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Sample records for edwards mira bileaflet

  1. Wonderful Mira.

    PubMed

    Wareing, Christopher John

    2008-12-13

    Since being named 'wonderful' in the seventeenth century for its peculiar brightness variability, Mira A has been the subject of extensive research and become the prototype for a whole class of 'Mira' variable stars. The primary star in a binary system, Mira A is reaching the end of its life and currently undergoing an extended period of enhanced mass loss. Recent observations have revealed a surrounding arc-like structure and a stream of material stretching 12 light years away in opposition to the arc. In this article, I review recent modelling of this cometary appearance as a bow shock with an accompanying tail of material ram pressure stripped from the head of the bow shock, place Mira in an evolutionary context, predict its future with reference to the similar star R Hya and planetary nebula Sh 2-188, and speculate some avenues of research both on Mira itself and on other 'Mira-like' stars with bow shocks and tails. I also discuss the implications of this discovery for our own star, the Sun.

  2. 50 forgotten Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, T.; Bengtsson, H.; Wikander, T.; Holmberg, G.; Wahlström, R.; Allen, C.

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of 4 years observing of 50 poorly studied Mira stars. 247 maxima and 241 minima together with current period elements, ranges and colour indices for the stars are presented. "50 forgotten Miras" is an ongoing observing program run by SAAF/V that started in 2012.

  3. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-15

    New ultraviolet images from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of eeds for new solar systems. The star, named Mira pronounced my-rah after the latin word for wonderful.

  4. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  5. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  6. Edwards' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  7. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy.

    In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira.

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before.

    Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2).

    Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace

  8. Multi-criteria Integrated Resource Assessment (MIRA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    MIRA is an approach that facilitates stakeholder engagement for collaborative multi-objective decision making. MIRA is designed to facilitate and support an inclusive, explicit, transparent, iterative learning-based decision process.

  9. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (< 5%). However, patients still face the risks of blood cell damage, thromboembolic events, and material failure of the prosthetic device. One mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested.

  10. Mira: Argonne's 10-petaflops supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Papka, Michael; Coghlan, Susan; Isaacs, Eric; Peters, Mark; Messina, Paul

    2013-07-03

    Mira, Argonne's petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system, ushers in a new era of scientific supercomputing at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops supercomputer is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. As a machine for open science, any researcher with a question that requires large-scale computing resources can submit a proposal for time on Mira, typically in allocations of millions of core-hours, to run programs for their experiments. This adds up to billions of hours of computing time per year.

  11. Mira: Argonne's 10-petaflops supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    Papka, Michael; Coghlan, Susan; Isaacs, Eric; Peters, Mark; Messina, Paul

    2016-07-12

    Mira, Argonne's petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system, ushers in a new era of scientific supercomputing at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops supercomputer is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second. As a machine for open science, any researcher with a question that requires large-scale computing resources can submit a proposal for time on Mira, typically in allocations of millions of core-hours, to run programs for their experiments. This adds up to billions of hours of computing time per year.

  12. Four Neglected Southern Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragg, T. A.

    2006-06-01

    This paper is a continuation of the study of several southern Mira stars presented at the 1996 Fall Meeting of the AAVSO in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The four stars herein included are 0828-44, CT Vel; 1553-23, BK Sco; 1557-23, TY Sco; and 2011-52, X Tel. X Tel is now on the regular observing list of the RASNZ.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics of Mira's cometary tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: The asymptotic giant-branch, long-period variable star Mira exhibits a 4 parsec long cometary tail in the far-ultraviolet. We address the issue of the origin of this structure and its emission process by simulating the transition of this star from the interstellar medium to the Local Bubble, which is a tenuous, high-pressure medium. Methods: We use the hydrodynamic and the magnetohydrodynamic modules of the PLUTO astrophysical code to carry out our simulations. We study the system without a cooling function, with a simplified exponential cooling function, and with a simplified nonequilibrium cooling function. Results: We find evidence that magnetohydrodynamics constrain the shape of the cometary tail and explain features of its far-ultraviolet emission. We suggest an emission process that involves C0 excitation through inelastic electron collisions and a two-photon continuum to explain the luminosity of Mira's tail.

  14. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application Project (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grubbs, Rodney P.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA) Project. A detailed description of the MIRA camera service software architecture, encoder features, and on-board communications are presented. A description of a candidate camera under development is also shown.

  15. Measurements of flow past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2013-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve has been inserted in an axisymmetric model of the aorta within a mock circulation apparatus with physiological pressure and flow variations. The velocity field behind the valve has been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The results closely match those reported by similar studies. A triple jet emanated from the valve's orifices and regions of reverse flow formed in the sinus region. Velocity fluctuations were greatest in the shear layers of the jets. The average r.m.s. streamwise velocity fluctuation over the turbulent period was 0.22 m/s; its maximum value was 0.53 m/s and occurred at the onset of deceleration. Measurements with the valve inserted in an anatomical model of the aorta are planned for the near future. The present and future measurements will be compared to determine the effects of the aorta anatomy on the characteristics of flow through bileaflet valves. In particular, measurements of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses will be analyzed to identify possible locations of blood element damage, and regions of recirculation and stagnation will be identified as locations favourable to thrombus growth. The effects of flows in branching arteries and valve orientation will also be investigated. Supported by NSERC.

  16. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  17. Motion Imagery and Robotics Application (MIRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Lindolfo; Rich, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives include: I. Prototype a camera service leveraging the CCSDS Integrated protocol stack (MIRA/SM&C/AMS/DTN): a) CCSDS MIRA Service (New). b) Spacecraft Monitor and Control (SM&C). c) Asynchronous Messaging Service (AMS). d) Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN). II. Additional MIRA Objectives: a) Demo of Camera Control through ISS using CCSDS protocol stack (Berlin, May 2011). b) Verify that the CCSDS standards stack can provide end-to-end space camera services across ground and space environments. c) Test interoperability of various CCSDS protocol standards. d) Identify overlaps in the design and implementations of the CCSDS protocol standards. e) Identify software incompatibilities in the CCSDS stack interfaces. f) Provide redlines to the SM&C, AMS, and DTN working groups. d) Enable the CCSDS MIRA service for potential use in ISS Kibo camera commanding. e) Assist in long-term evolution of this entire group of CCSDS standards to TRL 6 or greater.

  18. Introducing Mira, Argonne's Next-Generation Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-19

    Mira, the new petascale IBM Blue Gene/Q system installed at the ALCF, will usher in a new era of scientific supercomputing. An engineering marvel, the 10-petaflops machine is capable of carrying out 10 quadrillion calculations per second.

  19. Mira Ceti and the Star of Bethlehem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    We consider the probability that the Gospel of Matthew could report the earliest observation of Mira Ceti. Some biblical remarks have to be considered in order to distinguish a scientific text in the modern acceptation and the content of Gospels regarding some astronomical arguments. Mira fulfills the basic requirements to be the Star of Bethlehem as described in the Gospel according to Matthew (Mt 2:1-12). In fact it was visible at least two times with a time interval (not specified in Mt text) in which it disappeared. Moreover Mira was close to the position were the triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn occurred in the years 7-6 b. C. and it could be observed during that period by ancient astronomers. The discovery of Mira in 1596 and its second observation 12.5 years later, made by David Fabricius, occurred when Jupiter approached it. Because of those reasons we study the maxima of Mira in order to evaluate both the frequency of one and of two consecutive bright apparitions eventually as observed by the Magi. We did an evaluation of the correlation between two following maxima in order to verify the probability of occurrence of two consecutive bright maxima, because that condition would have been indeed the most favorable for the candidature of Mira as the Bethlehem Star. Analyzing the maxima of Mira we found a probability of seeing it brighter than alpha Ceti once every 21 years. In this case, as in February 1997, Mira can be detected at the first sight as a new component near the most significant asterism in its zone, composed by alpha, gamma and delta Ceti. This condition could have happened in the case of the Bethlehem Star. We found also a correlation between the magnitude of two consecutive maxima: if a bright maximum occurs it is more probable that the following is a faint one.

  20. In-vivo turbulent stresses of bileaflet prosthesis leakage jets.

    PubMed

    Travis, Brandon R; Christensen, Thomas D; Smerup, Morten; Olsen, Morten S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies of leakage jet turbulence have been carried out in vitro, using a Newtonian fluid to simulate blood and large, rigid approximations to the chambers of the heart. The study aim was to apply an in-vivo method of quantifying leakage jet turbulence to a variety of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, and thereafter to determine the effects of exercise and valve design on turbulent shear stresses within leakage flow. Bileaflet prostheses sewn to a manual traversing device were implanted in the mitral position of 29 pigs of body weight ca. 90 kg. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was used to acquire velocity measurements within the leakage jets detected 1 mm upstream of the housing. Analytical techniques were used to estimate peak velocities and maximum turbulent shear stresses from these velocity measurements. Maximum turbulent shear stress was found to rise with increasing ventricular pressure. No leakage turbulence was found from a valve with relatively small leakage gap widths. The Medtronic Parallel valve was found to have considerable significant leakage flow disturbance, even under low ventricular pressure conditions. Similar maximum turbulent shear stress magnitudes were estimated in the leakage jets of the St. Jude Medical, CarboMedics and Sorin Bicarbon valves at medium ventricular pressure conditions. The maximum turbulent shear stresses estimated in these experiments were lower than those found in previous in-vitro measurements. Exercise raises the turbulent shear stresses of leakage flow substantially. Hinge design and leakage gap width also affect the magnitudes of these stresses. Leakage flow turbulence may be less damaging to the blood than was previously thought, and is considerably less damaging than forward-flow turbulence.

  1. Interferometric observations of Mira (Omicron Ceti)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Mozurkewich, D.; Armstrong, J. T.; Johnston, K. J.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.

    1992-01-01

    The long-period variable Mira Omicron Ceti has been observed at 800 nm wavelength with the Mk III Optical Interferometer at photometric phases 0 = 0.96, 0.05, and 0.14 in 1990; some additional data were taken in 1989. The star is not spherically symmetric, and temporal variations of the size and the position angle of the asymmetry are detected. The visibility data can be represented by two uniform elliptical disks, which could correspond to different layers in Mira's atmosphere. If the size variations are interpreted in terms of physical motion of the emitting material, an infall velocity of about 15 km/s around phi = 0 is derived.

  2. Sites of Successful Ventricular Fibrillation Ablation in Bileaflet Mitral Valve Prolapse Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Syed, Faisal F; Ackerman, Michael J; McLeod, Christopher J; Kapa, Suraj; Mulpuru, Siva K; Sriram, Chenni S; Cannon, Bryan C; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Noseworthy, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Although the vast majority of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is benign, a small subset of patients, predominantly women, with bileaflet prolapse, complex ventricular ectopy (VE), and abnormal T waves comprise the recently described bileaflet MVP syndrome. We compared findings on electrophysiological study in bileaflet MVP syndrome patients with and without cardiac arrest to identify factors that may predispose to malignant ventricular arrhythmia. Fourteen consecutive bileaflet MVP syndrome patients (n=13 women; median [limits], age at index ablation, 33.8 [21.0-58.7] years; ejection fraction, 60% [45%-67%]; all ≤ moderate mitral regurgitation; n=6 with previous cardiac arrest and implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks for ventricular fibrillation; and n=8 without implantable cardioverter defibrillator although with symptomatic complex VE) were included. The 2 groups had similar baseline echocardiographic and electrocardiographic characteristics. All patients had at least 1 left ventricular papillary or fascicular VE focus. Purkinje origin VE was identified as the ventricular fibrillation trigger in 6 of 6 cardiac arrest patients (4 from papillary muscle) and Purkinje origin of dominant VE was seen in 5 of 8 (3 from papillary muscle) nonarrest patients. Acute success was seen in 17 of 19 procedures, and a ventricular fibrillation storm occurred within 24 hours of ablation in a single patient. Repeat ablation for recurrent symptomatic arrhythmia was performed in 6 patients. At 478 (39-2099) days of follow-up, 2 cardiac arrest patients received appropriate shocks. Symptoms from VE were reduced in 12 of 14. Bileaflet MVP syndrome is characterized by fascicular and papillary muscle VE that triggers ventricular fibrillation. Ablation of clinically dominant VE foci improves symptoms and reduces appropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Ventricular pressure slope and bileaflet mechanical heart valve closure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Hwang, N H

    1995-01-01

    The maximum left ventricular pressure slope (dP/dt) value has been used by several investigators as the criterion for studying mitral valve closure. In this article, the relationship between the ventricular pressure slope (dP/dt) and the leaflet closing behavior of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMV) is investigated. Two current BMVs, the St. Jude Medical 29 mm and CarboMedics 29 mm, installed in the mitral position of a mock circulatory pulsatile flow loop were used as the study model. Under simulated physiologic pressures and flow conditions, the experiment was conducted at 70, 90, and 120 beats/min with corresponding flow rates of 5.0, 6.0, and 7.5 liters/min, respectively. A laser sweeping technique was used to monitor the leaflet closing motion within the last 3 degrees excursion at valve closure. A modified dual beam laser sweeping technique system was used to register the difference of leaflet/housing impact time between the two BMV closing leaflets in asynchronous closure. Common BMV asynchronous closures were found in both BMVs at all three heart rates tested. The second closing leaflet was found to always close at higher velocity than the first. Simultaneous measurements of the ventricular pressure (Pv) and the leaflet closing time showed that Pv exhibited three stage characteristics. In the first stage, Pv gradually increased as the ventricle was filled. A sudden rise of Pv occurred immediately after closing of the first leaflet. The maximum dp/dt occurred in the third stage after closure of both BMV leaflets. The BMV closing behavior and the corresponding Pv pattern were found to depend strongly upon valve type and heart rate. The time averaged ventricular pressure slope (dp/dt) values at 70, 90, and 120 beats/min were about 40, 70, and 150 mmHg/sec for the St. Jude Medical valve and 40, 105, and 205 for the CarboMedics valve during the first closing stage. The maximum dp/dt values were 2670, 4350, and 5000 mmHg/sec for the St. Jude Medical valve

  4. SiO Maser Emission in Miras

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 394, 51–66 (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14237.x SiO maser emission in Miras M. D. Gray,1 M. Wittkowski,2 M. Scholz...October 27; in original form 2008 September 1 ABSTRACT We describe a combined dynamic atmosphere and maser propagation model of SiO maser emission in...brightest at an optical phase of 0.1–0.25, which is consistent with observed phase lags. Dust can have both mild and profound effects on the maser emission

  5. Analysis of velocity fluctuations downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2010-11-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves are widely used to replace diseased aortic heart valves. The stresses induced by the rich and unsteady non-physiological flow structures have been the focus to evaluate red blood cells damage and platelet activation, develop flow control strategies, or improve valve designs. In this study, we analyzed the flow fields obtained downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve using time-resolved particle image velocimetry under pulsatile and steady flow conditions. Our study demonstrates the rich dynamics downstream of the valve and weighs the relevance of unsteady effects vs inertia effects on the different flow structures. Power spectrum analyses of the turbulent fluctuations highlight the highly anisotropic influence and the limited applicability of classical self-similar turbulence theory in describing the small-scale structures in the immediate vicinity of the valve.

  6. Numerical simulation of opening process in a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under pulsatile flow condition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Zhao, Yong; Yeo, Tony Joon Hock; Hwang, Ned H C

    2003-03-01

    Most previous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of blood flow in mechanical heart valves (MHVs) have not efficiently addressed the important features of moving leaflet and blood-leaflet interaction. Herein, computationally efficient approaches were developed to study these features and to obtain better insight into the pulsatile flow field in bileaflet MHVs. A simple and effective method to track the moving boundary was proposed, and an efficient method for calculating the blood-leaflet interaction applied. In this way, a CFD code was developed to study the pulsatile flow field around bileaflet MHVs. The CFD code was parallelized on a supercomputer to reduce turn-around time in the simulation. The solver was then used to study the opening process in a St. Jude Medical (SJM) size 29 bileaflet MHV. CFD results showed that, in the opening process, the flow field was consistently partitioned into two side channels and a central channel due to the presence of the two leaflets. In the flow field near the surface of the two leaflets, the fluid velocity followed the local surface velocity of the leaflets, thus showing a strong blood-leaflet interaction effect. Throughout the valve-opening process, peak velocities were always observed near the tips of the valve leaflet. The CFD simulation showed that the opening process took approximately 0.044 s, which compared well with experimental findings. The new computational approaches were efficient and able to address the moving leaflet and blood-leaflet interaction. The flow field in the opening process of a SJM 29 bileaflet MHV was successfully simulated using the developed solver.

  7. A linear and nonlinear study of Mira

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.; Ostlie, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Both linear and nonlinear calculations of the 331 day, long period variable star Mira have been undertaken to see what radial pulsation mode is naturally selected. Models are similar to those considered in the linear nonadiabatic stellar pulsation study of Ostlie and Cox. Models are considered with masses near one solar mass, luminosities between 4000 and 5000 solar luminosities, and effective temperatures of approximately 3000 K. These models have fundamental mode periods that closely match the pulsation period of Mira. The equation of state for the stellar material is given by Stellingwerf procedure, and the opacity is obtained from a fit by Cahn that matches the low temperature molecular absorption data for the Population I Ross-Aller 1 mixture calculated from the Los Alamos Astrophysical Opacity Library. For the linear study, the Cox, Brownlee, and Eilers approximation is used for the linear theory variation of the convection luminosity. For the nonlinear work, the method described by Ostlie and Cox is followed. Results showing internal details of the radial fundamental and first overtone modes behavior in linear theory are presented. Preliminary radial fundamental mode nonlinear calculations are discussed. The very tentative conclusion is that neither the fundamental or first overtone mode is excluded from being the actual observed one.

  8. Long-term OH variability of Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoka, S.; Le Squeren, A. M.

    2000-10-01

    We present here the results and interpretation of a long-term OH variability program conducted with the French {Nançay} Radiotelescope from 1980 to 1995. It concerns seven Mira stars: R Aql, RS Vir, S CrB, R LMi, RR Aql, U Her and UX Cyg. This study deals with the three OH maser lines observed in the Miras at 1612, 1665 and 1667 MHz. These OH variable stars have periods ranging from 290 to 580 days. The study presents the first insight of the long-term temporal behaviour of OH integrated flux variations as well as spectral component variations. The main aims are to determine the temporal behaviour of the OH maser emission and the longevity and variability of the spectral components. We find that the shapes of the OH curve are closer to the IR than the optical shapes and that the emissions at 1665 and 1667 MHz have a very similar behaviour while the emission at 1612 MHz behaves differently. The 1612 MHz emission shows smoother temporal variations and greater component longevity than the main line emission, leading to the conclusion that the 1612 MHz emission is coming from an outer part of the circumstellar shell and is more saturated than the main line emission. The study also shows the existence of inhomogeneities, especially differences between the front and back parts of the shell can be seen, and that OH variability curves undergo long term variations over several cycles.

  9. Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmons, Vianne

    2003-01-01

    This article profiles the educational system of Prince Edward Island and discusses initiatives for students who are at-risk. It describes programs and services for students who are at-risk, relevant educational legislation, areas of strength, challenges that need to be overcome, and areas of action. (Contains references.) (CR)

  10. Edward Said and "Orientalism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In the nearly 30 years since Edward Said published the hugely influential Orientalism, his indictment of racism and imperialism in Western scholarship on the Orient has had its share of plaudits and condemnations. Now Robert Irwin, the Middle East editor of The Times Literary Supplement, has reignited the controversy with his broadside against the…

  11. Edward Hopper: The Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on Edward Hopper, focusing on his use of watercolors. Explores five of his watercolor paintings: (1) "The Mansard Roof"; (2) "House on Pamet River"; (3) "Light at Two Lights"; (4) "Saltillo Mansion"; and (5) "Roofs of Washington Square." Addresses the exhibition "Edward…

  12. Edward Hopper: The Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on Edward Hopper, focusing on his use of watercolors. Explores five of his watercolor paintings: (1) "The Mansard Roof"; (2) "House on Pamet River"; (3) "Light at Two Lights"; (4) "Saltillo Mansion"; and (5) "Roofs of Washington Square." Addresses the exhibition "Edward…

  13. Mira Period-Luminosity Relations at Near-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; Macri, Lucas M.; He, Shiyuan; Long, James; Huang, Jianhua; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi

    2017-01-01

    We built JHK template light curves for ~200 Oxygen-rich Miras in LMC by scaling their I-band light curves. The I-(JHK) colors at individual epochs were derived using a Gaussian process method, and then modeled as a function of generic parameters. We obtained their JHK Period-Luminosity relations (PLRs) at maximum light and mean light with dispersions comparable to Cepheid PLRs. We also derived Mira PLRs in M33 and obtained a Mira distance to this system. We present the method for template development and preliminary results.

  14. Pulsation and mass loss in Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of pulsation in the outer layers of a typical Mira variable was studied in the adiabatic and isothermal limits. A shock wave propagates outward once per period and the radial velocity obtained from observations of hydrogen emission lines is identified with the velocity of gas in the post shock region. In the adiabatic case, mass loss in the form of a steady stellar wind was produced. In the isothermal case, no continuous mass loss was produced but occasional ejection of shells occur. Pulsation introduced into a star undergoing steady mass loss as a result of radiation pressure acting on grains caused the mass loss rate to increase by a factor of approximately 40, while the terminal velocity of the flow was almost unaltered.

  15. Discovering Mira Ceti: Celestial Change and Cosmic Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Robert Alan

    In the short narrative that follows I introduce two new heroes. Although we begin with Fabricius's first sighting in 1596, the new pivot point in the drama is the collaboration between Hevelius and Boulliau that began around 1660. As it happens, Learned Europe paid little attention to Mira in the generation after the first scattered sightings of 1596, indeed, nearly 70 years passed before the New Star was given a working identity. Like Columbus discovering America, Fabricius and Holwarda saw different things - for convenience, I call them Fabricius's Star and Holwarda's Star. Hevelius's Historiola (Danzig, 1662) and Boulliau's Ad astronomos (Paris, 1667) presented a different vision. It made Mira famous. As I shall argue, if Hevelius gave Mira a history, Boulliau gave Mira a future.5 In the end, the New Star not only challenged the ancient cosmos, it became an enduring icon for the New Science, a returning reminder of celestial continuity and cosmic order.

  16. Monitoring of Mira (omi Cet) in support of HST Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2007-09-01

    Dr. Margarita Karovska (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and collaborators are performing a comprehensive study of the Mira AB interacting system, using the HST WFPC2 camera. Mira AB is composed of the prototype Mira variable omi Cet and its companion VZ Cet, separated by about 0.5 arcsecond. As part of this project they plan to obtain a large number of high-angular resolution images at wavelengths ranging from UV to optical. The main objectives of the HST/WFPC2 observations are 1) to determine the properties of the material ejected in December 2004 as it flows throughout the binary and interacts with the Mira A (omi Cet, Mira) circumstellar material and wind; 2) to determine the physical characteristics of mass transfer in this system and especially the role of the accretion stream between Mira A and its accreting companion Mira B (VZ Cet); 3) to determine the response of the system to the increased accretion rate onto Mira B following the outburst. The HST observations are scheduled for September 23, 1900-2300 UT. Both visual and instrumental observers are requested to observe this object, currently at minimum around visual magnitude 9-9.5. Observations should be made approximately two weeks on either side of the September 23 observation date. Visual observer should observe as usual, making not more than 3 observations spaced about 10 days apart. PEP and CCD observers should use the bluest-wavelength filters they have, and should make nightly observations, with intensive observations during the HST observations themselves. UBV and RIJH observations would be very valuable. Please make sure to use an aperture that covers both omi Cet and VZ Cet when evaluating CCD images. Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database as OMI CET.

  17. A period-luminosity-colour relation for Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feast, M. W.; Glass, I. S.; Whitelock, P. A.; Catchpole, R. M.

    1989-11-01

    Time-averaged J, H, K and m(bot) magnitudes are given for 29 O-rich and 20 C-rich Mira variables in the LMC. PL and PC relations are derived. The PL relations for O-Miras and C-Miras are very similar at K. For the O-Miras the residuals from the PL and PC relations are correlated showing the existence of PLC relations. Such relations are derived and compared with the theoretical pulsation equation. Data are also given for six variables with periods greater than 420 days. These are brighter by 0.7 mag than expected from extrapolations of the PL or PLC relations. Using Miras in galactic globular clusters to estimate the cluster distances (from the PLC relation) gives a mean horizontal branch luminosity of +0.71 + or - 0.09 (internal standard error) at Fe/H = -0.58, in good agreement with that derived in other ways. For the C-Miras, a significant color term is estimated for the PLC relation at J. There is, however, little evidence for a significant color term at K and the evidence for one in m(bot) is marginal.

  18. Three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography incremental value in a rare case of a bileaflet tricuspid valve.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Hani M; Walley, Hossam; Hosny, Hatem; Yacoub, Magdi

    2016-09-01

    Detailed assessment of the tricuspid valve using two-dimensional echocardiography is always challenging, as only two of three leaflets can be seen at a time. Three-dimensional echocardiography can provide the enface view of the tricuspid valve that allows simultaneous visualization of all of the three leaflets. In a 42-year-old male patient scheduled for pulmonary endarterectomy, 3DTEE showed that the tricuspid valve is bileaflet, with one septal and another lateral leaflet. There were two commissures, one of them is anteriorly positioned and the other one is posterior. Our findings were confirmed intra-operatively by direct surgical visualization of the tricuspid valve.

  19. Edward Teller's Scientific Life

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Weiss, M S

    2004-04-15

    Edward Teller was one of the great physicists of the twentieth century. His career began just after the key ideas of the quantum revolution of the 1920's were completed, opening vast areas of physics and chemistry to detailed understanding. Thus, his early work in theoretical physics focused on applying the new quantum theory to the understanding of diverse phenomena. These topics included chemical physics, diamagnetism, and nuclear physics. Later, he made key contributions to statistical mechanics, surface physics, solid state, and plasma physics. In many cases, the ideas in these papers are still rich with important ramifications.

  20. Landing, Edwards AFB, CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-09

    STS006-46-667 (9 April 1983) --- One of the final pictures taken aboard the space shuttle Challenger is this 35mm frame of Landing Strip 22 at Edwards Air Force Base as the reusable spacecraft was lined up for its landing only seconds later. The frame was exposed by astronaut Donald H. Peterson, STS-6 mission specialist, who was stretching behind the commander’s seat occupied by astronaut Paul J. Weitz on the flight deck. Also onboard the spacecraft for the five-day flight were astronauts Karol J. Bobko, pilot, and Dr. F. Story Musgrave, mission specialist. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Airborne infrared spectrophotometry of Mira variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne spectrophotometric observations of R Cas near minimum and maximum light, R Leo near minimum, and NML Tau near maximum are reported which were obtained over the wavelength range from 1.2 to 4 microns with 1.5% resolution. The spectral energy distributions of the three stars at the indicated times are presented, and it is shown that the H2O bands at 1.4, 1.9, and 2.7 microns are clearly evident in all the spectra, while the absorption bands of CO at about 1.6 and 2.3 microns are probably present although they are masked by the strong water vapor features. The results indicate that water vapor is the dominant opacity source in the atmospheres of Mira variables, that R Leo and NML Tau may be fitted well over the entire spectrum by respective single temperatures of 2250 and 1800 K, and that R Cas near both minimum and maximum cannot be adequately described by one temperature over the entire wavelength range investigated. The shapes and depths of the absorption bands are determined together with the apparent angular diameter of each star and the equivalent widths of the H2O + CO absorption bands. It is concluded that water vapor absorption is more strongly correlated with color temperature than with spectral type for R Cas and R Leo.

  2. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  3. Pulsational Modes of Mira Variables Examined through IR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Thompson, R. R.; van Belle, G. T.

    1999-12-01

    We have undertaken a program with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) to measure the angular size variations, with respect to pulsational phase, of a group of about 20 mainly O-rich Mira variables. While previous groups have attempted to measure angular size with phase (van Belle et al. 1996, 1997; Tej et al. 1999) these are the first dedicated, spatially-resolved K band observations designed to detect size variations in a large sample of Miras at regular intervals over their pulsation periods. Our first goal has been the unambiguous detection of the mira pulsational cycle with phase, already shown in previous work to be as much as 35% of the radial size over the course of a pulsational period (van Belle et al. 1996; Burns et al. 1997; Tuthill et al. 1995; Perrin et al. 1999 ). We will ultimately use these data, along with the best estimates of stellar distance and effective temperatures for these sources, to determine the mode of pulsation. There has long been a debate as to whether Mira variables pulsate in their fundamental or first-overtone mode (Barthes 1999; Feast 1998; Wood and Sebo 1996). Determination of the pulsation behavior of Mira variables may eventually render them suitable as standard candles for distance determination.

  4. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Schneider in the cockpit of an F-104. Schneider served as a U.S. Navy pilot from 1968 to 1983, during which time he trained at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, and received assignments as an engineering test pilot, as a test pilot school instructor, and as a Naval Liaison Officer at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center). Schneider joined NASA as a research pilot in 1983. Over the next 17 years, he was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA SR-71s. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  5. Edward Teller Biographical Memoir

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, S B; Sessler, A M

    2009-07-27

    Edward Teller died on September 9, 2003 in Stanford, California at the age of 95. He was both one of the great theoretical physicists of the twentieth century and a leading figure in the development of nuclear weapons and broader defense advocacy. Teller's work in physics, spanning many decades of the twentieth century, includes some of the most fundamental insights in the quantum behaviors of molecules and their spectra, nuclei, surfaces, solid state and spin systems, and plasmas. In the defense arena, Teller is best known for his key insight that made thermonuclear weapons possible. Teller was both a great scientific collaborator and physics teacher at all levels, known for his openness, generosity, personal warmth, and powerful physical intuition. Many of his graduate students went on to illustrious careers.

  6. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    ScienceCinema

    Edward Moses

    2016-07-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  7. 02-NIF Dedication: Edward Moses

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Moses

    2009-07-02

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by NIF Director Edward Moses.

  8. Edward A. Bouchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    2002-04-01

    Edward A. Bouchet was the first African American to receive the doctorate in any field of knowledge in the United States and that area was physics. He was granted the degree in 1876 from Yale University making him at that time one of the few persons to hold the physics doctorate from an American university. His prior education included the Hopkins Grammar School and Yale College (BA in 1874). After Yale, Bouchet taught mathematics, physics, and chemistry for over twenty-five years at the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia. During the following two decades, he was employed in positions ranging from high school principal to employment by the federal government. Bouchet played a significant role in the education of African Americans through his teaching and mentoring activities. He was one among a small group of African Americans who achieved advanced training and education within decades of the American civil war. These individuals provided direction, leadership, and role models for what eventually became the civil/human rights movements. The year 2001 marks the 125th celebration of his receiving the doctorate. We present details of his life and career with an emphasis on the influence of the political and social forces exerted on him by society.

  9. Edward Teller Medal: Acceptance Remarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuckolls, John H.

    I am honored to receive this award. It is especially significant because Edward Teller is the father of inertial fusion. Teller's pioneering work in the extreme compressibility of matter, the radiation implosion concept, and the physics of thermonuclear burn are fundamental to the creation of very small scale inertially confined fusion explosions. Edward also made key contributions by fighting to reduce secrecy and by promoting international collaborations.

  10. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  11. Effect of the sinus of valsalva on the closing motion of bileaflet prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Y; Kikuta, Y; Shimooka, T; Mitamura, Y; Yuhta, T; Dohi, T

    2000-04-01

    Conventional bileaflet prosthetic mechanical heart valves close passively with backflow. Naturally, the valve has problems associated with closure, such as backflow, water hammer effect, and fracture of the leaflet. On the other hand, in the case of the natural aortic valve, the vortex flow in the sinus of Valsalva pushes the leaflet to close, and the valve starts the closing motion earlier than the prosthetic valve as the forward flow decelerates. This closing mechanism is thought to decrease backflow at valve closure. In this study, we propose a new bileaflet mechanical valve resembling a drawbridge in shape, and the prototype valve was designed so that the leaflet closes with the help of the vortex flow in the sinus. The test valve was made of aluminum alloy, and its closing motion was compared to that of the CarboMedics (CM) valve. Both valves were driven by a computer controlled hydraulic mock circulator and were photographed at 648 frames/s by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Each frame of the valve motion image was analyzed with a personal computer, and the opening angles were measured. The flow rate was set as 5.0 L/min. The system was pulsed with 70 bpm, and the systolic/diastolic ratio was 0.3. Glycerin water was used as the circulation fluid at room temperature, and polystyrene particles were used to visualize the streamline. The model of the sinus of Valsalva was made of transparent silicone rubber. As a result, high speed video analysis showed that the test valve started the closing motion 41 ms earlier than the CM valve, and streamline analysis showed that the test valve had a closing mechanism similar to the natural one with the effect of vortex flow. The structure of the test valve was thought to be effective for soft closure and could solve problems associated with closure.

  12. A Large X-Ray Outburst in Mira A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita; Schlegel, Eric; Hack, Warren; Raymond, John C.; Wood, Brian E.

    2005-04-01

    We report the Chandra ACIS-S detection of a bright soft X-ray transient in the Mira AB interacting symbiotic-like binary. We have resolved the system for the first time in X-rays. Using Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope images, we determine that the unprecedented outburst is likely associated with the cool asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, Mira A, the prototype of the Mira class of variables. X-rays have never before been detected from an AGB star, and the recent activity signals that the system is undergoing dramatic changes. The total X-ray luminosity of the system is several times higher than the luminosity estimated using previous XMM-Newton and ROSAT observations. The outburst may be caused by a giant flare in Mira A associated with a mass ejection or a jet and may have long-term consequences on the system. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Janet A. Mattei, who inspired this work and made these observations possible for many years.

  13. Transformation of Consciousness: Decoding Conceptual Metaphors in Mira Bai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrita; Anisha

    2016-01-01

    Mira Bai, a saint-poet of North India is an important figure in medieval Hindi literature. Her "bhajan"-s (songs) profoundly represent the transforming of consciousness working through conceptual metaphors which fall in the realm of religious poetry wherein target domains are generally abstract. Since, the working of the mind is more…

  14. Maxima and O-C Diagrams for 489 Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Maxima for 489 Mira stars have been compiled. They were computed with data from AAVSO, AFOEV, VSOLJ, and BAA-VSS and collected from published maxima. The result is presented in a mysql database and on web pages with O-C diagrams, periods and some statistical information for each star.

  15. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of Mira Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, P. T.; Hoai, D. T.; Diep, P. N.; Phuong, N. T.; Thao, N. T.; Tuan-Anh, P.; Darriulat, P.

    2016-07-01

    Observations of 12CO(3-2) emission of the circumbinary envelope of Mira Ceti, made by Atacama Large Millimetre/sub-millimetre Array, are analysed. The observed Doppler velocity distribution is made of three components: a blueshifted south-eastern arc, which can be described as a ring in slow radial expansion, ˜1.7 km s-1, making an angle of ˜50° with the plane of the sky and born some 2000 years ago; a few arcs, probably born at the same epoch as the blueshifted arc, all sharing Doppler velocities redshifted by approximately 3±2 km s-1 with respect to the main star; thirdly, a central region dominated by the circumbinary envelope, displaying two outflows in the south-western and north-eastern hemispheres. At short distances from the star, up to ˜1.5 arcsec, these hemispheres display very different morphologies: the south-western outflow covers a broad solid angle, expands radially at a rate between 5 and 10 km s-1 and is slightly redshifted; the north-eastern outflow consists of two arms, both blueshifted, bracketing a broad dark region where emission is suppressed. At distances between ˜1.5 and ˜2.5 arcsec the asymmetry between the two hemispheres is significantly smaller and detached arcs, particularly spectacular in the north-eastern hemisphere are present. Close to the stars, we observe a mass of gas surrounding Mira B, with a size of a few tens of au, and having Doppler velocities with respect to Mira B reaching ±1.5 km s-1, which we interpret as gas flowing from Mira A towards Mira B.

  16. Time-dependent analysis of leaflets in mechanical aortic bileaflet heart valves in closing phase using the finite strip method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, H; Ahmadian, M T; Wan, W K

    2006-03-01

    Mechanical heart valves (MHV) are widely used to replace dysfunctional and failed heart valves. The bileaflet MHV design is very popular due to its superior hemodynamics. Since their introduction in 1977, the hemodynamics of bileaflet prostheses has been extensively studied. In this study the dynamic behaviour during the closing phase of a bileaflet MHV under normal physiological conditions has been investigated. Fluid analysis is based on the control volume with moving boundaries in the vicinity of the occluder. Unsteady continuity equation, unsteady momentum equation on the control volume and unsteady Bernoulli's equation have been used to calculate velocity of blood flow and force on the occluder tip. To solve the governing equations for the calculation of pressure and the related force, the finite strips method has been implemented. Only 32 strips are sufficient to calculate the force due to pressure on the leaflets. The equations of motion have been solved using the Runge-Kutta method in the fourth order. The maximum velocity of the leakage flow in the closing phase falls within the range of 3.5-4.4 m/s. The maximum velocity of the occluder tip is in the range of 2.4-3.2 m/s. The backflow also exhibits oscillation similar to that of the occluder with net backflow rate in the range of 9.7-12.3 ml/beat. The impact force between occluder and its housing is in the range of 80-140 N and impact occurs during 33.1-41.0 ms and the leaflets are completely settled at 108-115 ms in the closing phase. The finite strip method was implemented to study the closing phase of a bileaflet MHV. Results are consistent with the previous experimental data. This method is of general applicability to study dynamic behaviour of MHVs.

  17. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  18. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research Pilot Edward T. Schneider is shown sitting in the cockpit of a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet that was used in the High Angle-of-Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Ames - Dryden Flight Research Facility. When the aircraft arrived at the Dryden Facility in 1987, from the US Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, it consisted of parts in crates. The aircraft crew made an airplane from those parts, and in doing so they took a 'sow's ear' and created a 'silk purse', thus the name on the side of the aircraft. Ed's helmet is from his time in the Navy. The design was taken from the Flag that is flown on the bow of a Navy ship, referred to as the Jack, and is navy blue with the 50 States being represented by the white stars. Ed arrived at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later renamed the Dryden Flight Research Center) on July 5, 1982, as a Navy Liaison Officer, becoming a NASA research pilot one year later. Ed was the project pilot for the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program and later served as a project pilot for the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the NASA B-52 launch aircraft, and the SR-71 'Blackbird' aircraft. He served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. Following squadron service he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, in 1973, and then served as an engineering test pilot, and test pilot school instructor at the Naval Air Test Center. Ed has been an active member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots since 1974. He was made a Fellow of the Society in 1993 and served as its President in 1993/94. In 1996 he was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Chanute Flight Award. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  19. Mg II line profiles of the Mira S Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugel, Edward W.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Brown, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    High-dispersion IUE observations obtained to investigate the evolution of the shock structure of the Mira S Carinae (S Car) produced, despite very limited phase coverage, a set of five spectra of the Mg II h and k lines. There is significant emission from both the h and k lines at velocities of -150 km/sec relative to the stellar photosphere. The h-to-k ratio of the Mg II doublet remains below the theoretically predicated values of 2:1 to 1:1, and shows a smooth dependence on the optical phase. Archival studies of other Miras (e.g., R Car) indicate that S Car is not unique in possessing unusual and highly variable Mg II h and k line profiles.

  20. Multi-color interferometric observations of Mira stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Thompson, B. B.; Foresto, V. Coude du; Merand, A.; Ridgway, S.; Perrin, G.

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric observations in the atmospheric windows of the near infrared (1 to 4 microns) can be efficiently used to probe the chemical composition of Miras atmosphere and provide direct measurements of extended gas layers around these stars. This is illustrated by recent Miras observations carried out with the FLUOR instrument of the IOTA interferometer (Mennesson et al. 2002, and Perrin et al. proceedings of this conference) and with the PTI test-bed (Thompson 2002, Thompson et al. 2002). These visibility measurements show evidence for continuum emission from very extended ( 2-3 stellar radii) semi-transparent gaseous atmospheric layers, and large apparent diameter changes with pulsation phase. Interestingly these observations are consistent with the extended molecular gas layers (H20, CO ...) already inferred around some of these objects from IS0 and high resolution ground-based FTS infrared spectra.

  1. Hydrogen Lines in Mira Stars Through Interferometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Chiavassa, A.; Millour, F.; Wittkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Balmer lines in emission are the most prominent features in Mira stars spectra and have a strong potential as a proxy to study the lower atmosphere's dynamics. In Fabas et al. ([1]), we accumulated spectropolarimetric observations of Balmer lines in emission. As the shock is propagating outwards, linear polarization rate increases and the angle of this polarization evolves. Assuming that linear polarization arises from anisotropic scattering, it has the potential of telling us about the geometric structure of the shock as it propagates and the study of such atmospheric structures can typically be performed with interferometry. In 2012, AMBER data on the Mira star omicron Ceti were collected in which the Brackett γ line is studied. The data show signatures in the interferometric observables around this line. Olivier Chesneau was in the jury evaluating the PhD thesis of N. Fabas and he was seduced by the idea to study these shock waves with interferometry and use polarimetry as a complementary study.

