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Sample records for edwards mira bileaflet

  1. Wonderful Mira.

    PubMed

    Wareing, Christopher John

    2008-12-13

    Since being named 'wonderful' in the seventeenth century for its peculiar brightness variability, Mira A has been the subject of extensive research and become the prototype for a whole class of 'Mira' variable stars. The primary star in a binary system, Mira A is reaching the end of its life and currently undergoing an extended period of enhanced mass loss. Recent observations have revealed a surrounding arc-like structure and a stream of material stretching 12 light years away in opposition to the arc. In this article, I review recent modelling of this cometary appearance as a bow shock with an accompanying tail of material ram pressure stripped from the head of the bow shock, place Mira in an evolutionary context, predict its future with reference to the similar star R Hya and planetary nebula Sh 2-188, and speculate some avenues of research both on Mira itself and on other 'Mira-like' stars with bow shocks and tails. I also discuss the implications of this discovery for our own star, the Sun.

  2. 50 forgotten Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, T.; Bengtsson, H.; Wikander, T.; Holmberg, G.; Wahlström, R.; Allen, C.

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of 4 years observing of 50 poorly studied Mira stars. 247 maxima and 241 minima together with current period elements, ranges and colour indices for the stars are presented. "50 forgotten Miras" is an ongoing observing program run by SAAF/V that started in 2012.

  3. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  4. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  5. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  6. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (< 5%). However, patients still face the risks of blood cell damage, thromboembolic events, and material failure of the prosthetic device. One mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested.

  7. Multi-criteria Integrated Resource Assessment (MIRA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    MIRA is an approach that facilitates stakeholder engagement for collaborative multi-objective decision making. MIRA is designed to facilitate and support an inclusive, explicit, transparent, iterative learning-based decision process.

  8. Mira: Argonne's 10-petaflops supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    Papka, Michael; Coghlan, Susan; Isaacs, Eric; Peters, Mark; Messina, Paul

    2016-07-12

    Mira, Argonne's petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system, ushers in a new era of scientific supercomputing at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops supercomputer is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. As a machine for open science, any researcher with a question that requires large-scale computing resources can submit a proposal for time on Mira, typically in allocations of millions of core-hours, to run programs for their experiments. This adds up to billions of hours of computing time per year.

  9. Four Neglected Southern Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragg, T. A.

    2006-06-01

    This paper is a continuation of the study of several southern Mira stars presented at the 1996 Fall Meeting of the AAVSO in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The four stars herein included are 0828-44, CT Vel; 1553-23, BK Sco; 1557-23, TY Sco; and 2011-52, X Tel. X Tel is now on the regular observing list of the RASNZ.

  10. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application Project (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grubbs, Rodney P.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA) Project. A detailed description of the MIRA camera service software architecture, encoder features, and on-board communications are presented. A description of a candidate camera under development is also shown.

  11. Measurements of flow past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2013-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve has been inserted in an axisymmetric model of the aorta within a mock circulation apparatus with physiological pressure and flow variations. The velocity field behind the valve has been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The results closely match those reported by similar studies. A triple jet emanated from the valve's orifices and regions of reverse flow formed in the sinus region. Velocity fluctuations were greatest in the shear layers of the jets. The average r.m.s. streamwise velocity fluctuation over the turbulent period was 0.22 m/s; its maximum value was 0.53 m/s and occurred at the onset of deceleration. Measurements with the valve inserted in an anatomical model of the aorta are planned for the near future. The present and future measurements will be compared to determine the effects of the aorta anatomy on the characteristics of flow through bileaflet valves. In particular, measurements of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses will be analyzed to identify possible locations of blood element damage, and regions of recirculation and stagnation will be identified as locations favourable to thrombus growth. The effects of flows in branching arteries and valve orientation will also be investigated. Supported by NSERC.

  12. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  13. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Lindolfo; Rich, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives include: I. Prototype a camera service leveraging the CCSDS Integrated protocol stack (MIRA/SM&C/AMS/DTN): a) CCSDS MIRA Service (New). b) Spacecraft Monitor and Control (SM&C). c) Asynchronous Messaging Service (AMS). d) Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN). II. Additional MIRA Objectives: a) Demo of Camera Control through ISS using CCSDS protocol stack (Berlin, May 2011). b) Verify that the CCSDS standards stack can provide end-to-end space camera services across ground and space environments. c) Test interoperability of various CCSDS protocol standards. d) Identify overlaps in the design and implementations of the CCSDS protocol standards. e) Identify software incompatibilities in the CCSDS stack interfaces. f) Provide redlines to the SM&C, AMS, and DTN working groups. d) Enable the CCSDS MIRA service for potential use in ISS Kibo camera commanding. e) Assist in long-term evolution of this entire group of CCSDS standards to TRL 6 or greater.

  14. Introducing Mira, Argonne's Next-Generation Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-19

    Mira, the new petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system installed at the ALCF, will usher in a new era of scientific supercomputing. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops machine is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second.

  15. Mira Ceti and the Star of Bethlehem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    We consider the probability that the Gospel of Matthew could report the earliest observation of Mira Ceti. Some biblical remarks have to be considered in order to distinguish a scientific text in the modern acceptation and the content of Gospels regarding some astronomical arguments. Mira fulfills the basic requirements to be the Star of Bethlehem as described in the Gospel according to Matthew (Mt 2:1-12). In fact it was visible at least two times with a time interval (not specified in Mt text) in which it disappeared. Moreover Mira was close to the position were the triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn occurred in the years 7-6 b. C. and it could be observed during that period by ancient astronomers. The discovery of Mira in 1596 and its second observation 12.5 years later, made by David Fabricius, occurred when Jupiter approached it. Because of those reasons we study the maxima of Mira in order to evaluate both the frequency of one and of two consecutive bright apparitions eventually as observed by the Magi. We did an evaluation of the correlation between two following maxima in order to verify the probability of occurrence of two consecutive bright maxima, because that condition would have been indeed the most favorable for the candidature of Mira as the Bethlehem Star. Analyzing the maxima of Mira we found a probability of seeing it brighter than alpha Ceti once every 21 years. In this case, as in February 1997, Mira can be detected at the first sight as a new component near the most significant asterism in its zone, composed by alpha, gamma and delta Ceti. This condition could have happened in the case of the Bethlehem Star. We found also a correlation between the magnitude of two consecutive maxima: if a bright maximum occurs it is more probable that the following is a faint one.

  16. Edward Hopper: The Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on Edward Hopper, focusing on his use of watercolors. Explores five of his watercolor paintings: (1) "The Mansard Roof"; (2) "House on Pamet River"; (3) "Light at Two Lights"; (4) "Saltillo Mansion"; and (5) "Roofs of Washington Square." Addresses the exhibition "Edward…

  17. Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Vianne

    2003-01-01

    This article profiles the educational system of Prince Edward Island and discusses initiatives for students who are at-risk. It describes programs and services for students who are at-risk, relevant educational legislation, areas of strength, challenges that need to be overcome, and areas of action. (Contains references.) (CR)

  18. Ventricular pressure slope and bileaflet mechanical heart valve closure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Hwang, N H

    1995-01-01

    The maximum left ventricular pressure slope (dP/dt) value has been used by several investigators as the criterion for studying mitral valve closure. In this article, the relationship between the ventricular pressure slope (dP/dt) and the leaflet closing behavior of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMV) is investigated. Two current BMVs, the St. Jude Medical 29 mm and CarboMedics 29 mm, installed in the mitral position of a mock circulatory pulsatile flow loop were used as the study model. Under simulated physiologic pressures and flow conditions, the experiment was conducted at 70, 90, and 120 beats/min with corresponding flow rates of 5.0, 6.0, and 7.5 liters/min, respectively. A laser sweeping technique was used to monitor the leaflet closing motion within the last 3 degrees excursion at valve closure. A modified dual beam laser sweeping technique system was used to register the difference of leaflet/housing impact time between the two BMV closing leaflets in asynchronous closure. Common BMV asynchronous closures were found in both BMVs at all three heart rates tested. The second closing leaflet was found to always close at higher velocity than the first. Simultaneous measurements of the ventricular pressure (Pv) and the leaflet closing time showed that Pv exhibited three stage characteristics. In the first stage, Pv gradually increased as the ventricle was filled. A sudden rise of Pv occurred immediately after closing of the first leaflet. The maximum dp/dt occurred in the third stage after closure of both BMV leaflets. The BMV closing behavior and the corresponding Pv pattern were found to depend strongly upon valve type and heart rate. The time averaged ventricular pressure slope (dp/dt) values at 70, 90, and 120 beats/min were about 40, 70, and 150 mmHg/sec for the St. Jude Medical valve and 40, 105, and 205 for the CarboMedics valve during the first closing stage. The maximum dp/dt values were 2670, 4350, and 5000 mmHg/sec for the St. Jude Medical valve

  19. Analysis of velocity fluctuations downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2010-11-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves are widely used to replace diseased aortic heart valves. The stresses induced by the rich and unsteady non-physiological flow structures have been the focus to evaluate red blood cells damage and platelet activation, develop flow control strategies, or improve valve designs. In this study, we analyzed the flow fields obtained downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve using time-resolved particle image velocimetry under pulsatile and steady flow conditions. Our study demonstrates the rich dynamics downstream of the valve and weighs the relevance of unsteady effects vs inertia effects on the different flow structures. Power spectrum analyses of the turbulent fluctuations highlight the highly anisotropic influence and the limited applicability of classical self-similar turbulence theory in describing the small-scale structures in the immediate vicinity of the valve.

  20. SiO Maser Emission in Miras

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 394, 51–66 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14237.x SiO maser emission in Miras M. D. Gray,1 M. Wittkowski,2 M. Scholz...October 27; in original form 2008 September 1 ABSTRACT We describe a combined dynamic atmosphere and maser propagation model of SiO maser emission in...brightest at an optical phase of 0.1–0.25, which is consistent with observed phase lags. Dust can have both mild and profound effects on the maser emission

  1. Edward Teller's Scientific Life

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Weiss, M S

    2004-04-15

    Edward Teller was one of the great physicists of the twentieth century. His career began just after the key ideas of the quantum revolution of the 1920's were completed, opening vast areas of physics and chemistry to detailed understanding. Thus, his early work in theoretical physics focused on applying the new quantum theory to the understanding of diverse phenomena. These topics included chemical physics, diamagnetism, and nuclear physics. Later, he made key contributions to statistical mechanics, surface physics, solid state, and plasma physics. In many cases, the ideas in these papers are still rich with important ramifications.

  2. Mira Period-Luminosity Relations at Near-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; Macri, Lucas M.; He, Shiyuan; Long, James; Huang, Jianhua; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi

    2017-01-01

    We built JHK template light curves for ~200 Oxygen-rich Miras in LMC by scaling their I-band light curves. The I-(JHK) colors at individual epochs were derived using a Gaussian process method, and then modeled as a function of generic parameters. We obtained their JHK Period-Luminosity relations (PLRs) at maximum light and mean light with dispersions comparable to Cepheid PLRs. We also derived Mira PLRs in M33 and obtained a Mira distance to this system. We present the method for template development and preliminary results.

  3. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Schneider in the cockpit of an F-104. Schneider served as a U.S. Navy pilot from 1968 to 1983, during which time he trained at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, and received assignments as an engineering test pilot, as a test pilot school instructor, and as a Naval Liaison Officer at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center). Schneider joined NASA as a research pilot in 1983. Over the next 17 years, he was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA SR-71s. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  4. Edward Teller Biographical Memoir

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Sessler, A M

    2009-07-27

    Edward Teller died on September 9, 2003 in Stanford, California at the age of 95. He was both one of the great theoretical physicists of the twentieth century and a leading figure in the development of nuclear weapons and broader defense advocacy. Teller's work in physics, spanning many decades of the twentieth century, includes some of the most fundamental insights in the quantum behaviors of molecules and their spectra, nuclei, surfaces, solid state and spin systems, and plasmas. In the defense arena, Teller is best known for his key insight that made thermonuclear weapons possible. Teller was both a great scientific collaborator and physics teacher at all levels, known for his openness, generosity, personal warmth, and powerful physical intuition. Many of his graduate students went on to illustrious careers.

  5. Discovering Mira Ceti: Celestial Change and Cosmic Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Robert Alan

    In the short narrative that follows I introduce two new heroes. Although we begin with Fabricius's first sighting in 1596, the new pivot point in the drama is the collaboration between Hevelius and Boulliau that began around 1660. As it happens, Learned Europe paid little attention to Mira in the generation after the first scattered sightings of 1596, indeed, nearly 70 years passed before the New Star was given a working identity. Like Columbus discovering America, Fabricius and Holwarda saw different things - for convenience, I call them Fabricius's Star and Holwarda's Star. Hevelius's Historiola (Danzig, 1662) and Boulliau's Ad astronomos (Paris, 1667) presented a different vision. It made Mira famous. As I shall argue, if Hevelius gave Mira a history, Boulliau gave Mira a future.5 In the end, the New Star not only challenged the ancient cosmos, it became an enduring icon for the New Science, a returning reminder of celestial continuity and cosmic order.

  6. Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography incremental value in a rare case of a bileaflet tricuspid valve.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Hani M; Walley, Hossam; Hosny, Hatem; Yacoub, Magdi

    2016-09-01

    Detailed assessment of the tricuspid valve using two-dimensional echocardiography is always challenging, as only two of three leaflets can be seen at a time. Three-dimensional echocardiography can provide the enface view of the tricuspid valve that allows simultaneous visualization of all of the three leaflets. In a 42-year-old male patient scheduled for pulmonary endarterectomy, 3DTEE showed that the tricuspid valve is bileaflet, with one septal and another lateral leaflet. There were two commissures, one of them is anteriorly positioned and the other one is posterior. Our findings were confirmed intra-operatively by direct surgical visualization of the tricuspid valve.

  7. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    ScienceCinema

    Edward Moses

    2016-07-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  8. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Moses

    2009-07-02

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  9. Edward A. Bouchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    2002-04-01

    Edward A. Bouchet was the first African American to receive the doctorate in any field of knowledge in the United States and that area was physics. He was granted the degree in 1876 from Yale University making him at that time one of the few persons to hold the physics doctorate from an American university. His prior education included the Hopkins Grammar School and Yale College (BA in 1874). After Yale, Bouchet taught mathematics, physics, and chemistry for over twenty-five years at the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia. During the following two decades, he was employed in positions ranging from high school principal to employment by the federal government. Bouchet played a significant role in the education of African Americans through his teaching and mentoring activities. He was one among a small group of African Americans who achieved advanced training and education within decades of the American civil war. These individuals provided direction, leadership, and role models for what eventually became the civil/human rights movements. The year 2001 marks the 125th celebration of his receiving the doctorate. We present details of his life and career with an emphasis on the influence of the political and social forces exerted on him by society.

  10. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  11. Airborne infrared spectrophotometry of Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne spectrophotometric observations of R Cas near minimum and maximum light, R Leo near minimum, and NML Tau near maximum are reported which were obtained over the wavelength range from 1.2 to 4 microns with 1.5% resolution. The spectral energy distributions of the three stars at the indicated times are presented, and it is shown that the H2O bands at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.7 microns are clearly evident in all the spectra, while the absorption bands of CO at about 1.6 and 2.3 microns are probably present although they are masked by the strong water vapor features. The results indicate that water vapor is the dominant opacity source in the atmospheres of Mira variables, that R Leo and NML Tau may be fitted well over the entire spectrum by respective single temperatures of 2250 and 1800 K, and that R Cas near both minimum and maximum cannot be adequately described by one temperature over the entire wavelength range investigated. The shapes and depths of the absorption bands are determined together with the apparent angular diameter of each star and the equivalent widths of the H2O + CO absorption bands. It is concluded that water vapor absorption is more strongly correlated with color temperature than with spectral type for R Cas and R Leo.

  12. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  13. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  14. Foreword by Edward Michael Campbell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Edward Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Edward Teller medal has evolved into one of the most prestigious awards that recognizes the outstanding contributions to the field of inertial confinement fusion and high energy density science. It is appropriate that this international award be named after Teller, who with extraordinary vision and scientific insight, anticipated and then played a major role in the creation of this field...

  15. Transformation of Consciousness: Decoding Conceptual Metaphors in Mira Bai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrita; Anisha

    2016-01-01

    Mira Bai, a saint-poet of North India is an important figure in medieval Hindi literature. Her "bhajan"-s (songs) profoundly represent the transforming of consciousness working through conceptual metaphors which fall in the realm of religious poetry wherein target domains are generally abstract. Since, the working of the mind is more…

  16. Maxima and O-C Diagrams for 489 Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Maxima for 489 Mira stars have been compiled. They were computed with data from AAVSO, AFOEV, VSOLJ, and BAA-VSS and collected from published maxima. The result is presented in a mysql database and on web pages with O-C diagrams, periods and some statistical information for each star.

  17. A Large X-Ray Outburst in Mira A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita; Schlegel, Eric; Hack, Warren; Raymond, John C.; Wood, Brian E.

    2005-04-01

    We report the Chandra ACIS-S detection of a bright soft X-ray transient in the Mira AB interacting symbiotic-like binary. We have resolved the system for the first time in X-rays. Using Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope images, we determine that the unprecedented outburst is likely associated with the cool asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, Mira A, the prototype of the Mira class of variables. X-rays have never before been detected from an AGB star, and the recent activity signals that the system is undergoing dramatic changes. The total X-ray luminosity of the system is several times higher than the luminosity estimated using previous XMM-Newton and ROSAT observations. The outburst may be caused by a giant flare in Mira A associated with a mass ejection or a jet and may have long-term consequences on the system. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Janet A. Mattei, who inspired this work and made these observations possible for many years.

  18. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of Mira Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, P. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-07-01

    Observations of 12CO(3-2) emission of the circumbinary envelope of Mira Ceti, made by Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array, are analysed. The observed Doppler velocity distribution is made of three components: a blueshifted south-eastern arc, which can be described as a ring in slow radial expansion, ˜1.7 km s-1, making an angle of ˜50° with the plane of the sky and born some 2000 years ago; a few arcs, probably born at the same epoch as the blueshifted arc, all sharing Doppler velocities redshifted by approximately 3±2 km s-1 with respect to the main star; thirdly, a central region dominated by the circumbinary envelope, displaying two outflows in the south-western and north-eastern hemispheres. At short distances from the star, up to ˜1.5 arcsec, these hemispheres display very different morphologies: the south-western outflow covers a broad solid angle, expands radially at a rate between 5 and 10 km s-1 and is slightly redshifted; the north-eastern outflow consists of two arms, both blueshifted, bracketing a broad dark region where emission is suppressed. At distances between ˜1.5 and ˜2.5 arcsec the asymmetry between the two hemispheres is significantly smaller and detached arcs, particularly spectacular in the north-eastern hemisphere are present. Close to the stars, we observe a mass of gas surrounding Mira B, with a size of a few tens of au, and having Doppler velocities with respect to Mira B reaching ±1.5 km s-1, which we interpret as gas flowing from Mira A towards Mira B.

  19. Multi-color interferometric observations of Mira stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Thompson, B. B.; Foresto, V. Coude du; Merand, A.; Ridgway, S.; Perrin, G.

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric observations in the atmospheric windows of the near infrared (1 to 4 microns) can be efficiently used to probe the chemical composition of Miras atmosphere and provide direct measurements of extended gas layers around these stars. This is illustrated by recent Miras observations carried out with the FLUOR instrument of the IOTA interferometer (Mennesson et al. 2002, and Perrin et al. proceedings of this conference) and with the PTI test-bed (Thompson 2002, Thompson et al. 2002). These visibility measurements show evidence for continuum emission from very extended ( 2-3 stellar radii) semi-transparent gaseous atmospheric layers, and large apparent diameter changes with pulsation phase. Interestingly these observations are consistent with the extended molecular gas layers (H20, CO ...) already inferred around some of these objects from IS0 and high resolution ground-based FTS infrared spectra.

  20. Hydrogen Lines in Mira Stars Through Interferometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Chiavassa, A.; Millour, F.; Wittkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Balmer lines in emission are the most prominent features in Mira stars spectra and have a strong potential as a proxy to study the lower atmosphere's dynamics. In Fabas et al. ([1]), we accumulated spectropolarimetric observations of Balmer lines in emission. As the shock is propagating outwards, linear polarization rate increases and the angle of this polarization evolves. Assuming that linear polarization arises from anisotropic scattering, it has the potential of telling us about the geometric structure of the shock as it propagates and the study of such atmospheric structures can typically be performed with interferometry. In 2012, AMBER data on the Mira star omicron Ceti were collected in which the Brackett γ line is studied. The data show signatures in the interferometric observables around this line. Olivier Chesneau was in the jury evaluating the PhD thesis of N. Fabas and he was seduced by the idea to study these shock waves with interferometry and use polarimetry as a complementary study.

  1. The M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. II. Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; He, Shiyuan; Macri, Lucas M.; Long, James; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2017-04-01

    We present the discovery of 1847 Mira candidates in the Local Group galaxy M33 using a novel semi-parametric periodogram technique coupled with a random forest classifier. The algorithms were applied to ∼2.4 × 105 I-band light curves previously obtained by the M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. We derive preliminary period–luminosity relations at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths and compare them to the corresponding relations in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  2. Providing on-demand atmospheric data for users of MIRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, H.

    Many users of the new Mars International Reference Atmosphere MIRA will want to know what the meteorological conditions temperatures winds surface pressures etc were on Mars at a given time and place This information is difficult to obtain from the original archived spacecraft data because of the irregular observing patterns forced by orbital mechanics and because the raw data are typically in the form of infrared radiances This is the justification for the tabulated format of MIRA but it should be supplemented with online available data assimilation products These data assimilation results form a compact about 50 kbytes per sol summary of the Martian atmospheric state They can be integrated forward on demand to calculate the meteorology at a specified time and location or averaged over an interval The current results are based on Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer TES nadir and limb spectra but can easily be extended to include the Mars Express Planetary Fourier Spectrometer and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mars Climate Sounder when those datasets become publicly available This will enable the online MIRA to keep current as new observations are made and will improve the calibration validation and temporal coverage of the full dataset The root-mean-square residuals of the assimilated atmospheric temperatures compared to the TES team retrievals are 2 K growing to 6 K when compared with fully independent radio occultation profiles The online assimilated data can also reproduce the original spectra

  3. Shock waves, atmospheric structure and mass loss in Miras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, L. A.; Pierce, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Large amplitude shock waves are observed to be present in the atmospheres of the Mira variables: spectral line doubling with Delta v 30 km/s is present in infrared spectra. Even the visible spectra contain some evidence for such shocks. These shocks are sufficiently large to clearly dominate the energy balance of the atmosphere. Mira variables also show symptoms of substantial mass loss rates: they are strong maser and infrared continuum sources and have strong circumstellar absorption features. The pulsation induced shocks which are seen to be present are obvious suspects for causing or enhancing the mass loss from these stars. The Miras thus present an ideal case for the study of dynamical effects on atmospheric structure, since both the dynamics and the results are clearly observable. The results are given of calculations of the thermalization and cooling of the shock heated material passing through shock fronts whose properties were selected to be consistent with both the isothermal models and the spectroscopic observations.

  4. SOFIA/FORCAST Observations of the Symbiotic Mira, R Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Omelian, Eric B.; Helton, L. Andrew; Gorti, Uma; Wagner, R. Mark

    2017-01-01

    The FORCAST instrument on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) was used to observe the symbiotic Mira, R Aquarii (R Aqr) in September 2016. Images through several filters at wavelengths from 6.4 to 37.1 mu-m, and a grism spectrum covering 8.4 to 13.7 mu-m were obtained. R Aqr consists of an AGB star and a hot white dwarf in an eccentric binary orbit, an accretion flow onto the white dwarf, and the resulting jet. The images show a point source (~3.5" PSF at 37 mu-m) with the observed emission dominated by the dusty AGB star. The SOFIA data were obtained when the Mira phase was about 0.4 (minimum at phase 0.5) and the V magnitude was about 10. The measured fluxes range from about 700 Jy at the shorter wavelengths to about 80 Jy at 37 mu-m. These are a factor of 2 lower than the fluxes measured by ISO in May 1996, when the Mira phase was close to maximum and the V magnitude was about 8. We discuss the differences between the ISO and FORCAST measurements of the spectral energy distribution in the context of our proposed monitoring of the R Aquarii system with SOFIA as it approaches eclipse and periastron in its ~44 year orbit.

  5. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  6. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  7. A biomimetic bi-leaflet mitral prosthesis with enhanced physiological left ventricular swirl restorative capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical heart valve prostheses are often implanted in young patients due to their durability and long-term reliability. However, existing designs are known to induce elevated levels of blood damage and blood platelet activation. As a result, there is a need for patients to undergo chronic anti-coagulation treatment to prevent thrombosis, often resulting in bleeding complications. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the implantation of a mechanical prosthetic valve at the mitral position results in a significant alteration of the left ventricular flow field which may contribute to flow turbulence. This study proposes a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve design (Bio-MHV) that mimics the geometry of a human mitral valve, with the aim of reducing turbulence levels in the left ventricle by replicating physiological flow patterns. An in vitro three-dimensional particle velocimetry imaging experiment was carried out to compare the hemodynamic performance of the Bio-MHV with that of the clinically established ATS valve. The Bio-MHV was found to replicate physiological left ventricular flow patterns and produced lower turbulence levels.

  8. Three-Dimensional Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Flow Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Rui; Lai, Yong G.; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2005-01-01

    The wall shear stress induced by the leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase has been implicated with thrombus initiation with prosthetic valves. Detailed flow dynamic analysis in the vicinity of the leaflets and the housing during the valve-closure phase is of interest in understanding this relationship. A three-dimensional unsteady flow analysis past bileaflet valve prosthesis in the mitral position is presented incorporating a fluid-structure interaction algorithm for leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase. Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian method is employed for incorporating the leaflet motion. The forces exerted by the fluid on the leaflets are computed and applied to the leaflet equation of motion to predict the leaflet position. Relatively large velocities are computed in the valve clearance region between the valve housing and the leaflet edge with the resulting relatively large wall shear stresses at the leaflet edge during the impact-rebound duration. Negative pressure transients are computed on the surface of the leaflets on the atrial side of the valve, with larger magnitudes at the leaflet edge during the closing and rebound as well. Vortical flow development is observed on the inflow (atrial) side during the valve impact-rebound phase in a location central to the leaflet and away from the clearance region where cavitation bubbles have been visualized in previously reported experimental studies. PMID:15636108

  9. Measurements of steady flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve using stereoscopic PIV.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Chris; Sullivan, Pierre; Ethier, C Ross

    2011-03-01

    Computational modeling of bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BiMHV) flow requires experimentally validated datasets and improved knowledge of BiMHV fluid mechanics. In this study, flow was studied downstream of a model BiMHV in an axisymmetric aortic sinus using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. The inlet flow was steady and the Reynolds number based on the aortic diameter was 7600. Results showed the out-of-plane velocity was of similar magnitude as the transverse velocity. Although additional studies are needed for confirmation, analysis of the out-of-plane velocity showed the possible presence of a four-cell streamwise vortex structure in the mean velocity field. Spatial data for all six Reynolds stress components were obtained. Reynolds normal stress profiles revealed similarities between the central jet and free jets. These findings are important to BiMHV flow modeling, though clinical relevance is limited due to the idealized conditions chosen. To this end, the dataset is publicly available for CFD validation purposes.

  10. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage of Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves using Embedded Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of the mechanical prosthetic bileaflet aortic heart valve, is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for complications, associated with thrombosis and thromboembolism. These flow transients are investigated using phase and time-averaged PIV in a low-volume (about 150 ml) test setup that simulates the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 23 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The PIV measurements are accompanied by continuous monitoring of the ventricular and aortic pressures and valve flow rate. Following the valve closure, the leakage flow between the valve leaflets is caused by the pressure buildup across the leaflets, leading to the formation of a regurgitation jet starting from the BMHV B-datum line. As in a typical starting jet, a counter-rotating vortex pair is formed along each leaflet edge and the vorticity sheet is associated with high shear stress that may be result in blood platelet activation. The present investigation demonstrates that the placement of arrays of mm-scale vortex generators near the edges of the leaflets diffuses the vortex sheet and suppresses the formation of these vortices, weakening the local velocity gradients and small-scale vortical structures. Supported by NIH and NSF.

  11. Manipulation of the closing transients of bileaflet mechanical heart valves using passive, surface-mounted elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helene

    2005-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using PIV measurements that are phase locked to the leaflet motion. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. The valve is subjected to physiological flow conditions: a heart rate of 70 bpm; a cardiac output of 5 l/min; and a mean aortic pressure of 90 mmHg. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs.

  12. Effect of vortex generators on the closing transient flow of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Dasi, Lakshmi; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2006-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Two vortex generator designs were investigated: one design comprised staggered rectangular fins and the other one staggered hemispheres. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using phase locked PIV measurements. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  13. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto; Vieira Junior, Francisco Ubaldo; Vieira, Reinaldo Wilson; Antunes, Nilson; Tabacow, Fabio Bittencourt Dutra; Costa, Eduardo Tavares; Petrucci Junior, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. Objective To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models) exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. Methods To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min. ) and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. Results It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. Conclusions Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM) is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series). Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves. PMID:24598950

  14. Hemodynamic Performance and Thrombogenic Properties of a Superhydrophobic Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Vahabi, Hamed; Bui, Hieu; Movafaghi, Sanli; Moore, Brandon; Kota, Arun K; Popat, Ketul; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we explore how blood-material interactions and hemodynamics are impacted by rendering a clinical quality 25 mm St. Jude Medical Bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) superhydrophobic (SH) with the aim of reducing thrombo-embolic complications associated with BMHVs. Basic cell adhesion is evaluated to assess blood-material interactions, while hemodynamic performance is analyzed with and without the SH coating. Results show that a SH coating with a receding contact angle (CA) of 160° strikingly eliminates platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the surface. Alternatively, many platelets attach to and activate on pyrolytic carbon (receding CA = 47), the base material for BMHVs. We further show that the performance index increases by 2.5% for coated valve relative to an uncoated valve, with a maximum possible improved performance of 5%. Both valves exhibit instantaneous shear stress below 10 N/m(2) and Reynolds Shear Stress below 100 N/m(2). Therefore, a SH BMHV has the potential to relax the requirement for antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug regimens typically required for patients receiving MHVs by minimizing blood-material interactions, while having a minimal impact on hemodynamics. We show for the first time that SH-coated surfaces may be a promising direction to minimize thrombotic complications in complex devices such as heart valves.

  15. Star GK Bileaflet Mechanical Valve Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch After Mitral Valve Replacement: A Chinese Multicenter Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hua; Qiu, Zhihuang; Chen, Liangwan; Chen, Daozhong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and immediate and mid-term effects of heart valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after mitral valve replacement using the GK bileaflet mechanical valve. Material/Methods A total of 493 cases of mechanical mitral valve replacement were performed in the departments of cardiac surgery in 7 hospitals from January 2000 to January 2008. The patients included 142 men and 351 women ages 21 to 67 (average age, 48.75). The patients were followed for 3 years after surgery. The effective orifice area index (EOAI), ≤1.2 cm2/m2, was detected during the follow-up period and was defined as PPM. The patients were assigned to either the PPM group or the non-PPM group. Finally, the preoperative, perioperative and postoperative indexes of the 2 groups of patients were compared. Results A total of 157 patients had PPM 3 years after surgery. The incidence of PPM was 31.84%. Sixty-three patients in the PPM group received a 25-mm GK bileaflet valve (40.13%), 82 received a 27-mm valve (52.23%), and 12 (7.64%) received a 29-mm valve. There were significant differences in length of intensive care unit stay, duration of ventilator use, length of hospitalization, body surface area, EOAI, mean transmitral pressure gradient, and pulmonary artery pressure between the PPM and non-PPM group (P<0.05). There was a significant difference between preoperative and postoperative pulmonary artery pressures among non-PPM patients (P<0.05); however, there was no statistical difference in preoperative and postoperative pulmonary artery pressures among patients with PPM (P>0.05). Conclusions PPM after mitral valve replacement influences postoperative hemodynamics. Thus, larger-sized GK bileaflet mechanical valves are often used to reduce the risk of PPM. PMID:26313311

  16. Ground water geology of Edwards County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Archie T.

    1963-01-01

    About 150,000 acre-feet of water is recharged annually to and discharged from the Edwards and associated limestones in Edwards County. Most of this water is available for additional development inasmuch as only about 900 acre-feet per year is currently being used; however, additional development of ground water will result in a reduction in streamflow.

  17. Clarence Edwards Middle School: Success through Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts 2020, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Just a few years ago, Boston's Clarence Edwards Middle School was on the verge of being shut down. By 2009, a renaissance at the Edwards made it one of the highest performing and most desired middle schools in Boston, dramatically narrowing and even eliminating academic achievement gaps while delivering a far more well-rounded education to its…

  18. THE CARBON MIRA UV AURIGAE AND ITS COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Herbig, G. H.

    2009-11-15

    The carbon Mira UV Aur (photometric period 394 days) and its companion present several interesting spectroscopic issues. The late B-type companion, at a separation of 3.''36, is seen through at least two shells expanding from the C9-type primary, as evidenced by a series of narrow, displaced absorption features at the D{sub 1,2} lines of Na I. The (projected) expansion velocity of the fastest shell is about 116 km s{sup -1}, much larger than the typical outflow velocity of about 15 km s{sup -1} seen in C-type giants, but reminiscent of the velocities observed in the envelope of another C-type Mira, V Hya. Emission lines of H, Ca II, and Na I are present in UV Aur A; its Balmer emission lines are heavily mutilated by overlying C-type absorptions (much as is seen in Me-type Miras), so they must be formed at a lower level. UV Aur B offers the opportunity to test a speculation that the carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), believed to be a family of carbon-containing polyatomic molecules, may be formed in cool, carbon-rich stars. Moderately strong DIBs are indeed present in the spectrum of UV Aur B at about the same strength and velocity seen in nearby (in the sky) B-type stars. But the essential question is, are DIBs present in the outflow from UV Aur A, at the velocities of the Na I shell components? The answer is no, at least at the level permitted by the signal-to-noise ratio of these Keck/HIRES spectrograms.

  19. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  20. Spatio-temporal flow analysis in bileaflet heart valve hinge regions: potential analysis for blood element damage.

    PubMed

    Simon, Hélène A; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Leo, Hwa-Liang; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2007-08-01

    Point-wise velocity measurements have been traditionally acquired to estimate blood damage potential induced by prosthetic heart valves with emphasis on peak values of velocity magnitude and Reynolds stresses. However, the inherently Lagrangian nature of platelet activation and hemolysis makes such measurements of limited predictive value. This study provides a refined fluid mechanical analysis, including blood element paths and stress exposure times, of the hinge flows of a CarboMedics bileaflet mechanical heart valve placed under both mitral and aortic conditions and a St Jude Medical bileaflet valve placed under aortic conditions. The hinge area was partitioned into characteristic regions based on dominant flow structures and spatio-temporal averaging was performed on the measured velocities and Reynolds shear stresses to estimate the average bulk stresses acting on blood elements transiting through the hinge. A first-order estimate of viscous stress levels and exposure times were computed. Both forward and leakage flow phases were characterized in each partition by dynamic flows dependent on subtle leaflet movements and transvalvular pressure fluctuations. Blood elements trapped in recirculation regions may experience exposure times as long as the entire forward flow phase duration. Most calculated stresses were below the accepted blood damage threshold. Estimates of the stress levels indicate that the flow conditions within the boundary layers near the hinge and leaflet walls may be more detrimental to blood cells than bulk flow conditions, while recirculation regions may promote thrombus buildup.

  1. Annual parallax measurements of a Mira variable star, U Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    We have measured the annual parallax of the water maser around a Mira star, U Lyncis (U Lyn) with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The value of the parallax is 1.27 ± 0.06 mas, corresponding to a distance of 786^{+40}_{-36}pc. This is the first VLBI measurement of the parallax of U Lyn. We obtained the period and the apparent magnitude of U Lyn based on near-infrared observations with the Kagoshima University 1 m telescope. The period and the mean magnitude of the K' band are 437.9 day and +1.15 ± 0.09 mag, respectively. Using our measured parallax and period, we find that the location of U Lyn on the period-luminosity plane is consistent with its nature as a Mira variable fundamental mode pulsator. Also, we estimated the distance using the period-luminosity relationship, our period and apparent magnitude and this gave a difference of about 100 pc between our parallactic distance and the distance estimated by using the period-luminosity relationship. We estimated the luminosity, radius, and mass of U Lyn to be 10100 ± 420 L⊙, 391 ± 34 R⊙, and 1.9 ± 0.7 M⊙, respectively. We found 50 water maser spots with a distribution ˜ 13 au around the star and the motion implies the existence of an outflow.

  2. Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. (1922-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; McPherron, Robert L.; Birn, Joachim

    2013-02-01

    Space physicist Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. died on 17 September 2012 at his home in Los Alamos, N. M. He was 90 years old. The cause of death was a heart attack that came following a brief hospitalization.

  3. Sturckow Recaps Last Shuttle Landing at Edwards

    NASA Video Gallery

    When Space Shuttle Discovery touched down at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California on Sept. 11, 2009 to conclude mission STS-128, no one foresaw that it would be the last of 54 such landing...

  4. RECONCILING THE EMISSION MECHANISM DISCREPANCY IN MIRA'S TAIL AND ITS EVOLUTION IN AN INTERFACE WITH SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations of the Mira AB binary system revealed a surrounding structure that has been successfully hydrodynamically interpreted as a bow shock and tail of ram-pressure-stripped material. Even the narrow tail, initially difficult to model, has been understood to be the effect of the passage of Mira from a warm neutral medium into a hot, low-density medium, postulated to be the Local Bubble. However, no model to date has explained the observed kink and associated general curvature of the tail. We test the hypothesis that before entering the Local Bubble, Mira was traveling through a shear flow with approximately 1/3 Mira's own velocity at an angle of 30 Degree-Sign to Mira's proper motion. The hypothesis reproduces the kinked nature of Mira's tail and predicts recompression and reheating of the tail material to the same or greater levels of density and temperature predicted in the shock. This provides a heat source for the FUV emission, allowing for an extended lifetime of the FUV emission in line with other estimates of the age of the tail. The uniqueness of Mira's situation implies that the chances of observing other FUV tails behind asymptotic giant branch stars are highly unlikely.

  5. A Search for Miras in M33 Using Sparsely-Sampled Time Series Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; Macri, Lucas M.; He, Shiyuan; Long, James; Huang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    The Mira Period-Luminosity relations (PLRs) at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths are promising distance indicators, with brighter absolute magnitudes than Cepheids, comparable PLR dispersions and ubiquitous presence in all galaxy types. We developed a semi-parametric Gaussian process periodogram method for sparsely-sampled Mira light curves and applied it to I-band observations of M33. We discovered more than 1800 Miras, which were subsequently classified using machine-learning techniques. We present an overview of the Gaussian process model, the Random Forest classifiers, and the resulting PLRs.

  6. Interpreting the Mg IIh andk Line Profiles of Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Karovska, M.

    2000-11-01

    We use radiative transfer calculations to reproduce the basic appearance of Mg II lines observed from Mira variables. These lines have centroids that are blueshifted by at least 30 km s-1 from the stellar rest frame. It is unlikely that flow velocities in the stellar atmospheres are this fast, so radiative transfer effects must be responsible for this behavior. Published hydrodynamic models predict the existence of cool, downflowing material above the shocked material responsible for the Mg II emission, and we demonstrate that scattering in this layer can result in Mg II profiles as highly blueshifted as those that are observed. However, our models also show that scattering within the shock plays an equally strong role in shaping the Mg II profiles, and our calculations illustrate the importance of partial redistribution and the effects of being out of ionization equilibrium.

  7. SMOS PLM MIRAS hold-down release and deployment mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, José I.; García, Ignacio; Plaza, Miguel A.

    2005-07-01

    The hold-down, release and deployment mechanisms designed for SMOS PLM MIRAS have been a challenging activity in terms of design compromise, schedule and cost effectiveness. The existing design coming from previous phase was totally reanalysed to be adapted to a specific mission with extra requirements, making the previous design not totally valid as it was conceptually conceived. Novel concepts were implemented to maintain the feasibility of the design, providing compliance to new and more restrictive requirements. Exhaustive testing proved those concepts and provided the necessary maturity to be valid for flight. This paper is focused on all those new concepts and novelties implemented in phase C/D for the SMOS PLM Instrument Mechanisms as to reach the compliance to the applicable specification.

  8. 1612 MHz OH maser emission from axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes - Miras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collison, Alan J.; Fix, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative transfer calculations are performed using a modified form of the Sobolev approximation to determine the inversion of the 1612 MHz line of OH in axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes around Miras. The mass loss is assumed to be occurring in the form of a smooth wind. Line profiles and maps are presented for three models of varying degrees of asymmetry and for various orientations of the envelopes. It is concluded that the axisymmetric models can reproduce many of the features of observed profiles and maps which both the standard, spherically symmetric model and the discrete emission model cannot easily explain. The model profiles reproduce all of the general features seen in the line profiles of real sources.

  9. Miras, Mass Loss, and the Ultimate Fate of the Earth (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) The broad category of pulsating red giants includes semi-regular variables and Mira variables. The Miras are distinguished by their large amplitude variation in visible light, late spectral types (cool atmospheres), and the presence of emission lines during part of the cycle. The emission lines result from shock waves generated by pulsation that traverse their atmospheres. These stars' atmosphere are often dusty, an indication of mass loss. Based on decades of detailed modeling we can recognize that the Mira stage corresponds to the onset of devastating mass loss, a process that removes most of the remaining envelope and reveals the degenerate core, a new white dwarf star. I'll review the evidence for this claim, and then examine the effects of Mira stage mass loss on the future solar system. Finally, I shall draw some very general conclusions about the ultimate fate of the Earth.

  10. DNA methylation profiling using the methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA).

    PubMed

    Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2010-11-01

    The methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA) exploits the intrinsic specificity and the high affinity of a methylated-CpG-binding protein complex (MBD2B and MBD3L1) to methylated CpG dinucleotides in genomic DNA. The MIRA approach works on double-stranded DNA and does not depend on the application of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. It can be performed on a few hundred nanograms of genomic DNA. Recently, the MIRA technique has been used to profile DNA methylation patterns at a resolution of 100 base pairs along the entire genome of normal human B-lymphocytes. The MIRA method is compatible with microarray and next generation DNA sequencing approaches. We describe the principles and details of this method applied for methylation profiling of genomes containing methylated CpG sequences.

  11. STS-66 Edwards Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis approaches runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on

  12. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down on the lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert Tuesday, 3 December 1985 at 1:33:49 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, concluding the STS 61-B international mission. The eight-day mission successfully deployed three communications satellites including the Mexican Morelos B, the Australian Aussat 2 and an RCA Satcom K-2 satellite. In addition, two spacewalks were performed to experiment with construction of structures in space. Crew of the 61-B mission included Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr.; Pilot Bryan D. O'Connor; Mission Specialists Mary L. Cleave, Sherwood C. Spring and Jerry L. Ross; and Payload Specialists Rudolfo Neri Vela of Mexico and Charles Walker of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories

  13. DISCOVERY OF MIRA VARIABLE STARS IN THE METAL-POOR SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2012-12-10

    We report the discovery of two Mira variable stars (Miras) toward the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). We performed optical long-term monitoring observations for two red stars in the Sextans dSph. The light curves of both stars in the I{sub c} band show large-amplitude (3.7 and 0.9 mag) and long-period (326 {+-} 15 and 122 {+-} 5 days) variations, suggesting that they are Miras. We combine our own infrared data with previously published data to estimate the mean infrared magnitudes. The distances obtained from the period-luminosity relation of the Miras (75.3{sup +12.8}{sub -10.9} and 79.8{sup +11.5}{sub -9.9} kpc, respectively), together with the radial velocities available, support memberships of the Sextans dSph (90.0 {+-} 10.0 kpc). These are the first Miras found in a stellar system with a metallicity as low as [Fe/H] {approx} -1.9 than any other known system with Miras.

  14. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... Human Development (NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those ...

