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Sample records for edwardsiella tarda pathogenesis

  1. Edwardsiella tarda EsaE (Orf19 protein) is required for the secretion of type III substrates, and pathogenesis in fish.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Liu, Lu Yi; He, Tian Tian; Laghari, Zubair Ahmed; Nie, Pin; Gao, Qian; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-07-15

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) is a large macromolecular assembly found on the surface of many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Edwardsiella tarda is an important Gram-negative pathogen that employs T3SS to deliver effectors into host cells to facilitate its survival and replication. EseB, EseC, and EseD, when secreted, form a translocon complex EseBCD on host membranes through which effectors are translocated. The orf19 gene (esaE) of E. tarda is located upstream of esaK, and downstream of esaJ, esaI, esaH and esaG in the T3SS gene cluster. When its domains were searched using Delta-Blast, the EsaE protein was found to belong to the T3SS YscJ/PrgK family. In the present study, it is found that EsaE is not secreted into culture supernatant, and the deletion of esaE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocon proteins EseBCD and T3SS effector EseG. Increased steady-state protein level of EseC and EseD was detected in bacterial pellet of ΔesaE strain although a reduced level was observed for the eseC and eseD transcription. EsaE was found to localize on membrane but not in the cytoplasm of E. tarda by fractionation. In blue gourami fish infection model, 87.88% of blue gourami infected with ΔesaE strain survived whereas only 3.03% survived when infected with wild-type strain. Taken together, our study demonstrated that EsaE is probably an apparatus protein of T3SS, which contributes to the pathogenesis of E. tarda in fish. PMID:27283851

  2. Edwardsiella tarda EscE (Orf13 Protein) Is a Type III Secretion System-Secreted Protein That Is Required for the Injection of Effectors, Secretion of Translocators, and Pathogenesis in Fish.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Fang; Wang, Wei Na; Wang, Gai Ling; Zhang, He; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda is crucial for its intracellular survival and pathogenesis in fish. The orf13 gene (escE) of E. tarda is located 84 nucleotides (nt) upstream of esrC in the T3SS gene cluster. We found that EscE is secreted and translocated in a T3SS-dependent manner and that amino acids 2 to 15 in the N terminus were required for a completely functional T3SS in E. tarda. Deletion of escE abolished the secretion of T3SS translocators, as well as the secretion and translocation of T3SS effectors, but did not influence their intracellular protein levels in E. tarda. Complementation of the escE mutant with a secretion-incompetent EscE derivative restored the secretion of translocators and effectors. Interestingly, the effectors that were secreted and translocated were positively correlated with the EscE protein level in E. tarda. The escE mutant was attenuated in the blue gourami fish infection model, as its 50% lethal dose (LD50) increased to 4 times that of the wild type. The survival rate of the escE mutant-strain-infected fish was 69%, which was much higher than that of the fish infected with the wild-type bacteria (6%). Overall, EscE represents a secreted T3SS regulator that controls effector injection and translocator secretion, thus contributing to E. tarda pathogenesis in fish. The homology of EscE within the T3SSs of other bacterial species suggests that the mechanism of secretion and translocation control used by E. tarda may be commonly used by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:26459509

  3. An epizootic of Edwardsiella tarda in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Francis-Floyd, R; Reed, P; Bolon, B; Estes, J; McKinney, S

    1993-04-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, was isolated from dying largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) during an epizootic in a eutrophic lake system, Lochloosa Lake, Florida, USA. Approximately 1,500 adult fish died over a 6-wk period during the late summer and early fall of 1991. A mixed population of aerobic bacteria (E. tarda, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Pseudomonas sp.) was isolated from deep cutaneous ulcers and intestines of moribund bass. However, E. tarda in pure culture was the only bacterium isolated from several viscera of several fish; E. tarda may be the etiologic agent responsible for some episodes of seasonal mortality in largemouth bass.

  4. The macrophage chemotactic activity of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemoattractant capabilities of Edwardsiella tarda extracellular products (ECP) were investigated from two isolates, the virulent FL6-60 parent and less virulent RET-04 mutant. Chemotaxis and chemokinesis were assayed in vitro using blind well chambers with peritoneal macrophages obtained from ...

  5. Edwardsiella tarda isolated in Israel between 1961 and 1980.

    PubMed Central

    Sechter, I; Shmilovitz, M; Altmann, G; Seligmann, R; Kretzer, B; Braunstein, I; Gerichter, C B

    1983-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda was isolated from patients, water tortoises (Clemmys caspica), and samples of water from Lake Kinnereth, the river Jordan, well water, and sewage water. Of the 53 isolates, 35 belonged to completely identified serotypes, among them 7 new ones. Fourteen cultures had O antigens, and one had an H antigen, different from those previously described. Three serotypes isolated from patients were also found in other sources: water tortoises, lake water, or both. PMID:6853692

  6. Discriminatory PCR assays differentiate between Edwardsiella tarda and Edwardsiella tarda-like species and identify the predominant species in catfish aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently a new taxa of Edwardsiella, phenotypically similar to E. tarda, has been described from fishes of Europe and Asia. Based on extensive genetic and phenotypic characterization, researchers have determined this new strain does not belong to any established taxa within the genus Edwardsiella a...

  7. Real-time PCR assays for detection and quactification of Edwardsiella tarda, Edwardsiella piscicida, Edwardsiella piscicida-like sp. in catfish tissues and pond water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have proposed the adoption of 3 distinct genetic taxa among bacteria previously classified as Edwardsiella tarda; namely E. tarda, E. piscicida, and a taxon presently termed E. piscicida–like. Individual real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were developed, based on published...

  8. Complete genome sequence of Edwardsiella tarda (isolate FL95-01)recovered from channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe isolated from fish, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals, including humans. This is a report of the complete and annotated genome of E. tarda isolate FL95-01, recovered from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)....

  9. The serine protease autotransporter Tsh contributes to the virulence of Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Zhou, Hai-Zhen; Jin, Qian-Wen; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-30

    The temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (Tsh), identified as serine protease autotransporters of the Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) proteins, is an important virulence factor for avian-pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) and uropathogenic E. coli. However, little is known about the role of Tsh as a virulence factor in Edwardsiella tarda, a severe fish pathogen. In this study, we characterized the Tsh of E. tarda (named TshEt) and examined its function and vaccine potential. TshEt is composed of 1224 residues and has three functional domains typical for autotransporters. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that expression of tshEt was upregulated under conditions of high temperature, increased cell density, high pH, and iron starvation and during the infection of host cells. A markerless tsh in-frame mutant strain, TX01Δtsh, was constructed to determine whether TshEt participates in the pathogenicity of E. tarda, Compared to the wild type TX01, TX01Δtsh exhibited (i) retarded biofilm growth, (ii) decreased resistance against serum killing, (iii) impaired ability to block the host immune response, (iv) attenuated tissue and cellular infectivity. Introduction of a trans-expressed tsh gene restored the lost virulence of TX01Δtsh. The passenger domain of TshEt contains a putative serine protease (PepS) that exhibits apparent proteolytic activity when expressed in and purified from E. coli as a recombinant protein (rPepS). When used as a subunit vaccine to immunize Japanese flounder, rPepS was able to induce effective immune protection. This is the first study of Tsh in a fish pathogen, and the results suggest that TshEt exerts pleiotropic effects on the pathogenesis of E. tarda. PMID:27259829

  10. Edwardsiella tarda-Induced Inhibition of Apoptosis: A Strategy for Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ze-jun; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that can infect a wide range of freshwater and marine fish. One salient feature of E. tarda is the ability to survive and replicate in various host cells. In this study, we observed that E. tarda replicated robustly in the zebrafish cell line ZF4, and that E. tarda-infected cells exhibited no detectable signs of apoptosis. Global transcriptome analysis and quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that E. tarda infection generally significantly downregulated pro-apoptotic genes and upregulated anti-apoptotic genes. To investigate the role of apoptosis in E. tarda infection, two upregulated anti-apoptotic genes (Fech and Prx3) and two downregulated pro-apoptotic genes (Brms1a and Ivns1a) were overexpressed in zebrafish. Subsequent infection study showed that Fech and Prx3 overexpression significantly promoted E. tarda dissemination in and colonization of fish tissues, while Brms1a and Ivns1a overexpression significantly reduced E. tarda dissemination and colonization. Consistently, when Fech and Prx3 were knocked down in zebrafish, E. tarda infection was significantly inhibited, whereas Brms1a and Ivns1a knockdown significantly enhanced E. tarda infection. These results indicate for the first time that E. tarda prevents apoptosis in teleost as a strategy for intracellular survival, and that some putative apoptotic genes of teleost function in the apoptosis pathway probably in a manner similar to that in mammalian systems. PMID:27471679

  11. Edwardsiella tarda sepsis in a live-stranded sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Cools, Piet; Haelters, Jan; Lopes dos Santos Santiago, Guido; Claeys, Geert; Boelens, Jerina; Leroux-Roels, Isabel; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Deschaght, Pieter

    2013-09-27

    Whale strandings remain poorly understood, although bacterial infections have been suggested to contribute. We isolated Edwardsiella tarda from the blood of a stranded sperm whale. The pathogen was identified with MALDI-TOF MS, confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantified in blood by qPCR. We report the first case of sepsis in a sperm whale. The zoonotic potential of E. tarda and the possible role of bacterial infections in the enigmatic strandings of cetaceans are discussed.

  12. Real-time assays for detection and quantification of Edwardsiella tarda, Edwardsilla piscicida and Edwardsiella piscicida-like sp. in catfish tissues and pond water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have proposed the adoption of 3 distinct genetic taxa among bacteria previously classified as Edwardsiella tarda; namely E. tarda, E. piscicida, and a taxon presently termed E. piscicida–like. Individual real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were developed, based on previousl...

  13. Retention of virulence in a viable but nonculturable Edwardsiella tarda isolate.

    PubMed

    Du, Meng; Chen, Jixiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Aijuan; Li, Yun; Wang, Yingeng

    2007-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is pathogen of fish and other animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and virulence retention of this bacterium. Edwardsiella tarda CW7 was cultured in sterilized aged seawater at 4 degrees C. Total cell counts remained constant throughout the 28-day period by acridine orange direct counting, while plate counts declined to undetectable levels (<0.1 CFU/ml) within 28 days by plate counting. The direct viable counts, on the other hand, declined to ca. 10(9) CFU/ml active cells and remained fairly constant at this level by direct viable counting. These results indicated that a large population of cells existed in a viable but nonculturable state. VBNC E. tarda CW7 could resuscitate in experimental chick embryos and in the presence of nutrition with a temperature upshift. The resuscitative times were 6 days and 8 days, respectively. The morphological changes of VBNC, normal, and resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were studied with a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that when the cells entered into the VBNC state, they gradually changed in shape from short rods to coccoid and decreased in size, but the resuscitative cells did not show any obvious differences from the normal cells. The VBNC and the resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were intraperitoneally inoculated into turbot separately, and the fish inoculated with the resuscitative cells died within 7 days, which suggested that VBNC E. tarda CW7 might retain pathogenicity. PMID:17189433

  14. Retention of Virulence in a Viable but Nonculturable Edwardsiella tarda Isolate▿

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meng; Chen, Jixiang; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Aijuan; Li, Yun; Wang, Yingeng

    2007-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is pathogen of fish and other animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and virulence retention of this bacterium. Edwardsiella tarda CW7 was cultured in sterilized aged seawater at 4°C. Total cell counts remained constant throughout the 28-day period by acridine orange direct counting, while plate counts declined to undetectable levels (<0.1 CFU/ml) within 28 days by plate counting. The direct viable counts, on the other hand, declined to ca. 109 CFU/ml active cells and remained fairly constant at this level by direct viable counting. These results indicated that a large population of cells existed in a viable but nonculturable state. VBNC E. tarda CW7 could resuscitate in experimental chick embryos and in the presence of nutrition with a temperature upshift. The resuscitative times were 6 days and 8 days, respectively. The morphological changes of VBNC, normal, and resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were studied with a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that when the cells entered into the VBNC state, they gradually changed in shape from short rods to coccoid and decreased in size, but the resuscitative cells did not show any obvious differences from the normal cells. The VBNC and the resuscitative E. tarda CW7 cells were intraperitoneally inoculated into turbot separately, and the fish inoculated with the resuscitative cells died within 7 days, which suggested that VBNC E. tarda CW7 might retain pathogenicity. PMID:17189433

  15. [Finding of the bacterial species Edwardsiella tarda in the aquarium fish Betta splendens].

    PubMed

    Vladík, P; Prouza, A; Vítovec, J

    1983-01-01

    A case of the mass occurrence of a disease in the aquarium fish species Betta splendens is described; morphologically the disease was characterized by the finding of large dermal changes located mainly in the dorsal part and by miliary granulomata in liver, spleen and kidneys. The granulomata consisted of epitheloid light cells with centrally located necrosis. Gram-negative bacteria with morphological and biochemical characteristics corresponding to the bacterial species Edwardsiella tarda were isolated from the kidneys, liver and from the dermal lesion. The characteristics of the strains isolated by us were compared with the reference Edwardsiella strain (Bth 1/64) obtained from the Czechoslovak collection of type cultures, Prague.

  16. Septicaemia caused by Edwardsiella tarda and Plesiomonas shigelloides in captive penguin chicks.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, H; Wenker, C; Robert, N; Albini, S

    2011-03-01

    Three cases of fatal septicaemia due to Plesiomonas shigelloides and one due to Edwardsiella tarda were diagnosed in newborn penguins from the Basle Zoo, Switzerland from 2003 to 2007. The affected penguins were of two different species (king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, and African penguin, Spheniscus demersus) and between 2 and 10 days old at the time of death. The causative agents, E. tarda and P. shigelloides are ubiquitous bacteria which are reported to be present in the normal intestinal flora of wild and captive aquatic animals, including penguins. Their occurrence and infectious potential is discussed. PMID:21360449

  17. Septicaemia caused by Edwardsiella tarda and Plesiomonas shigelloides in captive penguin chicks.

    PubMed

    Nimmervoll, H; Wenker, C; Robert, N; Albini, S

    2011-03-01

    Three cases of fatal septicaemia due to Plesiomonas shigelloides and one due to Edwardsiella tarda were diagnosed in newborn penguins from the Basle Zoo, Switzerland from 2003 to 2007. The affected penguins were of two different species (king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, and African penguin, Spheniscus demersus) and between 2 and 10 days old at the time of death. The causative agents, E. tarda and P. shigelloides are ubiquitous bacteria which are reported to be present in the normal intestinal flora of wild and captive aquatic animals, including penguins. Their occurrence and infectious potential is discussed.

  18. Novel brain lesions caused by Edwardsiella tarda in a red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.).

    PubMed

    Iregui, Carlos A; Guarín, Marlly; Tibatá, Victor M; Ferguson, Hugh W

    2012-03-01

    The histological lesions caused by Edwardsiella tarda in a variety of fish species, including tilapia, have been well characterized. There are apparent differences in the type of inflammatory response manifested by these different species, which may be due to the fish species itself, the phase of infection, or the virulence factors produced by different strains of E. tarda. In catfish, systemic abscesses involving muscles of the flank or caudal peduncle are the most common lesions. By contrast, infection in tilapia and red sea bream is more likely to be associated with granulomatous inflammation. Necrotic meningitis, encephalitis, and vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis of the blood vessels walls, as well as the formation of a plaque-like structure in the brain, are described in the current study. The presence of E. tarda was confirmed by microbiological isolation and a positive nested polymerase chain reaction in paraffin wax-embedded tilapia tissues. PMID:22379061

  19. Upper extremity myonecrosis caused by Edwardsiella tarda resulting in transhumeral amputation: case report.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Samuel N; Snoddy, Mark C; Atkinson, Cameron T; Lee, Donald H; Weikert, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are rapidly progressive infections with a high rate of mortality. One type of necrotizing soft tissue infection is caused by marine gram-negative bacteria and commonly occurs in immunocompromised hosts. These types of infections are more common in patients with chronic liver disease, possibly because of impaired iron metabolism. We present the case of a rapidly progressive necrotizing soft tissue infection caused by Edwardsiella tarda, a marine gram-negative pathogen common in catfish. Few extraintestinal infections of E tarda have been described previously. Our patient had hepatitis C and was exposed to the bacteria by a puncture injury from a wild catfish. His infection required multiple debridements and ultimately required a transhumeral amputation for local control of the infection.