  2. Resolving the stellar activity of the Mira AB binary with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Ramstedt, S.; O'Gorman, E.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Wittkowski, M.; Baudry, A.; Karovska, M.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We present the size, shape, and flux densities at millimeter continuum wavelengths, based on ALMA science verification observations in Band 3 (~94.6 GHz) and Band 6 (~228.7 GHz), from the binary Mira A (o Ceti) and Mira B. Methods: The Mira AB system was observed with ALMA at a spatial resolution down to ~25 mas. The extended atmosphere of Mira A and the wind around Mira B sources were resolved, and we derived the sizes of Mira A and of the ionized region around Mira B. The spectral indices within Band 3 (between 89-100 GHz) and between Bands 3 and 6 were also derived. Results: The spectral index of Mira A is found to change from 1.71 ± 0.05 within Band 3 to 1.54 ± 0.04 between Bands 3 and 6. The spectral index of Mira B is 1.3 ± 0.2 in Band 3, in good agreement with measurements at longer wavelengths; however, it rises to 1.72 ± 0.11 between the bands. For the first time, the extended atmosphere of a star is resolved at these frequencies, and for Mira A the diameter is ~3.8 × 3.2 AU in Band 3 (with brightness temperature Tb ~ 5300 K) and ~4.0 × 3.6 AU in Band 6 (Tb ~ 2500 K). Additionally, a bright hotspot ~0.4 AU, with Tb ~ 10 000 K, is found on the stellar disk of Mira A. The size of the ionized region around the accretion disk of Mira B is found to be ~2.4 AU. Conclusions: The emission around Mira B is consistent with emission from a partially ionized wind of gravitationally bound material from Mira A close to the accretion disk of Mira B. The Mira A atmosphere does not fully match predictions with brightness temperatures in Band 3 significantly higher than expected, potentially owing to shock heating. The hotspot is very likely due to magnetic activity and could be related to the previously observed X-ray flare of Mira A. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. The M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. II. Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; He, Shiyuan; Macri, Lucas M.; Long, James; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2017-04-01

    We present the discovery of 1847 Mira candidates in the Local Group galaxy M33 using a novel semi-parametric periodogram technique coupled with a random forest classifier. The algorithms were applied to ∼2.4 × 105 I-band light curves previously obtained by the M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. We derive preliminary period–luminosity relations at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths and compare them to the corresponding relations in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  4. Providing on-demand atmospheric data for users of MIRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, H.

    Many users of the new Mars International Reference Atmosphere MIRA will want to know what the meteorological conditions temperatures winds surface pressures etc were on Mars at a given time and place This information is difficult to obtain from the original archived spacecraft data because of the irregular observing patterns forced by orbital mechanics and because the raw data are typically in the form of infrared radiances This is the justification for the tabulated format of MIRA but it should be supplemented with online available data assimilation products These data assimilation results form a compact about 50 kbytes per sol summary of the Martian atmospheric state They can be integrated forward on demand to calculate the meteorology at a specified time and location or averaged over an interval The current results are based on Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer TES nadir and limb spectra but can easily be extended to include the Mars Express Planetary Fourier Spectrometer and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mars Climate Sounder when those datasets become publicly available This will enable the online MIRA to keep current as new observations are made and will improve the calibration validation and temporal coverage of the full dataset The root-mean-square residuals of the assimilated atmospheric temperatures compared to the TES team retrievals are 2 K growing to 6 K when compared with fully independent radio occultation profiles The online assimilated data can also reproduce the original spectra

  5. SOFIA/FORCAST Observations of the Symbiotic Mira, R Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Omelian, Eric B.; Helton, L. Andrew; Gorti, Uma; Wagner, R. Mark

    2017-01-01

    The FORCAST instrument on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) was used to observe the symbiotic Mira, R Aquarii (R Aqr) in September 2016. Images through several filters at wavelengths from 6.4 to 37.1 mu-m, and a grism spectrum covering 8.4 to 13.7 mu-m were obtained. R Aqr consists of an AGB star and a hot white dwarf in an eccentric binary orbit, an accretion flow onto the white dwarf, and the resulting jet. The images show a point source (~3.5" PSF at 37 mu-m) with the observed emission dominated by the dusty AGB star. The SOFIA data were obtained when the Mira phase was about 0.4 (minimum at phase 0.5) and the V magnitude was about 10. The measured fluxes range from about 700 Jy at the shorter wavelengths to about 80 Jy at 37 mu-m. These are a factor of 2 lower than the fluxes measured by ISO in May 1996, when the Mira phase was close to maximum and the V magnitude was about 8. We discuss the differences between the ISO and FORCAST measurements of the spectral energy distribution in the context of our proposed monitoring of the R Aquarii system with SOFIA as it approaches eclipse and periastron in its ~44 year orbit.

  6. Foreword by Edward Michael Campbell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Edward Michael

    2016-10-01

    The Edward Teller medal has evolved into one of the most prestigious awards that recognizes the outstanding contributions to the field of inertial confinement fusion and high energy density science. It is appropriate that this international award be named after Teller, who with extraordinary vision and scientific insight, anticipated and then played a major role in the creation of this field...

  7. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage of Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves using Embedded Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of the mechanical prosthetic bileaflet aortic heart valve, is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for complications, associated with thrombosis and thromboembolism. These flow transients are investigated using phase and time-averaged PIV in a low-volume (about 150 ml) test setup that simulates the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 23 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The PIV measurements are accompanied by continuous monitoring of the ventricular and aortic pressures and valve flow rate. Following the valve closure, the leakage flow between the valve leaflets is caused by the pressure buildup across the leaflets, leading to the formation of a regurgitation jet starting from the BMHV B-datum line. As in a typical starting jet, a counter-rotating vortex pair is formed along each leaflet edge and the vorticity sheet is associated with high shear stress that may be result in blood platelet activation. The present investigation demonstrates that the placement of arrays of mm-scale vortex generators near the edges of the leaflets diffuses the vortex sheet and suppresses the formation of these vortices, weakening the local velocity gradients and small-scale vortical structures. Supported by NIH and NSF.

  8. Manipulation of the closing transients of bileaflet mechanical heart valves using passive, surface-mounted elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helene

    2005-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using PIV measurements that are phase locked to the leaflet motion. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. The valve is subjected to physiological flow conditions: a heart rate of 70 bpm; a cardiac output of 5 l/min; and a mean aortic pressure of 90 mmHg. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs.

  9. A biomimetic bi-leaflet mitral prosthesis with enhanced physiological left ventricular swirl restorative capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical heart valve prostheses are often implanted in young patients due to their durability and long-term reliability. However, existing designs are known to induce elevated levels of blood damage and blood platelet activation. As a result, there is a need for patients to undergo chronic anti-coagulation treatment to prevent thrombosis, often resulting in bleeding complications. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the implantation of a mechanical prosthetic valve at the mitral position results in a significant alteration of the left ventricular flow field which may contribute to flow turbulence. This study proposes a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve design (Bio-MHV) that mimics the geometry of a human mitral valve, with the aim of reducing turbulence levels in the left ventricle by replicating physiological flow patterns. An in vitro three-dimensional particle velocimetry imaging experiment was carried out to compare the hemodynamic performance of the Bio-MHV with that of the clinically established ATS valve. The Bio-MHV was found to replicate physiological left ventricular flow patterns and produced lower turbulence levels.

  10. Effect of vortex generators on the closing transient flow of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Dasi, Lakshmi; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2006-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Two vortex generator designs were investigated: one design comprised staggered rectangular fins and the other one staggered hemispheres. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using phase locked PIV measurements. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  11. Three-Dimensional Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Flow Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Rui; Lai, Yong G.; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2005-01-01

    The wall shear stress induced by the leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase has been implicated with thrombus initiation with prosthetic valves. Detailed flow dynamic analysis in the vicinity of the leaflets and the housing during the valve-closure phase is of interest in understanding this relationship. A three-dimensional unsteady flow analysis past bileaflet valve prosthesis in the mitral position is presented incorporating a fluid-structure interaction algorithm for leaflet motion during the valve-closing phase. Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian method is employed for incorporating the leaflet motion. The forces exerted by the fluid on the leaflets are computed and applied to the leaflet equation of motion to predict the leaflet position. Relatively large velocities are computed in the valve clearance region between the valve housing and the leaflet edge with the resulting relatively large wall shear stresses at the leaflet edge during the impact-rebound duration. Negative pressure transients are computed on the surface of the leaflets on the atrial side of the valve, with larger magnitudes at the leaflet edge during the closing and rebound as well. Vortical flow development is observed on the inflow (atrial) side during the valve impact-rebound phase in a location central to the leaflet and away from the clearance region where cavitation bubbles have been visualized in previously reported experimental studies. PMID:15636108

  12. Oval housing for the St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Fradet, Guy

    2017-10-01

    The St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in late 1970s. The basic idea for the design of the valve is simply two semicircular flat plates pivoting on hinges. The overall performance of St. Jude Medical valves such as blood flow being central, the leaflets opening completely, and the pressure drop across the valve being trivial is satisfactory. St. Jude Medical valves provide an improved hemodynamics compared to the other mechanical heart valve models; however, their non-physiological hemodynamics which may lead to red blood cells lysis and thrombogenicity still remains a major issue. In this study, we hypothesize that applying ovality to the housing might improve their hemodynamics significantly which is based on the fact that the native annulus is oval by nature. A quick but precise numerical model based on the finite strip method was developed by which the regurgitation flow volume and velocity of the proposed design were assessed in the closing phase. The results are satisfactory and an improved hemodynamics is observed. The proposed design can be considered for further numerical and experimental studies and shows promise and merits further development.

  13. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto; Vieira, Francisco Ubaldo; Vieira, Reinaldo Wilson; Antunes, Nilson; Tabacow, Fabio Bittencourt Dutra; Costa, Eduardo Tavares; Petrucci, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models) exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min.) and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM) is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series). Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves.

  14. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  15. Simulations of pulsatile suspension flow through bileaflet mechanical heart valves to quantify platelet damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Brian; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and long exposure times on platelets have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). This numerical study quantifies the platelet damage incurred in pulsatile flow through various BMHV designs. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) was implemented to simulate pulsatile flow and capture the dynamics and surface shear stresses of modeled platelets with realistic geometry. The platelets are released in key regions of interest in the geometry as well as at various times of the cardiac cycle. The platelet damage is quantified using a linear shear stress-exposure time blood damage index (BDI) model. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during the pulsatile flow has been validated as being able to accurately capture bulk BMHV fluid flow and for accurately quantifying platelet damage in BMHV flows. These simulations will further knowledge of the geometric features and cardiac cycle times that most affect platelet damage. This study will ultimately lead to optimization of BMHV design in order to minimize thromboembolic complications.

  16. Measurements of steady flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve using stereoscopic PIV.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Chris; Sullivan, Pierre; Ethier, C Ross

    2011-03-01

    Computational modeling of bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BiMHV) flow requires experimentally validated datasets and improved knowledge of BiMHV fluid mechanics. In this study, flow was studied downstream of a model BiMHV in an axisymmetric aortic sinus using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. The inlet flow was steady and the Reynolds number based on the aortic diameter was 7600. Results showed the out-of-plane velocity was of similar magnitude as the transverse velocity. Although additional studies are needed for confirmation, analysis of the out-of-plane velocity showed the possible presence of a four-cell streamwise vortex structure in the mean velocity field. Spatial data for all six Reynolds stress components were obtained. Reynolds normal stress profiles revealed similarities between the central jet and free jets. These findings are important to BiMHV flow modeling, though clinical relevance is limited due to the idealized conditions chosen. To this end, the dataset is publicly available for CFD validation purposes.

  17. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto; Vieira Junior, Francisco Ubaldo; Vieira, Reinaldo Wilson; Antunes, Nilson; Tabacow, Fabio Bittencourt Dutra; Costa, Eduardo Tavares; Petrucci Junior, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. Objective To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models) exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. Methods To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min. ) and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. Results It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. Conclusions Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM) is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series). Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves. PMID:24598950

  18. Hemodynamic Performance and Thrombogenic Properties of a Superhydrophobic Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Vahabi, Hamed; Bui, Hieu; Movafaghi, Sanli; Moore, Brandon; Kota, Arun K; Popat, Ketul; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we explore how blood-material interactions and hemodynamics are impacted by rendering a clinical quality 25 mm St. Jude Medical Bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) superhydrophobic (SH) with the aim of reducing thrombo-embolic complications associated with BMHVs. Basic cell adhesion is evaluated to assess blood-material interactions, while hemodynamic performance is analyzed with and without the SH coating. Results show that a SH coating with a receding contact angle (CA) of 160° strikingly eliminates platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the surface. Alternatively, many platelets attach to and activate on pyrolytic carbon (receding CA = 47), the base material for BMHVs. We further show that the performance index increases by 2.5% for coated valve relative to an uncoated valve, with a maximum possible improved performance of 5%. Both valves exhibit instantaneous shear stress below 10 N/m(2) and Reynolds Shear Stress below 100 N/m(2). Therefore, a SH BMHV has the potential to relax the requirement for antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug regimens typically required for patients receiving MHVs by minimizing blood-material interactions, while having a minimal impact on hemodynamics. We show for the first time that SH-coated surfaces may be a promising direction to minimize thrombotic complications in complex devices such as heart valves.

  19. Star GK Bileaflet Mechanical Valve Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch After Mitral Valve Replacement: A Chinese Multicenter Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hua; Qiu, Zhihuang; Chen, Liangwan; Chen, Daozhong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and immediate and mid-term effects of heart valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after mitral valve replacement using the GK bileaflet mechanical valve. Material/Methods A total of 493 cases of mechanical mitral valve replacement were performed in the departments of cardiac surgery in 7 hospitals from January 2000 to January 2008. The patients included 142 men and 351 women ages 21 to 67 (average age, 48.75). The patients were followed for 3 years after surgery. The effective orifice area index (EOAI), ≤1.2 cm2/m2, was detected during the follow-up period and was defined as PPM. The patients were assigned to either the PPM group or the non-PPM group. Finally, the preoperative, perioperative and postoperative indexes of the 2 groups of patients were compared. Results A total of 157 patients had PPM 3 years after surgery. The incidence of PPM was 31.84%. Sixty-three patients in the PPM group received a 25-mm GK bileaflet valve (40.13%), 82 received a 27-mm valve (52.23%), and 12 (7.64%) received a 29-mm valve. There were significant differences in length of intensive care unit stay, duration of ventilator use, length of hospitalization, body surface area, EOAI, mean transmitral pressure gradient, and pulmonary artery pressure between the PPM and non-PPM group (P<0.05). There was a significant difference between preoperative and postoperative pulmonary artery pressures among non-PPM patients (P<0.05); however, there was no statistical difference in preoperative and postoperative pulmonary artery pressures among patients with PPM (P>0.05). Conclusions PPM after mitral valve replacement influences postoperative hemodynamics. Thus, larger-sized GK bileaflet mechanical valves are often used to reduce the risk of PPM. PMID:26313311

  20. Visualization of the hinge flow in a 5:1 scaled model of the medtronic parallel bileaflet heart valve prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, T. M.; Fontaine, A. A.; Ellis, J. T.; Walton, S. P.; Yoganathan, A. P.

    In this work, a flow visualization experiment was performed to elucidate features of the retrograde hinge flow through a 5:1 scaled model of the Medtronic Parallel bileaflet heart valve. It was hypothesized that this model would provide detailed flow information facilitating identification of flow structures associated with thrombus formation in this valve. The experimental protocol was designed to ensure fluid dynamic similarity between the model and prototype heart valves. Flow was visualized using dye injection. The detailed flow structures observed showed the hinge's inflow channel was the most suspect region for thrombus formation. Here a complex helical structure was observed.

  1. THE CARBON MIRA UV AURIGAE AND ITS COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Herbig, G. H.

    2009-11-15

    The carbon Mira UV Aur (photometric period 394 days) and its companion present several interesting spectroscopic issues. The late B-type companion, at a separation of 3.''36, is seen through at least two shells expanding from the C9-type primary, as evidenced by a series of narrow, displaced absorption features at the D{sub 1,2} lines of Na I. The (projected) expansion velocity of the fastest shell is about 116 km s{sup -1}, much larger than the typical outflow velocity of about 15 km s{sup -1} seen in C-type giants, but reminiscent of the velocities observed in the envelope of another C-type Mira, V Hya. Emission lines of H, Ca II, and Na I are present in UV Aur A; its Balmer emission lines are heavily mutilated by overlying C-type absorptions (much as is seen in Me-type Miras), so they must be formed at a lower level. UV Aur B offers the opportunity to test a speculation that the carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), believed to be a family of carbon-containing polyatomic molecules, may be formed in cool, carbon-rich stars. Moderately strong DIBs are indeed present in the spectrum of UV Aur B at about the same strength and velocity seen in nearby (in the sky) B-type stars. But the essential question is, are DIBs present in the outflow from UV Aur A, at the velocities of the Na I shell components? The answer is no, at least at the level permitted by the signal-to-noise ratio of these Keck/HIRES spectrograms.

  2. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  3. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  4. Mira Variable Stars from LAMOST DR4 Data: Emission Features, Temperature Types, and Candidate Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; de Grijs, Richard; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2017-09-01

    Based on an extensive spectral study of a photometrically confirmed sample of Mira variables, we find a relationship between the relative Balmer emission-line strengths and spectral temperatures of O-rich Mira stars. The {F}{{H}δ }/{F}{{H}γ } flux ratio increases from less than unity to five as stars cool down from M0 to M10, which is likely driven by increasing TiO absorption above the deepest shock-emitting regions. We also discuss the relationship between the equivalent widths of the Balmer emission lines and the photometric luminosity phase of our Mira sample stars. Using our 291 Mira spectra as templates for reference, 191 Mira candidates are newly identified from the LAMOST DR4 catalog. We summarize the criteria adopted to select Mira candidates based on emission-line indices and molecular absorption bands. This enlarged spectral sample of Mira variables has the potential to contribute significantly to our knowledge of the optical properties of Mira stars and will facilitate further studies of these late-type, long-period variables.

  5. Integrated strategy for in vitro characterization of a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Susin, Francesca Maria; Espa, Stefania; Toninato, Riccardo; Fortini, Stefania; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2017-02-16

    Haemodynamic performance of heart valve prosthesis can be defined as its ability to fully open and completely close during the cardiac cycle, neither overloading heart work nor damaging blood particles when passing through the valve. In this perspective, global and local flow parameters, valve dynamics and blood damage safety of the prosthesis, as well as their mutual interactions, have all to be accounted for when assessing the device functionality. Even though all these issues have been and continue to be widely investigated, they are not usually studied through an integrated approach yet, i.e. by analyzing them simultaneously and highlighting their connections. An in vitro test campaign of flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve (Sorin Slimline 25 mm) was performed in a suitably arranged pulsatile mock loop able to reproduce human systemic pressure and flow curves. The valve was placed in an elastic, transparent, and anatomically accurate model of healthy aorta, and tested under several pulsatile flow conditions. Global and local hydrodynamics measurements and leaflet dynamics were analysed focusing on correlations between flow characteristics and valve motion. The haemolysis index due to the valve was estimated according to a literature power law model and related to hydrodynamic conditions, and a correlation between the spatial distribution of experimental shear stress and pannus/thrombotic deposits on mechanical valves was suggested. As main and general result, this study validates the potential of the integrated strategy for performance assessment of any prosthetic valve thanks to its capability of highlighting the complex interaction between the different physical mechanisms that govern transvalvular haemodynamics. We have defined an in vitro procedure for a comprehensive analysis of aortic valve prosthesis performance; the rationale for this study was the belief that a proper and overall characterization of the device should be based on the

  6. Spatio-temporal flow analysis in bileaflet heart valve hinge regions: potential analysis for blood element damage.

    PubMed

    Simon, Hélène A; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Leo, Hwa-Liang; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2007-08-01

    Point-wise velocity measurements have been traditionally acquired to estimate blood damage potential induced by prosthetic heart valves with emphasis on peak values of velocity magnitude and Reynolds stresses. However, the inherently Lagrangian nature of platelet activation and hemolysis makes such measurements of limited predictive value. This study provides a refined fluid mechanical analysis, including blood element paths and stress exposure times, of the hinge flows of a CarboMedics bileaflet mechanical heart valve placed under both mitral and aortic conditions and a St Jude Medical bileaflet valve placed under aortic conditions. The hinge area was partitioned into characteristic regions based on dominant flow structures and spatio-temporal averaging was performed on the measured velocities and Reynolds shear stresses to estimate the average bulk stresses acting on blood elements transiting through the hinge. A first-order estimate of viscous stress levels and exposure times were computed. Both forward and leakage flow phases were characterized in each partition by dynamic flows dependent on subtle leaflet movements and transvalvular pressure fluctuations. Blood elements trapped in recirculation regions may experience exposure times as long as the entire forward flow phase duration. Most calculated stresses were below the accepted blood damage threshold. Estimates of the stress levels indicate that the flow conditions within the boundary layers near the hinge and leaflet walls may be more detrimental to blood cells than bulk flow conditions, while recirculation regions may promote thrombus buildup.

  7. Annual parallax measurements of a Mira variable star, U Lyncis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    We have measured the annual parallax of the water maser around a Mira star, U Lyncis (U Lyn) with VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). The value of the parallax is 1.27 ± 0.06 mas, corresponding to a distance of 786^{+40}_{-36}pc. This is the first VLBI measurement of the parallax of U Lyn. We obtained the period and the apparent magnitude of U Lyn based on near-infrared observations with the Kagoshima University 1 m telescope. The period and the mean magnitude of the K' band are 437.9 day and +1.15 ± 0.09 mag, respectively. Using our measured parallax and period, we find that the location of U Lyn on the period-luminosity plane is consistent with its nature as a Mira variable fundamental mode pulsator. Also, we estimated the distance using the period-luminosity relationship, our period and apparent magnitude and this gave a difference of about 100 pc between our parallactic distance and the distance estimated by using the period-luminosity relationship. We estimated the luminosity, radius, and mass of U Lyn to be 10100 ± 420 L⊙, 391 ± 34 R⊙, and 1.9 ± 0.7 M⊙, respectively. We found 50 water maser spots with a distribution ˜ 13 au around the star and the motion implies the existence of an outflow.

  8. Discovery of carbon-rich Miras in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Menzies, John W.; Feast, Michael W.; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Onozato, Hiroki; Barway, Sudhanshu; Aydi, Elias

    2017-08-01

    Only one carbon-rich (C-rich, hereinafter) Mira variable has so far been suggested as a member of the Galactic bulge and this is in a symbiotic system. Here we describe a method for selecting C-rich candidates from an infrared colour-colour diagram, (J - Ks) versus ([9] - [18]). Follow-up low-resolution spectroscopy resulted in the detection of eight C-rich Mira variables from a sample of 36 candidates towards the Galactic bulge. Our near-infrared photometry indicates that two of these, including the known symbiotic, are closer than the main body of the bulge while a third is a known foreground object. Of the five bulge members, one shows He i and [O ii] emission and is possibly another symbiotic star. Our method is useful for identifying rare C-rich stars in the Galactic bulge and elsewhere. The age of these C-rich stars and the evolutionary process which produced them remain uncertain. They could be old and the products of either binary mass transfer or mergers, i.e. the descendants of blue stragglers, but we cannot rule out the possibility that they belong to a small in situ population of metal-poor intermediate age (<5 Gyr) stars in the bulge or that they have been accreted from a dwarf galaxy.

  9. STS-64 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-20

    The Space Shuttle Discovery settles to the main runway at Edwards, California, at 2:13 p.m. (PDT) 20 September 1994, to conclude mission STS-64. The spacecraft, with a crew of six, was launched into a 57-degree high inclination orbit from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 3:23 p.m. (PDT), 9 September 1994. The mission featured the study of clouds and the atmosphere with a laser beaming system called Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE), and the first untethered space walk in over ten years. A Spartan satellite was also deployed and later retrieved in the study of the sun's corona and the solar wind. The mission was scheduled to end Sunday, 18 September, but was extended one day to continue science work. Bad weather at the Kennedy Space Center on September 19, forced a one-day delay to September 20, with a weather divert that day to Edwards. Mission commander was Richard Richards, the pilot Blaine Hammond, while mission specialists were Jerry Linenger, Susan Helms, Carl Meade, and Mark Lee.

  10. RECONCILING THE EMISSION MECHANISM DISCREPANCY IN MIRA'S TAIL AND ITS EVOLUTION IN AN INTERFACE WITH SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations of the Mira AB binary system revealed a surrounding structure that has been successfully hydrodynamically interpreted as a bow shock and tail of ram-pressure-stripped material. Even the narrow tail, initially difficult to model, has been understood to be the effect of the passage of Mira from a warm neutral medium into a hot, low-density medium, postulated to be the Local Bubble. However, no model to date has explained the observed kink and associated general curvature of the tail. We test the hypothesis that before entering the Local Bubble, Mira was traveling through a shear flow with approximately 1/3 Mira's own velocity at an angle of 30 Degree-Sign to Mira's proper motion. The hypothesis reproduces the kinked nature of Mira's tail and predicts recompression and reheating of the tail material to the same or greater levels of density and temperature predicted in the shock. This provides a heat source for the FUV emission, allowing for an extended lifetime of the FUV emission in line with other estimates of the age of the tail. The uniqueness of Mira's situation implies that the chances of observing other FUV tails behind asymptotic giant branch stars are highly unlikely.

  11. Clarence Edwards Middle School: Success through Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts 2020, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Just a few years ago, Boston's Clarence Edwards Middle School was on the verge of being shut down. By 2009, a renaissance at the Edwards made it one of the highest performing and most desired middle schools in Boston, dramatically narrowing and even eliminating academic achievement gaps while delivering a far more well-rounded education to its…

  12. Ground water geology of Edwards County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Archie T.

    1963-01-01

    About 150,000 acre-feet of water is recharged annually to and discharged from the Edwards and associated limestones in Edwards County. Most of this water is available for additional development inasmuch as only about 900 acre-feet per year is currently being used; however, additional development of ground water will result in a reduction in streamflow.

  13. Pilot Edwards reads a rendezvous timeline

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-03

    STS089-385-004 (22-31 Jan. 1998) --- Astronaut Joe F. Edwards Jr., STS-89 pilot, highlights important data on a checklist while temporarily occupying the commander's station on the port side of the space shuttle Endeavour's flight deck. Edwards, making his first spaceflight, is an alumnus of the 1995 class of astronaut candidates (ASCAN). Photo credit: NASA

  14. A Search for Miras in M33 Using Sparsely-Sampled Time Series Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; Macri, Lucas M.; He, Shiyuan; Long, James; Huang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    The Mira Period-Luminosity relations (PLRs) at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths are promising distance indicators, with brighter absolute magnitudes than Cepheids, comparable PLR dispersions and ubiquitous presence in all galaxy types. We developed a semi-parametric Gaussian process periodogram method for sparsely-sampled Mira light curves and applied it to I-band observations of M33. We discovered more than 1800 Miras, which were subsequently classified using machine-learning techniques. We present an overview of the Gaussian process model, the Random Forest classifiers, and the resulting PLRs.

  15. Large Magellanic Cloud Near-infrared Synoptic Survey. V. Period–Luminosity Relations of Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenlong; Macri, Lucas M.; He, Shiyuan; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-10-01

    We study the near-infrared properties of 690 Mira candidates in the central region of the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on time-series observations at JHK s . We use densely sampled I-band observations from the OGLE project to generate template light curves in the near-infrared and derive robust mean magnitudes at those wavelengths. We obtain near-infrared Period–Luminosity relations for oxygen-rich Miras with a scatter as low as 0.12 mag at K s . We study the Period–Luminosity–Color relations and the color excesses of carbon-rich Miras, which show evidence for a substantially different reddening law.

  16. Interpreting the Mg IIh andk Line Profiles of Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Karovska, M.

    2000-11-01

    We use radiative transfer calculations to reproduce the basic appearance of Mg II lines observed from Mira variables. These lines have centroids that are blueshifted by at least 30 km s-1 from the stellar rest frame. It is unlikely that flow velocities in the stellar atmospheres are this fast, so radiative transfer effects must be responsible for this behavior. Published hydrodynamic models predict the existence of cool, downflowing material above the shocked material responsible for the Mg II emission, and we demonstrate that scattering in this layer can result in Mg II profiles as highly blueshifted as those that are observed. However, our models also show that scattering within the shock plays an equally strong role in shaping the Mg II profiles, and our calculations illustrate the importance of partial redistribution and the effects of being out of ionization equilibrium.

  17. 1612 MHz OH maser emission from axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes - Miras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collison, Alan J.; Fix, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative transfer calculations are performed using a modified form of the Sobolev approximation to determine the inversion of the 1612 MHz line of OH in axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes around Miras. The mass loss is assumed to be occurring in the form of a smooth wind. Line profiles and maps are presented for three models of varying degrees of asymmetry and for various orientations of the envelopes. It is concluded that the axisymmetric models can reproduce many of the features of observed profiles and maps which both the standard, spherically symmetric model and the discrete emission model cannot easily explain. The model profiles reproduce all of the general features seen in the line profiles of real sources.

  18. Multiwavelength Studies of Mira Ceti-type Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esipov, V. F.; Pashchenko, M. I.; Rudnitskij, G. M.; Kozin, M. V.; Lekht, E. E.; Nadjip, A. E.; Fomin, S. V.

    Since 1994, observations of a sample of about 20 Mira Ceti-type and semiregular variables have been carried out in three spectral ranges: radio (H2O maser line λ = 1.35cm), optical (spectroscopy and U BV photometry) and infrared (JHKLM photometry). Time series of the Hα emission intensity and H2O line flux, covering several periods of the stars, have been obtained. Correlation of the intensity variations of the H2O maser with optical variability in the maser stars RR Aql, U Ori, VX Sgr and others was confirmed. One of the most interesting results is the flare of the H2O maser emission in R Leo, which happened in autumn 1997, 14 months after a flare of the Hα emission.

  19. SMOS PLM MIRAS hold-down release and deployment mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, José I.; García, Ignacio; Plaza, Miguel A.

    2005-07-01

    The hold-down, release and deployment mechanisms designed for SMOS PLM MIRAS have been a challenging activity in terms of design compromise, schedule and cost effectiveness. The existing design coming from previous phase was totally reanalysed to be adapted to a specific mission with extra requirements, making the previous design not totally valid as it was conceptually conceived. Novel concepts were implemented to maintain the feasibility of the design, providing compliance to new and more restrictive requirements. Exhaustive testing proved those concepts and provided the necessary maturity to be valid for flight. This paper is focused on all those new concepts and novelties implemented in phase C/D for the SMOS PLM Instrument Mechanisms as to reach the compliance to the applicable specification.

  20. SiO MASERS IN ASYMMETRIC MIRAS. II. R CANCRI

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, W. D.; Ragland, S.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Danchi, W. C.; Traub, W. A.; Lacasse, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    This is the second paper in a series of multi-epoch observations of the SiO masers at 7 mm wavelength in several asymptotic giant branch stars from a sample of Mira variable stars showing evidence of asymmetric structure in the infrared. These stars have been observed interferometrically in the infrared by the Infrared Optical Telescope Array and with Very Long Baseline Array measurements of the SiO masers. In this paper, we present the observations of R Cancri (R Cnc). The systemic velocity of R Cnc is estimated to be 15.8 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1}. A comparison is made with the model calculations of Gray et al. which predict some but not all observed features.

  1. IR and SiO Maser Observations of Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, W. D.; Mennesson, B.; Diamond, P. J.; Perrin, G.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Chagnon, G.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Ridgway, S.; Waters, R.; Vlemmings, W.; Morel, S.; Traub, W.; Carleton, N.; Lacasse, M.

    2005-12-01

    Preliminary results of a coordinated program of near IR and SiO maser interferometric observations of Mira variables are reported. The 2.2 and 3.6 micron results are from the FLUOR/TISIS beam combiners on the IOTA interferometer and the SiO maser observations from the VLBA. The ratio of the SiO ring diameter to the apparent diameter at 2.2 microns for stars in our sample cluster around 2, whereas the 3.6 micron diameters range from slightly larger than the 2.2 micron diameter to approximately the SiO ring diameter. This may be due to differences in the opacity of the molecular envelope at 3.6 microns.

  2. Vanadium Oxide in the Spectra of Mira Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Piontek, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Over the last three years, we have made spectroscopic measurements of twenty Mira variable stars, as a function of phase, probing their stellar atmospheres and underlying pulsation mechanisms. Measurement of variations in TiO and VO with phase can be used to help determine whether these molecular species are produced in an extended region above the layers where Balmer line emission occurs or below this shocked region. Piontek & Luttermoser (1999 IAPPPC, submitted), produce synthetic spectra for three Mira variables, R Leo, V CVn, and R CVn as a function of phase. Comparison of their synthetic spectra to our observed spectra yield the fundamental astrophysical parameters of effective temperatures and surface gravities. Spectra are synthesized with LTE stellar stmospheres code ATLAS, using the 6.6--million Indiana University atomic and molecular line dataset. Piontek & Luttermoser point out that the IU dataset does not include vanadium oxide (VO). Thus, there is a noticeable difference between the synthetic spectra and observed near-IR spectra corresponding to the B-X bands of VO (Mahanti 1935, Proc. Phys. Soc., 47, 43; Keenan & Schroeder 1952,L. W., ApJ, 115, 82). In order to incorporate the VO bands in the synthetic spectra, we need to establish tables of wavenumbers, lowest energy levels, and oscillator strengths. Producing the tables is non-trivial. Laboratory measurements of wavenumbers are used in the Just-Overlapping Line Approximation (JOLA; Tsuji 1966, PASJ, 18, 127) to calculate oscillator strengths. The JOLA technique and preliminary results will be presented. MWC greatly appreciates support from the National Science Foundation grant AST-9500756. RAP acknowledges the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy 1998 Summer REU program supported by the National Science Foundation and thanks DGL for being his mentor.

  3. Shuttle Discovery Landing at Edwards

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-03-18

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission lands at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch of a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five-man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli.

  4. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-12-03

    NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down on the lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert Tuesday, 3 December 1985 at 1:33:49 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, concluding the STS 61-B international mission. The eight-day mission successfully deployed three communications satellites including the Mexican Morelos B, the Australian Aussat 2 and an RCA Satcom K-2 satellite. In addition, two spacewalks were performed to experiment with construction of structures in space. Crew of the 61-B mission included Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr.; Pilot Bryan D. O'Connor; Mission Specialists Mary L. Cleave, Sherwood C. Spring and Jerry L. Ross; and Payload Specialists Rudolfo Neri Vela of Mexico and Charles Walker of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co.

  5. STS-40 Landing at Edwards

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-06-14

    Space Shuttle Columbia nears its touchdown on Runway 22 at Edwards, California, at 8:39 a.m., 14 June 1991, as the STS-40 life sciences mission comes to an end at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center) after nine days of orbital flight. Aboard Columbia during the extended mission were Bryan D. O'Connor, mission commander; Sidney M. Gutierrez, pilot; mission specialists James P. Bagian, Tamara E. Jernigan, and Margaret Rhea Seddon; and payload specialists Francis Andrew Gaffney and Millie Hughes-Fulford. STS-40 was the first space shuttle mission dedicated to life sciences research to explore how the body reacts to a weightless environment and how it readjusts to gravity on return to earth. Columbia was launched on the STS-40 mission 5 June 1991, from Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  6. Flow in a mechanical bileaflet heart valve at laminar and near-peak systole flow rates: CFD simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Leo, Hwa-Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-10-01

    Time-accurate, fully 3D numerical simulations and particle image velocity laboratory experiments are carried out for flow through a fully open bileaflet mechanical heart valve under steady (nonpulsatile) inflow conditions. Flows at two different Reynolds numbers, one in the laminar regime and the other turbulent (near-peak systole flow rate), are investigated. A direct numerical simulation is carried out for the laminar flow case while the turbulent flow is investigated with two different unsteady statistical turbulence modeling approaches, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and detached-eddy simulation (DES) approach. For both the laminar and turbulent cases the computed mean velocity profiles are in good overall agreement with the measurements. For the turbulent simulations, however, the comparisons with the measurements demonstrate clearly the superiority of the DES approach and underscore its potential as a powerful modeling tool of cardiovascular flows at physiological conditions. The study reveals numerous previously unknown features of the flow.

  7. DNA methylation profiling using the methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA).

    PubMed

    Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2010-11-01

    The methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA) exploits the intrinsic specificity and the high affinity of a methylated-CpG-binding protein complex (MBD2B and MBD3L1) to methylated CpG dinucleotides in genomic DNA. The MIRA approach works on double-stranded DNA and does not depend on the application of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. It can be performed on a few hundred nanograms of genomic DNA. Recently, the MIRA technique has been used to profile DNA methylation patterns at a resolution of 100 base pairs along the entire genome of normal human B-lymphocytes. The MIRA method is compatible with microarray and next generation DNA sequencing approaches. We describe the principles and details of this method applied for methylation profiling of genomes containing methylated CpG sequences.

  8. Miras, Mass Loss, and the Ultimate Fate of the Earth (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) The broad category of pulsating red giants includes semi-regular variables and Mira variables. The Miras are distinguished by their large amplitude variation in visible light, late spectral types (cool atmospheres), and the presence of emission lines during part of the cycle. The emission lines result from shock waves generated by pulsation that traverse their atmospheres. These stars' atmosphere are often dusty, an indication of mass loss. Based on decades of detailed modeling we can recognize that the Mira stage corresponds to the onset of devastating mass loss, a process that removes most of the remaining envelope and reveals the degenerate core, a new white dwarf star. I'll review the evidence for this claim, and then examine the effects of Mira stage mass loss on the future solar system. Finally, I shall draw some very general conclusions about the ultimate fate of the Earth.

  9. DNA methylation profiling using the methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA)

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Tibor A.; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2010-01-01

    The methylated-CpG island recovery assay (MIRA) exploits the intrinsic specificity and the high affinity of a methylated CpG-binding protein complex (MBD2B and MBD3L1) to methylated CpG dinucleotides in genomic DNA. The MIRA approach works on double-stranded DNA and does not depend on the application of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. It can be performed on a few hundred nanograms of genomic DNA. Recently, the MIRA technique has been used to profile DNA methylation patterns at a resolution of 100 base pairs along the entire genome of normal human B-lymphocytes. The MIRA method is compatible with microarray and next generation DNA sequencing approaches. We describe the principles and details of this method applied for methylation profiling of genomes containing methylated CpG sequences. PMID:20304072

  10. The measurement of opening angle and orifice area of a bileaflet mechanical valve using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyeon; Youn, Ho-Joong; Shim, Sung-Bo; Lee, Sun-Hee; Jung, Jung-Im; Jung, Seung-Eun; Choi, Yun-Seok; Park, Chul-Soo; Oh, Yong-Seog; Chung, Wook-Sung; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess mechanical valve function using 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). In 20 patients (mean age, 50+/-12 years; male-to-female ratio, 10:10), 30 St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valves (15 aortic and 15 mitral valves) were evaluated using MDCT. We selected images vertical and parallel to the mechanical valve. The valve orifice area (OA) and valve length were determined by manual tracing and the opening and closing angles were measured using a protractor. The OA and length of the mechanical valves were compared with the manufacturer's values. The geometric orifice areas (GOAs) based on the manufacturer's values and the OAs determined by MDCT were 3.4+/-0.2 cm(2) and 3.4+/-0.3 cm(2) for the mitral valves and 2.1+/-0.3 cm(2) and 2.1+/-0.4 cm(2) for the aortic valves, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the OA measures were 0.433 for the mitral valves and 0.874 for the aortic valves (both p<0.001). The lengths based on the manufacturer's values and determined by MDCT were 29.3+/-1.99 mm and 29.6+/-1.65 mm for the mitral valves and 21.5+/-2.1 mm and 20.7+/-2.3 mm for the aortic valves, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the measures were 0.651 for the mitral valve and 0.846 for the aortic valve (both p<0.001). The opening and closing angles determined by MDCT were 10.9+/-0.6 degrees and 131.1+/-3.2 degrees for the mitral valves and 11.1+/-0.9 degrees and 120.6+/-1.7 degrees for the aortic valves, respectively. MDCT is an accurate modality with which to assess the function and morphology of bileaflet mechanical valves.

  11. DISCOVERY OF MIRA VARIABLE STARS IN THE METAL-POOR SEXTANS DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2012-12-10

    We report the discovery of two Mira variable stars (Miras) toward the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). We performed optical long-term monitoring observations for two red stars in the Sextans dSph. The light curves of both stars in the I{sub c} band show large-amplitude (3.7 and 0.9 mag) and long-period (326 {+-} 15 and 122 {+-} 5 days) variations, suggesting that they are Miras. We combine our own infrared data with previously published data to estimate the mean infrared magnitudes. The distances obtained from the period-luminosity relation of the Miras (75.3{sup +12.8}{sub -10.9} and 79.8{sup +11.5}{sub -9.9} kpc, respectively), together with the radial velocities available, support memberships of the Sextans dSph (90.0 {+-} 10.0 kpc). These are the first Miras found in a stellar system with a metallicity as low as [Fe/H] {approx} -1.9 than any other known system with Miras.

  12. Sturckow Recaps Last Shuttle Landing at Edwards

    NASA Image and Video Library

    When Space Shuttle Discovery touched down at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California on Sept. 11, 2009 to conclude mission STS-128, no one foresaw that it would be the last of 54 such landing...

  13. Edward A. Halbach 1909-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2011-06-01

    Edward A. Halbach (1909-2011) was a dedicated, lifelong member of the AAVSO and the Milwaukee Astronomical Society. His service to these organizations, and his valuable contributions to variable star astronomy, are described.

  14. Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. (1922-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; McPherron, Robert L.; Birn, Joachim

    2013-02-01

    Space physicist Edward Wheeler Hones Jr. died on 17 September 2012 at his home in Los Alamos, N. M. He was 90 years old. The cause of death was a heart attack that came following a brief hospitalization.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OGLE2 Mira variables in the Galactic bulge (Matsunaga+, 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, N.; Fukushi, H.; Nakada, Y.

    2006-05-01

    We have extracted a total of 1968 Mira variables from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment II (OGLE-II) data base in the Galactic bulge region. Among them, 1960 are associated with 2 Micron All-sky Survey (2MASS) sources, and 1541 are further identified with Midcourse Space Exploration (MSX) point sources. Their photometric properties are compared with those of Mira variables in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We have found that mass-losing stars with circumstellar matter are reddened such that the colour dependence of the absorption coefficient is similar to that of interstellar matter. We also discuss the structure of the bulge. The surface number density of the bulge Mira variables is well correlated with the 2.2-m surface brightness obtained by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite. Using this relation, the total number of Mira variables in the bulge is estimated to be about 6x105. The logP-K relation of the Mira variables gives their space distribution which supports the well-known asymmetry of the bar-like bulge. (1 data file).

