based on the Art & Perception Conference 2010 in Brussels. Our vision with this conference was to bring together artists and vision scientists from different backgrounds to exchange views and state-of-the-art knowledge on art perception and aesthetics. The complexity of the experience of art and of aesthetic phenomena, in general, calls for specific research approaches, for which interdisciplinarity seems to be key. Following this logic, the special issue Art & Perception contains contributions by artists and vision scientists with different methodological approaches. The contributions span a wide range of topics, but are all centred around two questions: How can one understand art perception and aesthetics from a psychological point of view, and how is this reflected in art itself? PMID:23145296

  13. Behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Alan J; Nezu, Arthur M

    2013-04-01

    This issue represents the 4th Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology special issue on behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology over the past 4 decades. Recent developments in health care policy, as well as in the maturation of the science, make a special issue in this area particularly timely. This collection includes state of the clinical science reviews, reports of clinical trials, and articles addressing theory and methods in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. A multilevel, ecological perspective that considers multiple levels of influences (e.g., cultural influences on behavior-health linkages, individual differences) is salient throughout many of the articles. Our hope is that this sampling of this broad field, and coverage of some key issues and areas, will play a role in stimulating the next 10 years of research, practice, and policy implementation in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology.

  14. Thematic Mapping in Case Conceptualization: An Introduction to the Special Section.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Charles R; Jeffrey, Christina E

    2017-04-01

    Case conceptualization is an essential clinical activity in which clinicians, in one form or another, gather and synthesize data about their clients in order to formulate clinical pictures and maximize therapeutic gains. However, a myriad of methods of case conceptualization that vary in complexity and theoretical bases currently reflects an almost complete lack of standardization in this most fundamental activity of mental health treatment. The lack of standardization in case conceptualization is especially daunting to trainees and clinicians who are early in their careers. This special section, comprising 5 articles, introduces thematic mapping, a transtheoretical and transdiagnostic method of case conceptualization. The method aims to overcome or minimize many of the problems inherent in current practice. In this first article, we provide a rationale for the special section and lay the groundwork for the subsequent four articles. Overall, we assert that thematic mapping holds promise as a systematic method of case conceptualization.

  15. Introduction to the special section on 3D representation, compression, and rendering.

    PubMed

    Vetro, Anthony; Frossard, Pascal; Lee, Sanghoon; Mueller, Karsten; Ohm, Jens-Rainer; Sullivan, Gary

    2013-09-01

    A new set of three-dimensional (3D) data formats and associated compression technologies are emerging with the aim to achieve more flexible representation and higher compression of 3D and multiview video content. These new tools will facilitate the generation of multiview output (e.g., as needed for multiview auto-stereoscopic displays), provide richer immersive multimedia experiences, and allow new interactive applications. This special section includes a timely set of papers covering the most recent technical developments in this area with papers covering topics in the different aspects of 3D systems, from representation and compression algorithms to rendering techniques and quality assessment. This special section includes a good balance on topics that are of interest to academic, industrial, and standardization communities. We believe that this collection of papers represent the most recent advances in representation, compression, rendering, and quality assessment of 3D scenes.

  16. Introduction to the Special Series: Current Directions for Measuring Parenting Constructs to Inform Prevention Science.

    PubMed

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Shaffer, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Parenting behaviors are multifaceted and dynamic and therefore challenging to quantify. Measurement methods have critical implications for study results, particularly for prevention trials designed to modify parenting behaviors. Although multiple approaches can complement one another and contribute to a more complete understanding of prevention trials, the assumptions and implications of each approach are not always clearly addressed. Greater attention to the measurement of complex constructs such as parenting is needed to advance the field of prevention science. This series examines the challenges of measuring changes in parenting behaviors in the context of prevention trials. All manuscripts in the special series address measurement issues and make practical recommendations for prevention researchers. Manuscripts in this special series include (1) empirical studies that demonstrate novel measurement approaches, (2) re-analyses of prevention trial outcome data directly comparing and contrasting two or more methods, and (3) a statistical primer and practical guide to analyzing proportion data.

  17. Biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services in environmental risk assessment: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ralf B

    2012-01-15

    This Special Issue focuses on the questions if and how biodiversity, ecosystem functions and resulting services could be incorporated into the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA). Therefore, three articles provide a framework for the integration of ecosystem services into ERA of soils, sediments and pesticides. Further articles demonstrate ways how stakeholders can be integrated into an ecosystem service-based ERA for soils and describe how the current monitoring could be adapted to new assessment endpoints that are directly linked to ecosystem services. Case studies show that the current ERA may not be protective for biodiversity, ecosystem functions and resulting services and that both pesticides and salinity currently adversely affect ecosystem functions in the field. Moreover, ecological models can be used for prediction of new protection goals and could finally support their implementation into the ERA. Overall, the Special Issue stresses the urgent need to enhance current procedures of ERA if biodiversity, ecosystem functions and resulting services are to be protected.

  18. Mathematics education and students with learning disabilities: introduction to the special series.

    PubMed

    Rivera, D P

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of students with mathematics learning disabilities has triggered an interest among special education researchers and practitioners in developing an understanding of the needs of this group of students, and in identifying effective instructional programming to foster their mathematical performance during the school years and into adulthood. Research into the characteristics of students with mathematics learning disabilities is being approached from different perspectives, including developmental, neurological and neuropsychological, and educational. This diversity helps us develop a broader understanding of students' learning needs and difficulties. Special education assessment practices encompass a variety of approaches, including norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and nonstandardized procedures, depending on the specific assessment questions professionals seek to answer. Students' mathematical knowledge and conceptual understanding must be examined to determine their strengths and weaknesses, curriculum-based progress, and use of cognitive strategies to arrive at mathematical solutions. Research findings have identified empirically validated interventions for teaching mathematics curricula to students with mathematics learning disabilities. Research studies have been grounded in behavioral theory and cognitive psychology, with an emergent interest in the constructivist approach. Although research studies have focused primarily on computational performance, more work is being conducted in the areas of story-problem solving and technology. These areas as well as other math curricular skills require further study. Additionally, the needs of adults with math LD have spurred educators to examine the elementary and secondary math curricula and determine ways to infuse them with life skills instruction accordingly. As the field of mathematics special education continues to evolve, special educators must remain cognizant of the developments in and

  19. Morphological specializations for fetal maintenance in viviparous vertebrates: An introduction and historical retrospective.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Daniel G; Starck, J Matthias

    2015-11-01

    In many viviparous vertebrates, pregnant females sustain their developing embryos and provide them with nutrients by means of placentas and a diversity of other types of specializations. With this article, we introduce a virtual (online) issue of the Journal of Morphology that presents 12 recent papers on fetal maintenance in viviparous vertebrates. We also outline the history of research in this area and document the central role of morphology in helping to explain the function and evolution of specializations for fetal nutrition. This virtual issue of the Journal of Morphology is an outgrowth of a symposium held under auspices of the International Congress of Vertebrate Morphology. The included papers reflect a diversity of taxa, research methods, and biological issues. To celebrate the publication of this virtual issue of the Journal of Morphology, the publisher is making freely available to readers a number of other relevant papers published in the journal over the past 128 years.

  20. The Context of Current Content Analysis of Gender Roles: An Introduction to a Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Rena M; Popova, Lucy; Linz, Daniel G

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide context for the quantitative content analyses of gender roles that are to be included in both parts of this special issue. First, a timeline of historical uses of the content analysis methodology is presented. Second, research objectives that frequently drive content analysis of gender roles are described; these include: to support feminist claims, to compare media with real life, to predict effects on audiences, and to detect effects of media producers on content. Third, previous content analyses published in Sex Roles and other gender-focused journals are reviewed and categorized in terms of medium, genre, time span, gender, and nationality. Finally, contributions of each of the articles in this special issue are outlined.

  1. The Context of Current Content Analysis of Gender Roles: An Introduction to a Special Issue

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Lucy; Linz, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide context for the quantitative content analyses of gender roles that are to be included in both parts of this special issue. First, a timeline of historical uses of the content analysis methodology is presented. Second, research objectives that frequently drive content analysis of gender roles are described; these include: to support feminist claims, to compare media with real life, to predict effects on audiences, and to detect effects of media producers on content. Third, previous content analyses published in Sex Roles and other gender-focused journals are reviewed and categorized in terms of medium, genre, time span, gender, and nationality. Finally, contributions of each of the articles in this special issue are outlined. PMID:20694031

  2. The intersection of behavioral genetics and political science: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Hatemi, Peter K

    2012-02-01

    The collection of papers in this special edition of Twin Research and Human Genetics represents a major land-mark at the intersection of behavioral genetics and political science. This issue is the fruit of 20 political scientists attending the Behavioral Genetics Association Methods Workshop in Boulder and a hands-on training practicum at the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, and includes results from the first wave of political science twin surveys.

  3. Introduction to the special section "Big'er' Data": Scaling up psychotherapy research in counseling psychology.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse; Imel, Zac E

    2016-04-01

    This article introduces the special section on utilizing large data sets to explore psychotherapy processes and outcomes. The increased use of technology has provided new opportunities for psychotherapy researchers. In particular, there is a rise in large databases of tens of thousands clients. Additionally, there are new ways to pool valuable resources for meta-analytic processes. At the same time, these tools also come with limitations. These issues are introduced as well as brief overview of the articles.

  4. Introduction to the special issue on molecular imaging in radiation biology.

    PubMed

    Humm, John L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2012-04-01

    Molecular imaging is an evolving science that is concerned with the development of novel imaging probes and biomarkers that can be used to non-invasively image molecular and cellular processes. This special issue approaches molecular imaging in the context of radiation research, focusing on biomarkers and imaging methods that provide measurable signals that can assist in the quantification of radiation-induced effects of living systems at the physical, chemical and biological levels. The potential to image molecular changes in response to a radiation insult opens new and exciting opportunities for a more profound understanding of radiation biology, with the possibility of translation of these techniques to radiotherapy practice. This special issue brings together 14 reviews dedicated to the use of molecular imaging in the field of radiation research. The initial three reviews are introductory overviews of the key molecular imaging modalities: magnetic resonance, nuclear and optical. This is followed by 11 reviews each focusing on a specialist area within the field of radiation research. These include: hypoxia and perfusion, tissue metabolism, normal tissue injury, cell death and viability, receptor targeting and nanotechnology, reporter genes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and biological dosimetry. Over the preceding decade, molecular imaging brought significant new advances to our understanding of every area of radiation biology. This special issue shows us these advances and points to the vibrant future of our field armed with these new capabilities.

  5. Introduction to herpetology: A workshop for use in special needs education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Frederick

    1999-09-01

    This research investigates the question: What are the attitudinal and behavioral responses to herpetofauna among adolescent males and females, who are placed in a program for students in need of extra emotional and motivational support, in a public high school? A workshop was presented to adolescents, with material from the field of herpetology, in order to observe and document their behavioral and attitudinal responses. Then, in follow-up interviews, questions were asked which deepened the researcher's understanding of their attitudinal response, their level of curiosity and learning, and their participation level in other classes as compared with this workshop. It is well documented that young people are fascinated by herpetofauna and other animals. Generally, the use of "animals in the classroom" type curricula is conducted for the purpose of teaching conservation, animal studies, or responsibility to other living things (all very important). The goal of this study was to use herpetofauna as the basic content for a workshop to observe special education students' interest level, curiosity, and academic involvement in general. Findings showed that the population had an interest in reptiles and amphibians, responded positively to the researcher's teaching style, and liked the special education program at the high school. The workshop was a one-time, 2-hour event. The results of this study denote a need for further investigation regarding the use of herpetology in special education settings.

  6. Sluggish cognitive tempo in abnormal child psychology: an historical overview and introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Marshall, Stephen A; McBurnett, Keith

    2014-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) as an important construct in the field of abnormal child psychology. Characterized by drowsiness, daydreaming, lethargy, mental confusion, and slowed thinking/behavior, SCT has primarily been studied as a feature of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and namely the predominately inattentive subtype/presentation. Although SCT is strongly associated with ADHD inattention, research increasingly supports the possibility that SCT is distinct from ADHD or perhaps a different mental health condition altogether, with unique relations to child and adolescent psychosocial adjustment. This introductory article to the Special Section on SCT provides an historical overview of the SCT construct and briefly describes the contributions of the eight empirical papers included in the Special Section. Given the emerging importance of SCT for abnormal psychology and clinical science, there is a clear need for additional studies that examine (1) the measurement, structure, and multidimensional nature of SCT, (2) SCT as statistically distinct from not only ADHD-inattention but also other psychopathologies (particularly depression and anxiety), (3) genetic and environmental contributions to the development of SCT symptoms, and (4) functional impairments associated with SCT. This Special Section brings together papers to advance the current knowledge related to these issues as well as to spur research in this exciting and expanding area of abnormal psychology.

  7. Introduction to the Special Section on Teaching, Training, and Supervision in Personality and Psychological Assessment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin D

    2017-01-01

    This special section contains empirical and conceptual articles pertaining to the broad topic of teaching, training, and supervision of assessment. Despite some evidence of a decline in recent decades, assessment remains a defining practice of professional psychologists in many subfields, including clinical, counseling, school, and neuropsychology, that consumes a consequential proportion of their time. To restore assessment to its rightful place of prominence, a clear agenda needs to be developed for advancing teaching and training methods, increasing instruction to state-of-the-art methods, and defining aims that could be elucidated through empirical inquiry. The 7 articles in this special section provide a developmental perspective of these issues that collectively provide practical tools for instructors and begin to set the stage for a research agenda in this somewhat neglected area of study that is vital to the identity of professional psychology. Additionally, 2 comments are provided by distinguished figures in the field concerning the implications of the articles in the special section to health services psychology and the competencies-based movement in applied psychology.

  8. Genetic Influences on Peer and Family Relationships Across Adolescent Development: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, Paula Y; DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher

    2015-07-01

    Nearly all aspects of human development are influenced by genetic and environmental factors, which conjointly shape development through several gene-environment interplay mechanisms. More recently, researchers have begun to examine the influence of genetic factors on peer and family relationships across the pre-adolescent and adolescent time periods. This article introduces the special issue by providing a critical overview of behavior genetic methodology and existing research demonstrating gene-environment processes operating on the link between peer and family relationships and adolescent adjustment. The overview is followed by a summary of new research studies, which use genetically informed samples to examine how peer and family environment work together with genetic factors to influence behavioral outcomes across adolescence. The studies in this special issue provide further evidence of gene-environment interplay through innovative behavior genetic methodological approaches across international samples. Results from the quantitative models indicate environmental moderation of genetic risk for coercive adolescent-parent relationships and deviant peer affiliation. The molecular genetics studies provide support for a gene-environment interaction differential susceptibility model for dopamine regulation genes across positive and negative peer and family environments. Overall, the findings from the studies in this special issue demonstrate the importance of considering how genes and environments work in concert to shape developmental outcomes during adolescence.

  9. Engaging Students in Modeling as an Epistemic Practice of Science: An Introduction to the Special Issue of the "Journal of Science Education and Technology"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an introduction for the special issue of the "Journal of Science Education and Technology" focused on science teaching and learning with models. The article provides initial framing for questions that guided the special issue. Additionally, based on our careful review of each of these articles, some discussion of…

  10. An introduction to the special issue on Geoscience Papers of the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Cédric H.; Gil, Yolanda; Duffy, Christopher J.; Peckham, Scott D.; Venayagamoorthy, S. Karan

    2016-10-01

    Advocates of enhanced quality for published scientific results are increasingly voicing the need for further transparency of data and software for scientific reproducibility. However, such advanced digital scholarship can appear perplexing to geoscientists that are seduced by the concept of open science yet wonder about the exact mechanics and implications of the associated efforts. This special issue of Earth and Space Science entitled "Geoscience Papers of the Future" includes a review of existing best practices for digital scholarship and bundles a set of example articles that share their digital research products and reflect on the process of opening their scientific approach in a common quest for reproducible science.

  11. Introduction: Special issue on advances in topobathymetric mapping, models, and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean B.; Brock, John C.; Parrish, Christopher E.; Rogers, Jeffrey N.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of near-shore topography and bathymetry is required for many geospatial data applications in the coastal environment. New data sources and processing methods are facilitating development of seamless, regional-scale topobathymetric digital elevation models. These elevation models integrate disparate multi-sensor, multi-temporal topographic and bathymetric datasets to provide a coherent base layer for coastal science applications such as wetlands mapping and monitoring, sea-level rise assessment, benthic habitat mapping, erosion monitoring, and storm impact assessment. The focus of this special issue is on recent advances in the source data, data processing and integration methods, and applications of topobathymetric datasets.

  12. Sexual orientation across the life span: introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Charlotte J

    2008-01-01

    What impact does sexual orientation have on human development over the life span? As questions related to sexual orientation have become increasingly topics of public discussion and debate in recent years, psychological study of the issues has also burgeoned. What was once a new frontier for research has matured into a large, complex, and rapidly growing area of knowledge. Important research is being conducted on many issues, by diverse investigators, from a number of theoretical perspectives, in many parts of the world. The articles in this special section provide only a sampling of current research, but they begin to suggest the vitality and excitement of a field that is coming into its own.

  13. Introduction to the special series on "Narcissistic personality disorder--new perspectives on diagnosis and treatment".

    PubMed

    Ronningstam, Elsa

    2014-10-01

    The first aim for this Special Series on "Narcissistic personality disorder--new perspecitves on diagnosis and treatment" is to further the dimensional self-regulatory diagnostic approach for identifying NPD by integrating range of functioning, co-occurring grandiosity and vulnerability, compromised empathic ability, self-enhancing interpersonal strategies and relatedness, and overt and covert expressions of pathological narcissism. A second aim is to broaden the conceptualization of pathological narcissism by identifying it in terms of attachment and mentalization/reflective function. The third aim is to apply the combined dimensional and trait diagnostic approach to clinical practice, both diagnostic evaluation and treatment.

  14. Introduction to Chemistry and Applications in Nature of Mass Independent Isotope Effects Special Feature

    PubMed Central

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented. PMID:24167299

  15. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    PubMed

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented.

  16. Introduction to the special issue celebrating 200 years of geodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strak, Vincent; Schellart, Wouter P.

    2016-10-01

    Since the first published laboratory models from Sir James Hall in 1815, analogue and numerical geodynamic modelling have become widely used as they provide qualitative and quantitative insights into a broad range of geological processes. To celebrate the 200th anniversary of geodynamic modelling, this special issue gathers review works and recent studies on analogue and numerical modelling of tectonic and geodynamic processes, as an opportunity to present some of the milestones and recent breakthroughs in this field, to discuss potential issues and to highlight possible future developments.

  17. Introduction to C. M. Scarfe Memorial: Special Section on Silicate Melts and Mantle Petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Donald B.

    1990-09-01

    In the summer of 1988 it was decided to commemorate Chris's career with a special session at an international meeting and a publication containing contributions volunteered by his former friends and associates. The 1989 Spring Meeting of the American Geophysical Union was chosen for the memorial session and the Journal of Geophysical Research was chosen for the publication of contributed scientific papers. This section would not have been possible without the active encouragement, advice, and direction provided by Bob Liebermann. I also extend my thanks to the participants and to the reviewers.

  18. A Visual Editor in Java for View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansifer, Ryan

    2000-01-01

    In this project we continued the development of a visual editor in the Java programming language to create screens on which to display real-time data. The data comes from the numerous systems monitoring the operation of the space shuttle while on the ground and in space, and from the many tests of subsystems. The data can be displayed on any computer platform running a Java-enabled World Wide Web (WWW) browser and connected to the Internet. Previously a special-purpose program bad been written to display data on emulations of character-based display screens used for many years at NASA. The goal now is to display bit-mapped screens created by a visual editor. We report here on the visual editor that creates the display screens. This project continues the work we bad done previously. Previously we had followed the design of the 'beanbox,' a prototype visual editor created by Sun Microsystems. We abandoned this approach and implemented a prototype using a more direct approach. In addition, our prototype is based on newly released Java 2 graphical user interface (GUI) libraries. The result has been a visually more appealing appearance and a more robust application.

  19. Environmental occurrences, behavior, fate, and ecological effects of nanomaterials: an introduction to the special series.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Gregory V; Hotze, Ernest M; Bernhardt, Emily S; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Pedersen, Joel A; Wiesner, Mark R; Xing, Baoshan

    2010-01-01

    The release of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into the biosphere will increase as industries find new and useful ways to utilize these materials. Scientists and engineers are beginning to assess the material properties that determine the fate, transport, and effects of ENMs; however, the potential impacts of released ENMs on organisms, ecosystems, and human health remain largely unknown. This special collection of four review papers and four technical papers identifies many key and emerging knowledge gaps regarding the interactions between nanomaterials and ecosystems. These critical knowledge gaps include the form, route, and mass of nanomaterials entering the environment; the transformations and ultimate fate of nanomaterials in the environment; the transport, distribution, and bioavailability of nanomaterials in environmental media; and the organismal responses to nanomaterial exposure and effects of nanomaterial inputs, on ecological communities and biogeochemical processes at relevant environmental concentrations and forms. This introductory section summarizes the state of knowledge and emerging areas of research needs identified within the special collection. Despite recent progress in understanding the transport, transformations, and fate of ENMs in model environments and organisms, there remains a large need for fundamental information regarding releases, distribution, transformations and persistence, and bioavailability of nanomaterials. Moreover, fate, transport, bioaccumulation, and ecological impacts research is needed using environmentally relevant concentrations and forms of ENMs in real field materials and with a broader range of organisms.

  20. Introduction to the special issue on circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms influence virtually every aspect of behavior. This special issue provides updates on the current state and future directions for the field of circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience. Recent data have linked circadian rhythms to behavioral and physiological phenomena and disease states in virtually every area of behavioral and biomedical science. Specifically, a growing interest in the cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and metabolic consequences of circadian rhythm disorders and dysfunction is emerging. This special issue is not intended to provide an exhaustive overview of the entire field of chronobiology or behavioral rhythms. Instead, we invited researchers from a variety of fields to critically review and integrate studies that address the roles of circadian rhythms in behavioral neuroscience. The papers included in this issue range from the molecular biology of clock genes to the behavior of free-living animals, and cover a wide variety of species ranging from insects, to rodents, to humans. As such, the reviews provide an overview of the burgeoning field of circadian rhythms within behavioral neuroscience.

  1. Introduction to the special issue from the 2014 meeting of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society.

    PubMed

    Young, Jared W; Hall, F Scott; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Kent, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In 2013, President Obama launched what has been optimistically described as the "decade of the brain". The launch of this effort comes on the back of widespread acknowledgement that more is required to aid those suffering from mental health disorders. Specifically, a greater understanding of the neural circuitry related to behaviors specific to mental health disorders is needed. The field of research that relates the circuitry of the brain to specific aspects of behavior is referred to as behavioral neuroscience. The International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (IBNS) was founded in 1992 specifically to meet on an annual basis and present the latest research findings in this field, and to gather together the international research community to discuss issues important for the development and progress of this scientific discipline. This special issue includes reviews of topics of emerging interest and advancing knowledge in behavioral neuroscience, based on symposia presented at the 2014 IBNS meeting. Topics discussed at the annual IBNS meeting ranged from investigations of the neural mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, traumatic brain injury, and risk-taking behavior, to behavioral consequences of obesity and immune dysfunction. Novel treatment areas are covered such as the use of deep brain stimulation, as well as investigation of the behavioral impacts of nicotine withdrawal and how this research will influence the development of nicotine cessation treatments. Hence, this special issue covers a wide-range of topics in behavioral neuroscience offering an insight into the challenges faced by researchers in this decade of the brain.

  2. Introduction to the special series on health disparities in genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Graves, Kristi D; Tercyak, Kenneth P

    2015-02-01

    Given the importance of minority health and health-disparities research in addressing our nation's health-care objectives, Health Psychology encourages manuscripts that reflect a range of themes in this topic. This special section focuses on genomic medicine and continues the journal's effort to highlight behavioral research in disparities. Genomics is a rapidly evolving science and is becoming ubiquitous throughout health care. Researchers and clinicians are increasingly turning their attention to the human genome and its interaction with the environment to understand root causes of many chronic diseases. For all individuals, families, and communities within our society to benefit equitably from such discoveries, genomic research must become an ally in the fight to eliminate health disparities. In this special section, 3 studies concentrate on understanding genomic risk information in racially and ethnically diverse populations, and how that information is communicated and received. These works represent a call to action for health psychologists (and social and behavioral scientists more broadly) to improve our understanding of the role of sociocultural factors in the delivery of genomic medicine through empirical research on affect, cognition, behavior, and patient-provider communication.

  3. Introduction to the Special Issue: Beyond traits: integrating behaviour into plant ecology and biology

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, James F.

    2015-01-01

    The way that plants are conceptualized in the context of ecological understanding is changing. In one direction, a reductionist school is pulling plants apart into a list of measured ‘traits’, from which ecological function and outcomes of species interactions may be inferred. This special issue offers an alternative, and more holistic, view: that the ecological functions performed by a plant will be a consequence not only of their complement of traits but also of the ways in which their component parts are used in response to environmental and social conditions. This is the realm of behavioural ecology, a field that has greatly advanced our understanding of animal biology, ecology and evolution. Included in this special issue are 10 articles focussing not on the tried and true metaphor that plant growth is similar to animal movement, but instead on how application of principles from animal behaviour can improve our ability to understand plant biology and ecology. The goals are not to draw false parallels, nor to anthropomorphize plant biology, but instead to demonstrate how existing and robust theory based on fundamental principles can provide novel understanding for plants. Key to this approach is the recognition that behaviour and intelligence are not the same. Many organisms display complex behaviours despite a lack of cognition (as it is traditionally understood) or any hint of a nervous system. The applicability of behavioural concepts to plants is further enhanced with the realization that all organisms face the same harsh forces of natural selection in the context of finding resources, mates and coping with neighbours. As these ecological realities are often highly variable in space and time, it is not surprising that all organisms—even plants—exhibit complex behaviours to handle this variability. The articles included here address diverse topics in behavioural ecology, as applied to plants: general conceptual understanding, plant nutrient foraging

  4. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Comment on `Magnetic and electric field strengths of high voltage power lines and household appliances' José Luis Giordano Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, CPSI, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Twins paradox S R Carson Norton College, Malton, North Yorkshire, UK On alternative ways of finding the ratio of specific heats of gases Tomas Ficker Physics Department, Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic

  5. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Physics and history Arthur I Miller Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Physics and history: a reply David Miller Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Cathode rays, the electron and Thomson's discovery John Harris 33 Glentham Road, London SW13 9JD, UK Vectors: swallow them whole! David Wheeler Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

  6. Qualitative and mixed methods research in dissemination and implementation science: introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Southam-Gerow, Michael A; Dorsey, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This special issue provides examples of how qualitative and mixed methods research approaches can be used in dissemination and implementation science. In this introductory article, we provide a brief rationale for why and how qualitative and mixed methods approaches can be useful in moving the field forward. Specifically, we provide a brief primer on common qualitative methods, including a review of guidelines provided by the National Institutes of Health. Next, we introduce the six articles in the issue. The first of the articles by Palinkas represents a more thorough and authoritative discussion related to qualitative methods, using the other five articles in the issue (and other published works) as examples. The remaining five articles are empirical and/or descriptive articles of recently completed or ongoing qualitative or mixed methods studies related to dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices for children and adolescents.