  20. Fructose restores susceptibility of multidrug-resistant Edwardsiella tarda to kanamycin.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-bin; Peng, Bo; Han, Yi; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2015-03-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, the causative agent of Edwardsiellosis, imposes medical challenges in both the clinic and aquaculture. The emergence of multidrug resistant strains makes antibiotic treatment impractical. The identification of molecules that facilitate or promote antibiotic efficacy is in high demand. In the present study, we aimed to identify small molecules whose abundance is correlated with kanamycin resistance in E. tarda by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that the abundance of fructose was greatly suppressed in kanamycin-resistant strains. The incubation of kanamycin-resistant bacteria with exogenous fructose sensitized the bacteria to kanamycin. Moreover, the fructose also functioned in bacteria persisters and biofilm. The synergistic effects of fructose and kanamycin were validated in a mouse model. Furthermore, the mechanism relies on fructose in activating TCA cycle to produce NADH, which generates proton motive force to increase the uptake of the antibiotics. Therefore, we present a novel approach in fighting against multidrug resistant bacteria through exploration of antibiotic-suppressed molecules.

  1. Production of an anti-idiotypic antibody single chain variable fragment vaccine against Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong; Jin, Xiaohang; Huang, Weiquan; Liu, Yulin

    2010-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is the pathogen responsible for edwardsiellosis, a serious infectious disease of freshwater and marine fish species, and currently recognized to be the species pathogenic for human. An anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody (mAb), 1E11, has been developed. It mimics the protective epitope of E. tarda and can prevent fish from infection of E. tarda. In this study, the correct variable heavy (VH) and variable light (VL) genes were obtained from 1E11 by using bioinformatics methods, and a 15 amino acid (Gly4Ser)3 linker was used to hold the two V domains together for the construction of VL-linker-VH form of single chain variable fragment (scFv) gene. Then, the scFv was subcloned into the vector pET-28a, expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 cells, and identified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus L.) weighing about 50 g was subjected to challenge with different E. tarda strains after 4 weeks followed by vaccination, the mortality rates and relative percentage survival were recorded and calculated, and the survival rate of fish in the scFv subgroups was obviously higher than that of control subgroups (P<0.01). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results show that after 4 weeks of post-vaccination, the level of specific antibody in fish sera of scFv groups was significantly higher than control groups. This study indicates that the recombinant antibody scFv was successfully developed, and it may serve as an effective vaccine candidate against E. tarda. PMID:20119624

  2. A multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Tenacibaculum maritimum and Edwardsiella tarda in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nuria; Toranzo, Alicia E; Magariños, Beatriz

    2014-06-01

    A specific and sensitive multiplex PCR (mPCR) method was developed as a useful tool for the simultaneous detection of two important flatfish pathogens in marine aquaculture, Tenacibaculum maritimum and Edwardsiella tarda. In fish tissues, the average detection limit for these mPCR-amplified organisms was 2 × 10 ⁵ ± 0.2 CFU/g and 4 × 10 ⁵ ± 0.3 CFU/g, respectively. These values are similar or even lower than those previously obtained using the corresponding single PCR. Moreover, mPCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against 36 taxonomically related and unrelated strains belonging to 33 different bacterial species. Large amounts of DNA from one of the target bacterial species in the presence of low amounts from the other did not have a significant effect on the amplification sensitivity of the latter.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Versatile Fish Pathogen Edwardsiella tarda Provides Insights into its Adaptation to Broad Host Ranges and Intracellular Niches

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfan; Wu, Haizhen; Wang, Xin; Lv, Yuanzhi; Xu, Lili; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Shengyue; Zhao, Guoping; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2009-01-01

    Background Edwardsiella tarda is the etiologic agent of edwardsiellosis, a devastating fish disease prevailing in worldwide aquaculture industries. Here we describe the complete genome of E. tarda, EIB202, a highly virulent and multi-drug resistant isolate in China. Methodology/Principal Findings E. tarda EIB202 possesses a single chromosome of 3,760,463 base pairs containing 3,486 predicted protein coding sequences, 8 ribosomal rRNA operons, and 95 tRNA genes, and a 43,703 bp conjugative plasmid harboring multi-drug resistant determinants and encoding type IV A secretion system components. We identified a full spectrum of genetic properties related to its genome plasticity such as repeated sequences, insertion sequences, phage-like proteins, integrases, recombinases and genomic islands. In addition, analysis also indicated that a substantial proportion of the E. tarda genome might be devoted to the growth and survival under diverse conditions including intracellular niches, with a large number of aerobic or anaerobic respiration-associated proteins, signal transduction proteins as well as proteins involved in various stress adaptations. A pool of genes for secretion systems, pili formation, nonfimbrial adhesions, invasions and hemagglutinins, chondroitinases, hemolysins, iron scavenging systems as well as the incomplete flagellar biogenesis might feature its surface structures and pathogenesis in a fish body. Conclusion/Significance Genomic analysis of the bacterium offered insights into the phylogeny, metabolism, drug-resistance, stress adaptation, and virulence characteristics of this versatile pathogen, which constitutes an important first step in understanding the pathogenesis of E. tarda to facilitate construction of a practical effective vaccine used for combating fish edwardsiellosis. PMID:19865481

  4. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus parauberis, and Streptococcus iniae in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Bin; Kwon, Kyoung; Cha, In Seok; Jang, Ho Bin; Nho, Seong Won; Fagutao, Fernand F; Kim, Young Kyu; Yu, Jong Earn; Jung, Tae Sung

    2014-01-01

    A multiplex PCR protocol was established to simultaneously detect major bacterial pathogens in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) including Edwardsiella (E.) tarda, Streptococcus (S.) parauberis, and S. iniae. The PCR assay was able to detect 0.01 ng of E. tarda, 0.1 ng of S. parauberis, and 1 ng of S. iniae genomic DNA. Furthermore, this technique was found to have high specificity when tested with related bacterial species. This method represents a cheaper, faster, and reliable alternative for identifying major bacterial pathogens in olive flounder, the most important farmed fish in Korea.

  5. Comparative proteomic study of Edwardsiella tarda strains with different degrees of virulence.

    PubMed

    Buján, Noemí; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha; Magariños, Beatriz

    2015-09-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is an enteric opportunistic pathogen that causes a great loss in aquaculture. This species has been described as a phenotypical homogeneous group; in contrast, serological studies and molecular typing revealed a wide heterogeneity. In this work, a proteomic study of differential expression of a virulent isolate from turbot cultured in the Norwest of Spain in comparison with an avirulent collection strain was performed in order to recognize proteins involved in virulence. One hundred and three proteins that presented different abundance were successfully identified and classified into 11 functional categories according to their biological processes: amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, tricarboxylic cycle, stress response and protein fate, protein synthesis, biogenesis of cellular components, cell rescue defence and virulence, cell membrane and transport, signal transduction and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Twenty three protein spots detected only in turbot isolate were identified. It was shown that the same proteins appeared in different spots in the two isolates. Mass spectra obtained by MALDITOF/TOF of some of these proteins and DNA sequencing explained the changes as a result of different amino acid sequences. Several proteins related with the virulence of E. tarda (FliC, ArnA or FeSODI) were only detected in the turbot European isolate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: HUPO 2014. PMID:25979771

  6. ORF13 in the Type III secretion system gene cluster of Edwardsiella tarda binds to the mammalian factor Cugbp2.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Jun; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Yasuda, Masashi; Nakai, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Type III secretion system (TTSS) is essential for the intracellular replication of Edwardsiella tarda in phagocytes of fish and mammals, and a hypothetical gene (orf13) located in the TTSS gene cluster is required for intracellular replication and virulence of E. tarda. Here, we show that under TTSS-inducing conditions, the protein ORF13 was secreted into culture supernatant. Then, using a yeast 2-hybrid screen, we show that the mammalian factor Cugbp2, which regulates apoptosis in breast cancer cells, directly interacts with ORF13. A pull-down assay revealed that ORF13 binds to the C-terminal region of Cugbp2. Our results suggest that ORF13 may facilitate E. tarda replication in phagocytes by binding to Cugbp2. PMID:27137075

  7. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) against Edwardsiellosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuguo; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC), and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1) the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2) rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4-5 weeks after immunization; and (3) the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:27420049

  8. Edwardsiella tarda Outer Membrane Protein C: An Immunogenic Protein Induces Highly Protective Effects in Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) against Edwardsiellosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuguo; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein C of Edwardsiella tarda is a major cell surface antigen and it was identified to be an immunogenic protein by Western blot using flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) anti-recombinant OmpC (rOmpC), and anti-E. tarda antibodies. rOmpC tested the immune protective effect against E. tarda challenge in a flounder model and produced a relative percentage of survival rate of 85%. The immune response of flounder induced by rOmpC was investigated, and the results showed that: (1) the levels of specific serum antibodies induced by rOmpC were significantly higher than the control group after the second week after immunization, and the peak level occurred at week five after immunization; (2) rOmpC could induce the proliferation of sIg+ lymphocytes, and the peak levels of sIg+ lymphocytes in blood, spleen, and pronephros occurred at 4–5 weeks after immunization; and (3) the MHCIIα, CD4-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α genes were significantly induced after being injected with rOmpC. Taken together, these results demonstrated that rOmpC could evoke highly protective effects against E. tarda challenge and induce strong innate immune response and humoral immune response of flounder, which indicated that OmpC was a promising vaccine candidate against E. tarda infection. PMID:27420049

  9. Computer-aided vaccine designing approach against fish pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare using bioinformatics softwares

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Radha; Jeyabaskar, Suganya; Sitharaman, Gayathri; Michael, Rajamani Dinakaran; Paul, Agnal Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare are two important intracellular pathogenic bacteria that cause the infectious diseases edwardsiellosis and columnaris in wild and cultured fish. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding is an important issue in T-cell epitope prediction. In a healthy immune system, the T-cells must recognize epitopes and induce the immune response. In this study, T-cell epitopes were predicted by using in silico immunoinformatics approach with the help of bioinformatics tools that are less expensive and are not time consuming. Such identification of binding interaction between peptides and MHC alleles aids in the discovery of new peptide vaccines. We have reported the potential peptides chosen from the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. tarda and F. columnare, which interact well with MHC class I alleles. OMPs from E. tarda and F. columnare were selected and analyzed based on their antigenic and immunogenic properties. The OMPs of the genes TolC and FCOL_04620, respectively, from E. tarda and F. columnare were taken for study. Finally, two epitopes from the OMP of E. tarda exhibited excellent protein–peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Five epitopes from the OMP of F. columnare had good protein–peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Further in vitro studies can aid in the development of potential peptide vaccines using the predicted peptides. PMID:27284239

  10. Computer-aided vaccine designing approach against fish pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare using bioinformatics softwares.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Radha; Jeyabaskar, Suganya; Sitharaman, Gayathri; Michael, Rajamani Dinakaran; Paul, Agnal Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare are two important intracellular pathogenic bacteria that cause the infectious diseases edwardsiellosis and columnaris in wild and cultured fish. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding is an important issue in T-cell epitope prediction. In a healthy immune system, the T-cells must recognize epitopes and induce the immune response. In this study, T-cell epitopes were predicted by using in silico immunoinformatics approach with the help of bioinformatics tools that are less expensive and are not time consuming. Such identification of binding interaction between peptides and MHC alleles aids in the discovery of new peptide vaccines. We have reported the potential peptides chosen from the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. tarda and F. columnare, which interact well with MHC class I alleles. OMPs from E. tarda and F. columnare were selected and analyzed based on their antigenic and immunogenic properties. The OMPs of the genes TolC and FCOL_04620, respectively, from E. tarda and F. columnare were taken for study. Finally, two epitopes from the OMP of E. tarda exhibited excellent protein-peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Five epitopes from the OMP of F. columnare had good protein-peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Further in vitro studies can aid in the development of potential peptide vaccines using the predicted peptides. PMID:27284239

  11. GC/MS-based metabolomics approach to identify biomarkers differentiating survivals from death in crucian carps infected by Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Man-Jun; Wang, Sheng; Ren, Shi-Tong; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2014-08-01

    Microbial disease problems constitute the largest single cause of economic losses in aquaculture. An understanding of immune system in aquaculture animals how to function in defense against bacterial infections is especially important to control these diseases and improve food quality and safety. In the present study, we use a crucian carp model to explore which pathways and metabolites are crucial for the defense against infection caused by Edwardsiella tarda EIB202. We establish the metabolic profile of crucian carps and then compare the metabolic difference between survivals and dead fish by self-control. We identify elevating unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis and decreasing fructose and mannose metabolism as the most key pathways and increasing palmitic acid and decreasing d-mannose as the most crucial metabolites differentiating survivals from death in these fish infected by E. tarda. Our findings highlight the importance of metabolic strategy against bacterial infections.

  12. Presenting a foreign antigen on live attenuated Edwardsiella tarda using twin-arginine translocation signal peptide as a multivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yamin; Yang, Weizheng; Wang, Qiyao; Qu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2013-12-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system is a major pathway for transmembrane translocation of fully folded proteins. In this study, a multivalent vaccine to present foreign antigens on live attenuated vaccine Edwardsiella tarda WED using screened Tat signal peptide was constructed. Because the Tat system increases the yields of folded antigens in periplasmic space or extracellular milieu, it is expected to contribute to the production of conformational epitope-derived specific antibodies. E. tarda Tat signal peptides fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was constructed under the control of an in vivo inducible dps promoter. The resulting plasmids were electroporated into WED and the subcellular localizations of GFP were analyzed with Western blotting. Eight signal peptides with optimized GFP translocation efficiency were further fused to a protective antigen glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA) from a fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila. Signal peptides of DmsA, NapA, and SufI displayed high efficiency for GapA translocation. The relative percent survival (RPS) of turbot was measured with a co-infection of E. tarda and A. hydrophila, and the strain with DmsA signal peptide showed the maximal protection. This study demonstrated a new platform to construct multivalent vaccines using optimized Tat signal peptide in E. tarda. PMID:23994481

  13. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P <0.001). Therefore, 106 individuals were genotyped using all the SSR markers in LG1 by single marker analysis. Two different analytical models were then employed to detect SSR markers with different levels of significance in LG1, where 17 and 18 SSR markers were identified, respectively. Each model found three resistance-related QTLs by composite interval mapping (CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  14. Quantitative trait loci detection of Edwardsiella tarda resistance in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus using bulked segregant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Xu, Wenteng; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lei; Sun, Hejun; Wang, Lei; Chen, Songlin

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, Edwardsiella tarda has become one of the most deadly pathogens of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), causing serious annual losses in commercial production. In contrast to the rapid advances in the aquaculture of P. olivaceus, the study of E. tarda resistance-related markers has lagged behind, hindering the development of a disease-resistant strain. Thus, a marker-trait association analysis was initiated, combining bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. Based on 180 microsatellite loci across all chromosomes, 106 individuals from the F1333 (♀: F0768 ×♂: F0915) (Nomenclature rule: F+year+family number) were used to detect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and QTLs associated with E. tarda resistance. After a genomic scan, three markers (Scaffold 404-21589, Scaffold 404-21594 and Scaffold 270-13812) from the same linkage group (LG)-1 exhibited a significant difference between DNA, pooled/bulked from the resistant and susceptible groups (P <0.001). Therefore, 106 individuals were genotyped using all the SSR markers in LG1 by single marker analysis. Two different analytical models were then employed to detect SSR markers with different levels of significance in LG1, where 17 and 18 SSR markers were identified, respectively. Each model found three resistance-related QTLs by composite interval mapping (CIM). These six QTLs, designated qE1-6, explained 16.0%-89.5% of the phenotypic variance. Two of the QTLs, qE-2 and qE-4, were located at the 66.7 cM region, which was considered a major candidate region for E. tarda resistance. This study will provide valuable data for further investigations of E. tarda resistance genes and facilitate the selective breeding of disease-resistant Japanese flounder in the future.