  15. Edward Weston and the "Modern" Galvanometer Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  16. Edward Weston and the ``Modern'' Galvanometer Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2008-03-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  17. Prince Edward Island. Reference Series No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Prince Edward Island and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography, climate, history, early trade, development, agriculture, the potato industry, forests, fisheries, aquaculture, industry, tourism, energy,…

  18. Prince Edward Island's School Psychology Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matters, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    The Prince Edward Island (PEI) school system has been struggling with issues of recruitment and particularly retention for psychologists. Reasons include concerns about professional autonomy; having more limited roles, which are heavily assessment focused; reduced job satisfaction; and restrictions on additional private practice work. The waiting…

  19. Particle image velocimetry study of pulsatile flow in bi-leaflet mechanical heart valves with image compensation method.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Yeo, Tony Joon Hock; Zhao, Yong; Hwang, Ned H C

    2006-12-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is an important technique in studying blood flow in heart valves. Previous PIV studies of flow around prosthetic heart valves had different research concentrations, and thus never provided the physical flow field pictures in a complete heart cycle, which compromised their pertinence for a better understanding of the valvular mechanism. In this study, a digital PIV (DPIV) investigation was carried out with improved accuracy, to analyse the pulsatile flow field around the bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV) in a complete heart cycle. For this purpose a pulsatile flow test rig was constructed to provide the necessary in vitro test environment, and the flow field around a St. Jude size 29 bi-leaflet MHV and a similar MHV model were studied under a simulated physiological pressure waveform with flow rate of 5.2 l/min and pulse rate at 72 beats/min. A phase-locking method was applied to gate the dynamic process of valve leaflet motions. A special image-processing program was applied to eliminate optical distortion caused by the difference in refractive indexes between the blood analogue fluid and the test section. Results clearly showed that, due to the presence of the two leaflets, the valvular flow conduit was partitioned into three flow channels. In the opening process, flow in the two side channels was first to develop under the presence of the forward pressure gradient. The flow in the central channel was developed much later at about the mid-stage of the opening process. Forward flows in all three channels were observed at the late stage of the opening process. At the early closing process, a backward flow developed first in the central channel. Under the influence of the reverse pressure gradient, the flow in the central channel first appeared to be disturbed, which was then transformed into backward flow. The backward flow in the central channel was found to be the main driving factor for the leaflet rotation in the valve

  20. Are the Current Doppler Echocardiography Criteria Able to Discriminate Mitral Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Malfunction? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Evin, Morgane; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Rieu, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Malfunction of bileaflet mechanical heart valves in the mitral position could either be due to patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) or leaflet obstruction. The aim of this article is to investigate the validity of current echocardiographic criteria used for diagnosis of mitral prosthesis malfunction, namely maximum velocity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index. In vitro testing was performed on a double activation left heart duplicator. Both PPM and leaflet obstruction were investigated on a St. Jude Medical Master. PPM was studied by varying the St. Jude prosthesis size (21, 25, and 29 mm) and stroke volume (70 and 90 mL). Prosthesis leaflet obstruction was studied by partially or totally blocking the movement of one valve leaflet. Mitral flow conditions were altered in terms of E/A ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) to simulate physiologic panel of diastolic function. Maximum velocity, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index are shown to be insufficient to distinguish normal from malfunctioning St. Jude prostheses. Doppler velocity index and effective orifice area were 1.3 ± 0.49 and 1.83 ± 0.43 cm(2) for testing conditions with no malfunction below the 2.2 and 2 cm(2) thresholds (1.19 cm(2) for severe PPM and 1.23 cm(2) for fully blocked leaflet). The mean pressure gradient reached 5 mm Hg thresholds for several conditions of severe PPM only (6.9 mm Hg and mean maximum velocity value: 183.4 cm/s) whereas such value was never attained in the case of leaflet obstruction. In the case of leaflet obstruction, the maximum velocity averaged over the nine pulsed-wave Doppler locations increased by 38% for partial leaflet obstruction and 75% for a fully blocked leaflet when compared with normal conditions. Current echocardiographic criteria might be suboptimal for the detection of bileaflet mechanical heart valve malfunction. Further developments and investigations are required in order

  1. New Mira Variables from the MACHO Galactic Bulge Fields, part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, A.; Hümmerich, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new sample of 525 Mira variables in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, expanding on previous samples of 69 and 500 objects, respectively, and thereby concluding our search for new Mira variables in the MACHO Galactic Bulge fields. 364 Miras of the present sample are reported as variable stars for the first time. We have cross-correlated our sample with the sample of Mira stars from the OGLE-III Catalog of Long-Period Variables (LPVs) in the Galactic Bulge and found 146 matches; MACHO and OGLE periods are in very good overall agreement. We present summary data for all stars of the present sample and give a statistical overview, comparing the properties of the MACHO and OGLE samples and enlarging on the analyses in our previous paper. Lightcurves, folded lightcurves and further details are available via the AAVSO International Variable Star Index (http://www.aavso.org/vsx/). Data of the complete sample of Mira variables from the MACHO Galactic Bulge fields, as presented in our papers (Bernhard, 2011; Hümmerich and Bernhard, 2012 and the present paper), can be found in the appendix.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OGLE2 Mira variables in the Galactic bulge (Matsunaga+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, N.; Fukushi, H.; Nakada, Y.

    2006-05-01

    We have extracted a total of 1968 Mira variables from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment II (OGLE-II) data base in the Galactic bulge region. Among them, 1960 are associated with 2 Micron All-sky Survey (2MASS) sources, and 1541 are further identified with Midcourse Space Exploration (MSX) point sources. Their photometric properties are compared with those of Mira variables in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We have found that mass-losing stars with circumstellar matter are reddened such that the colour dependence of the absorption coefficient is similar to that of interstellar matter. We also discuss the structure of the bulge. The surface number density of the bulge Mira variables is well correlated with the 2.2-m surface brightness obtained by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite. Using this relation, the total number of Mira variables in the bulge is estimated to be about 6x105. The logP-K relation of the Mira variables gives their space distribution which supports the well-known asymmetry of the bar-like bulge. (1 data file).

  3. A turbulent wake as a tracer of 30,000 years of Mira's mass loss history.

    PubMed

    Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Neill, James D; Schiminovich, David; Forster, Karl; Rich, R Michael; Welsh, Barry Y; Madore, Barry F; Wheatley, Jonathan M; Morrissey, Patrick; Barlow, Tom A

    2007-08-16

    Mira is one of the first variable stars ever discovered and it is the prototype (and also the nearest example) of a class of low-to-intermediate-mass stars in the late stages of stellar evolution. These stars are relatively common and they return a large fraction of their original mass to the interstellar medium (ISM) (ref. 2) through a processed, dusty, molecular wind. Thus stars in Mira's stage of evolution have a direct impact on subsequent star and planet formation in their host galaxy. Previously, the only direct observation of the interaction between Mira-type stellar winds and the ISM was in the infrared. Here we report the discovery of an ultraviolet-emitting bow shock and turbulent wake extending over 2 degrees on the sky, arising from Mira's large space velocity and the interaction between its wind and the ISM. The wake is visible only in the far ultraviolet and is consistent with an unusual emission mechanism whereby molecular hydrogen is excited by turbulent mixing of cool molecular gas and shock-heated gas. This wind wake is a tracer of the past 30,000 years of Mira's mass-loss history and provides an excellent laboratory for studying turbulent stellar wind-ISM interactions.

  4. Evaluation of shear stress accumulation on blood components in normal and dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, S; Maleki, H; Hassan, I; Kadem, L

    2012-10-11

    Evaluating shear induced hemodynamic complications is one of the major concerns in design of the mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The monitoring of these events relies on both numerical simulations and experimental measurements. Currently, numerical approaches are mainly based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. A more straightforward evaluation can be based on the Lagrangian analysis of the whole blood. As a consequence, Lagrangian meshfree methods are more adapted to such evaluation. In this study, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a fully meshfree particle method originated to simulate compressible astrophysical flows, is applied to study the flow through a normal and a dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). The SPH results are compared with the reference data. The accumulation of shear stress patterns on blood components illustrates the important role played by non-physiological flow patterns and mainly vortical structures in this issue. The statistical distribution of particles with respect to shear stress loading history provides important information regarding the relative number of blood components that can be damaged. This can be used as a measure of the response of blood components to the presence of the valve implant or any implantable medical device. This work presents the first attempt to simulate pulsatile flow through BMHVs using SPH method.

  5. Device Thrombogenicty Emulator (DTE) – Design optimization Methodology for Cardiovascular Devices: A Study in Two Bileaflet MHV Designs

    PubMed Central

    Xenos, Michalis; Girdhar, Gaurav; Alemu, Yared; Jesty, Jolyon; Slepian, Marvin; Einav, Shmuel; Bluestein, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Patients who receive prosthetic heart valve (PHV) implants require mandatory anticoagulation medication after implantation due to the thrombogenic potential of the valve. Optimization of PHV designs may facilitate reduction of flow-induced thrombogenicity and reduce or eliminate the need for post-implant anticoagulants. We present a methodology entitled Device Thrombogenicty Emulator (DTE) for optimizing the thrombo-resistance performance of PHV by combining numerical and experimental approaches. Two bileaflet mechanical heart valves (MHV) designs – St. Jude Medical (SJM) and ATS were investigated, by studying the effect of distinct flow phases on platelet activation. Transient turbulent and direct numerical simulations (DNS) were conducted, and stress loading histories experienced by the platelets were calculated along flow trajectories. The numerical simulations indicated distinct design dependent differences between the two valves. The stress-loading waveforms extracted from the numerical simulations were programmed into a hemodynamic shearing device (HSD), emulating the flow conditions past the valves in distinct ‘hot spot’ flow regions that are implicated in MHV thrombogenicity. The resultant platelet activity was measured with a modified prothrombinase assay, and was found to be significantly higher in the SJM valve, mostly during the regurgitation phase. The experimental results were in excellent agreement with the calculated platelet activation potential. This establishes the utility of the DTE methodology for serving as a test bed for evaluating design modifications for achieving better thrombogenic performance for such devices. PMID:20483411

  6. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices.

  7. CFD simulation of a novel bileaflet mechanical heart valve prosthesis: an estimation of the Venturi passage formed by the leaflets.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Y; Medart, D; Hormes, M; Schmitz, C; Hamilton, K; Kwant, P B; Takatani, S; Schmitz-Rode, T; Steinseifer, U

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the flow characteristics of the novel Helmholtz-Institute Aachen Bileaflet (HIA-BL) heart valve prosthesis. The curved leaflets of the HIA-BL valve form a Venturi passage between the leaflets at peak systole. By narrowing the cross section the flow accelerates and the static pressure at the central passage decreases according to the Venturi effect. The low-pressure zone between the leaflets is expected to stabilize the leaflets in fully open position at peak systole. To investigate the Venturi passage, the flow fields of two valve geometries were investigated by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics): one geometry exhibits curved leaflets resulting in a Venturi passage; the other geometry features straight leaflets. The flow profiles, pressure distribution and resulting torque of both passages were compared and investigated. Although flow profiles downstream of both valves were similar, the flow passages between the leaflets were different for the investigated leaflet geometries. The straight leaflet passage showed a large boundary layer separation zone near the leaflets and the lowest pressure at the leading edge of the leaflet. The Venturi passage showed a reduction of the boundary layer separation zones and the lowest pressure between the leaflets could be found in the narrowest flow cross section of the Venturi passage. Additionally, the resulting torque showed that the Venturi passage produced an opening momentum. The results demonstrate that the Venturi passage stabilizes the leaflets in open position at peak systole.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Opacity-sampling models of Mira variables (Ireland+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2012-05-01

    We present four model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to {omicron} Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These models also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore cannot drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables. (1 data file).

  9. Dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables - I. Modelling description and analysis of approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2008-12-01

    We describe the Cool Opacity-sampling Dynamic EXtended (CODEX) atmosphere models of Mira variable stars, and examine in detail the physical and numerical approximations that go in-to the model creation. The CODEX atmospheric models are obtained by computing the temperature and the chemical and radiative states of the atmospheric layers, assuming gas pressure and velocity profiles from Mira pulsation models, which extend from near the H-burning shell to the outer layers of the atmosphere. Although the code uses the approximation of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and a grey approximation in the dynamical atmosphere code, many key observable quantities, such as infrared diameters and low-resolution spectra, are predicted robustly in spite of these approximations. We show that in visible light, radiation from Mira variables is dominated by fluorescence scattering processes, and that the LTE approximation likely underpredicts visible-band fluxes by a factor of 2.

  10. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  11. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF☆

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-01-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed, preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’s impact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’ priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility. The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction. The early life and career of Robert Edwards are described and re-evaluated in the light of documentary evidence. His early interest in the genetics of development provided the major motivation behind his goal of achieving IVF in humans. Through this work, he aimed to understand and hopefully to reduce the transmission of genetic disease in humans. His meeting with Patrick Steptoe, the details of which are re-examined, increased the significance for Edwards of infertility as an outcome of IVF. It also led to a creative long-term research partnership, initiated a long-term programme of public education in the UK about reproductive science and stimulated the development of

  12. Joint VLBA/VLTI Observations of the Mira Variable S Orionis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    0 (red ) and v ¼ 2, J ¼ 1 0 (blue) SiO maser emission toward S Ori. The images represent maximum pixel values over the LSR velocity range from +10.1...Observations of the v ¼ 1, J ¼ 1 0 (43.1 GHz) and v ¼ 2, J ¼ 1 0 (42.8 GHz) SiO maser emission toward the Mira variable S Ori were conducted using the VLBA...of Mira variables and supergiants have been investigated by mapping the SiO maser emission at typical distances of 2–4 stellar radii toward these

  13. Absence of an X-shaped Structure in the Milky Way Bulge Using Mira Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, Martín

    2017-02-01

    The stellar density distribution of the bulge is analyzed through one of its tracers. We use oxygen-rich Mira variables from the Catchpole et al. survey and OGLE-III survey as standard candles. The average age of these stars is around 9 Gyr. The population traced by Mira variables matches a boxy bulge prediction, not an X-shaped one, because only one peak is observed in the density along the analyzed lines of sight, whereas the prediction of an X-shape gives two clear peaks.

  14. A carbon-rich Mira variable in a globular cluster: a stellar merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feast, Michael W.; Menzies, John W.; Whitelock, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The membership of Matsunaga's variable 1, a carbon-rich, mass-losing, Mira variable, in the globular cluster Lynga 7 is discussed on the basis of radial velocities. We conclude that it is a member, the first known C-Mira in a globular cluster. Since such a variable is expected to have an age of ˜1-2 Gyr and an initial mass of ˜1.5 M⊙, we conclude that this star must be the product of a stellar merger.

  15. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is <90 beats/min; however, these values significantly increase in the St. Jude Medical valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as

  16. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration-rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5-2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2-2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected for

  17. 26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED TEST TRACK." Drawing No. 10-259. One inch to 400 feet plan of original 10,000-foot sled track. No date. No D.O. series number. No headings as above. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Resolving The Extended Atmosphere And The Inner Wind of Mira (ω Cet) With Long ALMA Baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ka Tat; Kamiński, Tomasz; Menten, Karl M.; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2016-10-01

    This is the presentation file of the talk in the Cool Stars 19 conference about the imaging and radiative transfer modelling results of the SiO and H2O data of the AGB star Mira (o Cet) observed in the 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New Miras in Galactic Bulge (Hummerich+ 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummerich, S.; Bernhard, K.

    2013-01-01

    500 previously unrecorded Mira variables were found during an inspection of R-band lightcurves from the MACHO Galactic Bulge fields (http://macho.anu.edu.au/). This research continues the search for new Miras in the MACHO database (Bernhard, 2011PZP....11...12B). The MACHO 1.3m telescope is situated at Mount Stromlo in Australia and uses B and R filters in combination with eight 2048*2048 CCD cameras. Calculation of MACHO R magnitudes was done from the given instrumental R magnitudes using the formula given in Alcock et al. (1999PASP..111.1539A). Astrometric positions and near-infrared color indices were derived from the 2MASS catalog (Skrutskie et al. 2006, VII/233). Only objects with an amplitude >2mag (Rc) were taken into consideration. In addition, all lightcurves have been inspected visually; objects with significant changes in amplitude, mean magnitude and / or period suggesting semi-regularity have been rejected. Each object was checked against the Strasbourg CDS Vizier service and the International Variable Star Index (VSX) for pre-existence as a Mira-type star in variability catalogues. Summary data for all new Mira variables are listed in Table 1. (:) denotes uncertain value. Lightcurves, folded lightcurves and further details are available via AAVSO-VSX (http://www.aavso.org/vsx/). (1 data file).

  20. The Chromosphere/Shock Dilemma of Non-Mira, Late-Type Variable Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Lee Anne

    1997-01-01

    An investigation of the atmospheric structure of non-Mira, asymptotic giant branch stars through NLTE radiative transfer modeling applied to hydrodynamic models is discussed. Synthetic spectra resulting from these calculations were compared with IUE observations of these stars to test the validity of the models. The development of the hydrodynamic models is detailed.

  1. An Analysis of Retention and Attrition at MiraCosta College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ronald

    A study was conducted at MiraCosta College (MCC), in Del Mar, California, to investigate various aspects of retention and attrition and to make recommendations for possible program enhancements. The study sought to determine when students drop out of classes, which students drop out of school completely, and the drop out rate for various…

  2. Development of the optical and infrared interferometer MIRA-I.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Yoshizawa, Masanori; Fukushima, Toshio; Machida, Yoshihiro; Honma, Yukihiro; Kuwabara, Ryuichiro; Suzuki, Shunsaku; Torii, Yasuo; Kubo, Koichi; Matsuda, Ko; Iwashita, Hikaru

    1998-07-01

    The MIRA-1.2 system consists of two siderostats, beam reducers, vacuum delay liens, baseline metrology system, tip-tilt mirrors, beam combine optics, and fringe detector. Two siderostats, of which aperture of the flat mirror is 300mm, are placed apart by 4 meters in the north-south direction. Beam reducer is a Cassegrain optics with the paraboloidal primary and secondary mirrors of the diameter D(subscript 1) equals 200mm and D(subscript 2) equals 30mm, respectively. The metrology system with laser interferometers is set up to stabilize the baseline length for astrometry. Piezo-driven tip-tilt mirrors are equipped for the correction of image motions due to the air turbulence and other errors. Delay lines are placed in a vacuum tube. Experiments of the fiber optics is carried out as a part of MIRA-1.2. Developing MIRA-1.2 system, it is aimed to establish the basic techniques of astrometry and future projects, especially of MIRA-II.

  3. Edward P. Ney (1920-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Tom

    On July 9, 1996, Edward P. Ney, whose research spanned many disciplines across physics, astronomy, and geophysics, succumbed to a long battle with congestive heart disease at his home in Minneapolis at the age of 75.Ney was a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was regents' professor emeritus of physics and astronomy at the University of Minnesota, where he had been a member of the faculty since 1947. Although he retired from teaching in 1990, Ney remained active in research until his death.

  4. Ethical reflections on Edward Jenner's experimental treatment

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    In 1798 Dr Edward Jenner published his famous account of “vaccination”. Some claim that a Research Ethics Committee, had it existed in the 1790s, might have rejected his work. I provide the historical context of his work and argue that it addressed a major risk to the health of the community, and, given the devastating nature of smallpox and the significant risk of variolation, the only alternative preventative measure, Jenner's study had purpose, justification and a base in the practice of the day. PMID:17329392

  5. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-08-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed,preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’simpact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility.The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction.

  6. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here.

  7. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography,…

  8. Edward Jenner and the Small Pox Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A.

    2011-01-01

    Edward Jenner, who discovered that it is possible to vaccinate against Small Pox using material from Cow Pox, is rightly the man who started the science of immunology. However, over the passage of time many of the details surrounding his astounding discovery have been lost or forgotten. Also, the environment within which Jenner worked as a physician in the countryside, and the state of the art of medicine and society are difficult to appreciate today. It is important to recall that people were still being bled at the time, to relieve the presence of evil humors. Accordingly, this review details Jenner’s discovery and attempts to place it in historical context. Also, the vaccine that Jenner used, which decreased the prevalence of Small Pox worldwide in his own time, and later was used to eradicate Small Pox altogether, is discussed in light of recent data. PMID:22566811

  9. Edward o. Wilson and the organicist tradition.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Abraham H

    2013-01-01

    Edward O. Wilson's recent decision to abandon kin selection theory has sent shockwaves throughout the biological sciences. Over the past two years, more than a hundred biologists have signed letters protesting his reversal. Making sense of Wilson's decision and the controversy it has spawned requires familiarity with the historical record. This entails not only examining the conditions under which kin selection theory first emerged, but also the organicist tradition against which it rebelled. In similar fashion, one must not only examine Wilson's long career, but also those thinkers who influenced him most, especially his intellectual grandfather, William Morton Wheeler (1865-1937). Wilson belongs to a long line of organicists, biologists whose research highlighted integration and coordination, many of whom struggled over the exact same biological riddles that have long defined Wilson's career. Drawing inspiration (and sometimes ideas) from these intellectual forebears, Wilson is confident that he has finally identified the origin of the social impulse.

  10. Edward jenner and the small pox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kendall A

    2011-01-01

    Edward Jenner, who discovered that it is possible to vaccinate against Small Pox using material from Cow Pox, is rightly the man who started the science of immunology. However, over the passage of time many of the details surrounding his astounding discovery have been lost or forgotten. Also, the environment within which Jenner worked as a physician in the countryside, and the state of the art of medicine and society are difficult to appreciate today. It is important to recall that people were still being bled at the time, to relieve the presence of evil humors. Accordingly, this review details Jenner's discovery and attempts to place it in historical context. Also, the vaccine that Jenner used, which decreased the prevalence of Small Pox worldwide in his own time, and later was used to eradicate Small Pox altogether, is discussed in light of recent data.

  11. Near-Infrared and Visual Photometry of the Mira Variables V Tau and X AUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, G. D.

    1997-05-01

    We have been using a system of narrow-band, near-infrared filters to monitor changes in the infrared continuum magnitude and spectral type of several Mira variables (Rebel and Henson 1996, Bull. A.A.S., 28, 1399). Observations in V were added to the program at the beginning of 1997. We are now building simultaneous visual and near-infrared light curves with corresponding spectral type and color index variations. A comparison of the visual and infrared behavior will allow us to determine whether peculiarities in the visual light curves for these stars can be attributed to differential line blanketing effects or the phasing of temperature and diameter variations. Curves for a complete cycle of the short period Miras, V Tau and X Aur, are presented and the results discussed.

  12. GH Lib: A multi-periodic Mira, not an eclipsing binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviero, Alessandro; Munari, Ulisse; Righetti, Gian Luigi; Graziani, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    Over the period 2012-2016 we have obtained accurate V and R band photometry and 3400-8000 Ang spectroscopy which show the poorly studied variable GH Lib to be a multi-periodic Mira and not an Algol-type eclipsing binary. The main pulsation periods are 157 and 1180 days, with amplitudes of 3.5 and 1.0 mag, respectively. The spectral type change from M2III at maximum to M7III at minimum. The intensity of Halpha and Hbeta emission lines in GH Lib is much larger than in normal Miras, suggesting that the region of Balmer line formation is located at a larger radius (more external atmospheric layers) as if mixed with and not deeply below the region where absorption by TiO molecules occurs.

  13. Resolving the extended atmosphere and the inner wind of Mira (o Ceti) with long ALMA baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. T.; Kamiński, T.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High angular resolution (sub)millimetre observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, now possible with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), allow direct imaging of these objects' photospheres. The physical properties of the molecular material around these regions, which until now has only been studied by imaging of maser emission and spatially unresolved absorption spectroscopy, can be probed with radiative transfer modelling and compared to hydrodynamical model predictions. The prototypical Mira variable, o Cet (Mira), was observed as a Science Verification target in the 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign, offering the first opportunity to study these physical conditions in detail. Aims: With the longest baseline of 15 km, ALMA produces clearly resolved images of the continuum and molecular line emission/absorption at an angular resolution of ~30 mas at 220 GHz. Models are constructed for Mira's extended atmosphere to investigate the physics and molecular abundances therein. Methods: We imaged the data of 28SiO ν= 0, 2J = 5-4 and H2O v2 = 1JKa,Kc = 55,0-64,3 transitions and extracted spectra from various lines of sight towards Mira's extended atmosphere. In the course of imaging the emission/absorption, we encountered ambiguities in the resulting images and spectra that appear to be related to the performance of the CLEAN algorithm when applied to a combination of extended emission, and compact emission and absorption. We addressed these issues by a series of tests and simulations. We derived the gas density, kinetic temperature, molecular abundance, and outflow/infall velocities in Mira's extended atmosphere by modelling the SiO and H2O lines. Results: We resolve Mira's millimetre continuum emission and our data are consistent with a radio photosphere with a brightness temperature of 2611 ± 51 K. In agreement with recent results obtained with the Very Large Array, we do not confirm the existence of a compact region (<5 mas) of

  14. "Ask a slave" and interpreting race on public history's front line: interview with Azie Mira Dungey.

    PubMed

    Dungey, Azie Mira; Tyson, Amy M

    2014-02-01

    In this interview, Azie Mira Dungey (creator of the web series, "Ask a Slave") and Amy M. Tyson (Associate Professor of History at DePaul University and author of The Wages of History: Emotional Labor on Public History's Front Lines) discuss Dungey's web series, as well as her experiences as a living history interpreter at both the Smithsonian Museum of American History and at Mount Vernon.

  15. Circumstellar Dust Composition of M-type Mira Variables observed with phase with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Tina; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.

    2017-01-01

    Our research concerns the detailed dust composition surrounding Mira variables. These regular pulsators are easily observed in the optical and infrared due to their changes in brightness. Data on 25 galactic Miras were obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument in 2008-09 under a GO program led by Creech-Eakman. The stars were observed approximately once per month to track changes in their brightness and spectral features. This dataset is unique for both the number of observations of each star and the high SNR due to their intrinsic brightness.The stars in this study span the range of oxygen- to carbon-rich, with each type exhibiting certain known solid state components (i.e dust). The current focus is on trying to reproduce dust spectral features in the short, high (SH) and long, high (LH) resolution wavelength range (~9.7 - 40 microns) of the oxygen-rich Miras (C/O < 1). These high resolution, reduced spectra reveal a wonderful “forest” of features that provide insight into the stellar atmospheres and circumstellar dust composition with phase.Using the 1-D radiative transfer modeling code, DUSTY, we are attempting to identify several broad, and some sharp, dust features by including recently derived laboratory spectral indices for dust opacities. Prominent features seen in oxygen-rich Mira variables include potential identifications of water ice emission, as well as amorphous and crystalline silicates. We implement a greybody continuum obtained from MARCS, a 1-D hydrostatic spherical LTE model grid code, as the stellar continuum input for DUSTY. Using a greybody rather than a blackbody curve allows us to obtain a better agreement between the DUSTY spectrum and the Spitzer data. We will show these amended model fits that will improve the identification of the dust and other features in the spectra.

  16. Resolving asymmetries along the pulsation cycle of the Mira star X Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, X.; Wittkowski, M.; Perrin, G.; Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Thiébaut, E.; Ridgway, S. T.; Ireland, M.; Scholz, M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The mass-loss process in Mira stars probably occurs in an asymmetric way where dust can form in inhomogeneous circumstellar molecular clumps. Following asymmetries along the pulsation cycle can give us clues about these mass-loss processes. Aims: We imaged the Mira star X Hya and its environnement at different epochs to follow the evolution of the morphology in the continuum and in the molecular bands. Methods: We observed X Hya with AMBER in J-H-K at low resolution at two epochs. We modelled squared visibilities with geometrical and physical models. We also present imaging reconstruction results obtained with MiRA and based on the physical a priori images. Results: We report on the angular scale change of X Hya between the two epochs. 1D CODEX profiles allowed us to understand and model the spectral variation of squared visibilities and constrain the stellar parameters. Reconstructed model-dependent images enabled us to reproduce closure phase signals and the azimuthal dependence of squared visibilities. They show evidence for material inhomogeneities located in the immediate environment of the star. Based on observations obtained with the ESO VLTI/ATs telescopes under the program ID 084.D-0326. Figures 7-12 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Are anticoagulant independent mechanical valves within reach—fast prototype fabrication and in vitro testing of innovative bi-leaflet valve models

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    Background Exploration for causes of prosthetic valve thrombogenicity has frequently focused on forward or post-closure flow detail. In prior laboratory studies, we uncovered high amplitude flow velocities of short duration close to valve closure implying potential for substantial shear stress with subsequent initiation of blood coagulation pathways. This may be relevant to widely accepted clinical disparity between mechanical and tissue valves vis-à-vis thrombogenicity. With a series of prototype bi-leaflet mechanical valves, we attempt reduction of closure related velocities with the objective of identifying a prototype valve with thrombogenic potential similar to our tissue valve control. This iterative design approach may find application in preclinical assessment of valves for anticoagulation independence. Methods Tested valves included: prototype mechanical bi-leaflet BVs (n=56), controls (n=2) and patented early prototype mechanicals (n=2) from other investigators. Pulsatile and quasi-steady flow systems were used for testing. Projected dynamic valve area (PDVA) was measured using previously described novel technology. Flow velocity over the open and closing periods was determined by volumetric flow rate/PDVA. For the closed valve interval, use was made of data obtained from quasi-steady back pressure/flow tests. Performance was ranked by a proposed thrombogenicity potential index (TPI) relative to tissue and mechanical control valves. Results Optimization of the prototype valve designs lead to a 3-D printed model (BV3D). For the mitral/aortic site, BV3D has lower TPI (1.10/1.47) relative to the control mechanical valve (3.44/3.93) and similar to the control tissue valve (ideal TPI ≤1.0). Conclusions Using unique technology, rapid prototyping and thrombogenicity ranking, optimization of experimental valves for reduced thrombogenic potential was expedited and simplified. Innovative mechanical valve configurations were identified that merit consideration

  18. 3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by Mrs. Arthur Williams, owner of the house in 1960. JOSHUA DYER HOUSE FROM THE REAR - Joshua Dyer House, North Pamet Road, Truro, Barnstable County, MA

  19. EPA Seeks Public Input on Modified Training at Camp Edwards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BOSTON - EPA is seeking public comment on a proposed agreement to allow the Massachusetts Army National Guard to train with a Percussion Activated Neutralizer at the Camp Edwards portion of Joint Base Cape Cod (JBCC).

  20. EPA Seeks Public Input on Modified Training at Camp Edwards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is seeking public comment on a proposed agreement to allow the Massachusetts Army National Guard to train with a Percussion Activated Neutralizer at the Camp Edwards portion of Joint Base Cape Cod.

  1. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  2. 16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, East Hampton, 1958; Photograph by Morton Pennypacker of painting MANOR HOUSE, GARDINER'S ISLAND, 1639 - Gardiner's Island Windmill, Napeague, Suffolk County, NY

  3. Edward Mills Purcell, August 30, 1912-March 7, 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigden, John S.

    2011-03-01

    I discuss the life, education, personality, and contributions of Edward Mills Purcell (1912-1997) to physics, radio astronomy, astrophysics, biological physics, physics teaching and education, and to the nation.

  4. 7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 5Q4: Chris Edwards - Child Presence Sensor

    NASA Video Gallery

    Five Questions For (5Q4) Chris Edwards, NASA engineer who was the team lead of a group that invented a child presence sensor designed to alert parents if they've inadvertently left their child in h...

  6. 14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long Island Windmills,' American Machinist, 17 October 1918, p. 728 STONE CRANE AT THE SHELTER ISLAND WINDMILL - Shelter Island Windmill, Manwaring Road, Shelter Island, Suffolk County, NY

  7. Edward Teller Medal: Laudations and Citations 2005-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Max Tabak * Joseph D. Kilkenny * Kunioki Mima * Brian R. Thomas * Ricardo Betti * Edward I. Moses * Christine Garban-Labaune * Bruce A. Remington * James Hammer * Richard Petrasso * Jie Zhang * Hiroshi Azechi

  8. 4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Fuel & Water Tank, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. January, 1998 Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. January, 1998 - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Electrical Substation, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 1. NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Looking east. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. NORTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, BUILDING 1933 Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, BUILDING 1933 - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Observation Bunker Types, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 3. SOUTH SIDE. Edwards Air Force Base, South Base ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  5. Malfunctioning Starr-Edwards mitral valve 21 years after installation.

    PubMed

    Sakata, K; Ishikawa, S; Ohtaki, A; Otani, Y; Suzuki, M; Kawashima, O; Morishita, Y

    1997-02-01

    Two cases of malfunctioning Starr-Edwards cloth-covered mitral valve prostheses requiring reoperation are presented. Both cases underwent successful surgical repair 21 years after the valve replacement. The causes were a disturbance of the poppet during the opening movement due to excessive tissue ingrowth and a paravalvular leak associated with a tear of the valve seat. Replacement of the Starr-Edwards valve prosthesis more than 20 years after the initial installation has not been reported.

  6. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Mid-IR/Far-IR Dust Emissions of the Symbiotic Mira, V* R Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelian, Eric B.; Sankrit, Ravi; Helton, L. Andrew; Gorti, Uma; Wagner, R. Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present RADMC-3D models of the symbiotic system V* R Aqr, which consists of a Mira variable and white dwarf. Thermal radiative transfer modeling is performed using RADMC-3D to characterize the mid-IR/far-IR Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of the system at two different phases of the visible light curve. Near maximum visible light (Mira phase of 1.0), we utilize the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Short Wave Spectrometer/Long Wave Spectrometer observations (2.3 - 197 mu-m) and contrast them to the recently obtained near minimum visible light (~0.4 Mira phase) observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)/Faint Object infraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) (6.4 - 37.1 mu-m). Initial spectra and photometry from the SOFIA/FORCAST observations of the central Mira indicate that flux values are about 50% of that measured by the ISO SWS/LWS observations. Dust models utilizing a spherical shell and amorphous silicates are used to generate synthetic SEDs, which are compared with the ISO and FORCAST observations in order to constrain the properties of the shell (such as its dust mass and temperature) at different phases of the Mira variability. Our proposed monitoring of the V* R Aqr system will establish a characterization baseline of the SEDs as the system approaches its upcoming eclipse and periastron passage.

  7. Sir Charles Edward Saunders, Dominion cerealist.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Malcolm J

    2008-06-01

    Charles Edward Saunders was born in London, Ontario, in 1867. His father, Sir William Saunders, was the first director of the Dominion Experimental Farms (1886-1911). Charles received his B.A. with honours in science from the University of Toronto in 1888 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1891. He attempted a career in music, his first love, from 1893 to 1902. With his father, Charles attended the 1902 International Conference on Plant Breeding and Hybridization in New York, where he learned of Mendel's theories of inheritance and their applicability to plant breeding. When he began work in 1903 in the Division of Cereal Breeding and Experimentation at the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa, he used the knowledge he had gained at that conference. It was Charles's goal to achieve "fixity" in the varieties that had been bred and released using phenotypic mass selection, prior to his tenure as Cerealist. He selected four heads from the wheat variety Markham and in the winter of 1904 he performed a "chewing test" to select for gluten elasticity and colour. Seeds from two heads were chosen, and seeds from one went on to produce the variety Marquis after extensive yield trials on the Prairies. Marquis was 7 to 10 days earlier than Red Fife, the standard bread wheat of the Prairies. The earliness and tremendous yield of Marquis wheat resulted in the rapid and successful settlement of the Great Plains and countless billions of dollars in revenue to Canada. By 1923, 90% of the spring wheat in Canada and 70% in the USA was Marquis. Charles continued as Dominion Cerealist until his retirement in 1922. He was knighted in 1934, and died in 1937.

  8. Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test: 3 Years at MiraCosta College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbaugh French, Rica

    2007-12-01

    The Astronomy Diagnostic Test 2.0 (ADT) was administered to 26 sections of ASTR 101 at MiraCosta College (MCC) from fall 2004 through summer 2007. MiraCosta is a two-year community college located in Oceanside, CA, USA (roughly 40 miles north of San Diego) with an enrollment of approximately 11,000 students. ASTR 101 is MiraCosta's introductory astronomy survey course for non-science majors and has no math prerequisite. Class sizes ranged from 10 to 38 students. Comparison with the ADT National Project results indicates similar pre- and post-course averages: 31.8% (MCC) vs. 32.4% (National) for pre-course tests and 49.3% (MCC) vs. 47.3% (National) for post-course tests. The sample sizes are 709 and 530 students for the pre- and post-tests, respectively. The normalized gain for the entire data set is 0.256 and the effect size (ES) is 1.04, meaning that approximately 85% of the post-test scores are above the average of the pre-test scores. Previous studies have shown the ADT to be a reliable indicator of pre-course misconceptions while post-course scores are useful for comparing modes of instruction and assessing student learning on a limited number of concepts. Additional analyses of the MCC data probe for trends with variables such as gender, class size, and implementation of materials designed for a more "learner-centered” approach (such as Lecture Tutorials, Ranking Tasks, and Think-Pair-Share questions), as well as gains for a particular subset of concepts.

  9. A First Look At The Circumstellar Dust Of M-Type Mira Variables Observed With Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Tina; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.

    2016-09-01

    Our research is on the dust composition surrounding Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. In particular, the AGB star sub-group called Mira variables. These regular pulsators are easily observed in the optical and infrared due to their changes in brightness. Data on 25 Galactic Miras were obtained with the IRS instrument on Spitzer Space Telescope in 2008-09. The stars were observed once per month to monitor changes in their brightness and spectral features. This dataset is unique, not only for the number of observations of each star, but also because of the high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) due to the intrinsic brightness of the targets. By taking quick exposure times while sampling the data, the saturation of the detectors was avoided. The current focus of our research is on the high resolution data observed in the mid-infrared wavelength range ( 9 - 40 microns). The reduced spectra reveal a wonderful forest of features which provide insight into the stellar atmosphere and circumstellar dust composition. The stars in our sample can be categorized into either oxygen- or carbon-rich stars, with each type exhibiting certain known solid state components (i.e. dust). Preliminary study of the oxygen-rich dust composition shows the primary known features, such as broad silicate emission and aluminum oxide (Al2O3). Additional broad, and some sharp, dust features are currently being identified using the radiative transfer modeling code, DUSTY, along with recently derived laboratory spectral indexes for dust. Initial identifications of prominent dust features seen in oxygen-rich Miras include potential contributions from water emission, as well as crystalline and amorphous silicates, and possibly corundum. Preliminary results for a sub-sample of the set is presented here.

  10. Search for surface magnetic fields in Mira stars. First detection in χ Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lèbre, A.; Aurière, M.; Fabas, N.; Gillet, D.; Herpin, F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Petit, P.

    2014-01-01

    Context. So far, surface magnetic fields have never been detected on Mira stars. Only recently have the spectropolarimetric capabilities of measuring it via the Zeeman effect become available to us. Then, to complete the knowledge of the magnetic field and of its influence during the transition from asymptotic giant branch to planetary nebulae stages, we have undertaken a search for magnetic fields on the surface of Mira stars. Aims: Our main goal is to constrain - at this stage of stellar evolution - the surface magnetic field (presence and strength) and to define the magnetic field strength dependence along the radial distance to the star, above the photosphere and across the circumstellar envelope of cool and evolved stars. Methods: We used spectropolarimetric observations (Stokes V spectra probing circular polarization), collected with the Narval instrument at TBL, in order to detect - with the least squares deconvolution (LSD) method - a Zeeman signature in the visible part of the spectrum. Results: We present the first spectropolarimetric observations of the S-type Mira star χ Cyg, performed around its maximum light. We detected a polarimetric signal in the Stokes V spectra and established its Zeeman origin. We claim that it is likely to be related to a weak magnetic field present at the photospheric level and in the lower part of the stellar atmosphere. We estimated the strength of its longitudinal component to about 2-3 gauss. This result favors a 1/r law for the variation in the magnetic field strength across the circumstellar envelope of χ Cyg. This is the first detection of a weak magnetic field on the stellar surface of a Mira star, and we discuss its origin in the framework of shock waves periodically propagating throughout the atmosphere of these radially pulsating stars. Conclusions: At the date of our observations of χ Cyg, the shock wave reaches its maximum intensity, and it is likely that the shock amplifies a weak stellar magnetic field during

  11. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  12. Untersuchung der Mira-Sterne RT Boo, TV Peg und VX Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, Kerstin; Berthold, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The light-change of the Mira stars RT Boo, TV Peg and VX Aur was analyzed on three ways for a long time. In the first period I estimated the brightness of the variables on sky monitoring photo plates (red spectral range) from Sonneberg Observatory with Argelander¥s Method, in the last years I measured scanned photo plates with a photometry program and in addition I used visual observations from A.A.V.S.O. for the analysis. The behavior of the periods of the tree stars from 1965 to 2013 is described here.

  13. Mira and SR type variable stars from the ROTSE-IIID archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucsav, B.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    Applications of machine-learned algorithms in the field of variable classification have been popular as they are simple to implement and performing as well. A few years back, a small MPI application developed as the core of a variable detection pipeline for the ROTSE-IIID robotic telescope archive. Now it has been extended to involve the parallel approach for machine learned classification specifically for the long-term variables like Mira and Semi-regular variables. This presentation mainly covers the efforts to put the methodology in reality.

  14. Three-Color, Narrow-Band, Near-Infrared Photometry of Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebel, B.; Henson, G.

    1996-12-01

    The calibration of a photometric system used to detect spectral type changes of M-type stars is described. The system consists of three filters used to measure an index of TiO band strength, a color index, and an infrared continuum magnitude as described by Wing (1992, J.AAVSO, 21, 47). A plot of TiO index versus spectral type shows the system to be sensitive to spectral changes of approximately 1/2 subtype over the range of M1 to M7. The system will be used to provide coarse spectral information to supplement the infrared and visual light curves of M-type variables. We have established absolute magnitudes in all three filters for a set of 10 standard stars and have begun synoptic observations of Mira variable stars. Light curves with corresponding spectral type and color changes will be presented for six Mira stars: Z Oph, T Her, W Lyr, RT Cyg, CN Cyg, and R Vul.

  15. High-angular-resolution stellar imaging with occultations from the Cassini spacecraft - III. Mira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of spectral and spatial data of Mira obtained by the Cassini spacecraft, which not only observed the star's spectra over a broad range of near-infrared wavelengths, but was also able to obtain high-resolution spatial information by watching the star pass behind Saturn's rings. The observed spectral range of 1-5 microns reveals the stellar atmosphere in the crucial water-bands which are unavailable to terrestrial observers, and the simultaneous spatial sampling allows the origin of spectral features to be located in the stellar environment. Models are fitted to the data, revealing the spectral and spatial structure of molecular layers surrounding the star. High-resolution imagery is recovered revealing the layered and asymmetric nature of the stellar atmosphere. The observational data set is also used to confront the state-of-the-art cool opacity-sampling dynamic extended atmosphere models of Mira variables through a detailed spectral and spatial comparison, revealing in general a good agreement with some specific departures corresponding to particular spectral features.

  16. Blinded By The Lines: Mid-IR Spectra Of Mira Variables Taken With Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylis-Aguirre, Dana; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Luttermoser, Donald G.; Güth, Tina

    2016-08-01

    We present preliminary analysis of mid-infrared spectra of M-type and C-type Mira variables. Due to the brightness of this sample, it is straightforward to monitor changes with phase in the infrared spectral features of these regular pulsators. We have spectra of 25 Mira variables, taken with phase, using the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) high-resolution module. Each star has multiple spectra obtained over a one-year period from 2008-09. This is a rich, unique data set due to multiple observations of each star and the high signal-to-noise ratio from quick exposure times to prevent saturation of the IRS instrument. This paper focuses on the 17.6 and 33.2 micron lines shared by M-types and C-types. These are mostly emission lines that change with phase. We discuss preliminary physical diagnostics for the atmospheres based on the lines, as well as possible line identifications such as fluorescence of metal species.

  17. Period Estimation for Sparsely-sampled Quasi-periodic Light Curves Applied to Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shiyuan; Yuan, Wenlong; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Long, James; Macri, Lucas M.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a nonlinear semi-parametric Gaussian process model to estimate periods of Miras with sparsely sampled light curves. The model uses a sinusoidal basis for the periodic variation and a Gaussian process for the stochastic changes. We use maximum likelihood to estimate the period and the parameters of the Gaussian process, while integrating out the effects of other nuisance parameters in the model with respect to a suitable prior distribution obtained from earlier studies. Since the likelihood is highly multimodal for period, we implement a hybrid method that applies the quasi-Newton algorithm for Gaussian process parameters and search the period/frequency parameter space over a dense grid. A large-scale, high-fidelity simulation is conducted to mimic the sampling quality of Mira light curves obtained by the M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. The simulated data set is publicly available and can serve as a testbed for future evaluation of different period estimation methods. The semi-parametric model outperforms an existing algorithm on this simulated test data set as measured by period recovery rate and quality of the resulting period-luminosity relations.

  18. Annual parallax and a dimming event of a Mira variable star, FV Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    We present the first measurement of the trigonometric parallax of water masers associated with a Mira star, FV Bootis (FV Boo) using VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). Based on our multi-epoch VERA observations, we derived the parallax to be 0.97 ± 0.06 mas, which corresponds to a distance of 1.03^{+0.07}_{-0.06} kpc. The water masers around FV Boo were spatially distributed over an area of 41 au × 41 au, and their internal motions indicate the presence of an outflow. Using the Kagoshima University 1 m optical/infrared telescope, we determined the period to be 305.6 d and the mean apparent magnitude to be +2.91 mag in the K'-band. On the period-luminosity plane, the obtained period and K'-band magnitude puts FV Boo slightly below the sequence of Miras, possibly due to circumstellar reddening. Combining our photometric data with COBE and 2MASS datasets spanning over 20 years, we found in the near infrared that FV Boo was significantly fainter in 2005 compared with preceding and later phases. Its color, however, did not show a large variation through this change. We infer that the dimming could be caused by an eclipse due to a cloud in a binary system.

  19. Mathematical Existence Results for the Doi-Edwards Polymer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupin, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present some mathematical results on the Doi-Edwards model describing the dynamics of flexible polymers in melts and concentrated solutions. This model, developed in the late 1970s, has been used and extensively tested in modeling and simulation of polymer flows. From a mathematical point of view, the Doi-Edwards model consists in a strong coupling between the Navier-Stokes equations and a highly nonlinear constitutive law. The aim of this article is to provide a rigorous proof of the well-posedness of the Doi-Edwards model, namely that it has a unique regular solution. We also prove, which is generally much more difficult for flows of viscoelastic type, that the solution is global in time in the two dimensional case, without any restriction on the smallness of the data.