  16. New Mira Variables from the MACHO Galactic Bulge Fields, part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, A.; Hümmerich, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new sample of 525 Mira variables in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, expanding on previous samples of 69 and 500 objects, respectively, and thereby concluding our search for new Mira variables in the MACHO Galactic Bulge fields. 364 Miras of the present sample are reported as variable stars for the first time. We have cross-correlated our sample with the sample of Mira stars from the OGLE-III Catalog of Long-Period Variables (LPVs) in the Galactic Bulge and found 146 matches; MACHO and OGLE periods are in very good overall agreement. We present summary data for all stars of the present sample and give a statistical overview, comparing the properties of the MACHO and OGLE samples and enlarging on the analyses in our previous paper. Lightcurves, folded lightcurves and further details are available via the AAVSO International Variable Star Index (http://www.aavso.org/vsx/). Data of the complete sample of Mira variables from the MACHO Galactic Bulge fields, as presented in our papers (Bernhard, 2011; Hümmerich and Bernhard, 2012 and the present paper), can be found in the appendix.

  17. A turbulent wake as a tracer of 30,000 years of Mira's mass loss history.

    PubMed

    Martin, D Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Neill, James D; Schiminovich, David; Forster, Karl; Rich, R Michael; Welsh, Barry Y; Madore, Barry F; Wheatley, Jonathan M; Morrissey, Patrick; Barlow, Tom A

    2007-08-16

    Mira is one of the first variable stars ever discovered and it is the prototype (and also the nearest example) of a class of low-to-intermediate-mass stars in the late stages of stellar evolution. These stars are relatively common and they return a large fraction of their original mass to the interstellar medium (ISM) (ref. 2) through a processed, dusty, molecular wind. Thus stars in Mira's stage of evolution have a direct impact on subsequent star and planet formation in their host galaxy. Previously, the only direct observation of the interaction between Mira-type stellar winds and the ISM was in the infrared. Here we report the discovery of an ultraviolet-emitting bow shock and turbulent wake extending over 2 degrees on the sky, arising from Mira's large space velocity and the interaction between its wind and the ISM. The wake is visible only in the far ultraviolet and is consistent with an unusual emission mechanism whereby molecular hydrogen is excited by turbulent mixing of cool molecular gas and shock-heated gas. This wind wake is a tracer of the past 30,000 years of Mira's mass-loss history and provides an excellent laboratory for studying turbulent stellar wind-ISM interactions.

  18. Particle image velocimetry study of pulsatile flow in bi-leaflet mechanical heart valves with image compensation method.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Yeo, Tony Joon Hock; Zhao, Yong; Hwang, Ned H C

    2006-12-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is an important technique in studying blood flow in heart valves. Previous PIV studies of flow around prosthetic heart valves had different research concentrations, and thus never provided the physical flow field pictures in a complete heart cycle, which compromised their pertinence for a better understanding of the valvular mechanism. In this study, a digital PIV (DPIV) investigation was carried out with improved accuracy, to analyse the pulsatile flow field around the bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV) in a complete heart cycle. For this purpose a pulsatile flow test rig was constructed to provide the necessary in vitro test environment, and the flow field around a St. Jude size 29 bi-leaflet MHV and a similar MHV model were studied under a simulated physiological pressure waveform with flow rate of 5.2 l/min and pulse rate at 72 beats/min. A phase-locking method was applied to gate the dynamic process of valve leaflet motions. A special image-processing program was applied to eliminate optical distortion caused by the difference in refractive indexes between the blood analogue fluid and the test section. Results clearly showed that, due to the presence of the two leaflets, the valvular flow conduit was partitioned into three flow channels. In the opening process, flow in the two side channels was first to develop under the presence of the forward pressure gradient. The flow in the central channel was developed much later at about the mid-stage of the opening process. Forward flows in all three channels were observed at the late stage of the opening process. At the early closing process, a backward flow developed first in the central channel. Under the influence of the reverse pressure gradient, the flow in the central channel first appeared to be disturbed, which was then transformed into backward flow. The backward flow in the central channel was found to be the main driving factor for the leaflet rotation in the valve

  19. Are the Current Doppler Echocardiography Criteria Able to Discriminate Mitral Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Malfunction? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Evin, Morgane; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Rieu, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Malfunction of bileaflet mechanical heart valves in the mitral position could either be due to patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) or leaflet obstruction. The aim of this article is to investigate the validity of current echocardiographic criteria used for diagnosis of mitral prosthesis malfunction, namely maximum velocity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index. In vitro testing was performed on a double activation left heart duplicator. Both PPM and leaflet obstruction were investigated on a St. Jude Medical Master. PPM was studied by varying the St. Jude prosthesis size (21, 25, and 29 mm) and stroke volume (70 and 90 mL). Prosthesis leaflet obstruction was studied by partially or totally blocking the movement of one valve leaflet. Mitral flow conditions were altered in terms of E/A ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) to simulate physiologic panel of diastolic function. Maximum velocity, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index are shown to be insufficient to distinguish normal from malfunctioning St. Jude prostheses. Doppler velocity index and effective orifice area were 1.3 ± 0.49 and 1.83 ± 0.43 cm(2) for testing conditions with no malfunction below the 2.2 and 2 cm(2) thresholds (1.19 cm(2) for severe PPM and 1.23 cm(2) for fully blocked leaflet). The mean pressure gradient reached 5 mm Hg thresholds for several conditions of severe PPM only (6.9 mm Hg and mean maximum velocity value: 183.4 cm/s) whereas such value was never attained in the case of leaflet obstruction. In the case of leaflet obstruction, the maximum velocity averaged over the nine pulsed-wave Doppler locations increased by 38% for partial leaflet obstruction and 75% for a fully blocked leaflet when compared with normal conditions. Current echocardiographic criteria might be suboptimal for the detection of bileaflet mechanical heart valve malfunction. Further developments and investigations are required in order

  20. Shuttle Atlantis Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down on the lakebed runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California's Mojave Desert Tuesday, 3 December 1985 at 1:33:49 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, concluding the STS 61-B international mission. The eight-day mission successfully deployed three communications satellites including the Mexican Morelos B, the Australian Aussat 2 and an RCA Satcom K-2 satellite. In addition, two spacewalks were performed to experiment with construction of structures in space. Crew of the 61-B mission included Commander Brewster H. Shaw, Jr.; Pilot Bryan D. O'Connor; Mission Specialists Mary L. Cleave, Sherwood C. Spring and Jerry L. Ross; and Payload Specialists Rudolfo Neri Vela of Mexico and Charles Walker of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories

  1. STS-66 Edwards Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis approaches runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to Earth and can be reused on

  2. Shuttle Discovery Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission lands at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch of a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five-man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Opacity-sampling models of Mira variables (Ireland+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2012-05-01

    We present four model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to {omicron} Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These models also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore cannot drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables. (1 data file).

  4. Dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables - I. Modelling description and analysis of approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2008-12-01

    We describe the Cool Opacity-sampling Dynamic EXtended (CODEX) atmosphere models of Mira variable stars, and examine in detail the physical and numerical approximations that go in-to the model creation. The CODEX atmospheric models are obtained by computing the temperature and the chemical and radiative states of the atmospheric layers, assuming gas pressure and velocity profiles from Mira pulsation models, which extend from near the H-burning shell to the outer layers of the atmosphere. Although the code uses the approximation of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and a grey approximation in the dynamical atmosphere code, many key observable quantities, such as infrared diameters and low-resolution spectra, are predicted robustly in spite of these approximations. We show that in visible light, radiation from Mira variables is dominated by fluorescence scattering processes, and that the LTE approximation likely underpredicts visible-band fluxes by a factor of 2.

  5. The Clouds are breaking: tracing the Magellanic system with Gaia DR1 Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deason, Alis J.; Belokurov, Vasily; Erkal, Denis; Koposov, Sergey E.; Mackey, Dougal

    2017-05-01

    We exploit the first data release from the Gaia mission to identify candidate Mira variables in the outskirts of the Magellanic Clouds. The repeated observations of sources during the initial phase of the Gaia mission is used to identify stars that show signs of variability. This variability information, combined with infrared photometry from Two Micron All Sky Survey and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, allows us to select a clean sample of giants in the periphery of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We find evidence for Miras surrounding the LMC out to ˜20 deg in all directions, apart from the North-West quadrant. Our sample does not generally follow the gas distribution of the Magellanic system; Miras are notably absent in the gaseous bridge between the LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), but they are likely related to the stellar RR Lyrae bridge reported by Belokurov et al. (2016). The stellar stream discovered by Mackey et al. (2016) to the North of the LMC is almost perfectly delineated by our Mira variables, and likely extends further East towards the Galactic plane. The presence of an intermediate-age population in this stream advocates an LMC disc origin. We also find a significant excess of Miras to the East of the LMC; these more diffusely distributed stars are likely stripped SMC stars due to interactions with the LMC. Miras are also identified in regions of the sky away from the Clouds; we locate stars likely associated with known massive substructures, and also find potential associations with stripped SMC debris above the Galactic plane.

  6. Evaluation of shear stress accumulation on blood components in normal and dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, S; Maleki, H; Hassan, I; Kadem, L

    2012-10-11

    Evaluating shear induced hemodynamic complications is one of the major concerns in design of the mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The monitoring of these events relies on both numerical simulations and experimental measurements. Currently, numerical approaches are mainly based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. A more straightforward evaluation can be based on the Lagrangian analysis of the whole blood. As a consequence, Lagrangian meshfree methods are more adapted to such evaluation. In this study, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a fully meshfree particle method originated to simulate compressible astrophysical flows, is applied to study the flow through a normal and a dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). The SPH results are compared with the reference data. The accumulation of shear stress patterns on blood components illustrates the important role played by non-physiological flow patterns and mainly vortical structures in this issue. The statistical distribution of particles with respect to shear stress loading history provides important information regarding the relative number of blood components that can be damaged. This can be used as a measure of the response of blood components to the presence of the valve implant or any implantable medical device. This work presents the first attempt to simulate pulsatile flow through BMHVs using SPH method.

  7. Experimental investigation of the flow field past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in pulsatile flow within an anatomical aorta model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2011-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) has been mounted at the inlet of an anatomical model of the human aorta, and placed within a mock circulation loop that simulates physiological flow conditions. The working fluid matches the refractive index of silicone, from which the aorta model and other parts of the test section are made, and the viscosity of blood. Flow characteristics past the BMHV are measured using stereoscopic and planar particle image velocimetry and laser Doppler velocimetry. In contrast to previous experiments, in which heart valves have been tested in simplified aortic geometries, this arrangement permits the study of the dependence of flow past the valve upon recirculation in the sinuses of Valsalva, the flow rate through the coronary arteries, and the aorta curvature. The effect of valve orientation will also be investigated with the objective to determine a hemodynamically optimal configuration with potential benefits to implantation procedures. The measured viscous shear stress distribution will be analyzed towards predicting the initiation of thrombosis in patients and identifying regions of stagnation, which could facilitate thrombus attachment.

  8. Device Thrombogenicty Emulator (DTE) – Design optimization Methodology for Cardiovascular Devices: A Study in Two Bileaflet MHV Designs

    PubMed Central

    Xenos, Michalis; Girdhar, Gaurav; Alemu, Yared; Jesty, Jolyon; Slepian, Marvin; Einav, Shmuel; Bluestein, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Patients who receive prosthetic heart valve (PHV) implants require mandatory anticoagulation medication after implantation due to the thrombogenic potential of the valve. Optimization of PHV designs may facilitate reduction of flow-induced thrombogenicity and reduce or eliminate the need for post-implant anticoagulants. We present a methodology entitled Device Thrombogenicty Emulator (DTE) for optimizing the thrombo-resistance performance of PHV by combining numerical and experimental approaches. Two bileaflet mechanical heart valves (MHV) designs – St. Jude Medical (SJM) and ATS were investigated, by studying the effect of distinct flow phases on platelet activation. Transient turbulent and direct numerical simulations (DNS) were conducted, and stress loading histories experienced by the platelets were calculated along flow trajectories. The numerical simulations indicated distinct design dependent differences between the two valves. The stress-loading waveforms extracted from the numerical simulations were programmed into a hemodynamic shearing device (HSD), emulating the flow conditions past the valves in distinct ‘hot spot’ flow regions that are implicated in MHV thrombogenicity. The resultant platelet activity was measured with a modified prothrombinase assay, and was found to be significantly higher in the SJM valve, mostly during the regurgitation phase. The experimental results were in excellent agreement with the calculated platelet activation potential. This establishes the utility of the DTE methodology for serving as a test bed for evaluating design modifications for achieving better thrombogenic performance for such devices. PMID:20483411

  9. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices.

  10. CFD simulation of a novel bileaflet mechanical heart valve prosthesis: an estimation of the Venturi passage formed by the leaflets.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Y; Medart, D; Hormes, M; Schmitz, C; Hamilton, K; Kwant, P B; Takatani, S; Schmitz-Rode, T; Steinseifer, U

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the flow characteristics of the novel Helmholtz-Institute Aachen Bileaflet (HIA-BL) heart valve prosthesis. The curved leaflets of the HIA-BL valve form a Venturi passage between the leaflets at peak systole. By narrowing the cross section the flow accelerates and the static pressure at the central passage decreases according to the Venturi effect. The low-pressure zone between the leaflets is expected to stabilize the leaflets in fully open position at peak systole. To investigate the Venturi passage, the flow fields of two valve geometries were investigated by CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics): one geometry exhibits curved leaflets resulting in a Venturi passage; the other geometry features straight leaflets. The flow profiles, pressure distribution and resulting torque of both passages were compared and investigated. Although flow profiles downstream of both valves were similar, the flow passages between the leaflets were different for the investigated leaflet geometries. The straight leaflet passage showed a large boundary layer separation zone near the leaflets and the lowest pressure at the leading edge of the leaflet. The Venturi passage showed a reduction of the boundary layer separation zones and the lowest pressure between the leaflets could be found in the narrowest flow cross section of the Venturi passage. Additionally, the resulting torque showed that the Venturi passage produced an opening momentum. The results demonstrate that the Venturi passage stabilizes the leaflets in open position at peak systole.

  11. A carbon-rich Mira variable in a globular cluster: a stellar merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feast, Michael W.; Menzies, John W.; Whitelock, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The membership of Matsunaga's variable 1, a carbon-rich, mass-losing, Mira variable, in the globular cluster Lynga 7 is discussed on the basis of radial velocities. We conclude that it is a member, the first known C-Mira in a globular cluster. Since such a variable is expected to have an age of ˜1-2 Gyr and an initial mass of ˜1.5 M⊙, we conclude that this star must be the product of a stellar merger.

  12. Joint VLBA/VLTI Observations of the Mira Variable S Orionis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    0 (red ) and v ¼ 2, J ¼ 1 0 (blue) SiO maser emission toward S Ori. The images represent maximum pixel values over the LSR velocity range from +10.1...Observations of the v ¼ 1, J ¼ 1 0 (43.1 GHz) and v ¼ 2, J ¼ 1 0 (42.8 GHz) SiO maser emission toward the Mira variable S Ori were conducted using the VLBA...of Mira variables and supergiants have been investigated by mapping the SiO maser emission at typical distances of 2–4 stellar radii toward these

  13. Absence of an X-shaped Structure in the Milky Way Bulge Using Mira Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, Martín

    2017-02-01

    The stellar density distribution of the bulge is analyzed through one of its tracers. We use oxygen-rich Mira variables from the Catchpole et al. survey and OGLE-III survey as standard candles. The average age of these stars is around 9 Gyr. The population traced by Mira variables matches a boxy bulge prediction, not an X-shaped one, because only one peak is observed in the density along the analyzed lines of sight, whereas the prediction of an X-shape gives two clear peaks.

  14. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. In Tribute: Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of ... NICHD) in Shriver's honor. Senator Edward M. Kennedy, Friend of NIH "… deep compassion for those in need." ...

  15. 7. DETAIL, ANCHOR FIXTURES. Looking to north. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL, ANCHOR FIXTURES. Looking to north. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration-rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5-2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2-2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected for

  17. Edward Weston and the "Modern" Galvanometer Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  18. Prince Edward Island. Reference Series No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Prince Edward Island and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography, climate, history, early trade, development, agriculture, the potato industry, forests, fisheries, aquaculture, industry, tourism, energy,…

  19. Prince Edward Island's School Psychology Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matters, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    The Prince Edward Island (PEI) school system has been struggling with issues of recruitment and particularly retention for psychologists. Reasons include concerns about professional autonomy; having more limited roles, which are heavily assessment focused; reduced job satisfaction; and restrictions on additional private practice work. The waiting…

  20. Prince Edward Island's School Psychology Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matters, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    The Prince Edward Island (PEI) school system has been struggling with issues of recruitment and particularly retention for psychologists. Reasons include concerns about professional autonomy; having more limited roles, which are heavily assessment focused; reduced job satisfaction; and restrictions on additional private practice work. The waiting…

  1. RME 1333 - Pilot Edwards engages in experiments

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-03-04

    S89-E-5382 (29 Jan 1998) --- This Electronic Still Camera (ESC) image shows astronaut Joe F. Edwards, Jr., pilot, working on a lap-top computer at the commanders station on the flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. This ESC view was taken on January 29, 1998, at 00:49:47 GMT.

  2. Edward Weston and the ``Modern'' Galvanometer Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2008-03-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  3. Prince Edward Island. Reference Series No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of External Affairs, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, one of a series featuring the Canadian provinces, presents a brief overview of Prince Edward Island and is suitable for teacher reference or student reading. Separate sections discuss geography, climate, history, early trade, development, agriculture, the potato industry, forests, fisheries, aquaculture, industry, tourism, energy,…

  4. Edward Weston and the "Modern" Galvanometer Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    One of my favorite 19th century electrical scientists is Edward Weston, and one of my favorite devices for teaching the topics of electromagnetic forces and torques is the D'Arsonval galvanometer. The junction of these two topics is Weston's improved meter movement that has been used in analog meters for the past 125 years.

  5. 31. "FIGURE 310, TRACK LAYOUT (EDWARDS)". Test track footing and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. "FIGURE 3-10, TRACK LAYOUT (EDWARDS)". Test track footing and rail head cross sections. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is <90 beats/min; however, these values significantly increase in the St. Jude Medical valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as

  7. The Chromosphere/Shock Dilemma of Non-Mira, Late-Type Variable Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Lee Anne

    1997-01-01

    An investigation of the atmospheric structure of non-Mira, asymptotic giant branch stars through NLTE radiative transfer modeling applied to hydrodynamic models is discussed. Synthetic spectra resulting from these calculations were compared with IUE observations of these stars to test the validity of the models. The development of the hydrodynamic models is detailed.

  8. Birkhoff normal forms and KAM theory for Gumowski-Mira equation.

    PubMed

    Kulenović, M R S; Nurkanović, Z; Pilav, E

    2014-01-01

    By using the KAM theory we investigate the stability of equilibrium solutions of the Gumowski-Mira equation: xn+1=(2ax n)/(1+x n2)-xn-1, n=0,1,…, where x-1, x0∈(-∞,∞), and we obtain the Birkhoff normal forms for this equation for different equilibrium solutions.

  9. Birkhoff Normal Forms and KAM Theory for Gumowski-Mira Equation

    PubMed Central

    Kulenović, M. R. S.; Nurkanović, Z.; Pilav, E.

    2014-01-01

    By using the KAM theory we investigate the stability of equilibrium solutions of the Gumowski-Mira equation: x n+1 = (2ax n)/(1 + x n 2) − x n−1, n = 0,1,…, where x −1, x 0 ∈ (−∞, ∞), and we obtain the Birkhoff normal forms for this equation for different equilibrium solutions. PMID:24558333

  10. Resolving The Extended Atmosphere And The Inner Wind of Mira (ω Cet) With Long ALMA Baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ka Tat; Kamiński, Tomasz; Menten, Karl M.; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2016-10-01

    This is the presentation file of the talk in the Cool Stars 19 conference about the imaging and radiative transfer modelling results of the SiO and H2O data of the AGB star Mira (o Cet) observed in the 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign.

  11. An Analysis of Retention and Attrition at MiraCosta College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ronald

    A study was conducted at MiraCosta College (MCC), in Del Mar, California, to investigate various aspects of retention and attrition and to make recommendations for possible program enhancements. The study sought to determine when students drop out of classes, which students drop out of school completely, and the drop out rate for various…

  12. An Analysis of the Public Feeder High Schools in the MiraCosta Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ronald

    A study was conducted to analyze the enrollment patterns of high school seniors from the eight public feeder high schools in the MiraCosta Community College (MCC) District. Using the California Community Colleges Student Data System and information obtained from the County Department of Education and each feeder high school, the study examined the…

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New Miras in Galactic Bulge (Hummerich+ 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummerich, S.; Bernhard, K.

    2013-01-01

    500 previously unrecorded Mira variables were found during an inspection of R-band lightcurves from the MACHO Galactic Bulge fields (http://macho.anu.edu.au/). This research continues the search for new Miras in the MACHO database (Bernhard, 2011PZP....11...12B). The MACHO 1.3m telescope is situated at Mount Stromlo in Australia and uses B and R filters in combination with eight 2048*2048 CCD cameras. Calculation of MACHO R magnitudes was done from the given instrumental R magnitudes using the formula given in Alcock et al. (1999PASP..111.1539A). Astrometric positions and near-infrared color indices were derived from the 2MASS catalog (Skrutskie et al. 2006, VII/233). Only objects with an amplitude >2mag (Rc) were taken into consideration. In addition, all lightcurves have been inspected visually; objects with significant changes in amplitude, mean magnitude and / or period suggesting semi-regularity have been rejected. Each object was checked against the Strasbourg CDS Vizier service and the International Variable Star Index (VSX) for pre-existence as a Mira-type star in variability catalogues. Summary data for all new Mira variables are listed in Table 1. (:) denotes uncertain value. Lightcurves, folded lightcurves and further details are available via AAVSO-VSX (http://www.aavso.org/vsx/). (1 data file).

  14. An Analysis of Retention and Attrition at MiraCosta College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ronald

    A study was conducted at MiraCosta College (MCC), in Del Mar, California, to investigate various aspects of retention and attrition and to make recommendations for possible program enhancements. The study sought to determine when students drop out of classes, which students drop out of school completely, and the drop out rate for various…

  15. Development of the optical and infrared interferometer MIRA-I.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Yoshizawa, Masanori; Fukushima, Toshio; Machida, Yoshihiro; Honma, Yukihiro; Kuwabara, Ryuichiro; Suzuki, Shunsaku; Torii, Yasuo; Kubo, Koichi; Matsuda, Ko; Iwashita, Hikaru

    1998-07-01

    The MIRA-1.2 system consists of two siderostats, beam reducers, vacuum delay liens, baseline metrology system, tip-tilt mirrors, beam combine optics, and fringe detector. Two siderostats, of which aperture of the flat mirror is 300mm, are placed apart by 4 meters in the north-south direction. Beam reducer is a Cassegrain optics with the paraboloidal primary and secondary mirrors of the diameter D(subscript 1) equals 200mm and D(subscript 2) equals 30mm, respectively. The metrology system with laser interferometers is set up to stabilize the baseline length for astrometry. Piezo-driven tip-tilt mirrors are equipped for the correction of image motions due to the air turbulence and other errors. Delay lines are placed in a vacuum tube. Experiments of the fiber optics is carried out as a part of MIRA-1.2. Developing MIRA-1.2 system, it is aimed to establish the basic techniques of astrometry and future projects, especially of MIRA-II.

  16. Modelling the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G.; Paladini, C.; Hron, J.; Aringer, B.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Nowotny, W.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir using the mid-infrared high spatial resolution interferometric observations from VLTI/MIDI. Aims: The aim of this work is to analyse the atmosphere of the carbon-rich Mira RU Vir with hydrostatic and dynamic models, in this way deepening the knowledge of the dynamic processes at work in carbon-rich Miras. Methods: We compare spectro-photometric and interferometric measurements of this carbon-rich Mira AGB star with the predictions of different kinds of modelling approaches (hydrostatic model atmospheres plus MOD-More Of Dusty, self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres). A geometric model fitting tool is used for a first interpretation of the interferometric data. Results: The results show that a joint use of different kinds of observations (photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry) is essential for shedding light on the structure of the atmosphere of a carbon-rich Mira. The dynamic model atmospheres fit the ISO spectrum well in the wavelength range λ = [2.9,25.0] μm. Nevertheless, a discrepancy is noticeable both in the SED (visible) and in the interferometric visibilities (shape and level), which is a possible explanation are intra-/inter-cycle variations in the dynamic model atmospheres, as well as in the observations. The presence of a companion star and/or a disk or a decrease in mass loss within the past few hundred years cannot be excluded, but these explanations are considered unlikely. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs: 085.D-0756 and 093. D-0708.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Comparison of the hemodynamic and thrombogenic performance of two bileaflet mechanical heart valves using a CFD/FSI model.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Kris; Vierendeels, Jan; Kaminsky, Rado; van Nooten, Guido; Verdonck, Pascal; Bluestein, Danny

    2007-08-01

    The hemodynamic and the thrombogenic performance of two commercially available bileaflet mechanical heart valves (MHVs)--the ATS Open Pivot Valve (ATS) and the St. Jude Regent Valve (SJM), was compared using a state of the art computational fluid dynamics-fluid structure interaction (CFD-FSI) methodology. A transient simulation of the ATS and SJM valves was conducted in a three-dimensional model geometry of a straight conduit with sudden expansion distal the valves, including the valve housing and detailed hinge geometry. An aortic flow waveform (60 beats/min, cardiac output 4 l/min) was applied at the inlet. The FSI formulation utilized a fully implicit coupling procedure using a separate solver for the fluid problem (FLUENT) and for the structural problem. Valve leaflet excursion and pressure differences were calculated, as well as shear stress on the leaflets and accumulated shear stress on particles released during both forward and backward flow phases through the open and closed valve, respectively. In contrast to the SJM, the ATS valve opened to less than maximal opening angle. Nevertheless, maximal and mean pressure gradients and velocity patterns through the valve orifices were comparable. Platelet stress accumulation during forward flow indicated that no platelets experienced a stress accumulation higher than 35 dyne x s/cm2, the threshold for platelet activation (Hellums criterion). However, during the regurgitation flow phase, 0.81% of the platelets in the SJM valve experienced a stress accumulation higher than 35 dyne x s/cm2, compared with 0.63% for the ATS valve. The numerical results indicate that the designs of the ATS and SJM valves, which differ mostly in their hinge mechanism, lead to different potential for platelet activation, especially during the regurgitation phase. This numerical methodology can be used to assess the effects of design parameters on the flow induced thrombogenic potential of blood recirculating devices.

  18. Effects of Surgical Techniques on Long-Term Results in Patients with Degenerative Mitral Valve Bileaflet Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Giuseppe; Bellitti, Renato; Pascarella, Clemente; Nappi, Gianantonio; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Santé, Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the long-term results in patients with degenerative mitral valve bileaflet prolapse (DMVBLP) undergoing mitral valve repair (MVr) or mitral valve replacement (MVR), and to compare the consequences of survival related to each technique. Between 2001 and 2012, a total of 421 patients underwent isolated primary surgery for DMVBLP. MVr was performed in 146 patients (34.7%), and MVR in 275 (65.3%). MVR patients were allocated to two subgroups. Subgroup A were operated on in routine fashion, preserving the posterior subvalvular apparatus, and in selected cases the anterior or both apparatus (n = 119; 43.3%). In subgroup B, surgery was performed without preservation of the subvalvular apparatus (n = 156; 56.7%). There were no intraoperative deaths in all patient groups. The median length of follow up was 5.96 ± 3.28 years. Five patients (3.4%) in the MVr group died, while 11 in MVR subgroup A (9.2%) died, and 29 in MVR subgroup B (18.6%). Patients in the MVr group demonstrated significant and persistent postoperative decreases in left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) and left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD) during the follow up, while the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) showed a trend to improve. In MVR subgroup A, preservation of the mitral subvalvular structures resulted in a decrease in LVEDD; this resulted in a lesser worsening of the LVEF, as occurs when subvalvular structures are resected. In MVR subgroup B, the LVEDD and LVESD were each increased constantly, which resulted in a statistically significant worsening of the LVEF. MVr in DMVBLP patients achieved a better preservation of left ventricular systolic indices than MVR, and guaranteed better shortand long-term survivals. When MVr is not feasible, it is recommended that subvalvular preservation be performed during MVR, in order to reduce the risk of early and late mortality and to improve left ventricular function.

  19. Characteristics of pulsatile blood flow through the curved bileaflet mechanical heart valve installed in two different types of blood vessels: velocity and pressure of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jin Seok; Yoo, Song Min; Kim, Chang Nyung

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the flow fields of blood flowing through the curved bileaflet mechanical heart valve. A numerical analysis was carried out with the fluid-structure interaction between the blood flow and the motion of leaflets in two different types of blood vessels (type A, with sinus blood vessel, and type B, without sinus blood vessel). When the leaflet was fully opened, a fluttering phenomenon was detected in association with the blood flow, and recirculation flows were observed in the sinus region of the blood vessel for type A. During the closing phase, regurgitation was formed between the ring and the edge of the each leaflet for both types. When the leaflet came into contact with the valve ring at the end of the closing phase, rebound of the leaflet occurred. In consideration of the entire domain, the pressure drop occurs mainly in the valve region. The present results showed tendencies similar to those obtained by previous experiments for blood flow and contribute to the development of the curved bileaflet mechanical heart valve prostheses.

  20. Modeling of the Edwards pipe experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tiselj, I.; Petelin, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Edwards pipe experiment is used as one of the basic benchmarks for the two-phase flow codes due to its simple geometry and the wide range of phenomena that it covers. Edwards and O`Brien filled 4-m-long pipe with liquid water at 7 MPa and 502 K and ruptured one end of the tube. They measured pressure and void fraction during the blowdown. Important phenomena observed were pressure rarefaction wave, flashing onset, critical two-phase flow, and void fraction wave. Experimental data were used to analyze the capabilities of the RELAP5/MOD3.1 six-equation two-phase flow model and to examine two different numerical schemes: one from the RELAP5/MOD3.1 code and one from our own code, which was based on characteristic upwind discretization.

  1. 1995 Edward Teller Lecture Patience and Optimism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.

    Remarks made in the author's acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. "Patience" and "optimism" are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the "zig-zag" path to fusion energy production.

  2. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  3. 1995 Edward teller lecture. Patience and optimism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.

    1996-05-01

    Remarks made in the author's acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. ``Patience'' and ``optimism'' are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the ``zig-zag'' path to fusion energy production.

  4. Landing - STS-6 - Edwards AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-11

    S83-30220 (9 April 1983) --- The space shuttle Challenger makes its first landing shortly before 11 a.m. (PST) on April 9, 1983, on Runway 22 at the Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. Onboard the reusable spacecraft, having just completed a successful five-day mission, are astronauts Paul J. Weitz, Karol J. Bobko, F. Story Musgrave and Donald H. Peterson. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF☆

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-01-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed, preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’s impact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’ priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility. The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction. The early life and career of Robert Edwards are described and re-evaluated in the light of documentary evidence. His early interest in the genetics of development provided the major motivation behind his goal of achieving IVF in humans. Through this work, he aimed to understand and hopefully to reduce the transmission of genetic disease in humans. His meeting with Patrick Steptoe, the details of which are re-examined, increased the significance for Edwards of infertility as an outcome of IVF. It also led to a creative long-term research partnership, initiated a long-term programme of public education in the UK about reproductive science and stimulated the development of

  6. Landing - STS-4 - Edwards AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-07-06

    S82-33229 (4 July 1982) --- The space shuttle Columbia touches down on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California at the completion of a successful seven-day stay in Earth orbit. Inside are astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly II and Henry W. Hartsfield Jr., STS-4 commander and pilot, respectively. Though this closeup scene is devoid of visible people, hundreds of thousands weren?t far away for the unique July 4 celebration. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Landing - STS-4 - Edwards AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-07-06

    Views of the Columbia landing at EAFB ending the STS-4 Mission on 07/04/1982; of President and Mrs. Reagan greeting the crew out on the Lake bed Runway; and, the view of Roy Rogers with Astronauts Jerry Ross and Guy Gardner. 1. President Ronald Reagan & wife Nancy 2. Roy Rogers 3. Astronaut Jerry L. Ross 4. Astronaut Guy S. Gardner Edwards AFB, CA

  8. MiraLAX is not as effective as GoLytely in bowel cleansing before screening colonoscopies.

    PubMed

    Hjelkrem, Michael; Stengel, Joel; Liu, Mark; Jones, David P; Harrison, Stephen A

    2011-04-01

    Successful colonoscopies require good bowel preparations-poor bowel preparations can increase medical costs, rates of missed lesions, and procedure duration. The combination of polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 without electrolytes (MiraLAX; Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc, Kenilworth, NJ) and 64 oz of Gatorade (PepsiCo, Inc, Purchase, NY) has gained popularity as a bowel preparation regimen. However, the efficacy and tolerability of this approach has not been compared with standard bowel preparations in clinical trials. We compared split-dose (PEG) 3350 with electrolytes (GoLytely; Braintree Laboratories, Inc, Braintree, MA) with split-dose MiraLAX alone and in combination with pretreatment medications (bisacodyl or lubiprostone) to determine the efficacy and patient tolerability of MiraLAX as an agent for bowel preparation. We performed a prospective, randomized, blinded, controlled trial at a tertiary care center. Patients (n=403) were randomly assigned to groups given GoLytely, MiraLAX, MiraLAX with bisacodyl (10 mg), or MiraLAX with lubiprostone (24 μg). MiraLAX was combined with 64 oz of Gatorade. All patients were surveyed regarding preparation satisfaction and tolerability. The Ottawa bowel preparation scale was used to grade colon cleanliness. GoLytely was more effective at bowel cleansing (average Ottawa score, 5.1) than MiraLAX alone (average Ottawa score, 6.9) or in combination with lubiprostone (average Ottawa score, 6.8), or bisacodyl (average Ottawa score, 6.3) (P<.001). MiraLAX was associated with a trend toward longer procedure duration (P=.096). Groups given MiraLAX rated the overall experience as more satisfactory than those given GoLytely (P<.001). There were no differences between polyp detection rates (P=.346) or adverse events (P=.823). Split-dose MiraLAX in 64 oz of Gatorade is not as effective as 4 L split-dose GoLytely in bowel cleansing for screening colonoscopies. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Resolving the extended atmosphere and the inner wind of Mira (o Ceti) with long ALMA baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. T.; Kamiński, T.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High angular resolution (sub)millimetre observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, now possible with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), allow direct imaging of these objects' photospheres. The physical properties of the molecular material around these regions, which until now has only been studied by imaging of maser emission and spatially unresolved absorption spectroscopy, can be probed with radiative transfer modelling and compared to hydrodynamical model predictions. The prototypical Mira variable, o Cet (Mira), was observed as a Science Verification target in the 2014 ALMA Long Baseline Campaign, offering the first opportunity to study these physical conditions in detail. Aims: With the longest baseline of 15 km, ALMA produces clearly resolved images of the continuum and molecular line emission/absorption at an angular resolution of ~30 mas at 220 GHz. Models are constructed for Mira's extended atmosphere to investigate the physics and molecular abundances therein. Methods: We imaged the data of 28SiO ν= 0, 2J = 5-4 and H2O v2 = 1JKa,Kc = 55,0-64,3 transitions and extracted spectra from various lines of sight towards Mira's extended atmosphere. In the course of imaging the emission/absorption, we encountered ambiguities in the resulting images and spectra that appear to be related to the performance of the CLEAN algorithm when applied to a combination of extended emission, and compact emission and absorption. We addressed these issues by a series of tests and simulations. We derived the gas density, kinetic temperature, molecular abundance, and outflow/infall velocities in Mira's extended atmosphere by modelling the SiO and H2O lines. Results: We resolve Mira's millimetre continuum emission and our data are consistent with a radio photosphere with a brightness temperature of 2611 ± 51 K. In agreement with recent results obtained with the Very Large Array, we do not confirm the existence of a compact region (<5 mas) of

  10. Effects of moderate abundance changes on the atmospheric structure and colours of Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.; Ireland, M. J.; Wood, P. R.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: We study the effects of moderate deviations from solar abundances upon the atmospheric structure and colours of typical Mira variables. Methods: We present two model series of dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables which have (1) 1/3 solar metallicity; and (2) "mild" S-type C/O abundance ratio ([C/O] = 0.9) with typical Zr enhancement (solar +1.0). These series are compared to a previously studied solar-abundance series which has similar fundamental parameters (mass, luminosity, period, radius) that are close to those of o Cet. Results: Both series show noticeable effects of abundance upon stratifications and infrared colours but cycle-to-cycle differences mask these effects at most pulsation phases, with the exception of a narrow-water-filter colour near minimum phase.

  11. GH Lib: A multi-periodic Mira, not an eclipsing binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviero, Alessandro; Munari, Ulisse; Righetti, Gian Luigi; Graziani, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    Over the period 2012-2016 we have obtained accurate V and R band photometry and 3400-8000 Ang spectroscopy which show the poorly studied variable GH Lib to be a multi-periodic Mira and not an Algol-type eclipsing binary. The main pulsation periods are 157 and 1180 days, with amplitudes of 3.5 and 1.0 mag, respectively. The spectral type change from M2III at maximum to M7III at minimum. The intensity of Halpha and Hbeta emission lines in GH Lib is much larger than in normal Miras, suggesting that the region of Balmer line formation is located at a larger radius (more external atmospheric layers) as if mixed with and not deeply below the region where absorption by TiO molecules occurs.

  12. Strong period decrease in the Mira star S Sex: a possible helium-shell flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchán Benítez, P.; Jurado Vargas, M.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of visual observations of the Mira-type variable star S Sex showed that the period of pulsation has decreased strongly since 1984 from 264.8 days to 249.4 days. The cycle length variations were tested by the method of contingency tables and by the span test, so that random or accumulative errors in the period variation were excluded. Our results are in good agreement with the theoretical models that suggest period decreases due to a flash in the helium-burning shell. The great rate of period change shown by S Sex suggests that this Mira star may now be in an immediate post primary helium-shell flash state.

  13. Near-Infrared and Visual Photometry of the Mira Variables V Tau and X AUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, G. D.

    1997-05-01

    We have been using a system of narrow-band, near-infrared filters to monitor changes in the infrared continuum magnitude and spectral type of several Mira variables (Rebel and Henson 1996, Bull. A.A.S., 28, 1399). Observations in V were added to the program at the beginning of 1997. We are now building simultaneous visual and near-infrared light curves with corresponding spectral type and color index variations. A comparison of the visual and infrared behavior will allow us to determine whether peculiarities in the visual light curves for these stars can be attributed to differential line blanketing effects or the phasing of temperature and diameter variations. Curves for a complete cycle of the short period Miras, V Tau and X Aur, are presented and the results discussed.

  14. Mira's Apparent Size Variations due to a Surrounding Semiopaque H2O Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.

    2004-08-01

    The variations in Mira's apparent size across the near- and mid-infrared are explained in terms of a single H2O shell surrounding the star. This simple model, consisting of a 2200 K H2O shell of column density 7×1019 cm-2 and radius 30.3 mas surrounding a 2700 K star of radius 12.8 mas, successfully reproduces a wide variety of interferometric and photometric observations that have been made near maximum phase.

  15. "Ask a slave" and interpreting race on public history's front line: interview with Azie Mira Dungey.

    PubMed

    Dungey, Azie Mira; Tyson, Amy M

    2014-02-01

    In this interview, Azie Mira Dungey (creator of the web series, "Ask a Slave") and Amy M. Tyson (Associate Professor of History at DePaul University and author of The Wages of History: Emotional Labor on Public History's Front Lines) discuss Dungey's web series, as well as her experiences as a living history interpreter at both the Smithsonian Museum of American History and at Mount Vernon.

  16. Diameters of Mira Stars Measured Simultaneously in the J, H, and K' Near-Infrared Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan-Gabet, R.; Pedretti, E.; Monnier, J. D.; Schloerb, F. P.; Traub, W. A.; Carleton, N. P.; Lacasse, M. G.; Segransan, D.

    2005-02-01

    We present the first spatially resolved observations of a sample of 23 Mira stars simultaneously measured in the near-infrared J, H, and K' bands. The technique used was optical long-baseline interferometry, and we present for each star visibility amplitude measurements as a function of wavelength. We also present characteristic sizes at each spectral band, obtained by fitting the measured visibilities to a simple uniform disk model. This approach reveals the general relation J diameter < H diameter < K' diameter.

  17. Circumstellar Dust Composition of M-type Mira Variables observed with phase with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Tina; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.

    2017-01-01

    Our research concerns the detailed dust composition surrounding Mira variables. These regular pulsators are easily observed in the optical and infrared due to their changes in brightness. Data on 25 galactic Miras were obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument in 2008-09 under a GO program led by Creech-Eakman. The stars were observed approximately once per month to track changes in their brightness and spectral features. This dataset is unique for both the number of observations of each star and the high SNR due to their intrinsic brightness.The stars in this study span the range of oxygen- to carbon-rich, with each type exhibiting certain known solid state components (i.e dust). The current focus is on trying to reproduce dust spectral features in the short, high (SH) and long, high (LH) resolution wavelength range (~9.7 - 40 microns) of the oxygen-rich Miras (C/O < 1). These high resolution, reduced spectra reveal a wonderful “forest” of features that provide insight into the stellar atmospheres and circumstellar dust composition with phase.Using the 1-D radiative transfer modeling code, DUSTY, we are attempting to identify several broad, and some sharp, dust features by including recently derived laboratory spectral indices for dust opacities. Prominent features seen in oxygen-rich Mira variables include potential identifications of water ice emission, as well as amorphous and crystalline silicates. We implement a greybody continuum obtained from MARCS, a 1-D hydrostatic spherical LTE model grid code, as the stellar continuum input for DUSTY. Using a greybody rather than a blackbody curve allows us to obtain a better agreement between the DUSTY spectrum and the Spitzer data. We will show these amended model fits that will improve the identification of the dust and other features in the spectra.