  15. Generation of two auxotrophic genes knock-out Edwardsiella tarda and assessment of its potential as a combined vaccine in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-07-01

    Two auxotrophic genes that play essential roles in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis--alanine racemase (alr) gene and aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene--knock-out Edwardsiella tarda (Δalr Δasd E. tarda) was generated by the allelic exchange method to develop a combined vaccine system. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as a model foreign protein, and was expressed by transformation of the mutant E. tarda with antibiotic resistant gene-free plasmids harboring cassettes for GFP and asd expression (pG02-ASD-EtPR-GFP). In vitro growth of the mutant E. tarda was similar to wild-type E. tarda when D-alanine and diaminopimelic acid (DAP) were supplemented to growth medium. However, without d-alanine and/or DAP supplementation, the mutant showed very limited growth. The Δalr Δasd E. tarda transformed with pG02-ASD-EtPR-GFP showed a similar growth pattern of wild-type E. tarda when D-alanine was supplemented in the medium, and the expression of GFP could be observed even with naked eyes. The virulence of the auxotrophic mutant E. tarda was decreased, which was demonstrated by approximately 10⁶ fold increase of LD₅₀ dose compared to wild-type E. tarda. To assess vaccine potential of the present combined vaccine system, olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immunized with the GFP expressing mutant E. tarda, and analyzed protection efficacy against E. tarda challenge and antibody titers against E. tarda and GFP. Groups of fish immunized with 10⁷ CFU of the Δalr Δasd E. tarda harboring pG02-ASD-EtPR-GFP showed no mortality, which was irrespective to boost immunization. The cumulative mortality rates of fish immunized with 10⁶ or 10⁵ CFU of the mutant bacteria were lowered by a boost immunization. Fish immunized with the mutant E. tarda at doses of 10⁶-10⁷ CFU/fish showed significantly higher serum agglutination activities against formalin-killed E. tarda than PBS-injected control fish. Furthermore, fish immunized with 10⁶-10

  16. Role of CD4(+) and CD8α(+) T cells in protective immunity against Edwardsiella tarda infection of ginbuna crucian carp, Carassius auratus langsdorfii.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Araki, Kyosuke; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Nakayasu, Chihaya; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is an intracellular pathogen that causes edwardsiellosis in fish. Our previous study suggests that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) plays an essential role in protection against E. tarda infection. In the present study, we adoptively transferred T-cell subsets sensitized with E. tarda to isogenic naïve ginbuna crucian carp to determination the T-cell subsets involved in protecting fish from E. tarda infection. Recipients of CD4(+) and CD8α(+) cells acquired significant resistance to infection with E. tarda 8 days after sensitization, indicating that helper T cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes plays crucial roles in protective immunity to E. tarda. Moreover, transfer of sensitized CD8α(+) cells up-regulated the expression of genes encoding interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and perforin, suggesting that protective immunity to E. tarda involves cell-mediated cytotoxicity and interferon-γ-mediated induction of CMI. The results establish that CMI plays a crucial role in immunity against E. tarda. These findings provide novel insights into understanding the role of CMI to intracellular pathogens of fish.

  17. An invasive and low virulent Edwardsiella tarda esrB mutant promising as live attenuated vaccine in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizheng; Wang, Lixia; Zhang, Lingzhi; Qu, Jiangbo; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a leading fish pathogen haunting worldwide aquaculture industry. In E. tarda, two-component system EsrA-EsrB positively regulates type III and VI secretion systems (T3SS and T6SS) and negatively regulates hemolysin EthA, which has been demonstrated to be essential for the invasion processes in fish. In order to develop a live attenuated vaccine (LAV) with high invasiveness to be practically and economically used as immersion-administered vaccine in aquaculture, here, we generated a random mutation library of esrB sequences by error-prone PCR and introduced them into the E. tarda esrB deletion mutant. The mutant YWZ47 with significantly increased hemolytic activity and low T3SS and T6SS secretion was screened. Phenotypes including extracellular protein profiles, invasion in macrophages, lethality toward fish, and infection kinetics were investigated in the wild-type strain EIB202 and the mutants ΔesrB, ΔT3SS, ΔT6SS, ΔT3SS/ΔT6SS, and YWZ47. Compared to the documented LAV strain ΔesrB, YWZ47 showed higher invasive capability and low in vivo virulence toward fish. Significantly higher relative percent survival (RPS) could be generated in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) against the challenge of the wild-type EIB202 when inoculated through immersion route, and the RPS was comparable with that of ΔesrB through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection inoculation. Two mutated points, K167M and H197L, were found by sequence analysis of EsrBYWZ47 variant. These structural modifications underpin the variations in the regulatory functions of the mutant and wild-type EsrB. This study promoted understanding of virulence regulation by EsrB in E. tarda and presented a promising candidate of invasive attenuated vaccine used in aquaculture industries. PMID:25431010

  18. In vitro quenching of fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda AHL production using marine bacterium Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20J cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Romero, Manuel; Muras, Andrea; Mayer, Celia; Buján, Noemí; Magariños, Beatriz; Otero, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Quorum quenching (QQ) has become an interesting alternative for solving the problem of bacterial antibiotic resistance, especially in the aquaculture industry, since many species of fish-pathogenic bacteria control their virulence factors through quorum sensing (QS) systems mediated by N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). In a screening for bacterial strains with QQ activity in different marine environments, Tenacibaculum sp. strain 20J was identified and selected for its high degradation activity against a wide range of AHLs. In this study, the QQ activity of live cells and crude cell extracts (CCEs) of strain 20J was characterized and the possibilities of the use of CCEs of this strain to quench the production of AHLs in cultures of the fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda ACC35.1 was explored. E. tarda ACC35.1 produces N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OC6-HSL). This differs from profiles registered for other E. tarda strains and indicates an important intra-specific variability in AHL production in this species. The CCEs of strain 20J presented a wide-spectrum QQ activity and, unlike Bacillus thuringiensis serovar Berliner ATCC10792 CCEs, were effective in eliminating the AHLs produced in E. tarda ACC35.1 cultures. The fast and wide-spectrum AHL-degradation activity shown by this member of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes group consolidates this strain as a promising candidate for the control of AHL-based QS pathogens, especially in the marine fish farming industry.

  19. An invasive and low virulent Edwardsiella tarda esrB mutant promising as live attenuated vaccine in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weizheng; Wang, Lixia; Zhang, Lingzhi; Qu, Jiangbo; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-02-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a leading fish pathogen haunting worldwide aquaculture industry. In E. tarda, two-component system EsrA-EsrB positively regulates type III and VI secretion systems (T3SS and T6SS) and negatively regulates hemolysin EthA, which has been demonstrated to be essential for the invasion processes in fish. In order to develop a live attenuated vaccine (LAV) with high invasiveness to be practically and economically used as immersion-administered vaccine in aquaculture, here, we generated a random mutation library of esrB sequences by error-prone PCR and introduced them into the E. tarda esrB deletion mutant. The mutant YWZ47 with significantly increased hemolytic activity and low T3SS and T6SS secretion was screened. Phenotypes including extracellular protein profiles, invasion in macrophages, lethality toward fish, and infection kinetics were investigated in the wild-type strain EIB202 and the mutants ΔesrB, ΔT3SS, ΔT6SS, ΔT3SS/ΔT6SS, and YWZ47. Compared to the documented LAV strain ΔesrB, YWZ47 showed higher invasive capability and low in vivo virulence toward fish. Significantly higher relative percent survival (RPS) could be generated in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) against the challenge of the wild-type EIB202 when inoculated through immersion route, and the RPS was comparable with that of ΔesrB through intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection inoculation. Two mutated points, K167M and H197L, were found by sequence analysis of EsrBYWZ47 variant. These structural modifications underpin the variations in the regulatory functions of the mutant and wild-type EsrB. This study promoted understanding of virulence regulation by EsrB in E. tarda and presented a promising candidate of invasive attenuated vaccine used in aquaculture industries.

  20. Type III Secretion System Translocon Component EseB Forms Filaments on and Mediates Autoaggregation of and Biofilm Formation by Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Lu, Jin Fang; Liu, Lu Yi; Xiao, Tiao Yi; Liu, Wei; Liu, Jia Shou; Xie, Hai Xia

    2015-09-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda plays an important role in infection by translocating effector proteins into host cells. EseB, a component required for effector translocation, is reported to mediate autoaggregation of E. tarda. In this study, we demonstrate that EseB forms filamentous appendages on the surface of E. tarda and is required for biofilm formation by E. tarda in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). Biofilm formation by E. tarda in DMEM does not require FlhB, an essential component for assembling flagella. Dynamic analysis of EseB filament formation, autoaggregation, and biofilm formation shows that the formation of EseB filaments occurs prior to autoaggregation and biofilm formation. The addition of an EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures before bacterial autoaggregation prevents autoaggregation and biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of the EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures in which biofilm is already formed does not destroy the biofilm. Therefore, EseB filament-mediated bacterial cell-cell interaction is a prerequisite for autoaggregation and biofilm formation.

  1. Type III Secretion System Translocon Component EseB Forms Filaments on and Mediates Autoaggregation of and Biofilm Formation by Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Lu, Jin Fang; Liu, Lu Yi; Xiao, Tiao Yi; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda plays an important role in infection by translocating effector proteins into host cells. EseB, a component required for effector translocation, is reported to mediate autoaggregation of E. tarda. In this study, we demonstrate that EseB forms filamentous appendages on the surface of E. tarda and is required for biofilm formation by E. tarda in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). Biofilm formation by E. tarda in DMEM does not require FlhB, an essential component for assembling flagella. Dynamic analysis of EseB filament formation, autoaggregation, and biofilm formation shows that the formation of EseB filaments occurs prior to autoaggregation and biofilm formation. The addition of an EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures before bacterial autoaggregation prevents autoaggregation and biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of the EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures in which biofilm is already formed does not destroy the biofilm. Therefore, EseB filament-mediated bacterial cell-cell interaction is a prerequisite for autoaggregation and biofilm formation. PMID:26116669

  2. Adhesive and invasive capacities of Edwardsiella tarda isolated from South American sea lion.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Araceli; Villanueva, María Paz; González, Mario; Fernández, Fabiola; Latif, Fadua; Flores, Sandra Nonier; Fernández, Heriberto

    2014-01-01

    Edwarsiella tarda is a zoonotic bacterium that can be isolated from humans, animals and the environment. Although E. tarda is primarily considered a fish pathogen, it is the only species of its genus considered to be pathogenic for humans as well. A survey of zoonotic intestinal bacteria in fresh feces from South American sea lions (SASL) Otaria flavescens, reported E. tarda as the most frequently isolated species. In this study, we used HEp-2 cells to establish in vitro the adherence and invasive ability of 17 E. tarda strains isolated from SASL fecal material. All the strains were able to adhere and invade HEp-2 cells with adhesion and invasion percentages ranging from 56 to 100% and 21 to 74%, respectively. Despite the expression of these pathogenic factors, further investigation is needed to determine whether this bacterium could play a role as primary pathogen for this and other species of pinnipeds. PMID:25477948

  3. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella isolates from fish in the eastern United States identifies two distinct genetic taxa amongst organisms phenotypically classified as E. tarda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Matt J.; Quiniou, Sylvie M.; Cody, Theresa; Tabuchi, Maki; Ware, Cynthia; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Mauel, Michael J.; Soto, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, has been implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United States. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) using 4 different primer sets (ERIC I & II, ERIC II, BOX, and GTG5) and multi-locus sequence analysis of 16S SSU rDNA, groEl, gyrA, gyrB, pho, pgi, pgm, and rpoA gene fragments identified two distinct genotypes of E. tarda (DNA group I; DNA group II). Isolates that fell into DNA group II demonstrated more similarity to E. ictaluri than DNA group I, which contained the reference E. tarda strain (ATCC #15947). Conventional PCR analysis using published E. tarda-specific primer sets yielded variable results, with several primer sets producing no observable amplification of target DNA from some isolates. Fluorometric determination of G + C content demonstrated 56.4% G + C content for DNA group I, 60.2% for DNA group II, and 58.4% for E. ictaluri. Surprisingly, these isolates were indistinguishable using conventional biochemical techniques, with all isolates demonstrating phenotypic characteristics consistent with E. tarda. Analysis using two commercial test kits identified multiple phenotypes, although no single metabolic characteristic could reliably discriminate between genetic groups. Additionally, anti-microbial susceptibility and fatty acid profiles did not demonstrate remarkable differences between groups. The significant genetic variation (<90% similarity at gyrA, gyrB, pho, phi and pgm; <40% similarity by rep-PCR) between these groups suggests organisms from DNA group II may represent an unrecognized, genetically distinct taxa of Edwardsiella that is phenotypically indistinguishable from E. tarda.

  4. EseE of Edwardsiella tarda Augments Secretion of Translocon Protein EseC and Expression of the escC-eseE Operon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jia; Xiao, Shui Bing; Zeng, Zhi Xiong; Lu, Jin Fang; Liu, Lu Yi; Laghari, Zubair Ahmed; Nie, Pin; Yu, Hong Bing; Xie, Hai Xia

    2016-08-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is an important Gram-negative pathogen that employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effectors into host cells to facilitate bacterial survival and replication. These effectors are translocated into host cells through a translocon complex composed of three secreted proteins, namely, EseB, EseC, and EseD. The secretion of EseB and EseD requires a chaperone protein called EscC, whereas the secretion of EseC requires the chaperone EscA. In this study, we identified a novel protein (EseE) that also regulates the secretion of EseC. An eseE deletion mutant secreted much less EseC into supernatants, accompanied by increased EseC levels within bacterial cells. We also demonstrated that EseE interacted directly with EseC in a pulldown assay. Interestingly, EseC, EseE, and EscA were able to form a ternary complex, as revealed by pulldown and gel filtration assays. Of particular importance, the deletion of eseE resulted in decreased levels of EseB and EseD proteins in both the bacterial pellet and supernatant fraction. Furthermore, real-time PCR assays showed that EseE positively regulated the transcription of the translocon operon escC-eseE, comprising escC, eseB, escA, eseC, eseD, and eseE These effects of EseE on the translocon components/operon appeared to have a functional consequence, since the ΔeseE strain was outcompeted by wild-type E. tarda in a mixed infection in blue gourami fish. Collectively, our results demonstrate that EseE not only functions as a chaperone for EseC but also acts as a positive regulator controlling the expression of the translocon operon escC-eseE, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of E. tarda in fish. PMID:27271743

  5. TolC plays a crucial role in immune protection conferred by Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines developed from live organisms have better efficacy than those developed from dead organisms, the mechanisms underlying this differential efficacy remain unexplored. In this study, we combined sub-immunoproteomics with immune challenge to investigate the action of the outer membrane proteome in the immune protection conferred by four Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines prepared via different treatments and to identify protective immunogens that play a key role in this immune protection. Thirteen spots representing five outer membrane proteins and one cytoplasmic protein were identified, and it was found that their abundance was altered in relation with the immune protective abilities of the four vaccines. Among these proteins, TolC and OmpA were found to be the key immunogens conferring the first and second highest degrees of protection, respectively. TolC was detected in the two effective vaccines (live and inactivated-30-F). The total antiserum and anti-OmpA titers were higher for the two effective vaccines than for the two ineffective vaccines (inactivated-80-F and inactivated-100). Further evidence demonstrated that the live and inactivated-30-F vaccines demonstrated stronger abilities to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell differentiation than the other two evaluated vaccines. Our results indicate that the outer membrane proteome changes dramatically following different treatments, which contributes to the effectiveness of whole-cell vaccines. PMID:27406266

  6. Identification of genes associated with the penetration activity of the human type of Edwardsiella tarda EdwGII through human colon epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Suezawa, Chigusa; Yasuda, Masashi; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Kameyama, Taeko; Hirauchi, Misato; Nakai, Toshihiro; Okuda, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative pathogen with a broad host range including fish and humans. E. tarda causes gastrointestinal and extraintestinal infections in humans. In present study, the penetration activities of 22 strains of E. tarda, including 10 human isolates and 12 diseased fish isolates, through Caco-2 cell monolayers were evaluated. All the human isolates exhibited penetration activity in contrast to the fish isolates, which did not. In order to identify genes responsible for penetration activity, we screened transposon (Tn) insertion mutants for reduced penetration activity. Two Tn insertion mutants showed markedly reduced penetration activity, and we identified the wecC and fliF genes as Tn insertion sites. The wecC and fliF genes encode UDP-N-acetyl-d-mannosamine dehydrogenase, which is involved in synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen and flagellar basal body M-ring protein, respectively. Motility activity, including swarming and swimming, by the wecC mutant was weaker than that by the wild-type strain, while the fliF mutant was immotile. These results indicated that the swarming and swimming abilities mediated by the wecC and fliF genes appeared to be essential for penetration activity of E. tarda through Caco-2 cell monolayers. We also demonstrated that it was possible to group E. tarda strains into two types of human isolates and diseased fish isolates based on distribution of the wecC gene, type III and type VI secretion system genes. PCR detection of the wecC gene may represent a useful method for detecting the human type of E. tarda, which may have the ability to cause human infection. PMID:27057670

  7. Starvation beneficially influences the liver physiology and nutrient metabolism in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream (Pagrus major).