  7. Introduction to the special section on mixture modeling in personality assessment.

    PubMed

    Wright, Aidan G C; Hallquist, Michael N

    2014-01-01

    Latent variable models offer a conceptual and statistical framework for evaluating the underlying structure of psychological constructs, including personality and psychopathology. Complex structures that combine or compare categorical and dimensional latent variables can be accommodated using mixture modeling approaches, which provide a powerful framework for testing nuanced theories about psychological structure. This special series includes introductory primers on cross-sectional and longitudinal mixture modeling, in addition to empirical examples applying these techniques to real-world data collected in clinical settings. This group of articles is designed to introduce personality assessment scientists and practitioners to a general latent variable framework that we hope will stimulate new research and application of mixture models to the assessment of personality and its pathology.

  8. Parenting Strategies in Modern and Emerging Economies : Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kermyt G; Starkweather, Kathrine E

    2017-03-09

    Independent of ecology, subsistence strategy, social complexity, or other aspects of socioecology, the altricial nature of young humans requires mothers to have help raising their offspring. What seems to be context-dependent, however, is who the helpers are, how they invest, and what the impacts of that investment are. In a series of papers that focus on parental and alloparental investment across five populations, this special issue of Human Nature uses evolutionary theory to examine how socioecological context influences modes of direct parental investment among the boat-dwelling Shodagor of Bangladesh (Starkweather), modes of indirect paternal investment in the modern United States (Anderson), and the biological outcome of paternal investment for men in Jamaica (Gray et al.), as well as direct alloparental investment among village Bangladeshis (Perry) and indirect alloparental investment in breastfeeding practices in the United States (Cisco).

  9. Development of borderline personality disorder in adolescence and young adulthood: introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Stepp, Stephanie D

    2012-01-01

    Recognizable symptoms and features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) appear during adolescence. However, there has been resistance to diagnose or research this disorder prior to adulthood because of clinical lore that BPD is a long-standing illness and that personality traits are not stable until adulthood. This has resulted in little information regarding the development of and risk factors for BPD in youth. The goal of this special section is to examine the development of BPD in adolescence and young adulthood using a broad collection of approaches, including a theoretical review paper, two prospective studies, and a multi-method cross-sectional study. This body of work provides new insights into vulnerabilities that may transact with early attachment relationships and experiences to predict the emergence of BPD in adolescence and young adulthood. These papers also point to future research that is needed to better understand the etiology, development, and course of BPD.

  10. Introduction to special section: Science and technology of over-the-horizon radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkey, F. Tom

    1998-07-01

    The rationale for the development of over-the-horizon (OTH) radar systems operating at frequencies in the HF band arose out of a perceived need for an early-warning defense network. That need changed with the end of the Cold War; however, today OTH radars play a major role in the CounterDrug Program for the interdiction of drug-smuggling aircraft. This special section of Radio Science is devoted to a review of OTH radar technology, with emphasis on contemporary developments in this field. The collection of papers presented here has evolved largely from research and development efforts directed to improving the performance of OTH radar systems deployed both in the United States and in Australia.

  11. Toward an Anthropology of Insurance and Health Reform: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Dao, Amy; Mulligan, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a special issue of Medical Anthropology Quarterly on health insurance and health reform. We begin by reviewing anthropological contributions to the study of financial models for health care and then discuss the unique contributions offered by the articles of this collection. The contributors demonstrate how insurance accentuates--but does not resolve tensions between granting universal access to care and rationing limited resources, between social solidarity and individual responsibility, and between private markets and public goods. Insurance does not have a single meaning, logic, or effect but needs to be viewed in practice, in context, and from multiple vantage points. As the field of insurance studies in the social sciences grows and as health reforms across the globe continue to use insurance to restructure the organization of health care, it is incumbent on medical anthropologists to undertake a renewed and concerted study of health insurance and health systems.

  12. Facilitating reintegration for military service personnel, veterans, and their families: An introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2017-01-01

    As service members return from active duty and, in some cases, exit the military, they face a process of reintegration (also referred to as community reintegration) as they seek to resume participation in their life roles as civilians. Facilitating this dynamic process of reintegration for service members, veterans, and their families-including outlining potential strategies for supporting this return to civilian life and its demands, roles, and responsibilities-is the focus of this Special Issue. Reintegration has been framed as a national priority (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 2015) and has been a point of emphasis of efforts at federal, state, and local levels. As the articles in this issue suggest, multiple public, private, and voluntary systems and the communities to which service members, veterans, and their families return can help influence their health outcomes and, ultimately, their reintegration. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Introduction to the special section on "Hormones and cognition: perspectives, controversies, and challenges for future research".

    PubMed

    Frick, Karyn M

    2012-02-01

    The research of the past two decades has firmly established that hormones modulate numerous aspects of cognitive function, including memory, attention, decision-making, and sensory processing. That such a wide variety of hormones influence cognition mediated by multiple nonhypothalamic brain regions illustrates the critical importance of hormones to neural and cognitive function. The diversity of hormonal effects on cognition is evident in the collection of reviews and original research articles assembled for this special section. Together, these articles provide an overview of recent research on varied topics in hormones and cognition, address controversial issues in the field, and discuss challenges that must be overcome in future research to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms through which hormones modulate cognitive function.

  14. Introduction to the Special Issue on Digital Signal Processing in Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, D. C.; Kocz, J.; Bailes, M.; Greenhill, L. J.

    Advances in astronomy are intimately linked to advances in digital signal processing (DSP). This special issue is focused upon advances in DSP within radio astronomy. The trend within that community is to use off-the-shelf digital hardware where possible and leverage advances in high performance computing. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are being used in place of application-specific circuits (ASICs); high-speed Ethernet and Infiniband are being used for interconnect in place of custom backplanes. Further, to lower hurdles in digital engineering, communities have designed and released general-purpose FPGA-based DSP systems, such as the CASPER ROACH board, ASTRON Uniboard, and CSIRO Redback board. In this introductory paper, we give a brief historical overview, a summary of recent trends, and provide an outlook on future directions.

  15. Introduction to the special issue on recentering science: Replication, robustness, and reproducibility in psychophysiology.

    PubMed

    Kappenman, Emily S; Keil, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the psychological and behavioral sciences have increased efforts to strengthen methodological practices and publication standards, with the ultimate goal of enhancing the value and reproducibility of published reports. These issues are especially important in the multidisciplinary field of psychophysiology, which yields rich and complex data sets with a large number of observations. In addition, the technological tools and analysis methods available in the field of psychophysiology are continually evolving, widening the array of techniques and approaches available to researchers. This special issue presents articles detailing rigorous and systematic evaluations of tasks, measures, materials, analysis approaches, and statistical practices in a variety of subdisciplines of psychophysiology. These articles highlight challenges in conducting and interpreting psychophysiological research and provide data-driven, evidence-based recommendations for overcoming those challenges to produce robust, reproducible results in the field of psychophysiology.

  16. Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension: an introduction to tectnophysics special issue

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wijk, Jolante W

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics and evolution of rifts and continental rifted margins have been the subject of intense study and debate for many years and still remain the focus of active investigation. The 2006 AGU Fall Meeting session 'Extensional Processes Leading to the Formation of Basins and Rifted Margins, From Volcanic to Magma-Limited' included several contributions that illustrated recent advances in our understanding of rifting processes, from the early stages of extension to breakup and incipient seafloor spreading. Following this session, we aimed to assemble a multi-disciplinary collection of papers focussing on the architecture, formation and evolution of continental rift zones and rifted margins. This Tectonophysics Special Issue 'Role of magmatism in continental lithosphere extension' comprises 14 papers that present some of the recent insights on rift and rifted margins dynamics, emphasising the role of magmatism in extensional processes. The purpose of this contribution is to introduce these papers.

  17. The Importance of the Prenatal Environment in Behavioral Genetics: Introduction to Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Knopik, Valerie S; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; de Geus, Eco; Boomsma, Dorret

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and discuss a special issue on prenatal factors in genetics research, that includes 14 papers ranging from studies on chorionicity, smoking during pregnancy, and more general prenatal risks to papers about theory, methods and measurement. There are two review papers, one focused on chorioncity and the second on pre- and perinatal ischemia-hypoxia, that help to frame the state of research in these areas with a focus on the relevance across multiple fields of study. Taken together, these papers clearly demonstrate the importance of considering prenatal environment influences on functioning in offspring across the lifespan while also underscoring the importance of using genetically informed designs as a means to clarify causality.

  18. Great nature's second course: Introduction to the special issue on the behavioral neuroscience of sleep.

    PubMed

    Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Sleep is necessary for normal psychological functioning, and psychological function in turn affects sleep integrity. Recent investigations delineate the relation of sleep to a broad array of processes ranging from learning and memory to emotional reactivity and mood, and use a variety of methodological approaches (imaging, electrophysiological, behavioral) to reveal the complex relations between sleep and the functioning of the awake brain. The articles in this issue advance our fundamental knowledge of the relation of sleep to psychological function. In addition, several of the articles discuss how sleep is affected by or affects human clinical conditions, including insomnia, epilepsy, mild cognitive impairment, bipolar disorder, and cancer. Together, the articles of this special issue highlight recent progress in understanding the behavioral neuroscience of sleep and identify promising areas for future research, including the possibility of sleep-based interventions to improve psychological health. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Introduction to special section: Stress triggers, stress shadows, and implications for seismic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Many aspects of earthquake mechanics remain an enigma as we enter the closing years of the twentieth century. One potential bright spot is the realization that simple calculations of stress changes may explain some earthquake interactions, just as previous and on going studies of stress changes have begun to explain human-induced seismicity. This paper, which introduces the special section "Stress Triggers, Stress Shadows, and Implications for Seismic Hazard," reviews many published works and presents a compilation of quantitative earthquake interaction studies from a stress change perspective. This synthesis supplies some clues about certain aspects of earthquake mechanics. It also demonstrates that much work remains before we can understand the complete story of how earthquakes work.

  20. Introduction to the Special Issue on Propensity Score Methods in Behavioral Research.

    PubMed

    Pruzek, Robert M

    2011-05-31

    This issue includes six articles that present logic, methods, and models for causal analyses of observational data, in particular those based on propensity score (PS) methods. The articles include a general introduction to propensity score analysis (PSA), uses of PSA in mediation studies, issues involved in choosing covariates, challenges that often arise in PSA applications, hierarchical data issues and models, and an application in an educational testing context. In this editorial I briefly summarize each article and make a few recommendations that relate to future applications in this field: the first pertains to how propensity score (PS) work could profit by connecting it with stronger forms of randomized experiments, not just simple randomization; the second to how and why graphical methods could be used to greater advantage in PSA studies; then why it might be helpful to reconsider the meaning of the term "treatments" in observational studies and why conventional usage might be modified; and finally, to the distinction between retrospective and prospective approaches to observational study design, noting the advantages, when feasible, of the latter approach.

  1. School-related factors in the development of bullying perpetration and victimization: introduction to the special section.

    PubMed

    Brendgen, Mara; Troop-Gordon, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Although not limited to school contexts, bullying perpetration and victimization often emanates from social ecologies formed within the classroom. Thus, to fully illuminate risk for involvement in bullying, we must investigate contextual features of schools that heighten or minimize aggression among students and the targeting of children for peer victimization. To this end, the articles in this special section each contribute conceptually and empirically to the study of school-related factors in bullying and peer victimization. This introduction summarizes and highlights the major findings of each paper, organized around two major themes of the articles-the role of peer group ecologies and the role of the classroom teacher. We conclude our synopsis by discussing implications for intervention and the need for anti-bullying efforts that systemically address the peer group and teacher influences identified in these investigations.

  2. Elaborating the assimilation model: Introduction to a special section on case studies of setbacks within sessions and therapeutic collaboration.

    PubMed

    Caro Gabalda, Isabel; Stiles, William B

    2016-11-01

    This article introduces a Special Section of case studies that focus on therapeutic collaboration and setbacks in the process of assimilation with the aim of contributing to the evolution of the assimilation model of therapeutic change. The first study examined setbacks in two depression cases (a good vs. a poor outcome) treated with emotion-focused therapy. The second article traced how therapist activities and positions toward internal voices were associated with setbacks in a case treated with linguistic therapy of evaluation. The third article studied contributions of therapeutic collaboration for both advances and setbacks in assimilation in two contrasting cases treated with emotion-focused therapy. The fourth and final article analyzed the therapeutic collaboration in episodes of ambivalence in two cases of narrative therapy (one good outcome, one poor outcome) reflecting on the implications for the assimilation model's perspective on the therapeutic relationship. This Introduction concludes by offering some suggestions for theory-building within the assimilation model.

  3. Reconciling evidence-based practice and cultural competence in mental health services: introduction to a special issue.

    PubMed

    Gone, Joseph P

    2015-04-01

    The calls for evidence-based practice (EBP) and cultural competence (CC) represent two increasingly influential mandates within the mental health professions. Advocates of EBP seek to standardize clinical practice by ensuring that only treatment techniques that have demonstrated therapeutic outcomes under scientifically controlled conditions would be adopted and promoted in mental health services. Advocates of CC seek to diversify clinical practice by ensuring that treatment approaches are designed and refined for a multicultural clientele that reflects a wide variety of psychological orientations and life experiences. As these two powerful mandates collide, the fundamental challenge becomes how to accommodate substantive cultural divergences in psychosocial experience using narrowly prescriptive clinical practices and approaches, without trivializing either professional knowledge or cultural difference. In this Introduction to a special issue of Transcultural Psychiatry, the virtue of an interdisciplinary conversation between and among anthropologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social work researchers in addressing these tensions is extolled.

  4. Introduction to the special issue on medically unexplained symptoms: background and future directions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J

    2007-10-01

    This special issue is devoted to the topic of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by persistent physical symptoms that cannot be explained by medical illness or injury. Although psychological factors have long been regarded as central to these problems, patients with MUS have typically been managed within medical settings and referrals to mental health services have been relatively rare. In recent years, however, interest in the psychological nature and treatment of MUS has expanded, culminating in the development of tailored psychological interventions for these conditions. This, coupled with the increasing willingness of practitioners to diagnose conditions such as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome, has led to an increase in the number of patients who are referred for psychological treatment. At present, however, many psychological therapists are unfamiliar with the literature on MUS. With this in mind, this special issue presents a series of papers that provide an overview of what is known about the nature, aetiology and treatment of medically unexplained illness. This introductory paper provides general information about the clinical presentation, diagnosis, classification, terminology and epidemiology of MUS in adults, and concludes with an examination of important areas for future development in the field. Subsequent papers address the psychological mechanisms [Deary, V., Chalder, T., & Sharpe, M. (2007-this issue). The cognitive behavioural model of medically unexplained symptoms: A theoretical and empirical review. Clinical Psychology Review; Iverson, A., Chalder, T., & Wessely, S. (2007-this issue). Gulf war illness: Lessons from medically unexplained illness. Clinical Psychology Review; Rief, W., & Broadbent, E. (2007-this issue). Explaining medically unexplained symptoms: Models and mechanisms. Clinical Psychology Review; Roelofs, K., & Spinhoven, P. (2007-this issue

  5. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in recent years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA-Cadarache, France Jiaqui Dong, Southwestern Institute of Physics, China Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Ambrogio Fasoli, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland Eric Fredrickson, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Manuel Garcia-Munoz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany William Heidbrink, California University, USA Katsumi Ida, National Inst. For Fusion Science, Japan Peter Stangeby, Toronto University, Canada James Strachan, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Victor Yavorskij, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2012. Our thanks to them!

  6. Introduction to the special issue, pathways between genes, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Kremen, William S; Jacobson, Kristen C

    2010-03-01

    In the past 10 years or so, with the sequencing of the human genome and rapid advances in the development of high throughput techniques, the field of behavior genetics has increasingly moved toward the detection of actual genes and environmental factors. However, the field is still in the relatively early stages of understanding some of the basic facts about the complex genetic underpinnings of brain structure and function and their relationship to behavior. The 15 articles in this special issue were selected to represent the diversity of methodologies applied to the complexity of pathways linking genes, brain, and behavior. While providing strong evidence for the role of genes in individual differences in brain structure and function, these papers also demonstrate that environmental experiences alter neurobiological pathways, and that genetic factors may further moderate the impact of environmental experience. Most importantly, the breadth of studies proves that in order to be able to trace the pathways between genes, brain, and behavior, we need experts in genetics, neuroscience, psychology, and psychiatry.

  7. Microbial Transport and Fate in the Subsurface Environment: Introduction to the Special Section.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Schijven, Jack; Harter, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Microorganisms constitute an almost exclusive form of life in the earth's subsurface environment (not including caves), particularly at depths exceeding the soil horizon. While of broad interest to ecology and geology, scientific interest in the fate and transport of microorganisms, particularly those introduced through the anthropogenic environment, has focused on understanding the subsurface environment as a pathway for human pathogens and on optimizing the use of microbial organisms for remediation of potable groundwater. This special section, inspired by the 2014 Ninth International Symposium for Subsurface Microbiology, brings together recent efforts to better understand the spatiotemporal occurrence of anthropogenic microbial groundwater contamination and the fate and transport of microbes in the subsurface environment: in soils, deep unsaturated zones, and within aquifer systems. Work includes field reconnaissance, controlled laboratory studies to improve our understanding of specific fate and transport processes, and the development and application of improved mechanistic understanding of microbial fate and transport processes in the subsurface environment. The findings confirm and also challenge the limitations of our current understanding of highly complex microbial fate and transport processes across spatiotemporal scales in the subsurface environment; they also add to the increasing knowledge base to improve our ability to protect drinking water resources and perform in situ environmental remediation.

  8. Residence times in subsurface hydrological systems, introduction to the Special Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dreuzy, J.-R.; Ginn, T. R.

    2016-12-01

    Interest in the residence time distribution (RTD) as a comprehensive measure of subsurface hydrologic systems is growing. This focus is resulting from recognition that diverse vadose zone, groundwater flows, and transfer between hydrological compartments, are fundamentally related to the system RTD. Furthermore, transport of chemical or biological species and the biogeochemical activities that govern their fate, is principally reflected by the system RTD. Thus the RTD is used in geochemical interpretation of environmental tracers, in direct reactive transport approaches, and ultimately for sustainability and protection assessments in the consideration of transient boundary flows due to climate change or other causes, anthropogenic and/or natural. The RTD has been handled in the past primarily as a byproduct of models. It is now increasingly viewed as an integrative characteristic for which shape-free and generic distributions are developed, that links conceptual hydrology, characterization data, and mathematical models. Intermediary between mechanistic modeling, geochemical data and predictions, the role for residence time distribution is to represent consistently the flow, transport and reactivity processes while reaching the objective of biogeochemical interpretation and sustainability assessment. After some outline of the scientific context, we introduce the contributions of this special issue and conclude with the emerging challenges.

  9. Introduction to special section on The U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettich, Richard A.; Wright, L. Donelson; Signell, Richard; Friedrichs, Carl; Friedrichs, Marjy; Harding, John; Fennel, Katja; Howlett, Eoin; Graves, Sara; Smith, Elizabeth; Crane, Gary; Baltes, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Strong and strategic collaborations among experts from academia, federal operational centers, and industry have been forged to create a U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed (COMT). The COMT mission is to accelerate the transition of scientific and technical advances from the coastal and ocean modeling research community to improved operational ocean products and services. This is achieved via the evaluation of existing technology or the development of new technology depending on the status of technology within the research community. The initial phase of the COMT has addressed three coastal and ocean prediction challenges of great societal importance: estuarine hypoxia, shelf hypoxia, and coastal inundation. A fourth effort concentrated on providing and refining the cyberinfrastructure and cyber tools to support the modeling work and to advance interoperability and community access to the COMT archive. This paper presents an overview of the initiation of the COMT, the findings of each team and a discussion of the role of the COMT in research to operations and its interface with the coastal and ocean modeling community in general. Detailed technical results are presented in the accompanying series of 16 technical papers in this special issue.

  10. Introduction for the special issue on recent advances in drug delivery across tissue barriers.

    PubMed

    Mrsny, Randall J; Brayden, David J

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of Tissue Barriers contains a series of reviews with the common theme of how biological barriers established at epithelial tissues limit the uptake of macromolecular therapeutics. By improving our functional understanding of these barriers, the majority of the authors have highlighted potential strategies that might be applied to the non-invasive delivery of biopharmaceuticals that would otherwise require an injection format for administration. Half of the articles focus on the potential of particular technologies to assist oral delivery of peptides, proteins and other macromolecules. These include use of prodrug chemistry to improve molecule stability and permeability, and the related potential for oral delivery of poorly permeable agents by cell-penetrating peptides and dendrimers. Safety aspects of intestinal permeation enhancers are discussed, along with the more recent foray into drug-device combinations as represented by intestinal microneedles and externally-applied ultrasound. Other articles highlight the crossover between food research and oral delivery based on nanoparticle technology, while the final one provides a fascinating interpretation of the physiological problems associated with subcutaneous insulin delivery and how inefficient it is at targeting the liver.

  11. Introduction to the special issue on GOCE Earth science applications and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meijde, M.; Pail, R.; Bingham, R.

    2015-03-01

    With the launch of the Gravity field and Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) in 2009 the study of Earth's gravity field received another boost. After the time-dependent and long-wavelength information from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission a new sensor with high accuracy and spatial resolution was available for determination of the Earth's gravity field and geoid. Equipped with a 6-component gradiometer and flying at an altitude of 260 km and less, GOCE provides the most detailed measurements of Earth's gravity from space to date. Additionally, GOCE provides gravity gradients, i.e., the three-dimensional second derivatives of the gravitational potential. This special issue provides a review of the results presented at the 'GOCE solid Earth workshop' at the University of Twente, The Netherlands (2012). The goal of this 2-day workshop was to provide training on the usage of GOCE data as well as to present the latest scientific results. The main workshop components were: to show the latest results on GOCE data in relation to solid Earth, provide new users with tips and tricks on which models and software to use, discuss quality and reliability of gravity data and models, and how to integrate GOCE data with own (local) gravity data. The workshop specifically focussed on where GOCE data has made a unique contribution and provides insights that would not have been possible without GOCE.

  12. Introduction to the special issue: parsimony and redundancy in models of language.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Daniel; Kerz, Elma; Snider, Neal; Jaeger, T Florian

    2013-09-01

    One of the most fundamental goals in linguistic theory is to understand the nature of linguistic knowledge, that is, the representations and mechanisms that figure in a cognitively plausible model of human language-processing. The past 50 years have witnessed the development and refinement of various theories about what kind of 'stuff' human knowledge of language consists of, and technological advances now permit the development of increasingly sophisticated computational models implementing key assumptions of different theories from both rationalist and empiricist perspectives. The present special issue does not aim to present or discuss the arguments for and against the two epistemological stances or discuss evidence that supports either of them (cf. Bod, Hay, & Jannedy, 2003; Christiansen & Chater, 2008; Hauser, Chomsky, & Fitch, 2002; Oaksford & Chater, 2007; O'Donnell, Hauser, & Fitch, 2005). Rather, the research presented in this issue, which we label usage-based here, conceives of linguistic knowledge as being induced from experience. According to the strongest of such accounts, the acquisition and processing of language can be explained with reference to general cognitive mechanisms alone (rather than with reference to innate language-specific mechanisms). Defined in these terms, usage-based approaches encompass approaches referred to as experience-based, performance-based and/or emergentist approaches (Amrnon & Snider, 2010; Bannard, Lieven, & Tomasello, 2009; Bannard & Matthews, 2008; Chater & Manning, 2006; Clark & Lappin, 2010; Gerken, Wilson, & Lewis, 2005; Gomez, 2002;

  13. Introduction to the Special Issue: Across the horizon: scale effects in global change research.

    PubMed

    Gornish, Elise S; Leuzinger, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the increasing speed and magnitude in which habitats worldwide are experiencing environmental change, making accurate predictions of the effects of global change on ecosystems and the organisms that inhabit them have become an important goal for ecologists. Experimental and modelling approaches aimed at understanding the linkages between factors of global change and biotic responses have become numerous and increasingly complex in order to adequately capture the multifarious dynamics associated with these relationships. However, constrained by resources, experiments are often conducted at small spatiotemporal scales (e.g. looking at a plot of a few square metres over a few years) and at low organizational levels (looking at organisms rather than ecosystems) in spite of both theoretical and experimental work that suggests ecological dynamics across scales can be dissimilar. This phenomenon has been hypothesized to occur because the mechanisms that drive dynamics across scales differ. A good example is the effect of elevated CO2 on transpiration. While at the leaf level, transpiration can be reduced, at the stand level, transpiration can increase because leaf area per unit ground area increases. The reported net effect is then highly dependent on the spatiotemporal scale. This special issue considers the biological relevancy inherent in the patterns associated with the magnitude and type of response to changing environmental conditions, across scales. This collection of papers attempts to provide a comprehensive treatment of this phenomenon in order to help develop an understanding of the extent of, and mechanisms involved with, ecological response to global change.

  14. Moving Denitrifying Bioreactors beyond Proof of Concept: Introduction to the Special Section.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Laura E; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-05-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors are organic carbon-filled excavations designed to enhance the natural process of denitrification for the simple, passive treatment of nitrate-nitrogen. Research on and installation of these bioreactors has accelerated within the past 10 years, particularly in watersheds concerned about high nonpoint-source nitrate loads and also for tertiary wastewater treatment. This special section, inspired by the meeting of the Managing Denitrification in Agronomic Systems Community at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, aims to firmly establish that denitrifying bioreactors for treatment of nitrate in drainage waters, groundwater, and some wastewaters have moved beyond the proof of concept. This collection of 14 papers expands the peer-reviewed literature of denitrifying bioreactors into new locations, applications, and environmental conditions. There is momentum behind the pairing of wood-based bioreactors with other media (biochar, corn cobs) and in novel designs (e.g., use within treatment trains or use of baffles) to broaden applicability into new kinds of waters and pollutants and to improve performance under challenging field conditions such as cool early season agricultural drainage. Concerns about negative bioreactor by-products (nitrous oxide and hydrogen sulfide emissions, start-up nutrient flushing) are ongoing, but this translates into a significant research opportunity to develop more advanced designs and to fine tune management strategies. Future research must think more broadly to address bioreactor impacts on holistic watershed health and greenhouse gas balances and to facilitate collaborations that allow investigation of mechanisms within the bioreactor "black box."