  18. 26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED TEST TRACK." Drawing No. 10-259. One inch to 400 feet plan of original 10,000-foot sled track. No date. No D.O. series number. No headings as above. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Resolving asymmetries along the pulsation cycle of the Mira star X Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, X.; Wittkowski, M.; Perrin, G.; Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Thiébaut, E.; Ridgway, S. T.; Ireland, M.; Scholz, M.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The mass-loss process in Mira stars probably occurs in an asymmetric way where dust can form in inhomogeneous circumstellar molecular clumps. Following asymmetries along the pulsation cycle can give us clues about these mass-loss processes. Aims: We imaged the Mira star X Hya and its environnement at different epochs to follow the evolution of the morphology in the continuum and in the molecular bands. Methods: We observed X Hya with AMBER in J-H-K at low resolution at two epochs. We modelled squared visibilities with geometrical and physical models. We also present imaging reconstruction results obtained with MiRA and based on the physical a priori images. Results: We report on the angular scale change of X Hya between the two epochs. 1D CODEX profiles allowed us to understand and model the spectral variation of squared visibilities and constrain the stellar parameters. Reconstructed model-dependent images enabled us to reproduce closure phase signals and the azimuthal dependence of squared visibilities. They show evidence for material inhomogeneities located in the immediate environment of the star. Based on observations obtained with the ESO VLTI/ATs telescopes under the program ID 084.D-0326. Figures 7-12 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. New Measurements of the Radio Photosphere of Mira Based on Data from the JVLA and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-07-01

    We present new measurements of the millimeter wavelength continuum emission from the long period variable Mira (o Ceti) at frequencies of 46, 96, and 229 GHz (λ ≈ 7, 3, and 1 mm) based on observations obtained with the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The measured millimeter flux densities are consistent with a radio photosphere model derived from previous observations, where flux density {S}ν \\propto {ν }1.86. The stellar disk is resolved, and the measurements indicate a decrease in the size of the radio photosphere at higher frequencies, as expected if the opacity decreases at shorter wavelengths. The shape of the radio photosphere is found to be slightly elongated, with a flattening of ˜10%-20%. The data also reveal evidence for brightness non-uniformities on the surface of Mira at radio wavelengths. Mira’s hot companion, Mira B was detected at all three observed wavelengths, and we measure a radius for its radio-emitting surface of ≈ 2.0× {10}13 cm. The data presented here highlight the power of the JVLA and ALMA for the study of the atmospheres of evolved stars.

  1. 1995 Edward teller lecture. Patience and optimism

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1996-05-01

    Remarks made in the author{close_quote}s acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. {open_quote}{open_quote}Patience{close_quote}{close_quote} and {open_quote}{open_quote}optimism{close_quote}{close_quote} are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the {open_quote}{open_quote}zig-zag{close_quote}{close_quote} path to fusion energy production. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Landing - STS-4 - Edwards AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-07-06

    S82-33226 (4 July 1982) --- Inveterate space fan Roy Rogers with astronauts Jerry L. Ross, left, and Guy S. Gardner at Edwards Air Force Base for the landing of the space shuttle Columbia at the conclusion of the STS-4 mission on July 4, 1982. Ross and Gardner piloted chase planes involved in the approach and landing operations for the flight?s conclusion. Also present at the landing was (near far right) former astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot for the historic first moon landing of almost 13 years ago. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Twin trisomies-Edward and Patau syndromes.

    PubMed

    Massiah, Nadine; Griffiths, Emma; Bamigboye, Vincent

    2008-11-01

    To report the rare occurrence of dichorionic diamniotic twins with dissimilar aneuploidies. Case report. District general hospital. A 36-year-old woman conceived by in vitro fertilization. Dichorionic diamniotic twins were found to have elevated nuchal translucencies and cystic hygromas. Intrauterine deaths occurred at 13 and 17 weeks gestation. Medical termination of pregnancy. Karyotypes. Cytogenetic studies confirmed Edward's and Patau's syndromes. The aetiology is unknown but maternal age and in vitro fertilization may be linked since the incidence of aneuploidy rises with maternal age and the incidence of twins' increases with assisted reproductive techniques. This case highlights the need for obstetricians to have good communication and counselling skills.

  4. Landing - STS-2 - Edwards AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-11-16

    S81-39564 (14 Nov. 1981) --- This view of the space shuttle Columbia (STS-2) was made with a hand-held 70mm camera in the rear station of the T-38 chase plane. Mission specialist/astronaut Kathryn D. Sullivan exposed the frame as astronauts Joe N. Engle and Richard H. Truly aboard the Columbia guided the vehicle to an unpowered but smooth landing on the desert area of Edwards Air Force base in California. The picture provides a good view of the underside of the returning spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA

  5. STS-66 Edwards Landing with Drag Chute

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-11-14

    The space shuttle Atlantis lands with its drag chute deployed on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather.

  6. Ethical reflections on Edward Jenner's experimental treatment

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    In 1798 Dr Edward Jenner published his famous account of “vaccination”. Some claim that a Research Ethics Committee, had it existed in the 1790s, might have rejected his work. I provide the historical context of his work and argue that it addressed a major risk to the health of the community, and, given the devastating nature of smallpox and the significant risk of variolation, the only alternative preventative measure, Jenner's study had purpose, justification and a base in the practice of the day. PMID:17329392

  7. Edward P. Ney (1920-1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Tom

    On July 9, 1996, Edward P. Ney, whose research spanned many disciplines across physics, astronomy, and geophysics, succumbed to a long battle with congestive heart disease at his home in Minneapolis at the age of 75.Ney was a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was regents' professor emeritus of physics and astronomy at the University of Minnesota, where he had been a member of the faculty since 1947. Although he retired from teaching in 1990, Ney remained active in research until his death.

  8. Extravehicular - Astronaut Edward H. White II

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-30202 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot on the Gemini-Titan IV (GT-4) spaceflight, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. His face is covered by a shaded visor to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun. White became the first American astronaut to walk in space. He remained outside the spacecraft for 21 minutes during the third revolution of the Gemini IV mission. He wears a specially designed spacesuit for the EVA. He?s holding the Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU), with which he controlled his movements while in space, and a camera is attached to the HHSMU. He was attached to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped together with gold tape to form one cord. He wears an emergency oxygen supply check pack. Astronaut James A. McDivitt is command pilot for the GT-4 mission. The mission was a four-day, 62-revolution flight, during which McDivitt and White performed a series of scientific and engineering experiments. (This image is black and white) Photo credit: NASA EDITOR?S NOTE: Astronaut Edward H. White II died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on Jan. 27, 1967.

  9. Robert Edwards: the path to IVF.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Martin H

    2011-08-01

    The early influences on Robert Edwards’ approach to the scientific research that led to human IVF are described. His interest as a graduate student in the genetics of early mammalian development stimulated him later to investigate whether the origins of human genetic diseases such as Down, Klinefelter and Turner syndromes might be explained by events during egg maturation. This clinical problem provided the most powerful stimulus to achieve both oocyte maturation and fertilization in vitro in humans. Indeed,preimplantation genetic diagnosis was his main goal until he met Patrick Steptoe in 1968. A re-evaluation of his meeting with Steptoe suggests that initially Steptoe’s laparoscopic skill was of interest for its potential to solve the sperm capacitation problem. Steptoe’simpact on Edwards was twofold. First, Steptoe’s long-held interest in infertility raised this application of IVF higher in Edwards’priorities. Second, Steptoe offered a long-term partnership, in which oocyte collection without in-vitro maturation was a possibility.The professional criticism generated by their work together encouraged Edwards to pursue a deliberate programme of public education about the issues raised and to challenge and develop professional bioethical thought and discourse about reproduction.

  10. Are anticoagulant independent mechanical valves within reach—fast prototype fabrication and in vitro testing of innovative bi-leaflet valve models

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    Background Exploration for causes of prosthetic valve thrombogenicity has frequently focused on forward or post-closure flow detail. In prior laboratory studies, we uncovered high amplitude flow velocities of short duration close to valve closure implying potential for substantial shear stress with subsequent initiation of blood coagulation pathways. This may be relevant to widely accepted clinical disparity between mechanical and tissue valves vis-à-vis thrombogenicity. With a series of prototype bi-leaflet mechanical valves, we attempt reduction of closure related velocities with the objective of identifying a prototype valve with thrombogenic potential similar to our tissue valve control. This iterative design approach may find application in preclinical assessment of valves for anticoagulation independence. Methods Tested valves included: prototype mechanical bi-leaflet BVs (n=56), controls (n=2) and patented early prototype mechanicals (n=2) from other investigators. Pulsatile and quasi-steady flow systems were used for testing. Projected dynamic valve area (PDVA) was measured using previously described novel technology. Flow velocity over the open and closing periods was determined by volumetric flow rate/PDVA. For the closed valve interval, use was made of data obtained from quasi-steady back pressure/flow tests. Performance was ranked by a proposed thrombogenicity potential index (TPI) relative to tissue and mechanical control valves. Results Optimization of the prototype valve designs lead to a 3-D printed model (BV3D). For the mitral/aortic site, BV3D has lower TPI (1.10/1.47) relative to the control mechanical valve (3.44/3.93) and similar to the control tissue valve (ideal TPI ≤1.0). Conclusions Using unique technology, rapid prototyping and thrombogenicity ranking, optimization of experimental valves for reduced thrombogenic potential was expedited and simplified. Innovative mechanical valve configurations were identified that merit consideration

  11. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography,…

  12. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography are presented here.

  13. X-48C Flies Over Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-28

    A deep blue sky was a backdrop for the NASA-Boeing X-48C Hybrid Wing Body aircraft as it flew over Edwards AFB on Feb. 28, 2013, during a test flight from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA.

  14. 76 FR 76710 - Baine, Edward H.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... [Federal Register Volume 76, Number 236 (Thursday, December 8, 2011)] [Notices] [Pages 76710-76711] [FR Doc No: 2011-31511] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ID-6541-001] Baine, Edward H.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 1, 2011, Edward H. Baine...

  15. Edward F. Diener: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents Edward F. Diener as one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions (2012). Edward F. Diener has been a leader in every aspect of well-being research. He provided an influential conception of well-being as consisting of cognitive and emotional elements. A citation, biography,…

  16. Efficacy of Edwards' Cognitive Shift Approach to Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine A.; Hartl, Alan J.

    1987-01-01

    Noting the lack of experimental evidence substantiating the efficacy of educational strategies designed to exploit the right hemisphere of the brain, a study was designed to assess the cognitive shift model of the Edwards' training procedure. Results showed no difference between the Edwards' procedure and a placebo procedure. Implications for the…

  17. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Mid-IR/Far-IR Dust Emissions of the Symbiotic Mira, V* R Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelian, Eric B.; Sankrit, Ravi; Helton, L. Andrew; Gorti, Uma; Wagner, R. Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present RADMC-3D models of the symbiotic system V* R Aqr, which consists of a Mira variable and white dwarf. Thermal radiative transfer modeling is performed using RADMC-3D to characterize the mid-IR/far-IR Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of the system at two different phases of the visible light curve. Near maximum visible light (Mira phase of 1.0), we utilize the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Short Wave Spectrometer/Long Wave Spectrometer observations (2.3 - 197 mu-m) and contrast them to the recently obtained near minimum visible light (~0.4 Mira phase) observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)/Faint Object infraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) (6.4 - 37.1 mu-m). Initial spectra and photometry from the SOFIA/FORCAST observations of the central Mira indicate that flux values are about 50% of that measured by the ISO SWS/LWS observations. Dust models utilizing a spherical shell and amorphous silicates are used to generate synthetic SEDs, which are compared with the ISO and FORCAST observations in order to constrain the properties of the shell (such as its dust mass and temperature) at different phases of the Mira variability. Our proposed monitoring of the V* R Aqr system will establish a characterization baseline of the SEDs as the system approaches its upcoming eclipse and periastron passage.

  18. STS-29 Landing Approach at Edwards

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-03-18

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission approaches for a landing at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli.

  19. Edward jenner and the small pox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kendall A

    2011-01-01

    Edward Jenner, who discovered that it is possible to vaccinate against Small Pox using material from Cow Pox, is rightly the man who started the science of immunology. However, over the passage of time many of the details surrounding his astounding discovery have been lost or forgotten. Also, the environment within which Jenner worked as a physician in the countryside, and the state of the art of medicine and society are difficult to appreciate today. It is important to recall that people were still being bled at the time, to relieve the presence of evil humors. Accordingly, this review details Jenner's discovery and attempts to place it in historical context. Also, the vaccine that Jenner used, which decreased the prevalence of Small Pox worldwide in his own time, and later was used to eradicate Small Pox altogether, is discussed in light of recent data.

  20. Edward Jenner and the Small Pox Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A.

    2011-01-01

    Edward Jenner, who discovered that it is possible to vaccinate against Small Pox using material from Cow Pox, is rightly the man who started the science of immunology. However, over the passage of time many of the details surrounding his astounding discovery have been lost or forgotten. Also, the environment within which Jenner worked as a physician in the countryside, and the state of the art of medicine and society are difficult to appreciate today. It is important to recall that people were still being bled at the time, to relieve the presence of evil humors. Accordingly, this review details Jenner’s discovery and attempts to place it in historical context. Also, the vaccine that Jenner used, which decreased the prevalence of Small Pox worldwide in his own time, and later was used to eradicate Small Pox altogether, is discussed in light of recent data. PMID:22566811

  1. Edward o. Wilson and the organicist tradition.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Abraham H

    2013-01-01

    Edward O. Wilson's recent decision to abandon kin selection theory has sent shockwaves throughout the biological sciences. Over the past two years, more than a hundred biologists have signed letters protesting his reversal. Making sense of Wilson's decision and the controversy it has spawned requires familiarity with the historical record. This entails not only examining the conditions under which kin selection theory first emerged, but also the organicist tradition against which it rebelled. In similar fashion, one must not only examine Wilson's long career, but also those thinkers who influenced him most, especially his intellectual grandfather, William Morton Wheeler (1865-1937). Wilson belongs to a long line of organicists, biologists whose research highlighted integration and coordination, many of whom struggled over the exact same biological riddles that have long defined Wilson's career. Drawing inspiration (and sometimes ideas) from these intellectual forebears, Wilson is confident that he has finally identified the origin of the social impulse.

  2. Landing - STS-2 - Edwards AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-11-16

    S81-39563 (14 Nov. 1981) --- This view of the space shuttle Columbia (STS-2) was made with a hand-held 70mm camera in the rear station of the T-38 chase plane. Mission specialist/astronaut Kathryn D. Sullivan exposed the frame as astronauts Joe N. Engle and Richard H. Truly aboard the Columbia guided the vehicle to an unpowered but smooth landing on the desert area of Edwards Air Force base in California. The view provides a good study of the high temperature protection material on the underside of the spacecraft which is exposed to the friction on the atmospheric entry on the return to Earth. Also note trails from the wing tips. Photo credit: NASA

  3. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Edward T. Lu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Lu became interested in the space program, the events that led to his interest, the transition from an engineer to research scientist, and finally to getting selected into the astronaut program. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the STS-106 mission, its scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS), making the Zvezda Service Module ready for entrance, and crew training both in the United States and Russia. Lu mentions his responsibilities during the much-anticipated docking as well as his scheduled space-walk with Yuri Ivanovich Malenchenko. Lu also discusses the use of the Robotic Arm during his space-walk, installation of a magnetometer on the Zvezda Module, and work that will have to take place inside the Service Module.

  4. Comparison of dynamical model atmospheres of Mira variables with mid-infrared interferometric and spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2006-02-01

    We present a comparison of dynamical model atmospheres with mid-infrared (~11 μm) interferometric and spectroscopic observations of the Mira variable o Cet. The dynamical model atmospheres of Mira variables pulsating in the fundamental mode can fairly explain, without assuming ad-hoc components, the seemingly contradictory mid-infrared spectroscopic and interferometric observations of o Cet: the 11 μm sizes measured in the bandpass without any salient spectral features are about twice as large as those measured in the near-infrared. Our calculations of synthetic spectra show that the strong absorption due to a number of optically thick H2O lines is filled in by the emission of these H2O lines originating in the geometrically extended layers, providing a possible physical explanation for the picture proposed by Ohnaka (2004a) based on a semi-empirical modeling. This filling-in effect results in rather featureless, continuum-like spectra in rough agreement with the observed high-resolution 11 μm spectra, although the models still predict the H2O lines to be more pronounced than the observations. The inverse P-Cyg profiles of some strong H2O lines observed in the 11 μm spectra can also be reasonably reproduced by our dynamical model atmospheres. The presence of the extended H2O layers manifests itself as mid-infrared angular diameters much larger than the continuum diameter. The 11 μm uniform-disk diameters predicted by our dynamical model atmospheres are in fair agreement with those observed with the Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI), but still somewhat smaller than the observed diameters. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy and problems with the current dynamical model atmospheres of Mira variables.

  5. Results from the Astronomy Diagnostic Test: 3 Years at MiraCosta College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbaugh French, Rica

    2007-12-01

    The Astronomy Diagnostic Test 2.0 (ADT) was administered to 26 sections of ASTR 101 at MiraCosta College (MCC) from fall 2004 through summer 2007. MiraCosta is a two-year community college located in Oceanside, CA, USA (roughly 40 miles north of San Diego) with an enrollment of approximately 11,000 students. ASTR 101 is MiraCosta's introductory astronomy survey course for non-science majors and has no math prerequisite. Class sizes ranged from 10 to 38 students. Comparison with the ADT National Project results indicates similar pre- and post-course averages: 31.8% (MCC) vs. 32.4% (National) for pre-course tests and 49.3% (MCC) vs. 47.3% (National) for post-course tests. The sample sizes are 709 and 530 students for the pre- and post-tests, respectively. The normalized gain for the entire data set is 0.256 and the effect size (ES) is 1.04, meaning that approximately 85% of the post-test scores are above the average of the pre-test scores. Previous studies have shown the ADT to be a reliable indicator of pre-course misconceptions while post-course scores are useful for comparing modes of instruction and assessing student learning on a limited number of concepts. Additional analyses of the MCC data probe for trends with variables such as gender, class size, and implementation of materials designed for a more "learner-centered” approach (such as Lecture Tutorials, Ranking Tasks, and Think-Pair-Share questions), as well as gains for a particular subset of concepts.

  6. High-Dispersion UV Spectroscopy of Mira Variables with HST/GHRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttermoser, D. G.; Mahar, S.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the first set of UV spectra taken of Mira stars under high dispersion with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Two spectral regions were observed, 2320 Angstroms -- 2368 Angstroms to record the C II] (UV0.01) multiplet and 2785 Angstroms -- 2835 Angstroms to obtain the Mg II h & k lines, for two Mira variables stars: R Hya, taken on 9 July 1996 (phase 0.26), and R Leo, taken on 14 January 1997 (phase 0.12). The R Hya Mg II spectrum is very clean and shows overlying absorption from Fe I (UV3) and Mn I (UV1) over the k line. The fluoresced Fe I (UV44) feature at 2824 Angstroms is plainly visible in this spectrum, whereas past IUE observations at high dispersion were unable to record this feature. Remarkably, the newly identified fluoresced Fe I (UV45) feature near 2807 Angstroms feature is seen in this spectrum. Until now, this line has only been seen in cool carbon stars with HST/GHRS. It is remarkable in that it is pumped by the thin C II] (UV0.01) emission line at 2325.5 Angstroms in the carbon stars. This line is the likely pump in the oxygen-rich Miras in our sample as well. Two of the strongest C II] (UV0.01) near 2325 Angstroms are barely detectable in our spectrum. This region of the spectrum is dominated by weak Si II] (UV0.01) near 2335 Angstroms, opposite to what is observed in the carbon stars. Very weak Mg II lines are seen in the R Leo spectrum at phase 0.12. At this phase, these lines are typically absent in IUE spectra. This work is supported by NASA/STSCI grant GO-06620.01-95A. Ms. Mahar is an undergraduate student at East Tennessee State University who is assisting in the data analysis.

  7. A First Look At The Circumstellar Dust Of M-Type Mira Variables Observed With Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Tina; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.

    2016-09-01

    Our research is on the dust composition surrounding Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. In particular, the AGB star sub-group called Mira variables. These regular pulsators are easily observed in the optical and infrared due to their changes in brightness. Data on 25 Galactic Miras were obtained with the IRS instrument on Spitzer Space Telescope in 2008-09. The stars were observed once per month to monitor changes in their brightness and spectral features. This dataset is unique, not only for the number of observations of each star, but also because of the high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) due to the intrinsic brightness of the targets. By taking quick exposure times while sampling the data, the saturation of the detectors was avoided. The current focus of our research is on the high resolution data observed in the mid-infrared wavelength range ( 9 - 40 microns). The reduced spectra reveal a wonderful forest of features which provide insight into the stellar atmosphere and circumstellar dust composition. The stars in our sample can be categorized into either oxygen- or carbon-rich stars, with each type exhibiting certain known solid state components (i.e. dust). Preliminary study of the oxygen-rich dust composition shows the primary known features, such as broad silicate emission and aluminum oxide (Al2O3). Additional broad, and some sharp, dust features are currently being identified using the radiative transfer modeling code, DUSTY, along with recently derived laboratory spectral indexes for dust. Initial identifications of prominent dust features seen in oxygen-rich Miras include potential contributions from water emission, as well as crystalline and amorphous silicates, and possibly corundum. Preliminary results for a sub-sample of the set is presented here.

  8. Search for surface magnetic fields in Mira stars. First detection in χ Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lèbre, A.; Aurière, M.; Fabas, N.; Gillet, D.; Herpin, F.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Petit, P.

    2014-01-01

    Context. So far, surface magnetic fields have never been detected on Mira stars. Only recently have the spectropolarimetric capabilities of measuring it via the Zeeman effect become available to us. Then, to complete the knowledge of the magnetic field and of its influence during the transition from asymptotic giant branch to planetary nebulae stages, we have undertaken a search for magnetic fields on the surface of Mira stars. Aims: Our main goal is to constrain - at this stage of stellar evolution - the surface magnetic field (presence and strength) and to define the magnetic field strength dependence along the radial distance to the star, above the photosphere and across the circumstellar envelope of cool and evolved stars. Methods: We used spectropolarimetric observations (Stokes V spectra probing circular polarization), collected with the Narval instrument at TBL, in order to detect - with the least squares deconvolution (LSD) method - a Zeeman signature in the visible part of the spectrum. Results: We present the first spectropolarimetric observations of the S-type Mira star χ Cyg, performed around its maximum light. We detected a polarimetric signal in the Stokes V spectra and established its Zeeman origin. We claim that it is likely to be related to a weak magnetic field present at the photospheric level and in the lower part of the stellar atmosphere. We estimated the strength of its longitudinal component to about 2-3 gauss. This result favors a 1/r law for the variation in the magnetic field strength across the circumstellar envelope of χ Cyg. This is the first detection of a weak magnetic field on the stellar surface of a Mira star, and we discuss its origin in the framework of shock waves periodically propagating throughout the atmosphere of these radially pulsating stars. Conclusions: At the date of our observations of χ Cyg, the shock wave reaches its maximum intensity, and it is likely that the shock amplifies a weak stellar magnetic field during

  9. Untersuchung der Mira-Sterne RT Boo, TV Peg und VX Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, Kerstin; Berthold, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The light-change of the Mira stars RT Boo, TV Peg and VX Aur was analyzed on three ways for a long time. In the first period I estimated the brightness of the variables on sky monitoring photo plates (red spectral range) from Sonneberg Observatory with Argelander¥s Method, in the last years I measured scanned photo plates with a photometry program and in addition I used visual observations from A.A.V.S.O. for the analysis. The behavior of the periods of the tree stars from 1965 to 2013 is described here.

  10. Mira and SR type variable stars from the ROTSE-IIID archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucsav, B.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    Applications of machine-learned algorithms in the field of variable classification have been popular as they are simple to implement and performing as well. A few years back, a small MPI application developed as the core of a variable detection pipeline for the ROTSE-IIID robotic telescope archive. Now it has been extended to involve the parallel approach for machine learned classification specifically for the long-term variables like Mira and Semi-regular variables. This presentation mainly covers the efforts to put the methodology in reality.

  11. Secular variations of the photometric parameters of Mira Ceti variables and semiregular variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsakova, V. I.

    2014-06-01

    The photometric properties of long-period variable stars and problems related to their traditional classification are analyzed. A general review of secular variations of such light-curve parameters studied in our previous papers as the period, amplitude, and mean brightness is given. Several types of Mira Ceti stars that differ in the secular period variation pattern are identified. A connection between the secular amplitude variations of certain variables with the effect of multiperiodicity is revealed. It is shown that the pattern of these variations and their numerical properties may be used to classify these variable stars.

  12. Oxygen-rich Mira variables: Near-infrared luminosity calibrations. Populations and period-luminosity relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, R.; Mennessier, M.-O.; Barthes, D.; Luri, X.; Mattei, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Hipparcos astrometric and kinematical data of oxygen-rich Mira variables are used to calibrate absolute near-infrared magnitudes and kinematic parameters. Three distinct classes of stars with different kinematics and scale heights were identified. The two most significant groups present characteristics close to those usually assigned to extended/thick disk-halo populations and old disk populations, respectively, and thus they may differ by their metallicity abundance. Two parallel period-luminosity relations are found, one for each population. The shift between these relations is interpreted as the consequence of the effects of metallicity abundance on the luminosity.

  13. Fault Attacks against the Miller's Algorithm in Edwards Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mrabet, Nadia

    Initially, the use of pairings did not involve any secret entry. However in an Identity Based Cryptographic protocol, one of the two entries of the pairing is secret, so fault attack can be applied to Pairing Based Cryptography to find it. In [18], the author shows that Pairing Based Cryptography in Weierstrass coordinates is vulnerable to a fault attack. The addition law in Edwards coordinates is such that the exponentiation in Edwards coordinates is naturally protected to Side Channel attacks. We study here if this property protects Pairing Based Cryptography in Edwards coordinates against fault attacks.

  14. Annual parallax and a dimming event of a Mira variable star, FV Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    We present the first measurement of the trigonometric parallax of water masers associated with a Mira star, FV Bootis (FV Boo) using VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). Based on our multi-epoch VERA observations, we derived the parallax to be 0.97 ± 0.06 mas, which corresponds to a distance of 1.03^{+0.07}_{-0.06} kpc. The water masers around FV Boo were spatially distributed over an area of 41 au × 41 au, and their internal motions indicate the presence of an outflow. Using the Kagoshima University 1 m optical/infrared telescope, we determined the period to be 305.6 d and the mean apparent magnitude to be +2.91 mag in the K'-band. On the period-luminosity plane, the obtained period and K'-band magnitude puts FV Boo slightly below the sequence of Miras, possibly due to circumstellar reddening. Combining our photometric data with COBE and 2MASS datasets spanning over 20 years, we found in the near infrared that FV Boo was significantly fainter in 2005 compared with preceding and later phases. Its color, however, did not show a large variation through this change. We infer that the dimming could be caused by an eclipse due to a cloud in a binary system.

  15. Blinded By The Lines: Mid-IR Spectra Of Mira Variables Taken With Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylis-Aguirre, Dana; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Luttermoser, Donald G.; Güth, Tina

    2016-08-01

    We present preliminary analysis of mid-infrared spectra of M-type and C-type Mira variables. Due to the brightness of this sample, it is straightforward to monitor changes with phase in the infrared spectral features of these regular pulsators. We have spectra of 25 Mira variables, taken with phase, using the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) high-resolution module. Each star has multiple spectra obtained over a one-year period from 2008-09. This is a rich, unique data set due to multiple observations of each star and the high signal-to-noise ratio from quick exposure times to prevent saturation of the IRS instrument. This paper focuses on the 17.6 and 33.2 micron lines shared by M-types and C-types. These are mostly emission lines that change with phase. We discuss preliminary physical diagnostics for the atmospheres based on the lines, as well as possible line identifications such as fluorescence of metal species.

  16. High-angular-resolution stellar imaging with occultations from the Cassini spacecraft - III. Mira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of spectral and spatial data of Mira obtained by the Cassini spacecraft, which not only observed the star's spectra over a broad range of near-infrared wavelengths, but was also able to obtain high-resolution spatial information by watching the star pass behind Saturn's rings. The observed spectral range of 1-5 microns reveals the stellar atmosphere in the crucial water-bands which are unavailable to terrestrial observers, and the simultaneous spatial sampling allows the origin of spectral features to be located in the stellar environment. Models are fitted to the data, revealing the spectral and spatial structure of molecular layers surrounding the star. High-resolution imagery is recovered revealing the layered and asymmetric nature of the stellar atmosphere. The observational data set is also used to confront the state-of-the-art cool opacity-sampling dynamic extended atmosphere models of Mira variables through a detailed spectral and spatial comparison, revealing in general a good agreement with some specific departures corresponding to particular spectral features.

  17. Three-Color, Narrow-Band, Near-Infrared Photometry of Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebel, B.; Henson, G.

    1996-12-01

    The calibration of a photometric system used to detect spectral type changes of M-type stars is described. The system consists of three filters used to measure an index of TiO band strength, a color index, and an infrared continuum magnitude as described by Wing (1992, J.AAVSO, 21, 47). A plot of TiO index versus spectral type shows the system to be sensitive to spectral changes of approximately 1/2 subtype over the range of M1 to M7. The system will be used to provide coarse spectral information to supplement the infrared and visual light curves of M-type variables. We have established absolute magnitudes in all three filters for a set of 10 standard stars and have begun synoptic observations of Mira variable stars. Light curves with corresponding spectral type and color changes will be presented for six Mira stars: Z Oph, T Her, W Lyr, RT Cyg, CN Cyg, and R Vul.

  18. Period Estimation for Sparsely-sampled Quasi-periodic Light Curves Applied to Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shiyuan; Yuan, Wenlong; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Long, James; Macri, Lucas M.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a nonlinear semi-parametric Gaussian process model to estimate periods of Miras with sparsely sampled light curves. The model uses a sinusoidal basis for the periodic variation and a Gaussian process for the stochastic changes. We use maximum likelihood to estimate the period and the parameters of the Gaussian process, while integrating out the effects of other nuisance parameters in the model with respect to a suitable prior distribution obtained from earlier studies. Since the likelihood is highly multimodal for period, we implement a hybrid method that applies the quasi-Newton algorithm for Gaussian process parameters and search the period/frequency parameter space over a dense grid. A large-scale, high-fidelity simulation is conducted to mimic the sampling quality of Mira light curves obtained by the M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. The simulated data set is publicly available and can serve as a testbed for future evaluation of different period estimation methods. The semi-parametric model outperforms an existing algorithm on this simulated test data set as measured by period recovery rate and quality of the resulting period-luminosity relations.

  19. Edward Teller Medal: Laudations and Citations 2005-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Max Tabak * Joseph D. Kilkenny * Kunioki Mima * Brian R. Thomas * Ricardo Betti * Edward I. Moses * Christine Garban-Labaune * Bruce A. Remington * James Hammer * Richard Petrasso * Jie Zhang * Hiroshi Azechi

  20. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUILDING 8767, SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. MOTION PICTURE CAMERA STAND AT BUILDING 8768. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. BUILDING 8769, WEST FRONT AND SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BUILDING 8768, NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SOUTH REAR, SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking north from deck. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of Illustration from Buffet, Edward P., 'Some Long Island Windmills,' American Machinist, 17 October 1918, p. 728 STONE CRANE AT THE SHELTER ISLAND WINDMILL - Shelter Island Windmill, Manwaring Road, Shelter Island, Suffolk County, NY

  10. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  11. SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Fuel & Water Tank, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of lithograph by Edward A. Wilson, owned by Mrs. Arthur Williams, owner of the house in 1960. JOSHUA DYER HOUSE FROM THE REAR - Joshua Dyer House, North Pamet Road, Truro, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 7. INTERIOR, STEEL BLAST DOORS, INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR, STEEL BLAST DOORS, INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-4, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 5. NORTHEAST CORNER. View to southwest from below. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTHEAST CORNER. View to southwest from below. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 1. NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Looking east. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST SIDE AND SOUTHWEST FRONT. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. January, 1998 Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH FRONT AND EAST SIDE. January, 1998 - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Electrical Substation, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Edward R. Chapin, Photographer. Copied ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Edward R. Chapin, Photographer. Copied by Frank O. Branzetti. Feb. 8, 1934 (b) EXT.-COACH HOUSE - Stephen Salisbury Mansion (second), Worcester, Worcester County, MA

  18. STS-92 - Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-24

    With its drag parachute deployed to help slow it down, the Space Shuttle Discovery rolls down the runway after landing at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California at the conclusion of mission STS-92 on October 24, 2000.

  19. 16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of illustration from Rattray, Jeannette Edwards, Gardiner's Island, East Hampton, 1958; Photograph by Morton Pennypacker of painting MANOR HOUSE, GARDINER'S ISLAND, 1639 - Gardiner's Island Windmill, Napeague, Suffolk County, NY

  20. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. NORTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, BUILDING 1933 Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST FRONT AND SOUTHWEST SIDE, BUILDING 1933 - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Observation Bunker Types, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. EPA Seeks Public Input on Modified Training at Camp Edwards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BOSTON - EPA is seeking public comment on a proposed agreement to allow the Massachusetts Army National Guard to train with a Percussion Activated Neutralizer at the Camp Edwards portion of Joint Base Cape Cod (JBCC).

  3. EPA Seeks Public Input on Modified Training at Camp Edwards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is seeking public comment on a proposed agreement to allow the Massachusetts Army National Guard to train with a Percussion Activated Neutralizer at the Camp Edwards portion of Joint Base Cape Cod.

  4. 5Q4: Chris Edwards - Child Presence Sensor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Five Questions For (5Q4) Chris Edwards, NASA engineer who was the team lead of a group that invented a child presence sensor designed to alert parents if they've inadvertently left their child in h...

  5. 3. SOUTH SIDE. Edwards Air Force Base, South Base ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Edward Mills Purcell, August 30, 1912-March 7, 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigden, John S.

    2011-03-01

    I discuss the life, education, personality, and contributions of Edward Mills Purcell (1912-1997) to physics, radio astronomy, astrophysics, biological physics, physics teaching and education, and to the nation.

  9. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  10. Episodic karstification, Edwards Plateau, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kastning, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Edwards Plateau and Llano Basin of central Texas form one of the largest contiguous regions of karst in North America (>80,000 km/sup 2/). Solutional phenomena show that several major episodes of karstification are documentable from late Cambrian to Holocene. Relict landforms representing intervals of solutional activity correlate well with the accepted geomorphic chronology for central Texas. Secondary porosity are vertically controlled by lithology, topographic incision of streams, position of the potentiometric surface, and attitude of bedding. Areally, development of karst is strongly influenced by the extent, density, and orientation of fractures and by hydrodynamic characteristics such as points of recharge and discharge, degree of integration of groundwater flow paths, and hydraulic gradients. Early episodes of karstification correspond to intervals of subaerial exposure of carbonate rocks during marine regression or following regional uplift. Paleokarst is prevalent in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences. Infilled dolines and solution-collapse breccias have been exhumed by extensive regional denudation during the Cenozoic Era. Subaerial conditions during the middle Cretaceous account for infilled solutional cavities within lower Cretaceous carbonate beds. The most extensive karstification began with regional uplift in the early Miocene. Enhanced relief along the Balcones escarpment promoted incision of streams, lowering of water tables, steepened hydraulic gradients, and increases in discharge. Caves at various-elevations attest to sequential dissection of the plateau during the late Quaternary.

  11. The ironic detachment of Edward Gibbon.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Harry

    2009-06-01

    Edward Gibbon, the author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, has been widely recognized as a master of irony. The historian's early life with parents he found self-serving and unreliable, his reaction to the events surrounding the death of his mother at the age of 9 and the decline of his father, left an impact on his personality and played a role in determining his choice of his life work. Irony has been approached from a psychoanalytic perspective as a mode of communication, as a stylistic device, as a modality through which one might view reality and as a way of uncovering the linkage between pretense and aspiration, between the apparent and the real. Gibbon's ironic detachment can be understood as rooted in his life history. He felt detached from his family of origin, in need of a protective device which would enable him to deal with passion. Sexual and aggressive impulses mobilized defensive postures that were later transformed into an attitude of skepticism and an interest in undercutting false beliefs and irrational authority, positions he attributes to religious ideation which served to instigate historical decline.

  12. Edward Teller Medal: Acceptance Remarks (lirpp Vol. 10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuckolls, John H.

    2016-10-01

    I am honored to receive this award. It is especially significant because Edward Teller is the father of inertial fusion. Teller's pioneering work in the extreme compressibility of matter, the radiation implosion concept, and the physics of thermonuclear burn are fundamental to the creation of very small scale inertially confined fusion explosions. Edward also made key contributions by fighting to reduce secrecy and by promoting international collaborations...

  13. Malfunctioning Starr-Edwards mitral valve 21 years after installation.

    PubMed

    Sakata, K; Ishikawa, S; Ohtaki, A; Otani, Y; Suzuki, M; Kawashima, O; Morishita, Y

    1997-02-01

    Two cases of malfunctioning Starr-Edwards cloth-covered mitral valve prostheses requiring reoperation are presented. Both cases underwent successful surgical repair 21 years after the valve replacement. The causes were a disturbance of the poppet during the opening movement due to excessive tissue ingrowth and a paravalvular leak associated with a tear of the valve seat. Replacement of the Starr-Edwards valve prosthesis more than 20 years after the initial installation has not been reported.

  14. Spectral variations of the symbiotic star V407 Cygni around light maximum of the secondary Mira variable in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, T.; Naito, H.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The outburst of the symbiotic recurrent nova V407 Cyg in 2010 has been studied by numerous authors. On the other hand, its spectral variations in the quiescent stage have not been well studied yet. This paper is probably the first report for the relation between the pulsation of the secondary Mira variable and the temperature of the primary hot component for V407 Cyg. Aims: The spectral variation in the post-outburst stage has been monitored to study the properties of this object. In the course of this work, we found some unexpected spectral variations around the light maximum of the secondary Mira variable in 2012. The relation between the mass transfer in the binary system and the pulsation of the secondary Mira variable is studied. Methods: High- and low-resolution optical spectra obtained at the Astronomical Observatories at Asiago were used. The photometric data depend on the database of the VSNET. Results: The secondary Mira variable reached its light maximum in 2012, when an absorption spectrum of a late-M-type giant developed and the emission line of Hδ became stronger than those of Hβ and Hγ, which are typical spectral features of Mira variables at light maxima. On the other hand, intensity ratios to Hβ of the emission lines of He I, He II, [Fe VII], etc., which obviously depended on the temperature of the hot component, rapidly varied around the light maximum. The intensity ratios started to decrease at phase about 0.9 of the periodical light variation of the Mira variable. This phenomenon suggests that the mass transfer rate, as well as the mass accretion rate onto the hot component, decreased according to the contraction of the Mira variable. However, these intensity ratios somewhat recovered just on the light maximum: phase 0.99. There might have occurred a temporal mass loss from the Mira variable at that time. The intensity ratios decreased again after the light maximum, then recovered and returned to the normal level at phase about 0

  15. Dynamical Models of Mira Atmospheres: Shocks, Limb Functions, and MG II Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Thomas Eugene

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic atmosphere models of Mira-type stars, prepared using a code developed by G. H. Bowen, were analyzed to determine observational implications of the models and suggest improvements to the code and model parameters. Three specific areas were addressed: Shock morphology, limb functions, and Mg II emission. The long-period, fundamental-mode models used in this study exhibit an unexpected shock morphology. In addition to the "main" shock, which forms as the radially pulsating surface of the Mira moves outward and is observed to travel out through atmosphere, a "preliminary" shock structure forms as rebounding layers of the atmosphere fall back onto lower layers. The preliminary shock remains deep in the atmosphere until overrun by the outward-moving main shock. The energy dissipated by the preliminary shock usually exceeds that dissipated by the main shock, and has important effects on the light curve. The dynamic atmosphere models exhibit radial extension of the atmosphere and post-shock emission that alter the limb function (limb darkening/brightening) of the models. The effects on stellar angular diameters measured by lunar occultation technique are calculated. The results show that the usual procedure of fitting occultation observations assuming a uniform brightness disk and then correcting the resulting diameter for limb darkening can give erroneous results. The dynamic effects cause Miras to appear larger and cooler than they actually are. A post-shock relaxation zone code developed by J. N. Pierce was modified and interfaced with the Bowen code to follow the ionization state and cooling radiation emitted by Hydrogen, Helium, and 23 metals in the models. Mg II emission data were used to prepare a light curve that is compared with Mg II light curves observed with the IUE satellite. The relaxation models show that the periodic passage of shocks through the atmosphere results in much lower concentrations of molecular hydrogen and higher ionization fractions

  16. Sir Charles Edward Saunders, Dominion cerealist.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Malcolm J

    2008-06-01

    Charles Edward Saunders was born in London, Ontario, in 1867. His father, Sir William Saunders, was the first director of the Dominion Experimental Farms (1886-1911). Charles received his B.A. with honours in science from the University of Toronto in 1888 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1891. He attempted a career in music, his first love, from 1893 to 1902. With his father, Charles attended the 1902 International Conference on Plant Breeding and Hybridization in New York, where he learned of Mendel's theories of inheritance and their applicability to plant breeding. When he began work in 1903 in the Division of Cereal Breeding and Experimentation at the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa, he used the knowledge he had gained at that conference. It was Charles's goal to achieve "fixity" in the varieties that had been bred and released using phenotypic mass selection, prior to his tenure as Cerealist. He selected four heads from the wheat variety Markham and in the winter of 1904 he performed a "chewing test" to select for gluten elasticity and colour. Seeds from two heads were chosen, and seeds from one went on to produce the variety Marquis after extensive yield trials on the Prairies. Marquis was 7 to 10 days earlier than Red Fife, the standard bread wheat of the Prairies. The earliness and tremendous yield of Marquis wheat resulted in the rapid and successful settlement of the Great Plains and countless billions of dollars in revenue to Canada. By 1923, 90% of the spring wheat in Canada and 70% in the USA was Marquis. Charles continued as Dominion Cerealist until his retirement in 1922. He was knighted in 1934, and died in 1937.