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sipra; Chakraborty, Tapas; Shimizu, Sonoko; Urasaki, Shintaro; Matsubara, Takahiro; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Ohta, Kohei

    2015-11-01

    Dietary compromises, especially food restrictions, possess species-specific effects on the health status and infection control in several organisms, including fish. To understand the starvation-mediated physiological responses in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream, especially in the liver, we performed a 20-day starvation experiment using 4 treatment (2 fed and 2 starved) groups, namely, fed-placebo, starved-placebo, fed-infected, and starved-infected, wherein bacterial exposure was done on the 11th day. In the present study, the starved groups showed reduced hepatosomatic index and drastic depletion in glycogen storage and vacuole formation. The fed-infected fish showed significant (P<0.05) increase in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in relation to its starved equivalent. Significant (P<0.05) alteration in glucose and energy metabolism, as evident from hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, was recorded in the starved groups. Interestingly, coinciding with the liver histology, PPAR (peroxisome proliferator activated receptors) α transcription followed a time-dependent activation in starved groups while PPARγ exhibited an opposite pattern. The transcription of hepcidin 1 and transferrin, initially increased in 0dai (days after infection) starved fish but reduced significantly (P<0.05) at later stages. Two-color immunohistochemistry and subsequent cell counting showed significant increase in P63-positive cells at 0dai and 5dai but later reduced slightly at 10dai. Similar results were also obtained in the lysosomal (cathepsin D) and non-lysosomal (ubiquitin) gene transcription level. All together, our data suggest that starvation exerts multidirectional responses, which allows for better physiological adaptations during any infectious period, in red sea bream.

  8. Immune responses of flounder Paralichthys olivaceus vaccinated by immersion of formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying-Li; Tang, Xiao-Qian; Sheng, Xiu-Zhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wen-Bin

    2015-10-16

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hyperosmotic immersion (HI) vaccination and determine the optimum hyperosmotic salinity for flounder Paralichthys olivaceus by investigating its immune responses following vaccination. Flounder were immersed in 1 of 3 hyperosmotic solutions at 50, 60 and 70‰ salinity, then transferred into 30‰ salinity normal seawater containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for vaccination (3 HI groups), or were immersed in normal seawater as direct immersion (DI group). The results showed that the percentages of surface membrane immunoglobulin-positive (sIg+) cells in peripheral blood leukocytes and spleen leukocytes induced by HI were significantly higher than that with DI (p < 0.05), and the 50‰ salinity group showed the strongest response among the HI groups, which reached peaks at Week 4. ELISA assay showed that the specific serum antibodies gradually increased after vaccination and reached peak at Day 32, and the fish treated with HI showed stronger antibody responses; among the HI groups, a significantly higher specific antibody level was detected in the 50‰ salinity group at Day 32 (p < 0.05). Similarly, the fish treated with HI showed higher specific mucosal antibody levels compared to the DI group, and the mucosal antibody showed a faster response, with peak time arriving 1 wk earlier than for the serum antibody. The relative percent survival (RPS) of flounder treated with HI at 50, 60 and 70‰ salinities were 79, 71 and 57% respectively, while this was 43% in the DI group. These results demonstrated that HI, especially the 50‰ salinity, could efficiently enhance the immune response of flounder and show higher RPS. This has significant value for immunological prevention of edwardsiellosis in flounder. PMID:26480914

  9. Immunomodulation of Lactobacillus pentosus PL11 against Edwardsiella tarda infection in the head kidney cells of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica).

    PubMed

    Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Lee, Joong-Su; Lee, Seung-Jin; Choi, Su-Hee; Hossain, Md Akil; Park, Ji-Yong; Kim, Jong-Choon; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Wild and farm-raised fish can be simultaneously exposed to different types of pathogens in their habitats. Hence, it is important to study their effects, whether isolated or in combination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus pentosus PL11 on the transcription of specific cytokine genes related to immune response, using Japanese eel macrophages as an in vitro model. Head kidney leukocytes were isolated from Japanese eels and cell viability was determined using an MTT reagent. In addition, the Griess reagent was used to determine the nitric oxide (NO) production while, an enzyme-linked immunosobent assay (ELISA) and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were utilized to quantify the level of proinflammatory cytokines. The results of the study indicated that infection by Edwardsiella tarda alone causes a higher rate of cell death and an increase in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β, 822.67 ± 29.48 pg mL(-1)), interleukin-6 (IL-6, 13.57 ± 0.55 pg mL(-1)), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 2033.67 ± 84.68 pg mL(-1)). However, co-culture with L. pentosus PL11 downregulates the production of NO and the related IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α by 46%, 88.4%, 59%, and 77%, respectively. Quantification of the mRNA expression level revealed it to be consistent with the ELISA analysis. Hence, we infer that L. pentosus PL11 plays a significant role in the immunmodulation of the inflammatory responses that arise in fish owing to infection by pathogenic bacteria such as Edwardsiella tarda. PMID:27108377

  10. Protective effect of herbal and probiotics enriched diet on haematological and immunity status of Oplegnathus fasciatus (Temminck & Schlegel) against Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Kim, Man-Chul; Kim, Ju-Sang; Balasundaram, Chellam; Heo, Moon-Soo

    2011-03-01

    This study determines the effect of diet enriched with the herb Baical skullcap Scutellaria baicalensis, and/or probiotics Lactobacillus sakei BK19 in rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus (32 ± 3 g) against Edwardsiella tarda. The changes in haematological parameters, innate immune response, and disease resistance were investigated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. The white blood cell count (WBC: 10(4) mm(-3)), red blood cell count (RBC: 10(6) mm(-3)), and haemoglobin (Hb: g dl(-1)) levels significant increased (P < 0.05) with mixed diet on 3rd and 6th week and probiotics enriched diet on 6th week. The haematocrit (Ht: %) level significantly increased (P < 0.05) when fed with mixed diet on weeks 1-6. Interestingly, in mixed diet group the lymphocytes (LYM), monocytes (MON), and neutrophils (NEU) significantly increased from week 1-6. The eosinophils (EOS) significantly increased in all the treated groups. In the probiotics or mixed diet groups the total protein (TP: g dl(-1)) increased significantly on weeks 3 and 6. The serum lysozyme activity significantly was enhanced in all the treated groups indicating an increase in the innate immunity level. Serum complement, antiprotease activities, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production significantly increased from week 1-6 with mixed diet. The maximum protection against E. tarda was recorded in mixed diet group with a minimum cumulative mortality of 20% and a high relative percent survival (RPS) of 72.84. In the probiotics and herbal diet groups the cumulative mortality was 25% and 35% and RPS was 68.63 and 59.42, respectively. This study indicates that administration of probiotics or mixed diets can effectively minimize the mortality and restore the altered hematological parameters and enhancing the innate immunity in O. fasciatus against E. tarda.

  11. Impact of co-deficiency of RpoN and RpoS on stress tolerance, virulence and gene regulation in Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enfu; Ye, Jiang; Song, ShanShan; Wang, Keping; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhang, Huizhan

    2014-07-01

    Edwardsiella tarda the etiological agent for edwardsiellosis, a devastating fish disease prevailing in worldwide aquaculture industries was subjected to a molecular genetic study. To research into the influence when RpoN (σ(54) ) and RpoS (σ(38) ) were deleted simultaneously, the double deletion mutant of RpoN (σ(54) ) and RpoS (σ(38) ), namely rnrs, was constructed. Firstly, RpoN and RpoS are both essential for H2 O2 , starvation, high osmotic pressure and acid resistance, which have synergistic effect. Secondly, virulence of rnrs reduces significantly compared to E. tarda EIB 202 WT, ΔrpoN mutant and ΔrpoS mutant. Furthermore, transcriptional control of rpoS by rpoN in stationary phase was observed through qRT-PCR, while rpoS had no influence on rpoN in the level of transcription. Meanwhile, regulation of flagellar sigma factor σ(F) (FliA) and other flagella-related genes including flgA, flgK, flgL, motA, and motB by rpoS, and rpoN was found. fliA and other flagella-related genes were controlled positively by rpoN, while negatively by rpoS. At last, two differential expression genes in transcriptional level of rnrs strain were detected by DD-RT-PCR, namely cheY and narK. This study therefore indicated interaction between sigma factors RpoN and RpoS, which modulates stress response, virulence, motility, and provides new insights into the regulatory networks of E. tarda. PMID:24633758

  12. Protective effect of herbal and probiotics enriched diet on haematological and immunity status of Oplegnathus fasciatus (Temminck & Schlegel) against Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Kim, Man-Chul; Kim, Ju-Sang; Balasundaram, Chellam; Heo, Moon-Soo

    2011-03-01

    This study determines the effect of diet enriched with the herb Baical skullcap Scutellaria baicalensis, and/or probiotics Lactobacillus sakei BK19 in rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus (32 ± 3 g) against Edwardsiella tarda. The changes in haematological parameters, innate immune response, and disease resistance were investigated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. The white blood cell count (WBC: 10(4) mm(-3)), red blood cell count (RBC: 10(6) mm(-3)), and haemoglobin (Hb: g dl(-1)) levels significant increased (P < 0.05) with mixed diet on 3rd and 6th week and probiotics enriched diet on 6th week. The haematocrit (Ht: %) level significantly increased (P < 0.05) when fed with mixed diet on weeks 1-6. Interestingly, in mixed diet group the lymphocytes (LYM), monocytes (MON), and neutrophils (NEU) significantly increased from week 1-6. The eosinophils (EOS) significantly increased in all the treated groups. In the probiotics or mixed diet groups the total protein (TP: g dl(-1)) increased significantly on weeks 3 and 6. The serum lysozyme activity significantly was enhanced in all the treated groups indicating an increase in the innate immunity level. Serum complement, antiprotease activities, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production significantly increased from week 1-6 with mixed diet. The maximum protection against E. tarda was recorded in mixed diet group with a minimum cumulative mortality of 20% and a high relative percent survival (RPS) of 72.84. In the probiotics and herbal diet groups the cumulative mortality was 25% and 35% and RPS was 68.63 and 59.42, respectively. This study indicates that administration of probiotics or mixed diets can effectively minimize the mortality and restore the altered hematological parameters and enhancing the innate immunity in O. fasciatus against E. tarda. PMID:21272648

  13. A Disordered Region in the EvpP Protein from the Type VI Secretion System of Edwardsiella tarda is Essential for EvpC Binding

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wentao; Anand, Ganesh; Sivaraman, J.; Leung, Ka Yin; Mok, Yu-Keung

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) of pathogenic bacteria plays important roles in both virulence and inter-bacterial competitions. The effectors of T6SS are presumed to be transported either by attaching to the tip protein or by interacting with HcpI (haemolysin corregulated protein 1). In Edwardsiella tarda PPD130/91, the T6SS secreted protein EvpP (E. tarda virulent protein P) is found to be essential for virulence and directly interacts with EvpC (Hcp-like), suggesting that it could be a potential effector. Using limited protease digestion, nuclear magnetic resonance heteronuclear Nuclear Overhauser Effects, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we confirmed that the dimeric EvpP (40 kDa) contains a substantial proportion (40%) of disordered regions but still maintains an ordered and folded core domain. We show that an N-terminal, 10-kDa, protease-resistant fragment in EvpP connects to a shorter, 4-kDa protease-resistant fragment through a highly flexible region, which is followed by another disordered region at the C-terminus. Within this C-terminal disordered region, residues Pro143 to Ile168 are essential for its interaction with EvpC. Unlike the highly unfolded T3SS effector, which has a lower molecular weight and is maintained in an unfolded conformation with a dedicated chaperone, the T6SS effector seems to be relatively larger, folded but partially disordered and uses HcpI as a chaperone. PMID:25401506

  14. Recombinant sialidase NanA (rNanA) cleaves α2-3 linked sialic acid of host cell surface N-linked glycoprotein to promote Edwardsiella tarda infection.

    PubMed

    Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Tabata, Mutsumi; Shinyoshi, Sayaka; Oishi, Kazuki; Araki, Kyosuke; Komatsu, Masaharu; Itakura, Takao; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is one of the major pathogenic bacteria affecting both marine and freshwater fish species. Sialidase NanA expressed endogenously in E. tarda is glycosidase removing sialic acids from glycoconjugates. Recently, the relationship of NanA sialidase activity to E. tarda infection has been reported, however, the mechanism with which sialidase NanA aids the pathogenicity of E. tarda remained unclear. Here, we comprehensively determined the biochemical properties of NanA towards various substrates in vitro to provide novel insights on the potential NanA target molecule at the host cell. GAKS cell pretreated with recombinant NanA showed increased susceptibility to E. tarda infection. Moreover, sialidase inhibitor treated E. tarda showed a significantly reduced ability to infect GAKS cells. These results indicate that NanA-induced desialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates is essential for the initial step of E. tarda infection. Among the natural substrates, NanA exhibited the highest activity towards 3-sialyllactose, α2-3 linked sialic acid carrying sialoglycoconjugates. Supporting this finding, intact GAKS cell membrane exposed to recombinant NanA showed changes of glycoconjugates only in α2-3 sialo-linked glycoproteins, but not in glycolipids and α2-6 sialo-linked glycoproteins. Lectin staining of cell surface glycoprotein provided further evidence that α2-3 sialo-linkage of the N-linked glycoproteins was the most plausible target of NanA sialidase. To confirm the significance of α2-3 sialo-linkage desialylation for E. tarda infection, HeLa cells which possessed lower amount of α2-3 sialo-linkage glycoprotein were used for infection experiment along with GAKS cells. As a result, infection of HeLa cells by E. tarda was significantly reduced when compared to GAKS cells. Furthermore, E. tarda infection was significantly inhibited by mannose pretreatment suggesting that the bacterium potentially recognizes and binds to mannose or mannose containing

  15. Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia. A rare but fatal water- and foodborne infection: Review of the literature and clinical cases from a single centre

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Yuji; Asahata-Tago, Sayaka; Ainoda, Yusuke; Fujita, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia (ETB) can be a fatal disease in humans. OBJECTIVES: To determine the significant risk factors associated with death caused by ETB, and to examine the geographical, seasonal, environmental and dietary factors of the disease. METHODS: A retrospective, observational, case control study was performed. The PubMed MEDLINE and Japanese Medical Abstract Society (www.jamas.or.jp) databases were searched for ETB case reports and meeting abstracts. In additon, retrospective chart reviews of patients with ETB at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) were conducted to evaluate the risk factors associated with death using multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 46 publications, comprising 72 cases from the English (n=30), French (n=1), Spanish (n=1) and Japanese (n=14) literature. Five cases at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital were also included. Of the included 77 cases, the mean age was 61 years and 39% of patients were female; 77.2% of the cases occurred between June and November, and 45.5% were reported in Japan. Dietary factors (raw fish/meat exposure) were reported for 10.4% of patients and 12.9% reported environmental (ie, brackish water) exposure. The overall mortality rate was 44.6%; however, this rate increased to 61.1% for ETB patients with soft tissue infections. Liver cirrhosis was determined to be an independent risk factor associated with death (OR 12.0 [95% CI 2.46 to 58.6]; P=0.00213) using multivariate analyses. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, the present analysis was the first and largest multi-language review of ETB. Clinical characteristics of ETB resemble those of Aeromonas, typhoid fever and Vibrio vulnificus infections, in addition to sharing similar risk factors. CONCLUSION: ETB should be categorized as a severe food- and waterborne infection, which results in high mortality for patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:26744588

  16. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P < 0.05), and the highest amount of antigen was detected in flounders immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P < 0.05) compared with the spleen, kidney and liver. Antigen uptake in the gill and skin both peaked at 30 min post immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P < 0.05), and then quickly declined. In contrast, antigen uptake in the spleen, kidney and liver gradually increased 3 h post immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P < 0.05). In the mucosal-associated tissues, the expression of MHC Iα and CD8α genes peaked at 24 hpi, while the expression of MHC IIα and CD4-1 genes showed up-regulation in the gill and skin

  17. Two-component PhoB-PhoR regulatory system and ferric uptake regulator sense phosphate and iron to control virulence genes in type III and VI secretion systems of Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Smarajit; Sivaraman, J; Leung, Ka Yin; Mok, Yu-Keung

    2011-11-11

    Inorganic phosphate (P(i)) and iron are essential nutrients that are depleted by vertebrates as a protective mechanism against bacterial infection. This depletion, however, is sensed by some pathogens as a signal to turn on the expression of virulence genes. Here, we show that the PhoB-PhoR two-component system senses changes in P(i) concentration, whereas the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) senses changes in iron concentration in Edwardsiella tarda PPD130/91 to regulate the expression of type III and VI secretion systems (T3SS and T6SS) through an E. tarda secretion regulator, EsrC. In sensing low P(i) concentration, PhoB-PhoR autoregulates and activates the phosphate-specific transport operon, pstSCAB-phoU, by binding directly to the Pho box in the promoters of phoB and pstS. PhoB also binds with EsrC simultaneously on the promoter of an E. tarda virulence protein, evpA, to regulate directly the transcription of genes from T6SS. In addition, PhoB requires and interacts with PhoU to activate esrC and suppress fur indirectly through unidentified regulators. Fur, on the other hand, senses high iron concentration and binds directly to the Fur box in the promoter of evpP to inhibit EsrC binding to the same region. In addition, Fur suppresses transcription of phoB, pstSCAB-phoU, and esrC indirectly via unidentified regulators, suggesting negative cross-talk with the Pho regulon. Physical interactions exist between Fur and PhoU and between Fur and EsrC. Our findings suggest that T3SS and T6SS may carry out distinct roles in the pathogenicity of E. tarda by responding to different environmental factors.