  20. Spectral variations of the symbiotic star V407 Cygni around light maximum of the secondary Mira variable in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, T.; Naito, H.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The outburst of the symbiotic recurrent nova V407 Cyg in 2010 has been studied by numerous authors. On the other hand, its spectral variations in the quiescent stage have not been well studied yet. This paper is probably the first report for the relation between the pulsation of the secondary Mira variable and the temperature of the primary hot component for V407 Cyg. Aims: The spectral variation in the post-outburst stage has been monitored to study the properties of this object. In the course of this work, we found some unexpected spectral variations around the light maximum of the secondary Mira variable in 2012. The relation between the mass transfer in the binary system and the pulsation of the secondary Mira variable is studied. Methods: High- and low-resolution optical spectra obtained at the Astronomical Observatories at Asiago were used. The photometric data depend on the database of the VSNET. Results: The secondary Mira variable reached its light maximum in 2012, when an absorption spectrum of a late-M-type giant developed and the emission line of Hδ became stronger than those of Hβ and Hγ, which are typical spectral features of Mira variables at light maxima. On the other hand, intensity ratios to Hβ of the emission lines of He I, He II, [Fe VII], etc., which obviously depended on the temperature of the hot component, rapidly varied around the light maximum. The intensity ratios started to decrease at phase about 0.9 of the periodical light variation of the Mira variable. This phenomenon suggests that the mass transfer rate, as well as the mass accretion rate onto the hot component, decreased according to the contraction of the Mira variable. However, these intensity ratios somewhat recovered just on the light maximum: phase 0.99. There might have occurred a temporal mass loss from the Mira variable at that time. The intensity ratios decreased again after the light maximum, then recovered and returned to the normal level at phase about 0

  1. Dynamical Models of Mira Atmospheres: Shocks, Limb Functions, and MG II Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Thomas Eugene

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic atmosphere models of Mira-type stars, prepared using a code developed by G. H. Bowen, were analyzed to determine observational implications of the models and suggest improvements to the code and model parameters. Three specific areas were addressed: Shock morphology, limb functions, and Mg II emission. The long-period, fundamental-mode models used in this study exhibit an unexpected shock morphology. In addition to the "main" shock, which forms as the radially pulsating surface of the Mira moves outward and is observed to travel out through atmosphere, a "preliminary" shock structure forms as rebounding layers of the atmosphere fall back onto lower layers. The preliminary shock remains deep in the atmosphere until overrun by the outward-moving main shock. The energy dissipated by the preliminary shock usually exceeds that dissipated by the main shock, and has important effects on the light curve. The dynamic atmosphere models exhibit radial extension of the atmosphere and post-shock emission that alter the limb function (limb darkening/brightening) of the models. The effects on stellar angular diameters measured by lunar occultation technique are calculated. The results show that the usual procedure of fitting occultation observations assuming a uniform brightness disk and then correcting the resulting diameter for limb darkening can give erroneous results. The dynamic effects cause Miras to appear larger and cooler than they actually are. A post-shock relaxation zone code developed by J. N. Pierce was modified and interfaced with the Bowen code to follow the ionization state and cooling radiation emitted by Hydrogen, Helium, and 23 metals in the models. Mg II emission data were used to prepare a light curve that is compared with Mg II light curves observed with the IUE satellite. The relaxation models show that the periodic passage of shocks through the atmosphere results in much lower concentrations of molecular hydrogen and higher ionization fractions

  2. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  3. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  4. Edward Adrian Wilson (1872-1912): polar explorer and artist.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    Dr Edward Wilson was a polar explorer who accompanied Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) on his expeditions to Antarctica in 1900 and 1910. He went with Scott to the South Pole and died with him on the return journey in 1912. Although medically qualified, he is now remembered more as a naturalist and as a talented artist recording the Antarctic expeditions.

  5. Edwards Personality Inventory, Booklet IV: Faking and Faking Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Control subjects completed Book IV of the Edwards Personality Inventory under instructions to be honest while experimental subjects were instructed to fake so as to make an excellent impression while also concealing their faking. Differences between group means were small. (Author/EK)

  6. Moyers receives Edward A. Flinn III Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Duce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Jarvis L. Moyers received the Edward A. Flinn III Award posthumously at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The award honors "individuals who personify the Union's motto `unselfish cooperation in research' through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities."

  7. Increasing Student Success: An Interview with Edward A. Morante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spann, Milton G.; Calderwood, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interview with Edward Morante, Dean of Student Services and Learning Resources at College of the Desert (California), regarding the needs of high-risk community college students. Morante focuses on assessment, placement, basic-skills courses, student-support services, the learning-community concept, student involvement, and evaluation,…

  8. Edward Lear, Limericks, and Nonsense: A Little Nonsense. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    British poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) is widely recognized as the father of the limerick form of poetry and is well known for his nonsense poems. In the first lesson for grades 3-5, which focuses on Lear's nonsense poem "The Owl and the Pussy Cat," students learn about nonsense poetry as well as the various poetic techniques and devices…

  9. Quality in Higher Education: The Contribution of Edward Demings Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Richard; Curtis, Elizabeth; Noone, Tom; Keenan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--There can be little doubt about the importance and relevance of quality for any service industry. One of the most influential contributors to service quality developments was W. Edwards Deming (1900-1993). An important component of Demings philosophy is reflected in his 14-principles for transforming a service as they indicate what…

  10. The Small Rural Schools of Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, E. L.

    In 1973, there were 56 one- and two-room elementary schools in Prince Edward Island (Canada). As part of a descriptive survey of these schools, now closed by consolidation, researchers visited each school in 1973 and recorded details of the buildings, facilities, and school organizations. Teachers from 47 schools and their 737 students in grades…

  11. What's Wrong with "Edward the Unready"? Our Responsibility for Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes how Rosemary Wells's new books about "Edward Unready" explain children and readiness; explores the problems with her message, and suggests new endings that are more supportive of all children. Asserts that variability in development should not be mistaken for deficit, and recommends changing the focus from judging children to…

  12. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour, after completing a mission of almost 17 days duration in space, touches down on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995. In this photo the nose gear is still in the air as the orbiter touches down.

  13. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear is on the ground and the nose gear is about to touch down as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  14. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed in this view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it completes a mission of almost 17 days duration in space on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995.

  15. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  16. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  17. Reception of Edward Bernays' Doctrine of "Manipulating Public Opinion."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasky, Marvin N.

    Ivy Lee and Edward Bernays are generally regarded as the founding fathers of modern public relations. While Lee has been the subject of a full biography that included contemporary reaction to his ideas, there has been no similar work on how Bernays' ideas were received, though his ideas were in some ways more radical. He believed that propaganda…

  18. A tumor profile in Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18).

    PubMed

    Satgé, Daniel; Nishi, Motoi; Sirvent, Nicolas; Vekemans, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Constitutional trisomy 18 causes Edwards syndrome, which is characterized by intellectual disability and a particular set of malformations. Although this condition carries high mortality during prenatal and early postnatal life, some of the rare infants who survive the first months develop benign and malignant tumors. To determine the tumor profile associated with Edwards syndrome, we performed a systematic review of the literature. This review reveals a tumor profile differing from those of Down (trisomy 21) and Patau (trisomy 13) syndromes. The literature covers 45 malignancies: 29 were liver cancers, mainly hepatoblastomas found in Japanese females; 13 were kidney tumors, predominantly nephroblastomas; 1 was neuroblastoma; 1 was a Hodgkin disease; and 1 was acute myeloid leukemia in an infant with both trisomy 18 and type 1 neurofibromatosis. No instances of the most frequent malignancies of early life-cerebral tumors, germ cell tumors, or leukemia--are reported in children with pure trisomy 18. Tumor occurrence does not appear to correlate with body weight, tissue growth, or cancer genes mapping to chromosome 18. Importantly, the most recent clinical histories report successful treatment; this raises ethical concerns about cancer treatment in infants with Edwards syndrome. In conclusion, knowledge of the Edwards' syndrome tumor profile will enable better clinical surveillance in at-risk organs (i.e., liver, kidney). This knowledge also provides clues to understanding oncogenesis, including the probably reduced frequency of some neoplasms in infants and children with this genetic condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A tribute to Robert Edwards and Howard Jones Jr

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.

    2011-01-01

    “2010 was a fascinating year. Robert Edwards finally received the Nobel prize for Medicine and his friend in the United States, Howard W. Jones Jr. was honored in Denver by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) upon his Centennial Birthday. He turned 100 on December 30th” PMID:24753845

  20. Obituary: Harrison Edward Radford, 1927-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, James Michael; Kirby, Kate Page; Chance, Kelly V.; Brown, Campbell

    2003-12-01

    Harrison Edward ``Harry" Radford, a noted laboratory spectroscopist and pioneer in the application of magnetic resonance techniques to spectroscopy, died on 5 May 2000, after a long battle with amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During a 37-year career at the National Bureau of Standards and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harry measured the frequencies of numerous molecular transitions which aided the emerging field of astrochemistry. Harry was both an excellent theoretician and a preeminently skilled experimentalist. He has several major spectroscopic achievements to his credit. He performed the first study of a short-lived molecular free radical, OH, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, opening up a huge and important field of research. Together with colleagues he made the first observation of the rotational spectrum of CH by far infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy and extended the technique to other molecules such as CH3O. Harry was born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, on 26 July 1927. He was the son of Harrison Edwin Radford, a roofer, and Dorothy (née Cole) Radford. He dropped out of high school to join the Navy in 1944 as an electronics technician's mate. After his discharge in 1946 he worked in the family construction business for four years as a roofer. In 1950 he entered the University of New Hampshire and graduated four years later, Summa Cum Laude, with a degree in physics. As a graduate student at Yale from 1954 to 1959 he wrote his PhD thesis under the supervision of V.W. Hughes on the microwave Zeeman spectra of oxygen and fluorine where he used the technique of paramagnetic resonance absorption in atomic vapors. In 1954 he married Mildred Spofford. They had three daughters, Susan (born in 1955), Amy (1957), and Sarah (1960). In 1974 he married Alfa Goldthwaithe Morrison, who survived him. From 1959 until 1969 Harry worked at the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology

  1. 75 FR 49991 - Beverley P. Edwards, M.D.; Revocation of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Enforcement Administration Beverley P. Edwards, M.D.; Revocation of Registration On January 21, 2010, I, the... Suspension of Registration to Beverly P. Edwards, M.D. (Respondent), of Indianapolis, Indiana. The Show Cause... DEA Certificate of Registration, BE8619667, issued to Beverly P. Edwards, M.D., be, and it hereby...

  2. [It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees: Emilio Mira y López and the social revolution].

    PubMed

    Mülberger, Annette; Jacó-Vilela, Ana Maria

    2007-01-01

    Although the socialist ideology of the Catalan psychiatrist Emilio Mira y López (1896-1964) is relatively well known, his psychological-political contribution has been ignored. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, Mira's psychological analysis of the social revolution is situated in the historical context of Catalonia and Spain before Franco's Dictatorship, taking account of biographical and political as well as scientific and cultural aspects. Second, the way in which Mira related psychology to politics is explored by examining the extent to which his scientific work reflected his socialist ideas.

  3. Interferometric Constraints on Molecule and Dust Formation in Oxygen-rich Mira stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Karovicova, I.; Scholz, M.; Ohnaka, K.; Boboltz, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    We present new results from our project on spatially and spectrally resolved multi-epoch near- and mid-infrared interferometric observations of oxygen-rich Mira stars using the ESO VLT Interferometer (VLTI). We confirm that the near-IR data are well described by recent CODEX dynamic model atmospheres, including features of extended water vapor and CO layers. Our mid-infrared data are consistent with Al2O3 grains condensing close to the photosphere at about 2 stellar radii and warm silicates condensing at about 4-5 stellar radii. We confirm that the number density of aluminum can match that of the best-fit dust shells near the inner dust shell radius up to the condensation radii of warm silicates, confirming that Al2O3 grains can be seed particles for the further dust condensation.

  4. Crowd-Sourced Spectroscopy of Long Period Mira-Type Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John C.; Barber, Henry R.; Rea, Bill; Templeton, Matthew; McFarland, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Crowd-sourced observing campaigns provide frequent temporal sampling over long durations at lower cost than can be achieved with exclusively professional efforts. They have been used very successfully to construct wellsampled light curves for variable stars and inform the timing of professional observing efforts. Until recently, spectroscopy has not been a tool commonly available for use in crowd-sourced campaigns. But advances in commercial equipment and educational efforts have removed many of the traditional barriers to low-resolution spectroscopy with small telescopes. One type of target that could benefit from a crowd-sourced photometry and spectroscopy campaign is Mira-type variables with long periods (over 500 days). We report the preliminary results from a pilot study testing the efficacy of crowd-sourcing spectroscopic observations of those stars using small telescopes and filter wheel gratings.

  5. Development of LM10-MIRA LOX/LNG expander cycle demonstrator engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnykh, Mikhail; Carapellese, Stefano; Liuzzi, Daniele; Arione, Luigi; Caggiano, Giuseppe; Bellomi, Paolo; D'Aversa, Emanuela; Pellegrini, Rocco; Lobov, S. D.; Gurtovoy, A. A.; Rachuk, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    This article contains results of joint works by Konstruktorskoe Buro Khimavtomatiki (KBKhA, Russia) and AVIO Company (Italy) on creation of the LM10-MIRA liquid-propellant rocket demonstrator engine for the third stage of the upgraded "Vega" launcher.Scientific and research activities conducted by KBKhA and AVIO in 2007-2014 in the frame of the LYRA Program, funded by the Italian Space Agency, with ELV as Prime contractor, and under dedicated ASI-Roscosmos inter-agencies agreement, were aimed at development and testing of a 7.5 t thrust expander cycle demonstrator engine propelled by oxygen and liquid natural gas (further referred to as LNG).

  6. Parallax of a Mira variable R Ursae Majoris studied with astrometric VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Akiharu; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Matsui, Makoto; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Honma, Mareki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Sato, Katsuhisa; Jike, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    We have measured an annual parallax of the Mira variable R Ursae Majoris (R UMa) with the VLBI Exploration for Radio Astronomy (VERA). From the monitoring VLBI observations over a span of about two years, we detected H2O maser spots in the LSR velocity range from 37 to 42 km s-1. We derived an annual parallax of 1.97 ± 0.05 mas, and this gives a corresponding distance of 508 ± 13 pc. The VLBI maps revealed 72 maser spots distributed in an ˜110 au area around the expected stellar position. Circumstellar kinematics of the maser spots were also revealed by subtracting a systemic motion in the Hipparcos catalog from proper motions of each maser spot derived from our VLBI observations. Infrared photometry was also conducted to measure a K-band apparent magnitude, and we obtained a mean magnitude of mK = 1.19 ± 0.02 mag. Using the trigonometric distance, mK is converted to a K-band absolute magnitude of MK = -7.34 ± 0.06 mag. This result gives a much more accurate absolute magnitude for R UMa than previously provided. We solved a zero-point of the MK-log P relation for the Galactic Mira variables and obtained a relation of MK = -3.52 log P + (1.09 ± 0.14). Other long-period variables, including red supergiants, whose distances were determined with astrometric VLBI, were also compiled to explore the different sequences of the MK-log P relation.

  7. Obituary: Donald Edward Osterbrock, 1924-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    Donald Edward Osterbrock, one of the leading figures of post-World War II astronomy, died suddenly of a heart attack on 11 January 2007, while walking near his office at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was 82 years old. His initials spelled D.E.O. (God in latin!), but he was known simply as Don to his many friends and colleagues. Don's long and productive career spanned five decades. His scientific work helped shape our understanding of lower main-sequence stars, the ionized interstellar medium, and active galactic nuclei. He was also a highly respected historian of astronomy who shed new light on 19th- and 20th-century astronomy. Don was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 13 July 1924. Both of his parents were of German descent and valued hard work, education, and science. They both completed their high-school education at night while working full-time during the day. His father eventually became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Cincinnati. Don's plan to become an astronomer was put on hold when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. After graduation from high school, Don joined the United States Army and trained as a meteorologist, taking all of the physics and mathematics courses required for a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Chicago. He was eventually sent to islands in the Pacific Ocean but never was in harm's way. After three years of service, Don returned to Chicago to obtain his bachelor's degree in 1948, his M.S. in astronomy in 1949, and a Ph.D. in astronomy in 1952. Don's years at the University of Chicago and the University's Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, were pivotal for his career and personal life. He came in contact with such luminaries as Otto Struve, Bengt Strömgren, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, and William W. Morgan. At Yerkes, he also met and married Irene L. Hansen, a native of Williams Bay, who was employed as a member of the Yerkes staff. They had a son, William, now

  8. Effect of hypertension on the closing dynamics and Lagrangian blood damage index measure of the b-datum regurgitant jet in a bileaflet mechanical heart valve.

    PubMed

    Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the formation of the closing vortex and subsequent b-datum regurgitation jet in bileaflet mechanical heart valves is governed by the magnitude of the driving mean aortic pressure (MAP), and that this sensitivity does impact the blood damage index (BDI) corresponding to platelet activation and lysis. High spatial resolution time resolved (1 kHz) as well as phase locked particle image velocimetry techniques captured the dynamic leaflet closure and regurgitation jet of a model 25 mm St. Jude Medical BMHV. Cell trajectories were estimated using Lagrangian particle tracking analysis while the leaflet kinematics was quantified by tracking the leaflet tip-position throughout closure. The non-principal as well as principal shear stress loading histories along each cell trajectory revealed BDI for platelet activation and lysis as a function of cell initial position, release time-point, and blood pressure. Results show that the leaflet closing time reduces by roughly 10 ms, in response to an increase in MAP by 40 mmHg. We report that higher MAP leads to a stronger b-datum vortex and jet formation. Platelet activation BDI lowers with a higher MAP due to reduction in exposure times despite an increase in principal shear stress experienced. Platelet lysis BDI however increases with higher MAP. Maximum BDI may occur for cells initially in the b-datum zone during the onset of leaflet closure. Our results provide a better understanding of BDI of the regurgitant b-datum jet and sheds light on the potential importance of blood damage testing under hypertensive conditions.

  9. Reduction of procoagulant potential of b-datum leakage jet flow in bileaflet mechanical heart valves via application of vortex generator arrays.

    PubMed

    Murphy, David W; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-07-01

    Current designs of bileaflet mechanical heart valves put patients at an increased risk of thromboembolism. In particular, regurgitant flow through the b-datum line is associated with nonphysiologic flow characteristics such as elevated shear stresses, regions of recirculation, and increased mixing, all of which may promote thrombus formation. We have previously shown that passive flow control in the form of vortex generators mounted on the downstream leaflet surfaces can effectively diminish turbulent stresses. The objective of the current work is thus to determine the effect of vortex generators on the thromboembolic potential of the b-datum line leakage jet and to correlate that effect with the vortex generator-induced changes to the flow structure. Flow experiments were performed using a steady model of the transient b-datum line jet. These experiments encompassed flow visualization to gain an overall picture of the flow system, particle image velocimetry to quantify the flow field in detail, and in vitro experiments with human blood to quantify thrombus formation in response to the applied passive flow control. Thrombus formation was quantified over time by an assay for thrombin-antithrombin III (TAT III). In comparing results with and without vortex generators, significantly lower mean TAT III levels were observed at one time point for the case with vortex generators. Also, the TAT III growth rate of the case with vortex generators was significantly lower. While no differences in jet spreading were found with and without vortex generators, lower peak turbulent stresses were observed for the case with vortex generators. The results thus demonstrate the potential of applying passive flow control to cardiovascular hardware in order to mitigate the hemodynamic factors leading to thrombus formation.

  10. Unusual clinical history of a male infant with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Surányi, Andrea; Bitó, Tamás; Vajda, György; Kaiser, László; Gáspár, Gábor; Katona, Márta; Szabó, János; Pál, Attila

    2009-03-01

    Edwards syndrome (trisomy of chromosome 18) is generally characterized by the disorders of central nervous system, as well as the musculoskeletal and genitourinary systems. In majority of the cases with trisomy 18 the following malformations can be found: ventricular septal defect, horseshoe kidneys, oesophageal atresia, omphalocele, facial clefts, diaphragmatic hernias and genital hypoplasia. We report a male patient with Edwards syndrome. The boy had a partial agenesis of corpus callosum, oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula, renal agenesis, ventricular septal defect, Dandy-Walker cyst and low-set malformed ears. The first three features are unique based on previous literature reports on trisomy 18. This report allows a further delineation of the trisomy 18 syndrome.

  11. Selected Scientific and Technical Contributions of Edward C. Polhamus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Edward C. Polhamus joined the NACA Langley Research Center staff in 1944 and was active in a broad range of aerodynamic research related to high-speed aircraft technology, aerodynamic prediction methods, and cryogenic wind-tunnel development. This lecture will focus on his 'leading-edge suction analogy' for the prediction of vortex-lift effects on slender wings. Briefer treatment of his contributions to variable-sweep aircraft and cryogenic wind tunnels is also included.

  12. Bibliography of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, through 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menard, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography comprises 1,022 multidisciplinary references to technical and general literature for the three regions of the Edwards aquifer, Texas-San Antonio area; Barton Springs segment, Austin area; and northern segment, Austin area. The references in the bibliography were compiled from computerized data bases and from published bibliographies and reports. Dates of references range from the late 1800's through 1993. Subject and author indexes are included.

  13. 1995 Edward Teller Lecture Patience and Optimism (LIRPP Vol. 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    Remarks made in the author's acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. "Patience" and "optimism" are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the "zig-zag" path to fusion energy production.

  14. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB CA 93524-7013 AFRL -RZ-ED-VG-2011-269 9...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 11. SPONSOR...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Air Force Research Laboratory Ed d Ai F B CA Col Mike Platt war s r orce

  15. Edwards syndrome in a 6-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Raczkowski, Jan W; Daniszewska, Barbara; Paradecka, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome - ES) is the second most common trisomy. It occurs in 1/3 000 to 1/8 000 births. ES is a cause of numerous developmental disorders and malformations. The median life span of children with ES is about 2 weeks and only 5%-10% will survive their first year of life. The report presents a case of a 6-year-old girl with ES.

  16. Acute cytotoxicity of MIRA-1/NSC19630, a mutant p53-reactivating small molecule, against human normal and cancer cells via a caspase-9-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bou-Hanna, Chantal; Jarry, Anne; Lode, Laurence; Schmitz, Ingo; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Kury, Sébastien; Bezieau, Stéphane; Mosnier, Jean-François; Laboisse, Christian L

    2015-04-10

    Although numerous studies have focused on the mechanisms of action of the candidate chemotherapeutic drug MIRA-1/NSC19630, initially described as a mutant p53-reactivating small molecule, the issue of its toxicological evaluation remains open. Here, we devised a strategy to examine the effects of MIRA-1 on a variety of human normal cells and cancer cell lines. First, we demonstrated a massive and rapid (within 2 hours) MIRA-1 apoptotic effect on human normal primary epithelial cells as shown using an intestinal mucosa explant assay. MIRA-1 was also cytotoxic to primary and subcultured human mesenchymal cells. Interestingly these effects were restricted to actively proliferating cells. Second, MIRA-1 acute toxicity was independent of p53, since it occurred in human normal cells with increased or silenced p53 expression level, in cancer cells derived from solid or liquid tumors, with either mutated or wt TP53, and in cancer cells devoid of p53. Third, combined pharmacological and genetic approaches showed that MIRA-1 acute cytotoxicity was mediated by a caspase-9-dependent apoptosis. In conclusion, our strategy unveils the limitations of the targeted action of a small molecule designed to reactivate mutant p53.

  17. Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards Test Station as it looked in 1945. To the immediate right of the Test Stand 'A' tower stands a concrete monitor building or blockhouse (now Building 4203/E-4) for observation and control of tests. Other frame buildings housed workshop and administrative functions. Long structure behind automobiles was designated 4207/E-8 and was used for instrument repair and storage, a cafeteria, machine and welding shops. To the immediate south of 4207/E-8 were 4200/E-1 (used as an office and photographic laboratory) and 4205/E-6 (guardhouse, with fire extinguisher mounted on it). To the northeast of 4205/E-6 was 4204/E-5 (a propellant storage dock, with shed roof). Buildings 4200/E-1, 4205/E-6 and 4207/E-8 were demolished in 1983. Note the absence of trees. (JPL negative no. 383-1297, July 1946) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Carrara, Sabina; Filippi, Valentina

    2011-06-01

    The Roman Catholic Church reacted negatively to the announcement that the Nobel Prize for Medicine had been awarded to Robert G Edwards. Thirty-three years ago, Cardinal Albino Luciani, on the eve of his election to become Pope, stated that, whereas progress is certainly a beautiful thing, mankind has not always benefited from progress. Catholic criticism has raised seven points: (i) God wants human life to begin through the 'conjugal act' and not artificially; (ii) artificial interventions at the beginning of human life are dangerous and ethically unacceptable; (iii) limits can be imposed even upon an individual's freedom to achieve a legitimate goal, such as having a child within marriage; (iv) the massive loss of preimplantation embryos characterizing IVF must be considered as a tragic loss of 'nascent' human persons; (v) Edwards bears a moral responsibility for all subsequent developments in assisted reproduction technology and for all 'abuses' made possible by IVF; (vi) there can be deleterious consequences for offspring of assisted reproduction technology; and (vii) Edwards' discovery did not eliminate the causes of infertility. This article elaborates from the Roman Catholic perspective on each of these points, some of which are found to be more substantial than others.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LCs re-analysis of Mira variables in ASAS (Vogt+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, N.; Contreras-Quijada, A.; Fuentes-Morales, I.; Vogt-Geisse, S.; Arcos, C.; Abarca, C.; Agurto-Gangas, C.; Caviedes, M.; Dasilva, H.; Flores, J.; Gotta, V.; Penaloza, F.; Rojas, K.; Villasenor, J. I.

    2017-01-01

    The ASAS database (All Sky Automated Survey, Pojmanski 2002, II/264) is the outcome of a sky patrol program with CCD photometry, conducted at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, between 2000 and 2009 (-90<=DEC<=+28°). The visual limiting magnitude is about 14.5m and a total of up to 500 measurements per star are available. An automatic procedure identified 50122 ASAS variable stars and classified part of them according to their type of variability. A total of 2895 variables are listed as Mira stars in this database. The aim of this paper is to re-analyze the light curves of all stars classified as Mira in ASAS. (2 data files).

  20. MIRAS characterization and monitoring during the SMOS In-Orbit Commissioning Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Martin-Neira, M.; Duffo, N.; González-Gambau, V.; Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.

    2009-04-01

    1 Introduction The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) is the single payload of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The instrument was completed in early 2007 and thoroughly tested both in anechoic chamber and vacuum thermal chamber during 2007. It was integrated to the platform in early 2008 and re-tested, including compatibility, during 2008. At present, the whole satellite is stowed and waiting to be launched during 2009. In two weeks after launch, the satellite will be in the final orbit with all deployments completed. Then the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase will start, having an estimated duration of 5.5 months. During this phase, the instrument modes of operation will be systematically checked and the calibration parameters will be fully characterized in real conditions. Also, the first brightness temperature images will be obtained in order to assess the overall retrieval procedures including inversion. In the end, the objective of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is to provide verification that the payload meets the scientific requirements of the mission. The general design and planning of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is given in [1]. This abstract presents the foreseen activities to be performed during this phase by the UPC team. Just after the start of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase, the instrument will be commanded to perform a sequence of operations oriented at providing a full characterization in terms of calibration parameters. The idea is to reproduce the results obtained during the tests carried out on ground [2]. In particular, the following issues will be covered: Thermal Stability: To provide understanding of both the intra-orbit and inter-orbit temperature variations. The instrument will be continuously operating during a number of orbits while all temperature sensors being monitored. Electrical Stability: To re-compute all internal calibration parameters (gains, offsets, receiver noise temperatures

  1. FE Line Diagnostics of Multiply Shocked Stellar Atmospheres: The Mira S. Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Extensive LWP-HI spectra were obtained of the Mira S Car at a rapid time cadence as compared with the shock cycle time of S Car. These spectra were obtained in an attempt to understand the velocity structures in the shocked wind using the fluoresced iron lines. Data analysis of the IUE observations, which included the primary calibration of all of the IUE spectra obtained of S Car, was carried out. In addition, line identifications, flux calculations, background subtractions, and line profile analysis as a function of S Car's pulsational phase were performed. The database incorporated all line identifications as a function of pulsation phase for all IUE LWP-HI observations to date of S Car. At least 45 separate iron line features are identified in the S Car spectrum at one or more phases of the shock cycle, including those due to Fe II (UV 161) which is pumped by three different iron lines; Fe I(UV 44) which is pumped by the Mg II k line. Other strong multiplets that have been identified include UV(1), UV(2), UV(5), UV(32), UV(60), UV(63), UV(161), UV(207), and UV(399). Over 300 weaker lines have also been tentatively identified with Fe line transitions.

  2. Ground winds and winds aloft for Edwards AFB, California (1978 revision)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ground level runway wind statistics for the Edwards AFB, California area are presented. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the two major Edwards AFB runways. Also presented are Edwards AFB bivariate normal wind statistics for a 90 degree flight azimuth for altitudes 0 through 27 km. Wind probability distributions and statistics for any rotation of axes can be computed from the five given parameters.

  3. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2011-05-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) and Edward Pigott (1753-1825) are credited with determining the first accurate periods for several important variable stars. Goodricke's name is associated with the determination of the period of the eclipsing binary Algol (Beta Persei); for this he was awarded the Copley Prize of the Royal Society of London. He also determined the periods of the contact binary Beta Lyrae and of Delta Cephei, the prototype Cepheid variable. Around the same time, Edward Pigott obtained the period of Eta Aquilae, another Cepheid. In actuality, the two collaborated on all these observations; today we would call them co-discoverers. Goodricke is the better known of the two, in part because he won the Copley Medal, in part because of his tragically short life, and in part because he was deaf. Edward Pigott was the more experienced observer, having worked with his father Nathaniel on determining the longitudes of several cities on the Continent. Evidence shows, however, that Goodricke had some astronomical experience while a student at the Warrington Academy. The journals of the two show that they developed a partnership that made the most of both their talents over the brief time (less than five years) they worked together before Goodricke's death. Today, the two are remembered as having suggested eclipses as the cause for the periodic dimming of Algol. This explanation is accepted today as the correct one. In their day, however, most eminent astronomers believed that starspots were a more likely cause for the dimming. By the time of John Goodricke's death, he seems to have accepted that explanation as well. A study of the work of Goodricke and Pigott contains many lessons for today's observers of variable stars. This work was supported by an AAS Small Research Grant and by the Pollack Award of the Dudley Observatory.

  4. A very rare entity of diabetes insipidus associated with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Doğan, Murat; Peker, Erdal; Bulan, Keziban; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2013-08-01

    Edwards syndrome is the second most commonly seen trisomy. It was first described by John Hamilton Edwards in 1960. Although most cases result in termination or foetal loss, live births have been documented in 5%. Edwards syndrome is characterized by multisystem anomalies, of which holoprosencephaly (HPE) is observed in 4-8% of cases. The clinical findings correspond to the degree of HPE malformation. Convulsions and endocrinopathies are among the severe clinical findings. The most common endocrinopathies are central diabetes insipidus (DI), hypothyroidism, hypocortisolism and growth hormone deficiency. The coexistence of holoproencephaly and DI in Edwards syndrome was discussed under the light of literature.

  5. Salutary swan song for the Starr Edwards valve.

    PubMed

    Masilonyane-Jones, Taolo Vijay; Blackham, Ruth; Alvarez, John

    2010-07-01

    The Starr-Edwards valve was the first manufactured valve to be used successfully as a cardiac valve replacement in 1960. Although superseded by newer valves over the decades it has achieved an excellent track record. It has unique features, namely a protective metal casing around the ball poppet and a large and thick sewing ring. We describe the last implant of this valve in Australia; it has now been withdrawn by the manufacturer. In this particular case, the unique features of this valve made the required surgery quite simple and avoided the need for complex mitral valve surgery in a very high-risk patient.

  6. The contributions of Edward H. Angle to dental public health.

    PubMed

    Peck, S

    2009-09-01

    The genius of Edward Hartley Angle, (1855-1930), the founder of the dental specialty of orthodontics, to create order from chaos in the study and treatment of positional discrepancies of the teeth, jaws and face advanced greatly the cause of dental public health. Angle's innovations that had the most public health impact were (1) his identification of dental occlusion, not simply tooth irregularity, as a prime concern, (2) his development of an uncomplicated classification system for occlusal conditions, (3) his introduction of prefabricated orthodontic appliances and (4) his framing of orthodontics as a dental specialty by organizing the world's first educational program to train orthodontists.

  7. The portrait of Dr Edward Harrison MD (1766-1838).

    PubMed

    Bovine, Gary

    2010-08-01

    The portrait of the London and Horncastle Physician Edward Harrison, painted and displayed in 1823, was editorially criticized by one of the medical journals of the time. After Harrison died the portrait remained in the family estate until 1938, after which it was presented to the National Gallery of Ireland. The image of Dr Harrison had never been displayed in any of his medical writings, nor in any other medical historical works, until 2008. This paper provides some history of the criticism of the portrait, similar to the historical vignette of the portraiture of William Harvey and outlines the detective work to track down the location of the portrait.

  8. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2012-06-01

    John Goodricke and Edward Pigott, working in York, England, between 1781 and 1786, determined the periods of variation of eclipsing binaries such as Algol and Beta Lyrae and speculated that the eclipses of Algol might be caused by a "dark body," perhaps even a planet. They also determined the periods of variation of the first two known Cepheid variables, the stars whose period-luminosity relation today enables astronomers to determine distances to distant galaxies. Goodricke holds special interest because he was completely deaf and because he died at the age of 21. The lives and work of these two astronomers are described.

  9. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  10. Griffith Edwards' work on the life course of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E Jane

    2015-07-01

    In 1976 Edwards & Gross proposed the concept of the alcohol dependence syndrome, based on the clinical observation that heavy drinkers manifested an inter-related clustering of signs and symptoms. That this modest 'provisional description' turned out to be so significant and influential is perhaps unsurprising when the context in which it was made is appreciated. Griffith Edwards and his colleagues at the Maudsley Hospital had undergone a rigorous 3-year training in clinical psychiatry, during which they had been taught to think critically and were grounded in the art of clinical observation. As he assessed patients for various alcohol research studies he realized that there was a clustering of certain elements. Thus clinical observation and an appreciation of the patient's drinking history contributed to the genesis of the concept. This paper reflects on the integration of his rigorous training at the Maudsley, his enquiring mind and encyclopaedic knowledge of the historical and research literature which enabled him to formulate a testable hypothesis about the alcohol dependence syndrome.

  11. Time variation observations of ISO SWS spectra of two oxygen-rich Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, T.; de Jong, T.; Yamamura, I.; Cami, J.; Tanab'e, T.

    1999-03-01

    Two M-type Mira variables, Z Cyg and T Cep, have been observed with SWS01 over an entire light variability cycle. Each star was observed 7 times with an interval of variability phase of approximately 0.2. Z Cyg has prominent ``silicate bands'' at 10 and 20 μm and shows large variation in the circumstellar emission. The 10 and 20 μm bands become stronger relative to the photospheric emission at maximum than at minimum and the relative intensity of the 10 μm to the 20 μm bands increases at maximum, indicating increase in the temperature of circumstellar grains. In contrast, T Cep shows relatively small, but complicated variation in its SWS spectrum. The dust shell emission is weak in T Cep compared to Z Cyg. It has atypical 10 μm feature, peaking at λ > 10 μm and band emission around 13 μm. It also shows several molecular features, including 13-17 μm CO2 and 7.3 μm SO2 bands, both of which originate from the layers of temperature of less than 1000 K. These circumstellar molecular bands show significant variations. On the other hand, the continuum slope of the dust emission in T Cep shows little change, indicating that the dust temperature does not vary largely during light variation. Neither the circumstellar molecular features nor the dust continuum intensity seems to vary synchronously with the visual light variation. The amounts of SO2 molecules and dust grains seem to be decreasing after the maximum.

  12. VLA positions and distributions of H2O masers associated with 15 Mira and semiregular variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, P. F.; Johnston, K. J.

    1994-05-01

    Results of VLA observations of 22 GHz H2O masers associated with 15 Mira and semiregular variables are reported. The combination of angular resolution (approximately equals 70 mas), spectral resolution (0.3 km/sec), rms sensitivity (+/- 35 mJy/beam), and hour-angle coverage is the best yet obtained for H2O masers from a significant sample of stars. Comparison of accurate optical positions of the stars with estimates from the masers yields total differences typically less than or equal to 0 sec .15-an improvement over previous comparisons by a factor of about 2. There are indications of some combination of nonuniformities in the density distribution, deviations from sphericity, and anisotropies in the velocity field, but it is difficult to disentangle the effects of these phenomena and achieve unique interpretation. A plausible model is clumps or filaments distributed at radii which vary with direction from the star. From the angular distributions and velocity ranges, there is good evidence that at least some parcels of gas are accelerated to the terminal outflow velocity at rho greater than or equal to 20 AU and that there is a component of outflow at rho approximately equals 10 to 15 AU; some gas probably is fully accelerated at radii less than 10 AU. To illustrate the problems of interpretation, the well-known case of VX Sgr is reexamined. The data do not support a simple model of increasing outflow velocity with increasing maser shell radius. It is proposed that the outflow is weakly bipolar.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A study of dust nucleation in Mira. Part I. (Kaminski+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, T.; Wong, K. T.; Schmidt, M. R.; Muller, H. S. P.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Cherchneff, I.; Menten, K. M.; Keller, D.; Brunken, S.; Winters, J. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Files contain ALMA observations of AlO emission in Mira (omicron Ceti) in two rotational transitions, N=6-5 and 9-8, and obtained at different epochs. Spectral cubes, moment-zero maps, and spectra of the entire emission source are provided and correspond directly to those presented in the paper (Figs. 2, 3, and 5). Complementary continuum data are also included in separate files. The data were self-calibrated and therefore their absolute astrometry is inaccurate. Relative spatial coordinates should be used. (2 data files).

  14. Mid-Infrared Interferometric Monitoring of Evolved Stars: The Dust Shell Around the Mira Variable RR Aquilae at 13 Epochs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    subsequent paper. 2. Characteristics of RR Aql RR Aql is an oxygen-rich Mira variable with spectral type M6e- M9 ( Samus et al. 2004). RR Aql shows a...at maximum light to ∼1.0 mag at mini- mum light. RR Aql is pulsating with a period of P = 394.78 days ( Samus et al. 2004) and the Julian Date of the...The main sequence precursor mass of RR Aql is 1.2 ± 0.2 M/M (Wyatt & Cahn 1983), and its spectral type is M6e-M9 ( Samus et al. 2004), versus M5-M9

  15. Dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables - II. Time-dependent atmospheric structure and observable properties of four M-type model series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2011-11-01

    We present four model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to o Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These models also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore cannot drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables.

  16. A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on May 1, 2001. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards would subsequently service the shuttle and mount it on a 747 for the ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  17. Struggles for Educational Equity in Prince Edward County, VA: Resistance, Southern Manifesto Ideologies, and School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillerson-Brown, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In light of contemporary school choice proposals and the 60th anniversary of the Southern Manifesto, the Prince Edward County, Virginia public schools crisis provides interesting historical discussion. Prince Edward County (PEC), a rural community in central Virginia, was one of five school districts represented in the 1954 "Brown v. Board of…

  18. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, T.A.; Hanson, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    In Comal County, the Edwards aquifer is probably most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Possible contamination can result from spills, leakage of hazardous materials, or runoff onto the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  19. Environmental Assessment: For the Testing and Evaluation of Directed Energy System Using Laser Technology, Edwards Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Test Center Edwards Air Force Base, California Final August 2006 Edwards AFB 95th Air Base Wing Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...light amplification by stimulated emission of rad iation (laser) technology at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California , and w ithin the R-2508 Complex...Force Flight Test Center, Edwards AFB, California . 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERN A TJVES CONSIDERED The Proposed Action would

  20. A psychoanalytic study of Edward de Vere's The Tempest.

    PubMed

    Waugaman, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    There is now abundant evidence that Freud was correct in believing Edward de Vere (1550-1604) wrote under the pseudonym "William Shakespeare." One common reaction is "What difference does it make?" I address that question by examining many significant connections between de Vere's life and The Tempest. Such studies promise to bring our understanding of Shakespeare's works back into line with our usual psychoanalytic approach to literature, which examines how a great writer's imagination weaves a new creation out of the threads of his or her life experiences. One source of the intense controversy about de Vere's authorship is our idealization of the traditional author, about whom we know so little that, as Freud noted, we can imagine his personality was as fine as his works.

  1. F-18 HARV final flight over Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  2. Sexual portraits: Edward Melcarth and homoeroticism in modern American art.

    PubMed

    Griffey, Erin; Reay, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Although one will not find Edward Melcarth (1914-73) in the best recent histories of male homosexuality and American art, he was not always so spectral. Named in Life magazine in 1950 as one of the best young American artists, he exhibited as a painter, draftsman and sculptor and also practised as an illustrator, photographer and designer. His work survives in the Forbes Collection, in the Smithsonian Institution and in the art archives at the Kinsey Institute. We argue that Melcarth’s vision of the erotic was far broader than the traditional categories of sexuality that are perpetuated in art histories of homoeroticism in modern America – and that such a revisioning enables a reinterpretation of some of the better known images of homosexual art.

  3. Oslo model, hyperuniformity, and the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Dhar, Deepak; Mohanty, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of the one-dimensional Oslo rice pile model in which the critical height at each site is randomly reset after each toppling. We use the fact that the stationary state of this sand-pile model is hyperuniform to reach system of sizes >107 . Most previous simulations were seriously flawed by important finite-size corrections. We find that all critical exponents have values consistent with simple rationals: ν =4/3 for the correlation length exponent, D =9/4 for the fractal dimension of avalanche clusters, and z =10/7 for the dynamical exponent. In addition, we relate the hyperuniformity exponent to the correlation length exponent ν . Finally, we discuss the relationship with the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model, where we find in particular that the local roughness exponent is αloc=1 .

  4. Edward Meryon (1809-1880) and muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A E; Emery, M L

    1993-01-01

    Edward Meryon was an English physician of Huguenot stock. He studied medicine at University College, London, and his chief appointments were at St Thomas's Hospital and the London Infirmary for Epilepsy and Paralysis. In a communication to the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society in December 1851, which was published in the Transactions of the Society the following year, he described in detail eight boys in three families with a disease later to be associated with the name of Duchenne. He was particularly impressed by the predilection for males and its familial nature. He appears to have been the first physician to make a systematic study of the disorder some years before Duchenne. Images PMID:8326496

  5. Phenotypic extremes in liveborn monozygotic twins with mosaic Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Neidin; Cunningham, Katie; Green, Andrew; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-11-11

    Mosaic trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in monozygotic diamniotic liveborn twins is rare. We describe such a case involving preterm male infants. Although both infants had a low percentage of trisomy 18 cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, their varied phenotypic presentation of mosaic trisomy 18 resulted in one twin surviving, with the other twin's demise at 1 month of age. Despite the presence of trisomy 18 in peripheral leucocytes, further analysis of a buccal smear and skin biopsy of the surviving twin did not show evidence of trisomy 18. Establishing such diagnoses in a timely manner is imperative for the child, parents and clinicians. The clinical course of these twins reflects the unpredictable prognosis associated with the diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 18, and emphasises the challenges that can be encountered when counselling parents.

  6. The Nucleus of the Planetary Nebula EGB 6 as a Post-Mira Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Esplin, Taran L.; Hawley, Steven A.; Liebert, James; Munari, Ulisse

    2016-08-01

    EGB 6 is a faint, large, ancient planetary nebula (PN). Its central star, a hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD), is a prototype of a rare class of PN nuclei associated with dense, compact emission-line knots. The central star also shows excess fluxes in both the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR). In a 2013 paper, we used Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to show that the compact nebula is a point-like source, located 0.″16 (˜118 AU) from the WD. We attributed the NIR excess to an M dwarf companion star, which appeared to coincide with the dense emission knot. We now present new ground-based NIR spectroscopy, showing that the companion is actually a much cooler source with a continuous spectrum, apparently a dust-enshrouded low-luminosity star. New HST images confirm common proper motion of the emission knot and red source with the WD. The I-band, NIR, and MIR fluxes are variable, possibly on timescales as short as days. We can fit the spectral energy distribution (SED) with four blackbodies (the WD, a ˜1850 K NIR component, and MIR dust at 385 and 175 K). Alternatively, we show that the NIR/MIR SED is very similar to that of Class 0/I young stellar objects. We suggest a scenario in which the EGB 6 nucleus is descended from a wide binary similar to the Mira system, in which a portion of the wind from an AGB star was captured into an accretion disk around a companion star; a remnant of this disk has survived to the present time and is surrounded by gas photoionized by UV radiation from the WD. Based in part on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based in part on observations with the 1.5 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

  7. Atlas of Light Curves of Faint Mira-Type Stars. Statistical Relations Between the Characteristics of Smoothed Phase Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashkina, L. S.; Andronov, I. L.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a set of the photometric parameters which could be useful for the classiffication of the pulsating Mira-type stars and related objects and determination of the EAGB and TPAGB stages of the stellar evolution. To solve this problem, the light curves of faint Mira- type stars and of the semi-regular variable V411 Sct were approximated using the program FDCN, which computes a trigonometric polynomial of a statistically optimal degree (I.L.Andronov, 1994, 2003). The at las of statistically optimal fits of the phase curves of 34 long-period is presented, based on digitized data from the scanned "Atlas" by P. Maffei and G.Tosti (http://astro.fisica.unipg.it/atlasmaffei/main.htm). Some statistical relations between the parameters of the trigonometrical polynomial approximation of the phase curve are analyzed. for an additional criterion of detailed classiffication of long-perodic variables, we used various parameters, e.g. "period", "amplitude", "asymmetry", "slope of the ascending branch", "characteristic time of brightening by 1m": Discussion of the results is presented.