  17. Pollution by oestrogenic endocrine disruptors and β-sitosterol in a south-western European river (Mira, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria João; Cruzeiro, Catarina; Reis, Mário; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The Mira River is a Portuguese water body widely known for its wilderness and is advertised as one of the less polluted European rivers. On this presumption, the levels of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in Mira waters were never measured. However, because environmentalists have claimed that the Mira could be moderately polluted, a range of 17 EDCs were measured not only at the estuary but also along the river. The targeted EDCs included natural and pharmaceutical oestrogens (17β-oestradiol, oestrone and 17α-ethynylestradiol), industrial/household pollutants (octylphenols, nonylphenols and their monoethoxylates and diethoxylates and bisphenol A), phytoestrogens (formononetin, biochanin A, daidzein, genistein) and the phytosterol sitosterol (SITO). For this propose, waters from six sampling sites were taken every 2 months, over a 1-year period (2011), and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly high levels of oestrogens and of industrial/household pollutants were measured at all sampling sites, including those located inside natural protected areas. Indeed, the annual average sum of EDCs was ≈57 ng/L for oestrogens and ≈1.3 μg/L for industrial/household chemicals. In contrast, the global average levels of phytoestrogens (≈140 ng/L) and of SITO (≈295 ng/L) were lower than those reported worldwide. The EDC concentrations were normalised for ethynylestradiol equivalents (EE2eq). In view of these, the oestrogenic load of the Mira River attained ≈47 ng/L EE2eq. In addition, phosphates were above legal limits at both spring and summer (>1 mg/L). Overall, data show EDCs at toxicant relevant levels in the Mira and stress the need to monitor rivers that are allegedly less polluted.

  18. [It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees: Emilio Mira y López and the social revolution].

    PubMed

    Mülberger, Annette; Jacó-Vilela, Ana Maria

    2007-01-01

    Although the socialist ideology of the Catalan psychiatrist Emilio Mira y López (1896-1964) is relatively well known, his psychological-political contribution has been ignored. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, Mira's psychological analysis of the social revolution is situated in the historical context of Catalonia and Spain before Franco's Dictatorship, taking account of biographical and political as well as scientific and cultural aspects. Second, the way in which Mira related psychology to politics is explored by examining the extent to which his scientific work reflected his socialist ideas.

  19. From wind to superwind - The evolution of mass-loss rates for Mira models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, G. H.; Willson, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical atmosphere models were calculated for a large grid of variables with Mira-like properties satisfying the Iben radius-luminosity-mass relationship for evolving AGB stars. Their masses ranged from 0.7 to 2.4 solar masses, and their periods from 150 to 800 days. All were fundamental-mode pulsators, had solar metallicity, and included effects of dust. The mass-loss rate increases as an approximately exponential function of time, reaching 0.00001-0.0001 solar masses/yr. Further evolution is dominated by the powerful wind, which strips the star's envelope from the core. This 'superwind', a remarkably robust effect, occurs for all initial stellar masses and all modeling parameters that have been tested. Models with very low metallicity also show the effect, but at higher luminosities, which has intriguing implications for the number of supernovae in early low-metallicity populations and for the chemical evolution of galaxies.

  20. Interferometric Constraints on Molecule and Dust Formation in Oxygen-rich Mira stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittkowski, M.; Karovicova, I.; Scholz, M.; Ohnaka, K.; Boboltz, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    We present new results from our project on spatially and spectrally resolved multi-epoch near- and mid-infrared interferometric observations of oxygen-rich Mira stars using the ESO VLT Interferometer (VLTI). We confirm that the near-IR data are well described by recent CODEX dynamic model atmospheres, including features of extended water vapor and CO layers. Our mid-infrared data are consistent with Al2O3 grains condensing close to the photosphere at about 2 stellar radii and warm silicates condensing at about 4-5 stellar radii. We confirm that the number density of aluminum can match that of the best-fit dust shells near the inner dust shell radius up to the condensation radii of warm silicates, confirming that Al2O3 grains can be seed particles for the further dust condensation.

  1. Crowd-Sourced Spectroscopy of Long Period Mira-Type Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John C.; Barber, Henry R.; Rea, Bill; Templeton, Matthew; McFarland, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Crowd-sourced observing campaigns provide frequent temporal sampling over long durations at lower cost than can be achieved with exclusively professional efforts. They have been used very successfully to construct wellsampled light curves for variable stars and inform the timing of professional observing efforts. Until recently, spectroscopy has not been a tool commonly available for use in crowd-sourced campaigns. But advances in commercial equipment and educational efforts have removed many of the traditional barriers to low-resolution spectroscopy with small telescopes. One type of target that could benefit from a crowd-sourced photometry and spectroscopy campaign is Mira-type variables with long periods (over 500 days). We report the preliminary results from a pilot study testing the efficacy of crowd-sourcing spectroscopic observations of those stars using small telescopes and filter wheel gratings.

  2. Development of LM10-MIRA LOX/LNG expander cycle demonstrator engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnykh, Mikhail; Carapellese, Stefano; Liuzzi, Daniele; Arione, Luigi; Caggiano, Giuseppe; Bellomi, Paolo; D'Aversa, Emanuela; Pellegrini, Rocco; Lobov, S. D.; Gurtovoy, A. A.; Rachuk, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    This article contains results of joint works by Konstruktorskoe Buro Khimavtomatiki (KBKhA, Russia) and AVIO Company (Italy) on creation of the LM10-MIRA liquid-propellant rocket demonstrator engine for the third stage of the upgraded "Vega" launcher.Scientific and research activities conducted by KBKhA and AVIO in 2007-2014 in the frame of the LYRA Program, funded by the Italian Space Agency, with ELV as Prime contractor, and under dedicated ASI-Roscosmos inter-agencies agreement, were aimed at development and testing of a 7.5 t thrust expander cycle demonstrator engine propelled by oxygen and liquid natural gas (further referred to as LNG).

  3. Parallax of a Mira variable R Ursae Majoris studied with astrometric VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Akiharu; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Matsui, Makoto; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Honma, Mareki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Sato, Katsuhisa; Jike, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    We have measured an annual parallax of the Mira variable R Ursae Majoris (R UMa) with the VLBI Exploration for Radio Astronomy (VERA). From the monitoring VLBI observations over a span of about two years, we detected H2O maser spots in the LSR velocity range from 37 to 42 km s-1. We derived an annual parallax of 1.97 ± 0.05 mas, and this gives a corresponding distance of 508 ± 13 pc. The VLBI maps revealed 72 maser spots distributed in an ˜110 au area around the expected stellar position. Circumstellar kinematics of the maser spots were also revealed by subtracting a systemic motion in the Hipparcos catalog from proper motions of each maser spot derived from our VLBI observations. Infrared photometry was also conducted to measure a K-band apparent magnitude, and we obtained a mean magnitude of mK = 1.19 ± 0.02 mag. Using the trigonometric distance, mK is converted to a K-band absolute magnitude of MK = -7.34 ± 0.06 mag. This result gives a much more accurate absolute magnitude for R UMa than previously provided. We solved a zero-point of the MK-log P relation for the Galactic Mira variables and obtained a relation of MK = -3.52 log P + (1.09 ± 0.14). Other long-period variables, including red supergiants, whose distances were determined with astrometric VLBI, were also compiled to explore the different sequences of the MK-log P relation.

  4. Assessing Groundwater Storage Changes in Edwards-Trinity Aquifer, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Green, R. T.; Rodell, M.; Michaels, T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Existing water supplies in Texas are projected to decline by about 18 percent by 2060, a trend caused primarily by increases in water demand and depletion of aquifers. The Edwards-Trinity regional aquifer system, a 200,000-km2 carbonate and clastic rock aquifer extending from southeastern Oklahoma to western Texas, provides water to all or parts of 38 counties in Texas. The extensive use of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer has already resulted in relatively large artesian pressure declines near population centers. Although numerous studies have been conducted on the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, significant uncertainty remains about the spatiotemporal replenishment characteristics of the aquifer. The U.S.-German Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides a unique opportunity to infer terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations on a regional basis. Previous studies have demonstrated the viability of using GRACE-derived TWS anomalies to conduct water budget analysis at both regional and continental scales. The purposes of our study are to (a) assess the potential of using GRACE, North America Land Assimilation System data, and in situ measurements to infer groundwater storage variations in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and (b) utilize remotely sensed data for informed groundwater resources management. Our preliminary results indicate that GRACE-derived TWS anomalies correlate well with results obtained through other means and, thus, the GRACE data could be a valuable tool for further calibrating a regional groundwater availability model developed for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system.

  5. STS-66 Edwards Landing with Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The space shuttle Atlantis lands with its drag chute deployed on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the STS-66 mission dedicated to the third flight of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science-3 (ATLAS-3), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. The astronauts also deployed and retrieved a free-flying satellite designed to study the middle and lower thermospheres and perform a series of experiments covering life sciences research and microgravity processing. The landing was at 7:34 a.m. (PST) 14 November 1994, after being waved off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, due to adverse weather. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay throughout the mission. They are then removed after the Space Shuttle returns to

  6. STS-67 Endeavour Landing at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The space shuttle Endeavour slips to a smooth landing on runway 22 at Edwards, California, to complete the highly successful record-setting STS-67 mission. The landing was at 1:46 p.m. (PST) 18 March 1995, after waiving off from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, earlier that morning due to adverse weather. Launched into space at 10:38 a.m. (PST) 1 March 1995, the Endeavour crew conducted NASA's longest shuttle flight to date and carried unique ultraviolet telescopes (ASTRO-2) which captured views of the universe impossible to obtain from the ground. Mission Commander was Steve Oswald making his third flight and the Pilot was Bill Gregory on his first mission. Mission Specialist 1 was John Grunsfeld making his first flight and Specialist 2 was Wendy Lawrence on her first flight. Tamara Jernigan served as Specialist 3 on her third flight and the two payload specialists were Samuel Durrance and Ronald Parise, both on their second flight. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads

  7. STS-29 Landing Approach at Edwards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The STS-29 Space Shuttle Discovery mission approaches for a landing at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards AFB, California, early Saturday morning, 18 March 1989. Touchdown was at 6:35:49 a.m. PST and wheel stop was at 6:36:40 a.m. on runway 22. Controllers chose the concrete runway for the landing in order to make tests of braking and nosewheel steering. The STS-29 mission was very successful, completing the launch a Tracking and Data Relay communications satellite, as well as a range of scientific experiments. Discovery's five man crew was led by Commander Michael L. Coats, and included pilot John E. Blaha and mission specialists James P. Bagian, Robert C. Springer, and James F. Buchli. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload

  8. Occasional Addresses by Edward Teller at Conferences of Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena (LIRPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Futurology of High Intensity Lasers (LIRPP Vol. 3A) * Lecture in Connection with the Edward Teller Medal Award (LIRPP Vol. 10) * Photo of the First Recipients of the Edward Teller Medal in 1991 * Photos from the Edward Teller Medal Celebration in 1997 * Photo with Participants of the LIRPP No. 12 Conference, 1995 * Photo with Edward Teller Medalists at IFSA01, Kyoto, 2001 * Keynote Address: The Edward Teller Lecture (LIRPP Vol. 11) * Keynote Address: Dr. Edward Teller (LIRPP Vol. 12) * Teller Award Presentation and Keynote Address (LIRPP Vol. 13) * Laudations of Awardees 1991-1995 (LIRPP Vol. 13) * Laudations of Awardees 1999-2003

  9. Mathematical Existence Results for the Doi-Edwards Polymer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupin, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present some mathematical results on the Doi-Edwards model describing the dynamics of flexible polymers in melts and concentrated solutions. This model, developed in the late 1970s, has been used and extensively tested in modeling and simulation of polymer flows. From a mathematical point of view, the Doi-Edwards model consists in a strong coupling between the Navier-Stokes equations and a highly nonlinear constitutive law. The aim of this article is to provide a rigorous proof of the well-posedness of the Doi-Edwards model, namely that it has a unique regular solution. We also prove, which is generally much more difficult for flows of viscoelastic type, that the solution is global in time in the two dimensional case, without any restriction on the smallness of the data.

  10. The origin and evolution of short-period Miras in the solar neighborhood: Constraints on the life cycle of old stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the short-period (P less than 300 days) oxygen-rich Miras in the solar neighborhood can be fitted with an exponential scale height above the Galactic plane of about 600 pc. Using the Gliese catalog of local main-sequence stars, we estimate that the density of suitable G-type progenitor dwarfs within 20 pc of the Sun for these short-period Miras is 6 x 10(exp -4)/cu pc. The portion of the H-R diagram near the main-sequence turnoff of these velocity-selected Gliese stars is intermediate between that of the old open cluster NGC 188 and that of the metal-rich globular cluster, 47 Tuc. We infer that the main-sequence progenitors of the short-period Miras have masses near 1.0 solar mass, and we estimate that these Miras have ages approximately 9 x 10(exp 9). We also identify a few old disk red giants in the neighborhood of the Sun. On the basis of very limited information, we estimate that the total amount of mass lost from these stars during their first ascent up the red giant branch is less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass. We derive a duration of the short-period Mira phase of close to 5 x 10(exp 5) yr. This estimate for the duration of the short period Mira phase is longer than our estimate of 2 x 10(exp 5) yr for the duration of the Mira phase for stars with periods longer than 300 days. From their infrared colors, we estimate a typical mass-loss rate from the short-period Miras of approximately 1 x 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LCs re-analysis of Mira variables in ASAS (Vogt+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, N.; Contreras-Quijada, A.; Fuentes-Morales, I.; Vogt-Geisse, S.; Arcos, C.; Abarca, C.; Agurto-Gangas, C.; Caviedes, M.; Dasilva, H.; Flores, J.; Gotta, V.; Penaloza, F.; Rojas, K.; Villasenor, J. I.

    2017-01-01

    The ASAS database (All Sky Automated Survey, Pojmanski 2002, II/264) is the outcome of a sky patrol program with CCD photometry, conducted at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, between 2000 and 2009 (-90<=DEC<=+28°). The visual limiting magnitude is about 14.5m and a total of up to 500 measurements per star are available. An automatic procedure identified 50122 ASAS variable stars and classified part of them according to their type of variability. A total of 2895 variables are listed as Mira stars in this database. The aim of this paper is to re-analyze the light curves of all stars classified as Mira in ASAS. (2 data files).

  12. Reduction of procoagulant potential of b-datum leakage jet flow in bileaflet mechanical heart valves via application of vortex generator arrays.

    PubMed

    Murphy, David W; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2010-07-01

    Current designs of bileaflet mechanical heart valves put patients at an increased risk of thromboembolism. In particular, regurgitant flow through the b-datum line is associated with nonphysiologic flow characteristics such as elevated shear stresses, regions of recirculation, and increased mixing, all of which may promote thrombus formation. We have previously shown that passive flow control in the form of vortex generators mounted on the downstream leaflet surfaces can effectively diminish turbulent stresses. The objective of the current work is thus to determine the effect of vortex generators on the thromboembolic potential of the b-datum line leakage jet and to correlate that effect with the vortex generator-induced changes to the flow structure. Flow experiments were performed using a steady model of the transient b-datum line jet. These experiments encompassed flow visualization to gain an overall picture of the flow system, particle image velocimetry to quantify the flow field in detail, and in vitro experiments with human blood to quantify thrombus formation in response to the applied passive flow control. Thrombus formation was quantified over time by an assay for thrombin-antithrombin III (TAT III). In comparing results with and without vortex generators, significantly lower mean TAT III levels were observed at one time point for the case with vortex generators. Also, the TAT III growth rate of the case with vortex generators was significantly lower. While no differences in jet spreading were found with and without vortex generators, lower peak turbulent stresses were observed for the case with vortex generators. The results thus demonstrate the potential of applying passive flow control to cardiovascular hardware in order to mitigate the hemodynamic factors leading to thrombus formation.

  13. Effect of hypertension on the closing dynamics and Lagrangian blood damage index measure of the b-datum regurgitant jet in a bileaflet mechanical heart valve.

    PubMed

    Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the formation of the closing vortex and subsequent b-datum regurgitation jet in bileaflet mechanical heart valves is governed by the magnitude of the driving mean aortic pressure (MAP), and that this sensitivity does impact the blood damage index (BDI) corresponding to platelet activation and lysis. High spatial resolution time resolved (1 kHz) as well as phase locked particle image velocimetry techniques captured the dynamic leaflet closure and regurgitation jet of a model 25 mm St. Jude Medical BMHV. Cell trajectories were estimated using Lagrangian particle tracking analysis while the leaflet kinematics was quantified by tracking the leaflet tip-position throughout closure. The non-principal as well as principal shear stress loading histories along each cell trajectory revealed BDI for platelet activation and lysis as a function of cell initial position, release time-point, and blood pressure. Results show that the leaflet closing time reduces by roughly 10 ms, in response to an increase in MAP by 40 mmHg. We report that higher MAP leads to a stronger b-datum vortex and jet formation. Platelet activation BDI lowers with a higher MAP due to reduction in exposure times despite an increase in principal shear stress experienced. Platelet lysis BDI however increases with higher MAP. Maximum BDI may occur for cells initially in the b-datum zone during the onset of leaflet closure. Our results provide a better understanding of BDI of the regurgitant b-datum jet and sheds light on the potential importance of blood damage testing under hypertensive conditions.

  14. MIRAS characterization and monitoring during the SMOS In-Orbit Commissioning Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Martin-Neira, M.; Duffo, N.; González-Gambau, V.; Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.

    2009-04-01

    1 Introduction The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) is the single payload of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The instrument was completed in early 2007 and thoroughly tested both in anechoic chamber and vacuum thermal chamber during 2007. It was integrated to the platform in early 2008 and re-tested, including compatibility, during 2008. At present, the whole satellite is stowed and waiting to be launched during 2009. In two weeks after launch, the satellite will be in the final orbit with all deployments completed. Then the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase will start, having an estimated duration of 5.5 months. During this phase, the instrument modes of operation will be systematically checked and the calibration parameters will be fully characterized in real conditions. Also, the first brightness temperature images will be obtained in order to assess the overall retrieval procedures including inversion. In the end, the objective of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is to provide verification that the payload meets the scientific requirements of the mission. The general design and planning of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase is given in [1]. This abstract presents the foreseen activities to be performed during this phase by the UPC team. Just after the start of the In-Orbit Commissioning Phase, the instrument will be commanded to perform a sequence of operations oriented at providing a full characterization in terms of calibration parameters. The idea is to reproduce the results obtained during the tests carried out on ground [2]. In particular, the following issues will be covered: Thermal Stability: To provide understanding of both the intra-orbit and inter-orbit temperature variations. The instrument will be continuously operating during a number of orbits while all temperature sensors being monitored. Electrical Stability: To re-compute all internal calibration parameters (gains, offsets, receiver noise temperatures

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey. II. Mira variables (Yuan+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, W.; He, S.; Macri, L. M.; Long, J.; Huang, J. Z.

    2017-08-01

    We carried out a search for Mira variables in M33 using sparsely sampled I-band light curves. We based our search on the observations of M33 obtained by Macri et al. 2001 (Cat. J/AJ/121/861) and Pellerin et al. 2011 (Cat. J/ApJS/193/26). These surveys covered most of the disk of this galaxy with a combined baseline of nearly a decade (1996 September to 1999 November for Macri et al. 2001, Cat. J/AJ/121/861; 2002 August to 2006 August for Pellerin et al. 2011, Cat. J/ApJS/193/26) mainly using the Fred L. Whipple Observatory (FLWO) 1.2m and the WIYN observatory 3.5m telescopes with a variety of cameras (see the respective publications for details). While images were obtained in multiple bandpasses (BVI), our analysis is only based on the I-band time-series photometry because Mira candidates fall below the detection limit in the bluer bands. Our final sample consists of 1847 Mira candidates (see Table2). (1 data file).

  16. Mary Edwards Walker: the soul ahead of her time.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atiq; Rahman, Naba G; Harris, Sharon M; Cheema, Faisal H

    2015-02-01

    Mary Edwards Walker was a gallant woman who stood for women's rights, embodied the true American spirit, and served the Union Army in the Civil War as a surgeon. She later became the first and only woman in United States history to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

  17. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  18. Edward Teller and Nuclei:. Along the Trail to the Neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.

    2010-01-01

    I discuss two of Edward Teller's contributions to nuclear physics, the introduction of the Gamow-Teller operator in β decay and the formulation of the Goldhaber-Teller model for electric dipole transitions, in the context of efforts to understand the weak interaction and the nature of the neutrino.

  19. The Small Rural Schools of Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, E. L.

    In 1973, there were 56 one- and two-room elementary schools in Prince Edward Island (Canada). As part of a descriptive survey of these schools, now closed by consolidation, researchers visited each school in 1973 and recorded details of the buildings, facilities, and school organizations. Teachers from 47 schools and their 737 students in grades…

  20. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  1. The Small Rural Schools of Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, E. L.

    In 1973, there were 56 one- and two-room elementary schools in Prince Edward Island (Canada). As part of a descriptive survey of these schools, now closed by consolidation, researchers visited each school in 1973 and recorded details of the buildings, facilities, and school organizations. Teachers from 47 schools and their 737 students in grades…

  2. Edward Said and the Cultural Politics of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Fazal; Lingard, Bob

    2006-01-01

    This introductory essay to this special issue of Discourse on Edward Said and the cultural politics of education provides an overview discussion of four inter-related themes representing the wideranging scope of Said's academic and political writings. The first of these themes relates to his idea of Orientalism, through which Said sought to…

  3. Reception of Edward Bernays' Doctrine of "Manipulating Public Opinion."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasky, Marvin N.

    Ivy Lee and Edward Bernays are generally regarded as the founding fathers of modern public relations. While Lee has been the subject of a full biography that included contemporary reaction to his ideas, there has been no similar work on how Bernays' ideas were received, though his ideas were in some ways more radical. He believed that propaganda…

  4. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  5. Public Educators as Interpretive Critics: Edward Said and Raymond Williams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Jon

    2008-01-01

    The work of Edward Said and Raymond Williams exemplifies an important aspect of the role of the public intellectual as educator. This paper concentrates on the significance of their work as public educators and on the tradition of interpretive criticism as they developed it within the field of literary and cultural theory. The argument builds from…

  6. Quality in Higher Education: The Contribution of Edward Demings Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Richard; Curtis, Elizabeth; Noone, Tom; Keenan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--There can be little doubt about the importance and relevance of quality for any service industry. One of the most influential contributors to service quality developments was W. Edwards Deming (1900-1993). An important component of Demings philosophy is reflected in his 14-principles for transforming a service as they indicate what…

  7. Moyers receives Edward A. Flinn III Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Duce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Jarvis L. Moyers received the Edward A. Flinn III Award posthumously at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The award honors "individuals who personify the Union's motto `unselfish cooperation in research' through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities."

  8. Increasing Student Success: An Interview with Edward A. Morante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spann, Milton G.; Calderwood, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interview with Edward Morante, Dean of Student Services and Learning Resources at College of the Desert (California), regarding the needs of high-risk community college students. Morante focuses on assessment, placement, basic-skills courses, student-support services, the learning-community concept, student involvement, and evaluation,…

  9. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour, after completing a mission of almost 17 days duration in space, touches down on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995. In this photo the nose gear is still in the air as the orbiter touches down.

  10. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear is on the ground and the nose gear is about to touch down as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  11. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed in this view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it completes a mission of almost 17 days duration in space on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995.

  12. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  13. Edwards Personality Inventory, Booklet IV: Faking and Faking Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, John R.

    1970-01-01

    Control subjects completed Book IV of the Edwards Personality Inventory under instructions to be honest while experimental subjects were instructed to fake so as to make an excellent impression while also concealing their faking. Differences between group means were small. (Author/EK)

  14. Social Perspective and Educational Knowledge: Edward L. Thorndike Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Barry M.

    This paper examines the relationship between educational theorist Edward L. Thorndike's psychology and his social viewpoint. Many of the revisionists in educational history have oversimplified Thorndike's thought by not examining his views from this perspective. Thorndike's educational ideas and practices are reflections of certain fundamental…

  15. Edward Adrian Wilson (1872-1912): polar explorer and artist.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    Dr Edward Wilson was a polar explorer who accompanied Robert Falcon Scott (1868-1912) on his expeditions to Antarctica in 1900 and 1910. He went with Scott to the South Pole and died with him on the return journey in 1912. Although medically qualified, he is now remembered more as a naturalist and as a talented artist recording the Antarctic expeditions.

  16. What's Wrong with "Edward the Unready"? Our Responsibility for Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Describes how Rosemary Wells's new books about "Edward Unready" explain children and readiness; explores the problems with her message, and suggests new endings that are more supportive of all children. Asserts that variability in development should not be mistaken for deficit, and recommends changing the focus from judging children to…

  17. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-30

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program.

  18. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-04-30

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program.

  19. Cleveland's Multicultural Librarian: Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, 1870-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Eleanor (Edwards) Ledbetter, who served immigrant populations in Cleveland throughout most of the Progressive Era and the Great Depression, was one of the first librarians to advocate for multiculturalism (then called cultural pluralism) as opposed to Americanism. In providing multicultural and multilingual library services for immigrants,…

  20. STS-114 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-09

    STS114-S-049 (9 August 2005) --- The sun rises on the Space Shuttle Discovery as it rests on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California, after a safe landing at 5:11 a.m. (PDT) on August 9, 2005. The landing concludes a historic 14-day, Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station.

  1. Quality in Higher Education: The Contribution of Edward Demings Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Richard; Curtis, Elizabeth; Noone, Tom; Keenan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--There can be little doubt about the importance and relevance of quality for any service industry. One of the most influential contributors to service quality developments was W. Edwards Deming (1900-1993). An important component of Demings philosophy is reflected in his 14-principles for transforming a service as they indicate what…

  2. STS-114 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-09

    STS114-S-048 (9 August 2005) --- The sun rises on the Space Shuttle Discovery as it rests on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base in California, after a safe landing at 5:11 a.m. (PDT) on Aug. 9, 2005. The landing concludes a historic 14-day Return to Flight STS-114 mission to the international space station.

  3. Edward Lear, Limericks, and Nonsense: A Little Nonsense. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    British poet Edward Lear (1812-1888) is widely recognized as the father of the limerick form of poetry and is well known for his nonsense poems. In the first lesson for grades 3-5, which focuses on Lear's nonsense poem "The Owl and the Pussy Cat," students learn about nonsense poetry as well as the various poetic techniques and devices…

  4. A tumor profile in Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18).

    PubMed

    Satgé, Daniel; Nishi, Motoi; Sirvent, Nicolas; Vekemans, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Constitutional trisomy 18 causes Edwards syndrome, which is characterized by intellectual disability and a particular set of malformations. Although this condition carries high mortality during prenatal and early postnatal life, some of the rare infants who survive the first months develop benign and malignant tumors. To determine the tumor profile associated with Edwards syndrome, we performed a systematic review of the literature. This review reveals a tumor profile differing from those of Down (trisomy 21) and Patau (trisomy 13) syndromes. The literature covers 45 malignancies: 29 were liver cancers, mainly hepatoblastomas found in Japanese females; 13 were kidney tumors, predominantly nephroblastomas; 1 was neuroblastoma; 1 was a Hodgkin disease; and 1 was acute myeloid leukemia in an infant with both trisomy 18 and type 1 neurofibromatosis. No instances of the most frequent malignancies of early life-cerebral tumors, germ cell tumors, or leukemia--are reported in children with pure trisomy 18. Tumor occurrence does not appear to correlate with body weight, tissue growth, or cancer genes mapping to chromosome 18. Importantly, the most recent clinical histories report successful treatment; this raises ethical concerns about cancer treatment in infants with Edwards syndrome. In conclusion, knowledge of the Edwards' syndrome tumor profile will enable better clinical surveillance in at-risk organs (i.e., liver, kidney). This knowledge also provides clues to understanding oncogenesis, including the probably reduced frequency of some neoplasms in infants and children with this genetic condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A tribute to Robert Edwards and Howard Jones Jr

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, W.

    2011-01-01

    “2010 was a fascinating year. Robert Edwards finally received the Nobel prize for Medicine and his friend in the United States, Howard W. Jones Jr. was honored in Denver by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) upon his Centennial Birthday. He turned 100 on December 30th” PMID:24753845

  6. Obituary: Harrison Edward Radford, 1927-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, James Michael; Kirby, Kate Page; Chance, Kelly V.; Brown, Campbell

    2003-12-01

    Harrison Edward ``Harry" Radford, a noted laboratory spectroscopist and pioneer in the application of magnetic resonance techniques to spectroscopy, died on 5 May 2000, after a long battle with amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS). During a 37-year career at the National Bureau of Standards and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harry measured the frequencies of numerous molecular transitions which aided the emerging field of astrochemistry. Harry was both an excellent theoretician and a preeminently skilled experimentalist. He has several major spectroscopic achievements to his credit. He performed the first study of a short-lived molecular free radical, OH, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, opening up a huge and important field of research. Together with colleagues he made the first observation of the rotational spectrum of CH by far infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy and extended the technique to other molecules such as CH3O. Harry was born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, on 26 July 1927. He was the son of Harrison Edwin Radford, a roofer, and Dorothy (née Cole) Radford. He dropped out of high school to join the Navy in 1944 as an electronics technician's mate. After his discharge in 1946 he worked in the family construction business for four years as a roofer. In 1950 he entered the University of New Hampshire and graduated four years later, Summa Cum Laude, with a degree in physics. As a graduate student at Yale from 1954 to 1959 he wrote his PhD thesis under the supervision of V.W. Hughes on the microwave Zeeman spectra of oxygen and fluorine where he used the technique of paramagnetic resonance absorption in atomic vapors. In 1954 he married Mildred Spofford. They had three daughters, Susan (born in 1955), Amy (1957), and Sarah (1960). In 1974 he married Alfa Goldthwaithe Morrison, who survived him. From 1959 until 1969 Harry worked at the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology

  7. 77 FR 41953 - Representative Edward J. Markey; Filing of Food Additive Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 175 Representative Edward J. Markey; Filing of...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that Representative Edward J. Markey has filed a... Edward J. Markey, House of Representatives, 2108 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC...

  8. Synthetic photometry for carbon-rich giants. III. Tracing the sequence of mass-losing galactic C-type Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Höfner, S.; Eriksson, K.

    2013-04-01

    Late-type giant stars in the evolutionary stage of the asymptotic giant branch increasingly lose mass via comparatively slow but dense stellar winds. Not only do these evolved red giants contribute in this way to the enrichment of the surrounding interstellar medium, but the outflows also have a substantial influence on the spectro-photometric appearance of such objects. In the case of carbon-rich atmospheric chemistries, the developing cool circumstellar envelopes contain dust grains mainly composed of amorphous carbon. With increasing mass-loss rates, this leads to more and more pronounced circumstellar reddening. With the help of model calculations we aim at reproducing the observational photometric findings for a large sample of well-characterised galactic C-type Mira variables losing mass at different rates. We used dynamic model atmospheres, describing the outer layers of C-rich Miras, which are severly affected by dynamic effects. Based on the resulting structures and under the assumptions of chemical equilibrium as well as LTE, we computed synthetic spectra and synthetic broad-band photometry (Johnson-Cousins-Glass BVRIJHKL'M). A set of five representative models with different stellar parameters describes a sequence from less to more evolved objects with steadily increasing mass-loss rates. This allowed us to study the significant influence of circumstellar dust on the spectral energy distributions and the (amplitudes of) lightcurves in different filters. We tested the photometric properties (mean NIR magnitudes, colours, and amplitudes) and other characteristics of the models (mass-loss rates, periods, and bolometric corrections) by comparing these with the corresponding observational data adopted from the literature. Using different kinds of diagrams we illustrate where the models are located in a supposed evolutionary sequence defined by observed C-type Mira samples. Based on comparisons of galactic targets with empirical relations derived for C stars

  9. Monitoring of Spectral Variations of Mira-Type and Semiregular Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitskij, G. M.

    The results of monitoring of a sample of late-type variable stars (Mira Ceti-type and semiregulars) are reported. Since 1980 a sample of 60 stars has been observed in the maser line of the H2O molecule at a wavelength of 1.35 cm. These observations are performed on the RT-22 radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory (Moscow Region). Since 1994 optical spectra of some of these stars have also been monitored on the 1.25-meter telescope of the Crimean Laboratory of the Sternberg Astronomical Institute. Regularities in the spectral behavior of the stars are discussed. Variations of the circumstellar H2O masers correlate with the visual light curves (AFOEV and AAVSO data) with a time lag of 0.3--0.4P (P is the star's period). Flares of the Hα emission noted in R Leo, U Aur, R Cas, and R LMi were followed 1.5--2 years later by corresponding flares of the H2O masers. These phenomena are interpreted as a consequence of propagation of a shock wave driven by stellar pulsation. Alternatively, the shock can be produced by motion of a low-mass satellite (a planet or a brown dwarf) in the inner layer of the circumstellar envelope. The effects of such a satellite on the spectrum and light curve of the primary star are discussed.

  10. FE Line Diagnostics of Multiply Shocked Stellar Atmospheres: The Mira S. Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1997-01-01

    Extensive LWP-HI spectra were obtained of the Mira S Car at a rapid time cadence as compared with the shock cycle time of S Car. These spectra were obtained in an attempt to understand the velocity structures in the shocked wind using the fluoresced iron lines. Data analysis of the IUE observations, which included the primary calibration of all of the IUE spectra obtained of S Car, was carried out. In addition, line identifications, flux calculations, background subtractions, and line profile analysis as a function of S Car's pulsational phase were performed. The database incorporated all line identifications as a function of pulsation phase for all IUE LWP-HI observations to date of S Car. At least 45 separate iron line features are identified in the S Car spectrum at one or more phases of the shock cycle, including those due to Fe II (UV 161) which is pumped by three different iron lines; Fe I(UV 44) which is pumped by the Mg II k line. Other strong multiplets that have been identified include UV(1), UV(2), UV(5), UV(32), UV(60), UV(63), UV(161), UV(207), and UV(399). Over 300 weaker lines have also been tentatively identified with Fe line transitions.

  11. Obituary: Donald Edward Osterbrock, 1924-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2007-12-01

    Donald Edward Osterbrock, one of the leading figures of post-World War II astronomy, died suddenly of a heart attack on 11 January 2007, while walking near his office at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was 82 years old. His initials spelled D.E.O. (God in latin!), but he was known simply as Don to his many friends and colleagues. Don's long and productive career spanned five decades. His scientific work helped shape our understanding of lower main-sequence stars, the ionized interstellar medium, and active galactic nuclei. He was also a highly respected historian of astronomy who shed new light on 19th- and 20th-century astronomy. Don was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 13 July 1924. Both of his parents were of German descent and valued hard work, education, and science. They both completed their high-school education at night while working full-time during the day. His father eventually became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Cincinnati. Don's plan to become an astronomer was put on hold when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. After graduation from high school, Don joined the United States Army and trained as a meteorologist, taking all of the physics and mathematics courses required for a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Chicago. He was eventually sent to islands in the Pacific Ocean but never was in harm's way. After three years of service, Don returned to Chicago to obtain his bachelor's degree in 1948, his M.S. in astronomy in 1949, and a Ph.D. in astronomy in 1952. Don's years at the University of Chicago and the University's Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, were pivotal for his career and personal life. He came in contact with such luminaries as Otto Struve, Bengt Strömgren, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, and William W. Morgan. At Yerkes, he also met and married Irene L. Hansen, a native of Williams Bay, who was employed as a member of the Yerkes staff. They had a son, William, now

  12. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  13. Regional behavior and evolution of the Edwards aquifer (South-Central Texas).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabeza Diaz de Cerio, Yoar; Carrera Ramírez, Jesús; Green, Ronald T.; Fratesi, Beth; Bertetti, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Karst aquifers are highly heterogeneous systems where flow regime is dominated by dissolution conduits. It is important to know the behavior of these conduit networks in order to being able to manage them correctly. In this work we focus on the Edwards aquifer, one of the most prolific artesian aquifers in the world, that is located in south-central Texas, USA, and included in the Trinity-Edwards system. A regional flow model for the Edwards aquifer has been developed using the code TRANSIN IV. For this purpose, It was necessary a reconceptualization of previous conceptual models of Edwards aquifer in order to include the contributing zone and evaluate the role that this area plays in the Edwards aquifer recharge. Chemical data for major and trace elements in the study area have been used for evaluating the relations between Trinity and Edwards aquifers and the evolution of dissolution within the Edwards aquifer.

  14. High-Resolution Fluid–Structure Interaction Simulations of Flow Through a Bi-Leaflet Mechanical Heart Valve in an Anatomic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2011-01-01

    We have performed high-resolution fluid–structure interaction simulations of physiologic pulsatile flow through a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) in an anatomically realistic aorta. The results are compared with numerical simulations of the flow through an identical BMHV implanted in a straight aorta. The comparisons show that although some of the salient features of the flow remain the same, the aorta geometry can have a major effect on both the flow patterns and the motion of the valve leaflets. For the studied configuration, for instance, the BMHV leaflets in the anatomic aorta open much faster and undergo a greater rebound during closing than the same valve in the straight axisymmetric aorta. Even though the characteristic triple-jet structure does emerge downstream of the leaflets for both cases, for the anatomic case the leaflet jets spread laterally and diffuse much faster than in the straight aorta due to the aortic curvature and complex shape of the anatomic sinus. Consequently the leaflet shear layers in the anatomic case remain laminar and organized for a larger portion of the accelerating phase as compared to the shear layers in the straight aorta, which begin to undergo laminar instabilities well before peak systole is reached. For both cases, however, the flow undergoes a very similar explosive transition to the small-scale, turbulent-like state just prior to reaching peak systole. The local maximum shear stress is used as a metric to characterize the mechanical environment experienced by blood cells. Pockets of high local maximum shear are found to be significantly more widespread in the anatomic aorta than in the straight aorta throughout the cardiac cycle. Pockets of high local maximum shear were located near the leaflets and in the aortic arc region. This work clearly demonstrates the importance of the aortic geometry on the flow phenomena in a BMHV and demonstrates the potential of our computational method to carry out image

  15. High-resolution fluid-structure interaction simulations of flow through a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve in an anatomic aorta.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-02-01

    We have performed high-resolution fluid-structure interaction simulations of physiologic pulsatile flow through a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) in an anatomically realistic aorta. The results are compared with numerical simulations of the flow through an identical BMHV implanted in a straight aorta. The comparisons show that although some of the salient features of the flow remain the same, the aorta geometry can have a major effect on both the flow patterns and the motion of the valve leaflets. For the studied configuration, for instance, the BMHV leaflets in the anatomic aorta open much faster and undergo a greater rebound during closing than the same valve in the straight axisymmetric aorta. Even though the characteristic triple-jet structure does emerge downstream of the leaflets for both cases, for the anatomic case the leaflet jets spread laterally and diffuse much faster than in the straight aorta due to the aortic curvature and complex shape of the anatomic sinus. Consequently the leaflet shear layers in the anatomic case remain laminar and organized for a larger portion of the accelerating phase as compared to the shear layers in the straight aorta, which begin to undergo laminar instabilities well before peak systole is reached. For both cases, however, the flow undergoes a very similar explosive transition to the small-scale, turbulent-like state just prior to reaching peak systole. The local maximum shear stress is used as a metric to characterize the mechanical environment experienced by blood cells. Pockets of high local maximum shear are found to be significantly more widespread in the anatomic aorta than in the straight aorta throughout the cardiac cycle. Pockets of high local maximum shear were located near the leaflets and in the aortic arc region. This work clearly demonstrates the importance of the aortic geometry on the flow phenomena in a BMHV and demonstrates the potential of our computational method to carry out image

  16. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers, Medina Lake area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, Ted A.; Lambert, Rebecca B.

    1998-01-01

    The Trinity aquifer, which crops out in the northern part of the Medina Lake area and underlies the Edwards aquifer in the southern part, is much less permeable and productive than the Edwards aquifer. Where the Trinity aquifer underlies the Edwards, the Trinity acts as a lower confining unit on the Edwards.

  17. Brief Reflections on Edward Teller's Scientific Life at Livermore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, C. Bruce

    2010-01-01

    As George Miller indicated in his welcoming remarks the theme of today's symposium is the scientific and educational legacy of Edward Teller. I will say a few words about his activities in those areas during the 50 plus years he spent at the Livermore Laboratory, Sig Hecker will touch on his re-engagement with the Los Alamos Laboratory during the last couple of decades of his life, and then we will show you a video with excerpts from the Memorial Service we held on November 3, 2003 after he passed away in September of that year. On the video you will get to hear comments by many of the people who knew Edward throughout much of his life, Hans Bethe, John Wheeler, Harold Agnew and many others ...

  18. STS-58 Landing at Edwards with Drag Chute

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-11-01

    A drag chute slows the space shuttle Columbia as it rolls to a perfect landing concluding NASA's longest mission at that time, STS-58, at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 8:06 a.m. (PST) touchdown 1 November 1993 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 14 day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 7:53 a.m. (PDT), October 18, was the second spacelab flight dedicated to life sciences research. Seven Columbia crewmembers performed a series of experiments to gain more knowledge on how the human body adapts to the weightless environment of space. Crewmembers on this flight included: John Blaha, commander; Rick Searfoss, pilot; payload commander Rhea Seddon; mission specialists Bill MacArthur, David Wolf, and Shannon Lucid; and payload specialist Martin Fettman.

  19. Unusual clinical history of a male infant with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Surányi, Andrea; Bitó, Tamás; Vajda, György; Kaiser, László; Gáspár, Gábor; Katona, Márta; Szabó, János; Pál, Attila

    2009-03-01

    Edwards syndrome (trisomy of chromosome 18) is generally characterized by the disorders of central nervous system, as well as the musculoskeletal and genitourinary systems. In majority of the cases with trisomy 18 the following malformations can be found: ventricular septal defect, horseshoe kidneys, oesophageal atresia, omphalocele, facial clefts, diaphragmatic hernias and genital hypoplasia. We report a male patient with Edwards syndrome. The boy had a partial agenesis of corpus callosum, oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula, renal agenesis, ventricular septal defect, Dandy-Walker cyst and low-set malformed ears. The first three features are unique based on previous literature reports on trisomy 18. This report allows a further delineation of the trisomy 18 syndrome.

  20. 1995 Edward Teller Lecture Patience and Optimism (LIRPP Vol. 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    Remarks made in the author's acceptance lecture for the 1995 Edward Teller Medal are presented and expanded. Topics covered include research on nuclear-pumped lasers, the first direct e-beam-pumped laser, direct energy conversion and advanced fuel fusion, plus recent work on inertial electrostatic confinement. "Patience" and "optimism" are viewed as essential elements needed by scientists following the "zig-zag" path to fusion energy production.