  18. Hemolysin EthA in Edwardsiella tarda is essential for fish invasion in vivo and in vitro and regulated by two-component system EsrA-EsrB and nucleoid protein HhaEt.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Liu, Qin; Wu, Haizhen; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2010-12-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative pathogen for hemorrhagic septicemia in fish. Recently, two-component system (TCS) EsrA-EsrB in E. tarda has been found to play key roles in regulating type III secretion system (TTSS) and type VI secretion system (T6SS). In this study, a markedly attenuated ΔesrB mutant was investigated to exhibit enhanced cell-invasion capability, as well as the increased cytotoxicity of its extracellular products (ECPs). Compared with the parental strain, the ΔesrB mutant unexpectedly displayed the significantly increased hemolytic activity, and the restoration of hemolysin production was observed in the complemented strain esrB(+). A hemolysis-associated 147 kDa protein, EthA, was found to be up-regulated in the ECPs of ΔesrB. The deletion of ethA gene in E. tarda wild type and ΔesrB strains drastically decreased their capacities in internalization of epithelial papilloma of carp (EPC) cells. These results indicated that the increased production of EthA was responsible for the enhanced cell-invasion related capabilities in ΔesrB. Furthermore, the expression of EthA in ΔesrB exhibited a temperature-induced manner, and a nucleoid protein Hha(Et) was identified to mediate ethA expression by directly binding to its promoter. These results demonstrated that the virulence determinant EthA was fully required for invasion abilities of E. tarda and was subjected to the control of a complicated and precisely regulated network primed for its invasion, colonization and infection process in fish. PMID:20832475

  19. Effect of multiple mutations in tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism pathways on Edwardsiella ictaluri pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dahal, N; Abdelhamed, H; Lu, J; Karsi, A; Lawrence, M L

    2014-02-21

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen causing enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC). We have shown recently that tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C1) metabolism are involved in E. ictaluri pathogenesis. However, the effect of multiple mutations in these pathways is unknown. Here, we report four novel E. ictaluri mutants carrying double gene mutations in TCA cycle (EiΔmdhΔsdhC, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC), C1 metabolism (EiΔglyAΔgcvP), and both TCA and C1 metabolism pathways (EiΔgcvPΔsdhC). In-frame gene deletions were constructed by allelic exchange and mutants' virulence and vaccine efficacy were evaluated using in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as well as end point mortality counts in catfish fingerlings. Results indicated that all the double gene mutants were attenuated compared to wild-type (wt) E. ictaluri. There was a 1.39-fold average reduction in bioluminescence, and hence bacterial numbers, from all the mutants except for EiΔfrdAΔsdhC at 144 h post-infection. Vaccination with mutants was very effective in protecting channel catfish against subsequent infection with virulent E. ictaluri 93-146 strain. In particular, immersion vaccination resulted in complete protection. Our results provide further evidence on the importance of TCA and C1 metabolism pathways in bacterial pathogenesis.

  20. Histologic and molecular characterization of Edwardsiella piscicida infection in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Fogelson, Susan B; Petty, Barbara D; Reichley, Stephen R; Ware, Cynthia; Bowser, Paul R; Crim, Marcus J; Getchell, Rodman G; Sams, Kelly L; Marquis, Hélène; Griffin, Matt J

    2016-05-01

    The genus Edwardsiella is composed of a diverse group of facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria that can produce disease in a wide variety of hosts, including birds, reptiles, mammals, and fish. Our report describes the isolation and identification of Edwardsiella piscicida associated with chronic mortality events in 2 separate captive largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) populations in New York and Florida. Wet-mount biopsies of skin mucus, gill, kidney, and spleen from several affected largemouth bass contained significant numbers of motile bacteria. Histologic examination revealed multifocal areas of necrosis scattered throughout the heart, liver, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, and spleen. Many of the necrotic foci were encapsulated or replaced by discrete granulomas and associated with colonies of gram-negative bacteria. Initial phenotypic and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometric analysis against existing spectral databases of recovered isolates identified these bacteria as Edwardsiella tarda Subsequent molecular analysis using repetitive sequence mediated and species-specific PCR, as well as 16S rRNA, rpoB, and gyrB sequences, classified these isolates as E. piscicida As a newly designated taxon, E. piscicida should be considered as a differential for multiorgan necrosis and granulomas in largemouth bass. PMID:26951328

  1. Histologic and molecular characterization of Edwardsiella piscicida infection in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Fogelson, Susan B; Petty, Barbara D; Reichley, Stephen R; Ware, Cynthia; Bowser, Paul R; Crim, Marcus J; Getchell, Rodman G; Sams, Kelly L; Marquis, Hélène; Griffin, Matt J

    2016-05-01

    The genus Edwardsiella is composed of a diverse group of facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria that can produce disease in a wide variety of hosts, including birds, reptiles, mammals, and fish. Our report describes the isolation and identification of Edwardsiella piscicida associated with chronic mortality events in 2 separate captive largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) populations in New York and Florida. Wet-mount biopsies of skin mucus, gill, kidney, and spleen from several affected largemouth bass contained significant numbers of motile bacteria. Histologic examination revealed multifocal areas of necrosis scattered throughout the heart, liver, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, and spleen. Many of the necrotic foci were encapsulated or replaced by discrete granulomas and associated with colonies of gram-negative bacteria. Initial phenotypic and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometric analysis against existing spectral databases of recovered isolates identified these bacteria as Edwardsiella tarda Subsequent molecular analysis using repetitive sequence mediated and species-specific PCR, as well as 16S rRNA, rpoB, and gyrB sequences, classified these isolates as E. piscicida As a newly designated taxon, E. piscicida should be considered as a differential for multiorgan necrosis and granulomas in largemouth bass.

  2. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on porphyria cutanea tarda and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... on " Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam " that there was sufficient evidence ...

  3. Three Cases of Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Tarda in One Korean Family

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang Wan; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Ha, You-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) tarda is an inherited skeletal arthropathy. Because SED tarda involves the joints and resemble the clinical findings of chronic arthropathies, this disease is frequently misdiagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report here on three patients (father and his two daughters) in one family with SED tarda. All patients had back pain and polyarthralgia. Their radiographs revealed typical changes for SED tarda including platyspondyly and dysplastic bone changes. This rare disease has major clinical importance in that it is similar with JIA or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27401665

  4. Three Cases of Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Tarda in One Korean Family.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sang Wan; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Ha, You Jung; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-09-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) tarda is an inherited skeletal arthropathy. Because SED tarda involves the joints and resemble the clinical findings of chronic arthropathies, this disease is frequently misdiagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report here on three patients (father and his two daughters) in one family with SED tarda. All patients had back pain and polyarthralgia. Their radiographs revealed typical changes for SED tarda including platyspondyly and dysplastic bone changes. This rare disease has major clinical importance in that it is similar with JIA or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27401665

  5. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a HIV- positive patient.

    PubMed

    Franzon, Valéria Aparecida Zanela; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Camelo, Fernanda Henriques; Camargo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report about Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and its relationship with the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cutaneous porphyria is an illness caused by enzymatic modification that results in partial deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), which may be hereditary or acquired. Several studies suggest that HIV infection associated with cofactors might trigger the development of porphyria cutanea tarda. In this case report, we present a patient infected with HIV, who after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) enjoyed clinical improvement of porphyria cutanea tarda symptoms. PMID:27579753

  6. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a HIV- positive patient*

    PubMed Central

    Franzon, Valéria Aparecida Zanela; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Camelo, Fernanda Henriques; Camargo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report about Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and its relationship with the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cutaneous porphyria is an illness caused by enzymatic modification that results in partial deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), which may be hereditary or acquired. Several studies suggest that HIV infection associated with cofactors might trigger the development of porphyria cutanea tarda. In this case report, we present a patient infected with HIV, who after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) enjoyed clinical improvement of porphyria cutanea tarda symptoms. PMID:27579753

  7. Pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda).

    PubMed

    Sravanthi, A; Srivalli, P; Gopal, K V T; Rao, T Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a rare type of ectodermal dysplasia further classified into 4 types. Cutaneous manifestations seen in most of the cases of Pachyonychia congenita include palmoplantar keratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, wedge shaped nails, oral leukokeratosis and woolly hair. A 25-year-old male presented to us with thickened nails and scanty scalp hair. On examination, we noticed hyperkeratotic plaques over both the soles, palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and yellowish discoloration, wedging with subungual hyperkeratosis of all the nails. Follicular hyperkeratotic papules and steatocystoma multiplex were also observed over the scalp and face. The patient had history of natal teeth and on dental examination, lower central incisors were absent. All cutaneous changes in our case had manifested first in the 2(nd) decade except for natal teeth. All the above features suggested the diagnosis of pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda), which is an infrequently reported rare variant. PMID:27559502

  8. Pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda)

    PubMed Central

    Sravanthi, A.; Srivalli, P.; Gopal, K. V. T.; Rao, T. Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a rare type of ectodermal dysplasia further classified into 4 types. Cutaneous manifestations seen in most of the cases of Pachyonychia congenita include palmoplantar keratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, wedge shaped nails, oral leukokeratosis and woolly hair. A 25-year-old male presented to us with thickened nails and scanty scalp hair. On examination, we noticed hyperkeratotic plaques over both the soles, palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and yellowish discoloration, wedging with subungual hyperkeratosis of all the nails. Follicular hyperkeratotic papules and steatocystoma multiplex were also observed over the scalp and face. The patient had history of natal teeth and on dental examination, lower central incisors were absent. All cutaneous changes in our case had manifested first in the 2nd decade except for natal teeth. All the above features suggested the diagnosis of pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda), which is an infrequently reported rare variant. PMID:27559502

  9. Edwardsiella tarda and Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from diseased Southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) are virulent to channel catfish and Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study is to identify bacterial pathogens isolated from diseased Southern flounder and determine their virulence to channel catfish and Nile tilapia. Twenty five Gram-negative bacteria isolates were recovered from five tissues (skin lesions, brain, liver, intestine, and posterior kidn...

  10. Towards the intelligent design of a vaccine against Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is the leading cause of disease loss in the catfish industry in the United States, accounting for an estimated 20.2 % loss in 2009. Previous work to establish live-attenuated vaccines for E. ictaluri demonstrated a relatively weak channel catfish immune response, with better im...

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda.

    PubMed

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Associated Sporadic Nonfamilial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Sibashish Kamal; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Lal, Niharika Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), a relatively uncommon metabolic disease, is the most common cutaneous porphyria. Here, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with sporadic, nonfamilial PCT that presented with classical cutaneous findings and multiple risk factors, including alcohol abuse, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS, that have been strongly associated with the sporadic form of PCT. PMID:27293254

  13. Possible cantharidin poisoning of a great bustard (Otis tarda).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Camarero, Pablo R; García-Montijano, Marino; Mateo, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    A possible cantharidin intoxication of a great bustard (Otis tarda) was described. This wild bird died by a traumatism, but also presented diarrhoea, congestion of the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys and had ingested several blister beetles of the species Berberomeloe majalis. The analysis of the stomach content by GC-MS revealed the presence of cantharidin at a concentration of 1.37 μg/g of wet weight, a similar level than in other birds poisoned in captivity. PMID:22001622

  14. Possible cantharidin poisoning of a great bustard (Otis tarda).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Camarero, Pablo R; García-Montijano, Marino; Mateo, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    A possible cantharidin intoxication of a great bustard (Otis tarda) was described. This wild bird died by a traumatism, but also presented diarrhoea, congestion of the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys and had ingested several blister beetles of the species Berberomeloe majalis. The analysis of the stomach content by GC-MS revealed the presence of cantharidin at a concentration of 1.37 μg/g of wet weight, a similar level than in other birds poisoned in captivity.

  15. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda. 3.813 Section 3.813 Pensions, Bonuses, and... porphyria cutanea tarda. (a) Disability benefits. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a... Vietnam era, and who suffers from chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda which became manifest within...

  16. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda. 3.813 Section 3.813 Pensions, Bonuses, and... porphyria cutanea tarda. (a) Disability benefits. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a... Vietnam era, and who suffers from chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda which became manifest within...

  17. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda. 3.813 Section 3.813 Pensions, Bonuses, and... porphyria cutanea tarda. (a) Disability benefits. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a... Vietnam era, and who suffers from chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda which became manifest within...

  18. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda. 3.813 Section 3.813 Pensions, Bonuses, and... porphyria cutanea tarda. (a) Disability benefits. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a... Vietnam era, and who suffers from chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda which became manifest within...

  19. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda. 3.813 Section 3.813 Pensions, Bonuses, and... porphyria cutanea tarda. (a) Disability benefits. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a... Vietnam era, and who suffers from chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda which became manifest within...

  20. Edwardsiella andrillae, a new species of sea anemone from Antarctic ice.

    PubMed

    Daly, Marymegan; Rack, Frank; Zook, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the lower surface of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica by the Submersible Capable of under-Ice Navigation and Imaging (SCINI) remotely operated vehicle discovered a new species of sea anemone living in this previously undocumented ecosystem. This discovery was a significant outcome of the Coulman High Project's geophysical and environmental fieldwork in 2010-2011 as part of the ANDRILL (ANtarctic geologic DRILLing) program. Edwardsiella andrillae n. sp., lives with most of its column in the ice shelf, with only the tentacle crown extending into the seawater below. In addition to being the only Antarctic representative of the genus, Edwardsiella andrillae is distinguished from all other species of the genus in the number of tentacles and in the size and distribution of cnidae. The anatomy and histology of Edwardsiella andrillae present no features that explain how this animal withstands the challenges of life in such an unusual habitat.