  15. New TOR editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    1984-04-01

    David A. Brooks, associate professor at Texas A&M University's oceanography department, has been appointed editor designate of The Oceanography Report (TOR). He succeeds Arnold L. Gordon of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Gordon, who initiated TOR in September 1981, is the new president-elect of the AGU Ocean Sciences Section.Brooks, a physical oceanographer, has been at Texas A&M for 6 years. His research interests include waves and tides, the interaction of waves and currents, Gulf Stream fluctuations, and Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of Maine circulation. Before going to Texas A&M, Brooks was a research associate and graduate faculty member at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

  16. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Plasmaphysik, Germany) V. Philipps (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany) S. Zweben (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA) Y. Hirano (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan) Y. Takase (Tokyo University, Japan) In addition there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2008. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2007 award was Clemente Angioni for the paper entitled `Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade' (Nucl. Fusion 44 8277-845). The winner of the 2008 Nuclear Fusion award is Todd Evans et al for the paper `Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 45 595-607). The awards were presented by the IAEA Deputy Director General, Werner Burkart, and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, on 16 October 2008 at the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. Given the topicality of these papers for the ITER design, it is a matter of pride to the journal that the work should be published in Nuclear Fusion. Reviews Like many who have worked for a long time in the field, I still make use of Nuclear Fusion Reviews that go back 20 or 30 years. It is particularly useful, therefore, that the Board of Editors has been working to re-activate the review programme. The first fruits will appear in this issue, in the form of `A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa. The special procedures for Reviews should be noted: most specifically that they should normally be commissioned by the Board of Editors. However, not only is the Board of Editors working on a programme but I am sure that they would be pleased to consider suggestions for review subjects. Letters The reputation of Nuclear

  17. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  18. Sources, interactions, and ecological impacts of organic contaminants in water, soil, and sediment: an introduction to the special series.

    PubMed

    Pignatello, Joseph J; Katz, Brian G; Li, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural and urban activities result in the release of a large number of organic compounds that are suspected of impacting human health and ecosystems: herbicides, insecticides, human and veterinary pharmaceuticals, natural and synthetic hormones, personal care products, surfactants, plasticizers, fire retardants, and others. Sorbed reservoirs of these compounds in soil represent a potentially chronic source of water contamination. This article is an introduction to a series of technical papers stemming from a symposium at the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America 2008 Annual Meeting, which was held jointly with The Geological Society of America, The Gulf Coast Association of Geological Scientists, and the Houston Geological Society, under one of the Joint Meeting's overarching themes: Emerging Trace Contaminants in Surface and Ground Water Generated from Waste Water and Solid Waste Application. The symposium emphasized the role of soils as sources, sinks, and reaction catalysts for these contaminants and the occurrence and fate of these contaminants in surface and underground water supplies. Topics covered included novel advances in analytical techniques, transport of infectious agents, occurrence and fate of veterinary pharmaceuticals, characterization of sorption mechanism, biotic and abiotic transformation reactions, the role of soil components, occurrence and fate in wastewater treatment systems, transport of engineered nanoparticles, groundwater contamination resulting from urban runoff, and issues in water reuse. Overviews of the reports, trends, gaps in our knowledge, and topics for further research are presented in this special series of papers. The technical papers in this special series reflect current gains in knowledge and simultaneously underscore how poorly we are able to predict the fate and, hence, the associated risk to ecological and human receptors of these contaminants.

  19. Introduction: the influence and legacy of Barbara Grier.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, Danielle M

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies focuses on the life and legacy of the lesbian publisher, editor, and author Barbara Grier. Through Grier's "Lesbiana" column in Daughters of Bilitis's magazine The Ladder, three editions of The Lesbian in Literature (1967, 1975, 1985), to her role as publisher of the Naiad Press from 1973-2003, Grier introduced hundreds of new lesbian books to readers and kept several lesbian classics on the literary horizon. The articles in this issue focus on Grier's biography, history, and impact through archival analysis, interviews, and content analysis. This introduction contextualizes and outlines the articles in this special issue.

  20. Special-Study Modules in a Problem-Based Learning Medical Curriculum: An Innovative Laboratory Research Practice Supporting Introduction to Research Methodology in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guner, Gul Akdogan; Cavdar, Zahide; Yener, Nilgun; Kume, Tuncay; Egrilmez, Mehtap Yuksel; Resmi, Halil

    2011-01-01

    We describe the organization of wet-lab special-study modules (SSMs) in the Central Research Laboratory of Dokuz Eylul Medical School, Izmir, Turkey with the aim of discussing the scientific, laboratory, and pedagogical aspects of this educational activity. A general introduction to the planning and functioning of these SSMs is given, along with…

  1. Introduction to special section on the Northern Chugach Mountains-Southern Copper River Basin Segment of the Alaskan Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Robert A.

    1989-11-01

    This special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research is the second part of a collection of papers on the nature and evolution of the lithosphere in southern Alaska, specifically beneath the Chugach Mountains and Copper River Basin. The studies in this collection were conducted under the Trans-Alaska Lithosphere Investigation [Stone et al., 1986]: a coordinated geological and geophysical transect of the Alaskan lithosphere along the north-south, trans-Alaska oil pipeline corridor between Valdez and Prudhoe Bay and across the Pacific and Arctic continental margins. The Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT) project of the U.S. Geological Survey was the primary source of support for these studies, including all the seismic refraction and reflection profiling and most of the geologic field investigations. The first part of the collection appeared in the April 1989 issue and focused on the geology and tectonics of the northern Chugach Mountains and southern Copper River Basin and on the interpretation of a 107-km-long seismic reflection profile along the transect. Appended to those papers, but not included in the introduction [Page, 1989], was an interpretation of the upper crustal structure of the Chugach terrane derived from a transverse (east-west) seismic refraction profile along the axis of the Chugach Mountains [Wolf and Levander, 1989].

  2. Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2008-01-01

    As of 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes has reached its all-time high regarding the ISI journal impact factor, with an impressive increase of 60% compared to 2005. We now rank at position 1,399, as shown in the statistics below. This is solely due to the increased number and quality of published articles: In 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes published 208 research papers and received 1,033 citations -- five citations per paper on average. In 2007, we have published 177 research papers, and one may be curious to see how their factor will develop. In co-operation with Wiley InterScience we have achieved an average o nline publication time of just 4.5 months. As in the past, publication in Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes} continues to be free of charge. Also, all articles of the first issue of each volume can be downloaded free of charge, as can all articles labelled ``Editor's Choice'', which are additionally featured with a color image on the front cover.

  3. Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2009-01-01

    As of 2007, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes has reached its all-time high regarding the ISI journal impact factor, with an impressive increase of 60% compared to 2005. We now rank at 1,461, as shown in the statistics below. This is solely due to the increased quality of the published articles: In 2006, Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes published 208 research papers and received 1,033 citations -- five citations per paper on average. In 2007, we have published 177 research papers with roughly the same number of citations. In co-operation with Wiley InterScience we have achieved an average online publication time of just 4.5 months. We hope that the year 2008 will be comparably prosperous. As in the past, publication in Astronomische Nachrichten -- Astronomical Notes continues to be free of charge. Also, all articles of the first issue of each volume can be downloaded free of charge, as can all articles labelled ``Editor's Choice'', which are additionally featured with a color image on the front cover.

  4. Disaster Mental Health and Positive Psychology-Considering the Context of Natural and Technological Disasters: An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Schulenberg, Stefan E

    2016-12-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the Journal of Clinical Psychology's special issue on disaster mental health and positive psychology. The special issue comprises two sections. The first section presents a series of data-driven articles and research-informed reviews examining meaning and resilience in the context of natural and technological disasters. The second section presents key topics in the area of disaster mental health, with particular relevance for positive psychology and related frameworks. The special issue is intended to bridge the gap between these two areas of applied science, with the audience being experienced clinicians or clinicians in training.

  5. Introduction to Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dale F.; Kachik, Cynthia J.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the 2001 Annual Community College Futures Assembly, which focused on the merging of education, entertainment, and information as driven by digital technology. The keynote presentation, titled "The Edutainment Age," was given by Richard W. Oliver and discussed the entertainment of education. Lists 2001 Bellwether Award winners and…

  6. Meet the Editor: Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    Meinrat Andreae was named the editor of the AGU's journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles last year.Andreae, director of the biogeochemistry department at the Max Plank Institute for Chemistry (MPIC), located in Mainz, Germany said that he plans to maintain the journal as a resource that highlights the broad spectrum of interdisciplinary themes that showcase the interactions between the biosphere and the geosphere. “Our special niche is in the field of larger-scale, more integrative studies that have global scope,” he explained.

  7. Remarks from a retiring Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, Louis K.

    2015-10-01

    At the end of 2015 I plan to step down as Chairman of Editors for the Journal of Nuclear Materials. I use the opportunity to express thoughts that have recurred to me but were muted in comparison with the day to day priorities of editorial work. The most important is that I hold the deepest gratitude for your enduring support- authors, reviewers, readers, the Advisory Editorial Board, and my fellow Editors.

  8. "Clones," Codes, and Conflicts of Interest in Cartooning: Cartoonists and Editors Look at Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel; And Others

    A study examined differences between political cartoonists and op-ed page editors on both traditional ethical issues (such as conflicts of interest) and the special, style-related concerns of editorial cartoonists. Hypotheses proposed were that editors and cartoonists (1) would condemn "cloning" or copying, reflecting an ethical…

  9. Letter from the Editors

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Roberto; Sforza, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    We are happy to publish this special issue dedicated to Prof. Rosangela Marchelli. This issue not only celebrates her long-standing scientific activity on occasion of her significant anniversary, but it is meant to recognize her contribution to Bioorganic Chemistry in the field of Artificial DNA, and in particular of Peptide Nucleic Acids. PMID:22777061

  10. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. As many of you are no doubt aware, our latest impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen to 1.228. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. The popularity of the journal amongst authors and readers has prompted us to introduce a new subject classification for articles, to make it easier for readers to find articles of interest. The eight subject categories are: Measurement theory and practical developments (e.g. precision measurements, metrology, new measurement principles, signal processing techniques, theory of measurement, calibration); Sensors and sensing systems (based on physical, chemical or biological principles; micro- and nano-scale systems; sensors for physical, chemical and biological quantities); Optical and laser based techniques (e.g. fibre optics, interferometry, etc); Fluid mechanics measurements (e.g. fluid flow, velocimetry, particle sizing, etc); Imaging techniques (e.g. tomography, microscopy, holography, THz, etc); Spectroscopy (e.g. optical, acoustic, dielectric, MS, NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS, fluorescence, PCS, x-ray, etc); New and improved techniques for materials evaluation (e.g. non-destructive testing and evaluation, structural measurements); Novel instrumentation. We kindly ask you to assign your paper to a category when you send it to the journal. In order to maintain our rapid

  11. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  12. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA Cadarache, France Russell Doerner, University of California - San Diego, USA Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany Akihide Fujisawa, Kyushi University, Japan Gerardo Giruzzi, CEA Cadarache, France Grigory Kagan, LANL, USA Morten Lennholm, CCFE, UK Akinobu Matsuyama, NIFS, Japan Peter Stangeby, University of Toronto, Canada Leonid Zakharov, PPPL, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2011. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Award is H. Urano, for the paper 'Dimensionless parameter dependence of H-mode pedestal width using hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in JT-60U' (Nucl. Fusion 48 045008). The award was presented at the Plasma Conference 2011 (Joint meeting of 28th JSPF Annual Meeting, The 29th Symposium on Plasma Processing, and Division of Plasma Physics, 2011 Autumn Meeting of The Physical Society of Japan). This is the sixth year that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has awarded an annual prize to honour exceptional work published in Nuclear Fusion. IOP Publishing has generously made a contribution of $2500 to the award. The Nuclear Fusion Electronic Archive The journal's electronic archive has been online since the beginning of the year. The archive has been a roaring success and has contributed to the nearly 300 000 downloads of journal papers in 2011. The archive can be accessed via http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Archive. It has direct links to 16 landmark papers, from authors such as Artsimovich and Mercier. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also

  13. SIERRA Editor v. 1.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Edward; Friedman-Hill, Ernest; Gibson, Marcus; Heinstein, Martin; & Whittford, Greg

    2010-03-24

    The SIERRA Editor is a syntax editor for text-based input decks for the SIERRA modeling and simulations codes. The SIERRA Editor provides color coded syntax, error checking, hyperlink navigation to referenced entities (e.g. functions and materials), and visual verification of mesh entity references (blocks, sidesets, and nodesets). The SIERRA Editor helps modeling and simulation analysts who use the SIERRA codes to produce syntactically correct input decks.

  14. Learning To Use a Text Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Carole R.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.

    Designed to determine how quickly elementary school children can learn to use a text editor and what editing concepts are difficult for them to master, this study presents preliminary data on children's acquisition of text editor skills and on the kinds of revisions they accomplished with the text editor. Observations were made on a total of 25…

  15. Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

  16. From the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Yevseyev, Igor V.

    2010-01-01

    Dear readers and authors, This preface opens the seventh volume of the journal Laser Physics Letters. We are happy to inform you that the first six years have been quite successful for the journal. In the years 2004-2009, Laser Physics Letters published around 700 original articles written by scientists from 55 countries. During these years, in addition to original articles, Laser Physics Letters published about 40 brief review invited articles written by top scientists from different countries. These review articles provide readers a unique possibility of being timely informed on the current research in different fields of laser physics and on the most fresh and important results in these fields. The brief review articles, published in Laser Physics Letters, have attracted high attention of readers and are extensively cited. Some of these review articles have been cited more than 60 times in the main journals covered by ISI Web of Science. This shows the great importance and attractiveness of the published brief review invited articles for the laser physics community. We certainly understand that such a success is due to the following reasons. First of all, the authors of Laser Physics Letters are the top scientists in the field of laser physics from all over the world. And, second, all 28 members of the Editorial Board, representing 13 countries, are strongly committed to do all their best for making the journal an excellent forum for the laser physics community. Laser Physics Letters publishes pioneering articles in different fields of laser physics. In order to be accessible to a wide auditorium, the papers should clearly point out the main contributions of the article to the field of research and their relation to other articles treating the topic. A well-written introduction is a prerequisite for a good paper. This allows the readers to better judge on the contribution of the article and to objectively evaluate the presented results. We are proud to announce

  17. Introduction to the Special Section on Racial and Ethnic Identity in Counseling Psychology: Conceptual and Methodological Challenges and Proposed Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Mallinckrodt, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Racial and ethnic identity development have been important topics in counseling psychology research for the last four decades. At present, however, there appears to be some confusion and debate regarding the quality of theory and measurement in the topical area. The present article serves as an introduction to this Journal of Counseling Psychology…

  18. Line-Editor Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

  19. A Syntax Directed Editor Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-05

    Much of his work was based on research by Bruce J. MacLennan of the Naval Postgraduate School (Ref 9) and two of Mister MacLennan’s former thesis...of Defense. Requirement for ADA Programming Suport | .:Environments - Stoneman. Washington, D.C. 1980. • .,6. Feiler , Peter H. and Raul Medina-Mora...1982. (AD-A053032). 9. MacLennan, Bruce J. The Automatic Generation of Syntax-Directed Editors. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA., 1981. 10

  20. The Motivational Foundations of Prosocial Behavior From A Developmental Perspective-Evolutionary Roots and Key Psychological Mechanisms: Introduction to the Special Section.

    PubMed

    Davidov, Maayan; Vaish, Amrisha; Knafo-Noam, Ariel; Hastings, Paul D

    2016-11-01

    Prosocial behavior is versatile, multifaceted, and complex. This special section seeks to advance coherent, integrative understanding of prosocial development by addressing this topic through the prism of motivations. This conceptual Introduction presents key ideas that provide a framework for thinking about motivation for prosocial behavior and its development. It outlines the evolutionary roots of prosocial behavior, underscoring the interdependent roles of nature and nurture. This is followed by a discussion of several key psychological mechanisms reflecting different motivations for prosocial action (empathy for a distressed other, concern about another's goal, desire to act in accordance with internalized prosocial norms, and guilt). We discuss the critical components of each motivation and highlight pertinent contributions of the special section articles.

  1. Introduction to the special issue: 50th anniversary of APA Division 28: The past, present, and future of psychopharmacology and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Stoops, William W; Sigmon, Stacey C; Evans, Suzette M

    2016-08-01

    This is an introduction to the special issue "50th Anniversary of APA Division 28: The Past, Present, and Future of Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse." Taken together, the scholarly contributions included in this special issue serve as a testament to the important work conducted by our colleagues over the past five decades. Division 28 and its members have advanced and disseminated knowledge on the behavioral effects of drugs, informed efforts to prevent and treat substance abuse, and influenced education and policy issues more generally. As past and current leaders of the division, we are excited to celebrate 50 years of Division 28 and look forward to many more successful decades for our division and its members. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. A great pioneer of clinical science remembered: introduction to the special issue in honor of Paul E. Meehl.

    PubMed

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Waller, Niels G

    2005-10-01

    In this special issue, the seminal contributions to clinical psychology of Paul E. Meehl, who passed away in 2003, are commemorated. The nine articles comprising this special issue chronicle Meehl's remarkable intellectual biography and examine his influence on diverse domains of psychology, including the clinical versus actuarial prediction debate, the cognitive activity of the clinician, personality assessment and trait theory, the etiology of schizophrenia, the shortcomings of statistical significance testing, and the use of metascientific methods to evaluate competing models of human nature. These articles illustrate not only Meehl's legendary brilliance but also his pivotal role in forcing clinical psychologists to think more clearly and incisively about their subject matter.

  3. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included

  4. Engaging Students in Modeling as an Epistemic Practice of Science: An Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok

    2015-04-01

    This article provides an introduction for the special issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology focused on science teaching and learning with models. The article provides initial framing for questions that guided the special issue. Additionally, based on our careful review of each of these articles, some discussion of how selected articles within the issue informed these questions. Specifically, when considering key facets of modeling instruction or design features of modeling curriculum, the studies in the special issue provided insight into productive ways in which teachers engaged students in modeling practices. Further, modeling pedagogies—pedagogies for transforming scientific practices of modeling into students' experience—were reified so that how these pedagogies could be coordinated into classroom instruction was revealed. When characteristic features of students' engagement in modeling were considered, research offered insight into productive model-based learning sequences for K-6 modelers and how students' development of productive epistemologies can evolve differently. Finally, the special issue considered how technology facilitated cognitive processes and/or instructional practices by examining learners' interactions with technology within modeling contexts. In this, instructional sequences using agent-based modeling (ABM) as a central technology are shared. These include the role of ABM in scaling student-modeling experiences beyond individuals to classroom experiences and how ABM can support student investigations of complex phenomenon that is not directly observable, among other affordances. Other articles also investigated some aspects of learners' interactions with technology to inform how technology-enhanced science teaching and learning with models.

  5. Library Instruction for the 21st Century: Introduction to a Special LOEX-of-the-West Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essinger, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a historical overview of LOEX-of-the-West (Library Orientation Exchange) while introducing this special issue of RSR that includes presentations from the 1998 conference, "Library Instruction for the 21st Century." The first LOEX-of-the-West Conference was held at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon in June 1994. (AEF)

  6. Introduction to Special Edition (of the Journal of Nuclear Materials Management) on Reducing the Threat from Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2007-03-01

    Introductory article for special edition of the JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT outlining the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technical Division. In particular the International Nuclear and Radiological Security Standing Committee and its initial focus covering four topical areas--Radiological Threat Reduction, Nuclear Smuggling and Illicit Trafficking, Countering Nuclear Terrorism, and Radioligical Terrorism Consequence Management.

  7. A Triarchic Model for Teaching "Introduction to Special Education": Case Studies, Content Acquisition Podcasts, and Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Michael J.; Newton, Jennier R.; Haines, Shana J.; Walther-Thomas, Christine S.; Kellems, Ryan O.

    2012-01-01

    Those who teach introductory level courses in special education to preservice teacher candidates often face a paradox in terms of whether to use limited instructional time to either focus on characteristics of students with disabilities or emphasize evidence-based practices (EBPs). The issue of limited instructional time is also an issue in other…

  8. New Metrics, Measures, and Uses for Fluency Data: An Introduction to a Special Issue on the Assessment of Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biancarosa, Gina; Cummings, Kelli D.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this special issue is to synthesize results from recent reading fluency research endeavors, and to link these findings to practical uses of reading curriculum-based measurement (R-CBM) tools. Taken together, the manuscripts presented in this issue discuss measurement work related to new metrics of indexing student reading…

  9. A Decade of Chais Conferences: Introduction to the "IJELL" Special Series of Chais Conference 2015 Best Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geri, Nitza; Blau, Ina; Caspi, Avner; Kalman, Yoram M.; Silber-Varod, Vered; Eshet-Alkalai, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    The seventh issue of the "Interdisciplinary Journal of e-Skills and Lifelong Learning" (IJELL--formerly "Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects"--IJELLO) special series includes a selection of best papers presented at the 10th Chais Conference for the Study of Innovation and Learning Technologies: Learning…

  10. Current Issues in the Neurology and Genetics of Learning-Related Traits and Disorders: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article briefly describes each of the following eight articles in this special issue on the neurology and genetics of learning related disorders. It notes the greater appreciation of learning disability as a set of complex disorders with broad and intricate neurological bases and of the large individual differences in how these…

  11. Richard E. Snow's Remaking of the Concept of Aptitude and Multidimensional Test Validity: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavelson, Richard J.; Roeser, Robert W.; Kupermintz, Haggai; Lau, Shun; Ayala, Carlos; Haydel, Angela; Schultz, Susan; Gallagher, Larry; Quihuis, Gisell

    2002-01-01

    Describes some of the "big ideas" of Richard E. Snow about aptitude, person-situation transaction, and test validity. Also describes the design of a high school study undertaken to explore some of Snow's ideas further and introduces the articles of this special issue. (SLD)

  12. Introduction to the Special Issue: The role of soil microbial-driven belowground processes in mediating exotic plant invasions

    PubMed Central

    Inderjit

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities are one of the multiple factors that facilitate or resist plant invasion. Regional and biogeographic studies help to determine how soil communities and the processes mediated by soil microbes are linked to other mechanisms of invasion. Both the success of plant invasions and their impacts are profoundly influenced by a wide range of soil communities and the soil processes mediated by them. With an aim to better understand the mechanisms responsible for the soil community-driven routes, a special issue of AoB PLANTS was conceived. I hope that the range of papers included in the special issue will reveal some of the complexities in soil community-mediated plant invasion. PMID:25979967

  13. Introduction to the Special Section: Advances in psychological prevention and treatment interventions to promote children's mental health.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; Youssef, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces the Special Section on Advances in Psychological Prevention and Treatment Interventions to Promote Children's Mental Health. The three articles in the Special Section provide perspectives on the adaptation, evaluation, and implementation of evidence-based psychological interventions for children in countries in Northern and Eastern Europe, and Latin America. The articles highlight disparate methodologies for the examination of intervention data, including addressing causal inference in the absence of availability of true experiment data (i.e., randomised controlled trial data), randomised trial data from a school-based prevention programme, and predictors of change in an evidence-based treatment programme. Together, the articles highlight the movement of evidence-based practices into routine care settings and emerging strategies for settings in which randomised trial data are not yet available. They demonstrate the contribution of psychological research to the advancement of practices for improving children's mental health.

  14. Introduction to the special issue on the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric; Gill, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The 8 invited and 17 contributed papers in this special issue focus on the following topical areas covered at the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum, held in San Francisco, California: 1) Materials and Resonators; 2) Oscillators, Synthesizers, and Noise; 3) Microwave Frequency Standards; 4) Sensors and Transducers; 5) Timekeeping and Time and Frequency Transfer; and 6) Optical Frequency Standards.

  15. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    semiconductors and certain complex materials. His recent interests have extended his domain of activity towards the field of quantum chemistry as he is now actively engaged in electronic structure theory and its applications, and light-matter interactions, in particular. The other new member of our editorial team, Professor David Keen, comes highly recommended by Professor Stephen Lovesey, a long-standing friend and former colleague, who was, himself, a former condensed matter editor for the journal many years ago. Professor Keen works in structural disorder, typically studying at the boundary between crystalline, amorphous and liquid phases using neutron and x-ray diffraction and atomistic modelling. Three examples of the areas in which he conducts research are 'liquid-like' disorder in superionic crystalline materials, solid-state amorphization transitions and disorder-induced properties, such as unusual negative thermal expansion. Through working at these boundaries, and at the ISIS neutron scattering facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for over 20 years, he has gained wide experience of all areas of structural condensed matter physics, encompassing crystallography and the structure and simulation of liquid and amorphous materials. Professor Keen has been a Guest Editor for a number of special issues of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. My thanks are extended to Stephen for his advice and for recommending such an enthusiastic new editor to join us. Until recently, the extensive review process engaged by Physica Scripta involved almost every manuscript being forwarded to several researchers for examination. The volume of material being received at present, however, makes this procedure untenable and undesirable, as it would be unfair on those researchers willing to participate in the peer review process to continue to review articles that are obviously destined for rejection. Thus, as a direct result of the increase in volume, a screening procedure has been

  16. Introduction to the Special Issue on Multimodality of Early Sensory Processing: Early Visual Maps Flexibly Encode Multimodal Space

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Roberto; Binda, Paola; Cicchini, Guido Marco

    2016-01-01

    As living organisms, we have the capability to explore our environments through different senses, each making use of specialized organs and returning unique information. This is relayed to a set of cortical areas, each of which appears to be specialized for processing information from a single sense — hence the definition of ‘unisensory’ areas. Many models assume that primary unisensory cortices passively reproduce information from each sensory organ; these then project to associative areas, which actively combine multisensory signals with each other and with cognitive stances. By the same token, the textbook view holds that sensory cortices undergo plastic changes only within a limited ‘critical period’; their function and architecture should remain stable and unchangeable thereafter. This model has led to many fundamental discoveries on the architecture of the sensory systems (e.g., oriented receptive fields, binocularity, topographic maps, to name just the best known). However, a growing body of evidence calls for a review of this conceptual scheme. Based on single-cell recordings from non-human primates, fMRI in humans, psychophysics, and sensory deprivation studies, early sensory areas are losing their status of fixed readouts of receptor activity; they are turning into functional nodes in a network of brain areas that flexibly adapts to the statistics of the input and the behavioral goals. This special issue in Multisensory Research aims to cover three such lines of evidence: suggesting that (1) the flexibility of spatial representations, (2) adult plasticity and (3) multimodality, are not properties of associative areas alone, but may depend on the primary visual cortex V1. PMID:26288898

  17. Donald R. Nielsen New WRR Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    Bridging the gap between the disciplines of engineering and agriculture is a major goal for Water Resources Research (WRR), says Donald R. Nielsen, who was appointed to a 4-year term as WRR editor, effective January 1, 1985. Nielsen succeeds Stephen J. Burges as the WRR editor for hydrology, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Ronald G. Cummings, at the University of New Mexico, is the WRR editor for policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law.