  1. CONTRATULATIONS - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE II - PERSONAL - ATLANTIC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-07

    S65-33533 (7 June 1965) --- The Gemini-4 prime crew, astronauts Edward H. White II (left), pilot; and James A. McDivitt, command pilot, listen to the voice of President Lyndon B. Johnson as he congratulated them by telephone on their successful four-day, 62-revolution Gemini-4 mission. They are shown aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp just after their recovery from the Atlantic.

  2. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB CA 93524-7013 AFRL -RZ-ED-VG-2011-269 9...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 11. SPONSOR...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Air Force Research Laboratory Ed d Ai F B CA Col Mike Platt war s r orce

  3. APOLLO CREW (NAA) - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE - TRAINING

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-24

    The members of the prime crew of the first manned Apollo space flight Apollo/Saturn 204 (AS-204) inspect spacecraft equipment during a tour of North American Aviation's (NAA) Downey facility. In the foreground, left to right, are astronauts Roger B. Chaffee, Virgil I. Grissom, and Edward H. White, II. NAA engineers and technicians are in the background. NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION, INC., DOWNEY, CA B&W

  4. Selected Scientific and Technical Contributions of Edward C. Polhamus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Edward C. Polhamus joined the NACA Langley Research Center staff in 1944 and was active in a broad range of aerodynamic research related to high-speed aircraft technology, aerodynamic prediction methods, and cryogenic wind-tunnel development. This lecture will focus on his 'leading-edge suction analogy' for the prediction of vortex-lift effects on slender wings. Briefer treatment of his contributions to variable-sweep aircraft and cryogenic wind tunnels is also included.

  5. SHOWN WITH NURSE - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE II - MISC. - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-01

    S65-29657 (June 1965) --- Gemini-4 prime crew, astronauts Edward H. White II (left), and James A. McDivitt are shown with Lt. Dolores (Dee) O'Hare, US Air Force, Center Medical Office, Flight Medicine Branch, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Lieutenant O'Hare has served during several spaceflights as official medical nurse for the astronaut crew members on the missions.

  6. Bibliography of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas, through 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menard, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography comprises 1,022 multidisciplinary references to technical and general literature for the three regions of the Edwards aquifer, Texas-San Antonio area; Barton Springs segment, Austin area; and northern segment, Austin area. The references in the bibliography were compiled from computerized data bases and from published bibliographies and reports. Dates of references range from the late 1800's through 1993. Subject and author indexes are included.

  7. STS-68 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-11

    STS068-S-060 (11 October 1994) --- With its main landing gear not quite on the runway, the Space Shuttle Endeavour wraps up an eleven-day mission at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Landing occurred at 10:02 a.m. (PDT), October 11, 1994. Onboard were astronauts Michael A. Baker, mission commander; Terrence W. Wilcutt, pilot; Thomas D. Jones, payload commander; and Daniel W. Bursch, Peter J. K. (Jeff) Wisoff and Steven L. Smith, all mission specialists.

  8. STS-68 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-11

    STS068-S-059 (11 October 1994) --- With its main landing gear not quite on the runway, the Space Shuttle Endeavour wraps up an eleven-day mission at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Landing occurred at 10:02 a.m. (PDT), October 11, 1994. Onboard were astronauts Michael A. Baker, mission commander; Terrence W. Wilcutt, pilot; Thomas D. Jones, payload commander; and Daniel W. Bursch, Peter J. K. (Jeff) Wisoff and Steven L. Smith, all mission specialists.

  9. STS-114 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-09

    STS114-S-047 (9 August 2005) --- NASA’s Crew Transport Vehicle (CTV) pulls up to the Space Shuttle Discovery to offload the STS-114 crewmembers after a successful landing at 5:11 a.m. (PDT) on August 9, 2005 at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The landing concludes a historic 14-day, Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station.

  10. Edwards syndrome in a 6-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Raczkowski, Jan W; Daniszewska, Barbara; Paradecka, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome - ES) is the second most common trisomy. It occurs in 1/3 000 to 1/8 000 births. ES is a cause of numerous developmental disorders and malformations. The median life span of children with ES is about 2 weeks and only 5%-10% will survive their first year of life. The report presents a case of a 6-year-old girl with ES.

  11. Dr Edward Wilson (1872-1912): Antarctic hero.

    PubMed

    Williams, Isobel

    2009-05-01

    Edward Wilson was an artist, doctor, naturalist and explorer. He was on both Scott's Antarctic expeditions of the early 1900s, as Junior Surgeon and Zoologist on the Discovery expedition of 1901 and as Chief of Scientific Staff on the Terra Nova expedition of 1910. He reached the Pole with Scott in 1912 and died with him on their ill-fated return from the Pole.

  12. Astronaut Edward White being weighed and balanced in spacecraft seat

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-07-07

    S65-19585 (21 May 1965) --- Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot for the Gemini-Titan 4 prime crew, participates in a weight and balance test during a wet mock simulation exercise at Cape Kennedy, Florida. The two-man Gemini-4 mission, scheduled no earlier than June 3, 1965, will orbit Earth 62 times in four days. Astronaut Edward H. White II (out of frame) is the GT-4 prime crew pilot.

  13. Time variation observations of ISO SWS spectra of two oxygen-rich Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, T.; de Jong, T.; Yamamura, I.; Cami, J.; Tanab'e, T.

    1999-03-01

    Two M-type Mira variables, Z Cyg and T Cep, have been observed with SWS01 over an entire light variability cycle. Each star was observed 7 times with an interval of variability phase of approximately 0.2. Z Cyg has prominent ``silicate bands'' at 10 and 20 μm and shows large variation in the circumstellar emission. The 10 and 20 μm bands become stronger relative to the photospheric emission at maximum than at minimum and the relative intensity of the 10 μm to the 20 μm bands increases at maximum, indicating increase in the temperature of circumstellar grains. In contrast, T Cep shows relatively small, but complicated variation in its SWS spectrum. The dust shell emission is weak in T Cep compared to Z Cyg. It has atypical 10 μm feature, peaking at λ > 10 μm and band emission around 13 μm. It also shows several molecular features, including 13-17 μm CO2 and 7.3 μm SO2 bands, both of which originate from the layers of temperature of less than 1000 K. These circumstellar molecular bands show significant variations. On the other hand, the continuum slope of the dust emission in T Cep shows little change, indicating that the dust temperature does not vary largely during light variation. Neither the circumstellar molecular features nor the dust continuum intensity seems to vary synchronously with the visual light variation. The amounts of SO2 molecules and dust grains seem to be decreasing after the maximum.

  14. VLA positions and distributions of H2O masers associated with 15 Mira and semiregular variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, P. F.; Johnston, K. J.

    1994-05-01

    Results of VLA observations of 22 GHz H2O masers associated with 15 Mira and semiregular variables are reported. The combination of angular resolution (approximately equals 70 mas), spectral resolution (0.3 km/sec), rms sensitivity (+/- 35 mJy/beam), and hour-angle coverage is the best yet obtained for H2O masers from a significant sample of stars. Comparison of accurate optical positions of the stars with estimates from the masers yields total differences typically less than or equal to 0 sec .15-an improvement over previous comparisons by a factor of about 2. There are indications of some combination of nonuniformities in the density distribution, deviations from sphericity, and anisotropies in the velocity field, but it is difficult to disentangle the effects of these phenomena and achieve unique interpretation. A plausible model is clumps or filaments distributed at radii which vary with direction from the star. From the angular distributions and velocity ranges, there is good evidence that at least some parcels of gas are accelerated to the terminal outflow velocity at rho greater than or equal to 20 AU and that there is a component of outflow at rho approximately equals 10 to 15 AU; some gas probably is fully accelerated at radii less than 10 AU. To illustrate the problems of interpretation, the well-known case of VX Sgr is reexamined. The data do not support a simple model of increasing outflow velocity with increasing maser shell radius. It is proposed that the outflow is weakly bipolar.

  15. Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Carrara, Sabina; Filippi, Valentina

    2011-06-01

    The Roman Catholic Church reacted negatively to the announcement that the Nobel Prize for Medicine had been awarded to Robert G Edwards. Thirty-three years ago, Cardinal Albino Luciani, on the eve of his election to become Pope, stated that, whereas progress is certainly a beautiful thing, mankind has not always benefited from progress. Catholic criticism has raised seven points: (i) God wants human life to begin through the 'conjugal act' and not artificially; (ii) artificial interventions at the beginning of human life are dangerous and ethically unacceptable; (iii) limits can be imposed even upon an individual's freedom to achieve a legitimate goal, such as having a child within marriage; (iv) the massive loss of preimplantation embryos characterizing IVF must be considered as a tragic loss of 'nascent' human persons; (v) Edwards bears a moral responsibility for all subsequent developments in assisted reproduction technology and for all 'abuses' made possible by IVF; (vi) there can be deleterious consequences for offspring of assisted reproduction technology; and (vii) Edwards' discovery did not eliminate the causes of infertility. This article elaborates from the Roman Catholic perspective on each of these points, some of which are found to be more substantial than others.

  16. Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, view looking northeast of JPL Edwards Test Station as it looked in 1945. To the immediate right of the Test Stand 'A' tower stands a concrete monitor building or blockhouse (now Building 4203/E-4) for observation and control of tests. Other frame buildings housed workshop and administrative functions. Long structure behind automobiles was designated 4207/E-8 and was used for instrument repair and storage, a cafeteria, machine and welding shops. To the immediate south of 4207/E-8 were 4200/E-1 (used as an office and photographic laboratory) and 4205/E-6 (guardhouse, with fire extinguisher mounted on it). To the northeast of 4205/E-6 was 4204/E-5 (a propellant storage dock, with shed roof). Buildings 4200/E-1, 4205/E-6 and 4207/E-8 were demolished in 1983. Note the absence of trees. (JPL negative no. 383-1297, July 1946) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-05-16

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing 16 May on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards AFB with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission.

  18. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-05-16

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing May 16 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission.

  19. Geomorphology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Plateau karst, central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastning, E. H., Jr.

    The Edwards Plateau is one of the largest continuous karst regions of the United States; yet, its geomorphic evolution has previously received little systematic study. The overall objectives of this investigation are to: (1) describe the physical characteristics of karst features, (2) determine which geomorphic and hydrogeologic controls and processes have governed their development, and (3) relate genesis of karst spatially and chronologically to the geomorphic evolution of the Edwards Plateau. Cavern development provides a record of evolution of karst and the development of major carbonate aquifers of the region. Some control on cavern development are region-wide; nevertheless, many caves exhibit characteristics that suggest a strong influence of local factors. Development of cave chambers and passages has responded to the lithic character of bedrocks. Solution conduits were guided by variations in calcite and dolomite content, thickness of strata, and frequency of bedding-plane partings. This is particularly true of the Glen Rose Formation, limestone beds of the Edwards Group, and the Gorman Formation, the three principal cave-forming units.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: A study of dust nucleation in Mira. Part I. (Kaminski+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, T.; Wong, K. T.; Schmidt, M. R.; Muller, H. S. P.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Cherchneff, I.; Menten, K. M.; Keller, D.; Brunken, S.; Winters, J. M.; Patel, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Files contain ALMA observations of AlO emission in Mira (omicron Ceti) in two rotational transitions, N=6-5 and 9-8, and obtained at different epochs. Spectral cubes, moment-zero maps, and spectra of the entire emission source are provided and correspond directly to those presented in the paper (Figs. 2, 3, and 5). Complementary continuum data are also included in separate files. The data were self-calibrated and therefore their absolute astrometry is inaccurate. Relative spatial coordinates should be used. (2 data files).

  1. Mid-Infrared Interferometric Monitoring of Evolved Stars: The Dust Shell Around the Mira Variable RR Aquilae at 13 Epochs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    subsequent paper. 2. Characteristics of RR Aql RR Aql is an oxygen-rich Mira variable with spectral type M6e- M9 ( Samus et al. 2004). RR Aql shows a...at maximum light to ∼1.0 mag at mini- mum light. RR Aql is pulsating with a period of P = 394.78 days ( Samus et al. 2004) and the Julian Date of the...The main sequence precursor mass of RR Aql is 1.2 ± 0.2 M/M (Wyatt & Cahn 1983), and its spectral type is M6e-M9 ( Samus et al. 2004), versus M5-M9

  2. Dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables - II. Time-dependent atmospheric structure and observable properties of four M-type model series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2011-11-01

    We present four model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to o Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These models also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore cannot drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables.

  3. Reassessment of the Georgetown limestone as a hydrogeologic unit of the Edwards Aquifer, Georgetown area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, L.F.; Dorsey, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the water-quality characteristics suggests that the Edwards Limestone and the streams have a significant hydraulic connection but the ground-water circulation between the Edwards Limestone and the Georgetown Limestone is very limited. The only area where a high degree of hydraulic connection between the main water-bearing zone of the Edwards aquifer (Edwards Limestone) and the streams was found is near the updip limits of the Georgetown Limestone, where a nearby major fault occurs and where major springs have developed. These findings suggest that the Georgetown Limestone does not function as a unit of the Edwards aquifer but as a regional confining bed with localized avenues that allow flow to and from the underlying Edwards aquifer.

  4. The Nucleus of the Planetary Nebula EGB 6 as a Post-Mira Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Esplin, Taran L.; Hawley, Steven A.; Liebert, James; Munari, Ulisse

    2016-08-01

    EGB 6 is a faint, large, ancient planetary nebula (PN). Its central star, a hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD), is a prototype of a rare class of PN nuclei associated with dense, compact emission-line knots. The central star also shows excess fluxes in both the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR). In a 2013 paper, we used Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to show that the compact nebula is a point-like source, located 0.″16 (˜118 AU) from the WD. We attributed the NIR excess to an M dwarf companion star, which appeared to coincide with the dense emission knot. We now present new ground-based NIR spectroscopy, showing that the companion is actually a much cooler source with a continuous spectrum, apparently a dust-enshrouded low-luminosity star. New HST images confirm common proper motion of the emission knot and red source with the WD. The I-band, NIR, and MIR fluxes are variable, possibly on timescales as short as days. We can fit the spectral energy distribution (SED) with four blackbodies (the WD, a ˜1850 K NIR component, and MIR dust at 385 and 175 K). Alternatively, we show that the NIR/MIR SED is very similar to that of Class 0/I young stellar objects. We suggest a scenario in which the EGB 6 nucleus is descended from a wide binary similar to the Mira system, in which a portion of the wind from an AGB star was captured into an accretion disk around a companion star; a remnant of this disk has survived to the present time and is surrounded by gas photoionized by UV radiation from the WD. Based in part on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based in part on observations with the 1.5 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

  5. Metal Emission Lines as Diagnostic Tools for Shock Waves in Outer Atmospheres of M-type Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, He.; Sedlmayr, E.; Wood, P. R.

    One way to reveal the thermo- and hydrodynamical conditions in M-type Mira atmospheres is to study the various emission lines which are emitted behind a shock front and can be observed over a substantial portion of the pulsation period. Analysing a time-resolved series of these emission lines offers the possibility to determine these conditions in different atmospheric layers influenced by the passing shock wave. In particular, the metal emission lines are a diagnostic tool to probe the hydrodynamical conditions of the outer, dust-forming layers of the atmosphere, because they appear late in the pulsation cycle when the shock wave has reached these layers. We present quantitive data on radial velocities, shapes, widths and fluxes of metal emission lines obtained by spectral observations in the optical wavelength region for a sample of six M-type Miras (periods 281-389 days), namely R Aql, RR Sco, R Car, R Leo, S Scl and R Hya (cf. Richter & Wood 2001, A&A 369, 1027-1047). Because of the multiple phase coverage of our observations, the data shows the history of the shock as it emerges through the deep photosphere and then moves out through the atmosphere. The observations are analysed and discussed with regard to the atmospheric conditions.

  6. Ground winds and winds aloft for Edwards AFB, California (1978 revision)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Brown, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ground level runway wind statistics for the Edwards AFB, California area are presented. Crosswind, headwind, tailwind, and headwind reversal percentage frequencies are given with respect to month and hour for the two major Edwards AFB runways. Also presented are Edwards AFB bivariate normal wind statistics for a 90 degree flight azimuth for altitudes 0 through 27 km. Wind probability distributions and statistics for any rotation of axes can be computed from the five given parameters.

  7. Edward Loughborough Keyes: an early twentieth century leader in urology.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Peter J; Vaughan, E D; Belt, Edward S; Bloom, David A

    2006-11-01

    Edward Loughborough Keyes was a renowned urologist, decorated war hero, prolific writer and beloved professor. Having served as president of the American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons, the American Urological Association, the International Urological Society and the Clinical Urological Association, Keyes in large part steered the course of urology during the early twentieth century. We reviewed letters, original publications and historical records pertaining to Doctor Keyes found in the New York Hospital archives, the American Urological Association historical record, the medical literature and the popular press. Edward Loughborough Keyes, Jr. received his M.D. from Columbia in 1895, and went on to hold academic positions in urology at Georgetown, the New York Polyclinic Medical School, St. Vincent's Hospital, Memorial Hospital, New York University and at the Cornell University Medical College, where he spent most of his career. He authored the premier urology textbook of his day, Urology, and published prolifically on a myriad of urological conditions. Doctor Keyes served in World War I as consultant in urology to General John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force. During the war he and Hugh Hampton Young led modern history's first public campaign against sexually transmitted disease, and in America he was one of the leaders of the American social hygiene movement from which contemporary sexual education evolved. He spoke Spanish and French fluently, wrote poetry and prose prolifically, and was beloved for his good humor. He died at the age of 75 in New York. Edward Loughborough Keyes is remembered as one of the great urologists of the early twentieth century.

  8. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2011-05-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) and Edward Pigott (1753-1825) are credited with determining the first accurate periods for several important variable stars. Goodricke's name is associated with the determination of the period of the eclipsing binary Algol (Beta Persei); for this he was awarded the Copley Prize of the Royal Society of London. He also determined the periods of the contact binary Beta Lyrae and of Delta Cephei, the prototype Cepheid variable. Around the same time, Edward Pigott obtained the period of Eta Aquilae, another Cepheid. In actuality, the two collaborated on all these observations; today we would call them co-discoverers. Goodricke is the better known of the two, in part because he won the Copley Medal, in part because of his tragically short life, and in part because he was deaf. Edward Pigott was the more experienced observer, having worked with his father Nathaniel on determining the longitudes of several cities on the Continent. Evidence shows, however, that Goodricke had some astronomical experience while a student at the Warrington Academy. The journals of the two show that they developed a partnership that made the most of both their talents over the brief time (less than five years) they worked together before Goodricke's death. Today, the two are remembered as having suggested eclipses as the cause for the periodic dimming of Algol. This explanation is accepted today as the correct one. In their day, however, most eminent astronomers believed that starspots were a more likely cause for the dimming. By the time of John Goodricke's death, he seems to have accepted that explanation as well. A study of the work of Goodricke and Pigott contains many lessons for today's observers of variable stars. This work was supported by an AAS Small Research Grant and by the Pollack Award of the Dudley Observatory.

  9. A very rare entity of diabetes insipidus associated with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nihat; Doğan, Murat; Peker, Erdal; Bulan, Keziban; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2013-08-01

    Edwards syndrome is the second most commonly seen trisomy. It was first described by John Hamilton Edwards in 1960. Although most cases result in termination or foetal loss, live births have been documented in 5%. Edwards syndrome is characterized by multisystem anomalies, of which holoprosencephaly (HPE) is observed in 4-8% of cases. The clinical findings correspond to the degree of HPE malformation. Convulsions and endocrinopathies are among the severe clinical findings. The most common endocrinopathies are central diabetes insipidus (DI), hypothyroidism, hypocortisolism and growth hormone deficiency. The coexistence of holoproencephaly and DI in Edwards syndrome was discussed under the light of literature.

  10. Edward Lu floats in SM assisted by Kenneth Bowersox

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-28

    ISS006-E-50604 (28 April 2003) --- Astronaut Edward T. Lu, Expedition 7 NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer, floats into the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS), assisted by astronaut Kenneth D. Bowersox, Expedition 6 mission commander. Also pictured are cosmonauts Nikolai M. Budarin (left foreground), Expedition 6 flight engineer, and Yuri I. Malenchenko, Expedition 7 mission commander. Astronaut Donald R. Pettit (out of view), Expedition 6 NASA ISS science officer, photographed this image. Budarin and Malenchenko represent Rosaviakosmos.

  11. LANDING (CREW ACTIVITIES) - STS-1 - EDWARDS AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1981-04-14

    S81-30852 (14 April 1981) --- Astronaut Robert L. Crippen, pilot for the STS-1 flight, egresses the NASA space shuttle following touchdown of the Columbia on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Astronaut John W. Young, crew commander, had earlier exited the craft and can be seen standing at the foot of the steps with George W.S. Abbey, director of flight operations at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Dr. Craig L. Fischer, chief of the medical operations branch in JSC?s medical sciences division, follows Crippen down the steps. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Salutary swan song for the Starr Edwards valve.

    PubMed

    Masilonyane-Jones, Taolo Vijay; Blackham, Ruth; Alvarez, John

    2010-07-01

    The Starr-Edwards valve was the first manufactured valve to be used successfully as a cardiac valve replacement in 1960. Although superseded by newer valves over the decades it has achieved an excellent track record. It has unique features, namely a protective metal casing around the ball poppet and a large and thick sewing ring. We describe the last implant of this valve in Australia; it has now been withdrawn by the manufacturer. In this particular case, the unique features of this valve made the required surgery quite simple and avoided the need for complex mitral valve surgery in a very high-risk patient.

  13. The contributions of Edward H. Angle to dental public health.

    PubMed

    Peck, S

    2009-09-01

    The genius of Edward Hartley Angle, (1855-1930), the founder of the dental specialty of orthodontics, to create order from chaos in the study and treatment of positional discrepancies of the teeth, jaws and face advanced greatly the cause of dental public health. Angle's innovations that had the most public health impact were (1) his identification of dental occlusion, not simply tooth irregularity, as a prime concern, (2) his development of an uncomplicated classification system for occlusal conditions, (3) his introduction of prefabricated orthodontic appliances and (4) his framing of orthodontics as a dental specialty by organizing the world's first educational program to train orthodontists.

  14. The portrait of Dr Edward Harrison MD (1766-1838).

    PubMed

    Bovine, Gary

    2010-08-01

    The portrait of the London and Horncastle Physician Edward Harrison, painted and displayed in 1823, was editorially criticized by one of the medical journals of the time. After Harrison died the portrait remained in the family estate until 1938, after which it was presented to the National Gallery of Ireland. The image of Dr Harrison had never been displayed in any of his medical writings, nor in any other medical historical works, until 2008. This paper provides some history of the criticism of the portrait, similar to the historical vignette of the portraiture of William Harvey and outlines the detective work to track down the location of the portrait.

  15. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2012-06-01

    John Goodricke and Edward Pigott, working in York, England, between 1781 and 1786, determined the periods of variation of eclipsing binaries such as Algol and Beta Lyrae and speculated that the eclipses of Algol might be caused by a "dark body," perhaps even a planet. They also determined the periods of variation of the first two known Cepheid variables, the stars whose period-luminosity relation today enables astronomers to determine distances to distant galaxies. Goodricke holds special interest because he was completely deaf and because he died at the age of 21. The lives and work of these two astronomers are described.

  16. STS-68 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-11

    STS068-S-061 (11 October 1994) --- The drag chute system, one of 13 Detailed Test Objectives (DTO) for STS-68, is deployed as the Space Shuttle Endeavour completes an eleven-day mission at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Landing occurred at 10:02 a.m. (PDT), October 11, 1994. Onboard were astronauts Michael A. Baker, mission commander; Terrence W. Wilcutt, pilot; Thomas D. Jones, payload commander; and Daniel W. Bursch, Peter J. K. (Jeff) Wisoff and Steven L. Smith, all mission specialists.

  17. From Miras to planetary nebulae: Which path for stellar evolution?; Proceedings of the International Colloquium, Universite de Montpellier II, France, Sept. 4-7, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Omont, A.

    This book considers stellar evolution of Mira variables to planetary nebulae. Topics discussed include pulsation and shock waves; mass loss; circumstellar dust; maser emission and OH/IR stars; C stars; and post-AGB evolution to planetary nebulae, protoplanetary nebulae, and prewhite dwarfs and binaries. Papers are presented on pulsations of model Mira variables, the environment of Miras from interferometry, the physics of mass loss from AGB stars, the mixing length and the mass loss rate, dust formation and stellar wind, dust formation in circumstellar shells of Mira variables, the evolution of water masers on the AGB, and phase lags from OH/IR stars. Attention is also given to the variability of carbon stars, transfer reactions as neutron sources for the s-process, planetary nebulae as post-AGB objects, the kinematic structure of NGC 7139, the post-AGB evolution of low-mass stars, OH/IR stars as the progenitors of planetary nebulae, atmospheric parameters for pre-WD, and a new protoplanetary nebula.

  18. Multi-Epoch Mid-Infrared Interferometric Observations of the Oxygen-rich Mira Variable Star RR Aql with the VLTI/MIDI Instrument

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    MIDI instrument. RR Aql is an oxygen-rich Mira variable with spectral type M6e–M9 and period of pulsation P = 394.78 days ( Samus et al. 2004). RR Aql...396, 918 Ohnaka, K., Scholz, M., & Wood, P. R. 2006, A&A, 446, 1119 Samus , N. N., Durlevich, O. V., et al. 2004, Combined General Catalogue of

  19. EVA - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE II - MISC. - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-30272 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot on the Gemini-Titan IV (GT-4) spaceflight, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. His face is covered by a shaded visor to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun. White became the first American astronaut to walk in space. He remained outside the spacecraft for 21 minutes during the third revolution of the Gemini IV mission. He wears a specially designed spacesuit for the EVA. His right hand is holding the Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU), with which he controlled his movements while in space, and a camera is attached to the HHSMU. He was attached to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped together with gold tape to form one cord. He wears an emergency oxygen supply check pack. Astronaut James A. McDivitt is command pilot for the GT-4 mission. The mission was a four-day, 62-revolution flight, during which McDivitt and White performed a series of scientific and engineering experiments. (This image is black and white) Photo credit: NASA EDITOR?S NOTE: Astronaut Edward H. White II died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on Jan. 27, 1967.

  20. EVA - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE II - MISC. - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-30271 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot on the Gemini-Titan IV (GT-4) spaceflight, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. His face is covered by a shaded visor to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun. White became the first American astronaut to walk in space. He remained outside the spacecraft for 21 minutes during the third revolution of the Gemini IV mission. He wears a specially designed spacesuit for the EVA. His right hand (out of frame) is holding the Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU), with which he controlled his movements while in space, and a camera is attached to the HHSMU. He was attached to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped together with gold tape to form one cord. He wears an emergency oxygen supply check pack. Astronaut James A. McDivitt is command pilot for the GT-4 mission. The mission was a four-day, 62-revolution flight, during which McDivitt and White performed a series of scientific and engineering experiments. (This image is black and white) Photo credit: NASA EDITOR?S NOTE: Astronaut Edward H. White II died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on Jan. 27, 1967.

  1. EVA - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE II - MISC. - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-30273 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot on the Gemini-Titan IV (GT-4) spaceflight, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. His face is covered by a shaded visor to protect him from the unfiltered rays of the sun. White became the first American astronaut to walk in space. He remained outside the spacecraft for 21 minutes during the third revolution of the Gemini IV mission. He wears a specially designed spacesuit for the EVA. His right hand is holding the Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU), with which he controlled his movements while in space, and a camera is attached to the HHSMU. He was attached to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped together with gold tape to form one cord. He wears an emergency oxygen supply check pack. Astronaut James A. McDivitt is command pilot for the GT-4 mission. The mission was a four-day, 62-revolution flight, during which McDivitt and White performed a series of scientific and engineering experiments. (This image is black and white) Photo credit: NASA EDITOR?S NOTE: Astronaut Edward H. White II died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy, Florida, on Jan. 27, 1967.

  2. Griffith Edwards' work on the life course of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Marshall, E Jane

    2015-07-01

    In 1976 Edwards & Gross proposed the concept of the alcohol dependence syndrome, based on the clinical observation that heavy drinkers manifested an inter-related clustering of signs and symptoms. That this modest 'provisional description' turned out to be so significant and influential is perhaps unsurprising when the context in which it was made is appreciated. Griffith Edwards and his colleagues at the Maudsley Hospital had undergone a rigorous 3-year training in clinical psychiatry, during which they had been taught to think critically and were grounded in the art of clinical observation. As he assessed patients for various alcohol research studies he realized that there was a clustering of certain elements. Thus clinical observation and an appreciation of the patient's drinking history contributed to the genesis of the concept. This paper reflects on the integration of his rigorous training at the Maudsley, his enquiring mind and encyclopaedic knowledge of the historical and research literature which enabled him to formulate a testable hypothesis about the alcohol dependence syndrome.

  3. An observational study of dust nucleation in Mira (o Ceti). II. Titanium oxides are negligible for nucleation at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, T.; Müller, H. S. P.; Schmidt, M. R.; Cherchneff, I.; Wong, K. T.; Brünken, S.; Menten, K. M.; Winters, J. M.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Patel, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The formation of silicate dust in oxygen-rich envelopes of evolved stars is thought to be initiated by the formation of seed particles that can withstand the high temperatures close to the stellar photosphere and act as condensation cores farther away from the star. TiO and TiO2 are among the candidate species considered as first condensates. Aims: We aim to identify and characterize the circumstellar gas-phase chemistry of titanium that leads to the formation of solid titanium compounds in the envelope of o Ceti, the prototypical Mira, and seek an observational verification of whether titanium oxides play a major role in the onset of dust formation in M-type asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Methods: We present high angular resolution (145 mas) ALMA observations at submillimeter (submm) wavelengths supplemented by APEX and Herschel spectra of the rotational features of TiO and TiO2. In addition, circumstellar features of TiO and Ti i are identified in optical spectra, which cover multiple pulsation cycles of o Ceti. Results: The submm ALMA data reveal TiO and TiO2 bearing gas within the extended atmosphere of Mira. While TiO is traceable up to a radius (FWHM/2) of 4.0 stellar radii (R⋆), TiO2 extends as far as 5.5 R⋆ and, unlike TiO, appears to be anisotropically distributed. Optical spectra display variable emission of Ti i and TiO from inner parts of the extended atmosphere (<3 R⋆). Conclusions: Chemical models that include shocks are in general agreement with the observations of gas-phase, titanium-bearing molecules. It is unlikely that substantial amounts of titanium is locked up in solids because the abundance of the gaseous titanium species is very high. The formation of hot titanium-rich condensates is very improbable because we find no traces of their hot precursor species in the gas phase. It therefore appears unlikely that the formation of dust in Mira, and possibly other M-type AGB stars, is initiated by titanium oxides.

  4. Physiological and proteomic analyses of the drought stress response in Amygdalus Mira (Koehne) Yü et Lu roots.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Luo, Qiuxiang; Tian, Yan; Meng, Fanjuan

    2017-02-27

    Plants are oftentimes exposed to many types of abiotic stresses. Drought is one of the main environmental stresses which limits plant growth, distribution and crop yield worldwide. Amygdalus mira (Koehne) Yü et Lu is an important wild peach, and it is considered an ideal wild peach germplasm for improving cultivated peach plants. Because of the loss of genetic variation, cultivated peach plants are sensitive to biotic and abiotic stresses. Wild peach germplasm can offer many useful genes for peach improvement. Responses to drought by withholding water have been studied in Amygdalus mira (Koehne) Yü et Lu roots. In this study, plants were divided into well-watered (control) and water-stressed (treatment) groups, and the treatment group did not receive water until the recovery period (day 16). Several physiological parameters, including root water content and root length, were reduced by drought stress and recovered after rewatering. In addition, the relative conductivity, the levels of proline, MDA and H2O2, and the activities of ROS scavenging enzymes (POD, APX and CAT) were increased, and none of these factors, except the level of proline, recovered after rewatering. In total, 95 differentially expressed proteins were revealed after drought. The identified proteins refer to a extensive range of biological processes, molecular functions and cellular components, including cytoskeleton dynamics (3.16% of the total 95 proteins), carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism (6.33% of the total 95 proteins), energy metabolism (7.37% of the total 95 proteins), transcription and translation (18.95% of the total 95 proteins), transport (4.21% of the total 95 proteins), inducers (3.16% of the total 95 proteins), stress and defense (26.31% of the total 95 proteins), molecular chaperones (9.47% of the total 95 proteins), protein degradation (3.16% of the total 95 proteins), signal transduction (7.37% of the total 95 proteins), other materials metabolism (5.26% of the total 95

  5. Teacher Kim Cantrell from the Edwards Air Force Base Middle School, Edwards, Calif., participating in a live uplink at NASA Dryden as part of NASA's Explorer Schools program, asks the crew of the International Space Station a question

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-15

    Teacher Kim Cantrell from the Edwards Air Force Base Middle School, Edwards, Calif., participating in a live uplink at NASA Dryden as part of NASA's Explorer Schools program, asks the crew of the International Space Station a question.

  6. A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A long telephoto lens captured Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on May 1, 2001. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards would subsequently service the shuttle and mount it on a 747 for the ferry flight to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

  7. Credit USAF. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. View of Motor Repair Shop (originally T-16), probably shortly after completion in 1943 - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Motor Repair Shop T-16, Third & C Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 77 FR 6595 - In the Matter of Edward G. Johnson; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Edward G. Johnson; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately) I Mr. Edward G... must file an exemption request, in accordance with 10 CFR 2.302(g), with their initial paper...

  9. Characterization of fractures in limestones - northern segment of Edwards aquifer and Balcones fault zone, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.

    1987-09-01

    Fracture distributions, orientations, and densities in Comanche Peak, Edwards, and Georgetown limestones (Edwards aquifer strata) were determined in conjunction with geologic mapping near the San Gabriel River from Lake Georgetown to Weir, Texas, to increase the understanding of the geology of the Balcones fault zone and to provide data useful in identification of potential recharge areas and assessment of local ground-water flow.

  10. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Comal County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, T.A.; Hanson, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    In Comal County, the Edwards aquifer is probably most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Possible contamination can result from spills, leakage of hazardous materials, or runoff onto the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  11. Struggles for Educational Equity in Prince Edward County, VA: Resistance, Southern Manifesto Ideologies, and School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillerson-Brown, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In light of contemporary school choice proposals and the 60th anniversary of the Southern Manifesto, the Prince Edward County, Virginia public schools crisis provides interesting historical discussion. Prince Edward County (PEC), a rural community in central Virginia, was one of five school districts represented in the 1954 "Brown v. Board of…

  12. Struggles for Educational Equity in Prince Edward County, VA: Resistance, Southern Manifesto Ideologies, and School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillerson-Brown, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In light of contemporary school choice proposals and the 60th anniversary of the Southern Manifesto, the Prince Edward County, Virginia public schools crisis provides interesting historical discussion. Prince Edward County (PEC), a rural community in central Virginia, was one of five school districts represented in the 1954 "Brown v. Board of…

  13. Validation of the SMOS-MIRAS Soil Moisture Product (SML2UDP) in the Pampean Region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niclòs, Raquel; Rivas, Raúl; Sánchez, Juan Manuel; García-Santos, Vicente; Doña, Carolina; Valor, Enric; Holzman, Mauro; Bayala, Martín Ignacio; Carmona, Facundo; Ocampo, Dora; Soldano, Alvaro; Thibeault, Marc

    2014-05-01

    A validation campaign was carried out to evaluate the SMOS-MIRAS Soil Moisture (SM) SML2UDP product (v5.51) in the Pampean Region of Argentina on February 2013. The study area was selected because it is a vast area of flatlands containing quite homogeneous rainfed croplands, with prevalence of soybean crops, considered SMOS nominal land uses (i.e., crops with vegetation heights not exceeding 1 to 2 m by opposition to trees). Transects of ground SM measurements were collected by Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x SM probes within four ISEA-4H9 DGG SMOS nodes. The SM data obtained by each probe transect in each parcel were checked by collecting soil samples in the same parcels at the same time and measuring their masses. The gravimetric method was used to obtain reference values. An uncertainty of ± 0.03 m3m-3 was obtained for the ML2x probes. Additionally, they were calibrated in the laboratory for different SMs by saturating and drying a specific and representative variety of soil samples collected from the experimental parcels (loam, clay loam and silt loam samples). This calibration showed again accurate operations for the ML2x probes, which even attain uncertainties of ±0.01 m3m-3, in agreement with the manufacturer. The comparison of the SM transect data collected during the campaign with the SMOS-MIRAS SML2UDP product values showed a negative bias between concurrent SMOS data and ground SM measurements, which means a slight SMOS-MIRAS underestimation, and a standard deviation of ± 0.06 m3m-3. The validation sites were selected taking as reference the locations of permanent SM stations property of the Argentinean Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE, National Commission of Space Activities), Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA, National Institute of Farming Technology) and Instituto de Hidrología de Llanuras (IHLLA, Plain Hydrology Institute). During the campaign several transects were carried out in the parcels where permanent SM

  14. The Mean Light Curves of the Mira-Type Stars in the H- and K-Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudashkina, L. S.

    For nine Mira-type stars (o Cet, R Leo, S Car, U Her, X Oph, R Aql, RR Aql, S Ori, S Scl) and one semi-regular star (L2 Pup), the mean light curves have been obtained. The initial values of the brightness (observations) were fitted by a trigonometric polynomial of the statistically optimal order.The Fourier coefficients and the additional parameters (degree of the trigonometric polynomial, amplitude of the brightness, the maximal slope of ascending and descending branch, semi-amplitudes and initial epochs for the brightness maximum (minimum magnitude) of each harmonic contribution, etc., were given in the tables reported earlier by Kudashkina (2016). In this study, we have received several interesting correlations between these parameters in the bands H and K. It was particularly noted the anomalous position on the figures of the star X Oph.The mean light curves of the investigated stars are commonly symmetric in the near infrared region (H and K).

  15. Speckle-Interferometry of Mira Stars with the SAO RAS 6-m Telescope: the Case of Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, V.; Balega, Yu.; Beskakotov, A.; Maksimov, A.; Rastegaev, D.

    2017-06-01

    The results of speckle-interferometric observations of Mira R Leo with the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory from 2008 to 2016 are presented. The obtained data indicate the presence of asymmetry in the brightness profiles. The observation sets covered different phases and cycles of pulsation. Observations were made in the 550/20, 656/16, 694/10, and 699/6 nm filters. A change in the asymmetries over time and between different regions of the spectrum is detected. We analyzed the sources of error at the limit of the angular resolution of the telescope. The nature of the observed brightness distribution and the possibility of using speckle interferometry to monitor changes in the external atmospheric layers of large giants and supergiants are discussed.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: I-band light curves of OGLE LMC Miras (He+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, S.; Yuan, W.; Huang, J. Z.; Long, J.; Macri, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Most of the disk of M33 was observed by the DIRECT (Macri et al. 2001, Cat. J/AJ/121/861) and M33 Synoptic Stellar Survey (M33SSS; Pellerin & Macri 2011, Cat. J/ApJS/193/26) projects in the BVI bands, with a combined baseline of 7-9 years. We use the I-band observations to carry out the simulations, as this is the wavelength range where Miras are brightest (out of the three bands used by these projects). Detailed descriptions of the M33 observations can be found in the above referenced papers. We use the data products from a new reduction that will be presented in a companion paper (W. Yuan et al. 2016, in preparation). I-band light curves are available for ~2.5x105 stars, with a median of 44 measurements and a maximum of 170. (3 data files).

  17. Edward Meryon (1809-1880) and muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A E; Emery, M L

    1993-01-01

    Edward Meryon was an English physician of Huguenot stock. He studied medicine at University College, London, and his chief appointments were at St Thomas's Hospital and the London Infirmary for Epilepsy and Paralysis. In a communication to the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society in December 1851, which was published in the Transactions of the Society the following year, he described in detail eight boys in three families with a disease later to be associated with the name of Duchenne. He was particularly impressed by the predilection for males and its familial nature. He appears to have been the first physician to make a systematic study of the disorder some years before Duchenne. Images PMID:8326496

  18. Oslo model, hyperuniformity, and the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter; Dhar, Deepak; Mohanty, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of the one-dimensional Oslo rice pile model in which the critical height at each site is randomly reset after each toppling. We use the fact that the stationary state of this sand-pile model is hyperuniform to reach system of sizes >107 . Most previous simulations were seriously flawed by important finite-size corrections. We find that all critical exponents have values consistent with simple rationals: ν =4/3 for the correlation length exponent, D =9/4 for the fractal dimension of avalanche clusters, and z =10/7 for the dynamical exponent. In addition, we relate the hyperuniformity exponent to the correlation length exponent ν . Finally, we discuss the relationship with the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model, where we find in particular that the local roughness exponent is αloc=1 .

  19. Astronaut Edward White during training for first EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-29

    S65-19504 (28 May 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot for the Gemini-Titan 4 prime crew, is pictured during an extravehicular exercise in the Building 4 laboratory at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas. White is controlling about the yaw (vertical) axis while translating. He stands on a Balance Extravehicular Training Aircraft which is separated from the level steel floor by a .001th-inch cushion of air. In his right hand White holds a zero-gravity integral propulsion unit which is a self-maneuvering device used by an astronaut in a zero-gravity environment. This condition is simulated in this training exercise. White's spacesuit is pressurized to create a realistic training condition. The simulated umbilical line is floated on air with the aid of eleven small air pads.

  20. GT-9 TEST - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE -- MISCILANIES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-06-03

    S65-19600 (3 June 1965) --- The prime crew for the Gemini-Titan 4 mission have an early morning breakfast prior to their historic flight which was launched at 10:16 a.m. (EST) on June 3, 1965. Shown here seated around the table (clockwise starting front center) are Dr. D. Owens Coons, chief, MSC Center Medical Office; astronaut James A. McDivitt, GT-4 command pilot; Dr. Eugene F. Tubbs, Kennedy Space Center; Rt. Rev. James Heiliky, McDivitt's priest at Cocoa Beach, Florida; Msgr. Irvine J. Nugent and astronaut Edward H. White II, GT-4 pilot. The group had a breakfast of tomato juice, broiled sirloin steak, poached eggs, toast, strawberry gelatin and coffee.