  1. Edwardsiella andrillae, a New Species of Sea Anemone from Antarctic Ice

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Marymegan; Rack, Frank; Zook, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the lower surface of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica by the Submersible Capable of under-Ice Navigation and Imaging (SCINI) remotely operated vehicle discovered a new species of sea anemone living in this previously undocumented ecosystem. This discovery was a significant outcome of the Coulman High Project’s geophysical and environmental fieldwork in 2010-2011 as part of the ANDRILL (ANtarctic geologic DRILLing) program. Edwardsiella andrillae n. sp., lives with most of its column in the ice shelf, with only the tentacle crown extending into the seawater below. In addition to being the only Antarctic representative of the genus, Edwardsiella andrillae is distinguished from all other species of the genus in the number of tentacles and in the size and distribution of cnidae. The anatomy and histology of Edwardsiella andrillae present no features that explain how this animal withstands the challenges of life in such an unusual habitat. PMID:24349517

  2. Edwardsiella andrillae, a new species of sea anemone from Antarctic ice.

    PubMed

    Daly, Marymegan; Rack, Frank; Zook, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the lower surface of the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica by the Submersible Capable of under-Ice Navigation and Imaging (SCINI) remotely operated vehicle discovered a new species of sea anemone living in this previously undocumented ecosystem. This discovery was a significant outcome of the Coulman High Project's geophysical and environmental fieldwork in 2010-2011 as part of the ANDRILL (ANtarctic geologic DRILLing) program. Edwardsiella andrillae n. sp., lives with most of its column in the ice shelf, with only the tentacle crown extending into the seawater below. In addition to being the only Antarctic representative of the genus, Edwardsiella andrillae is distinguished from all other species of the genus in the number of tentacles and in the size and distribution of cnidae. The anatomy and histology of Edwardsiella andrillae present no features that explain how this animal withstands the challenges of life in such an unusual habitat. PMID:24349517

  3. Clinical haematology of the great bustard (Otis tarda).

    PubMed

    Jimenez, A; Barrera, R; Sanchez, J; Cuenca, R; Rodriguez, J; Andres, S; Mane, M C

    1991-12-01

    The haematological parameters of healthy great bustards (Otis tarda L.) have been determined. The values obtained were red cell count (3.0 x 10(12) +/- 0.2 x 10(12/)1), white cell count (33.0 x 10(9) +/- 2.6 x 10(9)/1), haematocrit value (0.51 +/- 0.01 1/1), haemoglobin (13.0 +/- 0.3 g/dl), mean corpuscular volume (178.7 +/- 12.5 fl), mean cell haemoglobin concentration (25.0 +/- 0.6 g/dl), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (42.5 +/- 3.2 pg), differential white cell count: heterophils (22.5 x 10(9) +/- 0.7 x 10(9)/1), lymphocytes (6.0 x 10(9)+/-0.7 x 10(9)/1), eosinophils (2.7 x 10(9) +/- 0.3 x 10(9)/1) and monocytes (1.8 x 10(9)+/-0.2 x 10(9)/1).

  4. Identification of differentially regulated proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during iron restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause a significant stres...

  5. Edwardsiella ictaluri as the causative agent of mortality in cultured Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri was consistently isolated from the spleens, livers, and head kidneys of diseased Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus from a farm experiencing mortality events in several culture ponds. We describe the first published outbreak of E. ictaluri–induced Edwardsiellosis in Nile tilapi...

  6. Bacterial distribution and tissue targets following experimental Edwardsiella ictaluri infection in nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, a Gram-negative enteric bacterium, is the known etiological agent of enteric septicemia of catfish. In the last few years, different strains have been implicated as the causative agent of mortality events in cultured fish, including Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L. Due to...

  7. Effects of Bio-Mos on Growth and Survival of Channel Catfish Challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in the catfish farming industry has been high disease loss to enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri (E. ictaluri). Methods to control this disease include antibiotic therapy, vaccinations, and management strategies such as taking the fish...

  8. Molecular Characterization of a LacZ-Type Beta-Galactosidase Activity from Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish, caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is among the most common disease of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and is responsible for $50 - 60 million economic losses to catfish producers annually in the Southeastern U.S. After immunoscreening an E. ictaluri genomic libra...

  9. Transferable green fluorescence-tagged pEI2 in Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pEI2 plasmid of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolate, I49, was tagged using a Tn10-GFP-kan cassette to create the green fluorescence-expressing derivative I49-gfp. The Tn10-GFP-kan insertion site was mapped by plasmid sequencing to 663 bp upstream of orf2 and appeared to be at a neutral site in the pla...

  10. IncA/C Plasmid-Mediated Florfenicol Resistance in the Catfish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florfenicol has recently been approved for the treatment of enteric septicemia of catfish caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri. Here we report the identification of florfenicol resistance in a clinical isolate of E. ictaluri. Resistance in this isolate is associated with a mobile IncA/C plasmid conferrin...

  11. Chemical and electroporated transformation of Edwardsiella ictaluri using three different plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transfer of DNA by conjugation has been the method generally used for genetic manipulation of Edwardsiella ictaluri because, previously, attempts to transform E. ictaluri by the uptake of naked DNA has apparently failed. We report here the successful transformation of seven strains of E. ictaluri us...

  12. [A case of porphyria cutanea tarda in an 11-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Pindycka-Piaszczyńska, M; Danik, E; Bendkowski, W

    1995-06-01

    A rare case of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) in an 11-year-old boy is presented. The clinical manifestations were typical. Results of porphyrin analyses of urine and serum with a fluorescence emission maximum around 398 nm revealed a pattern consistent with PCT. PMID:8692611

  13. Genome sequence of Edwardsiella ictaluri 93-146 a strain associated with a natural channel catfish outbreak of enteric septicemia of catifsh

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is the cause of extensive mortalities and economic losses to the channel catfish industry of the southeast United States. Here we report the complete genome of Edwardsiella ictaluri 93-146. Whole-genome sequence analysis of E. ictaluri provides a tool for understanding the geno...

  14. Precipitating factors of porphyria cutanea tarda in Brazil with emphasis on hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations. Study of 60 patients*

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fatima Mendonça Jorge; Nakhle, Maria Cristina; Abrantes-Lemos, Clarice Pires; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common form of porphyria, characterized by the decreased activity of the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase enzyme. Several reports associated HFE gene mutations of hereditary hemochromatosis with porphyria cutanea tarda worldwide, although up to date only one study has been conducted in Brazil. OBJECTIVES Investigation of porphyria cutanea tarda association with C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Identification of precipitating factors (hepatitis C, HIV, alcoholism and estrogen) and their link with HFE mutations. METHODS An ambispective study of 60 patients with PCT was conducted during the period from 2003 to 2012. Serological tests for hepatitis C and HIV were performed and histories of alcohol abuse and estrogen intake were investigated. HFE mutations were identified with real-time PCR. RESULTS Porphyria cutanea tarda predominated in males and alcohol abuse was the main precipitating factor. Estrogen intake was the sole precipitating factor present in 25% of female patients. Hepatitis C was present in 41.7%. All HIV-positive patients (15.3%) had a history of alcohol abuse. Allele frequency for HFE mutations, i.e., C282Y (p = 0.0001) and H63D (p = 0.0004), were significantly higher in porphyria cutanea tarda patients, compared to control group. HFE mutations had no association with the other precipitating factors. CONCLUSIONS Alcohol abuse, hepatitis C and estrogen intake are prevalent precipitating factors in our porphyria cutanea tarda population; however, hemochromatosis in itself can also contribute to the outbreak of porphyria cutanea tarda, which makes the research for HFE mutations necessary in these patients PMID:24068123

  15. Edwardsiellosis Caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri in Laboratory Populations of Zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Hawke, John P.; Kent, Michael; Rogge, Matt; Baumgartner, Wes; Wiles, Judy; Shelley, Johnny; Savolainen, L. Christine; Wagner, Robert; Murray, Katy; Peterson, Tracy S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first cases of Edwardsiella ictaluri causing epizootics in laboratory populations of Zebrafish Danio rerio. Edwardsiella ictaluri is primarily recognized as a disease of catfish species and is known to cause an economically important bacterial disease of farm-raised catfish in the USA and abroad; however, it has been isolated on occasion from 10 other genera of nonictalurid fishes. We isolated E. ictaluri from moribund Zebrafish held in quarantine at two different universities in two states and from a research facility in a third state between February 23 and December 6, 2011. Edwardsiellosis in Zebrafish can be described as a severe systemic disease characterized by tissue necrosis and the presence of large numbers of extracellular and intracellular bacteria, often within macrophages. The kidneys (pronephros and mesonephros), spleen, nares, and forebrain were the most commonly and severely affected tissues. In outbreaks, mortality was acute and numerous fish died over a 1–2 week period. Mortality continued until the majority of the population was lost, at which time the remaining fish were euthanized. In addition to these cases, four cultures of bacteria isolated from Zebrafish by another diagnostic laboratory were submitted to the Louisiana Aquatic Diagnostic Laboratory for identification and were confirmed as E. ictaluri. In total, eight cultures of E. ictaluri from Zebrafish from Louisiana, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Florida were identified. The isolates were confirmed as E. ictaluri by biochemical phenotype, API 20E (bioMérieux), and amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Edwardsiella ictaluri isolates from Zebrafish are believed to comprise a unique group and were differentiated from catfish isolates by exhibiting weaker motility, autoaggregation in broth, a different plasmid profile (two plasmids of 4.0 and 3.5 kb), a different API 20E code (4204000), and lack of lipopolysaccharide recognition with Mab Ed9

  16. H-NS binding to evpB and evpC and repressing T6SS expression in fish pathogen Edwardsiella piscicida.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shilei; Xiao, Jingfan; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-09-01

    Edwardsiella piscicida is an important causative agent of hemorrhagic septicemia in fish and infects both cultured and wild fish species. Type VI secretion system (T6SS) was proved to play important roles in pathogenesis of E. piscicida. In this study, it was demonstrated that the expression of T6SS genes evpB and evpC was under control of the global regulator H-NS in E. piscicida and the transcriptional level of evpB and evpC was significantly down-regulated by H-NS. Compared to the wild type, the transcriptional levels of evpB and evpC were up-regulated in hns null mutant, while down-regulated in hns overexpression strain. The results of EMSA and DNase I footprinting revealed that H-NS protein directly bound to upstream region of evpC at multiple sites. A high-affinity motif with a 9-nucleotide sequence 5'-ATATAAAAT-3' was defined for H-NS preferential recognition based on the feature of the binding sites. These results indicated that H-NS acted cooperatively to form extended nucleoprotein filaments on target DNA. Site-directed mutagenesis of H-NS further showed that R86 played an essential role in T6SS gene binding. These findings highlighted the mechanisms underlying the complex regulation network of T6SS by H-NS in E. piscicida.

  17. Effects of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis parasitism on the survival, hematology and bacterial load in channel catfish previously exposed to Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) parasitism on survival, hematology and bacterial load in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, previously exposed to Edwardsiella ictaluri was studied. Fish were exposed to E. ictaluri one day prior to Ich in the following treatments: 1)- infected by...

  18. Comparative catfish macrophage function in families expressing high and low survivor phenotype following experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two channel catfish families were identified as displaying a high (>90%) or low (<10%) survival phenotype in repeated experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri. In order to gain understanding of the biological basis of these phenotypes, primary macrophages were prepared from head kidney tiss...

  19. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (float...

  20. Complete genome sequence of an Edwardsiella piscicida-like species recovered from tilapia in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella piscicida-like sp. is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that causes disease in some fish species. In this report we present the complete and annotated genome of isolate LADL05-105, recovered from cultured tilapia reared in Louisiana, which contains a chromosome of 4,142,037 bp and n...

  1. Roles for mannose binding lectin and rhamnose binding lectin in channel catfish fed essential oils and challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in the catfish farming industry has been high disease loss to enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri. Methods to control this disease include vaccination, antibiotic therapy, and restricted feeding. Another method that has been examined i...

  2. Oral vaccination of channel catfish against enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) using a live attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is the most problematic bacterial disease affecting catfish aquaculture in the southeastern United States. Efforts to develop an effective ESC vaccine have had limited industrial success. In commercial settings, ESC vaccines are t...

  3. Oral vaccination of channel catfish against enteric septicemia of catfish using a live attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri, is the most problematic bacterial disease affecting catfish aquaculture in the southeastern United States. Efforts to develop an effective ESC vaccine have had limited industrial success. In commercial settings, ESC vaccines are...

  4. Binding and Phagocytosis by Opsonized and Nonopsonized Channel Catfish Macrophages of Viable DsRed-fluorescent-labeled Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phagocyte-mediated killing of bacterial pathogens is one of the major defensive mechanisms in fish. The binding, uptake and destruction of recombinant fluorescent protein DsRed transformed Edwardsiella ictaluri by opsonized and nonopsonized channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) macrophages was chara...

  5. Edwardsiella ictaluri Encodes an Acid Activated Urease that is Required for Intracellular Replication in Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus Macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic analysis indicated that Edwardsiella ictaluri encodes a putative ureasepathogenicity island containing 9 open reading frames, including urea and ammonium transporters. In vitro studies with the wild-type E. ictaluri and a ureG::kan urease mutant strain indicated that E. ictaluri is significa...

  6. Comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages specific to the channel catfish pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri is a primary cause of mortality in channel catfish raised commercially in aquaculture farms. Additional treatment and diagnostic regimes are needed for this enteric pathogen, motivating the discovery and characterization of bacteriophages specific to E. ictaluri. Results The genomes of three Edwardsiella ictaluri-specific bacteriophages isolated from geographically distant aquaculture ponds, at different times, were sequenced and analyzed. The genomes for phages eiAU, eiDWF, and eiMSLS are 42.80 kbp, 42.12 kbp, and 42.69 kbp, respectively, and are greater than 95% identical to each other at the nucleotide level. Nucleotide differences were mostly observed in non-coding regions and in structural proteins, with significant variability in the sequences of putative tail fiber proteins. The genome organization of these phages exhibit a pattern shared by other Siphoviridae. Conclusions These E. ictaluri-specific phage genomes reveal considerable conservation of genomic architecture and sequence identity, even with considerable temporal and spatial divergence in their isolation. Their genomic homogeneity is similarly observed among E. ictaluri bacterial isolates. The genomic analysis of these phages supports the conclusion that these are virulent phages, lacking the capacity for lysogeny or expression of virulence genes. This study contributes to our knowledge of phage genomic diversity and facilitates studies on the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of these phages. PMID:21214923

  7. Desferrioxamine treatment of porphyria cutanea tarda in a patient with HIV and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Pedro; Luz-Rodrigues, H; Santos, Carla; Filipe, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) can occur in HIV patients. Current evidence suggests that HIV infection may interfere with the hepatic cytochrome oxidase system, leading to porphyrin metabolism impairment. Moreover, chronic hemodialysis in renal failure may be a risk factor for PCT. In addition to the contributory factors for PCT associated to HIV infection, it is possible that porphyrin accumulation secondary to renal failure may play a role in the expression of this disease. We report a case of PCT in an HIV-1 infected patient under blood dialysis, refractory to antimalarials and controlled with desferrioxamine.

  8. Production of a reference transcriptome and transcriptomic database (EdwardsiellaBase) for the lined sea anemone, Edwardsiella lineata, a parasitic cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The lined sea anemone Edwardsiella lineata is an informative model system for evolutionary-developmental studies of parasitism. In this species, it is possible to compare alternate developmental pathways leading from a larva to either a free-living polyp or a vermiform parasite that inhabits the mesoglea of a ctenophore host. Additionally, E. lineata is confamilial with the model cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, providing an opportunity for comparative genomic, molecular and organismal studies. Description We generated a reference transcriptome for E. lineata via high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated from five developmental stages (parasite; parasite-to-larva transition; larva; larva-to-adult transition; adult). The transcriptome comprises 90,440 contigs assembled from >15 billion nucleotides of DNA sequence. Using a molecular clock approach, we estimated the divergence between E. lineata and N. vectensis at 215–364 million years ago. Based on gene ontology and metabolic pathway analyses and gene family surveys (bHLH-PAS, deiodinases, Fox genes, LIM homeodomains, minicollagens, nuclear receptors, Sox genes, and Wnts), the transcriptome of E. lineata is comparable in depth and completeness to N. vectensis. Analyses of protein motifs and revealed extensive conservation between the proteins of these two edwardsiid anemones, although we show the NF-κB protein of E. lineata reflects the ancestral structure, while the NF-κB protein of N. vectensis has undergone a split that separates the DNA-binding domain from the inhibitory domain. All contigs have been deposited in a public database (EdwardsiellaBase), where they may be searched according to contig ID, gene ontology, protein family motif (Pfam), enzyme commission number, and BLAST. The alignment of the raw reads to the contigs can also be visualized via JBrowse. Conclusions The transcriptomic data and database described here provide a platform for studying the evolutionary developmental genomics

  9. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from methanogenic digester sludge

    DOE PAGES

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen -Tso

    2014-09-04

    In this study, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  11. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lidiya P.; Rogge, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  12. Genetic structure of the threatened West-Pannonian population of Great Bustard (Otis tarda).

    PubMed

    Horreo, Jose L; Raab, Rainer; Spakovszky, Péter; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow of the Great Bustards (Otis tarda) living in Austria-Slovakia-West Hungary (West-Pannonian region), one of the few populations of this globally threatened species that survives across the Palaearctic, has been assessed for the first time in this study. Fourteen recently developed microsatellite loci identified one single population in the study area, with high values of genetic diversity and gene flow between two different genetic subunits. One of these subunits (Heideboden) was recognized as a priority for conservation, as it could be crucial to maintain connectivity with the central Hungarian population and thus contribute to keeping contemporary genetic diversity. Current conservation efforts have been successful in saving this threatened population from extinction two decades ago, and should continue to guarantee its future survival. PMID:26966677

  13. Subulura halli (Ascaridida: Subuluridae) from the endangered great bustard Otis tarda Linnaeus (Aves: Gruiformes) in China.