  18. Introduction to special section on phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the special section on the "phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor" by highlighting key results of the studies published in it. Many of the results indicate that seismic and aseismic manifestations of slow slip reflect transient shear displacements on the plate interface, with the outstanding exception of northern Cascadia where tremor sources have been located on and above the plate interface (differing models of the plate interface there also need to be reconciled). Slow slip phenomena appear to result from propagating deformation that may develop with persistent gaps and segment boundaries. Results add to evidence that when tectonic deformation is relaxed via slow slip, most relaxation occurs aseismically but with seismic signals providing higher-resolution proxies for the aseismic slip. Instead of two distinct slip modes as suggested previously, lines between "fast" and "slow" slip more appropriately may be described as blurry zones. Results reported also show that slow slip sources do not coincide with a specific temperature or metamorphic reaction. Their associations with zones of high conductivity and low shear to compressional wave velocity ratios corroborate source models involving pore fluid pressure buildup and release. These models and spatial anticorrelations between earthquake and tremor activity also corroborate a linkage between slow slip and frictional properties transitional between steady state and stick-slip. Finally, this special section highlights the benefits of global and multidisciplinary studies, which demonstrate that slow phenomena are not confined to beneath the locked zone but exist in many settings.

  19. Introduction to the special issue on history development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Parks, G.; Svalgaard, L.; Kamide, Y.; Lui, T.

    2016-12-01

    Solar terrestrial (ST) sciences started centuries ago and branched into different disciplines. Starting with naked eye to highly sophisticated novel experimental techniques, observations have revealed the secrets of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, plasmasphere, and ionosphere-atmosphere components of the ST system. Theories and theoretical models have been developed for the different components independently and together. World-wide efforts under different umbrella are being persuaded to understand the challenges of the ST system. The onset problem and role of O+ ions in sub-storm physics are two issues that are hotly debated. The onset problem is whether sub-storm is triggered by magnetic reconnection in the tail region at 15-20 Re or by a current disruption at ~12 Re. The issue on O+ role is whether O+ ions affect the dynamics of sub-storms under magnetic storm and non-storm conditions differently. This special issue of Geoscience Letters contains a collection of 15 papers on the history and development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms. Over half of the papers are based on the presentations in a session on the same topic organized at the AOGS (Asia Oceania geosciences Society) General Assembly held in Singapore during 02-07 August 2015. The rest of the papers from outside the assembly also falls within the theme of the special issue. The papers are organized in the order of history and development of ST coupling, sub-storms, and outer heliosphere.

  20. Personality disorder and violence: understand violence risk: an introduction to the special section personality disorder and violence.

    PubMed

    Cooke, David J

    2010-10-01

    This paper introduces the Special Section on personality disorder and violence. The first paper evaluates the impact of removing the Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R) as a mandatory element of a major approach to the assessment of violence risk-the HCR-20. The second paper considers violence to self as well as violence to others; it examines the influence of dysfunctional personality traits in a sample of female offenders. The third paper provides a systematic framework for risk formulation, discussing how to bridge the gap between nomothetic research and the individual case. This paper concludes by arguing that there is a need to shift perspective from asking "what?" dysfunctional traits are relevant to future violence to "why?" are particular traits relevant. The "why?" question is particularly germane in the forensic arena where expert testimony must endeavor to provide a causal explanation of risk processes at the level of the individual.

  1. Kiyoo Wadati and early research on deep focus earthquakes: Introduction to Special Section on Deep and Intermediate Focus Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1987-12-01

    This special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research is dedicated to Kiyoo Wadati. This paper evaluates his contribution to our knowledge of geophysics and, especially, deep earthquake phenomena. In at least three areas, Wadati wrote several papers before 1936 which profoundly influenced modern geophysics. First, his work provided the first convincing evidence that deep earthquakes existed. Second, he was a leader in the construction of travel time tables and the determination of mantle velocity structure. Finally, he published the first accurate description of the inclined planar zone of deep earthquakes which extends from trenches beneath volcanic island arcs. Wadati's work strongly influenced research of many other scientists both before and after World War II, particularly, Jeffreys, Gutenberg, and Benioff. Several of the questions raised by the research of Wadati and others before 1940 are still unanswered today.

  2. Introduction to the GEOBIA 2010 special issue: From pixels to geographic objects in remote sensing image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addink, Elisabeth A.; Van Coillie, Frieke M. B.; De Jong, Steven M.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional image analysis methods are mostly pixel-based and use the spectral differences of landscape elements at the Earth surface to classify these elements or to extract element properties from the Earth Observation image. Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) has received considerable attention over the past 15 years for analyzing and interpreting remote sensing imagery. In contrast to traditional image analysis, GEOBIA works more like the human eye-brain combination does. The latter uses the object's color (spectral information), size, texture, shape and occurrence to other image objects to interpret and analyze what we see. GEOBIA starts by segmenting the image grouping together pixels into objects and next uses a wide range of object properties to classify the objects or to extract object's properties from the image. Significant advances and improvements in image analysis and interpretation are made thanks to GEOBIA. In June 2010 the third conference on GEOBIA took place at the Ghent University after successful previous meetings in Calgary (2008) and Salzburg (2006). This special issue presents a selection of the 2010 conference papers that are worked out as full research papers for JAG. The papers cover GEOBIA applications as well as innovative methods and techniques. The topics range from vegetation mapping, forest parameter estimation, tree crown identification, urban mapping, land cover change, feature selection methods and the effects of image compression on segmentation. From the original 94 conference papers, 26 full research manuscripts were submitted; nine papers were selected and are presented in this special issue. Selection was done on the basis of quality and topic of the studies. The next GEOBIA conference will take place in Rio de Janeiro from 7 to 9 May 2012 where we hope to welcome even more scientists working in the field of GEOBIA.

  3. Introduction to December 2013 issue.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Wendy A

    2013-12-01

    In this introduction to the December 2013 issue of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, the editor discusses her goals to get the Journal back on track. She gives thanks for the research that continues to advance both science and practice in experimental psychology.

  4. Introduction to the special section on religion and spirituality in family life: pathways between relational spirituality, family relationships and personal well-being.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Annette; Cano, Annmarie

    2014-12-01

    This special section on faith and family life presents 5 studies that each offer novel insights into the complex web of linkages between a target family member's religious and/or spiritual (R/S) functioning and parental or family factors that may influence the target family member's psychological or R/S functioning. The outcome domain of interest is adolescent psychological functioning in the first three studies, parental stress in the fourth study, and the R/S functioning of adult children in the fifth study. In this introduction, we feature unique findings from each study. We then highlight 3 key conceptual issues that researchers need to recognize to continue to move forward rigorous research on specific roles that R/S can play in enhancing as well as undermining individual and family well-being.

  5. The benefits of studying by production . . . And of studying production: Introduction to the special issue on the production effect in memory.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Glen E; MacLeod, Colin M

    2016-06-01

    The production effect refers to enhanced memory for materials that were produced at study (e.g., those read aloud) relative to materials that were not produced (e.g., those read silently). The effect has generated a wave of interest since being named in 2010 (MacLeod, Gopie, Hourihan, Neary, and Ozubko, 2010)-likely because of the simplicity of production tasks and of the substantial memory improvements that they can yield. This special issue of the Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology brings together 10 new studies on the production effect in memory. Our introduction provides an expanded definition of the effect along with some examples to help orient readers. The present studies contribute to our understanding of the production effect and to memory more broadly. Just as important, they also raise new questions and provide a honed set of methodological tools that will help to guide further research and theorizing about memory. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Examining Editor-Author Ethics: Real-World Scenarios from Interviews with Three Journal Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amare, Nicole; Manning, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Those who submit manuscripts to academic journals may benefit from a better understanding of how editors weigh ethics in their interactions with authors. In an attempt to ascertain and to understand editors' ethics, we interviewed 3 current academic journal editors of technical and/or business communication journals. We asked them about the…

  7. Tectonics, orbital forcing, global climate change, and human evolution in Africa: introduction to the African paleoclimate special volume.

    PubMed

    Maslin, Mark A; Christensen, Beth

    2007-11-01

    The late Cenozoic climate of Africa is a critical component for understanding human evolution. African climate is controlled by major tectonic changes, global climate transitions, and local variations in orbital forcing. We introduce the special African Paleoclimate Issue of the Journal of Human Evolution by providing a background for and synthesis of the latest work relating to the environmental context for human evolution. Records presented in this special issue suggest that the regional tectonics, appearance of C(4) plants in East Africa, and late Cenozoic global cooling combined to produce a long-term drying trend in East Africa. Of particular importance is the uplift associated with the East African Rift Valley formation, which altered wind flow patterns from a more zonal to more meridinal direction. Results in this volume suggest a marked difference in the climate history of southern and eastern Africa, though both are clearly influenced by the major global climate thresholds crossed in the last 3 million years. Papers in this volume present lake, speleothem, and marine paleoclimate records showing that the East African long-term drying trend is punctuated by episodes of short, alternating periods of extreme wetness and aridity. These periods of extreme climate variability are characterized by the precession-forced appearance and disappearance of large, deep lakes in the East African Rift Valley and paralleled by low and high wind-driven dust loads reaching the adjacent ocean basins. Dating of these records show that over the last 3 million years such periods only occur at the times of major global climatic transitions, such as the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (2.7-2.5 Ma), intensification of the Walker Circulation (1.9-1.7 Ma), and the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution (1-0.7 Ma). Authors in this volume suggest this onset occurs as high latitude forcing in both Hemispheres compresses the Intertropical Convergence Zone so that East Africa

  8. Introduction to the special issue: Substance use and the adolescent brain: Developmental impacts, interventions, and longitudinal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Luciana, Monica; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent substance abuse is a major public health problem, particularly given the negative brain and behavioral consequences that often occur during and following acute intoxication. Negative outcomes appear to be especially pronounced when substance use is initiated in the early adolescent years, perhaps due to neural adaptations that increase risk for substance use disorders into adulthood. Recent models to explain these epidemiological trends have focused on brain-based vulnerabilities to use as well as neurodevelopmental aberrations associated with initiation of use in substance naïve samples or through the description of case-control differences between heavy users and controls. Within this research, adolescent alcohol and marijuana users have shown relative decreases in regional gray matter volumes, substance-specific alterations in white matter volumes, deviations in microstructural integrity in white matter tracts that regulate communication between subcortical areas and higher level regulatory control regions, and deficits in functional connectivity. How these brain anomalies map onto other types of youth risk behavior and later vulnerabilities represent major questions for continued research. This special issue addresses these compelling and timely questions by introducing new methodologies, empirical relationships, and perspectives from major leaders in this field. PMID:26589541

  9. Restoration ecology and invasive riparian plants: An introduction to the special section on Tamarix spp. in western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, Patrick B.; Briggs, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    River systems around the world are subject to various perturbations, including the colonization and spread of non-native species in riparian zones. Riparian resource managers are commonly engaged in efforts to control problematic non-native species and restore native habitats. In western North America, small Eurasian trees or shrubs in the genus Tamarixoccupy hundreds of thousands of hectares of riparian lands, and are the targets of substantial and costly control efforts and associated restoration activities. Still, significant information gaps exist regarding approaches used in control and restoration efforts and their effects on riparian ecosystems. In this special section of papers, eight articles address various aspects of control and restoration associated with Tamarix spp. These include articles focused on planning restoration and revegetation; a synthetic analysis of past restoration efforts; and several specific research endeavors examining plant responses, water use, and various wildlife responses (including birds, butterflies, and lizards). These articles represent important additions to the Tamarix spp. literature and contain many lessons and insights that should be transferable to other analogous situations in river systems globally.

  10. The west-central Florida inner shelf and coastal system: A geologic conceptual overview and introduction to the special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hine, A.C.; Brooks, G.R.; Davis, R.A.; Duncan, D.S.; Locker, S.D.; Twichell, D.C.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview for this special publication on the geologic framework of the inner shelf and coastal zone of west-central Florida. This is a significant geologic setting in that it lies at the center of an ancient carbonate platform facing an enormous ramp that has exerted large-scale control on coastal geomorphology, the availability of sediments, and the level of wave energy. In order to understand the Holocene geologic history of this depositional system, a regional study defined by natural boundaries (north end of a barrier island to the apex of a headland) was undertaken by a group of government and university coastal geologists using a wide variety of laboratory and field techniques. It is the purpose of this introductory paper to define the character of this coastal/inner shelf system, provide a historical geologic perspective and background of environmental information, define the overall database, present the collective objectives of this regional study, and very briefly present the main aspects of each contribution. Specific conclusions are presented at the end of each paper composing this volume. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Introduction to Journal of Structural Geology special issue on "Deformation of the lithosphere. How small structures tell a big story"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintubin, Manuel; de Bresser, Hans; Drury, Martyn; Prior, David J.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-02-01

    This special issue Deformation of the Lithosphere. How small structures tell a big story is dedicated to Professor Henk Zwart (1924-2012). The theme is inspired by Henk's retirement lecture entitled Mountains must indeed be studied with a microscope (19 February 1988). Henk Zwart was a pioneer in linking microstructural research with the large-scale issues concerning lithospheric rheology and deformation. The famous Zwart's Hen House, representing the nine diagnostic relationships of porphyroblast growth with respect to the timing of deformation, is still a key element in contemporary textbooks on structural geology and microtectonics. This particular insight may not have occurred if it wasn't for a mistake made by the thin-section maker in the Leiden lab of Henk Zwart. By accident a thin section of a Pyrenean metamorphic rock was made, not perpendicular to the lineation - as was the standard procedure in those early days of structural geology - but parallel to the lineation. That mistake and Henk's recognition that the lineation parallel view gave more useful information changed structural geology and microtectonics.

  12. Introduction to the special issue: Substance use and the adolescent brain: Developmental impacts, interventions, and longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Luciana, Monica; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent substance abuse is a major public health problem, particularly given the negative brain and behavioral consequences that often occur during and following acute intoxication. Negative outcomes appear to be especially pronounced when substance use is initiated in the early adolescent years, perhaps due to neural adaptations that increase risk for substance use disorders into adulthood. Recent models to explain these epidemiological trends have focused on brain-based vulnerabilities to use as well as neurodevelopmental aberrations associated with initiation of use in substance naïve samples or through the description of case-control differences between heavy users and controls. Within this research, adolescent alcohol and marijuana users have shown relative decreases in regional gray matter volumes, substance-specific alterations in white matter volumes, deviations in microstructural integrity in white matter tracts that regulate communication between subcortical areas and higher level regulatory control regions, and deficits in functional connectivity. How these brain anomalies map onto other types of youth risk behavior and later vulnerabilities represent major questions for continued research. This special issue addresses these compelling and timely questions by introducing new methodologies, empirical relationships, and perspectives from major leaders in this field.

  13. Oceanography at coastal scales: Introduction to the special issue on results from the EU FP7 FIELD_AC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Wolf, Judith; Monbaliu, Jaak

    2014-09-01

    The high-resolution and coupled forecasting of wind, waves and currents, in restricted coastal domains, offer a number of important challenges; these limit the quality of predictions, in the present state-of-the-art. This paper presents the main results obtained for such coastal domains, with reference to a variety of modelling suites and observing networks for: a) Liverpool Bay; b) German Bight; c) Gulf of Venice; and d) the Catalan coast. All of these areas are restricted domains, where boundary effects play a significant role in the resulting inner dynamics. This contribution addresses also the themes of the other papers in this Special Issue, ranging from observations to simulations. Emphasis is placed upon the physics controlling such restricted areas. The text deals also with the transfer to end-users and other interested parties, since the requirements on resolution, accuracy and robustness must be linked to their applications. Finally, some remarks are included on the way forward for coastal oceanography and the synergetic combination of in-situ and remote measurements, with high-resolution 3D simulations.

  14. Principles, processes, and puzzles of social cognition: an introduction for the special issue on social cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Matthew D

    2005-12-01

    This article introduces the special issue of NeuroImage focused on social cognitive neuroscience. Social psychology has a rich history of making sense of the often paradoxical aspects of social cognition and the social world. This article reviews the principles, processes, and puzzles of social cognition and behavior that have been examined by social psychologists for decades. Five principles of social cognition and behavior are reviewed including: (1) the power of the situation over behavior, (2) blindness for situational influences, (3) social perception and self-perception are constructive processes, (4) blindness for the constructed nature of social and self-perception, and (5) self-processes are social. Four processes of social cognition are reviewed including: (1) cognitive architecture; (2) automaticity and control; (3) motivated reasoning; and (4) accessibility, frames, and expectations. Finally, five areas of social cognition that contain enduring puzzles are described including (1) the self, (2) attitudes, (3) reflective social cognition, (4) automatic social cognition, and (5) social motives. In several of the areas of study reviewed, cognitive neuroscience is well positioned to make important contributions to these research traditions either by allowing for new tests of hypotheses or by allowing for unobtrusive measurement of social cognitive processes.

  15. Why Go There? Evolution of Mobility and Spatial Cognition in Women and Men : An Introduction to the Special Issue.

    PubMed

    Cashdan, Elizabeth; Gaulin, Steven J C

    2016-03-01

    Males in many non-monogamous species have larger ranges than females do, a sex difference that has been well documented for decades and seems to be an aspect of male mating competition. Until recently, parallel data for humans have been mostly anecdotal and qualitative, but this is now changing as human behavioral ecologists turn their attention to matters of individual mobility. Sex differences in spatial cognition were among the first accepted psychological sex differences and, like differences in ranging behavior, are documented for a growing set of species. This special issue is dedicated to exploring the possible adaptive links between these cognitive and ranging traits. Multiple hypotheses, at various levels of analysis, are considered. At the functional (ultimate) level, a mating-competition hypothesis suggests that range expansion may augment mating opportunities, and a fertility-and-parental-care hypothesis suggests that range contraction may facilitate offspring provisioning. At a more mechanistic (proximate) level, differences in cue availability may support or inhibit particular sex-specific navigation strategies, and spatial anxiety may usefully inhibit travel that would not justify its costs. Studies in four different cultures-Twe, Tsimane, Yucatec Maya, and Faroese-as well as an experimental study using virtual reality tools are the venue for testing these hypotheses. Our hope is to stimulate more research on the evolutionary and developmental processes responsible for this suite of linked behavioral and cognitive traits.

  16. PROGRAMMABLE DISPLAY PUSHBUTTON LEGEND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Programmable Display Pushbutton (PDP) is a pushbutton device available from Micro Switch which has a programmable 16 x 35 matrix of LEDs on the pushbutton surface. Any desired legends can be displayed on the PDPs, producing user-friendly applications which greatly reduce the need for dedicated manual controls. Because the PDP can interact with the operator, it can call for the correct response before transmitting its next message. It is both a simple manual control and a sophisticated programmable link between the operator and the host system. The Programmable Display Pushbutton Legend Editor, PDPE, is used to create the LED displays for the pushbuttons. PDPE encodes PDP control commands and legend data into message byte strings sent to a Logic Refresh and Control Unit (LRCU). The LRCU serves as the driver for a set of four PDPs. The legend editor (PDPE) transmits to the LRCU user specified commands that control what is displayed on the LED face of the individual pushbuttons. Upon receiving a command, the LRCU transmits an acknowledgement that the message was received and executed successfully. The user then observes the effect of the command on the PDP displays and decides whether or not to send the byte code of the message to a data file so that it may be called by an applications program. The PDPE program is written in FORTRAN for interactive execution. It was developed on a DEC VAX 11/780 under VMS. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 12800 bytes. It requires four Micro Switch PDPs and two RS-232 VAX 11/780 terminal ports. The PDPE program was developed in 1985.

  17. [Report of the editors, 2011].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2012-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española (Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months (November 2010 to October 2011): (a) Objectives and attainments during 2011, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2012. In 2011 we have updated the editorial algorithm (revision by the responsible editor of all manuscripts sent to peer review and incorporated an «editorial coordinator»), we have renovated two advise facilities (editorial and scientific committees), we have created a new section called «monthly e-image», and we have promoted Rev Clin Esp annual prizes. From the first January 2010 to 31(st) October 2011 we handled 422 manuscripts (42,2 manuscripts per month, higher than the 2010 figure of 40,4 manuscript/month). Overall we have accepted 26% (originals, 16%). We asked for 343 revisions and obtained 231 (67%). Seventy two percent of the reviewers sent their comments in less than two weeks. The mean time taken to accept or reject a given manuscript has been 26 days. The mean time taken since a manuscript is received to publication (october, novembrer and december issues) has dropped from 334 days in 2010 to 254 in 2011 (24% decrease). The collaboration with the working groups has reported about 2 published manuscripts per issue. Our objectives for 2012 are: (a) to improve the editorial process; (b) main article translation into English; (c) improve some sections (i.e. clinical conference); (d) estimulate working groups collaboration; and (e) improve continued medical education. Revista Clínica Española is an open forum for all internal medicine specialists. We all have the responsibility to make our journal, each day, better.

  18. Editorial Commentary: Editor's Conflict of Interest.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-09-01

    The Editor-in-chief has recused himself from industry consulting, which he performed before assuming the position, and returned related royalties and divested related stock options, in order to mitigate against conflict-of-interest. The Editor discloses affiliation with an institution that receives support from diverse industry partners in support of research and education.

  19. Linguistic Prescriptivism in Letters to the Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukac, Morana

    2016-01-01

    The public's concern with the fate of the standard language has been well documented in the history of the complaint tradition. The print media have for centuries featured letters to the editor on questions of language use. This study examines a corpus of 258 language-related letters to the editor published in the English-speaking print media. By…

  20. Introduction to the Special Issue: Electrons, water and rice fields: plant response and adaptation to flooding and submergence stress

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Michael B.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2015-01-01

    Flooding and submergence impose widespread and unpredictable environmental stresses on plants and depress the yield of most food crops. The problem is increasing, as is the need for greater food production from an expanding human population. The incompatibility of these opposing trends creates an urgent need to improve crop resilience to flooding in its multifarious forms. This Special Issue brings together research findings from diverse plant species to address the challenge of enhancing adaptation to flooding in major crops and learning from tactics of wetland plants. Here we provide an overview of the articles, with attempts to summarize how recent research results are being used to produce varieties of crop plants with greater flooding tolerance, notably in rice. The progress is considerable and based firmly on molecular and physiological research findings. The article also sets out how next-generation improvements in crop tolerance are likely to be achieved and highlights some of the new research that is guiding the development of improved varieties. The potential for non-model species from the indigenous riparian flora to uncover and explain novel adaptive mechanisms of flooding tolerance that may be introduced into crop species is also explored. The article begins by considering how, despite the essential role of water in sustaining plant life, floodwater can threaten its existence unless appropriate adaptations are present. Central to resolving the contradiction is the distinction between the essential role of cellular water as the source of electrons and protons used to build and operate the plant after combining with CO2 and O2 and the damaging role of extracellular water that, in excess, interferes with the union of these gases with photosynthetic or respiratory electrons and protons. PMID:26174144

  1. Introduction to the special section: "the effects of bonds between human and nonhuman primates on primatological research and practice".

    PubMed

    Vitale, Augusto; Pollo, Simone

    2011-03-01

    This commentary introduces this special section on ‘‘the Effects of Bonds Between Human and Nonhuman Primates on Primatological Research and Practice.’’ The aim is to explore the different causes and consequences of bonding experiences between observers and observed in different primatological contexts. In the first contribution, Vitale asks what are the possible consequences of such bonding in behavioral primatology. Examples of beneficial consequences of this kind of relationship come fromstudies on cognitive abilities of great apes. Furthermore, an empathic attitude with the experimental animals leads to better care and attention toward individual welfare needs. Coleman discusses the particular case of nonhuman primates housed in research laboratories. Care-giving practices arediscussed in relation to scientific, ethical and emotional issues. Morimura et al. present the case of the first Japanese sanctuary for retiring chimpanzees from research where, in order to facilitate the social living of re-located chimpanzees, face-to-face interactions between caregivers and chimpanzees areessential. Asquith discusses the role of an thropomorphism, and proposes that this attitude can help to better understand the lives of primates, in more contextualized scenarios. In relation to this view, sheemphasizes how the term ‘‘primate culture’’ accords with some definition of the term ‘‘human culture.’’Fuentes, in his article asks whether national, class and ethnic characteristics can influence bonding between human and nonhuman primates, and calls for focused quantitative studies. Finally, Rose calls for the application of the concept of biosynergy, explained as promoting the formation of healthy and sustainable bonding relationships among living creatures. One of the most important aspects emerging from these papers is the need to better understand whether the issue of bonding in primatological studiescan be generalized to other areas of research such

  2. Introduction to special section on the Phoenix Mission: Landing Site Characterization Experiments, Mission Overviews, and Expected Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. H.; Tamppari, L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bass, D.; Blaney, D.; Boynton, W.; Carswell, A.; Catling, D.; Clark, B.; Duck, T.; DeJong, E.; Fisher, D.; Goetz, W.; Gunnlaugsson, P.; Hecht, M.; Hipkin, V.; Hoffman, J.; Hviid, S.; Keller, H.; Kounaves, S.; Lange, C. F.; Lemmon, M.; Madsen, M.; Malin, M.; Markiewicz, W.; Marshall, J.; McKay, C.; Mellon, M.; Michelangeli, D.; Ming, D.; Morris, R.; Renno, N.; Pike, W. T.; Staufer, U.; Stoker, C.; Taylor, P.; Whiteway, J.; Young, S.; Zent, A.