  1. F-18 HARV final flight over Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The final flight for the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) took place at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on May 29, 1996 and was flown by NASA pilot Ed Schneider. The highly modified F-18 airplane flew 383 flights over a nine year period and demonstrated concepts that greatly increase fighter maneuverability. Among concepts proven in the aircraft is the use of paddles to direct jet engine exhaust in cases of extreme altitudes where conventional control surfaces lose effectiveness. Another concept, developed by NASA Langley Research Center, is a deployable wing-like surface installed on the nose of the aircraft for increased right and left (yaw) control on nose-high flight angles.

  2. Astronaut Edward White - Gemini IV Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-01-01

    S65-30429 (3 June 1965) --- Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini IV four-day Earth-orbital mission, floats in the zero gravity of space outside the Gemini IV spacecraft. White wears a specially designed spacesuit; and the visor of the helmet is gold plated to protect him against the unfiltered rays of the sun. He wears an emergency oxygen pack, also. He is secured to the spacecraft by a 25-feet umbilical line and a 23-feet tether line, both wrapped in gold tape to form one cord. In his right hand is a Hand-Held Self-Maneuvering Unit (HHSMU) with which he controls his movements in space. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the mission, remained inside the spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA EDITOR'S NOTE: Astronaut White died in the Apollo/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967.

  3. LANDING - STS-9/41A - EDWARDS AFB (EAFB), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-12-09

    S83-45648 (8 Dec 1983) --- After more than 10 days in Earth orbit, the crewmembers for STS-9 egress the Space Shuttle Columbia following its successful landing at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Descending the stairs are (from bottom) Astronaut John W. Young, Brewster H. Shaw Jr. and Robert A. R. Parker; West German physicist Dr. Ulf Merbold; Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, and Dr. Byron K. Lichtenberg, a biomedical engineer from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Young was STS-9 crew commander; Shaw, pilot Drs. Parker and Garriott were mission specialists; and Drs. Merbold and Lichtenberg, payload specialists. Dr. Merbold was the European Space Agency?s first scientist to fly aboard a NASA spacecraft and Dr. Lichtenberg was America?s first non-astronaut to join a NASA crew in space. On hand to greet the crewmembers is George W. S. Abbey, director of flight crew operations.

  4. The 'unbooked' mother at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J V; van Middelkoop, A

    1982-09-25

    'Unbooked' status is associated with excessive perinatal mortality at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban. A survey was therefore conducted to characterize the unbooked mother and to identify important factors contributing to her unbooked status. The unbooked mother was found to come more frequently from a background of unstable relationships and to have poor financial and emotional support. Unwanted babies and inadequate parenting arrangements were more frequent in this group. One factor contributing to unbooked status was the inaccessibility of peripheral services, which too often also offer a low standard of care. Another was the lack of commitment of private practitioners (visited 67% of the study group) to a concept of antenatal care which is cumulative and includes the planning of the timing, mode and place of delivery. Factors which did not influence the booking status of the mother included the use of traditional healers (Umthandazo and Nyanga) and the incidence of previous operative deliveries. Various recommendations arising from these findings are made.

  5. Sexual portraits: Edward Melcarth and homoeroticism in modern American art.

    PubMed

    Griffey, Erin; Reay, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Although one will not find Edward Melcarth (1914-73) in the best recent histories of male homosexuality and American art, he was not always so spectral. Named in Life magazine in 1950 as one of the best young American artists, he exhibited as a painter, draftsman and sculptor and also practised as an illustrator, photographer and designer. His work survives in the Forbes Collection, in the Smithsonian Institution and in the art archives at the Kinsey Institute. We argue that Melcarth’s vision of the erotic was far broader than the traditional categories of sexuality that are perpetuated in art histories of homoeroticism in modern America – and that such a revisioning enables a reinterpretation of some of the better known images of homosexual art.

  6. A psychoanalytic study of Edward de Vere's The Tempest.

    PubMed

    Waugaman, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    There is now abundant evidence that Freud was correct in believing Edward de Vere (1550-1604) wrote under the pseudonym "William Shakespeare." One common reaction is "What difference does it make?" I address that question by examining many significant connections between de Vere's life and The Tempest. Such studies promise to bring our understanding of Shakespeare's works back into line with our usual psychoanalytic approach to literature, which examines how a great writer's imagination weaves a new creation out of the threads of his or her life experiences. One source of the intense controversy about de Vere's authorship is our idealization of the traditional author, about whom we know so little that, as Freud noted, we can imagine his personality was as fine as his works.

  7. Phenotypic extremes in liveborn monozygotic twins with mosaic Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Neidin; Cunningham, Katie; Green, Andrew; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-11-11

    Mosaic trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in monozygotic diamniotic liveborn twins is rare. We describe such a case involving preterm male infants. Although both infants had a low percentage of trisomy 18 cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, their varied phenotypic presentation of mosaic trisomy 18 resulted in one twin surviving, with the other twin's demise at 1 month of age. Despite the presence of trisomy 18 in peripheral leucocytes, further analysis of a buccal smear and skin biopsy of the surviving twin did not show evidence of trisomy 18. Establishing such diagnoses in a timely manner is imperative for the child, parents and clinicians. The clinical course of these twins reflects the unpredictable prognosis associated with the diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 18, and emphasises the challenges that can be encountered when counselling parents.

  8. Enhanced recharge and karst, Edwards aquifer, south central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, W.W. Jr. . Center for Water Research)

    1993-02-01

    Enhanced recharge is a water management strategy which can add significant quantities of ground water to the available water resources of the San Antonio region by utilizing the immense storage capacity of the unconfined zone of the Edwards aquifer. The Edwards aquifer presently is the sole source of water for a population of over 1,200,000, meeting public supply, industrial, and irrigation demands over a wide area of south central Texas. Valdina Farms Sinkhole is located adjacent to Seco Creek in Medina County and is in the recharge zone of the aquifer. Initial studies indicated that the sinkholes was capable of taking flood flows from Seco Creek and functioning as a recharge structure. Stream channels in the cavern system associated with Valdina Farms Sinkhole were incised into cave deposits and flood debris was present in the caverns at some distance from the sinkhole. Chemical analyses of samples of water from the cave and from nearby wells showed nitrate concentrations that decreased with distance from the cavern. Gradient of the potentiometric surface in the vicinity of the cave was very low, indicating high values of hydraulic conductivity for the aquifer. Based on evidence from these field studies a dam was constructed in 1982 on Seco Creek and a flood diversion channel was excavated to the sinkhole. Reservoir capacity is 2 acre-feet and design recharge rate is 3.8-6.7 m[sup 3]/sec. Annual recharge at the sinkhole has varied from 0 during periods of low runoff to 12,915 acre-feet.

  9. MiraLAX-Gatorade bowel prep versus GoLytely before screening colonoscopy: an endoscopic database study in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Frederick K; Gunaratnam, Naresh; Mohamud, Sagal O; Schoenfeld, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol-3350 without electrolytes (MiraLAX; Schering-Plough Healthcare Products Inc.)+a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (Gatorade; PepsiCo Inc.)+bisacodyl is frequently used for bowel cleansing, although limited data quantifies its efficacy and safety. No prior studies have assessed this in a community setting or with PM-only dosing, which is still used frequently. To compare the frequency of excellent/good/fair/poor bowel cleansing with PM-only dosing of MiraLAX-Gatorade-bisacodyl versus 4-liter GoLytely. This is a retrospective endoscopic database analysis of 50 years and older average-risk individuals with a normal screening colonoscopy at a community hospital and ambulatory endoscopy center. Data were extracted for the last 4 months when 4-liter GoLytely was the preferred bowel purgative and the first 4 months when 238-g MiraLAX in 64-ounce Gatorade and four 5-mg bisacodyl tablets became the preferred purgative. All patients used PM-only dosing of bowel purgative. A total of 778 subjects [GoLytely (n=395) vs. MiraLAX+Gatorade+bisacodyl (n=383)] were identified. Patients who took the MiraLAX bowel preparation were more likely to achieve an excellent/good bowel cleansing compared with patients taking the GoLytely preparation (93.3% vs. 89.3%, respectively; P=0.048). However, when only American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) class I patients are studied, there was no difference in frequency of excellent/good bowel cleansing (91.1% vs 93.6%, respectively; P=0.498). No serious adverse events were identified. An excellent/good bowel cleansing was strongly associated with a recommendation for repeat colonoscopy in 10 years compared with patients with a fair cleansing (odds ratio=28.01; 95% confidence interval, 13.96-56.19). The MiraLAX+Gatorade+bisacodyl combination produces similar rates of excellent/good bowel cleansing as compared with GoLytely in most average-risk individuals undergoing colonoscopy for colorectal screening in a community setting.

  10. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Medina County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, Ted A.; Clark, Allan K.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrogeologic subdivisions of the Edwards aquifer outcrop in Medina County generally are porous and permeable. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; and hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided, of the Person Formation. The most porous and permeable rocks of the Devils River Formation in Medina County appear to be in the top layer. The upper member of the Glen Rose Limestone, the lower confining unit, has much less porosity and permeability than that observed in the Edwards aquifer.The Edwards aquifer has relatively large porosity and permeability resulting, in part, from the development or redistribution of secondary porosity. Lithology, stratigraphy, diagenesis, and karstification account for the effective porosity and permeability in the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Karst features that can greatly enhance effective porosity and permeability in the Edwards aquifer outcrop include sinkholes, dolines, and caves. The Edwards aquifer rocks in Medina County change from the eight-member Edwards Group to the essentially indivisible Devils River Formation. The facies change occurs along a line extending northwestward from just south of Medina Lake.

  11. Hydrogeological framework of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Ardis, Ann F.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards-Trinity aquifer system underlies about 42,000 square miles of west-central Texas, where mostly gently dipping Lower Cretaceous strata comprise three regional aquifers and two regional confining units. The aquifers are the Edwards Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone, the Trinity Aquifer of the Balcones fault zone and Hill County, and the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer of the Edwards Plateau and Trans-Pecos. The Navarro-Del Rio confining unit confines the downdip part of the Edwards Aquifer, and the Hammett confining unit confines the updip, basal part of the Trinity Aquifer and a small southeastern fringe of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer. Transmissivity averages less than 10,000 feet squared per day throughout more than 90 percent of the study area as the result of widespread cementation and secondary mineral growth. However, in fractured and leached rocks in the Balcones fault zone, transmissivity averages about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the area.

  12. Recharge to and discharge from the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio area, Texas, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.S.; Patton, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer is the sole source of public water supply for more than 1 million people in the San Antonio area and supplies large quantities of water for agriculture, industry, and the military. The dissolutioned, faulted limestone aquifer is the major source of water for Bexar, Comal, Hays, Medina, and Uvalde Counties. The annual compilation of estimates of ground-water recharge to and discharge from the Edwards aquifer is part of a continuing program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation wilh the Edwards Underground Water District (EUWD).

  13. Using Geophysics to Define Hydrostratigraphic Units in the Edwards and Trinity Aquifers, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. D.; Blome, C. D.; Clark, A. K.; Kress, W.; Smith, D. V.

    2007-05-01

    Airborne and ground geophysical surveys conducted in Uvalde, Medina, and northern Bexar counties, Texas, can be used to define and characterize hydrostratigraphic units of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. Airborne magnetic surveys have defined numerous Cretaceous intrusive stocks and laccoliths, mainly in Uvalde County, that influence local hydrology and perhaps regional ground-water flow paths. Depositional environments in the aquifers can be classified as shallow water platforms (San Marcos Platform, Edwards Group), shoal and reef facies (Devils River Trend, Devils River Formation), and deeper water basins (Maverick Basin, West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations). Detailed airborne and ground electromagnetic surveys have been conducted over the Edwards aquifer catchment zone (exposed Trinity aquifer rocks), recharge zone (exposed Edwards aquifer rocks), and artesian zone (confined Edwards) in the Seco Creek area (northeast Uvalde and Medina Counties; Devils River Trend). These geophysical survey data have been used to divide the Edwards exposed within the Balcones fault zone into upper and lower hydrostratigraphic units. Although both units are high electrical resistivity, the upper unit has slightly lower resistivity than the lower unit. The Georgetown Formation, at the top of the Edwards Group has a moderate resistivity. The formations that comprise the upper confining units to the Edwards aquifer rocks have varying resistivities. The Eagleford and Del Rio Groups (mainly clays) have very low resistivities and are excellent electrical marker beds in the Seco Creek area. The Buda Limestone is characterized by high resistivities. Moderate resistivities characterize the Austin Group rocks (mainly chalk). The older Trinity aquifer, underlying the Edwards aquifer rocks, is characterized by less limestone (electrically resistive or low conductivity units) and greater quantities of mudstones (electrically conductive or low resistivity units). In the western

  14. Prince Edward Island Heart Health Dissemination Research Project: establishing a sustainable community mobilization initiative.

    PubMed

    White, R; Mitchell, T; Gyorfi-Dyke, E; Sweet, L; Hebert, R; Moase, O; MacPhee, R; MacDonald, B

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Prince Edward Island Heart Health Program (PEIHHP) Dissemination Research Project. Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a small province in the Atlantic region of Canada with a population of 137,980. The Island's economy is dependent on the fishery, agriculture, and tourism industries. Although unemployment rates are high (14.4%), Prince Edward Island has the lowest poverty rate in the country at 15.2%, high levels of social support (86%), and the second lowest rate of high chronic stress (Report on the Health of Canadians, 1996, 1999).

  15. Occurrence of Culex (Culiciomyia) Spathifurca (Edwards) (Diptera: Culicidae) in India--new country record.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, A R; Natarajan, R; Munirathinam, A

    1998-09-01

    Culex (Culiciomyia) spathifurca (Edwards) is recorded for the 1st time in India. Immature specimens of this species were collected from tree holes in a mangrove forest. Notes on the larval habitat are given.

  16. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, landing at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, glides over Runway 17 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) California just prior to main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. In the distance, Dryden Flight Research Facility (DFRF) is visible.

  17. 4. INSTRUMENT ROOM,INTERIOR, MAIN SPACE. Looking northeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INSTRUMENT ROOM,INTERIOR, MAIN SPACE. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. The C-17 simulator at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-04

    The C-17 simulator at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Simulators offer a safe and economical alternative to actual flights to gather data, as well as being excellent facilities for pilot practice and training.

  19. Night landing of Shuttle Columbia at Edwards AFB and end of STS 61-C mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Night landing of Shuttle Columbia at Edwards Air Force Base and end of the STS 61-C mission. View is of the Shuttle's main landing gear touching down, with streams of light trailing behind the orbiter.

  20. Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia on the ground at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This high angle view show the scene at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California soon after the sucessful landing of the Columbia to end STS-1. Service vehicles approach the spacecraft to perform evaluations for safety and egress preparedness.

  1. Flow dynamics over a foredune at Prince Edward Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Walker, Ian J.; Ollerhead, Jeff

    2005-02-01

    Time-averaged windspeed profiles at eight locations over a relatively high (8 m), vegetated, topographically simple foredune were measured using cup and ultrasonic anemometry during an onshore wind event in May 2002. The experiment was part of a larger study on the sedimentary dynamics of a beach-dune complex in the Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada. The foredune is vegetated with Ammophila breviligulata, and vegetation density ranged from 0% on the foredune ramp to upward of 70% at the dune crest. Topographic forcing and resulting flow acceleration was observed distinctly in windspeed profiles, and linear speedup occurred for all elevations above the vegetation canopy. A distinct inflection point is evident in normalized windspeed profiles over the dune indicating a net momentum sink below the vegetation canopy top, and systematic speed-down within the vegetation was observed up the foredune stoss slope. Wind speed profile structure was consistent for the range of incident wind speeds measured. A comparison of normal and slightly oblique incident winds indicated that for similar approach winds, wind speeds are consistently higher during oblique flow conditions. The implications for foredune morphodynamics and sedimentation are discussed.

  2. Generally representative is generally representative: comment on Shuttleworth-Edwards.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide comment on Shuttleworth-Edwards' criticism of the general population norms created for the South African adaptation of the WAIS-IV. In her criticism, she states that the norms are not applicable for any groups in South Africa, based on the fact that the norms were not stratified according to quality of education. A discussion of some of the key issues that impact on the creation of general population norms in the South African context is provided. Demographic characteristics such as education level, quality of education, urban and rural demarcations, and home language are all considered. While the utility of within-group norms is not denied, the adoption of these without reference to the general population is not advised. To recommend that practitioners simply dispense with the general population norm without evidence that it creates misclassification or does not function effectively for the intended population lacks scientific merit at the current time. The need for clinical studies and further predictive validity research using the South African adaptation of the WAIS-IV is crucial to demonstrate the continued utility of the test in the South African context. Additional reference groups will improve the amount of comparative information available for clinicians to be able to make better informed decisions for diagnosis, but the general population norms will be an important starting point in this process.

  3. Edward Burne-Jones' Heavenly Conception: A Biblical Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheney, L. D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Edward Burne-Jones was a Pre-Raphaelite artist and designer, who collaborated with William Morris on many decorative arts (stained glass windows, book illustrations, ceramic and tapestry designs). He was a founding partner in the firm Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company. Burne-Jones composed The Days of Creation between 1870 and 1876 for the Morris firm. These paintings were executed in gouache and gold paint, and cartoons were made for tile and in stained glass, for the Church of St. Editha at Tamworth in Staffordshire. Burne-Jones' creation was highly praised and elegantly described by Oscar Wilde: “The picture is divided into six compartments, each representing a day in the Creation of the World, under the symbol of an angel holding a crystal globe, within which is shown the work of a day.” This paper will examine how Burne-Jones visualized an unusual celestial creation where angels holding magical spheres unveil the divine manifestation for the creation of a terrestrial realm. He created a cosmic utopia of the natural world.

  4. The selenium status of dairy herds in Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Bulk tank milk selenium (Se) concentration was compared with mean serum Se concentration in 15 herds and was found to be an accurate reflection of the herd Se status. The Se status of 109 Prince Edward Island (PEI) dairy herds was monitored for 1 year using bulk tank milk Se concentration. Fifty-nine percent of the herds surveyed were, at some point, found to be marginal or deficient in Se, putting them at risk of disease and suboptimal production. The periods of greatest risk of deficiency were fall and winter, at which time 5% and 4%, respectively, of herds sampled fell in the range considered truly deficient in Se. Herds in which Se supplementation was provided in the form of a commercial dairy concentrate were over 4 times more likely to be Se-adequate than herds not using this method, and adjusted average daily milk yield was 7.6% greater in herds determined to be Se-adequate when compared with Se-marginal herds. We conclude that many dairy producers in PEI are providing insufficient supplementary Se in the ration to meet the recommended Se intake for lactating cows. PMID:15025148

  5. The JIM interview. Edward M. Kennedy, United States Senator.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, E M

    2000-05-01

    Senator Edward M. Kennedy has represented Massachusetts in the United States Senate for thirty-six years. He was first elected in 1962 to finish the term of his brother, President John F. Kennedy. Since then, he has been elected to six full terms, and he is now the third most senior member of the senate. The efforts to bring quality health care to every American is a battle that Kennedy has been waging ever since he arrived in the Senate. Recent achievements include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which makes it easier for those who change their job or lose their job to keep their health insurance, and the Children's Health Insurance Act of 1997, which makes health insurance more widely available to children through age 18 in all 50 states. A strong supporter of clinical research, Senator Kennedy cosponsored the Clinical Research Enhancement Act and has been a vocal advocate of stem cell research. He is currently the senior Democrat on the Labor and Human Resources committee in the Senate.

  6. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing 16 May on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards AFB with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their

  7. STS-49 Landing at Edwards with First Drag Chute Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour concludes mission STS-49 at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 1:57 p.m. (PDT) landing May 16 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 7-day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 4:41 p.m. (PFT), 7 May, was extended two days to allow extra time to rescue the Intelsat VI satellite and complete Space Station assembly techniques originally planned. After a perfect rendezvous in orbit and numerous attempts to grab the satellite, space walking astronauts Pierre Thuot, Rick Hieb and Tom Akers successfully rescued it by hand on the third space walk with the support of mission specialists Kathy Thornton and Bruce Melnick. The three astronauts, on a record space walk, took hold of the satellite and directed it to the shuttle where a booster motor was attached to launch it to its proper orbit. Commander Dan Brandenstein and Pilot Kevin Chilton brought Endeavours's record setting maiden voyage to a perfect landing at Edwards with the first deployment of a drag chute on a shuttle mission. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their

  8. W. Edwards Deming, quality analysis, and total behavior management

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Richard R.; Saunders, Jay L.

    1994-01-01

    During the past 10 years, the inclusion of the word “quality” in descriptions of production methods, management approaches, educational systems, service system changes, and so forth, has grown exponentially. It appears that no new approach to any problem is likely to be given much consideration today without overt acknowledgment that some improvement in quality must be the outcome. The origins of the importance of quality are primarily rooted in the awakening recognition of the influence of W. Edwards Deming in the post-World War II restoration of Japanese industry. We provide a brief overview of Deming's approach to modernizing management methods and discuss recent criticisms from the field of organizational behavior management that his approach lacks emphasis on the role of reinforcement. We offer a different analysis of Deming's approach and relate its evolution to the contingencies of reinforcement for the behavior of consulting. We also provide an example of problem solving with Deming's approach in a social service setting familiar to many behavior analysts. PMID:22478176

  9. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider preparing for an F-104 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NASA research pilot Edward T. Scheider is shown standing in the cockpit of a two-seat F-104. He is wearing a full pressure suit, which is required on all flights above 50,000 feet. Ed served in the U.S. Navy from 1968 to 1983. He attended the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and graduated in 1973. He was then assigned as an engineering test pilot, and as an instructor at the Naval Test Pilot School. He first arrived at what was then called the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center) as a Navy Liaison Officer on July 5, 1982. He joined NASA as a research pilot a year later. Ed was a project pilot on the F-18 High Angle-of-Attack program, the F-15 aeronautical research aircraft, the B-52 launch aircraft, and the NASA-operated SR-71 Blackbirds. Ed retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000.

  10. When Cri du chat syndrome meets Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingjun; Zhou, Yi; Wu, Jianzhu; Sun, Yunxia; Chen, Yongzhen; Chen, Baojiang

    2015-03-01

    It has been well established that the 5p deletion causes Cri du chat syndrome, typically characterized by a cat‑like cry, and that duplication of 18q causes Edwards syndrome; the two are rare genetic abnormalities that separately lead to physical and mental impairments. However, the severity of the clinicopathological characteristics that arise when these two aberrations occur in one patient is unknown. Here, the first case in our knowledge of a single patient (a two‑year‑old female) with 5p partial monosomy and 18q partial trisomy is described. In the present study, chromosome microarray analysis was performed, which identified the imbalance of chromosomes 5 and 18 in the patient. The chromosome aberrations were further confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. By comparing the phenotypes of combined case with those of the individual syndromes, severe clinical phenotypes of the 5p (5p15.33‑p13.3) deletion were confirmed, however, the net effect of the duplication of 18q22.3‑q23 was not determined, as this duplication only appeared to have a weak effect on the patient's phenotypes. The correlation between these chromosomal aberrations and their clinical features has implications for the identification of critical regions of 5p and 18q, particularly for the functional mapping of chromosome 18.

  11. Water Resources Investigations at Edwards Air Force Base since 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California (fig. 1) has relied on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. The extraction of ground water has led to two major problems that can directly affect the mission of EAFB: declining water levels (more than 120 ft since the 1920s) and land subsidence, a gradual downward movement of the land surface (more than 4 ft since the late 1920s). As water levels decline, this valuable resource becomes depleted, thus requiring mitigating measures. Land subsidence has caused cracked (fissured) runways and accelerated erosion on Rogers lakebed. In 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began investigations of the effects of declining water levels and land subsidence at EAFB and possible mitigation measures, such as the injection of imported surface water into the ground-water system. The cooperative investigations included data collection and analyses, numerical simulations of ground-water flow and land subsidence, and development of a preliminary simulation-optimization model. The results of these investigations indicate that the injection of imported water may help to control land subsidence; however, the potential ground-water-quality impacts are unknown.

  12. Emanuel Edward Klein's book on diseases of birds.

    PubMed

    Atalić, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Emanuel Edward Klein (1844 - 1925) was a British microbiologist of Croatian origin. He was born in Osijek in what is currently the Republic of Croatia and which was then part of the Habsburg Monarchy, he completed his medical studies in Vienna in 1869, and went on to spend his entire career in London. Although trained as an anatomist, embryologist and histologist, his main area of research was microbiology. Due to the fact that back then it was a new and fast developing discipline, he was able to pursue his interests in many directions and make significant discoveries, such as the identification of the 'Bacillus enteritidis sporogenes' as a cause of summer hospital diarrhoeas. Although the overwhelming majority of his researches dealt with bacteria which attacked humans, in 1892 he published a book entitled The Etiology and Pathology of Grouse Disease, Fowl Enteritis, and Some Other Diseases Affecting Birds, which revealed the results of his experiments on the bacteria which affected birds. In the context of the general development of the microbiology, this paper tries to give an objective evaluation of this until now widely neglected book.

  13. The F-18 simulator at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-04

    The F-18 simulator at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Simulators offer a safe and economical alternative to actual flights to gather data, as well as being excellent facilities for pilot practice and training. The F-18 Hornet is used primarily as a safety chase and mission support aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. As support aircraft, the F-18's are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency, aerial photography and other mission support functions.

  14. Landing view of the Columbia at the end of the STS-5 mission at Edwards AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Landing view of the Columbia at the end of the STS-5 mission at Edwards Air Force Base, California on Nov. 16, 1982. The nose landing gear of the Columbia nears touchdown on Runway 22 at Edwards AFB in southern California. The aft landing gear has already touched down in this scene (39894); Front view of the Columbia touching down on Runway 22, its nose landing gear still in the air (39895).

  15. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer outcrop, Hays County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, John A.; Small, Ted A.

    1995-01-01

    All of the hydrogeologic subdivisions within the Edwards aquifer outcrop in Hays County have some porosity and permeability. The most porous and permeable appear to be hydrogeologic subdivision VI, the Kirschberg evaporite member of the Kainer Formation; hydrogeologic subdivision III, the leached and collapsed members, undivided; and hydrogeologic subdivision II, the cyclic and marine members, undivided, of the Person Formation. The two types of porosity in the Edwards aquifer outcrop are fabric selective, which is related to depositional or diagenetic elements and typically exists in specific stratigraphic horizons; and not fabric selective, which can exist in any lithostratigraphic horizon. Permeability, the capacity of porous rock to transmit water, depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, and distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. Two faults, San Marcos Springs and Mustang Branch, completely, or almost completely, offset the Edwards aquifer by juxtaposing Edwards aquifer limestone against nearly impermeable upper confining units along parts of their traces across Hays County. These faults are thought to be barriers, or partial barriers, to groundwater flow where the beds are juxtaposed. In Hays County, the Edwards aquifer probably is most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Contamination can result from spills or leakage of hazardous materials; or runoff on the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  16. Recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer hydrologically associated with Barton springs in the Austin area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slagle, Diana L.; Ardis, Ann F.; Slade, Raymond M.

    1986-01-01

    The Edwards aquifer extends in a narrow belt from Bell County in the northeast to Kinney County in the southwest (index map) and provides water for at least nine counties in south-central Texas. Hydrologic boundaries divide the Edwards aquifer in the Austin area for which Barton Springs is the major discharge point. This part of the Edwards aquifer provides the municipal, industrial, domestic, and agricultural water supplies for about 30,000 people in the Austin area (southern Travis and northern Hays counties). Discharge from Barton Springs sustains streamflow at the mouth of Barton Creek and flows into Town Lake. Much of the land use within the outcrop area of the Edwards aquifer near Austin is rapidly changing from natural woodland and grassland to commercial and residential developments. Because urban development can result in a substantial degradation of the quality of water that recharges the aquifer, the extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer was delineated to provide information to the City of Austin for their use in formulating a plan for protecting and managing groundwater quality. The purpose of this report is to define and delineate the areal extent of the recharge zone of the Edwards aquifer in southern Travis and northern Hays Counties. The areal boundary of the recharge zone was determined by: (1) geologic mapping of the aquifer area; (2) interpretation of aerial photographs; (3) field verification of existing geologic maps; and (4) streamflow-loss studies. 

  17. Compliance through pollution prevention opportunity assessments at Edwards AFB -- Development, results and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Beutelman, H.P.; Lawrence, A.

    1999-07-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), located in the Mojave Desert of southern California, is required to comply with environmental requirements for air pollution emissions, hazardous waste disposal, and clean water. The resources required to meet these many compliance requirements represents an ever increasing financial burden to the base, and to the Department of Defense. A recognized superior approach to environmental management is to achieve compliance through a proactive pollution prevention (P2) program which mitigates, and when possible, eliminates compliance requirements and costs, while at the same time reducing pollution released to the environment. At Edwards AFB, the Environmental Management Office P2 Branch developed and implemented a strategy that addresses this concept, better known as Compliance Through Pollution Prevention (CTP2). At the 91st AWMA Annual Meeting and Exhibition, Edwards AFB presented a paper on its strategy and implementation of its CTP2 concept. Part of that strategy and implementation included accomplishment of process specific focused P2 opportunity assessments (OAs). Starting in 1998, Edwards AFB initiated a CTP2 OA project where OAs were targeted on those operational processes, identified as compliance sites, that contributed most to the compliance requirements and costs at Edwards AFB. The targeting of these compliance sites was accomplished by developing a compliance matrix that prioritized processes in accordance with an operational risk management approach. The Edwards AFB CTP2 PPOA project is the first of its kind within the Air Force Material Command, and is serving as a benchmark for establishment of the CTP2 OA process.

  18. Benefits of size dimorphism and copulatory silk wrapping in the sexually cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alissa G; Hebets, Eileen A

    2016-02-01

    In sexually cannibalistic animals, male fitness is influenced not only by successful mate acquisition and egg fertilization, but also by avoiding being eaten. In the cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira, the legs of mature males are longer in relation to their body size than those of females, and males use these legs to aid in wrapping a female's legs with silk prior to and during copulation. We hypothesized that elongated male legs and silk wrapping provide benefits to males, in part through a reduced likelihood of sexual cannibalism. To test this, we paired females of random size with males from one of two treatment groups-those capable of silk wrapping versus those incapable of silk wrapping. We found that males with relatively longer legs and larger body size were more likely to mate and were less likely to be cannibalized prior to copulation. Regardless of relative size, males capable of silk wrapping were less likely to be cannibalized during or following copulation and had more opportunities for sperm transfer (i.e. pedipalpal insertions). Our results suggest that male size and copulatory silk wrapping are sexually selected traits benefiting male reproductive success.

  19. Benefits of size dimorphism and copulatory silk wrapping in the sexually cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira

    PubMed Central

    Hebets, Eileen A.

    2016-01-01

    In sexually cannibalistic animals, male fitness is influenced not only by successful mate acquisition and egg fertilization, but also by avoiding being eaten. In the cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira, the legs of mature males are longer in relation to their body size than those of females, and males use these legs to aid in wrapping a female's legs with silk prior to and during copulation. We hypothesized that elongated male legs and silk wrapping provide benefits to males, in part through a reduced likelihood of sexual cannibalism. To test this, we paired females of random size with males from one of two treatment groups—those capable of silk wrapping versus those incapable of silk wrapping. We found that males with relatively longer legs and larger body size were more likely to mate and were less likely to be cannibalized prior to copulation. Regardless of relative size, males capable of silk wrapping were less likely to be cannibalized during or following copulation and had more opportunities for sperm transfer (i.e. pedipalpal insertions). Our results suggest that male size and copulatory silk wrapping are sexually selected traits benefiting male reproductive success. PMID:26911340

  20. The Dynamic Atmospheres of Mira Stars: Comparing the CODEX Models to PTI Time Series Observations of TU Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; Van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    We present our already-published evaluation of the effectiveness of the CODEX models, released in 2011, in representing the atmospheres of M-type Mira variables. We present a high-precision interferometric K-band time series of TU And, consisting of 50 nights that cover eight consecutive pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2μm was obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in five channels across the K band. We show a comparison between these data and the dynamical self-excited CODEX model which gives the closest match in stellar parameters yet available. Both the spectrum and the visibilities are consistently reproduced around visual minimum phases. Near the maximum phases, however, the current models predict a photosphere that is too hot and compact, surrounded by an extended atmosphere that lacks H2O opacity, compared to the observations. A better coverage in the model parameter space is needed to make firm conclusions as to the cause of the discrepancies. In the case of TU And, the discrepancy might be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increased stellar mass and/or a decreased metallicity.

  1. EXTENDED-MIRAS: the instrumental approach for the search of traces of extinct and extant life on Mars, measuring scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, J.; Tarcea, N.; Thomas, N.; Cockell, C.; Edwards, H. W. G.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Hilchenbach, M.; Hochleitner, R.; Hofer, S.; Hoffmann, V.; Hofmann, B.; Jessberger, E. K.; Kiefer, W.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Maurice, S.; Rull Pérez, F.; Schmitt, M.; Simon, G.; Sobron, F.; Weigand, W.; Whitby, J. A.; Wurz, P.

    2004-03-01

    Whether there was or is life on Mars is a question of high interest to man. When looking for evidence of present or ancient life on Mars it might not be sufficient to disclose the chemical composition of the surface or subsurface material. Further information concerning for example the morphology of the sample under investigation or the spatial distribution of the observed chemicals or minerals is of similar relevance. Therefore one needs a reliable, automated, robust and miniaturized apparatus capable of resolving all the above mentioned problems in one effort. EXTENDED-MIRAS is an instrumental approach combining optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy with additional elementary characterization methods such as LIPS/LIBS (laser induced plasma spectrometry/laser induced breakdown spectrometry) or LMS (laser mass spectrometry). Nevertheless an exhaustive investigation usually requires time/energy which is a limited resource for a planetary mission. The size of the dataset produced might also pose a serious problem since the data link budget is limited (energy constraints). In order to maximize the scientific return, a measuring scenario that will make the most out of the reduced time/energy budget has to be implemented. Such a measuring scenario is described here with exemplification at laboratory scale.

  2. Simulations of flow in the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.; Holligan, K.Q.

    1994-01-01

    The transmissivity values used in the simulations were within estimated ranges and generally are: 1,000 to 10,000 ft2/d (feet squared per day) for the Edwards-Trinity and Trinity aquifers; 100,000 to greater than 1 million ft2/d for the Edwards aquifer; and less than 500 to 10,000 ft2/d in contiguous hydraulically connected units. Simulated flow through the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system and contiguous hydraulically connected units is about 3 million acre-feet per year. Estimates of areally distributed recharge from the simulations range from 0.1 to 1 inch per year for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer and increase to 4 inches per year for the Trinity aquifer. Recharge to the Edwards aquifer occurs along streambeds that cross outcropped high-permeability rocks of the Edwards Group through joints and faults. Many of the streams are diverted completely underground during periods of no precipitation. The movement of a substantial quantity of water (about 400 cubic feet per second) from the Trinity and Edwards-Trinity aquifers into the Edwards aquifer was simulated. Results of the simulations indicate that anisotropy strongly influences flow in the Edwards aquifer. In the San Antonio and Austin areas, the Edwards aquifer is the most active part of the ground-water flow system with one-third of ground-water discharge occurring in 5 percent of the modeled area for both simulations.

  3. Short-term hemodynamic performance of the mitral Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve. Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Morehead, A. J.; Thomas, J. D.; Smedira, N. G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Marchand, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although long-term durability data exist, little data are available concerning the hemodynamic performance of the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve in the mitral position. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients who were implanted with mitral PERIMOUNT valves at seven international centers between January 1996 and February 1997 consented to participate in a short-term echocardiography follow-up. Echocardiographs were collected at a mean of 600+/-133 days after implantation (range, 110 to 889 days); all underwent blinded core lab analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, peak gradients were 9.09+/-3.43 mm Hg (mean, 4.36+/-1.79 mm Hg) and varied inversely with valve size (p < 0.05). The effective orifice areas were 2.5+/-0.6 cm2 and tended to increase with valve size (p = 0.08). Trace mitral regurgitation (MR) was common (n = 48), 9 patients had mild MR, 1 had moderate MR, none had severe MR. All MR was central (n = 55) or indeterminate (n = 3). No paravalvular leaks were observed. Mitral regurgitation flow areas were 3.4+/-2.8 cm2 and were without significant volumes. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study, these mitral valves are associated with trace, although physiologically insignificant, central MR. Despite known echocardiographic limitations, the PERIMOUNT mitral valves exhibit similar hemodynamics to other prosthetic valves.

  4. Short-term hemodynamic performance of the mitral Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve. Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Morehead, A. J.; Thomas, J. D.; Smedira, N. G.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Marchand, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although long-term durability data exist, little data are available concerning the hemodynamic performance of the Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT pericardial valve in the mitral position. METHODS: Sixty-nine patients who were implanted with mitral PERIMOUNT valves at seven international centers between January 1996 and February 1997 consented to participate in a short-term echocardiography follow-up. Echocardiographs were collected at a mean of 600+/-133 days after implantation (range, 110 to 889 days); all underwent blinded core lab analysis. RESULTS: At follow-up, peak gradients were 9.09+/-3.43 mm Hg (mean, 4.36+/-1.79 mm Hg) and varied inversely with valve size (p < 0.05). The effective orifice areas were 2.5+/-0.6 cm2 and tended to increase with valve size (p = 0.08). Trace mitral regurgitation (MR) was common (n = 48), 9 patients had mild MR, 1 had moderate MR, none had severe MR. All MR was central (n = 55) or indeterminate (n = 3). No paravalvular leaks were observed. Mitral regurgitation flow areas were 3.4+/-2.8 cm2 and were without significant volumes. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study, these mitral valves are associated with trace, although physiologically insignificant, central MR. Despite known echocardiographic limitations, the PERIMOUNT mitral valves exhibit similar hemodynamics to other prosthetic valves.

  5. Conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, K.J.; Dutton, A.R.; Hovorka, S.D.; Worthington, S.R.H.; Painter, S.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Numerical ground-water flow models for the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region of Texas generally have been based on a diffuse-flow conceptualization. That is, although conduits likely are present, the assumption is that flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of small fractures and openings sufficiently numerous that the aquifer can be considered a porous-media continuum at the regional scale. Whether flow through large fractures and conduits or diffuse flow predominates in the Edwards aquifer at the regional scale is an open question. A new numerical ground-water-flow model (Edwards aquifer model) that incorporates important components of the latest information and an alternate conceptualization of the Edwards aquifer was developed. The conceptualization upon which the Edwards aquifer model is based emphasizes conduit development and conduit flow, and the model can be considered a test of one of two reasonable conceptualizations. The model incorporates conduits simulated as generally continuously connected, one-cell-wide (1,320 feet) zones with very large hydraulic-conductivity values (as much as 300,000 feet per day). The locations of the conduits are based on a number of factors, including major potentiometric-surface troughs in the aquifer, the presence of sinking streams, geochemical information, and geologic structures (for example, faults and grabens). The model includes both the San Antonio and Barton Springs segments of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas, and was calibrated for steady-state (1939-46) and transient (1947-2000) conditions. Transient simulations were conducted using monthly recharge and pumpage (withdrawals) data. The predominantly conduit-flow conceptualization incorporated in the Edwards aquifer model yielded a reasonably good match between measured and simulated hydraulic heads in the confined part of the aquifer and between measured and simulated springflows. The simulated directions of flow in the

  6. Dryden B-52 Launch Aircraft on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's venerable workhorse, the B-52 mothership, rolls out on the Edwards AFB runway after a test flight in 1996. Over the course of more than 40 years, the B-52 launched numerous experimental aircraft, ranging from the X-15 to the X-38, and was also used as a flying testbed for a variety of other research projects. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket

  7. STS-1 landing at Edwards - first orbital mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    shuttles without power--and therefore without the weight penalty of an additional engine and fuel--was based on previous experience at the Flight Research Center with piloted lifting bodies that also landed without power, as had the X-15s. Dryden and Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) had also hosted the approach and landing tests of the shuttle prototype Enterprise in 1977 and had tested the computers used for the shuttles' flight control systems in the F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire aircraft, which also contributed to the solution of a dangerous pilot induced oscillation that occurred on the final approach and landing test. In this clip Young and Crippen fly the orbiter Columbia to a picture-perfect, unpowered landing on the dry lakebed runway 23 at Edwards AFB, CA, after it's first orbital flight, which ended on April 14.

  8. The Impact of the Prince Edward Island School Library Policy on the Development of School Library Programs across Prince Edward Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doiron, Ray; Davies, Judy

    In Canada's smallest province, Prince Edward Island (PEI), the "PEI School Library Policy" and its supporting documents have guided the development of school library programs since 1989. This study explores the impact that policy has had on school library programs in PEI. The "Survey of School Library Resource Centers" probed…

  9. [Edward Blyth (1810-1873). Father of the Indian ornitology].

    PubMed

    Malec, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Edward Blyth was born on 23 December 1810. When he was ayoung man he took an interest with the zoology which became his life's passion. As a young naturalist he was a conscientious observer of the nature and a man gifted with a superb memory. Unfortunately his career was not successful in London because of the conflict with the younger of the Gray brothers. Facing the prospect of no employment in The British Museum, Blyth decided to leave England for Calcutta where he was offered a post of a museum curator. The English naturalist spent in India the years from 1841 to 1862. During that time he greatly enriched the zoological collection of the museum and consequently the place had much more visitors. Regarding his private life he got married in 1854 to Elisabeth Mary Turner Hodges. Undoubtedly the next four year were the happiest in Blyth's life. After his wife's death Blyth's health condition deteriorated. The ongoing conflicts he kept having while the first stay in India and constant struggle to improve his financial status made him decide to return to England. Blyth left India in 1862. After coming back to his homeland he continued the naturalistic passions. Nevertheless Blyth was constantly troubled by the financial problems. Also, his health, both mental and physical, systematically deteriorated. Finally the death came on 27 December 1873, in London. Blyth tried in vain to gain the recognition and join the scientific establishment of the 19th century England. Constant lack of satisfactory income and often problems with health prevented the ornithologist to be fully devote to his passion. The aim of this article is to highlight some of the most important and interesting events of Blyth's life. Moreover, another objective is to popularise Blyth and his work since he was one of the greatest naturalists of that time.