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Qiang; Xu, Zhen; Li, Shun-Cai; Li, Liang

    2014-02-01

    Subulurid nematodes identified as Subulura halli Barreto, 1918 were collected from the endangered bird Otis tarda Linnaeus (Gruiformes: Otididae) in China. A detailed redescription of the hitherto poorly known species is presented using both light and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy. Previously unreported and erroneous morphological features of taxonomic significance are revealed. This species can be readily distinguished from its congeners by the relatively long oesophagus (1.47-1.92 mm long, representing 10.6-16.9% of body length), the number and arrangement of male caudal papillae (11 pairs in total, arranged as five pairs of precloacal and six pairs of postcloacal papillae), the equal length of spicules (1.35-1.52 mm long, representing 10.7-13.7% of body length) and the presence of a small medioventral, precloacal papilla in the male. PMID:24684055

  14. Genetic structure of the threatened West-Pannonian population of Great Bustard (Otis tarda).

    PubMed

    Horreo, Jose L; Raab, Rainer; Spakovszky, Péter; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow of the Great Bustards (Otis tarda) living in Austria-Slovakia-West Hungary (West-Pannonian region), one of the few populations of this globally threatened species that survives across the Palaearctic, has been assessed for the first time in this study. Fourteen recently developed microsatellite loci identified one single population in the study area, with high values of genetic diversity and gene flow between two different genetic subunits. One of these subunits (Heideboden) was recognized as a priority for conservation, as it could be crucial to maintain connectivity with the central Hungarian population and thus contribute to keeping contemporary genetic diversity. Current conservation efforts have been successful in saving this threatened population from extinction two decades ago, and should continue to guarantee its future survival.

  15. Subulura halli (Ascaridida: Subuluridae) from the endangered great bustard Otis tarda Linnaeus (Aves: Gruiformes) in China.

    PubMed

    Du, Li-Qiang; Xu, Zhen; Li, Shun-Cai; Li, Liang

    2014-02-01

    Subulurid nematodes identified as Subulura halli Barreto, 1918 were collected from the endangered bird Otis tarda Linnaeus (Gruiformes: Otididae) in China. A detailed redescription of the hitherto poorly known species is presented using both light and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy. Previously unreported and erroneous morphological features of taxonomic significance are revealed. This species can be readily distinguished from its congeners by the relatively long oesophagus (1.47-1.92 mm long, representing 10.6-16.9% of body length), the number and arrangement of male caudal papillae (11 pairs in total, arranged as five pairs of precloacal and six pairs of postcloacal papillae), the equal length of spicules (1.35-1.52 mm long, representing 10.7-13.7% of body length) and the presence of a small medioventral, precloacal papilla in the male.

  16. Genetic structure of the threatened West-Pannonian population of Great Bustard (Otis tarda)

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Rainer; Spakovszky, Péter; Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow of the Great Bustards (Otis tarda) living in Austria-Slovakia-West Hungary (West-Pannonian region), one of the few populations of this globally threatened species that survives across the Palaearctic, has been assessed for the first time in this study. Fourteen recently developed microsatellite loci identified one single population in the study area, with high values of genetic diversity and gene flow between two different genetic subunits. One of these subunits (Heideboden) was recognized as a priority for conservation, as it could be crucial to maintain connectivity with the central Hungarian population and thus contribute to keeping contemporary genetic diversity. Current conservation efforts have been successful in saving this threatened population from extinction two decades ago, and should continue to guarantee its future survival. PMID:26966677

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of Otis tarda (Gruiformes: Otididae) and phylogeny of Gruiformes inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong; Wu, Xiaobing; Yan, Peng; Su, Xia; Yang, Banghe

    2010-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Great bustard (Otis tarda) was determined by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The genome is 16,849 bp in size, containing 13 protein-coding, 2 ribosomal and 22 transfer RNA genes. Sequences of the tRNA genes can be folded into canonical cloverleaf secondary structure except for tRNA-Cys and tRNA-Ser (AGY), which lose "DHU" arm. Sequence analysis showed that the O. tarda mitochondrial control region (mtCR) contained many elements in common with other avian mtCRs. A microsatellite repeat was found in the 3'-peripheral domain of the O. tarda mtCR. Based on the mitochondrial DNA sequences of 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA and tRNA-Val, a phylogenetic study of Gruiformes was performed. The result showed that Otididae was a sister group to "core Gruiformes" and Charadriiformes with strong support (97% posterior probability values) in Bayesian analysis. The taxonomic status of Rhynochetidae, Mesitornithidae, Pedionomidae and Turnicidae that traditionally belonged to Gruiformes was also discussed in this paper. PMID:19823949

  18. Efficacy of Florfenicol for Control of Mortality Associated with Edwardsiella ictaluri in Three Species of Catfish.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Patricia S; Chatakondi, Nagaraj; Gao, Dana; Endris, Richard

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of florfenicol for control of mortality associated with Edwardsiella icatluri was studied in fingerlings of Channel Catfish Ictalurus puntatus (Delta strain), Blue Catfish I. furcatus (D&B strain), and a hybrid catfish (Delta strain Channel Catfish × D&B strain Blue Catfish). On day 0, fish were immersion challenged in 65-L aquaria. For each of the three species of catfish, 10 aquaria were randomly assigned to two treatment groups, either treated with florfenicol at 0 mg/kg of body weight (unmedicated feed) or at 10 mg/kg (medicated feed). Fish were treated for 10 consecutive days, monitored for mortality during this treatment period, and observed for 14 d afterwards. Post observation, all survivors were humanely euthanized in tricaine methanesulfonate, cultured for E. ictaluri, and examined for gross pathology. The mean cumulative percent mortality from enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) challenge among the three genotypes of catfish did not differ between Blue Catfish, hybrid, and Channel Catfish in treated or control groups. However, the florfenicol-treated fish had a significantly lower mean cumulative mortality (6%) than the controls (78%). All genotypes of catfish tested were responsive to treatment with florfenicol-medicated feed for control of mortality associated with ESC. There were no significant differences in mortality associated with hybrid catfish, blue catfish, and Channel Catfish (Delta strain). PMID:26306332

  19. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Peterson, Brian C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS) for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05) difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri. PMID:26168192

  20. Tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism pathways are important in Edwardsiella ictaluri virulence.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Lu, Jingjun; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen causing enteric septicemia of channel catfish (ESC). The disease causes considerable economic losses in the commercial catfish industry in the United States. Although antibiotics are used as feed additive, vaccination is a better alternative for prevention of the disease. Here we report the development and characterization of novel live attenuated E. ictaluri mutants. To accomplish this, several tricarboxylic acid cycle (sdhC, mdh, and frdA) and one-carbon metabolism genes (gcvP and glyA) were deleted in wild type E. ictaluri strain 93-146 by allelic exchange. Following bioluminescence tagging of the E. ictaluri ΔsdhC, Δmdh, ΔfrdA, ΔgcvP, and ΔglyA mutants, their dissemination, attenuation, and vaccine efficacy were determined in catfish fingerlings by in vivo imaging technology. Immunogenicity of each mutant was also determined in catfish fingerlings. Results indicated that all of the E. ictaluri mutants were attenuated significantly in catfish compared to the parent strain as evidenced by 2,265-fold average reduction in bioluminescence signal from all the mutants at 144 h post-infection. Catfish immunized with the E. ictaluri ΔsdhC, Δmdh, ΔfrdA, and ΔglyA mutants had 100% relative percent survival (RPS), while E. ictaluri ΔgcvP vaccinated catfish had 31.23% RPS after re-challenge with the wild type E. ictaluri.

  1. Expression profiles of seven channel catfish antimicrobial peptides in response to Edwardsiella ictaluri infection.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, J W; Mu, X; Klesius, P H

    2012-03-01

    Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), the relative transcriptional levels of seven channel catfish antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes (NK-lysin type 1, NK-lysin type 2, NK-lysin type 3, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein, cathepsin D, hepcidin and liver-expressed AMP 2) in response to Edwardsiella ictaluri infection were determined. None of the AMP genes tested was significantly upregulated at 2 h post-infection. Hepcidin was the only one that was significantly (P<0.05) upregulated at 4, 6 and 12 h post-infection. At 24 and 48 h post-infection, four AMPs (hepcidin, NK-lysin type 1, NK-lysin type 3 and cathepsin D) were significantly (P<0.05) upregulated. Among all the AMPs that were significantly upregulated at different time points, hepcidin at 4, 6 and 12 h post-infection was upregulated the most. When catfish were injected with different doses of E. ictaluri, all lethal doses were able to induce significant (P <0.05) upregulation of hepcidin in the posterior kidney, whereas sublethal doses failed to induce any significant upregulation of hepcidin. In vitro growth studies revealed that the presence of synthetic hepcidin peptide at a concentration of 16 μm or higher significantly inhibited the cell proliferation of E. ictaluri. Taken together, our results suggest that hepcidin might play an important role in the channel catfish defence against E. ictaluri infection.

  2. Transcriptome of intraperitoneal organs of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus challenged by Edwardsiella ictaluri JCM1680

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yanli; Sun, Xiuqin; Wang, Bo; Wang, Ling; Li, Yan; Tian, Jinhu; Zheng, Fengrong; Zheng, Minggang

    2014-09-01

    Platichthys stellatus is an economically important marine bony fish species that is cultured in China on a large scale. However, very little is known about its immune-related genes. In this study, the transcriptome of the immune organs of P. stellatus that were intraperitoneally challenged with the pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri JCM1680 is analyzed. Total RNA from four tissues (spleen, kidney, liver, and intestine) was mixed equally and then sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Overall, 28 465 813 quality reads were generated and assembled into 43 061 unigenes. Similarity searches against public protein sequence databases were used to annotate 28 291 unigenes (65.7% of the total), 368 of which were associated with immunoregulation, including 188 related to immunity response. Additionally, the transcript levels of immunity response unigenes annotated as related to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNF receptor, chemokine, major histocompatibility complex, and interleukin-6 were investigated in the different tissues of normal and infected P. stellatus by real-time quantitative PCR. The results confirmed that the unigenes identified in the transcriptome database were indeed expressed and up-regulated in infected P. stellatus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the sequencing and analysis of the transcriptome of P. stellatus. These findings provide insights into the transcriptomics and immunogenetics of bony fish.

  3. Mechanisms of intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial peptides of Edwardsiella ictaluri and its influence on fish gut inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Taylor; Loh, Amanda; Pohlenz, Camilo; Gatlin, Delbert M.; Curtiss, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The genus Edwardsiella comprises a genetically distinct taxon related to other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It consists of bacteria differing strongly in their biochemical and physiological features, natural habitats, and pathogenic properties. Intrinsic resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) is a specific property of the genus Edwardsiella. In particular, Edwardsiella ictaluri, an important pathogen of the catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) aquaculture and the causative agent of a fatal systemic infection, is highly resistant to CAMPs. E. ictaluri mechanisms of resistance to CAMPs are unknown. We hypothesized that E. ictaluri lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a role in both virulence and resistance to CAMPs. The putative genes related to LPS oligo-polysaccharide (O-PS) synthesis were in-frame deleted. Individual deletions of wibT, gne and ugd eliminated synthesis of the O-PS, causing auto-agglutination, rough colonies, biofilm-like formation and motility defects. Deletion of ugd, the gene that encodes the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase enzyme responsible for synthesis of UDP-glucuronic acid, causes sensitivity to CAMPs, indicating that UDP-glucuronic acid and its derivatives are related to CAMP intrinsic resistance. E. ictaluri OP-S mutants showed different levels of attenuation, colonization of lymphoid tissues and immune protection in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and catfish. Orally inoculated catfish with O-PS mutant strains presented different degrees of gut inflammation and colonization of lymphoid tissues. Here we conclude that intrinsic resistance to CAMPs is mediated by Ugd enzyme, which has a pleiotropic effect in E. ictaluri influencing LPS synthesis, motility, agglutination, fish gut inflammation and virulence. PMID:23676433

  4. Biomedical and Social Aspects of Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Tarda Cases from Bengkulu District of Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Ruyani, A.; Karyadi, B.; Muslim, C.; Sipriyadi; Suherlan

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although short stature male (SSM) cases are often found in South Bengkulu, no management reports about their existence are available. This paper summarizes the researches of biomedical and social aspects for the human genetic disorders. CASE PRESENTATION: Field survey results indicated that SSM community was located in Kedurang area, and 67 persons with SSM were successfully sampled from a population of 17,357 persons (one of 260). Anthropometric comparative studies, history of the pattern of X-linked inheritance, as well as the study of anatomy through radiology and ultrasound confirmed that SSM is spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDT). Genomic studies through characterisation of mutations of the SEDL gene revealed that point mutations on SEDT Kedurang are different from the results of previous similar studies, and these people are predicted to come from the same ancestors. It is necessary to notice that persons with SEDT have normal intellectual ability, but the physical conditions make their socio-economic competitiveness very low. Furthermore premature joint pains make persons with SEDT become old faster than the ordinary people by the age of 40 years. Realizing that they are marginalized, some of them try to come together to establish a foundation designed to make a better life. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that the appropriate management of SEDT should be done by integrating to improve their nutritional status, reduce the suffering of joint pain, develop labelled molecular markers for early detection, and increase their socio-economic competitiveness. PMID:23675282

  5. Microbiome Composition and Diversity of the Ice-Dwelling Sea Anemone, Edwardsiella andrillae.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alison E; Rack, Frank R; Zook, Robert; Williams, Michael J M; Higham, Mary L; Broe, Michael; Kaufmann, Ronald S; Daly, Marymegan

    2016-10-01

    Edwardsiella andrillae is a sea anemone (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniaria) only known to live embedded in the ice at the seawater interface on the underside of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Although the anatomy and morphological characteristics of E. andrillae have been described, the adaptations of this species to the under-ice ecosystem have yet to be examined. One feature that may be important to the physiology and ecology of E. andrillae is its microbiome, which may play a role in health and survival, as has been deduced in other metazoans, including anthozoans. Here we describe the microbiome of five specimens of E. andrillae, compare the diversity we recovered to that known for temperate anemones and another Antarctic cnidarian, and consider the phylogenetic and functional implications of microbial diversity for these animals. The E. andrillae microbiome was relatively low in diversity, with seven phyla detected, yet included substantial phylogenetic novelty. Among the five anemones investigated, the distribution of microbial taxa varied; this trait appears to be shared by many anthozoans. Most importantly, specimens either appeared to be dominated by Proteobacteria-affiliated members or by deeply branching Tenericute sequences. There were few closely related sequence types that were common to temperate and Antarctic sea anemone microbiomes, the exception being an Acinetobacter-related representative. Similar observations were made between microbes associated with E. andrillae and an Antarctic soft coral; however, there were several closely-related, low abundance Gammaproteobacteria in both Antarctic microbiomes, particularly from the soft coral, that are also commonly detected in Southern Ocean seawater. Although this preliminary study leaves open many questions concerning microbiome diversity and its role in host ecology, we identify major lineages of microbes (e.g., diverse deep-branching Alphaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, and divergent

  6. Global transcription analysis of vaccinated channel catfish following challenge with virulent Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Shoemaker, Craig A; Klesius, Phillip H

    2012-03-15

    To determine the identities of genes involved in either innate or adaptive immunity, microarray analysis of 65,182 UniGene transcripts were performed to compare gene expression in vaccinated channel catfish after challenge with a virulent Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to that in sham-vaccinated fish without challenge. With a filter of false-discovery rate less than 0.05 and fold change greater than 2, a total of 167 functionally known unique transcripts were found to be up-regulated, whereas 40 were down-regulated. The 167 up-regulated transcripts represent genes with putative functions in the following eight major categories: (1) immunity (30%); (2) metabolism and energy production (22%); (3) transcription or translation (12%); (4) protein degradation (11%); (5) signal transduction (6%); (6) traffic and transport (6%); (7) cell structure or cell cycle (8%); and (8) others (5%). The 40 down-regulated transcripts represent genes with putative functions in the following six major categories: (1) metabolism (27.5%); (2) immunity (17.5%); (3) cell structure (17.5%); (4) cell motility (10%); (5) signal transduction (15%); and (6) others (12.5%). Microarray analysis revealed that lysozyme c was up-regulated the most (70-fold) in vaccinated fish at 48 h post challenge of virulent E. ictaluri whereas myotubularin related protein 1a and cytochrome P450 2J27 were down-regulated the most (8.1 fold). Differential regulation of eight randomly selected transcripts in vaccinated fish after challenge with virulent E. ictaluri was also validated by quantitative PCR. Our results suggest that these differentially regulated genes might play important roles in channel catfish immunity against E. ictaluri.