    2008-10-01

    Phoenix, the first Mars Scout mission, capitalizes on the large NASA investments in the Mars Polar Lander and the Mars Surveyor 2001 missions. On 4 August 2007, Phoenix was launched to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a Delta 2 launch vehicle. The heritage derived from the canceled 2001 lander with a science payload inherited from MPL and 2001 instruments gives significant advantages. To manage, build, and test the spacecraft and its instruments, a partnership has been forged between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the University of Arizona (home institution of principal investigator P. H. Smith), and Lockheed Martin in Denver; instrument and scientific contributions from Canada and Europe have augmented the mission. The science mission focuses on providing the ground truth for the 2002 Odyssey discovery of massive ice deposits hidden under surface soils in the circumpolar regions. The science objectives, the instrument suite, and the measurements needed to meet the objectives are briefly described here with reference made to more complete instrument papers included in this special section. The choice of a landing site in the vicinity of 68°N and 233°E balances scientific value and landing safety. Phoenix will land on 25 May 2008 during a complex entry, descent, and landing sequence using pulsed thrusters as the final braking strategy. After a safe landing, twin fan-like solar panels are unfurled and provide the energy needed for the mission. Throughout the 90-sol primary mission, activities are planned on a tactical basis by the science team; their requests are passed to an uplink team of sequencing engineers for translation to spacecraft commands. Commands are transmitted each Martian morning through the Deep Space Network by way of a Mars orbiter to the spacecraft. Data are returned at the end of the Martian day by the same path. Satisfying the mission's goals requires digging and providing samples of interesting layers to three on-deck instruments. By

  3. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    . Different from a traditional review, these can highlight emerging areas in the field, alerting our readers to new opportunities. Topical reviews can also serve to highlight experimental tools that can assist researchers. Special issues are a compilation of invited papers on a selected topic from authors selected by guest editors and approved by the Editorial Board. This concentration of high-quality, original papers draws attention to all the papers in a special issue. These issues should not be considered as conference proceedings, and all papers go through our excellent review procedures and must comply with the usual strict criteria applied to regular papers in JPCM. Expanding these programs will be a high priority of mine. Other mechanisms that will draw attention to the journal and individual papers include the use of multimedia, our annual highlights compilation, our excellent web presence and the introduction of open-access articles. Authors can also benefit from extra promotion of their work via LabTalk, IOP Select and personalized 'recommended reader' campaigns. A challenge for JPCM is to ensure that it is at the forefront in terms of online tools and article presentation. The first step has been taken with the introduction of 'article evolution'—an enhanced HTML for all articles that will provide a new and interactive user experience for the benefit of our authors and readers (for further information, visit iopscience.iop.org/info/page/articleevolution). Many new features are available, such as being able to zoom in and out of images and export them to Powerpoint. MathJax technology has been incorporated, improving the rendering of mathematics, and a mobile view of abstract and article pages is also available. This format will be developed on an ongoing basis in response to the demands of the community. I therefore encourage you to contact me, or the journal team, with any feedback you may have regarding this new article format and how it can be improved

  4. Introduction: Special Issue: Discussions on Metahydrogeology: Research Stocktaking or Identity Crisis? Essays on the Once and Future Merit of Research in Hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, Timothy R.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    means that most of the citations that do exist are rarely conveyed. These studies raise a number of questions. Is publishing, for the most part, a waste of time outside of academic merit? Is hydrogeology a “mature science”? Is progress really being made on longstanding hydrogeological problems? This special issue is intended not only to provide a robust platform for continuating the debate surrounding these and related questions but also to reinitialize the role of the Journal of Hydrologic Engineering in disseminating contributions to hydrogeological engineering science and practice. As a continuation of this discussion, the issue editors hosted a session at the fall 2005 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm05/?pageRequest=search&show =detail&sessid=362) encouraging debate about the value of research, academic and otherwise, in hydrogeology. This session involved a small sample of some of the top thinkers on these issues today, representing a wide range of perspectives. Included in this special issue are essays and philosophical commentaries by the participants in that session. These contributions illuminate ways that research, publishing, teaching, practice, and scholarship may evolve to increase the value of research to society, ranging from basic science to engineering hydrogeology, worldwide.

  5. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  6. [2009 report from the editors].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2010-01-01

    The editors of the Rev Clin Esp present the editorial course of action of the journal over the past year. We have up-dated the design of the journal, its contents (sections) and computerized the editorial process. We processed 467 manuscripts and made an editorial decision on 402 of them between November 2008 and October 2009. A total of 92 manuscripts (23%) were accepted. Fifteen (13%) out of the 119 original articles for which the editorial process was completed were accepted. Our goal for the year 2010 is to make the journal available on the Internet for all those who are subscribers to the Rev Clin Esp as well as for internal medicine residents (for which they must be members of each regional society). Other objectives of the editorial team are to edit the E-cases, for the journal to be a continuing education tool and that the coordinators of the work groups develop a monographic number at least once every two years. These actions aim to increase the impact factor and the quality of the Rev Clin Esp, official publication of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and of Spanish-speaking internal medicine physicians.

  7. EDITORIAL: Thank you and farewell from the Founding Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskes, Mike

    2005-07-01

    I have been involved with Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering (MSMSE) from the very beginning when it was merely an idea, over 14 years ago, to the current journal that is well supported by the community. During my time as Editor there have been many changes in the journal, including the introduction of electronic submissions, web-based services and free printed colour where it is essential to the article, as well as completely free colour online. The journal has seen excellent growth in the number and quality of submissions and the number of articles published continues to rise, enabling us to expand the journal to eight issues in 2005. Web accesses and downloads have greatly surpassed even my wildest dreams. In my opinion, the emergence of MSMSE as a top materials modelling journal has confirmed the vision of Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP) and the Executive Board that this area of science and engineering was ripe for a specialized journal. I feel that, having seen the journal through the early years and watched it grow into a successful arena for multidisciplinary materials research, it is now an appropriate time for me to hand over the reins. The journal has a great foundation for future growth and development and is supported by an excellent Editorial Board, who have given me a great deal of help and advice over the years. I feel sure that they will continue to support the journal when Bill Curtin, Brown University, takes over on 1 July 2005. Bill has the diverse experience in modelling at the atomic, dislocation, and continuum levels to lead the journal to new heights. Finally I would like to thank all of the readers, authors and referees who have greatly contributed to MSMSE over the years. Thank you for your support and help, and I hope you will continue to support the journal. Last, but not least, I would like to thank the staff at IOPP. Without their expert assistance, the journal could not have been as successful as it is

  8. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.

    2013-01-01

    Dear readers, contributors, and members of the world laser physics community. It is a great honour for us to introduce to you our new publishing partner, IOP Publishing, a subsidiary of the Institute of Physics, United Kingdom. IOP Publishing is a world renowned authority in producing journals, magazines, websites and services that enable researchers and research organizations to present their work to a world-wide audience. Laser Physics, the first English-language scientific journal in Russia, was founded in 1990 on the initiative of Alexander M Prokhorov, a pioneer and leader in laser physics research. Professor Prokhorov served as the first Editor-in-Chief of the journal until 2002. We are proud that it is our 23rd year of publishing Laser Physics and our 10th year of publishing Laser Physics Letters. We would like to honour the memory of our friend, late Professor Igor Yevseyev, whose enthusiasm and unwavering dedication to our journals contributed most significantly to their success. It was initially his idea in 2011 to approach IOP with a partnership proposal. We deeply regret that he is no longer with us as we enter this productive alliance. Now, in partnership with IOP, we are turning a new page in providing world-wide access to the cutting-edge research results in our journals, serving our well established global audience. We see new horizons opening for our journals for years to come and hope that our readers share our enthusiasm and aspirations. Please accept our best wishes for all your new scientific endeavors in the exciting field of laser physics.

  9. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland.

  10. Richard Gilbert, Reporter and Assistant City Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Looks at the experiences of Richard Gilbert, reporter and assistant editor for "The Herald Telephone," a daily newspaper in Bloomington, Indiana, and discusses Gilbert's suggested guidelines for high school journalism advisers. (MS)

  11. Report of the editors, 2014.

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2015-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) Objectives and attainments in 2014, (b) Editorial activity, 2014, and (c) 2013 impact factor. In 2014 we achieved the 5 planned objectives. We have published the 9 programmed issues and 103% of the planned papers according to the usual fixed sections. We emphasize the publication of 29 editorials, 21 of which are signed by prestigious foreign authors. From the first January to the 30th September 2014 we received 421 manuscripts (46.8 manuscripts per month), a slight lower figure to that obtained in 2013 (50.9 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 404 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 32.3% (originals, 22.4%). We asked for 315 revisions to 240 reviewers and we received 53.3% revisions in less than two weeks (10.4 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 18,3 (less than half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56,6 days in 2009 to 26.6 days in 2014. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 103 days. In 2014 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation (FEMI) has reported 11 published manuscripts. In July 2014 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports gave Rev Clin Esp an Impact Factor of 1,314 (year 2013). This Impact Factor without self-citations would have been 0.705 (in 2009 the global impact factor was 0,584). With the Editorial Committee farewell we welcome the new editorial team and we sincerely thank the SEMI Steering Committee, our colleagues, journal officers, reviewers, readers and authors that since 2009 have trusted on our editorial work.

  12. [Report of the editors, 2010].

    PubMed

    García Puig, Juan; Alonso-Vega, Gabriel Gaspar; Blanco, Juan José Ríos

    2011-01-01

    The Editors of the Rev Clin Esp inform herein on their editorial activity in the last year (November 2009 to October 2010) according to three different sections: (a) Objectives and achievements during 2010, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2011. During 2010, we have updated the editorial algorithm (manuscript time lag). We have developed the "E-case reports" section and we have linked the abstracts of the Annual Congress of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) to a journal supplement (electronically available). Since 2010, the subscribers have been able to receive all of the contents of the Rev Clin Esp on-line and to perform self-evaluations in order to obtain 1.7 credits per each journal issue (continuing education). In 2010 we handled 402 manuscripts (7.2% more than in 2009), 35% of which were accepted for publication. We asked 186 reviewers for their expert opinion, 75% of whom sent their reports in less than two weeks. The mean time needed to reach an editorial decision concerning original manuscripts ("accepted / rejected") was 44.5 days and for papers not sent to external reviewers 19.5 days. Collaboration with the work groups produced good results (2.4 published manuscripts per issue), but this could be improved if all the groups collaborated in all the journal sections. Our objectives for 2011 are to complete the renewal of the Rev Clin Esp scientific committee, in accordance with the SEMI Council, and to continue to proceed with the actions initiated to increase the journal impact factor. Rev Clim Esp is an open forum for all internal medicine specialists. Responsibility falls on all of us to collaborate in order to make our journal a little better day by day.

  13. 2012 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  14. 2013 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  15. How are Editors Selected, Recruited and Approved?

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Al-Khatib, Aceil

    2016-11-28

    The editors of scholarly journals have a duty to uphold and promote the highest standards of ethical conduct of research. They also have a responsibility to maintain the integrity of the literature, and to promote transparency and honesty in reporting research findings. In the process of screening manuscripts they receive for possible publication, editors have the obligation to report infractions to the institutions of offending authors, and request an investigation. Since editors can reject a paper on ethical grounds, they can be considered to be the guardians of ethics who should express high ethical standards in conducting and publishing their own research. An examination of several publishers' websites reveals no such requirement or clear selection criteria for journal editors. Therefore, we aim to discuss the factors that publishers, in a broad sense, should consider when selecting editors for scholarly journals and believe that such criteria should be made public to ensure accountability. This would restore some of the eroding public trust in disseminated research, fortify confidence in the composition and qualification of members of an editorial board, and help to protect the reputations of publishers and editors.

  16. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  17. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  18. A Visually Oriented Text Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    HERMAN employs Evans & Sutherland Picture System 2 to provide screenoriented editing capability for DEC PDP-11 series computer. Text altered by visual indication of characters changed. Group of HERMAN commands provides for higher level operations. HERMAN provides special features for editing FORTRAN source programs.

  19. Putting the World into World-Class Education: Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Stewart, Vivien

    2004-01-01

    Ms. Kagan and Ms. Stewart, guest editors of this special section, present a discussion of the need to strengthen international education in American schools. Noting the gap between American students' international knowledge and skills and those they will need to effectively navigate an increasingly interconnected world, the editors sound a call…

  20. [Report of the editors, 2013].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) objectives and attainments, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2014. In 2013 the most relevant modification concerning the editorial activity has been the translation into English of the 5 manuscripts with abstract contained in each issue (http://www.revclinesp.es/). From the first January to the 30th September 2013 we received 458 manuscripts (50.9 manuscripts per month), a similar figure to that obtained in 2012 (51.1 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 443 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 23.7% (originals, 11.8%). We asked for 253 revisions to 186 reviewers and we received 74.4% revisions in less than 2 weeks (10.9 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 20,3 (half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56.6 days in 2009 to 22.5 days in 2013. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 94.8 days in 2013 (110.5 in 2012 and 155.8 in 2011). In 2013 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation has reported 17 published manuscripts. In 2013 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports excluded Rev Clin Esp from its impact factor journal list due to its elevated self-citations. We have taken a number of actions to reduce self-citations and we expect to be a minority in 2014. Some other data concerning the editorial policy are encouraging. In this sense, manuscript citation to Rev Clin Esp published articles has seen a substantial increase from 19% in 2008 to 29% in 2012. We work to achieve the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000). The continuous renewal of the journal sections and the working groups collaboration are necessary elements to make our journal, each day

  1. University-government relationships in the training of technical writers-editors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohrer, Freda F.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional and nontraditional methods of training technical writers-editors are reviewed. Combining work experience with classroom instruction in the form of cooperative education provides a method of strengthening the Federal career service in professional occupations. The NASA Langley experience that successfully introduced students to the special demands of technical writing and editing is described.

  2. Professional Wisdom and Writing for Publication: Qualitative Interviews with Editors and Authors in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2013-01-01

    College and university faculty members specializing in early childhood education face some unique challenges in scholarly writing. The purpose of this research was to use open-ended interviews as a way to gather the collective wisdom of a group of key informants about academic writing and publishing in the field. Twenty-two editors and/or authors,…

  3. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  4. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  5. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  6. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  7. [The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors].

    PubMed

    Reyes, H

    2001-01-01

    On September 29th, 2000, The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors was founded, sponsored by the "Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT)" (the Governmental Agency promoting and funding scientific research and technological development in Chile) and the "Sociedad Médica de Santiago" (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine). The Association adopted the goals of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and therefore it will foster "cooperation and communication among Editors of Chilean biomedical journals; to improve editorial standards, to promote professionalism in medical editing through education, self-criticism and self-regulation; and to encourage research on the principles and practice of medical editing". Twenty nine journals covering a closely similar number of different biomedical sciences, medical specialties, veterinary, dentistry and nursing, became Founding Members of the Association. A Governing Board was elected: President: Humberto Reyes, M.D. (Editor, Revista Médica de Chile); Vice-President: Mariano del Sol, M.D. (Editor, Revista Chilena de Anatomía); Secretary: Anna María Prat (CONICYT); Councilors: Manuel Krauskopff, Ph.D. (Editor, Biological Research) and Maritza Rahal, M.D. (Editor, Revista de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello). The Association will organize a Symposium on Biomedical Journal Editing and will spread information stimulating Chilean biomedical journals to become indexed in international databases and in SciELO-Chile, the main Chilean scientific website (www.scielo.cl).

  8. AGU Publications Volunteers Feted At Elegant Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting Editors' Evening, held at the City Club of San Francisco, was hosted by the Publications Committee and is the premier social event for editors and associate editors attending the Fall Meeting. The evening commenced with a welcome from Carol Finn, incoming AGU president, in which she expressed her thanks to the editors and associate editors for volunteering their time to benefit AGU.

  9. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  10. Introduction to the special collection of papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Hopton, Matthew E

    2012-11-30

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, description of the region, overview of the methods, and summary of the results. Although there are a multitude of scientifically based sustainability metrics, many are data intensive, difficult to calculate, and fail to capture all aspects of a system. We wanted to see if we could develop an approach that decision-makers could use to understand if their system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The goal was to produce a scientifically defensible, but straightforward and inexpensive methodology to measure and monitor environmental quality within a regional system. We initiated an interdisciplinary pilot project in the San Luis Basin, south-central Colorado, to test the methodology. The objectives were: 1) determine the applicability of using existing datasets to estimate metrics of sustainability at a regional scale; 2) calculate metrics through time from 1980 to 2005; and 3) compare and contrast the results to determine if the system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The sustainability metrics, chosen to represent major components of the system, were: 1) Ecological Footprint to capture the impact and human burden on the system; 2) Green Net Regional Product to represent economic welfare; 3) Emergy to capture the quality-normalized flow of energy through the system; and 4) Fisher information to capture the overall dynamic order and to look for possible regime changes. The methodology, data, and results of each metric are presented in the remaining four papers of the special collection. Based on the results of each metric and our criteria for understanding the sustainability trends, we find that the San Luis Basin is moving away from sustainability. Although we understand

  11. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2008-01-01

    To begin, I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors a successful and happy 2008 and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2007. I took over the editorship of Nuclear Fusion in January, and the year has been one in which the community as a whole has been busier than ever with a variety of duties associated with the ITER project. It was with pride that we published the Progress in the ITER Physics Basis in the June issue of the journal (stacks.iop.org/NF/47/i=6). The task undertaken by the coordinators, authors and referees was a daunting one but one which led to an outstandingly successful issue. The response from readers has been phenomenal and there were in the region of 10 000 downloads of papers in the first month following publication. Looking to 2008 and beyond, the journal will endeavour to continue to support the work of the fusion community. Refereeing As we have done since January 2005, we would like to thank our top ten most loyal referees who have helped the journal with its double-referee peer-review procedure in the past year. At the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Office we are fully aware of the load we put on the shoulders of our referees. At the end of 2004 the Editorial Board decided that a gesture of gratitude should be made to our most loyal referees. We offer them a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. To select the top referees we have adopted the criterion that a researcher should have acted as a referee or adjudicator for at least three different manuscripts during the period from summer 2006 to the end of 2007. We have excluded our Board members and those referees who were already listed in the top ten in the last two years. According to our records the following people met this criterion. Congratulations and many, many thanks! H.L. Berk (Texas University, USA) J.S. DeGrassie (GAT, USA) C. Deutsch (Paris University, France) N. Hayashi (JAEA

  12. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  13. A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    appears and presents the hierarchy of CEMenuCells A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP 2 of 27 m arble Final Report for Contract # DAAHO1-93-C-R013 in the...icon, "Default" status, state list, textual description, tool sta- A Command Editor Tool for NEXTSTEP 3 of 27 m arble Final Report for Contract... arble Final Report for Contract # DAAH01-93-C-R013 FIGURE 7 Configuration of a TAV 3.0.. Acietr O ev 3.1 luBman d aetn Cmoe a ConQ summw t. Paletta e

  14. Are Editors Out of the Tenure Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    University presses have complained for years that tenure committees unfairly expect their editors to be arbiters of what counts as tenure-worthy work. At the same time, the presses have been caught in a business-side squeeze between dwindling sales (and shrinking subsidies) and the ever-greater pressure on scholars to publish. In this article, the…

  15. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    the journal, and a tremendous intellectual resource, is the Editorial Board. The board members are all distinguished scientists and engineers who provide valuable counsel in defining the technical scope of the journal and its management. The members attend the board meetings at least once a year and, as a dynamic group, discuss ways of making the journal better. Most of them, including myself, also publish in J. Phys. D on a regular basis. This is truly a unique feature. So, what do I hope to accomplish during my tenure? I will strive to continue the legacy established by Allister and to look at ways of making a first-rate journal even better. At the heart of this is the quality of papers published. This can be done in several ways: raising the bar for refereeing and acceptance, regular publication of topical clusters and special issues in important areas, and publication of review articles by internationally renowned researchers and academics. In all these areas, the Editorial Board members can play a leading role. While I believe that the present topical scope of the journal is adequate and covers the important areas of applied physics, it is easy to miss out on important emerging areas. Therefore, we will have to keep the scope of the journal under constant scrutiny. Above all, the content of the journal must remain relevant at all times. I look forward to working with the journal's excellent staff, Associate Editors, and the Editorial Board.

  16. Introduction to the Special Collection of Papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: A Methodology for Evaluating Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, descripti...

  17. OPM Scheme Editor 2: A graphical editor for specifying object-protocol structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min A.; Markowitz, V.M.; Pang, F.; Ben-Shachar, O.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes an X-window based Schema Editor for the Object-Protocol Model (OPM). OPM is a data model that supports the specification of complex object and protocol classes. objects and protocols are qualified in OPM by attributes that are defined over (associated with) value classes. Connections of object and protocol classes are expressed in OPM via attributes. OPM supports the specification (expansion) of protocols in terms of alternative and sequences of component (sub) protocols. The OPM Schema Editor allows specifying, displaying, modifying, and browsing through OPM schemas. The OPM Schema Editor generates an output file that can be used as input to an OPM schema translation tool that maps OPM schemas into definitions for relational database management systems. The OPM Schema Editor was implemented using C++ and the X11 based Motif toolkit, on Sun SPARCstation under Sun Unix OS 4.1. This document consists of the following parts: (1) A tutorial consisting of seven introductory lessons for the OPM Schema Editor. (2) A reference manual describing all the windows and functions of the OPM Schema Editor. (3) An appendix with an overview of OPM.

  18. Serials Management in the Electronic Era: Papers in Honor of Peter Gellatly, Founding Editor of "The Serials Librarian."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jim, Ed.; Williams, James W., Ed.

    This book assesses progress and technical changes in the field of serials management and anticipates future directions and challenges for librarians. The book consists of 18 chapters: (1) "Introduction" (Jim Cole and James W. Williams); (2) "Peter Gellatly--Editor with a Deft Touch" (Ruth C. Carter); (3) "The "Deseret…

  19. Editor and Student Views on the Censorship Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raburn, Josephine

    Out of 200 newspaper editors randomly selected from a directory, 64 responded to a questionnaire eliciting their opinions on the subject materials most often censored by groups in the United States. The editors' responses were compared to those of 121 freshmen at Cameron University (Oklahoma). A majority of the editors supported the First…

  20. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research in the Context of Hurricane Katrina: An Ecological Needs-Based Perspective and Introduction to the Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Carl F.; Overstreet, Stacy

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the special section on child and adolescent mental health research in the context of Hurricane Katrina. We outline the purpose and intent of the special section and present an integrative perspective based on broad contextual theories of human development with which to think about the impact of disasters like Katrina. The…

  1. PREFACE: Introductory remarks from the Editors Introductory remarks from the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Meseguer, A.; Marques, F.

    2012-06-01

    The local organizers of the 4th BIFD (Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics) Symposium held in Barcelona on 18-21 July 2011 would like to thank the editors of Fluid Dynamics Research for offering us the opportunity of publishing a peer-reviewed special issue of the journal with a selection of the contributions presented at this conference. We thank both the authors and the referees for working with us on the rather tight schedule necessary to release the issue within one year of the date of the conference. We also thank the invited speakers, B Eckhardt, L Tuckerman, and J M Vega, for contributing keynote papers to this special issue. The series of BIFD symposia started as a small workshop in Madeira, Portugal, in 2004 with no more than 20 participants. This number increased rapidly during the second and third symposia held in 2006 (Denmark) and 2009 (United Kingdom), with 40 and 110 participants, respectively. The 4th BIFD symposium has consolidated this event as one of the leading conferences in hydrodynamic stability, with nearly 200 participants from around the world. The main goal of this conference is to bring together scientists and engineers from different disciplines directly or indirectly related to fluid dynamics, bifurcation theory and hydrodynamic stability theory. The conference covered many research areas within the aforementioned fields, ranging from thermal, shear and centrifugal flows to biofluids, films, drops, viscoelastic flows and magnetohydrodynamics. The structure of the conference, with invited plenary talks and focused sessions, helped the participants find their home in the conference and share state-of-the-art knowledge within the field of hydrodynamic instabilities. The financial support from MICINN (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Grant no FIS2009-08065-E) and UPC (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) is greatly appreciated. The local organizers would also like to thank ETSAB (Barcelona School of Architecture

  2. Evolutionary theory in letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Orion; Lowe, Clayton Cory

    2015-05-01

    This research note presents the results of a content analysis of 234 letters to the editors that discuss evolutionary theory and were published in American newspapers. We find that letters to the editor both support and hinder the cause of teaching evolutionary theory in American secondary schools. On the one hand, anti-evolutionary theory messages are marginalized in the letters section. This marginalization signals a low level of legitimacy for creationism. It might also contribute to the sense of tension that sustains creationist identities. On the other hand, relatively few letters explicitly note the fact that scientists or the scientific community accept evolution. Interestingly, the obscuration of the scientific community's support for evolutionary theory occurs both in letters supporting and opposing evolutionary theory.

  3. Unified Meta-Component Model Specification Editor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-20

    relationship between the two major user interface modules, the editor and wizard, and their associated features. Functional to module mapping diagrams are...SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18 . NUMBER OF PAGES 148 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39- 18

  4. EDITORIAL: A word from the new Editor-in-Chief A word from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    TIn the autumn of 2010 I became the Editor-in Chief of European Journal of Physics (EJP). EJP is a place for teachers, instructors and professors to exchange their views on teaching physics at university level and share their experience. It is general opinion that no good research is possible without connection with good, high-quality teaching, at the university level in particular. Therefore excellence in physics teaching is important to the physics community. European Journal of Physics is proud of its contribution to achieving this goal. As Editor-in-Chief, I will continue to work to this general objective of the journal. We will publish articles on specific topics in physics, stressing originality of presentation and suitability for use in students'laboratories, lectures and physics teaching in general. We will also publish more pedagogical papers presenting the achievements of particular teaching methods. In addition, we will continue to publish special sections on particular areas of physics, as well as the annual special section on physics competitions. European Journal of Physics is in good shape. Due to the work of the previous editors and the publisher, the readership is high and growing steadily, and many excellent papers are being submitted and published. I hope that this positive trend for the journal will continue, and I will do my best to keep to this high standard. A few words about myself. I work in the Institute of Physics in Warsaw, Poland. My main research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and I have published about 80 research papers on this topic. For many years I was involved in teaching physics at university and in high school. I am a co-author of a textbook on physics for high-school students and of a problem book in quantum mechanics. For the last ten years, I have been involved in the International Physics Olympiad and over the last few years I have been a member of the Editorial Board of European Journal of Physics.

  5. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    biological, medical and life science applications or sensors and sensing systems. Selected papers or special features in recent issues of MST attest to this development [1-3]. In parallel with these new fields, board members have always kept their eye on the other journal topics. Many papers published in MST have been downloaded very often and highly cited. This shows the acceptance and reputation of MST. Thanks to the activity of all board members over the last ten years MST has published a number of excellent review articles. This has strengthened the prestige of MST. A new series of articles was introduced under the banner of 'Perspectives' in 2008. They highlight milestones in a selected field and indicate some future challenges from the point of view of the author [4]. In summary, it can be stated that MST is on a good path. This was created thanks to the activity of all members of the Editorial Board. In recent years we have enlarged this board with well known scientists from universities and industry from all over the world. This will ensure a continuously positive development of MST. As outgoing Editor-in-Chief, I can say that I have found my task fascinating and I have enjoyed it very much. I have learned a lot in this time because I have come into close contact with a large number of scientists from a vast spectrum of technical areas and parts of our world. My special gratitude is dedicated to all the Editorial Board members of the last ten years and especially to Sharon D'Souza from IOPP. Furthermore, I would like to pass on to my successor, Professor David Birch from University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, my best wishes for an enjoyable and successful tenure as Editor-in-Chief! References [1] Tanaka M, Baba T and Postek M T 2011 Nanometrology Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 020101 [2] Potyrailo R A et al 2011 RFID sensors as the common sensing platform for single-use biopharmaceutical manufacturing Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 082001 [3] Fritze H 2011 High-temperature bulk

  6. Editorial and Introduction of the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Benson, Sally M.; Karimjee, Anhar; Rubin, Edward S.