  8. Metal Emission Lines as Diagnostic Tools for Shock Waves in Outer Atmospheres of M-type Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, He.; Sedlmayr, E.; Wood, P. R.

    One way to reveal the thermo- and hydrodynamical conditions in M-type Mira atmospheres is to study the various emission lines which are emitted behind a shock front and can be observed over a substantial portion of the pulsation period. Analysing a time-resolved series of these emission lines offers the possibility to determine these conditions in different atmospheric layers influenced by the passing shock wave. In particular, the metal emission lines are a diagnostic tool to probe the hydrodynamical conditions of the outer, dust-forming layers of the atmosphere, because they appear late in the pulsation cycle when the shock wave has reached these layers. We present quantitive data on radial velocities, shapes, widths and fluxes of metal emission lines obtained by spectral observations in the optical wavelength region for a sample of six M-type Miras (periods 281-389 days), namely R Aql, RR Sco, R Car, R Leo, S Scl and R Hya (cf. Richter & Wood 2001, A&A 369, 1027-1047). Because of the multiple phase coverage of our observations, the data shows the history of the shock as it emerges through the deep photosphere and then moves out through the atmosphere. The observations are analysed and discussed with regard to the atmospheric conditions.

  9. Hydrogeological framework of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Ardis, Ann F.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer system underlies about 42,000 square miles of west-central Texas, where mostly gently dipping Lower Cretaceous strata comprise three regional aquifers and two regional confining units. The aquifers are the Edwards Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone, the Trinity Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone and Hill County, and the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer of the Edwards Plateau and Trans-Pecos. The Navarro-Del Rio confining unit confines the downdip part of the Edwards Aquifer, and the Hammett confining unit confines the updip, basal part of the Trinity Aquifer and a small southeastern fringe of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer. Transmissivity averages less than 10,000 feet squared per day throughout more than 90 percent of the study area as the result of widespread cementation and secondary mineral growth. However, in fractured and leached rocks in the Balcones fault zone, transmissivity averages about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the area.

  10. Prince Edward Island Heart Health Dissemination Research Project: establishing a sustainable community mobilization initiative.

    PubMed

    White, R; Mitchell, T; Gyorfi-Dyke, E; Sweet, L; Hebert, R; Moase, O; MacPhee, R; MacDonald, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program (PEIHHP) Dissemination Research Project. Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a small province in the Atlantic region of Canada with a population of 137,980. The Island's economy is dependent on the fishery, agriculture, and tourism industries. Although unemployment rates are high (14.4%), Prince Edward Island has the lowest poverty rate in the country at 15.2%, high levels of social support (86%), and the second lowest rate of high chronic stress (Report on the Health of Canadians, 1996, 1999).

  11. Using Geophysics to Define Hydrostratigraphic Units in the Edwards and Trinity Aquifers, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Blome, C. D.; Clark, A. K.; Kress, W.; Smith, D. V.

    2007-05-01

    Airborne and ground geophysical surveys conducted in Uvalde, Medina, and northern Bexar counties, Texas, can be used to define and characterize hydrostratigraphic units of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. Airborne magnetic surveys have defined numerous Cretaceous intrusive stocks and laccoliths, mainly in Uvalde County, that influence local hydrology and perhaps regional ground-water flow paths. Depositional environments in the aquifers can be classified as shallow water platforms (San Marcos Platform, Edwards Group), shoal and reef facies (Devils River Trend, Devils River Formation), and deeper water basins (Maverick Basin, West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations). Detailed airborne and ground electromagnetic surveys have been conducted over the Edwards aquifer catchment zone (exposed Trinity aquifer rocks), recharge zone (exposed Edwards aquifer rocks), and artesian zone (confined Edwards) in the Seco Creek area (northeast Uvalde and Medina Counties; Devils River Trend). These geophysical survey data have been used to divide the Edwards exposed within the Balcones fault zone into upper and lower hydrostratigraphic units. Although both units are high electrical resistivity, the upper unit has slightly lower resistivity than the lower unit. The Georgetown Formation, at the top of the Edwards Group has a moderate resistivity. The formations that comprise the upper confining units to the Edwards aquifer rocks have varying resistivities. The Eagleford and Del Rio Groups (mainly clays) have very low resistivities and are excellent electrical marker beds in the Seco Creek area. The Buda Limestone is characterized by high resistivities. Moderate resistivities characterize the Austin Group rocks (mainly chalk). The older Trinity aquifer, underlying the Edwards aquifer rocks, is characterized by less limestone (electrically resistive or low conductivity units) and greater quantities of mudstones (electrically conductive or low resistivity units). In the western

  12. Recharge to and discharge from the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Texas, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.S.; Patton, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is the sole source of public water supply for more than 1 million people in the San Antonio area and supplies large quantities of water for agriculture, industry, and the military. The dissolutioned, faulted limestone aquifer is the major source of water for Bexar, Comal, Hays, Medina, and Uvalde Counties. The annual compilation of estimates of ground-water recharge to and discharge from the Edwards aquifer is part of a continuing program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation wilh the Edwards Underground Water District (EUWD).

  13. From Miras to planetary nebulae: Which path for stellar evolution?; Proceedings of the International Colloquium, Universite de Montpellier II, France, Sept. 4-7, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Omont, A.

    This book considers stellar evolution of Mira variables to planetary nebulae. Topics discussed include pulsation and shock waves; mass loss; circumstellar dust; maser emission and OH/IR stars; C stars; and post-AGB evolution to planetary nebulae, protoplanetary nebulae, and prewhite dwarfs and binaries. Papers are presented on pulsations of model Mira variables, the environment of Miras from interferometry, the physics of mass loss from AGB stars, the mixing length and the mass loss rate, dust formation and stellar wind, dust formation in circumstellar shells of Mira variables, the evolution of water masers on the AGB, and phase lags from OH/IR stars. Attention is also given to the variability of carbon stars, transfer reactions as neutron sources for the s-process, planetary nebulae as post-AGB objects, the kinematic structure of NGC 7139, the post-AGB evolution of low-mass stars, OH/IR stars as the progenitors of planetary nebulae, atmospheric parameters for pre-WD, and a new protoplanetary nebula.

  14. Multi-Epoch Mid-Infrared Interferometric Observations of the Oxygen-rich Mira Variable Star RR Aql with the VLTI/MIDI Instrument

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    MIDI instrument. RR Aql is an oxygen-rich Mira variable with spectral type M6e–M9 and period of pulsation P = 394.78 days ( Samus et al. 2004). RR Aql...396, 918 Ohnaka, K., Scholz, M., & Wood, P. R. 2006, A&A, 446, 1119 Samus , N. N., Durlevich, O. V., et al. 2004, Combined General Catalogue of

  15. An observational study of dust nucleation in Mira (o Ceti). II. Titanium oxides are negligible for nucleation at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, T.; Müller, H. S. P.; Schmidt, M. R.; Cherchneff, I.; Wong, K. T.; Brünken, S.; Menten, K. M.; Winters, J. M.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Patel, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The formation of silicate dust in oxygen-rich envelopes of evolved stars is thought to be initiated by the formation of seed particles that can withstand the high temperatures close to the stellar photosphere and act as condensation cores farther away from the star. TiO and TiO2 are among the candidate species considered as first condensates. Aims: We aim to identify and characterize the circumstellar gas-phase chemistry of titanium that leads to the formation of solid titanium compounds in the envelope of o Ceti, the prototypical Mira, and seek an observational verification of whether titanium oxides play a major role in the onset of dust formation in M-type asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Methods: We present high angular resolution (145 mas) ALMA observations at submillimeter (submm) wavelengths supplemented by APEX and Herschel spectra of the rotational features of TiO and TiO2. In addition, circumstellar features of TiO and Ti i are identified in optical spectra, which cover multiple pulsation cycles of o Ceti. Results: The submm ALMA data reveal TiO and TiO2 bearing gas within the extended atmosphere of Mira. While TiO is traceable up to a radius (FWHM/2) of 4.0 stellar radii (R⋆), TiO2 extends as far as 5.5 R⋆ and, unlike TiO, appears to be anisotropically distributed. Optical spectra display variable emission of Ti i and TiO from inner parts of the extended atmosphere (<3 R⋆). Conclusions: Chemical models that include shocks are in general agreement with the observations of gas-phase, titanium-bearing molecules. It is unlikely that substantial amounts of titanium is locked up in solids because the abundance of the gaseous titanium species is very high. The formation of hot titanium-rich condensates is very improbable because we find no traces of their hot precursor species in the gas phase. It therefore appears unlikely that the formation of dust in Mira, and possibly other M-type AGB stars, is initiated by titanium oxides.

  16. Occurrence of Culex (Culiciomyia) Spathifurca (Edwards) (Diptera: Culicidae) in India--new country record.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, A R; Natarajan, R; Munirathinam, A

    1998-09-01

    Culex (Culiciomyia) spathifurca (Edwards) is recorded for the 1st time in India. Immature specimens of this species were collected from tree holes in a mangrove forest. Notes on the larval habitat are given.

  17. 4. INSTRUMENT ROOM,INTERIOR, MAIN SPACE. Looking northeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INSTRUMENT ROOM,INTERIOR, MAIN SPACE. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Water Resources Investigations at Edwards Air Force Base since 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California (fig. 1) has relied on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. The extraction of ground water has led to two major problems that can directly affect the mission of EAFB: declining water levels (more than 120 ft since the 1920s) and land subsidence, a gradual downward movement of the land surface (more than 4 ft since the late 1920s). As water levels decline, this valuable resource becomes depleted, thus requiring mitigating measures. Land subsidence has caused cracked (fissured) runways and accelerated erosion on Rogers lakebed. In 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began investigations of the effects of declining water levels and land subsidence at EAFB and possible mitigation measures, such as the injection of imported surface water into the ground-water system. The cooperative investigations included data collection and analyses, numerical simulations of ground-water flow and land subsidence, and development of a preliminary simulation-optimization model. The results of these investigations indicate that the injection of imported water may help to control land subsidence; however, the potential ground-water-quality impacts are unknown.

  19. The JIM interview. Edward M. Kennedy, United States Senator.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, E M

    2000-05-01

    Senator Edward M. Kennedy has represented Massachusetts in the United States Senate for thirty-six years. He was first elected in 1962 to finish the term of his brother, President John F. Kennedy. Since then, he has been elected to six full terms, and he is now the third most senior member of the senate. The efforts to bring quality health care to every American is a battle that Kennedy has been waging ever since he arrived in the Senate. Recent achievements include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which makes it easier for those who change their job or lose their job to keep their health insurance, and the Children's Health Insurance Act of 1997, which makes health insurance more widely available to children through age 18 in all 50 states. A strong supporter of clinical research, Senator Kennedy cosponsored the Clinical Research Enhancement Act and has been a vocal advocate of stem cell research. He is currently the senior Democrat on the Labor and Human Resources committee in the Senate.

  20. Flow dynamics over a foredune at Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Walker, Ian J.; Ollerhead, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    Time-averaged windspeed profiles at eight locations over a relatively high (8 m), vegetated, topographically simple foredune were measured using cup and ultrasonic anemometry during an onshore wind event in May 2002. The experiment was part of a larger study on the sedimentary dynamics of a beach-dune complex in the Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. The foredune is vegetated with Ammophila breviligulata, and vegetation density ranged from 0% on the foredune ramp to upward of 70% at the dune crest. Topographic forcing and resulting flow acceleration was observed distinctly in windspeed profiles, and linear speedup occurred for all elevations above the vegetation canopy. A distinct inflection point is evident in normalized windspeed profiles over the dune indicating a net momentum sink below the vegetation canopy top, and systematic speed-down within the vegetation was observed up the foredune stoss slope. Wind speed profile structure was consistent for the range of incident wind speeds measured. A comparison of normal and slightly oblique incident winds indicated that for similar approach winds, wind speeds are consistently higher during oblique flow conditions. The implications for foredune morphodynamics and sedimentation are discussed.

  1. Edward Burne-Jones' Heavenly Conception: A Biblical Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheney, L. D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Edward Burne-Jones was a Pre-Raphaelite artist and designer, who collaborated with William Morris on many decorative arts (stained glass windows, book illustrations, ceramic and tapestry designs). He was a founding partner in the firm Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company. Burne-Jones composed The Days of Creation between 1870 and 1876 for the Morris firm. These paintings were executed in gouache and gold paint, and cartoons were made for tile and in stained glass, for the Church of St. Editha at Tamworth in Staffordshire. Burne-Jones' creation was highly praised and elegantly described by Oscar Wilde: “The picture is divided into six compartments, each representing a day in the Creation of the World, under the symbol of an angel holding a crystal globe, within which is shown the work of a day.” This paper will examine how Burne-Jones visualized an unusual celestial creation where angels holding magical spheres unveil the divine manifestation for the creation of a terrestrial realm. He created a cosmic utopia of the natural world.

  2. When Cri du chat syndrome meets Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingjun; Zhou, Yi; Wu, Jianzhu; Sun, Yunxia; Chen, Yongzhen; Chen, Baojiang

    2015-03-01

    It has been well established that the 5p deletion causes Cri du chat syndrome, typically characterized by a cat‑like cry, and that duplication of 18q causes Edwards syndrome; the two are rare genetic abnormalities that separately lead to physical and mental impairments. However, the severity of the clinicopathological characteristics that arise when these two aberrations occur in one patient is unknown. Here, the first case in our knowledge of a single patient (a two‑year‑old female) with 5p partial monosomy and 18q partial trisomy is described. In the present study, chromosome microarray analysis was performed, which identified the imbalance of chromosomes 5 and 18 in the patient. The chromosome aberrations were further confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. By comparing the phenotypes of combined case with those of the individual syndromes, severe clinical phenotypes of the 5p (5p15.33‑p13.3) deletion were confirmed, however, the net effect of the duplication of 18q22.3‑q23 was not determined, as this duplication only appeared to have a weak effect on the patient's phenotypes. The correlation between these chromosomal aberrations and their clinical features has implications for the identification of critical regions of 5p and 18q, particularly for the functional mapping of chromosome 18.

  3. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider preparing for an F-104 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Scheider is shown standing in the cockpit of a two-seat F-104. He is wearing a full pressure suit, which is required on all flights above 50,000 feet. Ed served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and graduated in 1973. He was then assigned as an engineering test pilot, and as an instructor at the Naval Test Pilot School. He first arrived at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) as a Navy Liaison Officer on July 5, 1982. He joined NASA as a research pilot a year later. Ed was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA-operated SR-71 Blackbirds. Ed retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  4. Validation of the SMOS-MIRAS Soil Moisture Product (SML2UDP) in the Pampean Region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niclòs, Raquel; Rivas, Raúl; Sánchez, Juan Manuel; García-Santos, Vicente; Doña, Carolina; Valor, Enric; Holzman, Mauro; Bayala, Martín Ignacio; Carmona, Facundo; Ocampo, Dora; Soldano, Alvaro; Thibeault, Marc

    2014-05-01

    A validation campaign was carried out to evaluate the SMOS-MIRAS Soil Moisture (SM) SML2UDP product (v5.51) in the Pampean Region of Argentina on February 2013. The study area was selected because it is a vast area of flatlands containing quite homogeneous rainfed croplands, with prevalence of soybean crops, considered SMOS nominal land uses (i.e., crops with vegetation heights not exceeding 1 to 2 m by opposition to trees). Transects of ground SM measurements were collected by Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x SM probes within four ISEA-4H9 DGG SMOS nodes. The SM data obtained by each probe transect in each parcel were checked by collecting soil samples in the same parcels at the same time and measuring their masses. The gravimetric method was used to obtain reference values. An uncertainty of ± 0.03 m3m-3 was obtained for the ML2x probes. Additionally, they were calibrated in the laboratory for different SMs by saturating and drying a specific and representative variety of soil samples collected from the experimental parcels (loam, clay loam and silt loam samples). This calibration showed again accurate operations for the ML2x probes, which even attain uncertainties of ±0.01 m3m-3, in agreement with the manufacturer. The comparison of the SM transect data collected during the campaign with the SMOS-MIRAS SML2UDP product values showed a negative bias between concurrent SMOS data and ground SM measurements, which means a slight SMOS-MIRAS underestimation, and a standard deviation of ± 0.06 m3m-3. The validation sites were selected taking as reference the locations of permanent SM stations property of the Argentinean Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE, National Commission of Space Activities), Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA, National Institute of Farming Technology) and Instituto de Hidrología de Llanuras (IHLLA, Plain Hydrology Institute). During the campaign several transects were carried out in the parcels where permanent SM

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: I-band light curves of OGLE LMC Miras (He+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, S.; Yuan, W.; Huang, J. Z.; Long, J.; Macri, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Most of the disk of M33 was observed by the DIRECT (Macri et al. 2001, Cat. J/AJ/121/861) and M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey (M33SSS; Pellerin & Macri 2011, Cat. J/ApJS/193/26) projects in the BVI bands, with a combined baseline of 7-9 years. We use the I-band observations to carry out the simulations, as this is the wavelength range where Miras are brightest (out of the three bands used by these projects). Detailed descriptions of the M33 observations can be found in the above referenced papers. We use the data products from a new reduction that will be presented in a companion paper (W. Yuan et al. 2016, in preparation). I-band light curves are available for ~2.5x105 stars, with a median of 44 measurements and a maximum of 170. (3 data files).

  6. Recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer hydrologically associated with Barton springs in the Austin area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slagle, Diana L.; Ardis, Ann F.; Slade, Raymond M.

    1986-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer extends in a narrow belt from Bell County in the northeast to Kinney County in the southwest (index map) and provides water for at least nine counties in south-central Texas. Hydrologic boundaries divide the Edwards aquifer in the Austin area for which Barton Springs is the major discharge point. This part of the Edwards aquifer provides the municipal, industrial, domestic, and agricultural water supplies for about 30,000 people in the Austin area (southern Travis and northern Hays counties). Discharge from Barton Springs sustains streamflow at the mouth of Barton Creek and flows into Town Lake. Much of the land use within the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer near Austin is rapidly changing from natural woodland and grassland to commercial and residential developments. Because urban development can result in a substantial degradation of the quality of water that recharges the aquifer, the extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer was delineated to provide information to the City of Austin for their use in formulating a plan for protecting and managing groundwater quality. The purpose of this report is to define and delineate the areal extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer in southern Travis and northern Hays Counties. The areal boundary of the recharge zone was determined by: (1) geologic mapping of the aquifer area; (2) interpretation of aerial photographs; (3) field verification of existing geologic maps; and (4) streamflow-loss studies. 

  7. Compliance through pollution prevention opportunity assessments at Edwards AFB -- Development, results and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Beutelman, H.P.; Lawrence, A.

    1999-07-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), located in the Mojave Desert of southern California, is required to comply with environmental requirements for air pollution emissions, hazardous waste disposal, and clean water. The resources required to meet these many compliance requirements represents an ever increasing financial burden to the base, and to the Department of Defense. A recognized superior approach to environmental management is to achieve compliance through a proactive pollution prevention (P2) program which mitigates, and when possible, eliminates compliance requirements and costs, while at the same time reducing pollution released to the environment. At Edwards AFB, the Environmental Management Office P2 Branch developed and implemented a strategy that addresses this concept, better known as Compliance Through Pollution Prevention (CTP2). At the 91st AWMA Annual Meeting and Exhibition, Edwards AFB presented a paper on its strategy and implementation of its CTP2 concept. Part of that strategy and implementation included accomplishment of process specific focused P2 opportunity assessments (OAs). Starting in 1998, Edwards AFB initiated a CTP2 OA project where OAs were targeted on those operational processes, identified as compliance sites, that contributed most to the compliance requirements and costs at Edwards AFB. The targeting of these compliance sites was accomplished by developing a compliance matrix that prioritized processes in accordance with an operational risk management approach. The Edwards AFB CTP2 PPOA project is the first of its kind within the Air Force Material Command, and is serving as a benchmark for establishment of the CTP2 OA process.

  8. Simulations of flow in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.; Holligan, K.Q.

    1994-01-01

    The transmissivity values used in the simulations were within estimated ranges and generally are: 1,000 to 10,000 ft2/d (feet squared per day) for the Edwards-Trinity and Trinity aquifers; 100,000 to greater than 1 million ft2/d for the Edwards aquifer; and less than 500 to 10,000 ft2/d in contiguous hydraulically connected units. Simulated flow through the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units is about 3 million acre-feet per year. Estimates of areally distributed recharge from the simulations range from 0.1 to 1 inch per year for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer and increase to 4 inches per year for the Trinity aquifer. Recharge to the Edwards aquifer occurs along streambeds that cross outcropped high-permeability rocks of the Edwards Group through joints and faults. Many of the streams are diverted completely underground during periods of no precipitation. The movement of a substantial quantity of water (about 400 cubic feet per second) from the Trinity and Edwards-Trinity aquifers into the Edwards aquifer was simulated. Results of the simulations indicate that anisotropy strongly influences flow in the Edwards aquifer. In the San Antonio and Austin areas, the Edwards aquifer is the most active part of the ground-water flow system with one-third of ground-water discharge occurring in 5 percent of the modeled area for both simulations.

  9. Short-term hemodynamic performance of the mitral Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve. Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Morehead, A. J.; Thomas, J. D.; Smedira, N. G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Marchand, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although long-term durability data exist, little data are available concerning the hemodynamic performance of the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve in the mitral position. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients who were implanted with mitral PERIMOUNT valves at seven international centers between January 1996 and February 1997 consented to participate in a short-term echocardiography follow-up. Echocardiographs were collected at a mean of 600+/-133 days after implantation (range, 110 to 889 days); all underwent blinded core lab analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, peak gradients were 9.09+/-3.43 mm Hg (mean, 4.36+/-1.79 mm Hg) and varied inversely with valve size (p < 0.05). The effective orifice areas were 2.5+/-0.6 cm2 and tended to increase with valve size (p = 0.08). Trace mitral regurgitation (MR) was common (n = 48), 9 patients had mild MR, 1 had moderate MR, none had severe MR. All MR was central (n = 55) or indeterminate (n = 3). No paravalvular leaks were observed. Mitral regurgitation flow areas were 3.4+/-2.8 cm2 and were without significant volumes. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study, these mitral valves are associated with trace, although physiologically insignificant, central MR. Despite known echocardiographic limitations, the PERIMOUNT mitral valves exhibit similar hemodynamics to other prosthetic valves.

  10. Conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, K.J.; Dutton, A.R.; Hovorka, S.D.; Worthington, S.R.H.; Painter, S.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Numerical ground-water flow models for the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region of Texas generally have been based on a diffuse-flow conceptualization. That is, although conduits likely are present, the assumption is that flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of small fractures and openings sufficiently numerous that the aquifer can be considered a porous-media continuum at the regional scale. Whether flow through large fractures and conduits or diffuse flow predominates in the Edwards aquifer at the regional scale is an open question. A new numerical ground-water-flow model (Edwards aquifer model) that incorporates important components of the latest information and an alternate conceptualization of the Edwards aquifer was developed. The conceptualization upon which the Edwards aquifer model is based emphasizes conduit development and conduit flow, and the model can be considered a test of one of two reasonable conceptualizations. The model incorporates conduits simulated as generally continuously connected, one-cell-wide (1,320 feet) zones with very large hydraulic-conductivity values (as much as 300,000 feet per day). The locations of the conduits are based on a number of factors, including major potentiometric-surface troughs in the aquifer, the presence of sinking streams, geochemical information, and geologic structures (for example, faults and grabens). The model includes both the San Antonio and Barton Springs segments of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas, and was calibrated for steady-state (1939-46) and transient (1947-2000) conditions. Transient simulations were conducted using monthly recharge and pumpage (withdrawals) data. The predominantly conduit-flow conceptualization incorporated in the Edwards aquifer model yielded a reasonably good match between measured and simulated hydraulic heads in the confined part of the aquifer and between measured and simulated springflows. The simulated directions of flow in the

  11. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  12. STS-1 landing at Edwards - first orbital mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    shuttles without power--and therefore without the weight penalty of an additional engine and fuel--was based on previous experience at the Flight Research Center with piloted lifting bodies that also landed without power, as had the X-15s. Dryden and Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) had also hosted the approach and landing tests of the shuttle prototype Enterprise in 1977 and had tested the computers used for the shuttles' flight control systems in the F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire aircraft, which also contributed to the solution of a dangerous pilot induced oscillation that occurred on the final approach and landing test. In this clip Young and Crippen fly the orbiter Columbia to a picture-perfect, unpowered landing on the dry lakebed runway 23 at Edwards AFB, CA, after it's first orbital flight, which ended on April 14.

  13. [Edward Blyth (1810-1873). Father of the Indian ornitology].

    PubMed

    Malec, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Edward Blyth was born on 23 December 1810. When he was ayoung man he took an interest with the zoology which became his life's passion. As a young naturalist he was a conscientious observer of the nature and a man gifted with a superb memory. Unfortunately his career was not successful in London because of the conflict with the younger of the Gray brothers. Facing the prospect of no employment in The British Museum, Blyth decided to leave England for Calcutta where he was offered a post of a museum curator. The English naturalist spent in India the years from 1841 to 1862. During that time he greatly enriched the zoological collection of the museum and consequently the place had much more visitors. Regarding his private life he got married in 1854 to Elisabeth Mary Turner Hodges. Undoubtedly the next four year were the happiest in Blyth's life. After his wife's death Blyth's health condition deteriorated. The ongoing conflicts he kept having while the first stay in India and constant struggle to improve his financial status made him decide to return to England. Blyth left India in 1862. After coming back to his homeland he continued the naturalistic passions. Nevertheless Blyth was constantly troubled by the financial problems. Also, his health, both mental and physical, systematically deteriorated. Finally the death came on 27 December 1873, in London. Blyth tried in vain to gain the recognition and join the scientific establishment of the 19th century England. Constant lack of satisfactory income and often problems with health prevented the ornithologist to be fully devote to his passion. The aim of this article is to highlight some of the most important and interesting events of Blyth's life. Moreover, another objective is to popularise Blyth and his work since he was one of the greatest naturalists of that time.

  14. The Impact of the Prince Edward Island School Library Policy on the Development of School Library Programs across Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doiron, Ray; Davies, Judy

    In Canada's smallest province, Prince Edward Island (PEI), the "PEI School Library Policy" and its supporting documents have guided the development of school library programs since 1989. This study explores the impact that policy has had on school library programs in PEI. The "Survey of School Library Resource Centers" probed…

  15. Geologic framework of the Edwards Aquifer and upper confining unit, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer, south-central Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Small, Ted A.

    1997-01-01

    The stratigraphic units of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County generally are porous and permeable. The stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County are the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend; and the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick Basin. The Balcones fault zone is the principal structural feature in Uvalde County; however, the displacement along the fault zone is less in Uvalde County than in adjacent Medina and Bexar Counties to the east. The Uvalde Salient is a structural high in south-central Uvalde County, and consists of several closely connected crustal uplifts that bring Edwards aquifer strata to the surface generally forming prominent hills. The crustal uplifts forming this structural high are the remnants of intrusive and extrusive magnatic activity. Six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—cross the length of the study area from the southwest to the northeast juxtaposing the Lower Cretaceous Salmon Peak Formation at the surface in the northwestern part of the study area against Upper Cretaceous formations in the central part of the study area. In the study area, the porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. The middle 185 feet of the lower part of the Devils River Formation, the upper part of the Devils River Formation, and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation probably are the most porous and permeable stratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County.

  16. Quality of water in the Trinity and Edwards aquifers, south-central Texas, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahlquist, Lynne; Ardis, Ann F.

    2004-01-01

    During 1996?98, the U.S. Geological Survey studied surface- and ground-water quality in south-central Texas. The ground-water components included the upper and middle zones (undifferentiated) of the Trinity aquifer in the Hill Country and the unconfined part (recharge zone) and confined part (artesian zone) of the Edwards aquifer in the Balcones fault zone of the San Antonio region. The study was supplemented by information compiled from four ground-water-quality studies done during 1996?98. Trinity aquifer waters are more mineralized and contain larger dissolved solids, sulfate, and chloride concentrations compared to Edwards aquifer waters. Greater variability in water chemistry in the Trinity aquifer likely reflects the more variable lithology of the host rock. Trace elements were widely detected, mostly at small concentrations. Median total nitrogen was larger in the Edwards aquifer than in the Trinity aquifer. Ammonia nitrogen was detected more frequently and at larger concentrations in the Trinity aquifer than in the Edwards aquifer. Although some nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the Edwards aquifer exceeded a U.S. Geological Survey national background threshold concentration, no concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public drinking-water standard. Synthetic organic compounds, such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds, were detected in the Edwards aquifer and less frequently in the Trinity aquifer, mostly at very small concentrations (less than 1 microgram per liter). These compounds were detected most frequently in urban unconfined Edwards aquifer samples. Atrazine and its breakdown product deethylatrazine were the most frequently detected pesticides, and trihalomethanes were the most frequently detected volatile organic compounds. Widespread detections of these compounds, although at small concentrations, indicate that anthropogenic activities affect ground-water quality. Radon gas was detected throughout the Trinity

  17. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio

  18. Geohydrologic Framework of the Edwards and Trinity Aquifers, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, Charles D.; Faith, Jason R.; Ozuna, George B.

    2007-01-01

    This five-year USGS project, funded by the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, is using multidisciplinary approaches to reveal the surface and subsurface geologic architecture of two important Texas aquifers: (1) the Edwards aquifer that extends from south of Austin to west of San Antonio and (2) the southern part of the Trinity aquifer in the Texas Hill Country west and south of Austin. The project's principal areas of research include: Geologic Mapping, Geophysical Surveys, Geochronology, Three-dimensional Modeling, and Noble Gas Geochemistry. The Edwards aquifer is one of the most productive carbonate aquifers in the United States. It also has been designated a sole source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and is the primary source of water for San Antonio, America's eighth largest city. The Trinity aquifer forms the catchment area for the Edwards aquifer and it intercepts some surface flow above the Edwards recharge zone. The Trinity may also contribute to the Edwards water budget by subsurface flow across formation boundaries at considerable depths. Dissolution, karst development, and faulting and fracturing in both aquifers directly control aquifer geometry by compartmentalizing the aquifer and creating unique ground-water flow paths.

  19. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design

  20. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  1. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  2. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design

  3. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  4. SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  5. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider in Front of SR-71 Blackbird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    SR-71 research pilot Ed Schneider is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Schneider became a NASA research pilot at Dryden in 1983. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  6. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  7. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  8. Generalized Edwards thermodynamics and marginal stability in a driven system with dry and viscous friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradenigo, Giacomo; Bertin, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We consider a spring-block model with both dry and viscous frictions, subjected to a periodic driving allowing mechanically stable configurations to be sampled. We show that under strong driving, the scaling of the correlation length with the energy density is incompatible with the prediction of the Edwards statistical approach, which assumes a uniform sampling of mechanically stable configurations. A crossover between the Edwards scaling and nonstandard high-energy scaling is observed at energy scales that depend on the viscous friction coefficient. Generalizing Edwards thermodynamics, we propose a statistical framework, based on a sampling of marginally stable states, that is able to describe the scaling of the correlation length in the highly viscous regime.

  9. Investigating groundwater flow between Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Wong, C I; Kromann, J S; Hunt, B B; Smith, B A; Banner, J L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of communication between aquifers can be challenging when using traditional physical and geochemical groundwater sampling approaches. This study uses two multiport wells completed within Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas to determine the degree of groundwater inter-flow between adjacent aquifers. Potentiometric surfaces, hydraulic conductivities, and groundwater major ion concentrations and Sr isotope values were measured from multiple zones within three hydrostratigraphic units (Edwards and Upper and Middle Trinity aquifers). Physical and geochemical data from the multiport wells were combined with historical measurements of groundwater levels and geochemical compositions from the region to characterize groundwater flow and identify controls on the geochemical compositions of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. Our results suggest that vertical groundwater flow between Edwards and Middle Trinity aquifers is likely limited by low permeability, evaporite-rich units within the Upper and Middle Trinity. Potentiometric surface levels in both aquifers vary with changes in wet vs. dry conditions, indicating that recharge to both aquifers occurs through distinct recharge areas. Geochemical compositions in the Edwards, Upper, and Middle Trinity aquifers are distinct and likely reflect groundwater interaction with different lithologies (e.g., carbonates, evaporites, and siliceous sediments) as opposed to mixing of groundwater between the aquifers. These results have implications for the management of these aquifers as they indicate that, under current conditions, pumping of either aquifer will likely not induce vertical cross-formational flow between the aquifers. Inter-flow between the Trinity and the Edwards aquifers, however, should be reevaluated as pumping patterns and hydrogeologic conditions change.

  10. Benefits of size dimorphism and copulatory silk wrapping in the sexually cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alissa G; Hebets, Eileen A

    2016-02-01

    In sexually cannibalistic animals, male fitness is influenced not only by successful mate acquisition and egg fertilization, but also by avoiding being eaten. In the cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira, the legs of mature males are longer in relation to their body size than those of females, and males use these legs to aid in wrapping a female's legs with silk prior to and during copulation. We hypothesized that elongated male legs and silk wrapping provide benefits to males, in part through a reduced likelihood of sexual cannibalism. To test this, we paired females of random size with males from one of two treatment groups-those capable of silk wrapping versus those incapable of silk wrapping. We found that males with relatively longer legs and larger body size were more likely to mate and were less likely to be cannibalized prior to copulation. Regardless of relative size, males capable of silk wrapping were less likely to be cannibalized during or following copulation and had more opportunities for sperm transfer (i.e. pedipalpal insertions). Our results suggest that male size and copulatory silk wrapping are sexually selected traits benefiting male reproductive success.

  11. The Dynamic Atmospheres of Mira Stars: Comparing the CODEX Models to PTI Time Series Observations of TU Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    We present our already-published evaluation of the effectiveness of the CODEX models, released in 2011, in representing the atmospheres of M-type Mira variables. We present a high-precision interferometric K-band time series of TU And, consisting of 50 nights that cover eight consecutive pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2μm was obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in five channels across the K band. We show a comparison between these data and the dynamical self-excited CODEX model which gives the closest match in stellar parameters yet available. Both the spectrum and the visibilities are consistently reproduced around visual minimum phases. Near the maximum phases, however, the current models predict a photosphere that is too hot and compact, surrounded by an extended atmosphere that lacks H2O opacity, compared to the observations. A better coverage in the model parameter space is needed to make firm conclusions as to the cause of the discrepancies. In the case of TU And, the discrepancy might be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increased stellar mass and/or a decreased metallicity.

  12. Benefits of size dimorphism and copulatory silk wrapping in the sexually cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira

    PubMed Central

    Hebets, Eileen A.

    2016-01-01

    In sexually cannibalistic animals, male fitness is influenced not only by successful mate acquisition and egg fertilization, but also by avoiding being eaten. In the cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira, the legs of mature males are longer in relation to their body size than those of females, and males use these legs to aid in wrapping a female's legs with silk prior to and during copulation. We hypothesized that elongated male legs and silk wrapping provide benefits to males, in part through a reduced likelihood of sexual cannibalism. To test this, we paired females of random size with males from one of two treatment groups—those capable of silk wrapping versus those incapable of silk wrapping. We found that males with relatively longer legs and larger body size were more likely to mate and were less likely to be cannibalized prior to copulation. Regardless of relative size, males capable of silk wrapping were less likely to be cannibalized during or following copulation and had more opportunities for sperm transfer (i.e. pedipalpal insertions). Our results suggest that male size and copulatory silk wrapping are sexually selected traits benefiting male reproductive success. PMID:26911340

  13. EXTENDED-MIRAS: the instrumental approach for the search of traces of extinct and extant life on Mars, measuring scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, J.; Tarcea, N.; Thomas, N.; Cockell, C.; Edwards, H. W. G.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Hilchenbach, M.; Hochleitner, R.; Hofer, S.; Hoffmann, V.; Hofmann, B.; Jessberger, E. K.; Kiefer, W.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Maurice, S.; Rull Pérez, F.; Schmitt, M.; Simon, G.; Sobron, F.; Weigand, W.; Whitby, J. A.; Wurz, P.

    2004-03-01

    Whether there was or is life on Mars is a question of high interest to man. When looking for evidence of present or ancient life on Mars it might not be sufficient to disclose the chemical composition of the surface or subsurface material. Further information concerning for example the morphology of the sample under investigation or the spatial distribution of the observed chemicals or minerals is of similar relevance. Therefore one needs a reliable, automated, robust and miniaturized apparatus capable of resolving all the above mentioned problems in one effort. EXTENDED-MIRAS is an instrumental approach combining optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy with additional elementary characterization methods such as LIPS/LIBS (laser induced plasma spectrometry/laser induced breakdown spectrometry) or LMS (laser mass spectrometry). Nevertheless an exhaustive investigation usually requires time/energy which is a limited resource for a planetary mission. The size of the dataset produced might also pose a serious problem since the data link budget is limited (energy constraints). In order to maximize the scientific return, a measuring scenario that will make the most out of the reduced time/energy budget has to be implemented. Such a measuring scenario is described here with exemplification at laboratory scale.

  14. Invited commentary on 'Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church'.

    PubMed

    Serour, Gamal

    2011-06-01

    The paper 'Robert G. Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church' by Benagiano and colleagues in this issue of Reproductive BioMedicine Online is a very important and timely article published by well-informed authors on the occasion of the long-awaited award of the Nobel Prize to a well-deserved scientist, Bob Edwards. I found it very interesting and challenging that the authors went through all the arguments and criticism made by the Catholic and Orthodox Churches and other agents against the newly developed techniques of assisted reproductive technology.

  15. Pioneering contributions by Robert Edwards to oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM).

    PubMed

    Thompson, J G; Gilchrist, R B

    2013-12-01

    The history of in vitro maturation (IVM) of mammalian oocytes, especially of human oocytes, holds a special place for Robert Edwards. He was the first to comprehensively examine and demonstrate maturation of human oocytes in vitro and in so doing he changed the course of medicine by fertilizing them in vitro. In reviewing his contribution, we have examined the state of the field at the time and discuss his pioneering insights into mammalian oocyte biology. We will also discuss how some of the major concepts and challenges identified by Edwards 50 years ago remain among the major challenges facing IVM today.

  16. Geologic history and hydrogeologic setting of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.A.; Bush, P.W.; Baker, E.T.

    1994-01-01

    Because the diagenetic effects of cementation, recrystallization, and mineral replacement diminish the hydraulic conductivity of most rocks composing the Trinity and Edwards-Trinity aquifers, transmissivity values average less than 10,000 feet squared per day over more than 90 percent of the study area. However, the effects of tectonic fractures and dissolution in the Balcones fault zone cause transmissivity values to average about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the study area.

  17. President Edwards and the Sage of Highgate: Determinism, Depravity, and the Supernatural Will.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Scarce attention has been given to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's engagement with the philosophical theology of Jonathan Edwards, and yet a clear understanding of each thinker's position on determinism and Original Sin is of vital importance if we are understand the lasting significance of their disagreements. There have been a number of studies to take up Coleridge's influence on the American Romantics, but there is no scholarship that has taken into account how the reception of this influence was inflected both by the legacy of Edwards and by the critical response that his theology elicited from Coleridge.

  18. Final Environmental Assessment to Modernize Storage Facilities in the Munitions Complex and Throughout Edwards Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA June 2006 95th Air Base Wing Civil Engineer Directorate...documentation. For: 95th Air Base Wing Civil Engineer Directorate Environmental Management Division Edwards AFB CA FINAL iii Munitions...be renovated as part of this project. Under Alternative A, the Preferred Alternative, the 95th Air Base Wing, Civil Engineer Directorate

  19. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara... located in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California. We provide this notice in..., we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR in Alameda,...

  20. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer outcrop (Barton Springs segment), northeastern Hays and southwestern Travis Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, Ted A.; Hanson, John A.; Hauwert, Nico M.

    1996-01-01

    In the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, the aquifer probably is most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Contamination can result from spills or leakage of hazardous materials; or runoff on the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  1. Diffuse-flow conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical ground-water-flow model (hereinafter, the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model) of the karstic Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas was developed for a previous study on the basis of a conceptualization emphasizing conduit development and conduit flow, and included simulating conduits as one-cell-wide, continuously connected features. Uncertainties regarding the degree to which conduits pervade the Edwards aquifer and influence ground-water flow, as well as other uncertainties inherent in simulating conduits, raised the question of whether a model based on the conduit-flow conceptualization was the optimum model for the Edwards aquifer. Accordingly, a model with an alternative hydraulic conductivity distribution without conduits was developed in a study conducted during 2004-05 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System. The hydraulic conductivity distribution for the modified Edwards aquifer model (hereinafter, the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model), based primarily on a conceptualization in which flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of numerous small fractures and openings, includes 38 zones, with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 3 to 50,000 feet per day. Revision of model input data for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was limited to changes in the simulated hydraulic conductivity distribution. The root-mean-square error for 144 target wells for the calibrated steady-state simulation for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model is 20.9 feet. This error represents about 3 percent of the total head difference across the model area. The simulated springflows for Comal and San Marcos Springs for the calibrated steady-state simulation were within 2.4 and 15 percent of the median springflows for the two springs, respectively. The transient calibration period for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was 1947-2000, with 648 monthly stress periods, the same as for the conduit-flow Edwards

  2. Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward" and the American Ideology of Progress through Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Howard P.

    1989-01-01

    Examines Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward" as the most popular U.S. utopian novel, and a major expander of the ideology of progress through technology. Provides an explanation for the book's popularity, and compares it to other utopian novels. Warns against using "Looking Backward" as a substitute for full-scale historical…

  3. Edward Albee's "The Zoo Story": Echo/es of Contemporary Subversive Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabi, Naqibun; Ahmed, Firoz

    2016-01-01

    The post-world war II American social and cultural setting was ambiguously featured with enforced conformity in the name of prosperity and Americanization of the nation. Despite of this fact, American writers, especially, dramatists conveyed their message against this fixation through variety and intellectuality. Edward Albee's "The Zoo…

  4. Understanding "Together and Apart": A Case Study of Edward's Explorations at Nursery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Cath

    2009-01-01

    Edward was one of 58 children studied by workers and parents as part of a study on Well-being and Resilience at the Pen Green Nursery. Within the larger study, eight children were studied in greater depth in order to explore connections between cognitive and emotional development. Schematic theory and attachment theory were used as frameworks for…

  5. Dyadic Power Theory, Touch, and Counseling Psychology: A Response to Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Norah E.; Abra, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards' (2011) recent article tested dyadic power theory (DPT) by examining the use of touch as a compliance-gaining tactic in the conflicts of married couples. In this response, we raise a methodological issue about the touch behaviors examined by Smith et al. and also pose a theoretical critique that their test of DPT…

  6. [Book review] Fish and fishes of Saint Helena Island, by Alasdair J. Edwards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith-Vaniz, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Review of: FISH AND FISHERIES OF SAINT HELENA ISLAND. By AlasdairJ. Edwards. 1990. Available from the author, Department of Biology, Ridley Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, England, 152 p., 24 p. color plates, £14.50 (or US$25.) surface, £17.00 (or US$30.)

  7. On the Production of Expert Knowledge: Revisiting Edward Said's Work on the Intellectual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Edward Said is deservedly well known for his literary insights on Orientalism. Yet, his work on the nature of the intellectual is equally important and particularly critical for navigating this moment of political, cultural, and economic retrenchment. In this essay I will explore the contours of Said's work on the intellectual. I argue that Said…

  8. Enhancing Undergraduates' Capabilities through Team-Based Competitions: The Edward Jones Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umble, Elisabeth J.; Umble, Michael; Artz, Kendall

    2008-01-01

    The Edward Jones Company recently initiated financial sponsorship of team-based competitions in six undergraduate business core classes at Baylor University. The challenges were chosen to take place in an introductory freshman business class, Managerial Accounting, Principles of Marketing, Corporate Finance, Operations Management, and Strategic…

  9. Thirty-Seven-Year Durability of a Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ozkokeli, Mehmet; Ates, Mehmet; Ekinci, Abdurrahman; Akcar, Murat

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus. He had undergone aortic valve replacement with a Starr-Edwards prosthesis 37 years earlier. Because of uncontrolled infection despite antibiotic treatment, the patient underwent successful surgical replacement of the prosthetic valve. PMID:15902834

  10. Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonastia, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In 1959, Virginia's Prince Edward County closed its public schools rather than obey a court order to desegregate. For five years, black children were left to fend for themselves while the courts decided if the county could continue to deny its citizens public education. Investigating this remarkable and nearly forgotten story of local, state, and…

  11. Edward Y. Hartshorne and the Reopening of German Universities, 1945-1946: His Personal Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tent, James F.