  10. Edward Hitchcock's pre-Darwinian (1840) "tree of life".

    PubMed

    Archibald, J David

    2009-01-01

    The "tree of life" iconography, representing the history of life, dates from at least the latter half of the 18th century, but evolution as the mechanism providing this bifurcating history of life did not appear until the early 19th century. There was also a shift from the straight line, scala naturae view of change in nature to a more bifurcating or tree-like view. Throughout the 19th century authors presented tree-like diagrams, some regarding the Deity as the mechanism of change while others argued for evolution. Straight-line or anagenetic evolution and bifurcating or cladogenetic evolution are known in biology today, but are often misrepresented in popular culture, especially with anagenesis being confounded with scala naturae. Although well known in the mid 19th century, the geologist Edward Hitchcock has been forgotten as an early, if not the first author to publish a paleontologically based "tree of life" beginning in 1840 in the first edition of his popular general geology text Elementary Geology. At least 31 editions were published and those between 1840 and 1859 had this "paleontological chart" showing two trees, one for fossil and living plants and another for animals set within a context of geological time. Although the chart did not vary in later editions, the text explaining the chart did change to reflect newer ideas in paleontology and geology. Whereas Lamarck, Chambers, Bronn, Darwin, and Haeckel saw some form of transmutation as the mechanism that created their "trees of life," Hitchcock, like his contemporaries Agassiz and Miller, who also produced "trees of life," saw a deity as the agent of change. Through each edition of his book Hitchcock denounced the newer transmutationist hypotheses of Lamarck, then Chambers, and finally Darwin in an 1860 edition that no longer presented his tree-like "paleontological chart."

  11. STS-58 Landing at Edwards with Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A drag chute slows the space shuttle Columbia as it rolls to a perfect landing concluding NASA's longest mission at that time, STS-58, at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, with a 8:06 a.m. (PST) touchdown 1 November 1993 on Edward's concrete runway 22. The planned 14 day mission, which began with a launch from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 7:53 a.m. (PDT), October 18, was the second spacelab flight dedicated to life sciences research. Seven Columbia crewmembers performed a series of experiments to gain more knowledge on how the human body adapts to the weightless environment of space. Crewmembers on this flight included: John Blaha, commander; Rick Searfoss, pilot; payload commander Rhea Seddon; mission specialists Bill MacArthur, David Wolf, and Shannon Lucid; and payload specialist Martin Fettman. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space

  12. Conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards aquifer, San Antonio region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard J.; Dutton, A.R.; Hovorka, S.D.; Worthington, S.R.H.; Painter, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A new numerical ground-water-flow model (Edwards aquifer model) that incorporates important components of the latest information and plausible conceptualization of the Edwards aquifer was developed. The model includes both the San Antonio and Barton Springs segments of the Edwards aquifer in the San Antonio region, Texas, and was calibrated for steady-state (1939–46) and transient (1947–2000) conditions, excluding Travis County. Transient simulations were conducted using monthly recharge and pumpage (withdrawal) data. The model incorporates conduits simulated as continuously connected (other than being separated in eastern Uvalde and southwestern Medina Counties), one-cell-wide (1,320 feet) zones with very large hydraulic-conductivity values (as much as 300,000 feet per day). The locations of the conduits were based on a number of factors, including major potentiometric-surface troughs in the aquifer, the presence of sinking streams, geochemical information, and geologic structures (for example, faults and grabens). The simulated directions of flow in the Edwards aquifer model are most strongly influenced by the presence of simulated conduits and barrier faults. The simulated flow in the Edwards aquifer is influenced by the locations of the simulated conduits, which tend to facilitate flow. The simulated subregional flow directions generally are toward the nearest conduit and subsequently along the conduits from the recharge zone into the confined zone and toward the major springs. Structures simulated in the Edwards aquifer model influencing groundwater flow that tend to restrict flow are barrier faults. The influence of simulated barrier faults on flow directions is most evident in northern Medina County.A water budget is an accounting of inflow to, outflow from, and storage change in the aquifer. For the Edwards aquifer model steady-state simulation, recharge (from seepage losses from streams and infiltration of rainfall) accounts for 93.5 percent of the

  13. Geologic framework of the Edwards Aquifer and upper confining unit, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards Aquifer, south-central Uvalde County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Small, Ted A.

    1997-01-01

    The stratigraphic units of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County generally are porous and permeable. The stratigraphic units that compose the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County are the Devils River Formation in the Devils River trend; and the West Nueces, McKnight, and Salmon Peak Formations in the Maverick Basin. The Balcones fault zone is the principal structural feature in Uvalde County; however, the displacement along the fault zone is less in Uvalde County than in adjacent Medina and Bexar Counties to the east. The Uvalde Salient is a structural high in south-central Uvalde County, and consists of several closely connected crustal uplifts that bring Edwards aquifer strata to the surface generally forming prominent hills. The crustal uplifts forming this structural high are the remnants of intrusive and extrusive magnatic activity. Six primary faults—Cooks, Black Mountain, Blue Mountain, Uvalde, Agape, and Connor—cross the length of the study area from the southwest to the northeast juxtaposing the Lower Cretaceous Salmon Peak Formation at the surface in the northwestern part of the study area against Upper Cretaceous formations in the central part of the study area. In the study area, the porosity of the rocks in the Edwards aquifer is related to depositional or diagenetic elements along specific stratigraphic horizons (fabric selective) and to dissolution and structural elements that can occur in any lithostratigraphic horizon (not fabric selective). Permeability depends on the physical properties of the rock such as size, shape, distribution of pores, and fissuring and dissolution. The middle 185 feet of the lower part of the Devils River Formation, the upper part of the Devils River Formation, and the upper unit of the Salmon Peak Formation probably are the most porous and permeable stratigraphic zones of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Uvalde County.

  14. Delineation of the outcrop of the Edwards Aquifer hydrologically associated with Barton Springs in the Austin area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ardis, Ann F.; Slagle, D.L.; Snyder, Fred R.

    1985-01-01

    This report, prepared in cooperation with the City of Austin, delineates the outcrop of the Edwards aquifer that is hydrologically associated with Barton Springs.  The Edwards is a regional aquifer system in central Texas that extends in a narrow belt from Kinney County to Bell County (index map) and lies within an area locally known as the Balcones fault zone.  Hydrologic boundaries seperate the Edwards auifer into several parts.  Barton Springs is the major discharge point of the part of the Edwards aquifer in the Austin area (southern Travis and northern Hays Counties).

  15. Quality of water in the Trinity and Edwards aquifers, south-central Texas, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahlquist, Lynne; Ardis, Ann F.

    2004-01-01

    During 1996?98, the U.S. Geological Survey studied surface- and ground-water quality in south-central Texas. The ground-water components included the upper and middle zones (undifferentiated) of the Trinity aquifer in the Hill Country and the unconfined part (recharge zone) and confined part (artesian zone) of the Edwards aquifer in the Balcones fault zone of the San Antonio region. The study was supplemented by information compiled from four ground-water-quality studies done during 1996?98. Trinity aquifer waters are more mineralized and contain larger dissolved solids, sulfate, and chloride concentrations compared to Edwards aquifer waters. Greater variability in water chemistry in the Trinity aquifer likely reflects the more variable lithology of the host rock. Trace elements were widely detected, mostly at small concentrations. Median total nitrogen was larger in the Edwards aquifer than in the Trinity aquifer. Ammonia nitrogen was detected more frequently and at larger concentrations in the Trinity aquifer than in the Edwards aquifer. Although some nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the Edwards aquifer exceeded a U.S. Geological Survey national background threshold concentration, no concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public drinking-water standard. Synthetic organic compounds, such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds, were detected in the Edwards aquifer and less frequently in the Trinity aquifer, mostly at very small concentrations (less than 1 microgram per liter). These compounds were detected most frequently in urban unconfined Edwards aquifer samples. Atrazine and its breakdown product deethylatrazine were the most frequently detected pesticides, and trihalomethanes were the most frequently detected volatile organic compounds. Widespread detections of these compounds, although at small concentrations, indicate that anthropogenic activities affect ground-water quality. Radon gas was detected throughout the Trinity

  16. Quality of water in the Trinity and Edwards aquifers, south-central Texas, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahlquist, Lynne; Ardis, Ann F.

    2004-01-01

    During 1996–98, the U.S. Geological Survey studied surface- and ground-water quality in south-central Texas. The ground-water components included the upper and middle zones (undifferentiated) of the Trinity aquifer in the Hill Country and the unconfined part (recharge zone) and confined part (artesian zone) of the Edwards aquifer in the Balcones fault zone of the San Antonio region. The study was supplemented by information compiled from four ground-water-quality studies done during 1996–98.Trinity aquifer waters are more mineralized and contain larger dissolved solids, sulfate, and chloride concentrations compared to Edwards aquifer waters. Greater variability in water chemistry in the Trinity aquifer likely reflects the more variable lithology of the host rock. Trace elements were widely detected, mostly at small concentrations. Median total nitrogen was larger in the Edwards aquifer than in the Trinity aquifer. Ammonia nitrogen was detected more frequently and at larger concentrations in the Trinity aquifer than in the Edwards aquifer. Although some nitrate nitrogen concentrations in the Edwards aquifer exceeded a U.S. Geological Survey national background threshold concentration, no concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public drinking-water standard.Synthetic organic compounds, such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds, were detected in the Edwards aquifer and less frequently in the Trinity aquifer, mostly at very small concentrations (less than 1 microgram per liter). These compounds were detected most frequently in urban unconfined Edwards aquifer samples. Atrazine and its breakdown product deethylatrazine were the most frequently detected pesticides, and trihalomethanes were the most frequently detected volatile organic compounds. Widespread detections of these compounds, although at small concentrations, indicate that anthropogenic activities affect ground-water quality.Radon gas was detected throughout the Trinity

  17. The dynamic atmospheres of Mira stars: comparing the CODEX models to PTI time series of TU Andromedae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Verhoelst, T.; Degroote, P.; Acke, B.; van Winckel, H.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Our comprehension of stellar evolution on the AGB still faces many difficulties. To improve on this, a quantified understanding of large-amplitude pulsator atmospheres and interpretation in terms of their fundamental stellar parameters are essential. Aims: We wish to evaluate the effectiveness of the recently released CODEX dynamical model atmospheres in representing M-type Mira variables through a confrontation with the time-resolved spectro-photometric and interferometric PTI data set of TU And. Methods: We calibrated the interferometric K-band time series to high precision. This results in 50 nights of observations, covering 8 subsequent pulsation cycles. At each phase, the flux at 2.2 μm is obtained, along with the spectral shape and visibility points in 5 channels across the K-band. We compared the data set to the relevant dynamical, self-excited CODEX models. Results: Both spectrum and visibilities are consistently reproduced at visual minimum phases. Near maximum, our observations show that the current models predict a photosphere that is too compact and hot, and we find that the extended atmosphere lacks H2O opacity. Since coverage in model parameter space is currently poor, more models are needed to make firm conclusions on the cause of the discrepancies. We argue that for TU And, the discrepancy could be lifted by adopting a lower value of the mixing length parameter combined with an increase in the stellar mass and/or a decrease in metallicity, but this requires the release of an extended model grid. Figure 4 and Table 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Geohydrologic Framework of the Edwards and Trinity Aquifers, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, Charles D.; Faith, Jason R.; Ozuna, George B.

    2007-01-01

    This five-year USGS project, funded by the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, is using multidisciplinary approaches to reveal the surface and subsurface geologic architecture of two important Texas aquifers: (1) the Edwards aquifer that extends from south of Austin to west of San Antonio and (2) the southern part of the Trinity aquifer in the Texas Hill Country west and south of Austin. The project's principal areas of research include: Geologic Mapping, Geophysical Surveys, Geochronology, Three-dimensional Modeling, and Noble Gas Geochemistry. The Edwards aquifer is one of the most productive carbonate aquifers in the United States. It also has been designated a sole source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and is the primary source of water for San Antonio, America's eighth largest city. The Trinity aquifer forms the catchment area for the Edwards aquifer and it intercepts some surface flow above the Edwards recharge zone. The Trinity may also contribute to the Edwards water budget by subsurface flow across formation boundaries at considerable depths. Dissolution, karst development, and faulting and fracturing in both aquifers directly control aquifer geometry by compartmentalizing the aquifer and creating unique ground-water flow paths.

  19. Blood recipient notification for hepatitis C in Prince Edward Island

    PubMed Central

    Van Til, L D; Sweet, L E

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two of the major risk factors for hepatitis C are injection drug use and receipt of blood or blood products. Many patients are unaware that they have received transfusions. In 1998 Prince Edward Island conducted a province-wide look-back notification program to notify patients who had received transfusions in PEI between Jan. 1, 1984, and June 1, 1990. The authors present the results of the notification program. METHODS: A registry for recipients of blood and blood products was created from the province's Red Cross blood bank records. The registry data were linked with Vital Statistics data to determine death status and with Health Registration data to determine residence status of recipients (in PEI or moved out of province). All identified recipients with a current PEI mailing address were sent a letter recommending hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing. Laboratory records were checked to determine HCV test results. RESULTS: The registry contained data for 6086 recipients of blood or blood products during the look-back period; 51.1% (3109/6086) had died by the time of notification. Of the remainder, 18.4% (549/2977) were not directly notified because they had moved out of province, had refused delivery of the notification letter or had died recently, or because identifying information was missing from the blood bank records. Of the recipients who were notified 80.4% (1953/2428) underwent testing, and 2.2% (43/1953) were found to be HCV positive. Most of these (58.1% [25/43]) had undergone testing before notification. The HCV positivity rate differed significantly between recipients tested before notification and those tested after notification (9.9% v. 1.1%, p < 0.001). HCV-positive recipients were more likely than other notified recipients to have had multiple transfusions (39.5% v. 9.5%, p < 0.001). INTERPRETATION: Before notification 4.1% of PEI recipients had undergone HCV testing. After notification 91.2% of PEI recipients were identified as tested

  20. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio

  1. Altus I aircraft landing on Edwards lakebed runway 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft lands on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the craft by radio

  2. Late Quaternary climates and environments of the Edwards Plateau, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Rickard S.; Blum, Michael D.; Valastro, Salvatore

    1993-06-01

    Fossil vertebrate, pollen, and plant macrofossil data from the Edwards Plateau, Texas and throughout the southcentral United States permit reconstruction of regional changes in temperature and effective moisture. Full-glacial temperatures were significantly cooler than those of today, at least 6°C during the summer months, but by ca. 13,000 yrs B.P. summer temperatures were within 2-3°C of present values. There was more effective moisture during the full-glacial period than at any time since then. During the late-glacial, ca. 14,000-10,500 effective moisture first decreased then increased, while the early to middle Holocene was dominated by a protracted decrease in effective moisture. This long-term trend culminated in conditions that were drier than modern during the early part of the late Holocene from ca. 5000 to 2500 yr B.P. Conditions were more mesic than present from ca. 2500 and 1000 yr B.P., while the modern drought-prone climate has characterized the last 1000 years. Fossil vertebrates and the characteristics of cave fill sediments show that late Pleistocene and Holocene changes in temperature and moisture regimes were coupled with vegetation changes and a gradual degradation of upland soils. During the full- and late-glacial much of the upland landscape was covered by thick, deeply weathered reddish clay-rich soils and an open savanna vegetation with a mixed tall and short grass understory. Changes to Holocene climatic conditions promoted a diminished vegetation cover and initiated the gradual degradation of soil mantles, whereas minimum effective moisture during the earlier part of the late Holocene resulted in upland landscapes that were covered by a mixture of short grasses and scrub vegetation, and the near complete removal of the remaining soil mantle. Vegetation changes during the last 2500 years are poorly known, but the upland landscape has consisted of exposed bedrock with little soil cover. Comparison of empirical data and the results of

  3. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  4. SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  5. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design

  6. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  7. SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  8. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  9. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  10. STS-31 on Runway 22 at Edwards with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Discovery to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing April 29, 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain

  11. STS-36 on Edwards Runway with Recovery Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Personnel and equipment converge on the orbiter Atlantis to begin servicing the spacecraft following its landing 4 March 1990, at NASA's then Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California. Mission elapsed time for the Department of Defense mission was 4 days, 10 hours, 19 minutes and 15 seconds. Actual landing time was 10:08 a.m. Post-landing servicing by the recovery convoy is carried out after each Space Shuttle landing and includes safety checks for flammable and toxic gases escaping from systems aboard the orbiters, hooking up engine fuel purge and equipment coolant lines, and inspecting the brakes before the vehicle is towed from the runway to the shuttle facility at Dryden where it is prepared for the ferry flight back to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Up to 24 vehicles and scores of personnel make up the landing recovery convoys at Dryden. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed

  12. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft nears touchdown at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation of the Perseus design

  13. Perseus B Heads for Landing on Edwards AFB Runway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Perseus B remotely piloted aircraft approaches the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. at the conclusion of a development flight at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center in April 1998. The Perseus B is the latest of three versions of the Perseus design developed by Aurora Flight Sciences under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Perseus B is a remotely piloted aircraft developed as a design-performance testbed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Perseus is one of several flight vehicles involved in the ERAST project. A piston engine, propeller-powered aircraft, Perseus was designed and built by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia. The objectives of Perseus B's ERAST flight tests have been to reach and maintain horizontal flight above altitudes of 60,000 feet and demonstrate the capability to fly missions lasting from 8 to 24 hours, depending on payload and altitude requirements. The Perseus B aircraft established an unofficial altitude record for a single-engine, propeller-driven, remotely piloted aircraft on June 27, 1998. It reached an altitude of 60,280 feet. In 1999, several modifications were made to the Perseus aircraft including engine, avionics, and flight-control-system improvements. These improvements were evaluated in a series of operational readiness and test missions at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Perseus is a high-wing monoplane with a conventional tail design. Its narrow, straight, high-aspect-ratio wing is mounted atop the fuselage. The aircraft is pusher-designed with the propeller mounted in the rear. This design allows for interchangeable scientific-instrument payloads to be placed in the forward fuselage. The design also allows for unobstructed airflow to the sensors and other devices mounted in the payload compartment. The Perseus B that underwent test and development in 1999 was the third generation

  14. Edward (Ed) T. Schneider in Front of SR-71 Blackbird

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    SR-71 research pilot Ed Schneider is pictured here in front of an SR-71 Blackbird on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Schneider became a NASA research pilot at Dryden in 1983. Data from the SR-71 program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. He retired as a NASA research pilot in September 2000. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or

  15. Warm water vapor envelope in Mira variables and its effects on the apparent size from the near-infrared to the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.

    2004-09-01

    We present a possible interpretation for the increase of the angular diameter of the Mira variables o Cet, R Leo, and χ Cyg from the K band to the 11 μm region revealed by the recent interferometric observations using narrow bandpasses where no salient spectral feature is present (Weiner et al. \\cite{weiner03a},b). A simple two-layer model consisting of hot and cool H2O layers for the warm water vapor envelope, whose presence in Mira variables was revealed by previous spectroscopic observations, can reproduce the angular diameters observed with Infrared Spatial Interferometer as well as the high-resolution TEXES spectra obtained in the 11 μm region. The warm water vapor layers are optically thick in the lines, and therefore, strong absorption due to H2O can be expected from such a dense water vapor envelope. However, the absorption lines are filled in by emission from the extended part of the envelope, and this results in the high-resolution 11 μm spectra which exhibit only weak, fine spectral features, masking the spectroscopic evidences of the dense, warm water vapor envelope. On the other hand, the presence of the warm water vapor envelope manifests itself as the larger angular diameters in the 11 μm region as compared to those measured in the near-infrared. Furthermore, comparison of the visibilities predicted in the near-infrared (1.5-3.8 μm) with observational results available in the literature demonstrates that our two-layer model for the warm water vapor envelope can also reproduce the observed near-infrared visibilities and angular diameters, and suggests that the wavelength dependence of the angular size of Mira variables in the infrared largely reflects the H2O opacity. The radii of the hot H2O layers in the three Mira variables are derived to be 1.5-1.7 R* with temperatures of 1800-2000 K and H2O column densities of (1-5) × 1021 cm-2, while the radii of the cool H_2O layers are derived to be 2.2-2.5 R* with temperatures of 1200-1400 K and H2O

  16. Generalized Edwards thermodynamics and marginal stability in a driven system with dry and viscous friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradenigo, Giacomo; Bertin, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We consider a spring-block model with both dry and viscous frictions, subjected to a periodic driving allowing mechanically stable configurations to be sampled. We show that under strong driving, the scaling of the correlation length with the energy density is incompatible with the prediction of the Edwards statistical approach, which assumes a uniform sampling of mechanically stable configurations. A crossover between the Edwards scaling and nonstandard high-energy scaling is observed at energy scales that depend on the viscous friction coefficient. Generalizing Edwards thermodynamics, we propose a statistical framework, based on a sampling of marginally stable states, that is able to describe the scaling of the correlation length in the highly viscous regime.

  17. Translational Mini-Review Series on Vaccines: The Edward Jenner Museum and the history of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, A J; Parker, S

    2007-01-01

    Edward Jenner's discovery of vaccination must rank as one of the most important medical advances of all time and is a prominent example of the power of rational enquiry being brought to bear during the Age of Enlightenment in 18th century Europe. In the modern era many millions of lives are saved each year by vaccines that work essentially on the same principles that were established by Edward Jenner more than 200 years ago. His country home in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, is where he carried out his work and where he spent most of his life. The building is now a museum in which the life and times of Jenner are commemorated including not only the discovery of smallpox vaccination but also his other important scientific contributions to natural history and medicine. The trustees of the Edward Jenner museum are committed to promoting the museum as a real and “virtual” educational centre that is both entertaining and informative. PMID:17302886

  18. Investigating groundwater flow between Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Wong, C I; Kromann, J S; Hunt, B B; Smith, B A; Banner, J L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of communication between aquifers can be challenging when using traditional physical and geochemical groundwater sampling approaches. This study uses two multiport wells completed within Edwards and Trinity aquifers in central Texas to determine the degree of groundwater inter-flow between adjacent aquifers. Potentiometric surfaces, hydraulic conductivities, and groundwater major ion concentrations and Sr isotope values were measured from multiple zones within three hydrostratigraphic units (Edwards and Upper and Middle Trinity aquifers). Physical and geochemical data from the multiport wells were combined with historical measurements of groundwater levels and geochemical compositions from the region to characterize groundwater flow and identify controls on the geochemical compositions of the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. Our results suggest that vertical groundwater flow between Edwards and Middle Trinity aquifers is likely limited by low permeability, evaporite-rich units within the Upper and Middle Trinity. Potentiometric surface levels in both aquifers vary with changes in wet vs. dry conditions, indicating that recharge to both aquifers occurs through distinct recharge areas. Geochemical compositions in the Edwards, Upper, and Middle Trinity aquifers are distinct and likely reflect groundwater interaction with different lithologies (e.g., carbonates, evaporites, and siliceous sediments) as opposed to mixing of groundwater between the aquifers. These results have implications for the management of these aquifers as they indicate that, under current conditions, pumping of either aquifer will likely not induce vertical cross-formational flow between the aquifers. Inter-flow between the Trinity and the Edwards aquifers, however, should be reevaluated as pumping patterns and hydrogeologic conditions change.

  19. Views of STS-2 Columbia landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Views of STS-2 Columbia landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California followed by a T-38 jet aircraft. Rear wheels have touched down but front wheels are still in the air (39561); view of orbiter making final approach prior to landing at Edwards (39562); view of the underside of the orbiter as it makes its final approach for landing. This view provides a good study of the high temperature protection material exposed to friction on the atmospheric entry on the return to earth. Also show trails of smoke from wing tips (39563); view of the underside of orbiter as it makes its approach for landing (39564).

  20. President Edwards and the Sage of Highgate: Determinism, Depravity, and the Supernatural Will.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Scarce attention has been given to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's engagement with the philosophical theology of Jonathan Edwards, and yet a clear understanding of each thinker's position on determinism and Original Sin is of vital importance if we are understand the lasting significance of their disagreements. There have been a number of studies to take up Coleridge's influence on the American Romantics, but there is no scholarship that has taken into account how the reception of this influence was inflected both by the legacy of Edwards and by the critical response that his theology elicited from Coleridge.

  1. Invited commentary on 'Robert G Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church'.

    PubMed

    Serour, Gamal

    2011-06-01

    The paper 'Robert G. Edwards and the Roman Catholic Church' by Benagiano and colleagues in this issue of Reproductive BioMedicine Online is a very important and timely article published by well-informed authors on the occasion of the long-awaited award of the Nobel Prize to a well-deserved scientist, Bob Edwards. I found it very interesting and challenging that the authors went through all the arguments and criticism made by the Catholic and Orthodox Churches and other agents against the newly developed techniques of assisted reproductive technology.

  2. Pioneering contributions by Robert Edwards to oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM).

    PubMed

    Thompson, J G; Gilchrist, R B

    2013-12-01

    The history of in vitro maturation (IVM) of mammalian oocytes, especially of human oocytes, holds a special place for Robert Edwards. He was the first to comprehensively examine and demonstrate maturation of human oocytes in vitro and in so doing he changed the course of medicine by fertilizing them in vitro. In reviewing his contribution, we have examined the state of the field at the time and discuss his pioneering insights into mammalian oocyte biology. We will also discuss how some of the major concepts and challenges identified by Edwards 50 years ago remain among the major challenges facing IVM today.

  3. Geologic history and hydrogeologic setting of the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system, west-central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.A.; Bush, P.W.; Baker, E.T.

    1994-01-01

    Because the diagenetic effects of cementation, recrystallization, and mineral replacement diminish the hydraulic conductivity of most rocks composing the Trinity and Edwards-Trinity aquifers, transmissivity values average less than 10,000 feet squared per day over more than 90 percent of the study area. However, the effects of tectonic fractures and dissolution in the Balcones fault zone cause transmissivity values to average about 750,000 feet squared per day in the Edwards aquifer, which occupies less than 10 percent of the study area.

  4. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Edwards aquifer outcrop (Barton Springs segment), northeastern Hays and southwestern Travis Counties, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, Ted A.; Hanson, John A.; Hauwert, Nico M.

    1996-01-01

    In the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, the aquifer probably is most vulnerable to surface contamination in the rapidly urbanizing areas on the Edwards aquifer outcrop. Contamination can result from spills or leakage of hazardous materials; or runoff on the intensely faulted and fractured, karstic limestone outcrops characteristic of the recharge zone.

  5. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara... located in Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties of California. We provide this notice in..., we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR in Alameda,...

  6. Diffuse-flow conceptualization and simulation of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio Region, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical ground-water-flow model (hereinafter, the conduit-flow Edwards aquifer model) of the karstic Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas was developed for a previous study on the basis of a conceptualization emphasizing conduit development and conduit flow, and included simulating conduits as one-cell-wide, continuously connected features. Uncertainties regarding the degree to which conduits pervade the Edwards aquifer and influence ground-water flow, as well as other uncertainties inherent in simulating conduits, raised the question of whether a model based on the conduit-flow conceptualization was the optimum model for the Edwards aquifer. Accordingly, a model with an alternative hydraulic conductivity distribution without conduits was developed in a study conducted during 2004-05 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System. The hydraulic conductivity distribution for the modified Edwards aquifer model (hereinafter, the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model), based primarily on a conceptualization in which flow in the aquifer predominantly is through a network of numerous small fractures and openings, includes 38 zones, with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 3 to 50,000 feet per day. Revision of model input data for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was limited to changes in the simulated hydraulic conductivity distribution. The root-mean-square error for 144 target wells for the calibrated steady-state simulation for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model is 20.9 feet. This error represents about 3 percent of the total head difference across the model area. The simulated springflows for Comal and San Marcos Springs for the calibrated steady-state simulation were within 2.4 and 15 percent of the median springflows for the two springs, respectively. The transient calibration period for the diffuse-flow Edwards aquifer model was 1947-2000, with 648 monthly stress periods, the same as for the conduit-flow Edwards

  7. Qualitative and quantitative late blight resistance in the potato cultivar Sarpo Mira is determined by the perception of five distinct RXLR effectors.

    PubMed

    Rietman, Hendrik; Bijsterbosch, Gerard; Cano, Liliana M; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Vossen, Jack H; Jacobsen, Evert; Visser, Richard G F; Kamoun, Sophien; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A

    2012-07-01

    Potato defends against Phytophthora infestans infection by resistance (R)-gene-based qualitative resistance as well as a quantitative field resistance. R genes are renowned to be rapidly overcome by this oomycete, and potato cultivars with a decent and durable resistance to current P. infestans populations are hardly available. However, potato cultivar Sarpo Mira has retained resistance in the field over several years. We dissected the resistance of 'Sarpo Mira' in a segregating population by matching the responses to P. infestans RXLR effectors with race-specific resistance to differential strains. The resistance is based on the combination of four pyramided qualitative R genes and a quantitative R gene that was associated with field resistance. The qualitative R genes include R3a, R3b, R4, and the newly identified Rpi-Smira1. The qualitative resistances matched responses to avirulence (AVR)3a, AVR3b, AVR4, and AVRSmira1 RXLR effectors and were overcome by particular P. infestans strains. The quantitative resistance was determined to be conferred by a novel gene, Rpi-Smira2. It was only detected under field conditions and was associated with responses to the RXLR effector AvrSmira2. We foresee that effector-based resistance breeding will facilitate selecting and combining qualitative and quantitative resistances that may lead to a more durable resistance to late blight.

  8. Mid- to long-term outcome comparison of the Medtronic Hancock II and bi-leaflet mechanical aortic valve replacement in patients younger than 60 years of age: a propensity-matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Chen, Si; Shi, Jiawei; Li, Geng; Dong, Nianguo

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to compare mid-long-term clinical outcomes between patients younger than 60 years of age undergoing bioprosthetic and mechanical aortic valve replacement. From January 2002 to December 2009, patients younger than 60 years of age who received Medtronic Hancock II porcine bioprostheses were selected and compared with those who received mechanical bi-leaflet valves in the aortic position. A stepwise logistic regression propensity score identified a subset of 112 evenly matched patient-pairs. Mid-long-term outcomes of survival, valve-related reoperations, thromboembolic events and bleeding events were assessed. The follow-up was only 95.1% complete. Fourteen measurable variables were statistically similar for the matched cohort. Postoperative in-hospital mortality was 3.6% (bioprosthetic valves) and 2.7% (mechanical valves) (P = 0.700). Survival at 5 and 10 years was 96.3 and 88.7% for patients receiving bioprosthetic valve replacement versus 96.3 and 87.9% for patients receiving mechanical valve replacement (P = 0.860), respectively. At 5 and 10 years after operations, freedom from valve-related reoperation was 97.2 and 94.8% for patients receiving mechanical valve replacement, and 96.3 and 90.2% for patients receiving bioprosthetic valve replacement (P = 0.296), respectively. There was no difference between freedom from thromboembolic events (P = 0.528) and bleeding events (P = 0.128) between the matched groups during the postoperative 10 years. In patients younger than 60 years of age undergoing aortic valve replacement, mid-long-term survival rate was similar for patients receiving bioprosthetic versus mechanical valve replacement. Bioprosthetic valves were associated with a trend for a lower risk of anticoagulation treatment and did not have significantly greater likelihood of a reoperation. These findings suggest that a bioprosthetic valve may be a reasonable choice for AVR in patients younger than 60 years of age. © The Author 2015. Published by

  9. This Earthly World: Edward Said, the Praxis of Secular Humanisms and Situated Cosmopolitanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Leslie G.

    2006-01-01

    This essay unearths the educational and socio-political implications of Edward W. Said's work for our understanding of what a secular humanism might mean in the highly charged atmosphere of the post-Cold War and September 11 discourses that have pervaded the USA and, to varying degrees, other parts of the world. It asks what it means to move…

  10. "Affection in Education": Edward Carpenter, John Addington Symonds and the Politics of Greek Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Josephine Crawley; Brooke, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines Edward Carpenter's 1899 essay on education that defended the value of powerful same-sex attachments, either between older and younger boys or between teachers and pupils, in the context of Victorian ideologies of same-sex affection. Linda Dowling has described how "a homosexual counterdiscourse able to justify male love in…

  11. Diaspora as Catastrophe, Diaspora as a Mission and the Post-Colonial Philosophy of Edward Said

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappe, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Edward Said the refugee could not easily allow himself to join in the celebration of demythologizing nationalism. His Palestinianism had to coexist, uncomfortably, with his universalism. Time made this necessary coexistence an asset, not a liability, and this in fact was his political legacy for the future: Jews and Palestinians would have to…

  12. Tackling Problems through Lateral Thinking. An Interview with Edward de Bono.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodinsky, Ben

    1985-01-01

    In this interview, Edward de Bono says critical or logical thinking in lockstep fashion is necessary but not sufficient because we need not only the ability to critique ideas, but to create them. Creative or lateral thinking arrives at solutions by attacking problems "laterally" or "sideways." (DCS)

  13. The Marlowe-Crowne and Edwards Social Desirability Scales: A Psychometric Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Grady, Kevin E.

    1988-01-01

    Various psychometric characteristics of the Marlowe-Crowne and Edwards Social Desirability scales were assessed in a sample of 108 male and 189 female undergraduates. Results suggest that males and females show different means and similar internal consistency reliability and intercorrelation on the two scales. (TJH)

  14. Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward" and the American Ideology of Progress through Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Howard P.

    1989-01-01

    Examines Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward" as the most popular U.S. utopian novel, and a major expander of the ideology of progress through technology. Provides an explanation for the book's popularity, and compares it to other utopian novels. Warns against using "Looking Backward" as a substitute for full-scale historical…

  15. James Edward Scott: The Leadership Journey of a Senior-Level African American Student Affairs Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Salatha T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, understand, and describe the life, leadership, and influence of Dr. James Edward Scott on higher education and more specifically student affairs; as one of the most well-known and respected African American male chief student affairs officers in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Using a qualitative…

  16. Shuttle Challenger landing on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-05-06

    Shuttle Challenger lands on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission. The photo is a rear view of the shuttle landing gear touching the runway, with clouds of dirt trailing behind it. The nose gear is still in the air (071); Side view of the Challenger landing gear touching the runway (072).

  17. Shuttle Challenger landing on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Shuttle Challenger lands on Runway 17 at Edwards at end of 51-B mission. The photo is a rear view of the shuttle landing gear touching the runway, with clouds of dirt trailing behind it. The nose gear is still in the air (071); Side view of the Challenger landing gear touching the runway (072).

  18. STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California. In these side views its main landing gear has touched down, kicking up a cloud of dirt. Its nose gear is still in the air (224); Closer view of the Discovery with its main landing gear down and its nose wheels in the air (225).

  19. 76 FR 53961 - Harold Edward Smith, M.D.; Revocation Of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Enforcement Administration Harold Edward Smith, M.D.; Revocation Of Registration On April 17, 2009, the Deputy... proposed the revocation of Respondent's DEA Certificate of Registration, BS4681979, and the denial of any pending applications to renew or modify the registration, on the grounds that Respondent had...

  20. Space Shuttle Endeavour flares for landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California to conclude STS-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    At the conclusion of Space Shuttle Mission STS-100, Endeavour landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, May 1, 2001. There the Orbiter would be readied by technicians at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center for return to Kennedy Space Center, Florida, atop a 747 carrier aircraft.

  1. The Empty Cup: "Teaching for Understanding" at 21st Century Edward Waters College. Occasional Paper #6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    What happens in a final project that fosters teaching for understanding? That inquiry calls to mind the Taoist belief that emptiness makes a cup useful. In the context of this paper, the inquiry organizes a narrative about how teaching for understanding surfaced in a "Theories of Learning" course at Edward Waters College. At a deeper…

  2. Robert Cooper Liebermann Receives 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay; Duffy, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Robert Cooper Liebermann received the 2012 Edward A. Flinn III Award at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The award honors "individuals who personify the Union's motto `unselfish cooperation in research' through their facilitating, coordinating, and implementing activities."

  3. The Use of Technology in Prince Edward Island (Canada) High Schools: Perceptions of School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P; Moffatt, Lyndsay; Wiebe, Sean; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; Gabriel, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the perceptions of school leaders regarding the technological use, skills, and attitudes of high school teachers. Using a qualitative research approach, 11 educational leaders from Prince Edward Island (Canada) were individually interviewed. Participants represented the Department of Education, principals,…

  4. An Appreciation and Analysis of "Edward Burtynsky--Manufactured Landscapes": A Film by Jennifer Baichwal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donar, Ann

    2010-01-01

    This article begins with a synopsis of the film "Edward Burtynsky: Manufactured Landscapes", directed by Jennifer Baichwal. While the author can relate to the statements made in this synopsis, her experience and understanding of this 90-minute journey is much more intense and complex. In this essay, she attempts to dissect and examine…

  5. STS-111 commander, Ken Cockrell, greets dignitaries and recovery technicians on the runway at Edward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-111 commander Ken Cockrell greets dignitaries and recovery technicians on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base following the landing of the space shuttle Endeavour on June 19, 2002. Behind Cockrell are (from left) mission specialists Philippe Perrin and Franklin Chang-Diaz and Shuttle pilot Paul Lockhart.

  6. "Affection in Education": Edward Carpenter, John Addington Symonds and the Politics of Greek Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Josephine Crawley; Brooke, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines Edward Carpenter's 1899 essay on education that defended the value of powerful same-sex attachments, either between older and younger boys or between teachers and pupils, in the context of Victorian ideologies of same-sex affection. Linda Dowling has described how "a homosexual counterdiscourse able to justify male love in…

  7. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, lands at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, glides onto Runway 17 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. After main landing gear (MLG) touchdown, a trail of dust forms behind OV-104. The nose landing gear (NLG) rides above runway surface before touchdown.

  8. Southern Stalemate: Five Years without Public Education in Prince Edward County, Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonastia, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In 1959, Virginia's Prince Edward County closed its public schools rather than obey a court order to desegregate. For five years, black children were left to fend for themselves while the courts decided if the county could continue to deny its citizens public education. Investigating this remarkable and nearly forgotten story of local, state, and…

  9. STS-29 Discovery, OV-103, lands on Edwards AFB concrete runway 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, main landing gear (MLG) touches down at a speed of approximately 205 knots (235 miles per hour) on concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), California. Nose landing gear (NLG) is deployed and rides above runway surface prior touchdown. Mojave desert scrub brush appears in the foreground with mountain range appearing in the background.

  10. Edward Albee's "The Zoo Story": Echo/es of Contemporary Subversive Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabi, Naqibun; Ahmed, Firoz

    2016-01-01

    The post-world war II American social and cultural setting was ambiguously featured with enforced conformity in the name of prosperity and Americanization of the nation. Despite of this fact, American writers, especially, dramatists conveyed their message against this fixation through variety and intellectuality. Edward Albee's "The Zoo…

  11. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, landing at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, approaches Runway 17 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) California and is photographed just moments before main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. In the distance, are peaks of Southern California mountain range.

  12. STS-28 Columbia, OV-102, landing at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-28 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, approaches Runway 17 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) California. Nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) are deployed, locked, and ready for touchdown. In the distance, a van and truck with observation teams watch OV-102's approach.

  13. The Use of Technology in Prince Edward Island (Canada) High Schools: Perceptions of School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P; Moffatt, Lyndsay; Wiebe, Sean; McAuley, Alexander; Campbell, Barbara; Gabriel, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the perceptions of school leaders regarding the technological use, skills, and attitudes of high school teachers. Using a qualitative research approach, 11 educational leaders from Prince Edward Island (Canada) were individually interviewed. Participants represented the Department of Education, principals,…

  14. Enhancing Undergraduates' Capabilities through Team-Based Competitions: The Edward Jones Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umble, Elisabeth J.; Umble, Michael; Artz, Kendall

    2008-01-01

    The Edward Jones Company recently initiated financial sponsorship of team-based competitions in six undergraduate business core classes at Baylor University. The challenges were chosen to take place in an introductory freshman business class, Managerial Accounting, Principles of Marketing, Corporate Finance, Operations Management, and Strategic…

  15. A Persistent Interpretation: Art Education Historiography and the Legacy of Isaac Edwards Clarke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efland, Arthur; Soucy, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the work of Isaac Edwards Clarke, an influential nineteenth-century U.S. education official. Reports that Clarke encouraged instruction in drawing as an important industrial skill. Indicates that, although interest in industrial drawing as an important aspect of art education waned by 1900, Clarke's influence continued to be felt. (SG)

  16. STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-G Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base, California. In these side views its main landing gear has touched down, kicking up a cloud of dirt. Its nose gear is still in the air (224); Closer view of the Discovery with its main landing gear down and its nose wheels in the air (225).

  17. Landing of the Shuttle Challenger at Edwards AFB and end of STS 51-F mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    View of the landing of the Shuttle Challenger at Edwards Air Force Base and end of STS 51-F mission. The orbiter is just above the runway with its main landing gear about to touch down (160); Challenger's rear wheels touch down, causing clouds of dirt to appear (161).

  18. Edward Y. Hartshorne and the Reopening of German Universities, 1945-1946: His Personal Account.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tent, James F.

    1997-01-01

    Characterizes U.S. Edward Y. Hartshorne as a "manager of German social recovery." An instructor at Harvard University and protege of sociologist Talcott Parsons, Hartshorne was instrumental in the post-war reopening of German universities. Discusses Hartshorne's activities in military intelligence and psychological warfare, as well as…

  19. Edward Tuohy: the man, his needle, and its place in obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martini, Joshua A; Bacon, Douglas R; Vasdev, Gary M

    2002-01-01

    The introduction of a needle designed by Ralph Huber and Edward Tuohy made continuous epidural anesthesia for labor possible. Neither the needle nor the regional anesthetic technique evolved in a vacuum; both were the culmination of a range of ideas developed by individuals around the world.

  20. Dyadic Power Theory, Touch, and Counseling Psychology: A Response to Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Norah E.; Abra, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Smith, Vogel, Madon, and Edwards' (2011) recent article tested dyadic power theory (DPT) by examining the use of touch as a compliance-gaining tactic in the conflicts of married couples. In this response, we raise a methodological issue about the touch behaviors examined by Smith et al. and also pose a theoretical critique that their test of DPT…