    2010-03-01

    Short one page editorial to introduce the +30 peer reviewed papers contained within the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

  7. Special Issue on Casual Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Bulletin of Labour, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes "Editor's Introduction" (Cully); "A New Estimate of Casual Employment?" (Campbell, Burgess); "A New Estimate of Casual Employment?: Reply" (Murtough, Waite); "The 'Long-term or Permanent Casual'--An Oxymoron or 'A Well Enough Understood Australianism' in the Law?" (Owens); and "The ACTU's…

  8. Introduction to Special Section on Recent Advances in the Study of Optical Variability in the Near-Surface and Upper Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-30

    multiple path length, liquid core waveguide (MPLCW) absorption system, LISST 100X, and Coulter counter (Multisizer III, Beckman- Coulter) were used for some...underwater profiler fitted with additional subsurface instruments to characterize tur- bulence and bubble injection below the surface (Nortek HR...and direc - tion during the Hawaii experiment. 30 min averages were used. DICKEY ET AL.: INTRODUCTION C00H20C00H20 24 of 39 variability in the wind field

  9. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur

  10. Parting messages from current and former editors of the Journal of Andrology.

    PubMed

    Bartke, Andrzej; Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; Desjardins, Claude; Lewis, Ron; Tindall, Don; Hamilton, David W; Pryor, Jon L; Schlegel, Peter N; Hardy, Matthew P; Burnett, Arthur L Bud; Darney, Sally P; Sandlow, Jay

    2012-01-01

    The proposal to produce this final commemorative issue for the Journal of Andrology arose during our regular discussions as current editors soon after it was announced that the Journal would complete its own life course and merge into a new publication (to be named Andrology) with the International Journal of Andrology. We considered the momentous occasion to be one that should be celebrated with an enduring tribute in recognition of the Journal's exceptional 33-year existence. Among the various contributions sought for inclusion in this issue, we envisioned an article assembling collected short essays from all living former editors drawing on notable events and highlights, if not less well-known challenges and successes arising during their editorship eras. We thought that any such production of musings, viewpoints, and most of all words of wisdom from those who have had major roles in the direction and accomplishments of the Journal would offer an illuminating read for the society's members and friends and provide all readers another venue to share in and enjoy the Journal's great history. We are enthralled to have gathered these collections, all personal compositions of the former editors-in-chief, and for their effort that has helped us complete this special endeavor we express to them our tremendous gratitude. Serving as the Journal's last editors, we are also grateful to contribute our essay at the very end as part of this joyous chronicle.

  11. A Study of Issues Related to Discipline, Grouping and Tracking, and Special Education in New Castle County, Delaware, Desegration Area. Volume I, General Issues and Introduction: Discipline Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, Charles M.; And Others

    In the former New Castle County (Delaware) School District (reorganized into four districts in 1981), minority students were numerically overrepresented from 1979 to 1982 in suspensions from school and in placement in special education and lower academic groupings. To determine if the overrepresentation was based on discriminatory practices or…

  12. International Perspectives on Academic and Professional Preparation of School and Educational Psychologists: Introduction to a Special Issue of the "International Journal of School & Educational Psychology"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland, Thomas; Hatzichristou, Chryse

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the "International Journal of School & Educational Psychology" is devoted to promoting an understanding of some current features of school psychology programs and to suggest ways to further strengthen preparation. Information summarized in these 12 articles is intended to assist us in determining the relevance…

  13. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  14. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content

  15. A study of the dynamics of Salmonella infection in turkey breeding, rearing and finishing houses with special reference to elimination, persistence and introduction of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Doblies, Doris; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Davies, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    In this descriptive study, the dynamics of Salmonella infection of turkey flocks were investigated by repeated sampling of houses where Salmonella had been identified. The aim of the study was to identify the most common scenarios involved in elimination, persistence and introduction of Salmonella in the different branches of the turkey industry. Sixty-two houses on 34 turkey farms (comprising breeding, rearing and finishing farms) were sampled longitudinally, starting with the identification of a positive flock. A total of 117 follow-on flocks were tested and cleaning and disinfection (C&D) was assessed during 66 post-C&D visits. A total of 155 incidents (clearance, persistence or introduction of Salmonella) were recorded. Persistence was seen in 35.5% of incidents and was seen more frequently in breeding and rearing houses compared with finishing houses. Most persistence incidents were the result of insufficient C&D. Clearance was seen in 40% of incidents and was more often observed in finishing houses than in breeding or rearing houses. Introduction was seen in 24.5% of incidents and was more common in breeding and finishing flocks than in rearing flocks. Contamination of a house with Salmonella Typhimurium was more likely to be cleared compared with other serovars. The total number of positive samples found at a post-C&D visit was correlated with the probability of carry-over of infection, whereas the location of the positive samples seemed to be less important. Our highly sensitive post-C&D sampling method allowed us to predict a negative follow-on flock in most cases.

  16. Sleep Problems as Consequence, Contributor, and Comorbidity: Introduction to the Special Issue on Sleep, Published in Coordination With Special Issues in Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology and Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Dean W

    2016-07-01

    Despite long-standing public and scientific interest in the phenomenon of sleep, the current decade has shown tremendous growth in our understanding of the sleep of children who have medical or developmental conditions. To accommodate, promote, and guide that growth, Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology, and Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics have published coordinated special issues, encompassing >30 relevant articles. This article introduces the special issue in Journal of Pediatric Psychology, highlighting papers that illustrate how sleep problems are not only commonly comorbid with childhood medical and developmental conditions; they are also likely caused by and contribute to these conditions. In doing so, these coordinated special issues guide clinical care and reveal opportunities for future research.

  17. A Tisket, A Tasket--Out of the Editor's Basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2001-05-01

    In September 1940, the Journal introduced Out of the Editor's Basket for short items of interest: excerpts from letters, pamphlets, newspapers, and periodicals. By 1950, however, the Editor's Basket had evolved into a bulletin board for descriptions of new products and services, and it now contains almost exclusively press releases about recently marketed items. Now over 60 years old, the Editor's Basket still provides interesting tidbits for the Journal's broad readership.

  18. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  19. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  20. Web-Based Media Contents Editor for UCC Websites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seoksoo

    The purpose of this research is to "design web-based media contents editor for establishing UCC(User Created Contents)-based websites." The web-based editor features user-oriented interfaces and increased convenience, significantly different from previous off-line editors. It allows users to edit media contents online and can be effectively used for online promotion activities of enterprises and organizations. In addition to development of the editor, the research aims to support the entry of enterprises and public agencies to the online market by combining the technology with various UCC items.

  1. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  2. A Special Section. College Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Special section includes "True to Format," an editor's guide to periodicals (Robin Goldman); "The Move to Magazine," focusing on format (Patricia Ann LaSalle); "The Fast-paced Alternative," about timely tabloids (Janis D. Gleason, Lynn Donham); and also about tabloids, "Why Don't We Have a Magazine?" (Marsha…

  3. The health of European populations: introduction to the special supplement on the 2014 European Social Survey (ESS) rotating module on the social determinants of health.

    PubMed

    Beckfield, Jason; Balaj, Mirza; McNamara, Courtney L; Huijts, Tim; Bambra, Clare; Eikemo, Terje A

    2017-02-01

    This introduction summarizes the main findings of the Supplement 'Social inequalities in health and their determinants' to the European Journal of Public Health. The 16 articles that constitute this supplement use the new ESS (2014) health module data to analyze the distribution of health across European populations. Three main themes run across these articles: documentation of cross-national variation in the magnitude and patterning of health inequalities; assessment of health determinants variation across populations and in their contribution to health inequalities; and the examination of the effects of health outcomes across social groups. Social inequalities in health are investigated from an intersectional stance providing ample evidence of inequalities based on socioeconomic status (occupation, education, income), gender, age, geographical location, migrant status and their interactions. Comparison of results across these articles, which employ a wide range of health outcomes, social determinants and social stratification measures, is facilitated by a shared theoretical and analytical approach developed by the authors in this supplement.

  4. Writing a narrative biomedical review: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Blackmore, Heather; Kitas, George D

    2011-11-01

    Review articles comprehensively covering a specific topic are crucial for successful research and academic projects. Most editors consider review articles for special and regular issues of journals. Writing a review requires deep knowledge and understanding of a field. The aim of this review is to analyze the main steps in writing a narrative biomedical review and to consider points that may increase the chances of success. We performed a comprehensive search through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science using the following keywords: review of the literature, narrative review, title, abstract, authorship, ethics, peer review, research methods, medical writing, scientific writing, and writing standards. Opinions expressed in the review are also based on personal experience as authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

  5. A former Editor views the editorial process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    It was at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco in December 1976, shortly after my appointment as coeditor of Water Resources Research that I first began to realize the strong emotional ties that exist between a scientific community and its journals. Feelings run high, regardless of whether they come from readers, contributors, reviewers, active scientists, or scientific administrators. Opinions are often positive, sometimes negative, usually a mixture of the two; but regardless of their tenor they are delivered to the editor, in person, usually fortissimo. From that day until this, conference life has never been dull. When I meet a colleague in the halls there is never a loss for words, no need to search for a topic of mutual interest; WRR is always there at the ready.

  6. Introduction to special section of the Journal of Family Psychology, advances in mixed methods in family psychology: integrative and applied solutions for family science.

    PubMed

    Weisner, Thomas S; Fiese, Barbara H

    2011-12-01

    Mixed methods in family psychology refer to the systematic integration of qualitative and quantitative techniques to represent family processes and settings. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in study design, analytic strategies, and technological support (such as software) that allow for the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods and for making appropriate inferences from mixed methods. This special section of the Journal of Family Psychology illustrates how mixed methods may be used to advance knowledge in family science through identifying important cultural differences in family structure, beliefs, and practices, and revealing patterns of family relationships to generate new measurement paradigms and inform clinical practice. Guidance is offered to advance mixed methods research in family psychology through sound principles of peer review.

  7. How Newspaper Editors Reacted to "Post's" Pulitzer Prize Hoax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Douglas A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the findings of a nationwide survey of newspaper editors, revealing that most thought that the Janet Cooke hoax had been poorly handled by the "Washington Post." Notes that most of the editors said their newspapers had systems of review for stories coming from anonymous sources. (FL)

  8. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  9. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  10. March 2017 Letters to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Letters to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Regarding 'Unraveling the Complexity of Low Back Pain'" with Authors' Response "Beall's List Has Vanished: What Next?" with Editor-in-Chief Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):219-223. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0202.

  11. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  12. SCOR Working Group 137: "Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems": An introduction to the special issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerl, Hans W.; Yin, Kedong; O'Brien, Todd D.

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton form the base of most aquatic food webs and play a central role in assimilation and processing of carbon and nutrients, including nitrogen, phosphorus, silicon, iron and a wide range of trace elements (Reynolds, 2006). In the marine environment, estuarine and coastal ecosystems (jointly termed coastal here) are among the most productive, resourceful and dynamic habitats on Earth (Malone et al., 1999; Day et al., 2012). These ecosystems constitute only ∼10% of the global oceans' surface, but account for over 30% of its primary production (Day et al., 2012). They process vast amounts of nutrients, sediments, carbonaceous, and xenobiotic compounds generated in coastal watersheds, in which approximately 70% of the world's human population resides (Nixon, 1995; Vitousek et al., 1997; NOAA, 2013). Estuarine and coastal ecosystems are also strongly influenced by localized nutrient enrichment from coastal upwelling, with major impacts on the structure and function of phytoplankton communities and the food webs they support (Legendre and Rassoulzadegan, 2012; Paerl and Justić, 2012). In addition, introductions and invasions of exotic plant and animal species have led to significant "top down" mediated changes in phytoplankton community structure and function (Carlton, 1999; Thompson, 2005). Lastly, the coastal zone is the "front line" of climatically-induced environmental change, including warming, altered rainfall patterns, intensities and magnitudes (Trenberth, 2005; IPCC, 2012), which jointly impact phytoplankton community structure and function (Cloern and Jassby, 2012; Hall et al., 2013). The combined effects of these pressures translate into a myriad of changes in phytoplankton production and community structure along geomorphological and geographic gradients (Fig. 1), with cascading quantitative and qualitative impacts on biogeochemical cycling, food web structure and function, water quality and overall resourcefulness and sustainability of these

  13. Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xun, Gong

    2007-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power…

  14. Introduction to the Special Issue “Pharmacotherapies for the Treatment of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence” and a Summary of Patents Targeting other Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Richard L.; Franklin, Kelle M.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Zhou, Feng C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the Special Section: Pharmacotherapies for the Treatment of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence and provides a summary of patents targeting neurotransmitter systems not covered in the other four chapters. The World Health Organization notes that alcoholic-type drinking results in 2.5 million deaths per year, and these deaths occur to a disproportionately greater extent among adolescents and young adults. Developing a pharmacological treatment targeting alcohol abuse and dependence is complicated by (a) the heterogeneous nature of the disease(s), (b) alcohol affecting multiple neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, and (c) alcohol affecting multiple organ systems which in turn influence the function of the central nervous system. Presently, the USA Federal Drug Administration has approved three pharmacotherapies for alcoholism: disulfiram, naltrexone, and acamprosate. This chapter provides a summary of the following systems, which are not covered in the accompanying chapters; alcohol and acetaldehyde metabolism, opioid, glycinergic, GABA-A, neurosteroid, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and endocannabinoid, as well as patents targeting these systems for the treatment of alcoholism. Finally, an overview is presented on the use of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics in tailoring treatments for certain subpopulations of alcoholics, which is expected to continue in the future. PMID:22574678

  15. Introduction to the special issue on “Understanding and predicting change in the coastal ecosystems of the northern Gulf of Mexico”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Barras, John A.; Williams, S. Jeffress

    2013-01-01

    The coastal region of the northern Gulf of Mexico owes its current landscape structure to an array of tectonic, erosional and depositional, climatic, geochemical, hydrological, ecological, and human processes that have resulted in some of the world's most complex, dynamic, productive, and threatened ecosystems. Catastrophic hurricane landfalls, ongoing subsidence and erosion exacerbated by sea-level rise, disintegration of barrier island chains, and high rates of wetland loss have called attention to the vulnerability of northern Gulf coast ecosystems, habitats, built infrastructure, and economy to natural and anthropogenic threats. The devastating hurricanes of 2005 (Katrina and Rita) motivated the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program and partnering researchers to pursue studies aimed at understanding and predicting landscape change and the associated storm hazard vulnerability of northern Gulf coast region ecosystems and human communities. Attaining this science goal requires increased knowledge of landscape evolution on geologic, historical, and human time scales, and analysis of the implications of such changes in the natural and built components of the landscape for hurricane impact susceptibility. This Special Issue of the Journal of Coastal Research communicates northern Gulf of Mexico research results that (1) improve knowledge of prior climates and depositional environments, (2) assess broad regional ecosystem structure and change over Holocene to human time scales, (3) undertake process studies and change analyses of dynamic landscape components, and (4) integrate framework, climate, variable time and spatial scale mapping, monitoring, and discipline-specific process investigations within interdisciplinary studies.

  16. Introduction to a Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods: Building global resource programs to support HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana M; Denny, Thomas N; O'Gorman, Maurice

    2014-07-01

    This Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods includes 16 manuscripts describing quality assurance activities related to virologic and immunologic monitoring of six global laboratory resource programs that support international HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies: Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery (CAVD); Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI); External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL); HIV Vaccine Trial Network (HVTN); International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI); and Immunology Quality Assessment (IQA). The reports from these programs address the many components required to develop comprehensive quality control activities and subsequent quality assurance programs for immune monitoring in global clinical trials including: all aspects of processing, storing, and quality assessment of PBMC preparations used ubiquitously in HIV clinical trials, the development and optimization of assays for CD8 HIV responses and HIV neutralization, a comprehensive global HIV virus repository, and reports on the development and execution of novel external proficiency testing programs for immunophenotyping, intracellular cytokine staining, ELISPOT and luminex based cytokine measurements. In addition, there are articles describing the implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) in a large quality assurance laboratory, the development of statistical methods specific for external proficiency testing assessment, a discussion on the ability to set objective thresholds for measuring rare events by flow cytometry, and finally, a manuscript which addresses a framework for the structured reporting of T cell immune function based assays. It is anticipated that this series of manuscripts covering a wide range of quality assurance activities associated with the conduct of global clinical trials will provide a resource for individuals and programs involved in improving the harmonization, standardization, accuracy, and sensitivity of

  17. High-precision drop shape analysis on inclining flat surfaces: introduction and comparison of this special method with commercial contact angle analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Michael; Heib, Florian

    2013-10-07

    Drop shape analysis is one of the most important and frequently used methods to characterise surfaces in the scientific and industrial communities. An especially large number of studies, which use contact angle measurements to analyse surfaces, are characterised by incorrect or misdirected conclusions such as the determination of surface energies from poorly performed contact angle determinations. In particular, the characterisation of surfaces, which leads to correlations between the contact angle and other effects, must be critically validated for some publications. A large number of works exist concerning the theoretical and thermodynamic aspects of two- and tri-phase boundaries. The linkage between theory and experiment is generally performed by an axisymmetric drop shape analysis, that is, simulations of the theoretical drop profiles by numerical integration onto a number of points of the drop meniscus (approximately 20). These methods work very well for axisymmetric profiles such as those obtained by pendant drop measurements, but in the case of a sessile drop onto real surfaces, additional unknown and misunderstood effects on the dependence of the surface must be considered. We present a special experimental and practical investigation as another way to transition from experiment to theory. This procedure was developed to be especially sensitive to small variations in the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the surface; as a result, this procedure will allow the properties of the surface to be monitored with a higher precession and sensitivity. In this context, water drops onto a 111 silicon wafer are dynamically measured by video recording and by inclining the surface, which results in a sequence of non-axisymmetric drops. The drop profiles are analysed by commercial software and by the developed and presented high-precision drop shape analysis. In addition to the enhanced sensitivity for contact angle determination, this analysis technique, in

  18. High-precision drop shape analysis on inclining flat surfaces: Introduction and comparison of this special method with commercial contact angle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Michael; Heib, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Drop shape analysis is one of the most important and frequently used methods to characterise surfaces in the scientific and industrial communities. An especially large number of studies, which use contact angle measurements to analyse surfaces, are characterised by incorrect or misdirected conclusions such as the determination of surface energies from poorly performed contact angle determinations. In particular, the characterisation of surfaces, which leads to correlations between the contact angle and other effects, must be critically validated for some publications. A large number of works exist concerning the theoretical and thermodynamic aspects of two- and tri-phase boundaries. The linkage between theory and experiment is generally performed by an axisymmetric drop shape analysis, that is, simulations of the theoretical drop profiles by numerical integration onto a number of points of the drop meniscus (approximately 20). These methods work very well for axisymmetric profiles such as those obtained by pendant drop measurements, but in the case of a sessile drop onto real surfaces, additional unknown and misunderstood effects on the dependence of the surface must be considered. We present a special experimental and practical investigation as another way to transition from experiment to theory. This procedure was developed to be especially sensitive to small variations in the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the surface; as a result, this procedure will allow the properties of the surface to be monitored with a higher precession and sensitivity. In this context, water drops onto a 111 silicon wafer are dynamically measured by video recording and by inclining the surface, which results in a sequence of non-axisymmetric drops. The drop profiles are analysed by commercial software and by the developed and presented high-precision drop shape analysis. In addition to the enhanced sensitivity for contact angle determination, this analysis technique, in

  19. Conflicts of interest in biomedical publications: considerations for authors, peer reviewers, and editors.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Ayvazyan, Lilit; Akazhanov, Nurbek A; Kitas, George D

    2013-12-01

    This article overviews evidence on common instances of conflict of interest (COI) in research publications from general and specialized fields of biomedicine. Financial COIs are viewed as the most powerful source of bias, which may even distort citation outcomes of sponsored publications. The urge to boost journal citation indicators by stakeholders of science communication is viewed as a new secondary interest, which may compromize the interaction between authors, peer reviewers and editors. Comprehensive policies on disclosure of financial and non-financial COIs in scholarly journals are presented as proxies of their indexing in evidence-based databases, and examples of successful medical journals are discussed in detail. Reports on clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and clinical practice guidelines may be unduly influenced by author-pharmaceutical industry relations, but these publications do not always contain explicit disclosures to allow the readers to judge the reliability of the published conclusions and practice-changing recommendations. The article emphasizes the importance of adhering to the guidance on COI from learned associations such as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). It also considers joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers and editors as a foundation for appropriately defining and disclosing potential COIs.

  20. Editors' message--Hydrogeology Journal in 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Clifford; Olcott, Perry; Schneider, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogeology Journal appeared in six issues containing a total of 710 pages and 48 major articles, including 31 Papers and 14 Reports, as well as some Technical Notes and Book Reviews. The number of submitted manuscripts continues to increase. The final issue of 2003 also contained the annual volume index. Hydrogeology Journal (HJ) is an international forum for hydrogeology and related disciplines and authors in 2003 were from about 28 countries. Articles advanced hydrogeologic science and described hydrogeologic systems in many regions worldwide. These articles focused on a variety of general topics and on studies of hydrogeology in 24 countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, France, India, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey, and U.S.A. The Guest Editor of the 2003 HJ theme issue on “Hydromechanics in Geology and Geotechnics”, Ove Stephansson, assembled a valuable collection of technical reviews and research papers from eminent authors on important aspects of the subject area.

  1. ESDAPT - APT PROGRAMMING EDITOR AND INTERPRETER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.

    1994-01-01

    ESDAPT is a graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. ESDAPT has a graphical user interface that provides the user with an APT syntax sensitive text editor and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statement can also be created using menus and screen picks. ESDAPT interprets APT geometry statements and displays the results in its view windows. Tool paths are generated by batching the APT source to an APT processor (COSMIC P-APT recommended). The tool paths are then displayed in the view windows. Hardcopy output of the view windows is in color PostScript format. ESDAPT is written in C-language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4 series computers running SunOS. ESDAPT requires 4Mb of disk space, 7Mb of RAM, and MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Release 4, or OpenWindows version 3 for execution. Program documentation in PostScript format and an executable for OpenWindows version 3 are provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ESDAPT is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. This program was developed in 1992.

  2. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  3. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) a fast acting, promising, powerful, specific, and effective "small molecule" anti-cancer agent taken from labside to bedside: introduction to a special issue.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Peter L

    2012-02-01

    . Significantly, in subsequent experiments with rodents (19 animals with advanced cancer) Ko led a project in which 3BP was shown in a short treatment period to eradicate all (100%). Ko's and co-author's findings once published attracted global attention leading world-wide to many other studies and publications related to 3BP and its potent anti-cancer effect. This Issue of the Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes (JOBB 44-1) captures only a sampling of research conducted to date on 3BP as an anticancer agent, and includes also a Case Report on the first human patient known to the author to be treated with specially formulated 3BP. Suffice it to say in this bottom line, "3BP, a small molecule, results in a remarkable therapeutic effect when it comes to treating cancers exhibiting a "Warburg effect". This includes most cancer types.

  4. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  5. EDITORIAL: Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014 Editorial from the new Editor-in-Chief for 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. G.

    2014-02-01

    from receipt-to-first decision of a paper is only 50 days. In 2014 we will continue to support the low-temperature plasma physics community through the publication of special topical issues. Those already scheduled for next year are: Transport in B-fields in low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Rod Boswell and Igor D Kaganovich Spots and patterns on electrodes of gas discharges, Guest Editors: Mikhail S Benilov and Ulrich Kogelschatz Interaction of electromagnetic waves with low temperature plasmas, Guest Editors: Osamu Sakai and Shahid Rauf We will also launch a new feature: LabTalks, a way in which our authors can showcase their group's work and communicate their research published in PSST to a wider audience. Full details are on the PSST website. Along with the leadership team, made up of Associate Editors, Anne, Nick and Richard and the great PSST staff at Institute of Physics Publishing, led by Alice Malhador, I will strive to grow, improve and deliver a journal which reflects the excellent science from the low-temperature plasma community. We hope we can continue to count on your vital support as authors and referees.

  6. Editorial independence and the editor-owner relationship: good editors never die, they just cross the line.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, J F

    2009-12-01

    The concept of editorial freedom or independence is examined in the light of the editor-owner relationship. Like individual and national freedom or independence, it is a rhetorical concept whose realisation flows from internal achievement as much as it depends on external validation. This freedom entails roles and responsibilities embodied in specific codes of practice for editors, such as the guidelines espoused by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Association of Medical Editors. The calling to embody these guidelines makes editing a vocation that demands isolation and distancing, separation and solitude. It involves bracketing one's biases, prejudgments and preconceptions. With such detachment comes real freedom; one that requires a moral fibre and trustworthiness that uphold truth and right, whether in full view of public scrutiny, or in the aloneness of private secrecy. The stereotypical tension between academic and commercial concerns highlights the editor-owner relationship, and bears directly on editorial independence. In practice, journal owners overstep their prerogatives. The absence of clear contracts defining editorial independence and the lack of established mechanisms governing the editor-owner relationship affect many small- to medium-sized journals in developing countries. Even large journals in developed and democratic nations or totalitarian states and societies are not spared. At the end of the day, editorial freedom exists only insofar as it is tolerated, or until editors cross the line.

  7. Business, Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, Andrea

    1998-05-01

    The annual business meeting, which all members are encouraged to attend, will take place on Tuesday afternoon. Come enjoy the President's Ice Cream Party. Come meet new officers. Come nominate candidates for the Nominating Committee. The Nominating Committee is a very important body which provides the slate of candidates for the annual AAS election. Society business will be discussed briefly. Highlighting this meeting will be a panel discussion on: "How to Get Your Paper Published Promptly" Should I mention that Notable Authority Professor Hjalmar Sciatti hates me and my papers? When is it OK to start complaining that no report has arrived? Do I have to do everything the referee says? These and related questions will be addressed at the business meeting in a panel presentation by the editors of the three main AAS publications, Paul Hodge (AJ), Helmut Abt (ApJ), Alex Dalgarno (ApJ Letters), concerning the refereeing and editing process and how authors can interface with it most effectively. There will be time for questions and discussions toward the end, or you can send your questions in advance to askeds@aas.org, so that the most frequent ones can be covered in the presentations.

  8. The Letters Not Sent by a Journal Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    In the late hours of the night, even the most conscientious of journal editors may slip into writing imaginary letters to cherished authors and reviewers. Here are some of the letters that I composed:

  9. Bibliography or Bust: The "Angst" of Scholarly Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Richard Hauer

    1980-01-01

    Provides evidence indicating not only that the market for articles on literature and language is saturated with submissions, but that the glut creates burgeoning problems for editors, including the problem of rejecting publishable items. (RL)

  10. ANNOUNCEMENT: Greetings from the Editor and Publisher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wäppling, Roger; Williams, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Physica Scripta is an international physics journal published for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on behalf of the Nordic Science Academies and Physical Societies. This issue marks the beginning of the partnership between the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Institute of Physics Publishing (IOP). We look forward to a fruitful relationship in which Physica Scripta can profit from the international reach of IOP. Authors and readers will benefit from advance publication of articles on the web prior to receiving each month's journal issue. The peer-review system will continue to be managed by Professor Roger Wäppling who will assess each paper before assigning it to an external editor or sending it for refereeing. IOP will receive new article submissions and generate electronic documents suitable for use in the refereeing process. The editorial office in Sweden will then be responsible for these manuscripts up to the final publication decision. Accepted articles will be sent to IOP for copy-editing, typesetting, production and distribution. We aim to provide our authors, referees and readers with an enhanced service for this well-established journal. IOP will maintain and augment Physica Scripta's record in publishing a broad range of high-quality research papers and we will continue to publish Topical Issues as supplements to the regular 12 issues. The popular Comments articles will continue to be published in conjunction with regular papers under this new partnership. We hope that our subscribers will continue to enjoy reading Physica Scripta as a valuable resource for general physics research.