    1997-01-01

    Characterizes U.S. Edward Y. Hartshorne as a "manager of German social recovery." An instructor at Harvard University and protege of sociologist Talcott Parsons, Hartshorne was instrumental in the post-war reopening of German universities. Discusses Hartshorne's activities in military intelligence and psychological warfare, as well as…

  12. The Use of Technology in Prince Edward Island (Canada) High Schools: Perceptions of School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P; Moffatt, Lyndsay; Wiebe, Sean; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; Gabriel, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the perceptions of school leaders regarding the technological use, skills, and attitudes of high school teachers. Using a qualitative research approach, 11 educational leaders from Prince Edward Island (Canada) were individually interviewed. Participants represented the Department of Education, principals,…

  13. STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California. In these side views its main landing gear has touched down, kicking up a cloud of dirt. Its nose gear is still in the air (224); Closer view of the Discovery with its main landing gear down and its nose wheels in the air (225).

  14. Landing of the Shuttle Challenger at Edwards AFB and end of STS 51-F mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    View of the landing of the Shuttle Challenger at Edwards Air Force Base and end of STS 51-F mission. The orbiter is just above the runway with its main landing gear about to touch down (160); Challenger's rear wheels touch down, causing clouds of dirt to appear (161).

  15. 76 FR 53961 - Harold Edward Smith, M.D.; Revocation Of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Enforcement Administration Harold Edward Smith, M.D.; Revocation Of Registration On April 17, 2009, the Deputy... proposed the revocation of Respondent's DEA Certificate of Registration, BS4681979, and the denial of any pending applications to renew or modify the registration, on the grounds that Respondent had...

  16. Edward Tuohy: the man, his needle, and its place in obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martini, Joshua A; Bacon, Douglas R; Vasdev, Gary M

    2002-01-01

    The introduction of a needle designed by Ralph Huber and Edward Tuohy made continuous epidural anesthesia for labor possible. Neither the needle nor the regional anesthetic technique evolved in a vacuum; both were the culmination of a range of ideas developed by individuals around the world.

  17. Landing of STS-59 Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear of the Space Shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base to complete the 11 day STS-59/SRL-1 mission. Landing occured at 9:54 a.m., April 20, 1994. Mission duration was 11 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes.

  18. 3 CFR 8403 - Proclamation 8403 of August 26, 2009. Death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Kennedy, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and... August 26, 2009 Proc. 8403 Death of Senator Edward M. KennedyBy the President of the United States...

  19. Tackling Problems through Lateral Thinking. An Interview with Edward de Bono.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodinsky, Ben

    1985-01-01

    In this interview, Edward de Bono says critical or logical thinking in lockstep fashion is necessary but not sufficient because we need not only the ability to critique ideas, but to create them. Creative or lateral thinking arrives at solutions by attacking problems "laterally" or "sideways." (DCS)

  20. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with mountain range appearing in the background.

  1. The Empty Cup: "Teaching for Understanding" at 21st Century Edward Waters College. Occasional Paper #6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    What happens in a final project that fosters teaching for understanding? That inquiry calls to mind the Taoist belief that emptiness makes a cup useful. In the context of this paper, the inquiry organizes a narrative about how teaching for understanding surfaced in a "Theories of Learning" course at Edward Waters College. At a deeper…

  2. Robert Cooper Liebermann Receives 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay; Duffy, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Robert Cooper Liebermann received the 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The award honors "individuals who personify the Union's motto `unselfish cooperation in research' through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities."

  3. This Earthly World: Edward Said, the Praxis of Secular Humanisms and Situated Cosmopolitanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Leslie G.

    2006-01-01

    This essay unearths the educational and socio-political implications of Edward W. Said's work for our understanding of what a secular humanism might mean in the highly charged atmosphere of the post-Cold War and September 11 discourses that have pervaded the USA and, to varying degrees, other parts of the world. It asks what it means to move…

  4. James Edward Scott: The Leadership Journey of a Senior-Level African American Student Affairs Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Salatha T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, understand, and describe the life, leadership, and influence of Dr. James Edward Scott on higher education and more specifically student affairs; as one of the most well-known and respected African American male chief student affairs officers in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Using a qualitative…

  5. "Affection in Education": Edward Carpenter, John Addington Symonds and the Politics of Greek Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Josephine Crawley; Brooke, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines Edward Carpenter's 1899 essay on education that defended the value of powerful same-sex attachments, either between older and younger boys or between teachers and pupils, in the context of Victorian ideologies of same-sex affection. Linda Dowling has described how "a homosexual counterdiscourse able to justify male love in…

  6. Vulnerability of ground water to contamination, Edwards Aquifer recharge zone, Bexar County, Texas, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2000-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer, one of the most productive carbonate-rock aquifers in the Nation, is composed of the Kainer and Person Formations of the Edwards Group plus the overlying Georgetown Formation. Most recharge to the Edwards aquifer results from the percolation of streamflow loss and the infiltration of precipitation through porous parts of the recharge zone. Residential and commercial development is increasing, particularly in Bexar County in south-central Texas, atop the densely fractured and steeply faulted recharge zone. The increasing development has increased the vulnerability of ground water to contamination by spillage or leakage of waste materials, particularly fluids associated with urban runoff and (or) septic-tank leachate. This report describes a method of assessing the vulnerability of ground water to contamination in the Edwards aquifer recharge zone. The method is based on ratings of five natural features of the area: (1) hydraulic properties of outcropping hydrogeologic units; (2) presence or absence of faults; (3) presence or absence of caves and (or) sinkholes; (4) slope of land surface; and (5) permeability of soil. The sum of the ratings for the five natural features was used to develop a map showing the recharge zone's vulnerability to ground-water contamination.

  7. It Really Is All about the Child: An Interview with Dr. Edward Hallowell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dane L.

    2012-01-01

    In a decade when brain research has helped people understand learning difficulties in children, and people have seen increased media attention on the use of medications to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults, Dr. Edward (Ned) Hallowell has worked tirelessly to educate the medical profession, parents,…

  8. Diaspora as Catastrophe, Diaspora as a Mission and the Post-Colonial Philosophy of Edward Said

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappe, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Edward Said the refugee could not easily allow himself to join in the celebration of demythologizing nationalism. His Palestinianism had to coexist, uncomfortably, with his universalism. Time made this necessary coexistence an asset, not a liability, and this in fact was his political legacy for the future: Jews and Palestinians would have to…

  9. Perseus B over Edwards AFB on a Development Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A long, slender wing and a pusher propeller at the rear characterize the Perseus B remotely-piloted research aircraft, seen here during a test flight in April1998. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST

  10. Obituary: Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, 1919-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William M.; Arny, Thomas T.; Trimble, Virginia

    2007-12-01

    Cosmologist Edward R. (Ted) Harrison, emeritus Distinguished University Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, died on 29 January 2007 in his retirement city of Tucson, Arizona, where he was adjunct professor at the Steward Observatory, University of Arizona. The cause of death was colon cancer. He is survived by a sister, brother, and daughter. (A son died in 2000.) Perhaps best known for his work on the growth of fluctuations in the expanding universe and his books on cosmology for the dedicated layperson, Ted had extremely broad interests, and he published more than 200 papers in space sciences, plasma physics, high-energy physics, physical chemistry, and, principally, many aspects of astrophysics. He was a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Institute of Physics (UK). Ted Harrison was born 8 January 1919 in London, England. His parents were Robert Harrison and Daisy Harrison (nee White). His education at Sir John Cass College, London University, was interrupted by the Second World War, during which he served for six years with the British Army in various campaigns, ultimately acting as Radar Adviser to the Northern Area of the Egyptian Army. It was during the latter service that he met his wife Photeni (nee Marangas). Following the War, Ted became a British Civil Servant, at first with the Atomic Energy Research Establishment in Harwell and then at the Rutherford High Energy Laboratory. During this period he acquired the equivalent of university degrees, becoming a graduate, then an Associate, and finally a Fellow of the Institute of Physics. His somewhat unorthodox education may have contributed to his broad interests and his very intuitive and physical approach to scientific problems. The latter became the bane of generations of graduate students, who might find themselves asked on their physics qualifying exams to

  11. Perseus B over Edwards AFB on a Development Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A long, slender wing and a pusher propeller at the rear characterize the Perseus B remotely-piloted research aircraft, seen here during a test flight in April1998. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design, which began with the Perseus Proof-Of-Concept aircraft. Perseus was initially developed as part of NASA's Small High-Altitude Science Aircraft (SHASA) program, which later evolved into the ERAST

  12. The dynamic atmospheres of Mira stars: comparing the CODEX models to PTI time series of TU Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; van Winckel, H.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Our comprehension of stellar evolution on the AGB still faces many difficulties. To improve on this, a quantified understanding of large-amplitude pulsator atmospheres and interpretation in terms of their fundamental stellar parameters are essential. Aims: We wish to evaluate the effectiveness of the recently released CODEX dynamical model atmospheres in representing M-type Mira variables through a confrontation with the time-resolved spectro-photometric and interferometric PTI data set of TU And. Methods: We calibrated the interferometric K-band time series to high precision. This results in 50 nights of observations, covering 8 subsequent pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2 μm is obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in 5 channels across the K-band. We compared the data set to the relevant dynamical, self-excited CODEX models. Results: Both spectrum and visibilities are consistently reproduced at visual minimum phases. Near maximum, our observations show that the current models predict a photosphere that is too compact and hot, and we find that the extended atmosphere lacks H2O opacity. Since coverage in model parameter space is currently poor, more models are needed to make firm conclusions on the cause of the discrepancies. We argue that for TU And, the discrepancy could be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increase in the stellar mass and/or a decrease in metallicity, but this requires the release of an extended model grid. Figure 4 and Table 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. The Mira Variable S Orionis: Relationships Between the Photosphere, Molecular Layer, Dust Shell, and SiO Maser Shell at 4 Epochs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    the stellar minimum, and the later epochs shortly after the following stellar maximum. 2. Lightcurve and characteristics of S Ori S Ori is a Mira...453 190 days. Figure 1 shows the visual lightcurve of S Ori as a function of Julian Date and stellar phase based on these values. Also indicated are...phase MIDI observations VLBA observations Epoch A B C D AAVSO AFOEV b. Fig. 1. Visual lightcurve of S Ori as a function of Julian Date and stel- lar cycle

  14. Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, B.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, J.

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states.

  15. Invited commentary on 'Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church'.

    PubMed

    Head, Ivan Francis

    2011-06-01

    In this issue of Reproductive BioMedicine Online, Benagiano, Carrara and Filippi have produced a clearly written and comprehensive account of why the Roman Catholic Church has not welcomed the award of the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine to Dr Robert G Edwards for the development of human IVF. I commend the article for its clarity and lucidity but attempt to point out some areas where disagreement even with its nuanced opposition to IVF may be legitimate. I try to make some simple comments that explain why this is so and I suggest some areas to which contemporary theology and philosophy can commit itself. But it is good to see even a nuanced response to the work of Robert G Edwards rather than a blanket condemnation.

  16. Hot, cold, and annual reference atmospheres for Edwards Air Force Base, California (1975 version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference atmospheres pertaining to summer (hot), winter (cold), and mean annual conditions for Edwards Air Force Base, California, are presented from surface to 90 km altitude (700 km for the annual model). Computed values of pressure, kinetic temperature, virtual temperature, and density and relative differences percentage departure from the Edwards reference atmospheres, 1975 (ERA-75) of the atmospheric parameters versus altitude are tabulated in 250 m increments. Hydrostatic and gas law equations were used in conjunction with radiosonde and rocketsonde thermodynamic data in determining the vertical structure of these atmospheric models. The thermodynamic parameters were all subjected to a fifth degree least-squares curve-fit procedure, and the resulting coefficients were incorporated into Univac 1108 computer subroutines so that any quantity may be recomputed at any desired altitude using these subroutines.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative late blight resistance in the potato cultivar Sarpo Mira is determined by the perception of five distinct RXLR effectors.

    PubMed

    Rietman, Hendrik; Bijsterbosch, Gerard; Cano, Liliana M; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Vossen, Jack H; Jacobsen, Evert; Visser, Richard G F; Kamoun, Sophien; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A

    2012-07-01

    Potato defends against Phytophthora infestans infection by resistance (R)-gene-based qualitative resistance as well as a quantitative field resistance. R genes are renowned to be rapidly overcome by this oomycete, and potato cultivars with a decent and durable resistance to current P. infestans populations are hardly available. However, potato cultivar Sarpo Mira has retained resistance in the field over several years. We dissected the resistance of 'Sarpo Mira' in a segregating population by matching the responses to P. infestans RXLR effectors with race-specific resistance to differential strains. The resistance is based on the combination of four pyramided qualitative R genes and a quantitative R gene that was associated with field resistance. The qualitative R genes include R3a, R3b, R4, and the newly identified Rpi-Smira1. The qualitative resistances matched responses to avirulence (AVR)3a, AVR3b, AVR4, and AVRSmira1 RXLR effectors and were overcome by particular P. infestans strains. The quantitative resistance was determined to be conferred by a novel gene, Rpi-Smira2. It was only detected under field conditions and was associated with responses to the RXLR effector AvrSmira2. We foresee that effector-based resistance breeding will facilitate selecting and combining qualitative and quantitative resistances that may lead to a more durable resistance to late blight.

  18. NASA's Boeing 747 SCA with the Space Shuttle Endeavour on top climbs out after takeoff from Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's modified Boeing 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft with the Space Shuttle Endeavour on top climbs out after takeoff from Edwards Air Force Base on the first leg of its ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  19. Vertical Migration Potential of Metal Contaminants at Small Arms Firing Ranges, Camp Edwards Military Reservation, Massachusetts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Vertical Migration Potential of Metal Contaminants at Small Arms Firing Ranges. Camp Edwards Military Reservation, Massachusetts by R. Mark Bricka , Yilda...Military Reservation, Massachusetts by R. Mark Bricka , Yilda B. Rivera, Patrick N. Deliman U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment...Reservation, Massachusetts / by R. Mark Bricka , Yiida B. Rivera, Patrick N. Deliman; prepared for Massachusetts Military Reservation. 198 p.: ill.; 28

  20. Cloth destruction and haemolysis with totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schottenfeld, M.; Wisheart, J. D.; Ross, J. K.; Lincoln, J. C. R.; Ross, D. N.

    1971-01-01

    Four cases are described in which totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards valves (model 2300) had to be removed. All were causing significant haemolysis, two in the absence of a peripheral leak. The principal operative finding was destruction of the Dacron covering the struts. Following replacement of these prostheses there was complete resolution of signs and symptoms. The possible causes of haemolysis and consequences of cloth destruction are discussed. Images PMID:5576531

  1. Crew of the STS 51-I Discovery mission egress the orbiter at Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Crew of the STS 51-I Discovery mission egress the orbiter on the desert lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base. Astronaut Joe H. Engle, mission commander, hugs George W.S. Abbey, Director of Flight Crew Operations at JSC. Others descending the steps behind Engle (in order from the bottom) are Astronauts James D. van Hoften, John M. (Mike) Lounge, Richard O. Covey, and Willam F. Fisher.

  2. Edward E. Azar’s Early Warning Model - Does It Work

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    EARLY WARNING MODEL - DOES IT WORK? THESIS Donald E. Childre, Jr. Captain, USAF AFIT/GLM/LSM...Avaii ):id/or A-iA AFIT/GLM/LSM/90S-10 EDWARD E. AZAR’S EARLY WARNING MODEL - DOES IT WORK? THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Systems... Early Warning Model of International Hostilities .... 18 Overview of Azar’s Early Warning Model. 22 Assumptions Considered for Azar’s Model 28

  3. [A case of Edwards' syndrome in pregnancy complicated by serologic incompatibility and preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Murawski, Marek; Gryboś, Marian; Zalewska, Dominika; Symonowicz, Krzysztof

    2006-12-01

    A case of Edwards' syndrome (trisomy 18) diagnosed in the third pregnancy trimester is described. The diagnosis was based on sonographic examination and cytogenetic amniocentesis. Lethal genetic fetal malformation determined the medical indication to preterm delivery. Additionally, serologic incompatibility during pregnancy was observed, as well as pregnancy induced hypertension turning into preeclampsia after the labour action was evoked. A caesarean section due to obstetric indications was done. Phenotype and lethal congenital malformations in the newborn have confirmed of the chromosome aberration prenatally diagnosed.

  4. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The Edwards Aquifer Water Resource Conflict: USDA Farm Program resource-use incentives?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaible, Glenn D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1999-10-01

    This paper summarizes economic and hydrological analyses of the impacts of the 1990 and 1996 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) farm programs on irrigation water withdrawals from the Edwards Aquifer in south central Texas and on aquifer-dependent spring flows that support threatened and endangered species. Economic modeling, a regional producer behavioral survey, as well as institutional and farm characteristic analyses are used to examine likely irrigation water-use impacts. Hydrologie modeling is used to examine spring flow effects. Study results show that 1990 USDA commodity programs caused producers to require less irrigation water, in turn increasing rather than decreasing aquifer spring flows. Market economic factors are the dominant criteria influencing producer irrigation decisions. Farm-tenure arrangements and aquifer management responsibilities of the Edwards Aquifer Authority indicate that the 1996 Farm Act's PFC payment program will not cause an increase in irrigation withdrawals. Broader actions such as long-term water supply enhancement/conservation programs, dry-year water-use reduction incentives and water markets all provide tools for Edwards water-use conflict resolution. USDA farm programs do not apparently play a material part in the total debate.

  6. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18.

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, we have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. We have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8079991

  7. A Redescription of the Holotype Male of Aedes (Stegomyia) Tongae Edwards with a Note on Two Topotypic Females (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-09-01

    A REDESCRIPTION OF THE HOLOTYPE MALE OF AEDES (STEGOMYIA) TONGAE EDWARDS WITH A NOTE ON TWO TOPOTYPIC FEMALES ( DIPTERA : CULICIDAE ) YIAU-MIN...Stegomyia) Tongae Edwards with a Note on Two Topotypic Females 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d... FEMALES ( DIPTERA : CULICIDAE ) ‘v2 YIAU-MIN HUANG, Southeast Asia Mosquito Project, Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington

  8. Geologic Map of the Edwards Aquifer In Northern Medina and Northeastern Uvalde Counties, South-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pedraza, Diana E.

    2006-01-01

    The southern segment of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive subsurface reservoirs of potable water in the world, providing water of excellent quality to more than a million people in the San Antonio region, where the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared it to be a sole-source aquifer (van der Leeden and others, 1990). Depending on the depositional province within which the associated carbonate rocks originated (Maclay and Small, 1984), the Edwards aquifer is composed of several geologic formations (primarily limestone and dolostone) of Early Cretaceous age. Most water pumped from the Edwards aquifer comes form the Person and Kainer Formations, which were deposited over the San Marcos Platform. The principal source of ground water in study area is the Devils River Formation, which was deposited in the Devils River trend. The Devils River Formation provides large quantities of irrigation water to fertile bottomland areas of Medina and Uvalde Counties, where the success of farming and ranching activities has long depended upon water from the Edwards aquifer. The study area includes all of the Edwards aquifer recharge zone between the Sabinal River (on the west) and the Medina River (on the east) plus an updip fringe of the confined zone in east-central Uvalde and central Medina Counties. Over about ninety percent of the study area--within the Devils River trend--the Edwards aquifer is composed of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Devils River Formation. Over the remaining area--over the southwestern margin of the San Marcos platform--the Edwards aquifer consists of the Georgetown Formation plus the underlying Edwards Group (Rose, 1972), which comprises the Kainer and Person Formations.

  9. [Edwards syndrome--most frequent indications for genetic amniocentesis. Analysis of the last 5 years].

    PubMed

    Chuchracki, Marek; Janiak, Justyna; Ziółkowska, Katarzyna; Sedziak, Anna; Opala, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) occurs in 1: 8000 live births and is closely related to the mother's age. Most of the embryos and fetuses with trisomy of 18 chromosome pair undergo natural abortion. Change in number and structure of chromosomes usually takes place spontaneously. However, the incidence of chromosome mutations increases with the presence of mutagenic factors. One of the chemical mutagenic factors is benzopyrene - present in cigarette smoke. Prenatal cytogenetic diagnostic is used for detecting diseases and clinical syndromes conditioned by chromosome aberrations. To this date the "golden standard" of this diagnostic is the assessment of the fetus karyotype by means of analysis of chromosome banding pattern from amniotic fluid-derived cells. The aim of the study was the analysis of indications for genetic amniocenteses carried out in the last 5 years and in case of which trisomy of chromosome 18 (Edwards syndrome) was diagnosed. The analysis covered 1593 results of fetus karyotypes obtained from Cytogenetic Laboratory of the Central Gynecological-Obstetric Clinical Hospital in Poznań over the last 5 years. The study procedure consisted in producing cell culture from amniotic fluid, appliance of appropriate color techniques and thorough microscopic analysis of chromosome banding pattern. As a result of the analysis it was discovered that in 1538 cases the karyotype was normal, and in 55 cases trisomy 18 was diagnosed, which constituted 3% of all cytogenetic tests. The highest number of trisomy 18 cases was noted in 2009 - 19 cases, which constitutes 5% of all tests. In 2010 and 2011 the results included respectively 2% and 3% of diagnosed trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). In the last 5 years normal results for karyotypes constituted 87%, in 10% cases other aberrations were diagnosed through cystogenetic tests, whereas 3% of the results have shown trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome The most frequent indications for performing genetic amniocentesis, as a result of

  10. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.

    2003-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in Uvalde County is composed of Lower Cretaceous carbonate (mostly dolomitic limestone) strata of the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend and of the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick basin. Rocks in the Devils River trend are divided at the bottom of the Devils River Formation into the (informal) basal nodular unit. Maverick basin rocks are divided (informally) into the basal nodular unit of the West Nueces Formation; into lower, middle, and upper units of the McKnight Formation; and into lower and upper units of the Salmon Peak Formation. The Edwards aquifer overlies the (Lower Cretaceous) Glen Rose Limestone, which composes the lower confining unit of the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer is overlain by the (Upper Cretaceous) Del Rio Clay, the basal formation of the upper confining unit. Upper Cretaceous and (or) Lower Tertiary igneous rocks intrude all stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer, particularly in the southern part of the study area.The Balcones fault zone and the Uvalde salient are the principal structural features in the study area. The fault zone comprises mostly en echelon, high-angle, and down-to-the-southeast normal faults that trend mostly from southwest to northeast. The Uvalde salient—resulting apparently from a combination of crustal uplift, diverse faulting, and igneous activity—elevates the Edwards aquifer to the surface across the central part of Uvalde County. Downfaulted blocks associated with six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—juxtapose the Salmon Peak Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in central parts of the study area against Upper Cretaceous strata in the southeastern part.The carbonate rocks of the Devils River trend and the Maverick basin are products of assorted tectonic and depositional conditions that affected the depth and circulation of the Cretaceous seas. The Devils River Formation formed in a

  11. Reviewing the Community Learning Center: An Educational Center of the MiraCosta Community College District. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request from the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Commission Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This report from the California Postsecondary Education Commission considers the request by the Governors of the California Community Colleges and the MiraCosta Community College District (MCCD) to secure approval for the Community Learning Center in Oceanside. The MCCD serves a traditionally affluent, white region that has recently become far…

  12. Near-infrared spectro-interferometry of Mira variables and comparisons to 1D dynamic model atmospheres and 3D convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Freytag, B.; Scholz, M.; Höfner, S.; Karovicova, I.; Whitelock, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We aim at comparing spectro-interferometric observations of Mira variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the latest 1D dynamic model atmospheres based on self-excited pulsation models (CODEX models) and with 3D dynamic model atmospheres including pulsation and convection (CO5BOLD models) to better understand the processes that extend the molecular atmosphere to radii where dust can form. Methods: We obtained a total of 20 near-infrared K-band spectro-interferometric snapshot observations of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, R Aqr, X Hya, W Vel, and R Cnc with a spectral resolution of about 1500. We compared observed flux and visibility spectra with predictions by CODEX 1D dynamic model atmospheres and with azimuthally averaged intensities based on CO5BOLD 3D dynamic model atmospheres. Results: Our visibility data confirm the presence of spatially extended molecular atmospheres located above the continuum radii with large-scale inhomogeneities or clumps that contribute a few percent of the total flux. The detailed structure of the inhomogeneities or clumps show a variability on time scales of 3 months and above. Both modeling attempts provided satisfactory fits to our data. In particular, they are both consistent with the observed decrease in the visibility function at molecular bands of water vapor and CO, indicating a spatially extended molecular atmosphere. Observational variability phases are mostly consistent with those of the best-fit CODEX models, except for near-maximum phases, where data are better described by near-minimum models. Rosseland angular diameters derived from the model fits are broadly consistent between those based on the 1D and the 3D models and with earlier observations. We derived fundamental parameters including absolute radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for our sources. Conclusions: Our results provide a first observational support for theoretical results that shocks induced by convection and pulsation in the

  13. Millimeter and some near infra-red observations of short-period Miras and other AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Baas, F.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Stehle, R.; Josselin, E.; Tilanus, R. P. J.

    1999-12-01

    Millimeter observations of 48 oxygen- and 20 carbon-rich AGB Miras with periods shorter than 400 days are presented. In addition, observations of 14 O-rich and 15 C-stars with longer, or no known, periods have also been obtained. The detection statistics is as follows: in 12CO J=1-0 and 2-1 we observed 97 stars, and detected 66 in at least one line. We find 24 new detections in the 1-0 line, 38 new detections in the 2-1 line, and 29 stars have been detected for the first time in one or both lines. In 12CO J=3-2 we observed 14 stars and detected 11, with 4 new detections. In 13CO J=2-1, 3-2 we observed 2 stars and had one new detection. In HCN(1-0) we observed 5 carbon stars and detected 3, one new. In SO(6_5-5_4) we observed the same 5 stars and detected none. In CS(3-2) we observed 8 carbon stars and detected 3, all new. In SiO(3-2, v=0) we observed 34 O-rich stars and detected 25, all new except one. Near-infrared JHK photometry is presented for seven stars. For four stars it is the first NIR data published. The luminosity and dust mass loss rate are obtained for seven very red stars with unknown pulsation period from modelling the spectral energy distribution (SED) and IRAS LRS spectra. Thereby, a new IR supergiant is confirmed (AFGL 2968). For the rest of the sample, luminosity and distance are obtained in a variety of ways: using hipparcos parallaxes, period-luminosity and period-M_K-relations combined with apparent K magnitudes, and kinematic distances. The dust mass loss rate is obtained from model fitting of the SED (either from the literature, or presented in the present paper), or from the observed IRAS 60 mu m flux, corrected for the photospheric contribution. The gas mass loss rate is derived from the observed CO line intensities, as presented here, combined with existing literature data, if any. This allows the derivation of the dust-to-gas ratio. Our and literature CO J = 3-2 data has been used to calibrate the relation between mass loss rate and peak

  14. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Sallam, I. A.; Bain, W. H.; Turner, M. A.; Lawrie, T. D. V.

    1974-01-01

    Slater, S. D., Sallam, I. A., Bain, W. H., Turner, M. A., and Lawrie, T. D. V. (1974).Thorax, 29, 624-632. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study. A comparison was made of the haemolytic complications in 85 patients with two different types of Starr-Edwards cloth-covered ball and cage prosthesis with those in 44 patients with the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve. Intravascular haemolysis, as detected by the presence of haemosiderinuria, occurred significantly less often with the Björk-Shiley than with the Starr-Edwards valve, the overall incidence with aortic, mitral or multiple replacements being 31%, 15%, and 20% for Björk-Shiley and 94%, 92%, and 88% for Starr-Edwards valves respectively. There was no significant difference in the frequency of haemolysis between each of the two types of Starr-Edwards prosthesis studied at either the aortic (2300 versus 2310 model) or mitral (6300 versus 6310) site. Haemolytic anaemia developed in only one patient with a Björk-Shiley valve but was common though usually mild with Starr-Edwards prostheses, particularly aortic valve replacements with the 2300 model and in aortic plus mitral (± tricuspid) replacements. The greater severity of haemolysis produced by Starr-Edwards valves, again especially of the latter types, was further demonstrated by higher serum lactate dehydrogenase and 24-hour urinary iron levels. It is concluded that the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve represents a significant advance in the amelioration of the haemolytic complications of prosthetic valves. PMID:4450173

  15. Regional economic impacts of current and proposed management alternatives for Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Leslie; Huber, Chris; Koontz, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must describe the desired future conditions of a Refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. The Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located at the south end of California's San Francisco Bay and one of seven refuges in the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex, is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed Refuge management strategies. For Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan planning, a regional economic analysis provides a means of estimating how current management (No Action Alternative) and proposed management activities (alternatives) affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of information: (1) it illustrates the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge's contribution to the local community, and (2) it can help in determining whether economic effects are or are not a real concern in choosing among management alternatives. This report first presents a description of the local community and economy near the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Next, the methods used to conduct a regional economic impact analysis are described. An analysis of the final Comprehensive Conservation Plan management strategies that could affect stakeholders, residents, and the local economy is then presented. The management activities of economic concern in this analysis are: * Spending in the local community by Refuge visitors; * Refuge personnel salary spending; and * Refuge purchases of goods and services within the local

  16. Edward D. Goldberg's proposal of "the Mussel Watch": Reflections after 40years.

    PubMed

    Farrington, John W; Tripp, Bruce W; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sericano, José L; Wade, Terry L; Knap, Anthony H

    2016-09-15

    We chronicle the extensive influence over the past forty years of Professor Edward D. Goldberg and his call in 1975 for a "Mussel Watch" or bivalve sentinel organism approach to assess geographic status and temporal trends of several chemicals of environmental concern in the coastal ocean. Examples of local, regional, national and international programs are discussed briefly as are examples of interesting useful findings and limitations to the Mussel Watch concept. Mussel Watch continues to provide useful data about status and trends of chemical contamination in coastal ecosystems.

  17. "Smite this sleeping world awake": Edward Burne-Jones and "The legend of the briar rose".

    PubMed

    Rager, Andrea Wolk

    2009-01-01

    Challenging entrenched preconceptions about the supposed escapism and conservatism of Edward Burne-Jones's art, this paper seeks to establish his monumental painted series, "The Legend of the Briar Rose," as a fundamentally radical and confrontational work. Critics have long viewed it as an endorsement of sleepy stasis, antithetical to the political activism espoused by his friend William Morris. By unraveling the intertwining themes of the series -- the transformative dream vision, artistic labor, the decorative mode, and social egalitarianism -- the "Briar Rose" series is revealed instead to be dramatization of the struggle for personal, social, artistic, and even environmental awakening.

  18. Geology, hydrology, and water supply of Edwards Air Force Base, Kern County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutcher, Lee Carlton; Warts, G.F.

    1963-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base occupies the northern part of Antelope Valley, California. As a result of large-scale and increasing agricultural pumping in the valley, the net draft has exceeded the perennial supply since about 1930 and was about 170,000 acre-feet in 1951--at least three times the estimated yield. As a result, there has been a continuing depletion of ground water stored in all the unconsolidated deposits, including the principal aquifers contained in the younger and older alluvium.

  19. Science and Technology Review, July-August 1998: Celebrating Edward Teller at 90

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smart, J.

    1998-07-01

    On the occasion of Edward Teller's 90th birthday, Science and Technology Review (S&TR) has the pleasure of honoring Lawrence Livermore's co-founder and most influential scientist. Teller is known for his inventive work in physics, his concepts leading to thermonuclear explosions, and his strong stands on such issues as science education, the nation's strategic defense, the needs for science in the future, and sharing scientific information. The articles in this issue also show him, as always, tirelessly moving forward with his new and changing interests.

  20. Fractured occluder disc: a previously unrecognized complication of the Starr-Edwards disc prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J F; Hannoush, H M; Odell, J A

    2001-01-01

    Fracture of the occluder disc of a low-profile Starr-Edwards prosthesis is a hitherto unrecognized complication. We describe a patient who presented with right heart failure and severe pulmonary hypertension 27 years after mitral valve replacement with a model 6520 caged-disc prosthesis. At surgery, there was a longitudinal split in the occluder disc, and organized thrombus was lodged between the split segments. This case offers a unique opportunity to study the long-term effects of wear on the polyethylene poppet and Stellite cage.

  1. Long-term follow-up of cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carey, J S

    1976-05-01

    One hundred patients in whom cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses were implanted have now been followed for 3 to 7 years. The hospital mortality rate was 5 per cent, and survival at five years was 70 per cent. Complications related to valve design occurred in 8 per cent (4 per cent fatal). The majority of late deaths and poor results were related to progressive cardiac disease rather than valve-related complications. The results indicate that cloth-covered prostheses have significantly lowered the incidence of thromboembolism and eliminated poppet dysfunction. The problem of strut cloth wear was clinically observed only twice in 500 patient-years of follow-up.

  2. A non-linear mathematical model for a three species ecosystem: Hippos in Lake Edward.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Mauro; Chandía, Kristopher J; Flores, J C

    2016-01-21

    In this work we study a non-linear mathematical model based on three different interacting species. We apply our model to Lake Edward ecosystem consisting in hippos, tilapia fishes and human inhabitants. In this case, we estimate the values of the key parameters using actual data and show the reliability of the proposed model as a predictive tool. We also show, via numerical calculations and parameter values that the ecosystem associated to the lake is very far from reaching a stable equilibrium. Through our analysis we provide the conditions for a possible coexistence among the three species.

  3. Perchlorate in the San Antonio Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlquist, L.; Rajagapolan, S.; Jackson, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in drinking-water supplies and can have adverse health effects on humans by disrupting thyroid function. Perchlorate and other constituents were analyzed from ground-water samples that were collected in 2004-06 from 99 wells completed in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The fractured karstic carbonate Edwards aquifer, declared a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplies nearly one-half million acre-feet per year for drinking water and other uses. Wells were located in a variety of land-use settings that included rangeland, agriculture, and urban; well types included domestic, public, and observation. Perchlorate was detected in 98 percent of the samples, and concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Five samples contained concentrations greater than 1 μg/L and were from wells in the urban northern San Antonio area. The results from three samples that contained perchlorate at concentrations greater than 2 μg/L are anomalous. Chloride concentration ranged from 5.6 to 69 milligrams per liter, typical for freshwater in the Edwards aquifer. No significant (r2 greater than 0.7) correlations were observed when perchlorate concentrations were correlated with depth to water, total depth of well, or concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, strontium, and dissolved solids. Tritium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.9 tritium units in 31 of the 99 samples and indicate at least some fraction of modern water (post-atmospheric nuclear tests). No correlation between apparent tritium age and perchlorate concentration was observed, a possible indication that anthropogenic influences are not affecting observed perchlorate concentrations. The molar ratio of chloride to perchlorate ranged from 17,000 to 320

  4. Edward Gantt (1742-1837): US senate chaplain and first White House physician to Thomas Jefferson.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Harrison Dwight

    2015-10-27

    In his long and eventful life, Edward Gantt (1742-1837) made important contributions to the newly independent American Republic, as well as to the development of scientific evidence-based American medicine. Unfortunately, his achievements have gone unrecognized and unreported in mainstream historical publications. Specifically, his service as the first designated White House doctor, and personal physician to President Thomas Jefferson from 1801 to 1809 has not been reported. The purpose of this paper is to document the biographical and scientific details of his extraordinary life and notable contributions.

  5. STS-28 crew egresses Columbia, OV-102, at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 crewmembers are greeted by NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William B. Lenoir, NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly, and Flight Operations Directorate (FCOD) Director Donald R. Puddy as they egress Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. The crew spent five days in Earth orbit for a Department of Defense (DOD) dedicated mission. The astronauts, wearing navy blue flight coveralls (jumpsuits) are, from left to right, Mission Specialist (MS) Mark N. Brown, Pilot Richard N. Richards, MS David C. Leestma, MS James C. Adamson, and Commander Brewster H. Shaw. Visible in the background are OV-102's wing and tail section and ground servicing vehicles.

  6. A Left-to-Right Shunt After Transfemoral TAVR Using Edwards SAPIEN 3.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Julius; Köhler, Anton; Schwarz, Florian; Sadoni, Sebastian; Hagl, Christian; Massberg, Steffen; Greif, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is used for the treatment of aortic stenosis (AS). Besides major bleeding, conduction blocks, stroke or atrial fibrillation, complications include cardiac perforation with possible left-to-right-shunts. Herein is reported the sixth case of a left-to-right shunt in an 87-year-old man who underwent TAVR using a 29 mm Edwards SAPIEN S3 prosthesis to treat AS. Soon after the procedure, a small channel evolving from the right coronary cusp could be detected on echocardiography. The patient was managed medically.

  7. Getting to grips with the cannabis problem: the evolving contributions and impact of Griffith Edwards.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne

    2015-07-01

    Griffith Edwards played an important role in cannabis policy debates within government advisory committees in the United Kingdom from the early 1970s until the early 1980s. This has largely been hidden from public knowledge by the confidentiality of these committee discussions. The purpose of this paper is to use Griffith's writings and the results of recent historical scholarship to outline the views he expressed, the reasons he gave for them, and to provide a brief assessment of his contribution to the development of British cannabis policy.

  8. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Rear view captures OV-103 as it glides past photographer to wheel stop showing the tail section (speedbrake/rudder) and three space shuttle main engines (SSMEs). Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with aircraft hangar appearing in the background.

  9. A trap, neuter, and release program for feral cats on Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Karen L; Keizer, Karen; Golding, Christine

    2002-09-01

    A new program to address the feral cat population on Prince Edward Island was undertaken during the spring and summer of 2001. Feral cats from specific geographic areas were trapped, sedated, and tested for feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus. Healthy cats were neutered, dewermed, vaccinated, tattooed, and released to their area of origin. A total of 185 cats and kittens were trapped and tested during a 14-week period; 158 cats and kittens as young as 6 weeks of age were neutered and released. Twenty-three adult cats were positive for feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, or both, and were euthanized.

  10. Edward Ortiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    1989-01-01

    Describes a retiring superintendent's efforts to dismantle factory-style schooling and empower teachers. The Santa Fe (New Mexico) Schools' teacher/principal management teams have already instituted interdisciplinary teaching and ungraded, multi-age elementary classes. The latest project involved empowering teachers to select the next…

  11. Geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Golab, James A.; Morris, Robert R.

    2016-11-28

    During 2014–16, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, documented the geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Texas. The Edwards and Trinity aquifers are major sources of water for agriculture, industry, and urban and rural communities in south-central Texas. Both the Edwards and Trinity are classified as major aquifers by the State of Texas.The purpose of this report is to present the geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. The report includes a detailed 1:24,000-scale hydrostratigraphic map, names, and descriptions of the geology and hydrostratigraphic units (HSUs) in the study area.The scope of the report is focused on geologic framework and hydrostratigraphy of the outcrops and hydrostratigraphy of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers within northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. In addition, parts of the adjacent upper confining unit to the Edwards aquifer are included.The study area, approximately 866 square miles, is within the outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers and overlying confining units (Washita, Eagle Ford, Austin, and Taylor Groups) in northern Bexar and Comal Counties, Tex. The rocks within the study area are sedimentary and range in age from Early to Late Cretaceous. The Miocene-age Balcones fault zone is the primary structural feature within the study area. The fault zone is an extensional system of faults that generally trends southwest to northeast in south-central Texas. The faults have normal throw, are en echelon, and are mostly downthrown to the southeast.The Early Cretaceous Edwards Group rocks were deposited in an open marine to supratidal flats environment during two marine transgressions. The Edwards Group is composed of the Kainer and Person Formations. Following tectonic uplift, subaerial exposure, and erosion near the end of

  12. Simulation of groundwater flow in the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.

    2014-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer, a major aquifer in the Pecos County region of western Texas, is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses. Resource managers would like to better understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To that end, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a comprehensive, integrated analysis of available hydrogeologic data to develop a groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. Following calibration, the model was used to evaluate the sustainability of recent (2008) and projected water-use demands on groundwater resources in the study area.

  13. Bed-material entrainment and associated transportation infrastructure problems in streams of the Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation commonly builds and maintains low-water crossings (LWCs) over streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas. LWCs are low-height structures, typically constructed of concrete and asphalt, that provide acceptable passage over seasonal rivers or streams with relatively low normal-depth flow. They are designed to accommodate flow by roadway overtopping during high-flow events. The streams of the Edwards Plateau are characterized by cobble- and gravel-sized bed material and highly variable flow regimes. Low base flows that occur most of the time occasionally are interrupted by severe floods. The floods entrain and transport substantial loads of bed material in the stream channels. As a result, LWCs over streams in the Edwards Plateau are bombarded and abraded by bed material during floods and periodically must be maintained or even replaced.

  14. Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Burcu; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    The three and four-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states. J. M. and B. Y. are supported in part by the NSF (Grant No. DMR-0907235 and DMR-1208046).

  15. New insights into the Edwards Aquifer—Brackish-water simulation, drought, and the role of uncertainty analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Linzy K.; White, Jeremy T.

    2016-02-03

    The Edwards aquifer consists of three water-quality zones. The freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer is bounded to the south by a zone of brackish water (transition zone) where the aquifer transitions from fresh to saline water. The saline zone is downdip from the transition zone. There is concern that a recurrence of extreme drought, such as the 7-year drought from 1950 through 1956, could cause the transition zone to move toward (encroach upon) the freshwater zone, causing production wells near the transition zone to pump saltier water. There is also concern of drought effects on spring flows from Comal and San Marcos Springs. These concerns were evaluated through the development of a new numerical model of the Edwards aquifer.

  16. Oil production and groundwater quality in the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer, Texas.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Paul F

    2003-11-13

    Chloride concentrations and chloride/bromide ratios from 198 water wells in the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer were compiled, mapped, and evaluated within the context of regional geology and land use. The study area occupies eight counties in west-central Texas, within which oil production and agriculture are predominant land uses. Samples from 49 wells had chloride concentrations above the 250 mg/l secondary drinking water standard, 22 samples had greater than 500 mg/l chloride, and 9 samples exceeded 1000 mg/l chloride. Of the 22 samples above 500 mg/l chloride, 10 had relatively low chloride/bromide ratios of less than 300, consistent with oilfield brine, and 2 had ratios above 2000, consistent with groundwater impacted by evaporite dissolution. The remaining ten samples had chloride/bromide ratios ranging from 300 to 2000, consistent with partial mixing of unimpaired groundwater with evaporite-laden water. There were no significant correlations between chloride concentration and well depth, inconsistent with contaminants originating at the land surface. Results of this study suggest that evaporite dissolution and oilfield brine locally impact the Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer, but the problem is not regionally pervasive.

  17. [Edward Grzegorzewski (1906-1982)--Poland's delegate to the founding conference of the World Health Organization].

    PubMed

    Cianciara, Dorota; Muszyńska, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    Early years of Edward Grzegorzewski's professional work were associated with the National Institute of Hygiene (NIH) in Warsaw, Poland. This fact and Grzegorzewski's professional achievements and uniqueness of his life lead to dedicate him a separate article. A search of archival materials was guided by information from the prof. Zbigniew Machaliński article--a historian from Gdansk. Insight into the personal files and the archives of NIH was obtained and some other attempts to find factual data were undertaken. A numerous works written by Grzegorzewski were found and read. The article is complementary to the previously described facts, especially in the context of his relationship with the NIH. Repetitions of the information resulted from the need to preserve the chronological order of events or to highlight the context. In the years 1932-1942 Edward Grzegorzewski worked in National Institute of Hygiene, at the beginning as volunteer. During this time he studied the hygiene in the USA and periodically worked in the city board in Warsaw. He worked in the Department of Social Hygiene and published approximately 30 articles and reports, and dealt with health education as well. After the WWII he served on many post, eg. he was the rector of the Medical Academy in Gdańsk, director of the Department of Education and Training in the WHO and professor at Johns Hopkins University. In 1946 he signed the WHO Constitution for Poland. He was a prominent Polish hygienist.