  11. Adapting a thesis to publication style: meeting editors' expectations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S H

    1996-01-01

    Every year hundreds of thesis reports are completed by graduate students. Many of these end up on nursing journal editors' desks, only to be rejected. What characteristics of a thesis lead to rejection? How can authors develop quality research manuscripts? How can faculty teach graduate students the difference between a thesis and manuscript. This article answers these questions by providing advice from 15 critical care and research journal editors.

  12. Substrate Utilization in the Critically Ill (Letter to the Editor)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    pen.sagepub.com/ Nutrition Journal of Parenteral and Enteral http://pen.sagepub.com/content/33/1/111 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI...Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: The American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition can be found at:Journal of...the Editor Dear Editor, Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Volume 33 Number 1 January/February 2009 111 © 2009 American Society for Parenteral

  13. ZED- A LINE EDITOR FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZED editor for the DEC VAX is a simple, yet powerful line editor for text, program source code, and non-binary data. Line editors can be superior to screen editors in some cases, such as executing complex multiple or conditional commands, or editing via slow modem lines. ZED excels in the area of text processing by using procedure files. For example, such procedures can reformat a file of addresses or remove all comment lines from a FORTRAN program. In addition to command files, ZED also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, on-line help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. The ZED editor was originally developed at Cambridge University in London and has been continuously enhanced since 1976. Users of the Cambridge implementation have devised such elaborate ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating Pi. This implementation of ZED strives to maintain the characteristics of the Cambridge editor. A complete ZED manual is included on the tape. ZED is written entirely in C for either batch or interactive execution on the DEC VAX under VMS 4.X and requires 80,896 bytes of memory. This program was released in 1988 and updated in 1989.

  14. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/.

  15. INTRODUCTION: The early days of the journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. E.

    2006-07-01

    When he discovered that I was an assistant editor in the 1960s, Alun Beddoe asked me to write a brief article about the early days of Physics in Medicine and Biology in order to `lighten up' the 50th anniversary issue. Forty years is a long time ago and I did not keep a diary, so all I can do is to recall a few memories and reminiscences and hope that they are reasonably accurate and of some interest. Medical physics in the UK started expanding in the years after World War II, partly because of the number of hospital physicists recruited after the inauguration of the National Health Service in 1948, and also because of the introduction of high energy generators used in radiotherapy (2 MV van de Graaffs, linacs, cobalt-60 teletherapy etc), radioactive isotopes, and increasing concern about radiation protection in such areas as diagnostic radiology. As they perceived that this would give rise to an increasing number of papers in this area of science, in 1956 the publishers Taylor & Francis launched a new quarterly journal entitled Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in collaboration with the Hospital Physicists' Association (HPA). For various reasons the publication date of an issue began to lag further and further behind the date on the front cover. The journal was not gaining sufficient subscribers and was failing to attract many authors, and there was a serious danger that it was going to cease publication. The HPA Executive Committee discussed whether to make the purchase of PMB compulsory for all HPA members, but decided against it. As the great majority of papers on medical physics at that time were still published in a wide range of other scientific or medical journals, it was intended, as a service to readers of PMB, that about a quarter of each issue should be devoted to abstracts of selected articles published in other journals. By the 1960s there was an average of well over 200 abstracts in each quarterly issue, written specially for PMB by a team of

  16. Introduction to the Special Section on Genomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Dozier, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The debate about the relevance of human genetics knowledge to everyday life has been marked by fluctuations of interest and enthusiasm. The negative impact of eugenics on the public consciousness suppressed dialogue between geneticists and the public for most of the second half of the 20th century (Ridley, 1999). For the most part, nongeneticists…

  17. Introduction to special section: Long lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine; Pinkerton, Harry; Stephenson, Jon

    1998-11-01

    Long lava flows are traditionally considered to form when low-viscosity lava is erupted at high effusion rates. However, this view has recently been challenged. Detailed field measurements on active lava flows on Kilauea have shown that inflation of lava flows after emplacement can result in reactivation and continued lengthening of flows. Inflated sheets can thus act a insulated conduits (lava tubes) that permit the transport of lava over great distances at near isothermal conditions. Detailed observations of long lava flows in the Columbia River Basalt Group and in the Cenozoic Volcanic Provinces in northern Queensland confirm that this mechanism is not restricted to recent flows on Hawaii. These findings have led to a search for evidence of inflation in flows in other parts of the world and have stimulated theoretical and laboratory research on the emplacement and cooling of lava in flows and in tubes. Understanding the formation of long submarine and planetary lava flows presents an additional challenge. Current evidence supports high effusion rates for some, possibly all, long planetary lava flows, and improved resolution from the Mars Global Surveyor will undoubtedly lead to either a confirmation or a rejection of this view. In this review, we discuss the geological importance and distribution of long lava flows, we investigate diametrically opposed views on the formation of long lava flows, and we stress the need for an interdisciplinary approach to improve our understanding of these enigmatic geological features.

  18. Introduction: Special issue on planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip; Esposito, Larry

    2016-11-01

    This issue of Icarus is devoted largely to papers presented at an open conference held at the Univ. of Colorado on 13-15 August 2014. This Planetary Rings Workshop is the fourth in a series organized by the Rings Working Group of the Cassini-Huygens mission and most of the papers presented dealt with phenomena revealed

  19. 7 CFR 773.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS SPECIAL APPLE LOAN PROGRAM § 773.1 Introduction. This part contains the terms and conditions for loans made under the Special Apple Loan Program. These regulations are applicable to... program objective is to assist producers of apples suffering from economic loss as a result of low...

  20. 7 CFR 773.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS SPECIAL APPLE LOAN PROGRAM § 773.1 Introduction. This part contains the terms and conditions for loans made under the Special Apple Loan Program. These regulations are applicable to... program objective is to assist producers of apples suffering from economic loss as a result of low...

  1. 7 CFR 773.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS SPECIAL APPLE LOAN PROGRAM § 773.1 Introduction. This part contains the terms and conditions for loans made under the Special Apple Loan Program. These regulations are applicable to... program objective is to assist producers of apples suffering from economic loss as a result of low...

  2. 7 CFR 773.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS SPECIAL APPLE LOAN PROGRAM § 773.1 Introduction. This part contains the terms and conditions for loans made under the Special Apple Loan Program. These regulations are applicable to... program objective is to assist producers of apples suffering from economic loss as a result of low...

  3. 7 CFR 773.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS SPECIAL APPLE LOAN PROGRAM § 773.1 Introduction. This part contains the terms and conditions for loans made under the Special Apple Loan Program. These regulations are applicable to... program objective is to assist producers of apples suffering from economic loss as a result of low...

  4. Optical Society of America's 2010 Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings: introduction by the feature editors.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Christopher J; Tilsch, Markus K; Ristau, Detlev

    2011-03-20

    This Applied Optics feature issue is dedicated to the eleventh topical meeting on Optical Interference Coatings held on 6-11 June 2010 in Tucson, Arizona, USA. This topical conference is held in a three year rotation with conferences in Europe and Asia and is a premier opportunity to discuss advances in research and development within the field of optical interference coatings. Papers from this meeting cover a broad range of topics ranging from deposition processes, thin film design, materials, metrology, and a wide array of practical applications.

  5. Laser applications to chemical analysis: an introduction by the feature editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Jay B.; Ramsey, J. Michael; Lucht, Robert P.

    1995-06-01

    This issue of Applied Optics features papers on the application of laser technology to chemical analysis. Many of the contributions, although not all, result from papers presented at the Fourth OSA Topical Meeting on Laser Applications to Chemical Analysis, which was held at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, March, 1994. This successful meeting, with nearly one hundred participants, continued the tradition of earlier LACA meetings to focus on the optical science of laser-based measurements of temperature and trace chemical assays in a wide variety of practical applications.

  6. Stephen J. Burges—New WRR editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The ‘tower of Babel syndrome’ is the most important problem facing water-resources researchers, says Stephen J. Burges, the new coeditor for hydrology and physical, chemical, and biological sciences for Water Resources Research (WRR). Burges was appointed to a 4-year term which began November 1. He succeeds R. Allan Freeze.Specialized research that lacks a sense of connection to other aspects of hydrology characterizes the syndrome, Burges explained. He traces this scattering of interests back to 1966 with the ‘evolution’ of the third-generation computer.

  7. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  8. Writing filter processes for the SAGA editor, appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirslis, Peter A.

    1985-01-01

    The SAGA editor provides a mechanism by which separate processes can be invoked during an editing session to traverse portions of the parse tree being edited. These processes, termed filter processes, read, analyze, and possibly transform the parse tree, returning the result to the editor. By defining new commands with the editor's user defined command facility, which invoke filter processes, authors of filter can provide complex operations as simple commands. A tree plotter, pretty printer, and Pascal tree transformation program were already written using this facility. The filter processes are introduced, parse tree structure is described and the library interface made available to the programmer. Also discussed is how to compile and run filter processes. Examples are presented to illustrate aspect of each of these areas.

  9. Implementing a computerized text-management system: an editor's view

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of sophisticated function-key-driven programs for handling text on a video-display terminal enables the editorial staff of a publications department to take an active role on a computerized text-management team, along with compositors and other keyboard operators. Although there are still many things that editors cannot do on a computer terminal, the bulk of manipulating straight text can be speeded, and the problems of rekeyboarding and interpretation of editorial markings can be largely bypassed. The computer also gives editors new tools that open the way for greater control over both the editorial process and the quality of technical publishing. 5 figures.

  10. The Dimensions of Maltreatment: Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Diana J.; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Runyan, Desmond K.

    2005-01-01

    This special issue includes an introduction and seven papers exploring dimensions of maltreatment including type, severity, chronicity, and substantiation status of referrals to CPS, utilizing a subsample of the LONGSCAN studies. Each paper examines one of the dimensions of maltreatment from various perspectives to determine if different…

  11. Preparing Special Education Research Articles in APA Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob; Spooner, Fred; Karvonen, Meagan

    2002-01-01

    This article addresses key considerations in preparing special education research articles for submission to professional journals in which the preferred style guide is the "Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association." The guidelines are drawn from special education literature, from editors, and from authors experienced in…

  12. Semi-automated XML markup of biosystematic legacy literature with the GoldenGATE editor.

    PubMed

    Sautter, Guido; Böhm, Klemens; Agosti, Donat

    2007-01-01

    Today, digitization of legacy literature is a big issue. This also applies to the domain of biosystematics, where this process has just started. Digitized biosystematics literature requires a very precise and fine grained markup in order to be useful for detailed search, data linkage and mining. However, manual markup on sentence level and below is cumbersome and time consuming. In this paper, we present and evaluate the GoldenGATE editor, which is designed for the special needs of marking up OCR output with XML. It is built in order to support the user in this process as far as possible: Its functionality ranges from easy, intuitive tagging through markup conversion to dynamic binding of configurable plug-ins provided by third parties. Our evaluation shows that marking up an OCR document using GoldenGATE is three to four times faster than with an off-the-shelf XML editor like XML-Spy. Using domain-specific NLP-based plug-ins, these numbers are even higher.

  13. Righting the Wrongs of Writing: Copy Editors Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jaclyn J.; Wall, Judy

    1975-01-01

    The major part of APGA Press production editors' jobs is copy editing manuscripts before they are set in type. Two APGA Press Staff members use specific examples to illustrate the grammatical and stylistic errors that cause problems for them and, if not corrected, for readers. (Author)

  14. Females' participation in psychopharmacology research as authors, editors, and subjects.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Durgin, Amy; Bradley, Kelly P; Porter, Lindsay K; Van Wagner, Karen; Weeden, Marc; Panos, John J

    2009-04-01

    This study determined the involvement of women as first authors and other authors for every article published in Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, and Psychopharmacology in 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006. Their involvement as editors also was determined. Women's participation as authors, but not as editors, slightly increased over time. In 2006, 43% of first authors, 38% of other authors, and 24% of editors were women. The gender of subjects was examined for the same years and journals, but could not be determined for 6% and 9% of articles employing nonhuman and human subjects, respectively. In 2006, when subjects' gender could be determined, 77% of articles involving nonhuman subjects used only males, 9% only females, and 14% both males and females. In articles using human subjects in that same year, 17% involved only males, 6% only females, and 77% both males and females. Women researchers clearly make substantial contributions to the psychopharmacology literature, but are nonetheless underrepresented as editors. Findings regarding subjects indicate that there is growing recognition of the importance of gender as a determinant of drug effects, although the vast majority of nonhuman studies continue to involve only male subjects.

  15. Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

  16. Particle size fraction -Response: Letter to the Editors

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editors: We, the undersigned, would like to comment on the article by Cho et al. (Cho et al. 2009), which was published in the November 2009 issue (volume 11, number 11, page 1682-1689) of Environmental Health Perspectives. We read the paper with great interest as the dis...

  17. IN DEFENSE OF ECORISK ASSESSMENT (LETTER TO EDITOR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are writing to convey a more accurate portrayal of the status of ecological ("environmental" in Europe) risk assessment that was presented in the recent article by M. Power and L.S. McCarty (Fallacies in Ecological Risk Assessment Practices," August 1997, pp 370A-...

  18. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  19. LACE: A Web-Based, Structured Editor for PDS Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M.; Keller, R.; Sarram, P.

    2015-06-01

    PDS has moved to XML-based metadata, but many scientists are not familiar with XML and find its structure complicated. For these reasons, we have created LACE, an editor for PDS metadata that hides the complexity of XML from the user.

  20. Ethical dilemmas in scientific publication: pitfalls and solutions for editors.

    PubMed

    Gollogly, Laragh; Momen, Hooman

    2006-08-01

    Editors of scientific journals need to be conversant with the mechanisms by which scientific misconduct is amplified by publication practices. This paper provides definitions, ways to document the extent of the problem, and examples of editorial attempts to counter fraud. Fabrication, falsification, duplication, ghost authorship, gift authorship, lack of ethics approval, non-disclosure, 'salami' publication, conflicts of interest, auto-citation, duplicate submission, duplicate publications, and plagiarism are common problems. Editorial misconduct includes failure to observe due process, undue delay in reaching decisions and communicating these to authors, inappropriate review procedures, and confounding a journal's content with its advertising or promotional potential. Editors also can be admonished by their peers for failure to investigate suspected misconduct, failure to retract when indicated, and failure to abide voluntarily by the six main sources of relevant international guidelines on research, its reporting and editorial practice. Editors are in a good position to promulgate reasonable standards of practice, and can start by using consensus guidelines on publication ethics to state explicitly how their journals function. Reviewers, editors, authors and readers all then have a better chance to understand, and abide by, the rules of publishing.

  1. Editorial introduction.

    PubMed

    Gelso, Charles J

    2007-09-01

    Introduces the special section in the current issue of Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. This section contains a reprint of Carl R. Rogers' (1957) seminal paper on the necessary and sufficient conditions for constructive personality change, as well as 11 reaction papers from some of the best psychotherapy theoreticians and researchers of our time. The reaction papers address the impact of Rogers' paper on the field of psychotherapy in general and therapy of the commenter's persuasion in particular, limitations of Rogers' viewpoints, the most important and enduring aspects of Rogers' theoretical statement, and how Rogers' ideas may exhibit themselves directly and indirectly in the current psychotherapy scene. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. 7 CFR 762.101 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Introduction. 762.101 Section 762.101 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.101 Introduction. (a) Scope. This subpart...

  3. 7 CFR 762.101 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Introduction. 762.101 Section 762.101 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.101 Introduction. (a) Scope. This subpart...

  4. 32 CFR 516.69 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Introduction. 516.69 Section 516.69 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Cooperation With the Office of Special Counsel § 516.69 Introduction. This...

  5. Editors-in-Chief of Medical Journals: Are They Experts, Authorities, Both, or Neither?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsindely, Sandor; Schubert, Andras

    1989-01-01

    Uses citation analysis to study the professional status and influence of the editors-in-chief of 769 medical journals. Finds that these editors-in-chief are, at least in their own specialties, not necessarily experts but authorities. (SR)

  6. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan Michael

    2011-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Paul Corkum will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2011. During my term as Editor-in-Chief atomic, molecular and optical science has continued to change rapidly: we have seen ultracold physics widening its original emphasis on Bose-Einstein condensates to the entanglement of light and matter in the most general sense towards a science of information. At the same time attosecond science and interaction of matter with short x-ray pulses develops rapidly. I am very happy that J. Phys. B with Paul Corkum as Editor-in-Chief will play a central role in publishing exciting results from this field. I would like to thank the publishing team at J. Phys. B for their fantastic job, in particular for the quality of the refereeing system the team has been able to maintain while at the same time bringing down the publication times considerably. I thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for the support of J. Phys. B.

  7. RNA. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Marie Z; Kruger, Robert P; Rivas, Fabiola; Smith, Orla; Szewczak, Lara

    2009-02-20

    Two scientists walk into a bar. After a pint and an exchange of pleasantries, one says to the other, "Where do you come from? Scientifically, I mean." The queried scientist responds, "Out of the RNA world." "Don't we all," the asker responds chuckling. Fifteen years ago, the joke would have been made with a nod to the notion that life arose from an RNA-based precursor, the so-called "RNA world." Yet had this conversation happened last week, the scientists would also be grinning in appreciation of the extent to which contemporary cellular biology is steeped in all things RNA. Ours is truly an RNA world.In this year's special review issue, the Cell editorial team has brought together articles focused on RNA in the modern world, providing perspectives on classical and emerging areas of inquiry. We extend our thanks to the many distinguished experts who contributed their time and effort as authors and reviewers to make the issue informative, thought-provoking, and timely. We hope that this collection of articles, written as we stand on the verge of a new wave of RNA biology, edifies and inspires by revealing the inner workings of these versatile molecules and by highlighting the next key questions that need to be addressed as we strive to understand the full functional scope of RNA in cells.

  8. Preparing Students To Work on Newspaper Copy Desks: Are Educators Meeting Editors' Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auman, Ann E.; Cook, Betsy B.

    A study surveyed two groups in the fall of 1994, journalism educators and newspaper editors. Educators completed a survey regarding the course content and skill areas emphasized in beginning level copy editing courses, while editors were asked to respond to questions regarding the skills they expect entry-level copy editors to have. Respondents…

  9. The Future of Social Work: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briar, Scott

    1974-01-01

    The characteristic optimism of Americans is shifting and influencing social work views of the future. This introduction to the special issue of the journal points out some trends evident in projections made in the articles--trends related to human services, specialization, better management, accountability, and realistic objectives. (Author)

  10. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail.

  11. From the desk of the Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2015-07-01

    Life Sciences in Space Research had a prominent presence at the International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR) meeting held in Kyoto, Japan from May 25th-29th, with seven of the eleven editors attending the meeting. A journal booth was also put up at the pre-ICRR satellite meeting on Space Radiation and Heavy Ions in Therapy (SRHITS) held a few days earlier in Osaka. Since the inception of LSSR last year, the editors and publisher have promoted the journal at a number of major conferences including COSPAR 2014 in Moscow, the annual meeting of the Radiation Research Society and the NASA Space Radiation Investigators Meeting. These efforts have increased awareness of the journal among investigators in space life sciences and related fields. The number of monthly downloads of articles from the journal website averages 2000, a respectable number for a brand new journal.

  12. Wysession begins term as Eos Section Editor for Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael

    In mid-April, Michael Wysession, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University, embarked on a 3-year term as section editor of Eos for seismology. Wysession brings to the position a strong background in research and teaching. Below are a few remarks from Wysession.“I recently became the new seismology editor for Eos. I look forward to presenting the many exciting areas of seismological research to the entire geophysical community. I have taught at Washington University since obtaining my Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1991. My interest in seismology began during my undergraduate years at Brown University (Sc.B., 1984), but my experience as an educator began after I graduated and taught high school math and physics in Staten Island, N.Y.

  13. William E. Edmonston, Jr.: Editor, 1968-1976.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F; Frischholz, Edward J

    2010-10-01

    This article is part of an occasional series profiling editors of the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (AJCH). William E. Edmonston was the second editor, succeeding Milton H. Erickson. His research focused on the use of conditioning paradigms and psychophysiological measures to explore a wide variety of hypnotic phenomena, leading to a "neo-Pavlovian" theory of neutral hypnosis as physiological relaxation (anesis). A longtime professor of psychology at Colgate University, he created an interdisciplinary undergraduate major in neuroscience, and was named New York State College Professor of the Year in 1988. He gave the Journal a new look, and a greater balance of clinical and experimental papers. The article also provides background on George Barton Cutten, George H. Estabrooks, and Frank A. Pattie, pioneers of hypnosis who were linked to Edmonston.

  14. Narrowing the Gap between Research and Practice. Special Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Richard, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This monograph summarizes recent research on the education of learning disabled students. After an introduction by the editor, individual articles include: "Teaching Listening Skills" (Linda Higbee Mandlebaum and Richard Wilson); "Study-Skills Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities" (Deborah Gartland);…

  15. Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

  16. Incremental Expression Parsing for Syntax-Directed Editors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-27

    Cretsna*refr a+b+cde ftth I / \\ ,:I \\ I’\\ / , I \\ b- ’ I I € d Figure 4-3: Correct syntax tree for"a + (b + c" d" e) ftgth" The tokens between, the...Schwartz. The Design of a Language-Directed Editor for Block-Structured Languages. In Proceedings of the ACM SIGPLAN SIGOA Symposium on Text Manipulation

  17. Reference Accuracy: Authors', Reviewers', Editors', and Publishers' Contributions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Scientific authors are responsible for the accuracy of their writings and references to others' works. However, relying on authors is not enough when it comes to processing their manuscripts. Joint efforts of authors, peer reviewers, editors, and publishers throughout the publishing process may prevent most reference errors. This article analyzes essential aspects of bibliographic management and focuses on the importance of validating references by all stakeholders of scholarly publishing. PMID:25469055

  18. JGR-Solid Earth and Planets GP editor appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ken Hoffman (Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo) has been appointed GP editor for papers submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research—Solid Earth and Planets. His tenure will be from January 1987 to December 1988. Hoffman holds a Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of California, Berkeley, and has published extensively in the areas of rock magnetism, paleomagnetism, lunar paleointensity, and most recently, geomagnetic dipole field reversal modeling.

  19. A perspective on computer documentation: System developer vs. technical editor

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, E.T.; Truett, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    Between the computer-knowledgeable {open_quotes}techie{close_quotes} and the technical writer is a chasm created by differences in knowledge bases and skills. Although this gap is widened by misunderstandings and misconceptions of system development roles, it is bridged by mutual need and dual appreciation. Often the editor/writer is {open_quotes}behind{close_quotes} from beginning to end. The writer normally joins the team after the programmers are well into system development and do not want to {open_quotes}waste time{close_quotes} discussing fundamentals. The writer is usually excluded from technical discussions because it is assumed that he/she would not understand anyway. Later in the system development cycle, the writer has no time to polish the documentation before a new version of the software is issued which implies that the documentation must be revised. Nevertheless, the editor/writer`s product is critical for the end-user`s appreciation of the software, a fact which promotes unity to complete the comprehensive package of software and documentation. This paper explores the planks in the bridge that spans the chasm between developers and their fundamental PR agents, the technical editors/writers. This paper defines approaches (e.g., The Circling Theory) and techniques (Bold Thrust!) employed for effective communication -- between software developer and technical writer as well as between the software and the end-user.

  20. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  1. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Gorin, Sergey V; Koroleva, Anna M; Kitas, George D

    2016-09-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions.

  2. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Keith

    2005-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Jan-Michael Rost will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2005. As Editor-in-Chief I have seen the journal respond to the rapid and exciting developments in atomic, molecular and optical physics of recent years. There will, I am sure, be a great deal of new and important science in our field in the years ahead. I am also sure that Jan-Michael will do a fantastic job in guiding the journal through these times. The publishing team at J. Phys. B is a superbly responsive and effective one that does a great job in publishing the science we do. I want to thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for making J. Phys. B such a great journal to have been a part of.

  3. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions. PMID:27510376

  4. Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    I am very pleased to join the outstanding leadership team for the journal Nuclear Fusion as Scientific Editor. The journal's high position in the field of fusion energy research derives in no small measure from the efforts of the IAEA team in Vienna, the production and marketing of IOP Publishing, the Board of Editors led by its chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, the Associate Editor for Inertial Confinement Max Tabak and the outgoing Scientific Editor, Paul Thomas. During Paul's five year tenure submissions have grown by over 40%. The usage of the electronic journal has grown year by year with about 300 000 full text downloads of Nuclear Fusion articles in 2011, an impressive figure due in part to the launch of the full 50 year archive. High quality has been maintained while times for peer review and publishing have been reduced and the journal achieved some of the highest impact factors ever (as high as 4.27). The journal has contributed greatly to building the international scientific basis for fusion. I was privileged to serve from 2003 to 2010 as chairman of the Coordinating Committee for the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) which published in Nuclear Fusion the first ITER Physics Basis (1999) and its later update (2007). The scientific basis that has been developed to date for fusion has led to the construction of major facilities to demonstrate the production of power-plant relevant levels of fusion reactions. We look forward to the journal continuing to play a key role in the international effort toward fusion energy as these exciting major facilities and the various approaches to fusion continue to be developed. It is clear that Nuclear Fusion maintains its position in the field because of the perceived high quality of the submissions, the refereeing and the editorial processes, and the availability and utility of the online journal. The creation of the Nuclear Fusion Prize, led by the Board of Editors chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, for the most outstanding

  5. Special Days, Special Ways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Jacqueline

    2001-01-01

    Presents unique ways to create special rituals that recognize individual students' achievements and milestones. Ideas include throwing a send-off party for a student who is moving; holding monthly birthday luncheons; choosing an ambassador to accompany new students around school; and making a lost tooth container that students can use to safely…

  6. Racial Inequity in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losen, Daniel J., Ed.; Orfield, Gary, Ed.

    This collection of papers discusses issues related to the overidentification of minority students in special education. After a "Foreword" (Senator James M. Jeffords) and an introduction, "Racial Inequality in Special Education" (Daniel J. Losen and Gary Orfield), 11 chapters include: (1) "Community and School Predictors…

  7. Problems faced by editors of peer reviewed medical journals.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Shaukat A

    2004-01-01

    Forty-six medical and dental journals are published from Pakistan of which only 29 are currently recognized by the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council. Only a few are peer reviewed. Six are indexed in Medline while EMBASE Excerpta Medica and World Health Organization Index Medicus for Eastern Mediterranean Region cover others. Editors of the peer reviewed medical journals are faced with numerous problems, which relate to the authors. Some of these are: shortage of quality of manuscripts, poor quality of reviewers, problems with indexation in international indexing services particularly Medline, duplicate submission and authorship and lastly, financial problems. Patronage from the Pharma industry is the major source of revenue which itself has serious implications. Editing a medical journal is a very stressful job and the editors have to work under too many pressures. A lot of useful data is presented at medical conferences, but a vast majority of it remains unpublished for various reasons, which adversely affects the citation rate from scientists from the developing third world countries in the world of medical literature. A few lectures on medical writing and research methodology to final year medical students will expose them to the art of medical writing. Specialty organizations can be persuaded to have a session on medical writing at their conferences, which will be extremely helpful not only to the potential new authors but also others, thereby improving the quality of their manuscripts. In addition to regular seminars, workshops for authors, reviewers and training courses for editors, subscribing to local medical journals by healthcare professionals and libraries are some of the measures that will help improve the situation to a great extent.