  18. Insects attracted to Maple Sap: Observations from Prince Edward Island, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The collection of maple sap for the production of maple syrup is a large commercial enterprise in Canada and the United States. In Canada, which produces 85% of the world’s supply, it has an annual value of over $168 million CAD. Over 38 million trees are tapped annually, 6.5% of which use traditional buckets for sap collection. These buckets attract significant numbers of insects. Despite this, there has been very little investigation of the scale of this phenomenon and the composition of insects that are attracted to this nutrient source. The present paper reports the results of a preliminary study conducted on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Twenty-eight species of Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Trichoptera were found in maple sap buckets, 19 of which are known to be attracted to saps and nectars. The physiological role of sap feeding is discussed with reference to moths of the tribe Xylenini, which are active throughout the winter, and are well documented as species that feed on sap flows. Additionally, 18 of the 28 species found in this study are newly recorded in Prince Edward Island. PMID:21594122

  19. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  20. Ten year clinical evaluation of Starr-Edwards 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, D; Fessatidis, I; Sapsford, R; Oakley, C

    1987-01-01

    The long term performance characteristics of the 2400 and 1260 series of Starr-Edwards aortic prostheses were investigated by a follow up study of clinical outcome of 327 patients discharged from hospital with isolated aortic valve replacement. Follow up lasted for up to 10 years and was based on 1616 patient-years. The 2400 series cloth covered tracked valve was implanted in 182 patients from 1974 to 1980 and the 1260 series bare strut silastic ball valve was inserted in 145 patients from 1979 to 1983. Total 10 year mortality and valve related morbidity were low and no cases of mechanical valve failure were recorded. There were no significant actuarial differences in mortality or valve related morbidity between the 2400 and 1260 valves. Starr-Edwards models 2400 and 1260 aortic valve prostheses showed excellent durability without any mechanical failures over a 10 year period. The long term outcome of isolated aortic valve replacement with these models is associated with a low frequency of valve related complications. PMID:3580223

  1. Sir Edward Abraham's contribution to the development of the cephalosporins: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Miller, J M

    2000-08-01

    This paper is based on an invited lecture given at the 21st International Congress of Chemotherapy in July 1999, as part of a Symposium entitled '50 years of cephalosporins: their use the next 50 years', (Hamilton-Miller JMT, Cephalosporins: from mould to drug. Sardinia to Oxford and beyond, J Antimicr Chemother 1999;44(A):26). Celebration of this Golden Anniversary was made more poignant by the death of the last major participant, Sir Edward Abraham, in May 1999. This history has been told before, but mainly by Sir Edward, who being a very modest man (to which his obituaries graphically attest) consistently underplayed the role that he and Newton had in the discovery of cephalosporin C, that led to all the cephalosporins now in use. I had the privilege of working at the Dunn School from 1967 to 1970, with Abraham and Newton, where I met Brotzu, Florey and Dorothy Hodgkin, all of whom had important roles in this story. Other workers at the Dunn School at that time, e.g. Heatley, Sanders and Jennings (who became Lady Florey), helped develop penicillin. Such a galaxy of stars of the antibiotic firmament will never again be assembled. "Let us now praise famous men... these were honoured in their generation, and were the glory of their times" - Ecclesiasticus XLIV. vv 1.7.

  2. Babesia (Theileria) annae in a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) from Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clancey, Noel; Horney, Barbara; Burton, Shelley; Birkenheuer, Adam; McBurney, Scott; Tefft, Karen

    2010-04-01

    A 4-6-mo-old female red fox (Vulpes vulpes) was presented to the Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC) Teaching Hospital, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On presentation, the fox was weak and had pale mucous membranes. A complete blood count and a serum biochemistry profile were performed. Blood smear examination revealed low numbers of erythrocytes containing centrally to paracentrally located, single, rarely multiple, approximately 1 x 2 microm, oval to round organisms with morphology similar to Babesia microti. Polymerase chain reaction testing and DNA sequencing of the Babesia species 18S rRNA gene were performed on DNA extracted from whole blood. Results were positive for a Babesia microti-like parasite genetically identical to Babesia (Theileria) annae. The fox was euthanized due to poor prognosis for recovery. Necropsy examination revealed multifocal to locally extensive subacute nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, an eosinophilic broncho-pneumonia, a moderate diffuse vacuolar hepatopathy, and lesions associated with blunt trauma to the left abdominal region. This is the first reported case of a red fox in Canada infected with a piroplasm. It remains uncertain whether the presence of this hemoparasite in this fox was pathogenic or an incidental finding. The potential for competent vectors of Babesia species on Prince Edward Island, the potential for this Babesia microti-like parasite to infect other wild and domestic canids, and the significance of this parasite to the health of infected individuals are yet to be determined.

  3. Generalized Deam-Edwards approach to the statistical mechanics of randomly crosslinked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Lu, Bing-Sui; Ye, Fangfu; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2013-08-01

    We address the statistical mechanics of randomly and permanently crosslinked networks. We develop a theoretical framework (vulcanization theory) which can be used to systematically analyze the correlation between the statistical properties of random networks and their histories of formation. Generalizing the original idea of Deam and Edwards, we consider an instantaneous crosslinking process, where all crosslinkers (modeled as Gaussian springs) are introduced randomly at once in an equilibrium liquid state, referred to as the preparation state. The probability that two functional sites are crosslinked by a spring exponentially decreases with their distance squared. After formally averaging over network connectivity, we obtained an effective theory with all degrees of freedom replicated 1 + n times. Two thermodynamic ensembles, the preparation ensemble and the measurement ensemble, naturally appear in this theory. The former describes the thermodynamic fluctuations in the state of preparation, while the latter describes the thermodynamic fluctuations in the state of measurement. We classify various correlation functions and discuss their physical significances. In particular, the memory correlation functions characterize how the properties of networks depend on their method of preparation, and are the hallmark properties of all randomly crosslinked materials. We clarify the essential difference between our approach and that of Deam-Edwards, and discuss the saddle-point order parameters and its physical significance. Finally we also discuss the connection between saddle-point approximation of vulcanization theory, and the classical theory of rubber elasticity as well as the neo-classical theory of nematic elastomers.

  4. Microbiological quality of bulk tank raw milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Elmoslemany, A M; Keefe, G P; Dohoo, I R; Dingwell, R T

    2009-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate microbiological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island, to evaluate correlation among milk quality criteria, and to determine seasonal effects on milk quality parameters. Bulk tank raw milk quality was evaluated on all Prince Edward Island dairy herds (n = 235) over a 2-yr period (March 2005 to March 2007). Biweekly total aerobic (TAC), preliminary incubation (PIC), laboratory pasteurization, and coliform (CC) counts were determined using a Petrifilm culture system. Additionally, bulk tank somatic cell count was determined weekly. The mean and median values were 12.8 x 10(3) and 4.9 x 10(3) cfu/mL for TAC, 29.6 x 10(3) and 13 x 10(3) cfu/mL for PIC, 87 and 12 cfu/mL for laboratory pasteurization count, 21 and 5 cfu/mL for CC, and 218 x 10(3) and 187 x 10(3) cells/mL for somatic cell count. There was moderate correlation (0.57) between TAC and PIC. All other correlation coefficients were low (<0.26). Correlation results suggest that a single quality parameter could not predict others used in this study. Seasonal data indicate that 1) in general, all counts tended to be low in winter, 2) the CC and somatic cell count were always high in summer, and 3) TAC tended to be high during summer.

  5. Description and Evaluation of Numerical Groundwater Flow Models for the Edwards Aquifer, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard J.; Taylor, Charles J.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial number of public water system wells in south-central Texas withdraw groundwater from the karstic, highly productive Edwards aquifer. However, the use of numerical groundwater flow models to aid in the delineation of contributing areas for public water system wells in the Edwards aquifer is problematic because of the complex hydrogeologic framework and the presence of conduit-dominated flow paths in the aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, evaluated six published numerical groundwater flow models (all deterministic) that have been developed for the Edwards aquifer San Antonio segment or Barton Springs segment, or both. This report describes the models developed and evaluates each with respect to accessibility and ease of use, range of conditions simulated, accuracy of simulations, agreement with dye-tracer tests, and limitations of the models. These models are (1) GWSIM model of the San Antonio segment, a FORTRAN computer-model code that pre-dates the development of MODFLOW; (2) MODFLOW conduit-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (3) MODFLOW diffuse-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (4) MODFLOW Groundwater Availability Modeling [GAM] model of the Barton Springs segment; (5) MODFLOW recalibrated GAM model of the Barton Springs segment; and (6) MODFLOW-DCM (dual conductivity model) conduit model of the Barton Springs segment. The GWSIM model code is not commercially available, is limited in its application to the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and lacks the ability of MODFLOW to easily incorporate newly developed processes and packages to better simulate hydrologic processes. MODFLOW is a widely used and tested code for numerical modeling of groundwater flow, is well documented, and is in the public domain. These attributes make MODFLOW a preferred code with regard to accessibility and ease of use. The MODFLOW conduit-flow model

  6. Hydrogeologic factors that affect the flowpath of water in selected zones of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groschen, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region supplies drinking water for more than 1 million people. Proper development and protection of the aquifer is a high priority for local and State authorities. To better understand the flow of water in two major flowpaths in the Edwards aquifer, stratigraphic, structural, hydrologic, and geochemical data were analyzed. The western Medina flowpath is in parts of Uvalde, Medina, and Bexar Counties, and the eastern flowpath is in northern Bexar and central Comal Counties. A major hydrogeologic factor that affects the pattern of flow in the Edwards aquifer is the spatial and temporal distribution of recharge. Other hydrogeologic factors that affect flowpaths include internal boundaries and the location and rate of spring discharge. The relative displacement of faults and the high permeability layers have substantial control on the discharge at springs and on the flowpaths in the Edwards aquifer. Analysis of the estimated recharge to the Edwards aquifer during 1982 89 indicated that during years of substantial precipitation, a large part of the net recharge probably is diffuse infiltration of precipitation over large parts of the recharge area. During years with below-normal precipitation, most recharge is leakage from rivers and streams that drain the catchment subbasins. In the western Medina flowpath, concentrations of major ions indicate saturation of calcite and undersaturation of dolomite the two minerals that constitute most of the Edwards aquifer matrix. Concentrations of dissolved calcium, alkalinity, and dissolved chloride in the eastern flowpath are greater than those in the western Medina flowpath. These upward trends in concentrations might result in part from: (1) increased development in the recharge area, (2) mineralized effluent from developed areas, or (3) increased dissolution of aquifer material. Tritium data from wells sampled in and near the western Medina flowpath indicate no vertical stratification of

  7. Water quality of the Edwards Aquifer and streams recharging the aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roddy, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas is one of the most productive and most important aquifers in the State, with an average annual discharge of about 608,000 acre-ft of water during 1932-82 (Reeves and Ozuna, 1985).  The Edwards aquifer is the principal source of water for municipal, industrial, and irrigation use in all or parts of five counties- Bexar, Comal, hays, Medina, and Uvalde- and is the only source of water for San Antonio, the tenth-largest city in the United States (1980 population, 786,000) (A.H. Belo Corporation, 1985).

  8. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    DOEpatents

    McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood therethrough with two curved leaflets each of which is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance.

  9. Potential for bed-material entrainment in selected streams of the Edwards Plateau - Edwards, Kimble, and Real Counties, Texas, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation spends considerable money for maintenance and replacement of low-water crossings of streams in the Edwards Plateau in Central Texas as a result of damages caused in part by the transport of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material. An investigation of the problem at low-water crossings was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, and in collaboration with Texas Tech University, Lamar University, and the University of Houston. The bed-material entrainment problem for low-water crossings occurs at two spatial scales - watershed scale and channel-reach scale. First, the relative abundance and activity of cobble- and gravel-sized bed material along a given channel reach becomes greater with increasingly steeper watershed slopes. Second, the stresses required to mobilize bed material at a location can be attributed to reach-scale hydraulic factors, including channel geometry and particle size. The frequency of entrainment generally increases with downstream distance, as a result of decreasing particle size and increased flood magnitudes. An average of 1 year occurs between flows that initially entrain bed material as large as the median particle size, and an average of 1.5 years occurs between flows that completely entrain bed material as large as the median particle size. The Froude numbers associated with initial and complete entrainment of bed material up to the median particle size approximately are 0.40 and 0.45, respectively.

  10. Linking climate change and karst hydrology to evaluate species vulnerability: The Edwards and Madison aquifers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; Long, A. J.; Stamm, J. F.; Poteet, M.; Symstad, A.

    2013-12-01

    Karst aquifers present an extreme case of flow along structurally variable pathways, making them highly dynamic systems and therefore likely to respond rapidly to climate change. In turn, many biological communities and ecosystems associated with karst are sensitive to hydrologic changes. We explored how three sites in the Edwards aquifer (Texas) and two sites in the Madison aquifer (South Dakota) might respond to projected climate change from 2011 to 2050. Ecosystems associated with these karst aquifers support federally listed endangered and threatened species and state-listed species of concern, including amphibians, birds, insects, and plants. The vulnerability of selected species associated with projected climate change was assessed. The Advanced Research Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model was used to simulate projected climate at a 36-km grid spacing for three weather stations near the study sites, using boundary and initial conditions from the global climate model Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) and an A2 emissions scenario. Daily temperature and precipitation projections from the WRF model were used as input for the hydrologic Rainfall-Response Aquifer and Watershed Flow (RRAWFLOW) model and the Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) model. RRAWFLOW is a lumped-parameter model that simulates hydrologic response at a single site, combining the responses of quick and slow flow that commonly characterize karst aquifers. CCVI uses historical and projected climate and hydrologic metrics to determine the vulnerability of selected species on the basis of species exposure to climate change, sensitivity to factors associated with climate change, and capacity to adapt to climate change. An upward trend in temperature was projected for 2011-2050 at all three weather stations; there was a trend (downward) in annual precipitation only for the weather station in Texas. A downward trend in mean annual spring flow or groundwater level was projected for

  11. An observational study of dust nucleation in Mira (o Ceti). I. Variable features of AlO and other Al-bearing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, T.; Wong, K. T.; Schmidt, M. R.; Müller, H. S. P.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Cherchneff, I.; Menten, K. M.; Keller, D.; Brünken, S.; Winters, J. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Dust is efficiently produced by cool giant stars, but the condensation of inorganic dust is poorly understood. Observations of key aluminum bearing molecules around evolved stars has enabled us to investigate the nucleation of alumina (Al2O3) dust in the gas. Aims: We aim to identify and characterize aluminum bearing species in the circumstellar gas of Mira (o Ceti) in order to elucidate their role in the production of Al2O3 dust. Methods: We used multiepoch spectral line observations at (sub-)millimeter, far-infrared, and optical wavelengths including: maps with ALMA that probe the gas distribution in the immediate vicinity of the star at ~30 mas; observations with ALMA, APEX, and Herschel in 2013-2015 for studying cycle and inter-cycle variability of the rotational lines of Al-bearing molecules; optical records as far back as 1965 to examine variations in electronic transitions over time spans of days to decades; and velocity measurements and excitation analysis of the spectral features that constrain the physical parameters of the gas. Results: Three diatomic molecules AlO, AlOH, and AlH, and atomic Al i are the main observable aluminum species in Mira, although a significant fraction of aluminum might reside in other species that have not yet been identified. Strong irregular variability in the (sub-)millimeter and optical features of AlO (possibly the direct precursor of Al2O3) indicates substantial changes in the excitation conditions, or varying abundance that is likely related to shocks in the star. The inhomogeneous distribution of AlO might influence the spatial and temporal characteristics of dust production. Conclusions: We are unable to quantitatively trace aluminum depletion from the gas, but the rich observational material constrains time-dependent chemical networks. Future improvements should include spectroscopic characterization of higher aluminum oxides, coordinated observations of dust and gas species at different variability phases

  12. Missions and Medicine at Amherst: Family Ties to Edward Hitchcock Jr., the Missionary Movement, and the American University of Beirut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Haystack Movement began at Williams College in 1805, occasioning the spread of American missions throughout the world. A half century later, two graduates of nearby Amherst College, Edward Hitchcock Jr. and Daniel Bliss, laid the foundations for college health services in this country and for mission work and education in the Middle East. The…

  13. Sediment yield dynamics during the 1950s multi-year droughts from two ungauged basins in the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment yield dynamics on the Edwards Plateau region of Texas was dramatically influenced by a multi-year drought that occurred there during the 1950s. To assess the effect of this drought on sediment yield, we used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to identify the factors that contributed...

  14. How Direct Descendants of a School Lockout Achieved Academic Success: Resilience in the Educational Attainments of Prince Edward County's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Randolph, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    From 1959 to 1964, approximately 1,700 Black children in Prince Edward County, Virginia were denied schooling, due to the county leaders' decision to close schools--a defiant response to federal racial desegregation mandates stemming from "Brown v. Board of Education" (1954, 1955). Yet from one of the most extreme cases of injustice in…

  15. Assessment Literacy for Educators: Q&A with Edward Roeber, Ph.D. 2016 Educator Effectiveness Webinar Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeber, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In this webinar, Dr. Edward Roeber, Assessment Director for the Michigan Assessment Consortium, addressed what educators need to know about formative, summative, and interim assessments and how each functions in a coherent assessment system. This Q&A addressed the questions participants had for Dr. Roeber following the webinar. The webinar…

  16. The Writing Life: Narrative, Metaphor, and Emotion in the Spiritual Autobiographies of Teresa of Avila and Sarah Edwards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Elizabeth Ford

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I analyze the spiritual autobiographies of Teresa of Avila (1515-1582) and Sarah Edwards (1710-1758) through the methodological lenses of autobiography studies and cognitive linguistics in order to identify key narratives and metaphors for the spiritual life and explore the significance of the interpretation process for lived…

  17. Selected Annotated Bibliography of Recent Research on Rural Life on Prince Edward Island. Community Studies, Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Allan F.; O'Connell, Harold J.

    A review of research literature was the first step in a program of rural development and planning on Prince Edward Island. This bibliography containing 80 annotations of extended research reports from 1960-71 is the result of that search. The bibliography is divided into 4 main subject areas within which the annotations appear in alphabetical…

  18. G. Stanley Hall and Edward Thorndike on the Education of Women: Theory and Policy in the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seller, Maxine S.

    During the Progressive Era (late 19th and early 20th Centuries), the theories of educational psychologists G. Stanley Hall and Edward L. Thorndike provided a basis for educational policy formation. It is hypothesized that their educational policies led to separate and unequal educational programs for women. Review of their writing indicates that…

  19. Edward D. Churchill as a combat consultant: lessons for the senior visiting surgeons and today's military medical corps.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Fischer, Josef E

    2010-03-01

    In World War II, Edward D. Churchill volunteered as a combat consultant. In this role, he mentored many junior surgeons and challenged the Army leadership to treat hemorrhagic shock with blood rather than plasma. These lessons have continued relevance for today's Senior Visiting Surgeons and our military medical corps.

  20. Native Agency and the Making of "The North American Indian": Alexander B. Upshaw and Edward S. Curtis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Shamoon

    2007-01-01

    The twenty volumes of ethnographic text and pictorial photography and the twenty portfolios of large, finely printed photogravures that together comprise "The North American Indian" were the product of an extraordinary labor by Edward S. Curtis, an extensive and shifting team of co-workers, and the participation of hundreds of Native Americans. By…

  1. Historical potentiometric surface of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bush, Peter W.; Ardis, Ann F.; Wynn, Kirby H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a potentiometric-surface map of the principal aquifers of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system based on the earliest available data; to explain in general terms what the potentiometric surface represents relative to rainfall conditions and ground-water withdrawals; and to discuss the major factors that control the configuration of the potentiometric surface.

  2. Relation of precipitation to annual ground-water recharge in the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso

    1975-01-01

    The report includes a brief review of the geology and hydrology of the Edwards aquifer, a discussion of the preparation and evaluation of the precipitation data used in the regression analyses, and a brief summary of the method previously used to estimate recharge.

  3. Infectious disease prevalence in a feral cat population on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Foley, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Ninety-six feral cats from Prince Edward Island were used to determine the prevalence of selected infectious agents. The prevalence rates were 5.2% for feline immunodeficiency virus, 3.1% for feline leukemia virus, 3.1% for Mycoplasma haemofelis, 8.4% for Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, 2.1% for Bartonella spp. and 29.8% for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii. Oocysts of T. gondii were detected in 1.3% of the fecal samples that were collected. Gender and retroviral status of the cats were significantly correlated with hemoplasma infections. Use of a flea comb showed that 9.6% of the cats had fleas; however, flea infestation was not associated with any of the infectious agents.

  4. Infectious disease prevalence in a feral cat population on Prince Edward Island, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Foley, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Ninety-six feral cats from Prince Edward Island were used to determine the prevalence of selected infectious agents. The prevalence rates were 5.2% for feline immunodeficiency virus, 3.1% for feline leukemia virus, 3.1% for Mycoplasma haemofelis, 8.4% for Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, 2.1% for Bartonella spp. and 29.8% for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii. Oocysts of T. gondii were detected in 1.3% of the fecal samples that were collected. Gender and retroviral status of the cats were significantly correlated with hemoplasma infections. Use of a flea comb showed that 9.6% of the cats had fleas; however, flea infestation was not associated with any of the infectious agents. PMID:22379197

  5. The Elegance of Disordered Granular Packings: A Validation of Edwards' Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Donahue, Carly M.

    2004-01-01

    We have found a way to analyze Edwards' density of states for static granular packings in the special case of round, rigid, frictionless grains assuming constant coordination number. It obtains the most entropic density of single grain states, which predicts several observables including the distribution of contact forces. We compare these results against empirical data obtained in dynamic simulations of granular packings. The agreement between theory and the empirics is quite good, helping validate the use of statistical mechanics methods in granular physics. The differences between theory and empirics are mainly due to the variable coordination number, and when the empirical data are sorted by that number we obtain several insights that suggest an underlying elegance in the density of states

  6. Sawfly taxa (Hymenoptera, Symphyta) described by Edward Newman and Charles Healy

    PubMed Central

    Liston, Andrew D.; Prous, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Type specimens of seven nominal species of sawfly described by Edward Newman and one by Charles Healy were studied. This material is housed in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, United Kingdom. The following new synonymies are proposed (valid names in parentheses): Hartigia Schiødte, 1839 (Phylloecus Newman, 1838), Cephus helleri Taschenberg, 1871 (Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838) and Euura gallae Newman, 1837 (Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837)). The type species of Euura Newman, 1837 and Euura subgenus Gemmura E. L. Smith, 1968 belong to the same taxonomic species, Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837), so that these genus group names become new synonyms. Lectotypes are designated for Phyllotoma tormentillae Healy, 1868, Fenusa ianthe Newman, 1837, Fenusa parviceps Newman, 1837, Selandria pallida Newman, 1837 and Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838. 26 new combinations are proposed for species formerly placed in Hartigia and here transferred to Phylloecus, and 4 original combinations are re-instated as valid. PMID:24715803

  7. Measuring the Edwards-Anderson order parameter of the Bose glass: A quantum gas microscope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, S. J.; Walker, L. S.; Harte, T. L.; Bruce, G. D.

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of spatially resolved fluorescence imaging in quantum gas microscopes, it is now possible to directly image glassy phases and probe the local effects of disorder in a highly controllable setup. Here we present numerical calculations using a spatially resolved local mean-field theory, show that it captures the essential physics of the disordered system, and use it to simulate the density distributions seen in single-shot fluorescence microscopy. From these simulated images we extract local properties of the phases which are measurable by a quantum gas microscope and show that unambiguous detection of the Bose glass is possible. In particular, we show that experimental determination of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter is possible in a strongly correlated quantum system using existing experiments. We also suggest modifications to the experiments which will allow further properties of the Bose glass to be measured.

  8. The Immortal Fire Within: the life and work of Edward Emerson Barnard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, William

    1995-06-01

    This first full-length biography of Edward Emerson Barnard tells the remarkable tale of endurance and achievement of one of the leading astronomers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. As "a man who was never known to sleep", Barnard scoured the heavens endlessly, leaving an astonishing legacy of observations that make him one of the greatest observers of all time. This book traces Barnard's life from impoverished origins to status as an internationally recognized astronomer. His success as a professional astronomer unfolds in 1842 as he discovers the fifth satellite of Jupiter (the first since Galileo) and pioneers wide-angle photography of the Milky Way, which leads to the recognition of dark nebulae--clouds of dust on the galactic plane. Beautifully illustrated throughout, this book provides a complete history of Barnard's fascinating life and work, based largely on previously unpublished archival material, that will be of interest to astronomers and historians of science.

  9. Cuff leakage, not paravalvular leakage, in the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Cho, Tomoki; Izubuchi, Ryo; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-12-01

    Though the Carpentier Edwards PERIMOUNT Magna Ease valve is a bioprosthesis with documented excellent haemodynamics and easy implantability, this valve has a gap between the cobalt-chromium-nickel alloy stent and silicone sewing ring. This gap, which is widest just below each of the three commissural struts, lacks silicone and leaves the two-layer polytetrafluoroethylene fabric unsupported and unprotected. If the needle of a valve suture is placed in this structurally weak area of the sewing ring, the resultant fabric tear may result in a true cuff leakage, not the usual paravalvular leakage. We describe this pitfall in the context of a recent operation to alert surgeons everywhere that suture placement too close to the stent (missing the silicone sewing ring) can result in postoperative cuff leakage. We need to be very careful to include the silicone ring in each stitch to prevent injury to the valve cuff of this prosthesis and to avoid cuff leakage.

  10. Sonic booms of space shuttles approaching Edwards Air Force Base, 1988-1993.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    From 1988 to 1993 13 sonic booms of space shuttles approaching Edwards Air Force Base were measured at a site 10 miles west of EAFB, with one to seven different sound level meters for each measurement. Results from five of these measurements are here presented. Maximum differences in measured levels between instruments for the same flight varied from 0 to 6 dB depending on the measurement descriptor and model of sound level meter. The average difference between predicted and measured values was 0.7+/-1.5 dB. For sound level meters with adequate bandwidth the waveforms measured varied from a near perfect N-wave to a more distorted form reflecting the influence of the varying condition of the atmosphere during propagation to the ground.

  11. Empowerment through education and science: three intersecting strands in the career of Griffith Edwards.

    PubMed

    Crome, Ilana

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes three important strands in the career of Griffith Edwards that define him as a leader and an innovator. Believing that education and science were critical for the development of addiction as a profession and as a field of inquiry, his approach was multi-faceted: educating all doctors to appreciate the fundamental issues in addiction; training psychiatrists in the complexity of 'dual diagnosis' and specific specialist intervention; and teaching that addiction could be a chronic condition which required care management over the life course. These three inter-related areas are directly related to the need for a range of practitioners to have an understanding of addiction so that patients can be properly managed. The greater our understanding of the nature of addiction behaviour, the more likely the potential to optimize treatment and train practitioners from different professional disciplines.

  12. Diastolic murmurs in the presence of Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R A; McAnulty, J H; Starr, A; Rahimtoola, S H

    1975-03-01

    Diastolic murmurs associated with the Starr-Edwards mitral prosthesis have not been described previously. In this report, five patients with mitral prostheses are described in whom apical mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs resulted from two different causes. Three patients had clots obstructing the prosthetic orifice. The other two had normally functioning protheses and moderately severe aortic insufficiency. The occurrence of mid-diastolic and presystolic murmurs in the presence of a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve demonstrates that 1) the mid-diastolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete mitral valve opening, premature mitral valve closure, vibrating mitral leaflets, or relative mitral stenosis and 2) the presystolic Austin Flint murmur can occur in the absence of incomplete valve opening or presystolic mitral regurgitation. However, the presystolic murmur was associated with early closure movement of the presthetic poppet.

  13. Personality characteristics in heroin addicts and nonaddicted prisoners using the Edwards Personality Preference Schedule.

    PubMed

    Reith, G; Crockett, D; Craig, K

    1975-01-01

    The present study compares the self-reported personality characteristics of heroin addict and nonaddict prisoners using the Edwards Personality Preference Schedule (EPPS) which was corrected for social desirability. Seventy pairs of addicted and nonaddicted criminal offenders were matched for age, education, intelligence, and home environment. The addicted offenders were identified by the pattern of their response to the EPPS as reflected by the significant multivariate results. In addition, significant univariate differences consistent with those previously reported were found. Addicted criminals had stronger succorance, heterosexuality, and aggression needs and less abasement and endurance needs than nonaddicted offenders. Age, educational achievment, intelligence,and home environment had little influence on the prisoners' response to this self-report personality inventory.

  14. Deserts on the sea floor: Edward Forbes and his azoic hypothesis for a lifeless deep ocean.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas R; Rice, Tony

    2006-12-01

    While dredging in the Aegean Sea during the mid-19th century, Manxman Edward Forbes noticed that plants and animals became progressively more impoverished the greater the depth they were from the surface of the water. By extrapolation Forbes proposed his now infamous azoic hypothesis, namely that life would be extinguished altogether in the murky depths of the deep ocean. The whole idea seemed so entirely logical given the enormous pressure, cold and eternal darkness of this apparently uninhabitable environment. Yet we now know that the sea floor is teeming with life. Curiously, it took 25 years for the azoic hypothesis to fall from grace. This was despite the presence of ample contrary evidence, including starfishes, worms and other organisms that seemingly originated from the deep seabed. This is a tale of scientists ignoring observations that ran counter to their deep-seated, yet entirely erroneous, beliefs.

  15. Hydrochemical data for the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, R.W.; Rettman, P.L.; Small, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents hydrochemical data that was collected as part of the investigations of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Te xas, during 1970-78 and indicates other sources of available data. The report includes the results of chemical analyses of 159 water samples from 123 well s and springs; tritium analyses for 242 water samples from 120 wells and springs; isotope and redox-potential analyses of 31 water samples from wells, springs, and streams; and calculated dissolved carbonate, partial C02 pressures, and saturation indices of selected minerals in 98 water samples from 81 wells, springs, and streams. The water types and hydrochemical facies are given for six zones of the aquifer.

  16. A review of Edward Flatau's 1894 Atlas of the Human Brain by the neurologist Sigmund Freud.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2011-01-01

    In 1894, the Polish neurologist Edward Flatau (1868-1932), working in Berlin, published an exquisite photographic atlas of the unfixed human brain, preceding by 2 years Das Menschenhirn, the reference work of Gustaf Retzius (1842-1919) in Stockholm. In his early career as a neuroanatomist and neurologist, Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) wrote a review of Flatau's atlas for the Internationale klinische Rundschau, which has not been included in the 'Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works'. The aim of the present paper is twofold: to document Freud's review, and to revive the largely forgotten atlas of Flatau. The full text of Freud is presented in translation. Further, one element Flatau, Retzius and Freud had in common is discussed: their early role as protagonists and firm supporters of Ramón y Cajal's neuron theory, the cornerstone of modern neuroscience.

  17. Estimating transmissivity in the Edwards Aquifer using upscaling, geostatistics, and Bayesian updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S. L.; Jiang, Y.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Edwards Aquifer, a highly heterogeneous karst aquifer located in south central Texas, is the sole source of drinking water for more than one million people. Hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements in the Edwards Aquifer are sparse, highly variable (log-K variance of 6.4), and are mostly from single-well drawdown tests that are appropriate for the spatial scale of a few meters. To support ongoing efforts to develop a groundwater management (MODFLOW) model of the San Antonio segment of the Edwards Aquifer, a multistep procedure was developed to assign hydraulic parameters to the 402 m x 402 m computational cells intended for the management model. The approach used a combination of nonparametric geostatistical analysis, stochastic simulation, numerical upscaling, and automatic model calibration based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. Indicator correlograms reveal a nested spatial structure in the well-test K of the confined zone, with practical correlation ranges of 3,600 and 15,000 meters and a large nugget effect. The fitted geostatistical model was used in unconditional stochastic simulations by the sequential indicator simulation method. The resulting realizations of K, defined at the scale of the well tests, were then numerically upscaled to the block scale. A new geostatistical model was fitted to the upscaled values. The upscaled model was then used to cokrige the block-scale K based on the well-test K. The resulting K map was then converted to transmissivity (T) using deterministically mapped aquifer thickness. When tested in a forward groundwater model, the upscaled T reproduced hydraulic heads better than a simple kriging of the well-test values (mean error of -3.9 meter and mean-absolute-error of 12 meters, as compared with -13 and 17 meters for the simple kriging). As the final step in the study, the upscaled T map was used as the prior distribution in an inverse procedure based on Bayesian updating [1,2]. When input to the forward groundwater model, the

  18. Using Edward de Bono's six hats game to aid critical thinking and reflection in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Lesley J

    2003-03-01

    This article describes the use of a creative thinking game to stimulate critical thinking and reflection with qualified health professionals undertaking palliative care education. The importance of reflective practice in nursing is well documented and numerous models are available. However, the author as a nurse teacher has found that many of these models are either too simple or too complex to be valuable in practice. The six hats game, devised by Edward de Bono, is a method that stimulates a variety of types of thinking and when used as a means of reflection helps students to become more critical about their practice. Using this game with a palliative care case study the author demonstrates how thinking more creatively about the patients' perceived needs and problems can assist in developing reflective skills. The article concludes with a discussion on some of the challenges of using this method and suggestions for future practical uses.

  19. John L. LaBrecque Receives 2013 Edward A. Flinn III Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrecque, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Jean Bernard Minster and those who supported my nomination for the Edward A. Flinn III Award. We owe so much to colleagues such as Bernard Minster who support NASA and Earth Science with unrelenting and unselfish service. I am also grateful to my parents, the people of Lewiston, Maine, and the National Defense Education Act (NDEA) of 1958 for nurturing my early interest in science with an education that ultimately led me to Columbia University and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Lamont for me was a scientific wonderland tended by scientists with global appetites for discovery and adventure. Marine geophysics, geomagnetism, and satellite altimetry of the oceans were creating a revolution of discovery, and Lamont was the center of this revolution. I owe so much to my mentor and dear friend, Walter C. Pitman III, who showed me that great science was accomplished through boundless curiosity, perseverance, and, most of all, humility.

  20. Spectral characterization and classification of Carpentier-Edwards heart valves implanted in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Sava, H P; Grant, P M; McDonnell, J T

    1996-10-01

    This paper demonstrates an improvement in the performance of spectral phonocardiography, combined with pattern recognition techniques for monitoring the condition of bioprosthetic heart valves. The analysis of the heart sounds is performed using a modified forward-backward overdetermined Prony's method. Results show that the condition of the bioprosthesis affects mostly the higher part of the spectrum (i.e., above 250 Hz) where no frequency components were found for malfunctioning cases. Therefore, the amplitudes of the three highest frequency components are used as the input vector of an adaptive single layer perceptron-based classifier to identify normal and malfunctioning classes. For the sample set examined, this method gives 100% correct discrimination between normal and malfunctioning Carpentier-Edwards (C-E) valves.

  1. Numerical results for the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass model at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-04-01

    We have simulated Edwards-Anderson (EA) as well as Sherrington-Kirkpatrick systems of L3 spins. After averaging over large sets of EA system samples of 3≤L≤10, we obtain accurate numbers for distributions p(q) of the overlap parameter q at very low-temperature T. We find p(0)/T→0.233(4) as T→0. This is in contrast with the droplet scenario of spin glasses. We also study the number of mismatched links—between replica pairs—that come with large scale excitations. Contributions from small scale excitations are discarded. We thus obtain for the fractal dimension of outer surfaces of q˜0 excitations in the EA model ds→2.59(3) as T→0. This is in contrast with ds→3 as T→0 that is predicted by mean-field theory for the macroscopic limit.

  2. Mary Edwards Walker, M.D.: a feminist physician a century ahead of her time.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D; Suskind, P B

    1996-06-01

    In her teens, Mary Edwards Walker already wore the "bloomer" outfit began to campaign for reforming the "unhygienic" clothing of women. Assertively, she attended medical school and earned her M.D. degree. Due to prejudice, her practice did not flourish and she moved to Washington to offer her medical services to the Union as the Civil War began. Rebuffed by the male medical bureaucrats, she volunteered her services anyway. Eventually, she was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, the only women to ever gain such distinction. After the war, Walker became a journalist, an author of two sensational books, a political lobbyist, a suffrage campaigner, a professional and public lecturer, an ardent dress reformer, a peace activist, a Utopianist and a women's right advocate. Light-years ahead of her times, Dr. Walker was an intelligent, independent, irrepressible and indefatigable proponent for a host of worthy causes.

  3. Sir Edward Appleton and Joseph Priestley: two giants of electrical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Excell, P. S.

    The life of Sir Edward Appleton is reviewed, in commemoration of the recent centenary of his birth. Appleton discovered the ionosphere and devoted much of his life to investigations of its properties, receiving the Nobel Prize for physics as a result. He became a senior government scientist in World War II and afterwards was appointed Vice-Chancellor of Edinburgh University. The influence of his roots in the city of Bradford is emphasized and compared with the case of Joseph Priestley, also born near Bradford some 160 yr earlier. Priestley was a major early investigator of electrical phenomena and compiled a comprehensive treatise on the electrical knowledge of his day. He was the first person to present an experimental proof of the inverse-square law of electrostatic force, although he is usually better remembered as the discoverer of oxygen.

  4. Fosthiazate for Suppression of Pratylenchus penetrans in Potato on Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    Kimpinski, J.; Arsenault, W. J.; Sanderson, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The impacts of fosthiazate on potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber yields and populations of root lesion nematodes (primarily Pratylenchus penetrans) were studied during 1991-1994 in experimental plots on Prince Edward Island. Tuber yields were greater in treated plots when compared to untreated plots by 8% and 30% during 1991 and 1993, respectively. Numbers of nematodes in roots were reduced by the treatments in every year, and nematode populations in soil were suppressed in 1991, 1993, and 1994. Tuber yields in 1993 and 1994 were higher, and nematode counts in soil and roots in 1991, 1993, and 1994 were lower in plots treated with the emulsifiable concentrate formulations of fosthiazate than in plots treated with the granular formulations. Yields of plots treated with fosthiazate did not differ consistently from yields of plots treated with aldicarb. The results indicated that fosthiazate should be useful for potato production in the Maritime region of Canada. PMID:19274269

  5. Extensional Tectonics and Paleoclimate of the Albertine and Edward Rifts: Constraints from Integrated Seismic Reflection and Topographic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, T.; McGlue, M. M.; Scholz, C. A.; Kasande, R.; Mugisha, F.

    2004-12-01

    Lakes Albert and Edward are among the largest lakes in Africa and form substantial reservoirs for tropical precipitation within the Upper Nile Watershed (UNW), the equatorial headwaters supporting annual discharge of the main Nile River into the Mediterranean Sea. Extensional processes forming Lakes Albert and Edward have driven landscape evolution, manifested in significant topography and reversed drainages networks. Consequently, the UNW, including Lakes Albert, Edward, Victoria, and Kyoga, and their riverine connections, provide an important case study for drainage basin evolution in actively extending continental lithosphere. In addition to multiple scales of tectonic deformation, high frequency climate change affects the basins in the UNW, which record moisture signals from both the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Paleoclimate proxy data indicate the desiccation of Lake Victoria and cessation of Victoria Nile flow during the Last Glacial Maximum (22 - 18 ka). However, the response of Lakes Albert and Edward during this time period is not fully resolved. In 2003, 1600 line km of multichannel seismic reflection and high resolution echo-sounder data were collected from Lake Albert, while 200 km of 1 kHz seismic reflection data were collected from Lake Edward. In conjunction with recently released digital elevation models, we investigate both tectonic and climatic processes operative in the basins. In Lake Albert, we are able to map depth to pre-rift basement, basin boundary fault as well as intrabasinal fault geometries that control both bathymetry and sediment distribution. Shallow reflections suggest desiccation of the lake, probably during the LGM; these results tie well with published sediment core data. Acoustic data from Lake Edward record two regression events, although this lake apparently escaped LGM desiccation, and may contain a complete, high-resolution archive of Quaternary climate change in its deep-water sequences. Our interpretations provide another

  6. Three-dimensional geologic framework modeling of faulted hydrostratigraphic units within the Edwards Aquifer, Northern Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pantea, Michael P.; Cole, James C.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a digital, three-dimensional faulted hydrostratigraphic model constructed to represent the geologic framework of the Edwards aquifer system in the area of San Antonio, northern Bexar County, Texas. The model is based on mapped geologic relationships that reflect the complex structures of the Balcones fault zone, detailed lithologic descriptions and interpretations of about 40 principal wells (and qualified data from numerous other wells), and a conceptual model of the gross geometry of the Edwards Group units derived from prior interpretations of depositional environments and paleogeography. The digital model depicts the complicated intersections of numerous major and minor faults in the subsurface, as well as their individual and collective impacts on the continuity of the aquifer-forming units of the Edwards Group and the Georgetown Formation. The model allows for detailed examination of the extent of fault dislocation from place to place, and thus the extent to which the effective cross-sectional area of the aquifer is reduced by faulting. The model also depicts the internal hydrostratigraphic subdivisions of the Edwards aquifer, consisting of three major and eight subsidiary hydrogeologic units. This geologic framework model is useful for visualizing the geologic structures within the Balcones fault zone and the interactions of en-echelon fault strands and flexed connecting fault-relay ramps. The model also aids in visualizing the lateral connections between hydrostratigraphic units of relatively high and low permeability across the fault strands. Introduction The Edwards aquifer is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, industrial, and military uses by nearly 1.5 million inhabitants of the greater San Antonio, Texas, region (Hovorka and others, 1996; Sharp and Banner, 1997). Discharges from the Edwards aquifer also support local recreation and tourism industries at Barton, Comal, and San Marcos Springs located

  7. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M; Opsahl, S P; Mahler, B J; Herrington, C; Sample, T L; Banta, J R

    2016-10-15

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3(-)) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3(-) in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008-12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3(-) stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(18)O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3(-) concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3(-) concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3(-) concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3(-). These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3(-) contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008-10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3(-) than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously unrecognized

  8. Groundwater ages from the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas—Insights into groundwater flow and recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Landis, Gary P.; Faith, Jason R.

    2016-02-23

    Tritium–helium-3 groundwater ages of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas were determined as part of a long-term study of groundwater flow and recharge in the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. These ages help to define groundwater residence times and to provide constraints for calibration of groundwater flow models. A suite of 17 samples from public and private supply wells within Uvalde County were collected for active and noble gases, and for tritium–helium-3 analyses from the confined and unconfined parts of the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from monitoring wells at discrete depths in open boreholes as well as from integrated pumped well-head samples. The data indicate a fairly uniform groundwater flow system within an otherwise structurally complex geologic environment comprised of regionally and locally faulted rock units, igneous intrusions, and karst features within carbonate rocks. Apparent ages show moderate, downward average, linear velocities in the Uvalde area with increasing age to the east along a regional groundwater flow path. Though the apparent age data show a fairly consistent distribution across the study area, many apparent ages indicate mixing of both modern (less than 60 years) and premodern (greater than 60 years) waters. This mixing is most evident along the “bad water” line, an arbitrary delineation of 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids that separates the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer from the downdip saline water zone. Mixing of modern and premodern waters also is indicated within the unconfined zone of the aquifer by high excess helium concentrations in young waters. Excess helium anomalies in the unconfined aquifer are consistent with possible subsurface discharge of premodern groundwater from the underlying Trinity aquifer into the younger groundwater of the Edwards aquifer.

  9. The structure and function of roots of woody species on the Edwards Plateau, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pockman, W. T.; McElrone, A. J.; Bleby, T. M.; Jackson, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    The Edwards Plateau in central Texas USA, supports woody vegetation in savannas and woodlands despite characteristically shallow soils. Surveys using caves to access greater depths have shown that roots of all dominant woody species can reach 7 m below the surface while some species reliably reach depths as great as 20 m. Comparative studies showed that deep roots were structurally distinct from shallow roots of similar diameter. Deep roots had larger xylem conducting elements resulting in more than 2-fold greater hydraulic conductance than their shallow counterparts. To understand the relationship between environmental fluctuations and deep root function in these species, we directly measured water transport in deep roots accessed via caves for comparison with similar measurements in shallow roots and stems. Long term measurements of Juniperus ashei, one of the most abundant species on the Edwards plateau, showed that the contribution of roots 7 m below the surface fluctuated with the volumetric water content (VWC) of surface soils. During prolonged drought, upward flow in deep roots accounted for as much as 60% of total daily transpiration and occurred not only during the day when the canopy was transpiring but also throughout the night when hydraulic redistribution from deep to shallow soil maintained flow through the roots. Hydraulic redistribution was suppressed immediately after precipitation until nocturnal flow gradually increased as VWC decreased. In a cave system where roots reach a stream 18-20 m below the surface, hydraulic redistribution was observed year-round in all measured individuals of three additional dominant species (Quercus fusiformis, Bumelia lanuginosa and Prosopis glandulosa). Like J. ashei, upward hydraulic redistribution was observed when surface soils were dry. More complex patterns of redistribution were also observed, including downward redistribution of soil water following precipitation, and continuing redistribution of soil water

  10. X-43A Undergoing Controlled Radio Frequency Testing in the Benefield Anechoic Facility at Edwards Ai

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The X-43A Hypersonic Experimental (Hyper-X) Vehicle hangs suspended in the cavernous Benefield Aenechoic Facility at Edwards Air Force Base during radio frequency tests in January 2000. Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will be able to carry heavier payloads. Another unique aspect of the X-43A vehicle is the airframe integration

  11. Effects of altered soil moisture on respiratory quotient in the Edwards Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, M. A.; Hawkes, C.; Breecker, D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns around the world. The impacts of altered precipitation on ecosystem function will be partly controlled by soil microbes because of their primary role in soil carbon cycling. However, microbial responses to drought remain poorly understood, particularly local responses that might partly reflect specialization based on historical conditions. Here, we investigated the respiratory response of microbial communities originating from historically wetter and drier sites to both low and high soil moistures. We focused on the respiratory quotient (RQ= moles of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed), which varies with the oxidation state of organic carbon being respired and/or the compounds being synthesized by soil microbes. We hypothesized that there would be a shift in RQ across the gradient of soil moisture. Soils were collected from 13 sites across a steep precipitation gradient on the Edwards plateau in central Texas, air-dried, rewet at low or high soil moisture (6% or 24% gravimetric, respectively), and incubated in an atmosphere of 21% O2, 1% Ar, and balance He. After eight weeks, CO2, O2 and Ar in the headspace of incubation vials were measured by gas chromatography after separation of Ar and O2 at subambient temperature. Because of the high calcite content in soils on the Edwards plateau, we corrected the RQ values by assuming pH was buffered at 8 and then adding the calculated amount of CO2 dissolved in water in the incubations vials to the measured CO2 in the headspace. We found that uncorrected RQ values were slightly less than one and increased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation. In contrast, corrected RQ values were greater than one and decreased with increasing mean annual precipitation. In both cases, we see a shift in RQ across the gradient, suggesting that differences in substrate utilization may vary based on origin across the gradient and with current level of soil moisture

  12. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musgrove, Marylynn; Opsahl, Stephen P.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Herrington, Chris; Sample, Thomas; Banta, John (Ryan)

    2016-01-01

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3−) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3− in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008–12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3− stable isotopes (δ15N and δ18O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3− concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3− concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3− concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3−. These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3− contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008–10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3−than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously

  13. Twenty-four years' implant duration of the aortic Starr-Edwards Silastic ball prosthesis: a valve of the past?

    PubMed

    Mächler, H E; Schmidt, C H; Neuner, P; Iberer, F; Anelli-Monti, M; Dacar, D; Rigler, B; Kraft-Kinz, J

    1993-01-01

    Six years after the first aortic valve replacement with the Starr-Edwards Silastic ball prosthesis at Oregon Health Sciences University, the model 1260 was implanted in a 44-year-old patient at our department. During 24 years no signs of dysfunction, thromboembolism, thrombosis, periprosthetic leaks or hemolysis were observed. Material test showed no signs of fatigue. The dimension of the Silastic poppet was found to be one millimeter less than the original specifications of these poppets and there were some lipid infiltrations. Functionally the poppet was found to be nonvariant. Histologic findings detected focal hyalinization and giant cells without signs of acute inflammation or ulceration. With regard to its reliability and durability, the Starr-Edwards valve prosthesis should not be viewed with disfavor.