  8. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  9. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  10. Editors' Preface to Special Issue on Drinking Water Safety, Security, and Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recognizing these needs, researchers from Zhejiang University (China), the US EPA and the University of Alberta (Canada) organized the “International Conference on Drinking Water Safety, Security and Sustainability” in October 2011 in Hangzhou, China. The conference was attended...

  11. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  12. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  13. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  14. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  15. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  16. An editor for the generation and customization of geometry restraints

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Adams, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical restraints for use in macromolecular structure refinement are produced by a variety of methods, including a number of programs that use chemical information to generate the required bond, angle, dihedral, chiral and planar restraints. These programs help to automate the process and therefore minimize the errors that could otherwise occur if it were performed manually. Furthermore, restraint-dictionary generation programs can incorporate chemical and other prior knowledge to provide reasonable choices of types and values. However, the use of restraints to define the geometry of a molecule is an approximation introduced with efficiency in mind. The representation of a bond as a parabolic function is a convenience and does not reflect the true variability in even the simplest of molecules. Another complicating factor is the interplay of the molecule with other parts of the macromolecular model. Finally, difficult situations arise from molecules with rare or unusual moieties that may not have their conformational space fully explored. These factors give rise to the need for an interactive editor for WYSIWYG interactions with the restraints and molecule. Restraints Editor, Especially Ligands (REEL) is a graphical user interface for simple and error-free editing along with additional features to provide greater control of the restraint dictionaries in macromolecular refinement. PMID:28177308

  17. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting.

  18. Forum on Physics and Society Special Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post-Zwicker, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    This year we wish to use the FPS awards session to recognize those individuals who have made special contributions to issues at the interface of physics and society. Twelve years ago, Al Saperstein became the editor of Physics and Society, with Jeff Marque as the news editor. The two have been functioning as co-editors for the past five years. They have conscientiously brought us all a newsletter that informs and challenges. Thanks to the tireless efforts of these two men, the FPS ``newsletter'' is in reality a high-quality quarterly journal that is always thought-provoking and sometimes controversial. The typical issue contains a number of substantive articles, stimulating commentary and letters, informative news and interesting book reviews. The editors have had to exert considerable effort to assemble such interesting material on a range of relevant topics, often laboring with little additional help - and without benefit of a peer review system - to fill out the newsletter. With their retirement, the FPS Executive Committee wishes to express our deep appreciation to each of them for their many years of tireless service. Each year, the Forum on Physics and Society has the privilege of nominating APS members that have made outstanding contributions to the rank of Fellow. This year, we will introduce our newly elected Fellows during this Forum on Physics and Society Awards session.

  19. A Generic Metadata Editor Supporting System Using Drupal CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Banks, N. G.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    Metadata handling is a key factor in preserving and reusing scientific data. In recent years, standardized structural metadata has become widely used in Geoscience communities. However, there exist many different standards in Geosciences, such as the current version of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC CSDGM), the Ecological Markup Language (EML), the Geography Markup Language (GML), and the emerging ISO 19115 and related standards. In addition, there are many different subsets within the Geoscience subdomain such as the Biological Profile of the FGDC (CSDGM), or for geopolitical regions, such as the European Profile or the North American Profile in the ISO standards. It is therefore desirable to have a software foundation to support metadata creation and editing for multiple standards and profiles, without re-inventing the wheels. We have developed a software module as a generic, flexible software system to do just that: to facilitate the support for multiple metadata standards and profiles. The software consists of a set of modules for the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), with minimal inter-dependencies to other Drupal modules. There are two steps in using the system's metadata functions. First, an administrator can use the system to design a user form, based on an XML schema and its instances. The form definition is named and stored in the Drupal database as a XML blob content. Second, users in an editor role can then use the persisted XML definition to render an actual metadata entry form, for creating or editing a metadata record. Behind the scenes, the form definition XML is transformed into a PHP array, which is then rendered via Drupal Form API. When the form is submitted the posted values are used to modify a metadata record. Drupal hooks can be used to perform custom processing on metadata record before and after submission. It is trivial to store the metadata record as an actual XML file

  20. Analysis and meta-analysis of single-case designs: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Shadish, William R

    2014-04-01

    The last 10 years have seen great progress in the analysis and meta-analysis of single-case designs (SCDs). This special issue includes five articles that provide an overview of current work on that topic, including standardized mean difference statistics, multilevel models, Bayesian statistics, and generalized additive models. Each article analyzes a common example across articles and presents syntax or macros for how to do them. These articles are followed by commentaries from single-case design researchers and journal editors. This introduction briefly describes each article and then discusses several issues that must be addressed before we can know what analyses will eventually be best to use in SCD research. These issues include modeling trend, modeling error covariances, computing standardized effect size estimates, assessing statistical power, incorporating more accurate models of outcome distributions, exploring whether Bayesian statistics can improve estimation given the small samples common in SCDs, and the need for annotated syntax and graphical user interfaces that make complex statistics accessible to SCD researchers. The article then discusses reasons why SCD researchers are likely to incorporate statistical analyses into their research more often in the future, including changing expectations and contingencies regarding SCD research from outside SCD communities, changes and diversity within SCD communities, corrections of erroneous beliefs about the relationship between SCD research and statistics, and demonstrations of how statistics can help SCD researchers better meet their goals.

  1. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  2. Highlighting impact: Do editors' selections identify influential papers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    A recent trend in scientific publishing is that journal editors highlight each week a select set among the papers published (usually) in their respective journals. The highlighted papers are deemed of higher quality, importance, or interest than the 'average' paper and feature prominently in the publishers' websites. We perform a citation analysis of the highlighted papers for a number of journals from various publishers in physics. By comparing the performance of highlighted papers relative to (a) typical papers and (b) highly cited papers in their source journals and in other journals in the field, we explore whether, and to what extent, the selection process at the time of publication identifies papers that will turn out to be influential. We discuss the broader implications for research assessment.

  3. Upcoming IJTMB Initiatives from the Interim Executive Editor

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2016-01-01

    It is an honor and a privilege to be appointed the Interim Executive Editor for the IJTMB; I am lucky to have some initiatives that were already in development by the previous editorial team that I hope to bring to fruition over the next few months. First, I hope to increase the Journal’s Internet presence through social media to expand readership and encourage new submitters. The second initiative is a mentoring program to assist writers with their submissions to the Journal. Finally, I, and the rest of the editorial staff, will continue to evaluate the process, procedures, and forms used in peer review. I hope to move these initiatives forward and by doing so, bring in new readers, submitters, and reviewers to the Journal. PMID:27974945

  4. Automatic adverse drug events detection using letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini; Polgreen, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    We present and test the intuition that letters to the editor in journals carry early signals of adverse drug events (ADEs). Surprisingly these letters have not yet been exploited for automatic ADE detection unlike for example, clinical records and PubMed. Part of the challenge is that it is not easy to access the full-text of letters (for the most part these do not appear in PubMed). Also letters are likely underrated in comparison with full articles. Besides demonstrating that this intuition holds we contribute techniques for post market drug surveillance. Specifically, we test an automatic approach for ADE detection from letters using off-the-shelf machine learning tools. We also involve natural language processing for feature definitions. Overall we achieve high accuracy in our experiments and our method also works well on a second new test set. Our results encourage us to further pursue this line of research.

  5. Andreae is New Editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2004-10-01

    As the incoming editor of Global Biogeochemical Cycles, I would like to introduce myself and my ideas for the journal to Eos readers and to current and potential GBC authors. I've had a somewhat ``roaming'' scientific evolution, coming from ``straight'' chemistry through hard-rock geochemistry to chemical oceanography, the field in which I did my Ph.D. I taught marine chemistry at Florida State University for a number of years, and developed an interest in ocean/atmosphere interactions and atmospheric chemistry. In 1987 I took on my present job at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Mainz, Germany, and, after leaving the seacoast, my interests shifted to interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere, including the role of vegetation fires. My present focus is on the role of biogenic aerosols and biomass smoke in regulating cloud properties and influencing climate.

  6. The X-windows interactive navigation data editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinker, G. C.

    1992-01-01

    A new computer program called the X-Windows Interactive Data Editor (XIDE) was developed and demonstrated as a prototype application for editing radio metric data in the orbit-determination process. The program runs on a variety of workstations and employs pull-down menus and graphical displays, which allow users to easily inspect and edit radio metric data in the orbit data files received from the Deep Space Network (DSN). The XIDE program is based on the Open Software Foundation OSF/Motif Graphical User Interface (GUI) and has proven to be an efficient tool for editing radio metric data in the navigation operations environment. It was adopted by the Magellan Navigation Team as their primary data-editing tool. Because the software was designed from the beginning to be portable, the prototype was successfully moved to new workstation environments. It was also itegrated into the design of the next-generation software tool for DSN multimission navigation interactive launch support.

  7. EDITORIAL: A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief A few words from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-04-01

    As I begin my mandate as Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, I can look back with great pleasure at many years of service, as a member of the Editorial Board, to this outstanding instrument of scientific dissemination. Having witnessed the exceptional quantitative and qualitative growth of the journal, I must consider this appointment both an honour and a real challenge. The success of the journal is primarily based on three assets: the authors' talent of course, but also the illuminated leadership of my predecessors at the journal helm and the highly competent, dedicated and responsive staff. I would like to praise, in particular, the leadership of my immediate predecessor and good friend, Pallab Battacharya, the pilot of the years of major qualitative growth. Being Pallab's successor makes my new responsibility even more challenging! The IOP personnel is a key asset for the journal: in my rather broad experience in scientific publishing, I have never seen such a combination of professional experience, commitment and willingness to innovate—a traditional strength of JPD. Regrettably, I cannot acknowledge here all the women and men who contributed to the success of the journal; however, I would like to explicitly acknowledge the outstanding work of Sarah Quin over the past decade. In my new duty, I can fortunately count on her successor, Olivia Roche, whose excellent professional and managerial qualities we can already appreciate. How should we view the future of the journal? In my view, with reasonable optimism. Notwithstanding the tough competition, our journal has a solid reputation and increasing visibility. It has consistently belonged to the small elite group of top journals preferred by applied physics authors worldwide. My program as Editor-in-Chief is both simple and very testing: to continue to enhance this elite status. The challenge comes from a variety of factors: first, 'applied physics' is a continuously evolving notion, even

  8. Advances in Computational Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Alan C.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-03-01

    I was invited to be the guest editor for a special issue of Computing in Science and Engineering along with a colleague from Stony Brook. This is the guest editors' introduction to a special issue of Computing in Science and Engineering. Alan and I have written this introduction and have been the editors for the 4 papers to be published in this special edition.

  9. The Editor and Publisher as Public Official: The Ultimate Conflict of Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, Don

    A fifteen-item Likert scale and indepth personal interviews were used to collect data in a study that examined whether five individuals who held both the role of editor and public official were perceived as able to perform in a socially responsible manner as editors of their community newspapers in their estimation and in the estimation of a…

  10. A Coorientational Study of Food Public Relations Practitioners, Editors and Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knodell, Joyce Elaine

    Survey data on newspaper food editors and newspaper readers were collected through a title-rating technique. Analysis of responses to 40 food titles and leads indicated three newspaper food-editor types: transitional, traditional, and "new guard." Food-page readers fell into two types: information oriented (nutritionists) and cooking…

  11. Adolescent Sexual Initiation through the Lens of Letters to the Editor Published in Polish Teenage Magazines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacz, Marek S.; Bajka-Kopacz, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Almost all teenage magazines invite readers to submit questions concerning relationships, published as letters to the editor, popularly called "advice columns," often containing explicit questions about sexuality. This study aims to examine, firstly, how themes related to sexual initiation are presented in letters to the editor published…

  12. A survey of orthopaedic journal editors determining the criteria of manuscript selection for publication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the characteristics of editors and criteria used by orthopaedic journal editors in assessing submitted manuscripts. Methods Between 2008 to 2009 all 70 editors of Medline listed orthopaedic journals were approached prospectively with a questionnaire to determine the criteria used in assessing manuscripts for publication. Results There was a 42% response rate. There was 1 female editor and the rest were male with 57% greater than 60 years of age. 67% of the editors worked in university teaching hospitals and 90% of publications were in English. The review process differed between journals with 59% using a review proforma, 52% reviewing an anonymised manuscript, 76% using a routine statistical review and 59% of journals used 2 reviewers routinely. In 89% of the editors surveyed, the editor was able to overrule the final decision of the reviewers. Important design factors considered for manuscript acceptance were that the study conclusions were justified (80%), that the statistical analysis was appropriate (76%), that the findings could change practice (72%). The level of evidence (70%) and type of study (62%) were deemed less important. When asked what factors were important in the manuscript influencing acceptance, 73% cited an understandable manuscript, 53% cited a well written manuscript and 50% a thorough literature review as very important factors. Conclusions The editorial and review process in orthopaedic journals uses different approaches. There may be a risk of language bias among editors of orthopaedic journals with under-representation of non-English publications in the orthopaedic literature. PMID:21527007

  13. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  14. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  15. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer. 793...)(9) OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Requirements for Exemption § 793.11 Combination announcer, news... as a news editor. In such cases, the primary employment test under the section 13(b)(9)...

  16. Editorial Page Editors and Endorsements: Chain-owned vs. Independent Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Dizier, Byron

    Questionnaires were sent to 114 of the 228 editorial page editors at newspapers in the United States with daily circulations greater than 50,000 for a study that compared (1) the editor-publisher relationship existing at chains to that found at independent papers, and (2) the 1984 presidential endorsements made by chains to those by independent…

  17. Letter to the editor of TAAP, in response to letter from Anders et al.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To the Editor, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology: We would like to address the letter to the editor submitted by Anders et al. regarding the substantive issues raised regarding our paper "Evaluation of two different metabolic hypotheses for dichloromethane toxicity using physi...

  18. Debunking the Mutilated Boy: A Study of Newspaper Editors and an Inflammatory Rumor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lee

    A study examined how newspaper editors resolve issues relating to rumors--that is whether to cover stories which may turn out to be false. The "mutilated boy" rumor was chosen for its antiquity and endurance, its powerful theme, and its ability to create intense anxiety in a community. Thirty-three of the 86 editors who responded to the…

  19. Dr. Bruce Squires witnessed vast changes during tenure as CMAJ editor

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Bruce Squires retired in September after spending 10 years as editor of CMAJ. During his tenure the editor's responsibilities expanded greatly because of the CMA's foray into the publishing of medical books and additional journals and other publications. In this article, people who have worked with Squires reflect on his term with CMAJ. Imagesp570-a

  20. Seven decades of history of science: I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), second editor of Isis.

    PubMed

    Dauben, Joseph W; Gleason, Mary Louise; Smith, George E

    2009-03-01

    I. Bernard Cohen (1914-2003), the first American to receive a Ph.D. in history of science, was a Harvard undergraduate ('37) and then a Ph.D. student and protégé of George Sarton, founder of Isis and the History of Science Society. He went on to succeed Sarton as editor of Isis (1952-1958) and, later, president of the Society (1961-1962); he was also a president of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. Cohen was an internationally recognized Newton scholar; his interests were encyclopedic, ranging from science and public policy to the history of computers, with several decades as a special consultant for history of computing with IBM. Among his hundreds of publications were such major books as Franklin and Newton (1956), The Birth of a New Physics (1959; rpt., 1985), The Newtonian Revolution (1980), Revolution in Science (1985), Science and the Founding Fathers (1995), Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer (1999), and his last book, The Triumph of Numbers (2005), not to mention two jointly authored contributions, the variorum edition and new English translation of Newton's Principia, which will surely still be read a century from now.

  1. 7 CFR 767.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS INVENTORY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Overview § 767.1 Introduction. (a) Purpose. This part describes the Agency's policies for: (1) Managing inventory property; (2) Selling inventory property; (3) Leasing inventory property; (4) Managing real and chattel property the Agency takes into custody...

  2. Perspectives on...Hypertext: Introduction and Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunin, Lois F.; Rada, Roy

    1989-01-01

    This introduction presents a framework for discussing hypertext, previews individual articles, and discusses some relations of hypertext to library science. Historical notes are also provided, as well as biographical information on the authors of individual articles in this special section. (16 references) (CLB)

  3. Introduction to "Beliefs about SLA Revisited"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcelos, Ana Maria Ferreira; Kalaja, Paula

    2011-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to this second special issue of System on "Beliefs about Second Language Acquisition (SLA)" held by learners and/or teachers of foreign languages in a variety of contexts all over the world, and it compares and contrasts the empirical studies included in the issue. In sharp contrast to the first special…

  4. THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Shrestha, Biva; Palanisamy, Giri; Hook, Leslie A; Killeffer, Terri S; Boden, Thomas A; Cook, Robert B; Zolly, Lisa; Hutchison, Viv; Frame, Mike; Cialella, Alice; Lazer, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register

  5. Five years of interdisciplinary research on ageing and technology: Outcomes of the Lower Saxony Research Network Design of Environments for Ageing (GAL)--an introduction to this Special Issue on Ageing and Technology.

    PubMed

    Haux, Reinhold; Hein, Andreas; Kolb, Gerald; Künemund, Harald; Eichelberg, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue of Informatics for Health and Social Care is presenting outcomes of the Lower Saxony Research Network Design of Environments for Ageing (abbreviated as GAL), probably one of the largest inter- and multidisciplinary research projects on aging and technology. In order to investigate and provide answers on whether new information and communication technologies can contribute to keeping, or even improving quality of life, health and self-sufficiency in ageing societies through new ways of living and new forms of care, GAL had been established as a five-year research project, running from 2008 to 2013. Ambient-assisted living technologies in personal and home environments were especially important. During the five years of research in GAL, more than seventy researchers from computer science, economics, engineering, geriatrics, gerontology, informatics, medicine, nursing science and rehabilitation pedagogy intensively collaborated in finding answers.

  6. The New Online Metadata Editor for Generating Structured Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, R.; Shrestha, B.; Palanisamy, G.; Hook, L.; Killeffer, T.; Boden, T.; Cook, R. B.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Frame, M. T.; Cialella, A. T.; Lazer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nobody is better suited to "describe" data than the scientist who created it. This "description" about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [1] [2]. Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. How is OME helping Big Data Centers like ORNL DAAC? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the ESDIS Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and

  7. Volume 1 - Introduction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An introduction to the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) materials. Describes EIIP development, use of EIIP, inventory staff training, and planning, development, documentation, and reporting of inventories.

  8. Introduction to the special focus issue on the impact of diet on gut microbiota composition and function and future opportunities for nutritional modulation of the gut microbiome to improve human health.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Sharon M

    2017-03-04

    Over the past decade, application of culture-independent, next generation DNA sequencing has dramatically enhanced our understanding of the composition of the gut microbiome and its association with human states of health and disease. Host genetics, age, and environmental factors such as where and who you live with, use of pre-, pro- and antibiotics, exercise and diet influence the short- and long-term composition of the microbiome. Dietary intake is a key determinant of microbiome composition and diversity and studies to date have linked long-term dietary patterns as well as short-term dietary interventions to the composition and diversity of the gut microbiome. The goal of this special focus issue was to review the role of diet in regulating the composition and function of the gut microbiota across the lifespan, from pregnancy to old age. Overall dietary patterns, as well as perturbations such as undernutrition and obesity, as well as the effects of dietary fiber/prebiotics and fat composition are explored.

  9. Ecology: An Introduction for Non-Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungerford, Harold R.

    This book is a basic introduction to ecological concepts for mature learners who do not have a science specialization yet want an introduction to the science of ecology. Each of six chapters begins with learner objectives and an anecdotal story written to introduce the reader to the chapter's content. Anecdotes are followed by explanations of…

  10. 26 CFR 1.1311(a)-1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Introduction. 1.1311(a)-1 Section 1.1311(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Readjustment of Tax Between Years and Special Limitations § 1.1311(a)-1 Introduction....

  11. Training the unseasoned technical writer-editor: From the trainee's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Many unseasoned technical writer-editors who are not adequately trained may become seasoned inadequately trained technical writer-editors. This problem can occur when a trainee is involved in an ineffective training program, but it can be alleviated by the trainer's assessing the unseasoned writer's talents, becoming involved with the trainee's growth in writing and editing skills, and helping him to visualize his potential as a technical writer-editor. Assessment, support, mentoring, and nurturing are important elements in the trainee's growth process and in any good training or internship program. 1 ref.

  12. Foundational Studies in Teacher Education: A Reexamination. Special Issues from the Teachers College Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tozer, Steven, Ed.; Anderson, Thomas H., Ed.; Armbruster, Bonnie B., Ed.

    This collection of essays focuses on the role of psychological and cultural foundations in teacher education. Following an introduction by the editors, the 12 essays are as follows: "Reconnecting Foundations to the Substance of Teacher Education" (Lee S. Shulman); "A Reconceptualization of Educational Foundations" (Jonas F.…

  13. Introduction: Unsolved Problems on Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriols, X.; Ciliberto, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper is an introduction to the special issue of the 7th Int. Conf. on Unsolved Problems on Noise (UPoN) that took place at Casa Convalescència in Barcelona (Spain) in July 2015. The aim of the UPoN conferences is to provide a forum for researchers working on different fields of noise, fluctuations and variability, where they present their scientific problems which resist solutions. The papers of this Special Issue reflect the interdisciplinary topics (physics, biology, circuits, financial markets, psychology, technology, etc) presented at the UPoN conference. Noise is not only a hindrance to signal detection, but it is indeed a valuable source of information (not present in the signal) that help us to get a deeper understanding on how Nature works. This special issue of the 7th International Conference on Unsolved Problems on Noise (UPoN) is dedicated to Laszlo Kish in the occasion of his 60th birthday. He organized the first edition of these UPoN conferences in Szeged (Hungary) in 1996. Many of us have greatly benefited from his ‘volcanic imagination in tackling new problems from unconventional points of views’.

  14. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    2011-12-01

    At the end of 2011 I will retire as Editor-in-Chief of Semiconductor Science and Technology, and I am very pleased to announce that the job will be taken over by Professor Kornelius Nielsch. In the ten years I have held this position, I have seen many new topics entering the journal: spintronics, organic semiconductors, and Dirac fermion physics, to name just a few. The journal has also witnessed a strong internationalization of the authorship, with an especially strong increase in contributions from the Far East—a growth that is likely to continue in the coming years. I am certain that Kornelius will do an excellent job in guiding the journal through the developments of the coming decade. I would like to thank the publishing team of SST, or rather the three consecutive teams I witnessed during my tenure at the journal, for the help and support they have given me. The people at IOP Publishing are doing a great job in running the journal, and have made it possible to considerably reduce the time to publication for our submissions. I much enjoyed the collaboration with the other members of the Editorial Board; our annual meetings have always been a source of inspiration. Last, but certainly not least, I would like to thank you, the scientific community, authors, referees and readers, for your continuing support of the journal.

  15. Writing Science Effectively: Biology and English Students in an Author-Editor Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkala, Irene; Gessell, Donna A.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on the design of a collaborative learning community linking students in biology and English courses in author-editor relationships. Delineates the steps of the project and provides sample evaluations for both groups. (Contains 19 references.) (DDR)

  16. Issues in Communication Education: An Interview with Joe Ayers (Editor 1999-2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, Heather; Hazel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Joe Ayres, editor of this journal from 1999 to 2002. Addresses issues such as curriculum content, competencies for undergraduate students, graduate students, student retention, and the role of mentoring in higher education. (SG)

  17. 29 CFR 793.11 - Combination announcer, news editor and chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... editor and chief engineer. The 13(b)(9) exemption, as was made clear during the debate on the amendment... television stations. It is known at the time of such debate that these stations employ only a small number...

  18. Exploring why and how journal editors retract articles: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Peter; Wager, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Editors have a responsibility to retract seriously flawed articles from their journals. However, there appears to be little consistency in journals' policies or procedures for this. In a qualitative study, we therefore interviewed editors of science journals using semi-structured interviews to investigate their experience of retracting articles. We identified potential barriers to retraction, difficulties in the process and also sources of support and encouragement. Our findings have been used as the basis for guidelines developed by the Committee on Publication Ethics.

  19. Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the 13 years since it was first published the "Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals" (the Vancouver style), developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, has been widely accepted by both authors and editors; over 400 journals have stated that they will consider manuscripts that conform to its requirements. This is the fourth edition of the "Uniform requirements." PMID:8287338

  20. A special issue on the RCPs

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vuuren, Detlef; Edmonds, James A.; Kainuma, M.; Riahi, Keywan; Weyant, John

    2011-11-01

    This paper provides an editors' introduction to the special issue of Climatic Change on the RCPs. Scenarios form a crucial element in climate change research. They allow researchers to explore the long-term consequences of decisions today, while taking account of the inertia in both the socio-economic and physical system. Scenarios also form an integrating element among the different research disciplines of those studying climate change, such as economists, technology experts, climate researchers, atmospheric chemists and geologists. In 2007, the IPCC requested the scientific community to develop a new set of scenarios, as the existing scenarios (published in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, (Nakicenovic and Swart 2000), and called the 'SRES scenarios') needed to be updated and expanded in scope (see Moss et al. (2010) for a detailed discussion). Researchers from different disciplines worked together to develop a process to craft these new scenarios, as summarized by Moss, et al. (2010). The Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), founded in response to the IPCC call, played a key role in this process.1 The scenario development process aims to develop a set of new scenarios that facilitate integrated analysis of climate change across the main scientific communities. The process comprises 3 main phases: (1) an initial phase, developing a set of pathways for emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing, (2) a parallel phase, comprising both the development of new socio-economic storylines and climate model projections, and (3) an integration phase, combining the information from the first phases into holistic mitigation, impacts and vulnerability assessments. The pathways developed in the first phase were called 'Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)'. They play an important role in providing input for prospective climate model experiments, including both the decadal and long-term projections of climate change. The RCPs also provide an