  14. Preserving a Well-Functioning 33-Year-Old Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis in Repeat Aortic Root Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Alimov, Victor K.; Rousou, John A.; Pluchino, Fabrizio I.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old obese male patient in whom we found a well-functioning 33-year-old Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis during repeat aortic surgery. Rather than explant the prosthesis, we remodeled the aortic root, almost completely removing the aortic sinuses and leaving only a pillar of aortic tissue around the coronary ostia. The proximal end of a Hemashield tube-graft was then scalloped to accommodate the remaining aortic tissue. The patient's heart function was excellent after his weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Simplifying the repeat aortic root repair, by preserving a well-functioning Starr-Edwards valve, might lead to a better outcome in similar cases. We also discuss other instances of this valve's durability. PMID:28100977

  15. Investigation of seismicity and related effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousineau, R. D.; Crook, R., Jr.; Leeds, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters, probability of recurrence, and recommended analogous time-history accelerograms with their corresponding spectra. The recommendations apply specifically to the Dryden site and should not be extrapolated to other sites with varying foundation and geologic conditions or different seismic environments.

  16. Final Environmental Assessment for the Integration and Developmental Testing of High Power Microwave Systems at Edwards Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-16

    3-24 14 3.5.1 Topography —Restricted Area R-2515 and Edwards AFB Area......................3-24 15 3.5.2 Geology—Restricted...emission rates of the pollutant source, (3) the proximity of project emission sources to other 23 emission sources, (4) topography , and (5) local and...the geologic setting, which could either affect or be affected by a proposed project, 6 include topography and soil erosion on base. Normal military

  17. Thrombo-embolic complications of the cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses No. 2300 aortic and No. 6300 mitral

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, J.; Molloy, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The thrombo-embolic complications of the cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses No. 2300 aortic and No. 6300 mitral followed for an average of 14 months in 155 patients are reviewed. There was a high incidence of early fatal and disabling thrombo-embolus in patients having mitral valve replacement. Late emboli were more common after aortic valve replacement. Anticoagulant control was unsatisfactory and not without hazards. PMID:4685210

  18. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spring, Sarah E.; Miles, A. Keith; Anderson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 μl/L of TCE and 0.07 μl/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

  19. Emanuel Edward Klein, a diligent and industrious plodder or the father of British microbiology.

    PubMed

    Atalic, Bruno; Peric, Ines Drenjancevic; Ferencic, Stella Fatovic

    2010-08-01

    Emanuel Edward Klein (Osijek, 1844 - Hove, 1925) was a British microbiologist of Croatian origin. He completed his medical studies in Vienna in 1869. In 1869 he was sent to England to determine terms for the translation of Samuel Stricker's manual Handbuch von den Geweben des Menchen und der Tiere. During his visit he made a good impression on John Burdon Sanderson and John Simon, which was the main reason why he was invited to London in 1871 to conduct investigations under their guidance. In 1873 Klein began his collaboration with the Saint Bartholomew's Hospital, where he was appointed as a Joint Professor of General Anatomy and Physiology. His researches were in the fields of anatomy, histology, pathology, embryology, physiology, and especially microbiology. He did a great deal to its development in Britain. He has written about 260 scientific papers on a broad range of different topics. Despite all the aforementioned facts, his work was never properly studied, and he is almost unknown outside academic circles. For that reason, attitudes towards him still range between the extremes of calling him the father of British microbiology on one side, and attributing him as a diligent and industrious plodder on the other. In this paper we will try to prove the first attitude. We will put his researches in a general context. Finally we will highlight his original achievements in the isolation of new microbes.

  20. Edward Walter Maunder FRAS (1851-1928): his life and times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinder, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    The year 2001 saw the sesquicentenary of the birth of Edward Walter Maunder, and 2004 the centenary of the publication of his Butterfly Diagram and the experiment on the canals of Mars. Despite his holding a pivotal place in the history of British amateur astronomy, so far no major treatment of his life has appeared. Although a prolific writer, virtually no reference appears in any modern work today; even his work in solar astronomy and geophysics is generally unacknowledged. Sheehan's portrayal of Maunder as '...a good example of the way in which fame and oblivion are inequably distributed among scientists... though he accomplished a great deal of... work of the very first rank... he is relatively unknown today' is very pertinent. However this appears to be changing as research is currently in progress respecting his work in solar astronomy and his investigations of the history of the origins of constellations. It is however as the founder of the British Astronomical Association that he is remembered.

  1. A newly identified apothecary in Boswell's Life of Johnson: Edward Ferrand (1691-1769).

    PubMed

    Caudle, James J; Bundock, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Ever since the publication of James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson (1791), it has been known that Johnson's young servant, the former slave Francis Barber 'ran away' at one point and worked for a London apothecary. But the apothecary was not named by Boswell and has not been identified by any of Johnson's numerous biographers nor in recent studies of Francis Barber. Research in surviving Boswell manuscripts, 18th-century London guides and the archives of the Society of Apothecaries prove the apothecary to have been Edward Ferrand. This article sets out the circumstances in which the reference to the anonymous apothecary came to appear in the Life of Johnson and reconstructs Ferrand's life and career. Examining Ferrand's origins, his social circumstances and his career, a case study is presented of a successful practitioner of the profession of apothecary in early Georgian Britain and a suggestion made as to why the distinguished apothecary came to provide a place of refuge for a teenaged runaway servant who had been a slave until he was about nine years old.

  2. A cohort study of coagulase negative staphylococcal mastitis in selected dairy herds in Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, T J; Dohoo, I R; Donald, A W; Hariharan, H; Collins, K

    1992-01-01

    The epidemiology and importance of coagulase negative staphylococcal (CNS) mastitis in Prince Edward Island had not been documented. To investigate this, a cohort of 84 cows at seven farms were quarter sampled eight times over a lactation, commencing with samples taken prior to drying off in the previous lactation. Thirteen species of CNS were isolated. The quarter prevalence of CNS mastitis varied from 4.8% to 6.4% in the first five months of lactation and increased to 14.2 to 16.6% in the last four months of lactation. The geometric mean somatic cell counts (SCC) for quarters infected with CNS and uninfected quarters were 90 x 10(3) and 64 x 10(3) respectively (difference significant at p > 0.005). The two month new infection risk of CNS was 9.0% while the two month elimination risk was 74.4%. Infection with CNS did not alter the risk of subsequent infection with Staphylococcus aureus. The results from this project support the classification of CNS as a minor pathogen in mastitis control programs. PMID:1477796

  3. Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Tomokazu; Jeffries, Emiko; Amano, Misa; Ko, Akihiro C.; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, has previously been considered irremediable. Here, we report findings that euploid cells increased among cultured aneuploid cells after exposure to the protein ZSCAN4, encoded by a mammalian-specific gene that is ordinarily expressed in preimplantation embryos and occasionally in stem cells. For footprint-free delivery of ZSCAN4 to cells, we developed ZSCAN4 synthetic mRNAs and Sendai virus vectors that encode human ZSCAN4. Applying the ZSCAN4 biologics to established cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, most of which had become aneuploid and polyploid, dramatically increased the number of euploid cells within a few days. We then tested the biologics on non-immortalized primary human fibroblast cells derived from four individuals with Down syndrome—the most frequent autosomal trisomy of chromosome 21. Within weeks after ZSCAN4 application to the cells in culture, fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific probe detected the emergence of up to 24% of cells with only two rather than three copies. High-resolution G-banded chromosomes further showed up to 40% of cells with a normal karyotype. These findings were confirmed by whole-exome sequencing. Similar results were obtained for cells with the trisomy 18 of Edwards syndrome. Thus a direct, efficient correction of aneuploidy in human fibroblast cells seems possible in vitro using human ZSCAN4. PMID:26324424

  4. Oocyte number per live birth in IVF: were Steptoe and Edwards less wasteful?

    PubMed

    Inge, George B; Brinsden, Peter R; Elder, Kay T

    2005-03-01

    As part of a learning exercise to assess the efficiency of oocyte utilization after controlled ovarian stimulation, we compared historical data from the publications of Steptoe and Edwards describing their early experiences in Oldham and at Bourn Hall with retrospective data from IVF and ICSI cycles carried out at Bourn Hall Clinic during the year 2000. For the purpose of analysing the more recent data, patients were subdivided into groups by age (< or = 37 years and > or = 38 years) and by oocyte yield (low, intermediate and high). In patients less than 38 years of age, live birth rates were equivalent in each group, irrespective of the number of oocytes retrieved. Patients who yielded low numbers of oocytes (1-5) utilized an average of 9.6 oocytes per live birth, compared with 25.1 and 51.5 in those who yielded intermediate (6-16) and high (16+) numbers of oocytes. The comparison with historical data suggests that the 'efficiency' of oocyte utilization has not improved significantly since the early 1980s, despite 25 years' experience of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF treatment.

  5. Communication skills training at the Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Darcy H; Ihle, Sherri L

    2006-01-01

    Communication skills are considered a core clinical skill in human medicine. Recognizing the importance of communication skills and addressing them in veterinary curricula, however, is just beginning. In the fall of 2003, the Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, markedly changed the way in which it approaches communication teaching. An intensive one-week elective rotation on client communication was offered in the senior year. This rotation made extensive use of experiential techniques through the use of role plays and videotaped real client interactions. A group of faculty and hospital staff members were trained as coaches to support students as they practiced their communication in various client scenarios. The skills taught were based on the Calgary-Cambridge Observation Guide, which outlines observable behaviors that contribute to effective medical communication. Student response to and feedback on the rotation have been very positive. As a result, the number of rotations given per year has been increased. Long-term plans include expanding communication skills teaching into other years of the DVM program and incorporating simulated clients into the teaching program. Challenges that lie ahead include the development of a fully integrated communication teaching program that spans the whole curriculum, addressing the ongoing need for the professional development of coaches, improving methods of student assessment, and recruiting/training a sufficient number of coaches.

  6. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

  7. The three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson spin glass in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yllanes, David; Janus Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Spin glasses are a longstanding model for the sluggish dynamics that appears at the glass transition. However, in order for spin glasses to be a faithful model for general glassy physics, we need to introduce an external magnetic field to eliminate their time-reversal symmetry. Unfortunately, little is known about the critical behavior of a spin glass in a field in three spatial dimensions. We have carried out a dynamical study combining equilibrium and non-equilibrium data. In particular, using the Janus computer, we have been able to simulate one thousand samples, each with half a million spins, along a time window spanning ten orders of magnitude for several magnetic fields and temperature protocols. Our main conclusion is that the system has a clearly identifiable dynamical transition, which we discuss in terms of different possibilities for the underlying physics (from a thermodynamical spin-glass transition to a mode-coupling crossover). In fact, we are able to make quantitative connections between the Edwards-Anderson spin glass and the physics of supercooled liquids. We also discuss ongoing work in equilibrium from parallel tempering simulations. Supported by the ERC, grant agreement no. 247328.

  8. Editorial - Climate change impacts on rural poverty in low-elevation coastal zones, Edward B. Barbier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Michael; Wolanski, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In the Invited Feature Article in this issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, we are extremely grateful to Edward Barbier for performing the major task of increasing our awareness of the hazards and risks faced by all communities on low lying coasts but especially the poor, rural communities (Barbier, 2015). Against a background of climate-induced change, we now have a good and increasing evidence of the way the natural estuarine, coastal and marine system will respond (Elliott et al, 2015). However, more importantly Barbier (2015) highlights the way in which poor, rural coastal communities will be affected and will need to respond or will need help from the developed world to respond. It is axiomatic that while those communities are having less impact than more developed countries on the causes of climate change they are more affected and so have to respond to its consequences, what have been called exogenic unmanaged pressures. Hence they need to rely on mechanisms, techniques, technologies and approaches to help them cope with such change (see also Wolanski and Elliott 2015).

  9. Demographics, management, and welfare of nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island.

    PubMed

    Christie, Julie L; Hewson, Caroline J; Riley, Christopher B; Mcniven, Mary A; Dohoo, Ian R; Bate, Luis A

    2004-12-01

    There are no detailed, representative, horse-level data about equine management practices in different parts of Canada. To help address this, the demographics, management, and welfare of 312 nonracing horses in Prince Edward Island were examined in a randomized, horse-level survey during summer 2002. Owners completed a pretested questionnaire, and a veterinarian examined each horse. Owners were experienced caregivers and the horses were generally in good condition. Areas for improvement included parasite control, dental and hoof care, and tail docking. The mean fecal egg count was 428 eggs per gram; 76% of owners never removed manure from the pasture. Sixty-two percent of horses had never had a veterinary dental examination. Many horses had hoof defects (excessively long hooves, 26.8%; hoof wall breaks, 32.0%; and white line disease, 8.5%). Many (54.9%) draft horses had docked tails. These results suggest owners might benefit their horses by receiving education in aspects of equine care.

  10. A serological survey of leptospirosis in Prince Edward Island swine herds and its association with infertility.

    PubMed Central

    Van Til, L D; Dohoo, I R

    1991-01-01

    A serological survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence of leptospirosis, and to investigate associations between leptospiral antibody titers, and herd measures of reproduction. Production records and leptospirosis serology were analyzed for 25 slaughter hogs from each of eleven randomly sampled farrow-finish operations on Prince Edward Island. The effect of selected leptospiral serovars on nonproductive sow days per parity (NPSD/P) and the proportion of pigs born dead was evaluated. The four most common serovars to which antibodies were detected were Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae, L. bratislava, L. autumnalis and L. pomona, with respective prevalences of 57.1%, 35.1%, 3.4% and 1.5% of PEI slaughter hogs. None of these serovars was associated with increased frequency of stillbirths (p greater than 0.05). However, farms with a higher prevalence of L. bratislava antibody titers tended to have more infertility, as measured by NPSD/P (r = 0.738, p = 0.036 with Bonferroni adjustment). Also, farms with L. pomona antibody titers had higher NPSD/P than farms without L. pomona antibody titers (p = 0.0008 with Bonferroni adjustment). There was no association between NPSD/P and antibodies to either L. autumnalis or L. icterohaemorrhagiae (p greater than 0.05). PMID:1790491

  11. A pilot survey of trial court judges' opinions on pro se competence after Indiana v. Edwards.

    PubMed

    Knoll, James L; Leonard, Cecilia; Kaufman, Andrew R; Way, Bruce B

    2010-01-01

    In Indiana v. Edwards, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a higher standard may be required for pro se competence (PSC) than for competence to stand trial (CST). However, the Court refrained from elaborating a specific standard. The trial judge is in the best position to make more fine-tuned mental capacity decisions. This pilot study surveyed trial judges' opinions about PSC to help forensic evaluators structure their assessments. Eighteen of 400 New York State trial judges surveyed replied. Trial judges regarded disorders of cognitive impairment (n = 10) and psychosis (n = 4) to be potentially limiting for PSC. Responses relating to which domains should be assessed were heterogeneous, but the most common were intellectual and analytic abilities (n = 10), legal knowledge/experience (n = 9), and language abilities (n = 8). Several judges listed factors that are not traditionally part of CST evaluations, such as having a rational reason for proceeding pro se and a willingness to accept the assistance of standby counsel.

  12. Finite-size corrections for ground states of Edwards-Anderson spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    Extensive computations of ground-state energies of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass on bond-diluted, hypercubic lattices are conducted in dimensions d=3, ..., 7. Results are presented for bond densities exactly at the percolation threshold, p=pc, and deep within the glassy regime, p>pc, where finding ground states is one of the hardest combinatorial optimization problems. Finite-size corrections of the form 1/Nω are shown to be consistent throughout with the prediction ω=1-y/d, where y refers to the "stiffness" exponent that controls the formation of domain wall excitations at low temperatures. At p=pc, an extrapolation for d→∞ appears to match our mean-field results for these corrections. In the glassy phase, however, ω does not approach its anticipated mean-field value of 2/3, obtained from simulations of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass on an N-clique graph. Instead, the value of ω reached at the upper critical dimension matches another type of mean-field spin glass models, namely those on sparse random networks of regular degree called Bethe lattices.

  13. Numerical evidence against both mean field and droplet scenarios of the Edwards-Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio F.; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-03-01

    From tempered Monte Carlo simulations, we have obtained accurate probability distributions p (q) of the spin-overlap parameter q for finite Edwards-Anderson (EA) and Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin-glass systems at low temperatures. Our results for p (q) follow from averages over 105 disordered samples of linear sizes L = 4 - 8 and over 15 000 samples for L = 10 . In both the SK and EA models, at temperatures as low as 0 . 2Tsg , where Tsg is the transition temperature, p (q) varies insignificantly with L. This does not fit the trend that the droplet model predicts for large L. We have also calculated correlation functions, F (q1 ,q2) , from which rms deviations, δp , over different realizations of quenched disorder, as well as thermal fluctuations, w, of q values, follow. Our numerical results for δp and w scale as √{ L} and 1 / L , respectively, in the SK model. This fits in well with mean field predictions. On the other hand, our data for w and δp vary little, if at all, for the EA model.

  14. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III; Hoeth, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This abstract describes work that will be done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in assessing the success of different model configurations in predicting "wind cycling" cases at Edwards Air Force Base, CA (EAFB), in which the wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model allows users to choose among two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). There are also data assimilation analysis packages available for the initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS). Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, creates challenges for local forecasters, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. The goal of this project is to assess the different configurations available and determine which configuration will best predict surface wind speed and direction at EAFB.

  15. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III

    2008-01-01

    NASA prefers to land the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When weather conditions violate Flight Rules at KSC, NASA will usually divert the shuttle landing to Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in Southern California. But forecasting surface winds at EAFB is a challenge for the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) forecasters due to the complex terrain that surrounds EAFB, One particular phenomena identified by SMG is that makes it difficult to forecast the EAFB surface winds is called "wind cycling". This occurs when wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway leading to a challenging deorbit bum forecast for shuttle landings. The large-scale numerical weather prediction models cannot properly resolve the wind field due to their coarse horizontal resolutions, so a properly tuned high-resolution mesoscale model is needed. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model meets this requirement. The AMU assessed the different WRF model options to determine which configuration best predicted surface wind speed and direction at EAFB, To do so, the AMU compared the WRF model performance using two hot start initializations with the Advanced Research WRF and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical cores and compared model performance while varying the physics options.

  16. A Green's function decoupling scheme for the Edwards fermion-boson model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D M; Ejima, S; Alvermann, A; Fehske, H

    2010-11-03

    Holes in a Mott insulator are represented by spinless fermions in the fermion-boson model introduced by Edwards. Although the physically interesting regime is for low to moderate fermion density, the model has interesting properties over the whole density range. It has previously been studied at half-filling in the one-dimensional (1D) case by numerical methods, in particular using exact diagonalization and the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). In the present study the one-particle Green's function is calculated analytically by means of a decoupling scheme for the equations of motion, valid for arbitrary density in 1D, 2D and 3D with fairly large boson energy and zero boson relaxation parameter. The Green's function is used to compute some ground state properties, and the one-fermion spectral function, for fermion densities n = 0.1, 0.5 and 0.9 in the 1D case. The results are generally in good agreement with numerical results obtained using the DMRG and dynamical DMRG, and new light is shed on the nature of the ground state at different fillings. The Green's function approximation is sufficiently successful in 1D to justify future application to the 2D and 3D cases.

  17. Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tomokazu; Jeffries, Emiko; Amano, Misa; Ko, Akihiro C; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S H

    2015-10-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, has previously been considered irremediable. Here, we report findings that euploid cells increased among cultured aneuploid cells after exposure to the protein ZSCAN4, encoded by a mammalian-specific gene that is ordinarily expressed in preimplantation embryos and occasionally in stem cells. For footprint-free delivery of ZSCAN4 to cells, we developed ZSCAN4 synthetic mRNAs and Sendai virus vectors that encode human ZSCAN4. Applying the ZSCAN4 biologics to established cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, most of which had become aneuploid and polyploid, dramatically increased the number of euploid cells within a few days. We then tested the biologics on non-immortalized primary human fibroblast cells derived from four individuals with Down syndrome—the most frequent autosomal trisomy of chromosome 21. Within weeks after ZSCAN4 application to the cells in culture, fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific probe detected the emergence of up to 24% of cells with only two rather than three copies. High-resolution G-banded chromosomes further showed up to 40% of cells with a normal karyotype. These findings were confirmed by whole-exome sequencing. Similar results were obtained for cells with the trisomy 18 of Edwards syndrome. Thus a direct, efficient correction of aneuploidy in human fibroblast cells seems possible in vitro using human ZSCAN4.

  18. Monitoring stream sediment loads in response to agriculture in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Ashley; St-Hilaire, Andre; Courtenay, Simon C; van den Heuvel, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Increased agricultural land use leads to accelerated erosion and deposition of fine sediment in surface water. Monitoring of suspended sediment yields has proven challenging due to the spatial and temporal variability of sediment loading. Reliable sediment yield calculations depend on accurate monitoring of these highly episodic sediment loading events. This study aims to quantify precipitation-induced loading of suspended sediments on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Turbidity is considered to be a reasonably accurate proxy for suspended sediment data. In this study, turbidity was used to monitor suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and was measured for 2 years (December 2012-2014) in three subwatersheds with varying degrees of agricultural land use ranging from 10 to 69 %. Comparison of three turbidity meter calibration methods, two using suspended streambed sediment and one using automated sampling during rainfall events, revealed that the use of SSC samples constructed from streambed sediment was not an accurate replacement for water column sampling during rainfall events for calibration. Different particle size distributions in the three rivers produced significant impacts on the calibration methods demonstrating the need for river-specific calibration. Rainfall-induced sediment loading was significantly greater in the most agriculturally impacted site only when the load per rainfall event was corrected for runoff volume (total flow minus baseflow), flow increase intensity (the slope between the start of a runoff event and the peak of the hydrograph), and season. Monitoring turbidity, in combination with sediment modeling, may offer the best option for management purposes.

  19. Prince Edward Island: building capacity--the implementation of a critical care/emergency program.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Judith

    2012-03-01

    Like other Canadian provinces, Prince Edward Island has a shortage of experienced nurses, especially in critical and emergency care. To increase the numbers of competent nurses, a PEI-based nursing course in these areas was identified as key to building capacity. This Research to Action pilot program successfully involved nurses in PEI-based emergency and critical care courses developed by the Nova Scotia Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre and funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The programs were offered on a full-time basis, lasted 14 weeks and included classroom and simulation laboratory time, along with a strong clinical component.Sixteen RNs graduated from the courses and became Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) certified. An additional 12 RNs were trained as preceptors. Feedback from participants indicates greater job satisfaction and increased confidence in providing patient assessments and care. Based on the program's success, the RTA partners proposed the establishment of an ongoing, PEI-based critical care and emergency nursing program utilizing 80/20 staffing models and mentorship. Their proposal was approved, with courses set to resume in January, 2012.

  20. Dolomite dissolution rates and possible Holocene dedolomitization of water-bearing units in the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deike, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Rates of dolomite dissolution can be used to test the concept, based on geomorphologic evidence, that a major part of the Edwards aquifer could have formed within the Holocene, a timeframe of approximately 10,000 years. During formation of the aquifer in the Edwards limestone (Cretaceous, Albian) of the Balcones fault zone, dolomite dissolution and porosity development were synchronous and the result of mixing-zone dedolomitization. Initiation of the mixing zone in the early Holocene (???11,000 years before present) is suggested by the maximum age of formation of major discharge sites that allowed the influx of meteoric water into brine-filled, dolomitic preaquifer units. Dedolomitization, the dissolution of dolomite and net precipitation of calcite, has left aquifer units that are calcitic, and 40 vol.% interconnected pore space. The mass of dolomite missing is obtained by comparison of stratigraphically equivalent altered and unaltered units. One dissolution rate (1.76 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1) is determined from this mass, 104yr reaction time, and a log-linear function describing the increase in mass discharge (three orders of magnitude) during aquifer formation. The second estimated dissolution rate is obtained from the mass transfer of dolomite to solution calculated from the increase in magnesium in pore fluids selected from the modern aquifer to represent a typical flowpath during aquifer formation. A reaction time of 104yr for this mass transfer yields a rate of 0.56 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1. Both of these rates are comparable to modern rates of dolomite dissolution (0.3 to 4.5 ?? 10-4 mmol dolomite kgH2O-1yr-1) calculated from measured reaction times in the Tertiary Floridan aquifer system in Florida and the Madison aquifer in the Mississippian Madison Limestone of the Northern Great Plains. Similarity of these rates to the estimated paleo-rates of dolomite dissolution supports a 104 yr reaction timeframe. The Holocene reaction time also

  1. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hothem, R.L.; Crayon, J.J.; Law, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels-black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)-generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  2. Groundwater nitrate concentration evolution under climate change and agricultural adaptation scenarios: Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Daniel; Vigneault, Harold; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Qian, Budong

    2016-03-01

    Nitrate (N-NO3) concentration in groundwater, the sole source of potable water in Prince Edward Island (PEI, Canada), currently exceeds the 10 mg L-1 (N-NO3) health threshold for drinking water in 6 % of domestic wells. Increasing climatic and socio-economic pressures on PEI agriculture may further deteriorate groundwater quality. This study assesses how groundwater nitrate concentration could evolve due to the forecasted climate change and its related potential changes in agricultural practices. For this purpose, a tridimensional numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed for the aquifer system of the entire Island (5660 km2). A number of different groundwater flow and mass transport simulations were made to evaluate the potential impact of the projected climate change and agricultural adaptation. According to the simulations for year 2050, N-NO3 concentration would increase due to two main causes: (1) the progressive attainment of steady-state conditions related to present-day nitrogen loadings, and (2) the increase in nitrogen loadings due to changes in agricultural practices provoked by future climatic conditions. The combined effects of equilibration with loadings, climate and agricultural adaptation would lead to a 25 to 32 % increase in N-NO3 concentration over the Island aquifer system. The change in groundwater recharge regime induced by climate change (with current agricultural practices) would only contribute 0 to 6 % of that increase for the various climate scenarios. Moreover, simulated trends in groundwater N-NO3 concentration suggest that an increased number of domestic wells (more than doubling) would exceed the nitrate drinking water criteria. This study underlines the need to develop and apply better agricultural management practices to ensure sustainability of long-term groundwater resources. The simulations also show that observable benefits from positive changes in agricultural practices would be delayed in time due to

  3. Groundwater nitrate concentration evolution under climate change and agricultural adaptation scenarios: Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Vigneault, H.; Lefebvre, R.; Savard, M. M.; Ballard, J.-M.; Qian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate (N-NO3) concentration in groundwater, the sole source of potable water in Prince Edward Island (PEI, Canada), currently exceeds the 10 mg L-1 (N-NO3) health threshold for drinking water in 6 % of domestic wells. Increasing climatic and socio-economic pressures on PEI agriculture may further deteriorate groundwater quality. This study assesses how groundwater nitrate concentrations could evolve due to the forecasted climate change and its related potential changes in agricultural practices. For this purpose, a tridimensional numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed for the aquifer system of the entire Island (5660 km2). A number of different groundwater flow and mass transport simulations were made to evaluate the potential impact of the projected climate change and agricultural adaptation. According to the simulations for year 2050, N-NO3 concentration would increase due to two main causes: (1) the progressive attainment of steady-state conditions related to present-day nitrogen loadings, and (2) the increase in nitrogen loadings due to changes in agricultural practices provoked by future climatic conditions. The combined effects of equilibration with loadings, climate and agricultural adaptation would lead to a 25 to 32 % increase in N-NO3 concentration over the Island aquifer system. Climate change alone (practices maintained at their current level) would contribute only 0 to 6 % to that increase according to the various climate scenarios. Moreover, simulated trends in groundwater N-NO3 concentration suggest that an increased number of domestic wells (more than doubling) would exceed the nitrate drinking water criteria. This study underlines the need to develop and apply better agricultural management practices to ensure sustainability of long-term groundwater resources. The simulations also show that observable benefits from positive changes in agricultural practices would be delayed in time due to the slow dynamics of nitrate

  4. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

    PubMed

    Hothem, R L; Crayon, J J; Law, M A

    2006-11-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels--black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)--generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  5. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in three species of wild frogs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Forzán, M J; Vanderstichel, R; Hogan, N S; Teather, K; Wood, J

    2010-09-02

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has resulted in the decline or extinction of approximately 200 frog species worldwide. It has been reported throughout much of North America, but its presence on Prince Edward Island (PEI), on the eastern coast of Canada, was unknown. To determine the presence and prevalence of Bd on PEI, skin swabs were collected from 115 frogs from 18 separate sites across the province during the summer of 2009. The swabs were tested through single round end-point PCR for the presence of Bd DNA. Thirty-one frogs were positive, including 25/93 (27%) green frogs Lithobates (Rana) clamitans, 5/20 (25%) northern leopard frogs L. (R.) pipiens, and 1/2 (50%) wood frogs L. sylvaticus (formerly R. sylvatica); 12 of the 18 (67%) sites had at least 1 positive frog. The overall prevalence of Bd infection was estimated at 26.9% (7.2-46.7%, 95% CI). Prevalence amongst green frogs and leopard frogs was similar, but green frogs had a stronger PCR signal when compared to leopard frogs, regardless of age (p < 0.001) and body length (p = 0.476). Amongst green frogs, juveniles were more frequently positive than adults (p = 0.001). Green frogs may be the most reliable species to sample when looking for Bd in eastern North America. The 1 wood frog positive for Bd was found dead from chytridiomycosis; none of the other frogs that were positive for Bd by PCR showed any obvious signs of illness. Further monitoring will be required to determine what effect Bd infection has on amphibian population health on PEI.

  6. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in pigs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Budu-Amoako, Ebo; Greenwood, Spencer J; Dixon, Brent R; Barkema, Herman W; Hurnik, Daniel; Estey, Chelsie; McClure, J T

    2012-02-28

    In a cross-sectional study of 633 pigs from 21 herds on Prince Edward Island, Canada (PEI), the prevalence of infection with Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and the genotypes and species of isolates were determined in order to establish the zoonotic potential of pigs in this region. As determined by direct immunofluorescence microscopy (DFA), 18 herds (86%) and 163 animals (26%; 95% CI: 22-29%) tested positive for Cryptosporidium, while just 3 herds (14%) and 6 animals (1%; 95% CI: 0.4-2%) tested positive for Giardia. Cryptosporidium spp. isolates were detected in 39% (95% CI: 34-44%) of weanlings (1-3 months of age) and 9% (95% CI: 6-13) of sows (>8months of age). Molecular characterization using the 18S rDNA and HSP70 gene fragments revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II, C. suis, C. parvum, and Cryptosporidium sp. mouse genotype. Among the 113 isolates of Cryptosporidium spp. successfully genotyped, pig genotype II (61%) predominated, with C. suis (36%) being the next most prominant isolate. C. parvum (2%; two isolates) and Cryptosporidium sp. mouse genotype (0.9%; one isolate) were only occasionally isolated. The only two Cryptosporidium-positive genotyped isolates from sows included one each of C. suis and Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II. All but one of the six Giardia positive isolates were detected in weanling pigs. None of the Giardia-positive isolates was amenable to PCR. This study demonstrates that Cryptosporidium spp. are highly prevalent in pigs on PEI, Canada, are found mostly in weanlings (1-3 months of age). Furthermore, the pigs are primarily infected by the host-specific genotypes and species, Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II and C. suis, whereas the zoonotic C. parvum is rare. Giardia duodenalis is only occasionally found in pigs. These findings suggest that domestic pigs on PEI, Canada, likely do not pose a significant health risk to humans from these parasites.

  7. A Biography of Distinguished Scientist Gilbert Newton Lewis (by Edward S. Lewis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Reviewed By Harold H.

    1999-11-01

    The Edward Mellen Press: Lewiston, NY, 1998. 114 pp + index. ISBN 0-7734-8284-9. $69.95. There may not be a surname better known to students of chemistry than Lewis, from the Lewis electron-dot diagrams and the Lewis theory of acids and bases. More advanced students may know of the groundbreaking textbook Thermodynamics, by Lewis and Randall. Yet few Americans know much about this remarkable U.S.-born scholar, whose contributions equal those of the greatest scientists. He is a chemist-educator of whom we should be as proud and as well informed as we are of Linus Pauling, who was part of the westward movement of science in this country that G. N. Lewis began, or of the recently deceased Glenn Seaborg, who was one of the many students of Lewis who achieved renown. Gilbert N. Lewis was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts, in 1875, but his family moved to near Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1884. He spent two years at the University of Nebraska, but then moved to Harvard when his father became an executive at Merchants Trust Company in Boston. Young Lewis (then only 17) was also said to have been disappointed with the quality of education in Nebraska, and this may have been part of the impetus for the family's move east. After earning his baccalaureate at Harvard, he taught for a year at Phillips Andover Academy before returning to Harvard to study for his doctorate, which he completed 100 years ago, in 1899, under T. W. Richards. Lewis's doctoral work was on the thermodynamics of zinc and cadmium amalgams. At that time, physical chemistry was only beginning to achieve recognition as a branch of science, and its boundaries were ill defined. Edward Lewis quotes his father as often saying, "Physical chemistry is anything interesting." Like many chemists of his time, Lewis went to Europe to complete his preparation for a career; he was in the laboratories of Ostwald in Leipzig and Nernst in Göttingen in 1900-1901. On his return to the United States, he was an instructor at Harvard

  8. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time on 31 March 1996 after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both March 30 and March 31 necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards AFB. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton. Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Serving as payload commander and mission specialist-1 was Ronald M. Sega. Mission specialist-2 was Richard Clifford. Linda Godwin served as mission specialist-3, and Shannon Lucid was mission specialist-4. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they

  9. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis prepares to touch down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. Lucid was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 March and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards on the latter date. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was the payload commander and mission specialist-1. Other mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin, and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are

  10. STS-76 Landing - Space Shuttle Atlantis Lands at Edwards Air Force Base, Drag Chute Deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis touches down on the runway at Edwards, California, at approximately 5:29 a.m. Pacific Standard Time after completing the highly successful STS-76 mission to deliver Astronaut Shannon Lucid to the Russian Space Station Mir. She was the first American woman to serve as a Mir station researcher. Atlantis was originally scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but bad weather there both 30 and 31 March necessitated a landing at the backup site at Edwards. This photo shows the drag chute deployed to help the shuttle roll to a stop. Mission commander for STS-76 was Kevin P. Chilton, and Richard A. Searfoss was the pilot. Ronald M. Sega was payload commander and mission specialist-1. Mission specialists were Richard Clifford, Linda Godwin and Shannon Lucid. The mission also featured a spacewalk while Atlantis was docked to Mir and experiments aboard the SPACEHAB module. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be

  11. Simulation of flow in the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas, and refinement of storage and flow concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, R.W.; Land, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is a complexly faulted, carbonate aquifer lying within the Balcones fault zone of south-central Texas. The aquifer is recharged mainly by streamflow losses in the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer and is discharged by major springs located at considerable distances, as much as 150 mi, from the areas of recharge, and by wells. Groundwater flow within the Edwards aquifer of the San Antonio region was simulated to investigate concepts relating to the storage and flow characteristics. A general purpose, finite difference model, modified to provide the capability of representing barrier faults, was used to simulate groundwater flow and storage in the aquifer. The simulations investigated the effects of complex geologic structures and significant changes in transmissivity, anisotropy, and storage coefficient, with initial values based on concepts developed in previous studies. Results of the simulations confirmed the original estimates of transmissivity values (> 100 sq ft/sec) in the confined zone of the aquifer between San Antonio and Comal Springs. A storage coefficient of 0.05 in the unconfined zone of the aquifer produced the best simulation of water levels and springflow. A major interpretation resulting from the simulations is that two essentially independent areas of regional flow were identified in the west and central part of the study area. Flow from the two areas converges at Comal Springs. The directions of computed flux vectors reflected the presence of major barrier faults which locally deflect patterns of groundwater movement. The most noticeable deflection is the convergence of flow through the geologic structural opening, the Knippa gap, in eastern Uvalde County. A second significant interpretation is that groundwater flow in northeastern Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties is diverted by barrier faults toward San Marcos Springs, a regional discharge point. (Lantz-PTT)

  12. Upper Albian rudist buildups of the Edwards Formation in central Texas: A GPR-assisted reservoir analog study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Damayanti; Khan, Shuhab D.; Sullivan, Charlotte

    2012-03-01

    Albian rudist-associated shallow water carbonates form important hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Middle East, Mexico, and the United States. Outcrops of rudist-bearing shallow water carbonates are common across parts of central Texas, USA, and in places display lateral and vertical relationships that form important analogs for the subsurface distribution and heterogeneity of hydrocarbon reservoirs and seals. In particular, the walls and spillways of several lakes in central Texas provide ideal conditions for the investigation by ground-penetrating radar (GPR) of the three-dimensional geometries of platform interior rudist lithofacies belts. This study integrates outcrop studies and GPR surveys to clarify lateral and vertical facies relations of rudist-bearing lithofacies in the Cretaceous Edwards Formation (Fredericksburg Group) that are partially exposed in spillways and gullies near Lake Georgetown and Belton Lake in central Texas, USA. GPR data illuminated four types of mounds that have distinct three-dimensional geometries, lithofacies, and biota and that record both seaward to leeward changes and vertical changes from below wavebase to within wavebase. The lowermost mounds are high relief circular caprinid mounds that mark the aggradational part of the Edwards lithostratigraphic unit at our study locality. Well cemented, low relief toucasid-foraminiferal mounds and grainstones cap these caprinid-dominated buildups. Weakly cemented, circular, flat-topped radiolitid-caprinid-toucasid mounds developed above the toucasid mounds and low relief, often sucrosic-dolomitized mounds constitute the most shallow water rudist accumulations. Stromatolitic dolomites record final filling of accommodation space on the Edwards platform. GPR provides an unparalleled view of the three-dimensional growth, vertical accretion, and progradation of these mounds and lithofacies through time, and the geoelectrical signatures provide insight on porosity and permeability of the lithofacies

  13. A multiphased approach to groundwater investigations for the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.

    2014-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for agricultural, industrial, and public supply uses in the Pecos County region of western Texas. Resource managers would like to understand the future availability of water in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Pecos County region and the effects of the possible increase or temporal redistribution of groundwater withdrawals. To provide resource managers with that information, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Middle Pecos Groundwater Conservation District, Pecos County, City of Fort Stockton, Brewster County, and Pecos County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, completed a three-phase study of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in parts of Brewster, Jeff Davis, Pecos, and Reeves Counties. The first phase was to collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic data in the study area and develop a geodatabase of historical and collected data. Data compiled in the first phase of the study were used to develop the conceptual model in the second phase of the study. The third phase of the study involved the development and calibration of a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Analysis of well, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic data contributed to the development of the conceptual model in phase 1. Lithologic information obtained from well reports and geophysical data was used to describe the hydrostratigraphy and structural features of the groundwater-flow system, and aquifer-test data were used to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties. Geochemical data were used to evaluate groundwater-flow paths, water-rock interaction, aquifer interaction, and the mixing of water from different sources in phase 2. Groundwater-level data also were used to evaluate aquifer interaction, as well as to develop a potentiometric-surface map

  14. Economic efficiency and cost implications of habitat conservation: An example in the context of the Edwards Aquifer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillig, Dhazn; McCarl, Bruce A.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Boadu, Frederick

    2004-04-01

    Groundwater management in the Edwards Aquifer in Texas is in the process of moving away from a traditional right of capture economic regime toward a more environmentally sensitive scheme designed to preserve endangered species habitats. This study explores economic and environmental implications of proposed groundwater management and water development strategies under a proposed regional Habitat Conservation Plan. Results show that enhancing the habitat by augmenting water flow costs $109-1427 per acre-foot and that regional water development would be accelerated by the more extreme possibilities under the Habitat Conservation Plan. The findings also indicate that a water market would improve regional welfare and lower water development but worsen environmental attributes.

  15. Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 (Crustacea, Decapoda) from Southwestern Atlantic, including the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge area.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Irene A; Burukovsky, Rudolf N

    2014-11-26

    The deep sea shrimp genus Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 includes 47 species, ten of them have been recorded from the Atlantic Ocean. Herein, material sampled during three scientific projects (REVIZEE Central Fishery project; Campos Basin Deep Sea Environmental Project; Evaluation of Environmental Heterogeneity in the Campos Basin) made in the Southwestern Atlantic, off Brazil, is examined. In addition, material sampled from the South Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR-ECO Project) was also examined. Four species are recorded for the first time to the southwestern Atlantic Ocean including Mid Atlantic Ridge area: Nematocarcinus faxoni Burukovsky, 2001; N. gracilipes Filhol, 1884; N. rotundus Crosnier & Forest, 1973 and N. tenuipes Spence-Bate, 1888.

  16. Functional form of the Parisi overlap distribution for the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass.

    PubMed

    Berg, Bernd A; Billoire, Alain; Janke, Wolfhard

    2002-04-01

    Recently, it has been conjectured that the statistics of extremes is of relevance for a large class of correlated systems. For certain probability densities this predicts the characteristic large x falloff behavior f(x) approximately exp(-ae(x)), a>0. Using a multicanonical Monte Carlo technique, we have measured the Parisi overlap distribution P(q) for the three-dimensional Edward-Anderson Ising spin glass at and below the critical temperature We find that a probability distribution related to extreme-order statistics gives an excellent description of P(q) over about 80 orders of magnitude.

  17. Continuous monitoring and discrete water-quality data from groundwater wells in the Edwards aquifer, Texas, 2014–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Opsahl, Stephen P.; Musgrove, Marylynn; Slattery, Richard N.

    2017-01-01

    In cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, continuous and discrete water-quality data were collected from groundwater wells completed in the Edwards aquifer, Texas, 2014-2015. Discrete measurements of nitrate were made by using a nitrate sensor. Precipitation data from two sites in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Historical Climatology Network are included in the dataset. The continuous monitoring data were collected using water quality sensors and include hourly measurements of nitrate, specific conductance, and water level in two wells. Discrete measurements of nitrate, specific conductance, and vertical flow rate were collected from one well site at different depths throughout the well bore.

  18. Summary of hydrologic data for the San Gabriel River basin and Edwards Aquifer, Georgetown area, Texas, water year 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.; Dorsey, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present a summary of the hydrologic data collected from the streams draining the San Gabriel River basin and from the Edwards aquifer during the 1988 water year (October 1987–September 1988). A secondary purpose is to add perspective to the 1988 data by including data from the previous 2 years (1986 and 1987) when available. The scope of the report is limited to the Georgetown area (fig. 1) and to data collected by the Geological Survey.

  19. Science and art: emergence of patterns from nature's chaos, through parallels between Edward Lorenz and Yves Klein.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R P

    2009-07-01

    Famous stories achieve their enduring appeal because they capture the essence of the times from which they emerge. This is true for both art and science. At critical moments in history, these two worlds become intertwined through a shared quest to understand the world around them. Questions hang in the air and, remarkably, accidents deliver the answers. In this chapter, I will explore the relationship between science and art as Edward Lorenz's discoveries unfolded to shed new light on the sensitive patterns hidden within nature's processes.

  20. Joint min-max distribution and Edwards-Anderson's order parameter of the circular 1/f-noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the joint min-max distribution and the Edwards-Anderson's order parameter for the circular model of 1/f-noise. Both quantities, as well as generalisations, are obtained exactly by combining the freezing-duality conjecture and Jack-polynomial techniques. Numerical checks come with significantly improved control of finite-size effects in the glassy phase, and the results convincingly validate the freezing-duality conjecture. Application to diffusive dynamics is discussed. We also provide a formula for the pre-factor ratio of the joint/marginal Carpentier-Le Doussal tail for minimum/maximum which applies to any logarithmic random energy model.

  1. Statistical analysis of water-level, springflow, and streamflow data for the Edwards Aquifer in south-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso

    1976-01-01

    Water-level, springflow, and streamflow data were used to develop simple and multiple linear-regression equations for use in estimating water levels in wells and the flow of three major springs in the Edwards aquifer in the eastern San Antonio area. The equations provide daily, monthly, and annual estimates that compare very favorably with observed data. Analyses of geologic and hydrologic data indicate that the water discharged by the major springs is supplied primarily by regional underflow from the west and southwest and by local recharge in the infiltration area in northern Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties.

  2. Dr Percy Charles Edward d'Erf Wheeler (1859-1944): a notable medical missionary of the Holy Land.

    PubMed

    Perry, Yaron; Lev, Efraim

    2008-05-01

    Dr Percy Charles Edward d'Erf Wheeler, a medical missionary of the London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, spent 24 years (1885-1909) as head of the English medical institution in Jerusalem. Wheeler dedicated the years he served in Palestine to promote the medical condition of the Jews as a means of missionary work. The most significant of his achievements was his leading role in the founding of the new British Hospital for the Jews in Jerusalem, the flagship of the British presence in Palestine, to be inaugurated in 1897.

  3. Evaluating cumulative effects of anthropogenic inputs in Prince Edward Island estuaries using the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Finley, Megan A; Courtenay, Simon C; Teather, Kevin L; Hewitt, L Mark; Holdway, D A; Hogan, Natacha S; van den Heuvel, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Estuarine eutrophication as a result of agricultural land use, including the use of chemical fertilizers, is increasing worldwide. Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada has very high agricultural intensity by international standards with approximately 44% of the land area under production, and some watersheds in excess of 75% agricultural land-use. The type of agriculture is also intensive with primarily row crops that have high chemical fertilizer and pesticide usage. In light of these stressors, the hypothesis of this study was that mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) population parameters would change with point and nonpoint source pollution, and that multivariate statistics could be used to draw associations with specific stressors. Fish were sampled on a monthly basis from May through August at 7 estuaries spanning a range of land use, nutrient, and contaminant loadings. A suite of environmental variables were simplified into 3 principal components: PC1 representing agricultural land use, N loading, and plant habitat, PC2 being dominated by sediment sand and silt distribution, and PC3 largely reflecting P loading and sediment organic matter. There were significant differences in abundance of both adult and young-of-the-year mummichog, and these changes associated most strongly with PC1, the largely N-driven agricultural influences. In contrast, somatic variables such as liver and gonad size did not show strong association with the environmental quality principal component scores. The sand and silt PC2 appeared to have the opposite association with the biological data, with siltier environments correlating to older, larger, less dense populations of mummichog. Although pesticide residues were detected in estuarine sediment, there was no clear relationship between these and watershed agricultural intensity or biochemical indicators. There was, however, a strong relationship between agricultural environmental variables (PC1) and in vitro steroid production that is

  4. [Edward Wilhelm Drescher--the founder of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania].

    PubMed

    Pacanowski, J H

    1999-01-01

    Professor Edward Wilhelm Drescher--an eminent Polish pediatric surgeon and pioneer of this specialization in West Pomerania--was born in 1912 in Biłgoraj. His young years he spent in his parents familial town Kalisz, where he attended a very famous college--State Humanistic Grammar-School. In 1937 he graduated from Faculty of Medicine at the Warsaw University. Next year he started his career as a surgeon in the Surgery at Orthopedic Ward of Pediatric Clinic in Warsaw, which was directed by prof. Jan Kossakowski--excellent pediatric surgeon and artist. During the September Campaign he took part in the battle of Bzura and in the defense of Polish capital as the physician in the 25th Regiment of Artillery. In 1940 he joined Polish underground army--AK. In 1944, when the Warsaw Uprising broke out, he was the Commander of the insurgent hospital--Poznańska 11. It was a very well arranged and headed hospital, which admitted about eight hundred wounded soldiers and civilians. After the war for two years he lived in Sopot, where he organized and directed the Surgery Hospital and the Town Outpatients' Department. In 1947 he moved to Szczecin, where he arranged the first ward of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania (in Polish Red Cross hospital). Ten years later he was nominated the head of the Clinic of Pediatric Surgery in the Pomeranian Medical Academy in Szczecin. For many years Prof. Drescher was provincial and regional consultant. He helped to organize a few pediatric surgery wards in Pomerania (Koszalin, Gorzów Wlkp., Słupsk). He died in 1977 in Warsaw. Prof. Drescher published almost 80 scientific papers including two medical books. Traumatology of children and the newborn surgery became his principal area of interest. He was the author of Code of the Ethical and Moral Procedure of the Polish Medical Society. For almost twenty years he was co-author the Annales of Pomeranian Medical Academy. He was a co-founder, next was a president of the Polish Association of

  5. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for Space Shuttle landings. As defined in the Shuttle Flight Rules (FRs), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMTJ) developed a personal computer based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak-wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. However, the shuttle must land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested that a similar tool be developed for EAFB. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel archived and performed quality control of 2-minute average and 10-minute peak wind speeds at each tower adjacent to the main runway at EAFB from 1997- 2004. They calculated wind climatologies and probabilities of average peak wind occurrence based on the average speed. The climatologies were calculated for each tower and month, and were stratified by hour, direction, and direction/hour. For the probabilities of peak wind occurrence, MSFC calculated empirical and modeled probabilities of meeting or exceeding specific 10-minute peak wind speeds using probability density functions. The AMU obtained and reformatted the data into Microsoft Excel PivotTables, which allows users to display different values with point-click-drag techniques. The GUT was then created from the PivotTables using Visual Basic for Applications code. The GUI is run through a macro within Microsoft Excel and allows forecasters to quickly display and

  6. Further contributions to the Hydradephaga (Coleoptera, Haliplidae, Gyrinidae and Dytiscidae) fauna of Prince Edward Island, Canada: new records, distributions and faunal composition.

    PubMed

    Alarie, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The Haliplidae, Gyrinidae and Dytiscidae (Coleoptera) of Prince Edward Island, Canada were surveyed during the years 2004-2005. A total of 2450 individuals from 79 species were collected from 98 different localities, among which 30 species are newly recorded from that region. Among these, Acilius sylvanus Hilsenhoff, Rhantus consimilis Motschulsky and Neoporus sulcipennis (Fall) stand out as representing the easternmost reports of these species in Canada. Once removed, Gyrinus aquiris LeConte (Gyrinidae) is reinstated in the faunal list of Prince Edward Island. According to this study and literature 84 species of Hydradephaga are currently known from Prince Edward Island. The Nearctic component of the fauna is made up of 68 species (80.9%) and the Holarctic component of 16 species (19.1%). Most species are characteristic of the Boreal and Atlantic Maritime Ecozones and have a transcontinental distribution. In an examination of the Hydradephaga of insular portions of Atlantic Canada, we found that despite significantly different land areas and different distances to the neighbouring continental mainland the island faunas of Prince Edward Island and insular Newfoundland are very similar in the number of species (84 and 94 species respectively) despite differences in composition. With a land area significantly larger than that of Prince Edward Island, however, the fauna of Cape Breton Island was 39% smaller consisting of 53 species. This difference could be due to the comparative lack of collecting efforts on Cape Breton Island.

  7. Further contributions to the Hydradephaga (Coleoptera, Haliplidae, Gyrinidae and Dytiscidae) fauna of Prince Edward Island, Canada: new records, distributions and faunal composition

    PubMed Central

    Alarie, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Haliplidae, Gyrinidae and Dytiscidae (Coleoptera) of Prince Edward Island, Canada were surveyed during the years 2004–2005. A total of 2450 individuals from 79 species were collected from 98 different localities, among which 30 species are newly recorded from that region. Among these, Acilius sylvanus Hilsenhoff, Rhantus consimilis Motschulsky and Neoporus sulcipennis (Fall) stand out as representing the easternmost reports of these species in Canada. Once removed, Gyrinus aquiris LeConte (Gyrinidae) is reinstated in the faunal list of Prince Edward Island. According to this study and literature 84 species of Hydradephaga are currently known from Prince Edward Island. The Nearctic component of the fauna is made up of 68 species (80.9%) and the Holarctic component of 16 species (19.1%). Most species are characteristic of the Boreal and Atlantic Maritime Ecozones and have a transcontinental distribution. In an examination of the Hydradephaga of insular portions of Atlantic Canada, we found that despite significantly different land areas and different distances to the neighbouring continental mainland the island faunas of Prince Edward Island and insular Newfoundland are very similar in the number of species (84 and 94 species respectively) despite differences in composition. With a land area significantly larger than that of Prince Edward Island, however, the fauna of Cape Breton Island was 39% smaller consisting of 53 species. This difference could be due to the comparative lack of collecting efforts on Cape Breton Island. PMID:27408603

  8. Identification and Mapping of the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence in the State of Chihuahua Assisted by ten ArcMap Based Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Pina, C.; Granados, A.; Goodell, P.

    2007-05-01

    Edwards Formation is a reef limestone that hosts one of the largest aquifers of the State of Texas. In 2004 the United States and Mexico signed an agreement intended to characterize and identify the shared binational underground resources. Texas Water Development Board Report 360 established for the Edwards Aquifer an area of more than 31,000 km2, half of which is in the State of Coahuila, Mexico (the agreement did not include the State of Chihuahua). This led to the idea that Chihuahua may also have hydrologic potential in the Edwards equivalent, where numerous large cavern systems are already recognized (Naica's Sword Cavern, and the Coyame, Nombre de Dios and Bocagrande Caverns). The objective of this study is to establish the existence, in the State of Chihuahua, of the stratigraphic sequence and geohydrologic properties such as faulting, sinkholes, and springs, within the Edwards equivalent. The Consejo de Recursos Minerales geologic map, INEGI's hydrologic study, petroleum, mining and hydrogeology studies of Chihuahua, and many others, constitute the database used. ArcMap is used to define the geologic framework and construct different thematic layers (structural, lithological, hydrological) that would aid in the identification of the stratigraphic sequence. The results show that all the Edwards Stratigraphic Sequence (ESS) exists in Chihuahua; that there are isolated areas of groundwater production in eastern Chihuahua possibly from ESS but this is not well established. Overall the ESS presents an unusual opportunity as a potentially productive aquifer in the State of Chihuahua.

  9. Partial duplication of 18q including a distal critical region for Edwards Syndrome in a patient with normal phenotype and oligoasthenospermia: case report.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, R; Monfort, S; Oltra, S; Ferrer-Bolufer, I; Roselló, M; Mayo, S; Martinez, F; Orellana, C

    2011-01-01

    Several authors have attempted to construct a phenotype map for duplications of different portions of chromosome 18 to identify a possible critical region (CR) for Edwards Syndrome. Partial duplications of 18q have been reported in the literature involving the distal CR in patients with some clinical features of Edwards Syndrome. Here, we describe a phenotypically normal male with a large duplication on chromosome 18 that involves the proposed distal CR. The lack of clinical features is remarkable, except for pathological semen analysis, which suggests that terminal 17.4 Mb of 18q do not contain the Edwards Syndrome CR. Alternatively, unknown modifier factors or undetected somatic mosaicism might cause incomplete penetrance of this duplication.

  10. Study of Upper Albian rudist buildups in the Edwards Formation using ground-based hyperspectral imaging and terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupnik, Diana; Khan, Shuhab; Okyay, Unal; Hartzell, Preston; Zhou, Hua-Wei

    2016-11-01

    Ground-based hyperspectral imaging is used for development of digital outcrop models which can facilitate detailed qualitative and quantitative sedimentological analysis and augment the study of depositional environment, diagenetic processes, and hydrocarbon reservoir characterization in areas which are physically inaccessible. For this investigation, ground-based hyperspectral imaging is combined with terrestrial laser scanning to produce mineralogical maps of Late Albian rudist buildups of the Edwards formation in the Lake Georgetown Spillway in Williamson County, Texas. The Edwards Formation consists of shallow water deposits of reef and associated interreef facies. It is an aquifer in western Texas and was investigated as a hydrocarbon play in south Texas. Hyperspectral data were registered to a geometrically accurate laser point cloud-generated mesh with sub-pixel accuracy and were used to map compositional variation by distinguishing spectral properties unique to each material. More calcitic flat-topped toucasid-rich bioherm facies were distinguished from overlying porous sucrosic dolostones, and peloid wackestones and packstones of back-reef facies. Ground truth was established by petrographic study of samples from this area. This research integrates high-resolution datasets to analyze geometrical and compositional properties of this carbonate formation at a finer scale than traditional methods have achieved and to model the geometry and composition of rudist buildups.

  11. Accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA for detection of Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Freeman, Karoline; Geppert, Julia; Agbebiyi, Adeola; Uthman, Olalekan A; Madan, Jason; Clarke, Angus; Quenby, Siobhan; Clarke, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To measure test accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes using cell-free fetal DNA and identify factors affecting accuracy. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Data sources PubMed, Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and the Cochrane Library published from 1997 to 9 February 2015, followed by weekly autoalerts until 1 April 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies English language journal articles describing case–control studies with ≥15 trisomy cases or cohort studies with ≥50 pregnant women who had been given NIPT and a reference standard. Results 41, 37 and 30 studies of 2012 publications retrieved were included in the review for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes. Quality appraisal identified high risk of bias in included studies, funnel plots showed evidence of publication bias. Pooled sensitivity was 99.3% (95% CI 98.9% to 99.6%) for Down, 97.4% (95.8% to 98.4%) for Edwards, and 97.4% (86.1% to 99.6%) for Patau syndrome. The pooled specificity was 99.9% (99.9% to 100%) for all three trisomies. In 100 000 pregnancies in the general obstetric population we would expect 417, 89 and 40 cases of Downs, Edwards and Patau syndromes to be detected by NIPT, with 94, 154 and 42 false positive results. Sensitivity was lower in twin than singleton pregnancies, reduced by 9% for Down, 28% for Edwards and 22% for Patau syndrome. Pooled sensitivity was also lower in the first trimester of pregnancy, in studies in the general obstetric population, and in cohort studies with consecutive enrolment. Conclusions NIPT using cell-free fetal DNA has very high sensitivity and specificity for Down syndrome, with slightly lower sensitivity for Edwards and Patau syndrome. However, it is not 100% accurate and should not be used as a final diagnosis for positive cases. Trial registration number CRD42014014947. PMID:26781507

  12. Response to Edwards' comments on Origin of British and Irish mammals: disparate post-glacial colonisation and species introductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W. I.; Provan, J.

    2014-12-01

    We are most grateful to Dr Edwards for her lucid summary of recent, calibrated dates for giant Irish deer, red deer, reindeer and brown bear in Irish deposits during the period before and after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Montgomery et al. (2014) dealt largely with the period after the LGM because the physical evidence suggests Ireland was completely covered by ice for at least part of the period between 28 ka and 23 ka (Clark et al., 2012; O'Cofaigh et al., 2012) when Ireland would not have supported any terrestrial mammals. The earliest it was possible for re-colonisation of these species to occur after LGM was probably during the rapid retreat of ice after 23 ka and before 15 ka when the Irish Sea became a complete barrier to terrestrial mammals between Britain and Ireland. There are no dates for any of the four species during the LGM and only one for giant Irish deer (BM-1794, date 18,761-18,034 cal. BP) which is from a site close to the present coast just south of Dublin, between LGM and completion of the Irish Sea, suggesting that conditions generally remained unsuitable for even cold-adapted mammals for many millennia after LGM. Edwards (2014) indicates clearly that all four species are well represented after Ireland became an island although giant Irish deer struggle to make it into the Holocene and the red deer record is broken and perhaps influenced by people (Carden et al., 2012). The sudden reappearance of large mammals around 13-15 ka is consistent with re-colonisation from cryptic refugia lying to the south and west of present day Ireland. The relatively short periods of warming and cooling during the Older and Younger Dryas respectively, followed by warming in the Holocene and the arrival of Mesolithic and Neolithic people remain the major events in the history of Irish mammals until the late 19th Century to the present during which many mammals species have been introduced (Montgomery et al., 2014). Whilst events prior to the LGM are important

  13. Youth Speaks ... P.E.I. Listens! Young Leaders' Forum 2007. Rural Dialogue Summary Report (Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada, March 9-10, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Rural Partnership, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report is a summary of discussions that took place at the Young Leaders' Forum held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island (PEI), on March 9-10, 2007. The event was part of the Rural Dialogue, an on-going, two-way discussion between the Government of Canada and Canadians from rural, remote and northern regions. Launched in 1998, the Rural…

  14. Pedagogy of the Other: Edward Said, Postcolonial Theory, and Strategies for Critique. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 417

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, Shehla

    2012-01-01

    Edward Said has been acknowledged as one of the greatest critics and cultural theorists of our time. His groundbreaking work "Orientalism" initiated the development of postcolonial theory, causing a paradigm shift by re-conceptualizing, deconstructing, and re-presenting the "Orient" as the ultimate "Other" of the "Occident." Despite its influence…

  15. Requiem for Liberalism: The Therapeutic and Deliberative Functions of Nostalgic Appeals in Edward Kennedy's Address to the 1980 Democratic National Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depoe, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the emotion of nostalgia and the strategies and functions of nostalgic rhetorical appeals in order to analyze Edward Kennedy's major policy address during the 1980 Democratic national convention. Suggests that Kennedy used nostalgic appeals to serve therapeutic and deliberative functions. (KEH)

  16. Shaping America's Future III: Proceedings of the National Forum on Transforming Our System of Educating Youth with W. Edwards Deming (June 8, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Educational Service, Bloomington, IN.

    On June 8, 1992, the presidents of the nation's two largest teachers unions joined the directors and presidents of virtually every educational organization, as well as political leaders and executives from Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler in an effort to redesign U.S. schools using the quality principles of W. Edwards Deming. Panelists spent the…

  17. Reproductive biology of the Suez Canal spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834: Crustacea: Brachyura: Majidae).

    PubMed

    El-Serehy, Hamed A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Ibrahim, Nesreen K; Al-Misned, Fahad A

    2015-11-01

    A reproductive biology study of the spider crab Schizophrys aspera (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) was conducted in the Suez Canal from July 2012 to June 2013. The annual sex ratio (Male:Female) of S. aspera was female biased with values of 1:1.25. Out of the four ovarian development stages of this crab, two stages were observed in the Suez Canal throughout the whole year. The ovigerous crab's carapace width varied from 28 to 52 mm. This crab species can spawn during most of the year in the canal water, with a peak during late spring and early winter. The fecundity of ovigerous females ranged between 2349 and 13600 eggs with a mean of 5494 ± 1486 eggs. Female crabs that reached sexual maturity exhibited a minimum carapace width varying between 22 and 46 mm, and fifty percentage of all ovigerous females showed a carapace width of 36 mm.

  18. "We were all trespassers": George Edward Lemmon, Anglo-American cattle ranching, and the Great Sioux Reservation.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Nathan B

    2011-01-01

    With the opening of the Black Hills to white settlement in the mid-1870s, thousands of fortune-seekers made their way into Dakota Territory. George Edward Lemmon, a man later renowned as one of the world's most accomplished cowboys, was among them. During the 1880s his employer, the Sheidley Cattle Company, grazed thousands of cattle in western Dakota Territory, many of them on Sioux Indian land. Indeed, the company owed a great deal of its success to illegal grazing on the Great Sioux Reservation. Opportunists such as Lemmon supported Indian reservations because they could use those lands to make a profit. The interaction between large-scale white ranchers and the Indians of the Great Sioux Reservation provides insight into the development of the range cattle industry in the northern Great Plains and illuminates the motivations that led many ranchers to support, rather than oppose, the reservation system.

  19. A cross-sectional study of Tritrichomonas foetus infection in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Oriana; Greenwood, Spencer; Vanderstichel, Raphael; Gelens, Hans

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional study examined the occurrence of Tritrichomonas foetus, and other intestinal parasites, in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island (PEI). Fecal samples were collected from 100 feral cats, 100 cats from the PEI Humane Society, and 5 cats from a private residence. The occurrence of T. foetus, based on fecal culture, was 0% in feral and shelter cats. A single positive sample was obtained from an owned Abyssinian cat that was imported to PEI. Intestinal parasites were identified via fecal flotation in 76% of feral cats and 39% of cats from the humane society. Feral cats had a higher incidence of Toxocara cati than cats from the humane society (P < 0.001), conversely, shelter cats had a higher incidence of Cystoisospora spp. (P < 0.001). These results suggest that while T. foetus is not of importance in feral and shelter cats in PEI, imported cats could serve as reservoirs. PMID:26933262

  20. Scaling analysis of domain-wall free energy in the Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M; Hukushima, K; Yoshino, H; Takayama, H

    2007-09-28

    The stability of the spin-glass phase against a magnetic field is studied in the three- and four-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glasses. Effective couplings J(eff) and effective fields H(eff) associated with length scale L are measured by a numerical domain-wall renormalization-group method. The results obtained by scaling analysis of the data strongly indicate the existence of a crossover length beyond which the spin-glass order is destroyed by field H. The crossover length well obeys a power law of H which diverges as H --> 0 but remains finite for any nonzero H, implying that the spin-glass phase is absent even in an infinitesimal field. These results are well consistent with the droplet theory for short-range spin glasses.

  1. Biaxial deformation of a polymer under shear: NMR test of the Doi-Edwards model with convected constraint release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Ryan J.; Kilfoil, Maria L.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2001-11-01

    2H NMR quadrupole interaction spectroscopy has been used to measure the deformation of a 670 kD poly(dimethylsiloxane) melt under shear in a Couette cell. The signals were acquired from a per deuterated benzene probe molecule which provides a motionally averaged sampling of the entire segmental ensemble. We have measured the dependence on shear rate of the SXX (velocity), SYY (velocity gradient), SZZ (vorticity), and SXY (shear) elements of the segmental alignment tensor, as well as the angular dependence of the deuterium quadrupole splitting at fixed shear rate. We show that the data agree quite well with the Doi-Edwards theory but significantly better when convected constraint release effects are included. These fits return a value for the tube disengagement time of 100 ms.

  2. Simulation of flow in the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas, and refinement of storage and flow concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, Robert W.; Land, Larry F.

    1988-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is a complexly faulted, carbonate aquifer lying within the Balcones fault zone of south-central Texas. The aquifer consists of thin- to massive-bedded limestone and dolomite, most of which is in the form of mudstones and wackestones. Well-developed secondary porosity has formed in association with former erosional surfaces within the carbonate rocks, within dolomitized-burrowed tidal and evaporitic deposits, and along inclined fractures to produce an aquifer with transmissivities greater than 100 ft2/s. The aquifer is recharged mainly by streamflow losses in the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer and is discharged by major springs located at considerable distances, as much as 150 mi, from the areas of recharge and by wells. Ground-water flow within the Edwards aquifer of the San Antonio region was simulated to investigate concepts relating to the storage and flow characteristics. The concepts of major interest were the effects of barrier faults on flow direction, water levels, springflow, and storage within the aquifer. A general-purpose, finite-difference model, modified to provide the capability of representing barrier faults, was used to simulate ground-water flow and storage in the aquifer. The approach in model development was to conduct a series of simulations beginning with a simple representation of the aquifer framework and then proceeding to subsequent representations of increasing complexity. The simulations investigated the effects of complex geologic structures and of significant changes in transmissivity, anisotropy, and storage coefficient. Initial values of transmissivity, anisotropy, and storage coefficient were estimated based on concepts developed in previous studies. Results of the simulations confirmed the original estimates of transmissivity values (greater than 100 square feet/s) in the confined zone of the aquifer between San Antonio and Comal Springs. A storage coefficient of 0.05 in the unconfined zone of the aquifer

  3. Hydrology and water quality of the Edwards Aquifer associated with Barton Springs in the Austin area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slade, Raymond M.; Dorsey, Michael E.; Stewart, Sheree L.

    1986-01-01

    Water-quality data for 1979-83 are available for each creek that recharges the aquifer, from Barton Springs, and for 38 wells. Water quality from Barton Springs and the wells is better than the creeks providing surface recharge, which have fecal-bacteria values as high as 100,000 colonies per 100 milliliters. Significant densities of fecal bacteria have been found in water from Barton Springs. Significant concentrations of nitrate nitrogen, fecal-group bacteria, and fluoride have been identified in samples from wells. Fluoride originates in the aquifers that underlie the Edwards aquifer. Nitrate nitrogen and fecal-group bacteria originate in residential developments and cattle ranches located in the area.

  4. A cross-sectional study of Tritrichomonas foetus infection in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Raab, Oriana; Greenwood, Spencer; Vanderstichel, Raphael; Gelens, Hans

    2016-03-01

    A cross-sectional study examined the occurrence of Tritrichomonas foetus, and other intestinal parasites, in feral and shelter cats in Prince Edward Island (PEI). Fecal samples were collected from 100 feral cats, 100 cats from the PEI Humane Society, and 5 cats from a private residence. The occurrence of T. foetus, based on fecal culture, was 0% in feral and shelter cats. A single positive sample was obtained from an owned Abyssinian cat that was imported to PEI. Intestinal parasites were identified via fecal flotation in 76% of feral cats and 39% of cats from the humane society. Feral cats had a higher incidence of Toxocara cati than cats from the humane society (P < 0.001), conversely, shelter cats had a higher incidence of Cystoisospora spp. (P < 0.001). These results suggest that while T. foetus is not of importance in feral and shelter cats in PEI, imported cats could serve as reservoirs.

  5. Occurrence of anticyclonic eddies on the Prince Edward Plateau (Southern Ocean): effects on phytoplankton biomass and production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissinotto, R.; Duncombe Rae, C. M.

    1990-05-01

    Dimensional analysis suggests that mesoscale eddies observed at the Prince Edward Islands (47°S, 38°E) are unlikely to be the result of an island wake vortex shedding process. The analysis shows that appropriate conditions can exist for the formation of closed streamline, anticyclonic eddies (Taylor columns) over the plateau. Hydrographic observations on six surveys in the area show the repeated presence of anticyclonic eddies in the vicinity of the islands. These eddies appear to have some characteristics that are consistent with Taylor column phenomena, but the spatial resolution of the hydrographic data is not sufficient to draw conclusive results. Dense phytoplankton blooms are repeatedly found between the islands. A mechanism explaining these blooms in terms of the stability of the surface mixed layer and the availability of reduced forms of nitrogen is proposed. It is suggested that both water-column stability and available nutrient concentrations are locally enhanced by run-off retained by the eddy field.

  6. Can postoperative pulmonary conditions be improved by treatment with the Bartlett-Edwards incentive spirometer after upper abdominal surgery?

    PubMed

    Lyager, S; Wernberg, M; Rajani, N; Bøggild-Madsen, B; Nielsen, L; Nielsen, H C; Andersen, M; Møller, J; Silberschmid, M

    1979-08-01

    During the immediate postoperative course after upper abdominal surgery, pulmonary complications often occur, caused, inter alia, by reduced regional ventilation and by atelectases as a result of: (1) narrowing of the small peripheral bronchi, and (2) impaired respiratory function. Based on these pathophysiological mechanisms, an instrument (Bartlett-Edwards Incentive Spirometer) has been devised, which aims at giving the patient an opportunity of sustained maximal inspiration under standardized and controlled conditions. The use of this instrument has been followed by reports of a considerable reduction in postoperative pulmonary complications. In a controlled clinical investigation of the pre- and postoperative condition of the lungs, we were unable to show any beneficial effect of the instrument. In general, we have a low frequency of severe postoperative pulmonary complications, as compared with the results reported in the literature. We ascribe this to our very effective pre- and postoperative respiratory therapy.

  7. Emanuel Edward Klein--the father of British microbiology and the case of the animal vivisection controversy of 1875.

    PubMed

    Atalić, Bruno; Fatović-Ferencić, Stella

    2009-10-01

    The new Appendix A of the European Convention for the Protection of Vertebrate Animals Used for Experimental and Other Scientific Purposes, which gives guidelines for accommodation and care of animals and was approved on June 15, 2006, was the main reason the authors decided to investigate the origins of the regulations of animal experiments. Although one might assume that the regulation had its origin in the United Nations conventions, the truth is that its origins are a hundred years old. The authors present a case of the nineteenth-century vivisection controversy brought about by the publication of the Handbook for the Physiological Laboratory in 1873, in which John Burdon-Sanderson, Emanuel Edward Klein, Michael Foster, and Thomas Lauder Brunton described a series of vivisection experiments they performed on animals for research purposes. It was the first case of vivisection to be examined, processed, and condemned for inhuman behavior toward animals before an official body, leading to enactment of the Cruelty to Animals Act in 1876. The case reveals a specific ethos of science in the second half of the nineteenth century, which was characterized by a deep commitment of scientists to the scientific enterprise and their strong belief that science could solve social problems, combined with an overt insensitivity to the suffering of experimental animals. The central figure in the case was Emanuel Edward Klein, a disciple of the Central European medical tradition (Vienna Medical School) and a direct follower of the experimental school of Brücke, Stricker, Magendie, and Bernard. Because of his undisguised attitudes and opinions on the use of vivisection, Klein became a paradigm of the new scientific identity, strongly influencing the stereotypic image of a scientist, and polarizing the public opinion on vivisection in England in the nineteenth century and for some considerable time afterward.

  8. Thermostatic and rheological responses of DPD fluid to extreme shear under modified Lees-Edwards boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Moshfegh, Abouzar; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Jabbarzadeh, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and rheological interactions between velocity-dependent thermostats of Lowe-Andersen (LA) and Nosé-Hoover-Lowe-Andersen (NHLA), and modified Lees-Edwards (M-LEC) boundary condition were studied in the context of Dissipative Particle Dynamics method. Comparisons were made with original Lees-Edwards method to characterise the improvements that M-LEC offers in conserving the induced shear momentum. Different imposed shear velocities, heat bath collision/exchange frequencies and thermostating probabilities were considered. The presented analyses addressed an unusual discontinuity in momentum transfer that appeared in form of nonphysical jumps in velocity and temperature profiles. The usefulness of M-LEC was then quantified by evaluating the enhancements in obtained effective shear velocity, effective shear rate, Péclet number, and dynamic viscosity. System exchange frequency (Γ) with Maxwellian heat bath was found to play an important role, in that its larger values facilitated achieving higher shear rates with proper temperature control at the cost of deviation from an ideal momentum transfer. Similar dynamic viscosities were obtained under both shearing modes between LA and NHLA thermostats up to Γ = 10, whilst about twice the range of viscosity (1 < η < 20) was calculated for M-LEC at larger probabilities (ΓΔt > %). The main benefits of this modification were to facilitate momentum flow from shear boundaries to the system bulk. In addition, it was found that there exist upper thresholds for imposing shear on the system beyond which temperature cannot be controlled properly and nonphysical jumps reappear.

  9. Why the Medical Research Council refused Robert Edwards and Patrick Steptoe support for research on human conception in 1971

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin H.; Franklin, Sarah B.; Cottingham, Matthew; Hopwood, Nick

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 1971, Cambridge physiologist Robert Edwards and Oldham gynaecologist Patrick Steptoe applied to the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) for long-term support for a programme of scientific and clinical ‘Studies on Human Reproduction’. The MRC, then the major British funder of medical research, declined support on ethical grounds and maintained this policy throughout the 1970s. The work continued with private money, leading to the birth of Louise Brown in 1978 and transforming research in obstetrics, gynaecology and human embryology. METHODS The MRC decision has been criticized, but the processes by which it was reached have yet to be explored. Here, we present an archive-based analysis of the MRC decision. RESULTS We find evidence of initial support for Edwards and Steptoe, including from within the MRC, which invited the applicants to join its new directly funded Clinical Research Centre at Northwick Park Hospital. They declined the offer, preferring long-term grant support at the University of Cambridge, and so exposed the project to competitive funding mode. Referees and the Clinical Research Board saw the institutional set-up in Cambridge as problematic with respect to clinical facilities and patient management; gave infertility a low priority compared with population control; assessed interventions as purely experimental rather than potential treatments, and so set the bar for safety high; feared fatal abnormalities and so wanted primate experiments first; and were antagonized by the applicants’ high media profile. The rejection set MRC policy on IVF for 8 years, until, after the birth of just two healthy babies, the Council rapidly converted to enthusiastic support. CONCLUSIONS This analysis enriches our view of a crucial decision, highlights institutional opportunities and constraints and provides insight into the then dominant attitudes of reproductive scientists and clinicians towards human conception research. PMID:20657027

  10. Sedimentologic and diagenetic controls on aquifer properties, Lower Cretaceous Edwards Carbonate Aquifer, Texas: Implications for aquifer management

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D.; Dutton, A.R.; Ruppel, S.C.

    1994-09-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of water in the Edwards aquifer was assessed using a core and log-based study. Porosity distribution reflects both depositional fabric and subsequent diagenesis. Vertical facies stacking patterns influence the depositional porosity as well as dolomitization and diagentic porosity modification. Subtidal facies deposited during sea level highstands are generally undolomitized and exhibit low porosity (5-10%); platform grainstones typically have high depositional porosity and significant solution enhancement (20-42% porosity). Dolomitized subtidal facies in tidal-flat-capped cycles have very high porosity (20-40%) because of selective dolomite dissolution in the freshwater aquifer. Porosity in gypsum beds is high in some areas because of dissolution and collapse, but low where gypsum was replaced by calcite cement. Low-energy subtidal and evaporitic units in the Maverick basin have porosity generally less than 15%. The overlying basinal packstones and grainstones have solution-enhanced porosities of 25 to 35%. Diagenesis associated with fluctuations in water chemistry near the saline-freshwater interface may explain one high-porosity trend. Other complex patterns of high and low porosity are attributed to structurally and hydrologically controlled porosity enhancement and cementation. Three-dimensional mapping of porosity trends provides data for improved aquifer management. Only about 3% of the maximum stored water lies above the water table at which natural spring flow is diminished. An average specific yield of 42% in the unconfined aquifer is determined from total porosity, changes in the water-table elevation, and changes in estimated recharge and discharge. Average storativity of 2.6 x 10{sup -4} in the confined Edwards is estimated using average porosity and barometric efficiency calculated from comparing water-level hydrographs and atmospheric pressure changes.

  11. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination—Edwards aquifer near San Antonio, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Lindgren, Richard J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well field in San Antonio, Texas. The well field consists of six production wells that tap the Edwards aquifer. Typically, one or two wells are pumped at a time, yielding an average total of 20-21 million gallons per day. Water samples were collected from public-supply wells in the well field and from monitoring wells installed along general directions of flow to the well field. Samples from the well field contained some constituents of concern for drinking-water quality, including nitrate; the pesticide compounds atrazine, deethylatrazine, and simazine; and the volatile organic compounds tetrachloroethene (also called perchloroethene, or PCE), chloroform, bromoform, and dibromochloromethane. These constituents were detected in untreated water at concentrations much less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, the study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well field in San Antonio, Texas: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) fast pathways for flow of groundwater through features formed or enlarged by dissolution of bedrock, (3) recharge characteristics of the aquifer, and (4) natural geochemical processes within the aquifer. A computer-model simulation of groundwater flow and transport was used to estimate the traveltime (or age) of water particles entering public-supply well W4 in the well field. Modeled findings show that almost half of the water reaching the public-supply well is less than 2 years old. Such a large percentage of very young water indicates that (1) contaminants entering the aquifer may be transported rapidly to the well, (2) there is limited time for chemical reactions to occur in the aquifer that may attenuate contaminants, and (3) should recharge water become contaminated with

  12. Simulation of advective flow under steady-state and transient recharge conditions, Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Donald A.; Masterson, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed several ground-water models in support of an investigation of ground-water contamination being conducted by the Army National Guard Bureau at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Military Reservation on western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Regional and subregional steady-state models and regional transient models were used to (1) improve understanding of the hydrologic system, (2) simulate advective transport of contaminants, (3) delineate recharge areas to municipal wells, and (4) evaluate how model discretization and time-varying recharge affect simulation results. A water-table mound dominates ground-water-flow patterns. Near the top of the mound, which is within Camp Edwards, hydraulic gradients are nearly vertically downward and horizontal gradients are small. In downgradient areas that are further from the top of the water-table mound, the ratio of horizontal to vertical gradients is larger and horizontal flow predominates. The steady-state regional model adequately simulates advective transport in some areas of the aquifer; however, simulation of ground-water flow in areas with local hydrologic boundaries, such as ponds, requires more finely discretized subregional models. Subregional models also are needed to delineate recharge areas to municipal wells that are inadequately represented in the regional model or are near other pumped wells. Long-term changes in recharge rates affect hydraulic heads in the aquifer and shift the position of the top of the water-table mound. Hydraulic-gradient directions do not change over time in downgradient areas, whereas they do change substantially with temporal changes in recharge near the top of the water-table mound. The assumption of steady-state hydraulic conditions is valid in downgradient area, where advective transport paths change little over time. In areas closer to the top of the water-table mound, advective transport paths change as a function of time, transient and steady-state paths

  13. Edwards thermodynamics of the jamming transition for frictionless packings: Ergodicity test and role of angoricity and compactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Song, Chaoming; Wang, Ping; Makse, Hernán A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper illustrates how the tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics can help to describe a far-from-equilibrium problem: the jamming transition in frictionless granular materials. Edwards ideas consist of proposing a statistical ensemble of volume and stress fluctuations through the thermodynamic notion of entropy, compactivity, X, and angoricity, A (two temperature-like variables). We find that Edwards thermodynamics is able to describe the jamming transition (J point) in frictionless packings. Using the ensemble formalism we elucidate the following: (i) We test the combined volume-stress ensemble by comparing the statistical properties of jammed configurations obtained by dynamics with those averaged over the ensemble of minima in the potential energy landscape as a test of ergodicity. Agreement between both methods supports the idea of ergodicity and “thermalization” at a given angoricity and compactivity. (ii) A microcanonical ensemble analysis supports the maximum entropy principle for grains. (iii) The intensive variables A and X describe the approach to jamming through a series of scaling relations as A→0+ and X→0-. Due to the force-strain coupling in the interparticle forces, the jamming transition is probed thermodynamically by a “jamming temperature” TJ composed of contributions from A and X. (iv) The thermodynamic framework reveals the order of the jamming phase transition by showing the absence of critical fluctuations at jamming in static observables like pressure and volume, and we discuss other critical scenarios for the jamming transition. (v) Finally, we elaborate on a comparison with relevant studies by Gao, Blawzdziewicz, and O’Hern [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.74.061304 74, 061304 (2006)], showing a breakdown of equiprobability of microstates obtained via fast quenches. A network analysis of the energy landscape reveals the origin of the inhomogeneities in the uneven distribution of the areas of the basins

  14. A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Teeple, Andrew; Thomas, Jonathan V.; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2012-01-01

    A conceptual model of the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers, which include the Pecos Valley, Igneous, Dockum, Rustler, and Capitan Reef aquifers, was developed as the second phase of a groundwater availability study in the Pecos County region in west Texas. The first phase of the study was to collect and compile groundwater, surface-water, water-quality, geophysical, and geologic data in the area. The third phase of the study involves a numerical groundwater-flow model of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in order to simulate groundwater conditions based on various groundwater-withdrawal scenarios. Resource managers plan to use the results of the study to establish management strategies for the groundwater system. The hydrogeologic framework is composed of the hydrostratigraphy, structural features, and hydraulic properties of the groundwater system. Well and geophysical logs were interpreted to define the top and base surfaces of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units. Elevations of the top and base of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer generally decrease from the southwestern part of the study area to the northeast. The thicknesses of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer units were calculated using the interpolated top and base surfaces of the hydrostratigraphic units. Some of the thinnest sections of the aquifer were in the eastern part of the study area and some of the thickest sections were in the Pecos, Monument Draw, and Belding-Coyanosa trough areas. Normal-fault zones, which formed as growth and collapse features as sediments were deposited along the margins of more resistant rocks and as overlying sediments collapsed into the voids created by the dissolution of Permian-age evaporite deposits, were delineated based on the interpretation of hydrostratigraphic cross sections. The lowest aquifer transmissivity values were measured in the eastern part of the study area; the highest transmissivity values were

  15. ‘Where is the Fault?’: The Starvation of Edward Cooper at the Isle of Wight Workhouse in 1877

    PubMed Central

    Price, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Edward Cooper was a disabled pauper who died of starvation in a workhouse ‘idiot’ ward. His neglect was the result of systemic problems, exacerbated by policy, and the poor law's free market approach to employing doctors in this period. In the 1870s community care came under assault from a policy that is known to historians as the ‘crusade against outdoor relief’. Though it sought to target ‘idlers’ and ‘undeserving’ cases, the withdrawal of vital payments for familial carers drove up the number of institutionalised and vulnerable patients. In turn, workhouse medical officers and nurses were unprepared for disabled patients, such as Edward, and charges of negligence increased. This article will provide a rare and detailed comparison between Victorian workhouse care and care in the community, drawn from extant contemporary affidavits.

  16. A commentary on 'generally representative is representative of none: pitfalls of IQ test standardization in multicultural settings' by A.B. Shuttleworth-Edwards.

    PubMed

    Sunderaraman, Preeti; Zahodne, Laura B; Manly, Jennifer J

    2016-10-01

    We offer an appraisal of Professor Shuttleworth-Edwards's commentary (2016) on the extraordinary challenges of assessment of cognitive function in a culturally, educationally, racially, and linguistically diverse population. First, we discuss the purpose of using intelligence tests in South Africa and beyond in order to clarify the reference group on which norms will be based. Next, we discuss the psychometric consequences of Pearson's decisions to not adapt their measure of intellectual functioning to the cultural background of the majority of South Africans, and to use a population-matched normative sample in which the disadvantaged group is in the majority. We echo Professor Shuttleworth-Edwards's call for large-scale empirical studies of cognitive test performance in a multicultural context. We conclude the article by urging the entire community of neuropsychologists to hold test companies accountable to strict, ethical, and comprehensive standards for production of accurate and appropriate measurement of cognitive function.

  17. A conceptual hydrogeologic model for the hydrogeologic framework, geochemistry, and groundwater-flow system of the Edwards-Trinity and related aquifers in the Pecos County region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jonathan V.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Bumgarner, Johnathan R.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Teeple, Andrew; Houston, Natalie A.; Payne, Jason; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2013-01-01

    Several previous studies have been done to compile or collect physical and chemical data, describe the hydrogeologic processes, and develop conceptual and numerical groundwater-flow models of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer in the Trans-Pecos region. Documented methods were used to compile and collect groundwater, surface-water, geochemical, geophysical, and geologic information that subsequently were used to develop this conceptual model.

  18. Mercury deposition in ombrotrophic bogs in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Atlantic region surveillance report number EPS-5-AR-98-4

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, L.A.; Matthews, S.L.

    1998-12-31

    A study was conducted to determine historical atmospheric mercury deposition patterns in the Maritime Provinces. Investigators measured mercury concentrations in peat cores from five ombrotrophic bogs in Kejimkujik, Fundy, Kouchibougouac, and Cape Breton Highlands national parks and in East Baltic Bog, Prince Edward Island. Results presented and discussed include deposition rates calculated using lead-210 date estimates, temporal trends in mercury concentrations, and spatial patterns of mercury deposition.

  19. Digital elevation model of King Edward VII Peninsula, West Antarctica, from SAR interferometry and ICESat laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baek, S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Braun, Andreas; Lu, Zhiming; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present a digital elevation model (DEM) of King Edward VII Peninsula, Sulzberger Bay, West Antarctica, developed using 12 European Remote Sensing (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scenes and 24 Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry profiles. We employ differential interferograms from the ERS tandem mission SAR scenes acquired in the austral fall of 1996, and four selected ICESat laser altimetry profiles acquired in the austral fall of 2004, as ground control points (GCPs) to construct an improved geocentric 60-m resolution DEM over the grounded ice region. We then extend the DEM to include two ice shelves using ICESat profiles via Kriging. Twenty additional ICESat profiles acquired in 2003-2004 are used to assess the accuracy of the DEM. After accounting for radar penetration depth and predicted surface changes, including effects due to ice mass balance, solid Earth tides, and glacial isostatic adjustment, in part to account for the eight-year data acquisition discrepancy, the resulting difference between the DEM and ICESat profiles is -0.57 ?? 5.88 m. After removing the discrepancy between the DEM and ICESat profiles for a final combined DEM using a bicubic spline, the overall difference is 0.05 ?? 1.35 m. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  20. Limiting pumping from the Edwards Aquifer: An economic investigation of proposals, water markets, and spring flow guarantees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarl, Bruce A.; Dillon, Carl R.; Keplinger, Keith O.; Williams, R. Lynn

    1999-04-01

    The Edwards Aquifer, near San Antonio, Texas, is an important water source for both pumping and spring flow, which in turn provides water for recreation and habitat for several endangered species. A management authority is charged with aquifer management and is mandated to reduce pumping, facilitate water markets, protect agricultural rights, and protect the species habitat. This paper examines the economic dimensions of authority duties. A combined hydrologic-economic model is used in the investigation. The results indicate that proposed pumping limits are shown to have large consequences for agricultural usage and to decrease the welfare of current aquifer pumping users. However, the spring flow habitat is found to be protected, and the gains from that protection would have to exceed pumping user losses in order for the protection measures to increase regional economic welfare. Agricultural guarantees are shown to cause use value differences, indicating the opportunity for emergence of an active water market. Fixed quantity pumping limits are found to be an expensive way of insuring adequate spring flow.