  7. Global gene expression in channel catfish after vaccination with an attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Shoemaker, Craig A; Mu, Xingjiang; Klesius, Phillip H

    2012-04-01

    To understand the global gene expression in channel catfish after immersion vaccination with an attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri (AquaVac-ESC™), microarray analysis of 65,182 UniGene transcripts was performed. With a filter of false-discovery rate less than 0.05 and fold change greater than 2, a total of 52 unique transcripts were found to be upregulated in vaccinated fish at 48 h post vaccination, whereas a total of 129 were downregulated. The 52 upregulated transcripts represent genes with putative functions in the following seven major categories: (1) hypothetical (25%); (2) novel (23%); (3) immune response (17%); (4) signal transduction (15%); (5) cell structure (8%); (6) metabolism (4%); and (7) others (8%). The 129 downregulated transcripts represent genes with putative functions in the following ten major categories: (1) novel (25%); (2) immune response (23%); (3) hypothetical (12%); (4) metabolism (10%); (5) signal transduction (7%); (6) protein synthesis (6.2%); (7) cell structure (5%); (8) apoptosis (3%); (9) transcription/translation (2%); and (10) others (6%). Microarray analysis revealed that apolipoprotein A-I was upregulated the most (8.5 fold, P = 0.011) at 48 h post vaccination whereas a novel protein (accession no. CV995854) was downregulated the most (342 fold, P = 0.001). Differential regulation of several randomly selected transcripts in vaccinated fish was also validated by quantitative PCR. Our results suggest that these differentially regulated genes elicited by the vaccination might play important roles in the protection of channel catfish against E. ictaluri.

  8. Microbiome Composition and Diversity of the Ice-Dwelling Sea Anemone, Edwardsiella andrillae.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alison E; Rack, Frank R; Zook, Robert; Williams, Michael J M; Higham, Mary L; Broe, Michael; Kaufmann, Ronald S; Daly, Marymegan

    2016-10-01

    Edwardsiella andrillae is a sea anemone (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Actiniaria) only known to live embedded in the ice at the seawater interface on the underside of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Although the anatomy and morphological characteristics of E. andrillae have been described, the adaptations of this species to the under-ice ecosystem have yet to be examined. One feature that may be important to the physiology and ecology of E. andrillae is its microbiome, which may play a role in health and survival, as has been deduced in other metazoans, including anthozoans. Here we describe the microbiome of five specimens of E. andrillae, compare the diversity we recovered to that known for temperate anemones and another Antarctic cnidarian, and consider the phylogenetic and functional implications of microbial diversity for these animals. The E. andrillae microbiome was relatively low in diversity, with seven phyla detected, yet included substantial phylogenetic novelty. Among the five anemones investigated, the distribution of microbial taxa varied; this trait appears to be shared by many anthozoans. Most importantly, specimens either appeared to be dominated by Proteobacteria-affiliated members or by deeply branching Tenericute sequences. There were few closely related sequence types that were common to temperate and Antarctic sea anemone microbiomes, the exception being an Acinetobacter-related representative. Similar observations were made between microbes associated with E. andrillae and an Antarctic soft coral; however, there were several closely-related, low abundance Gammaproteobacteria in both Antarctic microbiomes, particularly from the soft coral, that are also commonly detected in Southern Ocean seawater. Although this preliminary study leaves open many questions concerning microbiome diversity and its role in host ecology, we identify major lineages of microbes (e.g., diverse deep-branching Alphaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, and divergent

  9. Growth Performance and Resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri of Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)Fed Diets Containing Distiller's Dried Grains with Solubles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to examine the effect of dietary levels of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth, body composition, hematology, immune response and resistance of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, to Edwardsiella ictaluri challenge. Five diets containing 0, 10, 20, 30 and ...

  10. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid detection of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus important bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with Edwardsiella ictaluri results in $40 - 50 million annual losses in profits to catfish producers. Early detection of this pathogen is necessary for disease control and reduction of economic loss. In this communication, the loop-mediated isothermal a...

  11. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  12. Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and t...

  13. Porphyria cutanea tarda associated with HFE C282Y homozygosity, iron overload, and use of a contraceptive vaginal ring

    PubMed Central

    Barton, James C.; Edwards, Corwin Q.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by decreased uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity in hepatocytes, uroporphyrin I and heptacarboxyl porphyrin III accumulation, photosensitivity dermatitis, and increased storage iron. In women, estrogen therapy, including oral contraceptives, postmenopausal hormone replacement, and tamoxifen for breast cancer treatment, is a risk factor for PCT. We report the case of a woman who presented with PCT, HFE C282Y homozygosity, and hepatic iron overload and was using a contraceptive vaginal ring containing ethinyl estradiol, an estrogen. We discuss this case in the context of characteristics of other persons with PCT, including common HFE mutations, iron overload, and estrogen exposure. PMID:26908385

  14. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  15. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  16. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  17. Complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from methanogenic digester sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Zinder, Stephen H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Liu, Wen -Tso

    2014-09-04

    In this study, we report a 2.0-Mb complete genome sequence of Methanolinea tarda NOBI-1T, a methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic digested sludge. This is the first genome report of the genus Methanolinea isolate belonging to the family Methanoregulaceae, a recently proposed novel family within the order Methanomicrobiales.

  18. [Pathogenesis of psoriasis].

    PubMed

    Schäkel, K; Schön, M P; Ghoreschi, K

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of skin and joints that affects 2-4 % of the adult population and 0.1-1 % of children. Genetic susceptibility, environmental triggering factors, and innate immune processes initiate psoriasis pathogenesis that results in an adaptive autoreactive response. The T cell response is orchestrated by CD 8(+) T cells in the epidermis and by CD 4(+) T cells in the dermis that predominantly produce interleukin-17 (IL‑17). Research of the past 15 years unraveled cellular and molecular mechanisms as well as cytokines like TNF-α or IL‑23 that contribute to psoriatic inflammation. This knowledge has been translated into clinical practice and a number of antipsoriatic small molecules and immunobiologics are now available. Here, we discuss the current principles of psoriasis pathogenesis in the context of modern therapies.

  19. Synergies between vaccination and dietary arginine and glutamine supplementation improve the immune response of channel catfish against Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, Camilo; Buentello, Alejandro; Criscitiello, Michael F; Mwangi, Waithaka; Smith, Roger; Gatlin, Delbert M

    2012-09-01

    Channel catfish was used to investigate the enhancement of vaccine efficacy following dietary supplementation with arginine (ARG, 4% of diet), glutamine (GLN, 2% of diet), or a combination of both. After vaccination against Edwardsiella ictaluri, humoral and cellular immune responses, along with lymphoid organ responses were evaluated. E. ictaluri-specific antibody titers in plasma were higher (P < 0.05) in fish fed the supplemented diets compared to those fed the basal diet as early as 7 d post-vaccination (dpv). B-cell proportion in head-kidney was higher (P < 0.05) at 14 dpv in vaccinated fish fed the GLN diet. The responsiveness of spleen and head-kidney lymphocytes against E. ictaluri was enhanced (P < 0.05) by dietary supplementation of ARG or GLN at 14 dpv. Additionally, at 7 dpv, vaccinated fish fed the GLN diet had higher (P < 0.05) head kidney weights relative to the other dietary treatments, and vaccinated fish fed ARG-supplemented diets had higher (P < 0.05) protein content in this tissue. Results from this study suggest that dietary supplementation of ARG and GLN may improve specific cellular and humoral mechanisms, enhancing the acquired immunity in vaccinated channel catfish.

  20. The effects of feeding β-glucan to Pangasianodon hypophthalmus on immune gene expression and resistance to Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Sirimanapong, Wanna; Thompson, Kim D; Ooi, Ei Lin; Bekaert, Michaël; Collet, Bertrand; Taggart, John B; Bron, James E; Green, Darren M; Shinn, Andrew P; Adams, Alexandra; Leaver, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (striped catfish) is an important aquaculture species and intensification of farming has increased disease problems, particularly Edwardsiella ictaluri. The effects of feeding β-glucans on immune gene expression and resistance to E. ictaluri in P. hypophthalmus were explored. Fish were fed 0.1% fungal-derived β-glucan or 0.1% commercial yeast-derived β-glucan or a basal control diet without glucan. After 14 days of feeding, the mRNA expression of immune genes (transferrin, C-reactive protein, precerebellin-like protein, Complement C3 and factor B, 2a MHC class II and interleukin-1 beta) in liver, kidney and spleen were determined. Following this fish from each of the three diet treatment groups were infected with E. ictaluri and further gene expression measured 24 h post-infection (h.p.i.), while the remaining fish were monitored over 2 weeks for mortalities. Cumulative percentage mortality at 14 days post-infection (d.p.i.) was less in β-glucan fed fish compared to controls. There was no difference in gene expression between dietary groups after feeding for 14 days, but there was a clear difference between infected and uninfected fish at 24 h.p.i., and based on principal component analysis β-glucans stimulated the overall expression of immune genes in the liver, kidney and spleen at 24 h.p.i. PMID:26439415

  1. Tissue persistence and vaccine efficacy of tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism mutant strains of Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-06-30

    Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia in fish. Recently, we reported construction of E. ictaluri mutants with single and double gene deletions in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C-1) metabolism. Here, we report the tissue persistence, virulence, and vaccine efficacy of TCA cycle (EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, and EiΔmdh), C-1 metabolism (EiΔgcvP and EiΔglyA), and combination mutants (EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, EiΔgcvPΔsdhC, EiΔmdhΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔglyA) in channel catfish. The tissue persistence study showed that EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔsdhC were able to invade catfish and persist until 11 days post-infection. Vaccination of catfish fingerlings with all nine mutants provided significant (P<0.05) protection against subsequent challenge with the virulent parental strain. Vaccinated catfish fingerlings had 100% survival when subsequently challenged by immersion with wild-type E. ictaluri except for EiΔgcvPΔglyA and EiΔgcvP. Mutant EiΔgcvPΔsdhC was found to be very good at protecting catfish fry, as evidenced by 10-fold higher survival compared to non-vaccinated fish.

  2. Development of a novobiocin-resistant Edwardsiella ictaluri as a novel vaccine in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H

    2011-08-01

    The efficacy of a novel attenuated Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine (B-50348) was determined in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) by bath immersion and intraperitoneal (IP) injection. The vaccine was developed from a virulent strain of E. ictaluri (AL93-58) through selection for novobiocin resistance. When channel catfish (average weight 10 g) were IP injected with 4.2 × 10⁶ colony-forming units (CFU) of the attenuated vaccine B-50348, no fish died. However, when the same age and size matched group of the catfish were IP injected with a lesser amount (2.4 × 10⁶ CFU/fish) of modified live RE-33 vaccine or the AL93-58 virulent strain (2.5 × 10⁶ CFU/fish) of E. ictaluri, 65% and 95% fish died, respectively. When channel catfish were challenged with AL93-58, relative percent survival values of vaccinated fish were all greater than 90% at 22, 32, and 63 days post B-50348 vaccination through intraperitoneal injection. By bath immersion, at 37 and 57 days post vaccination of B-50348, relative percent survival values were both 100% when fish were challenged by virulent E. ictaluri AL93-58. Our results suggest that B-50348 could be used as a novel safe and efficacious vaccine against ESC in channel catfish.

  3. Mortality and pathology in brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus associated with a spontaneous Edwardsiella ictaluri outbreak under tank culture conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Griffin, A.R.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Blazer, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    Brown bullheads Amieurus nebulosus (family Ictaluridae) are commonly used as a sentinel of environmental contamination. These fish are not generally cultured under laboratory conditions and little is known about their disease susceptibility. Here we report an outbreak of disease due to Edwardsiella ictaluri in a laboratory population of tank-reared, wild-caught brown bullheads. The isolate was positively identified as E. ictaluri using standard bacteriological substrate utilization tests and a monoclonal antibody specific for this bacterium. This pathogen causes a significant disease in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and is associated with disease in other ictalurid and non-ictalurid fishes. It appears that E. ictaluri is also a significant pathogen in brown bullheads and produces clinical signs and lesions similar but not identical to those observed in channel catfish. Since commercial sources of bullheads for laboratory tank studies are not available, precautions should be taken to prevent potential E. ictaluri disease outbreaks from wild-caught bullheads intended for laboratory research. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  4. Pathogenesis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Scott M.; Berryhill, Taylor F.; Ellenburg, James L.; Jilling, Tamas; Cleveland, Dava S.; Lorenz, Robin G.; Martin, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. The pathophysiology is likely secondary to innate immune responses to intestinal microbiota by the premature infant's intestinal tract, leading to inflammation and injury. This review provides an updated summary of the components of the innate immune system involved in NEC pathogenesis. In addition, we evaluate the animal models that have been used to study NEC with regard to the involvement of innate immune factors and histopathological changes as compared to those seen in infants with NEC. Finally, we discuss new approaches to studying NEC, including mathematical models of intestinal injury and the use of humanized mice. PMID:25447054

  5. Pathogenesis of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Oklu, Rahmi; Habito, Roy; Mayr, Manuel; Deipolyi, Amy R; Albadawi, Hassan; Hesketh, Robin; Walker, T Gregory; Linskey, Katy R; Long, Chandler A; Wicky, Stephan; Stoughton, Julianne; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of varicose veins and the recent surge in research on the condition, the precise mechanisms underlying their development remain uncertain. In the past decade, there has been a shift from initial theories based on purely mechanical factors to hypotheses pointing to complex molecular changes causing histologic alterations in the vessel wall and extracellular matrix. Despite progress in understanding the molecular aspects of venous insufficiency, therapies for symptomatic varicose veins are directed toward anatomic and physical interventions. The present report reviews current evidence identifying the underlying biochemical alterations in the pathogenesis of varicose veins.

  6. Pathogenesis of Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leckman, J F; Peterson, B S; Anderson, G M; Arnsten, A F; Pauls, D L; Cohen, D J

    1997-01-01

    This review presents a models of disease pathogenesis in the context of CNS development. It begins with an exploration of the clinical features and natural history of Tourette's syndrome. This is followed by a consideration of the role of genetic and nongenetic factors. An effort is then made to review the anatomical organization of the basal ganglia and related cortical sites. These circuits are intimately involved in the normal processing of sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotionally laden information. Evidence implicating these circuits in the pathobiology of Tourette's syndrome is then considered. The review closes with the prospects for advances in interdisciplinary research and therapeutics using this model as a guide.

  7. Comparative anatomy and histology of developmental and parasitic stages in the life cycle of the lined sea anemone Edwardsiella lineata.

    PubMed

    Reitzel, Adam M; Daly, Marymegan; Sullivan, James C; Finnerty, John R

    2009-02-01

    The evolution of parasitism is often accompanied by profound changes to the developmental program. However, relatively few studies have directly examined the developmental evolution of parasitic species from free-living ancestors. The lined sea anemone Edwardsiella lineata is a relatively recently evolved parasite for which closely related free-living outgroups are known, including the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. The larva of E. lineata parasitizes the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, and, once embedded in its host, the anemone assumes a novel vermiform body plan. That we might begin to understand how the developmental program of this species has been transformed during the evolution of parasitism, we characterized the gross anatomy, histology, and cnidom of the parasitic stage, post-parasitic larval stage, and adult stage of the E. lineata life cycle. The distinct parasitic stage of the life cycle differs from the post-parasitic larva with respect to overall shape, external ciliation, cnida frequency, and tissue architecture. The parasitic stage and planula both contain holotrichs, a type of cnida not previously reported in Edwardsiidae. The internal morphology of the post-parasitic planula is extremely similar to the adult morphology, with a complete set of mesenterial tissue and musculature despite this stage having little external differentiation. Finally, we observed 2 previously undocumented aspects of asexual reproduction in E. lineata: (1) the parasitic stage undergoes transverse fission via physal pinching, the first report of asexual reproduction in a pre-adult stage in the Edwardsiidae; and (2) the juvenile polyp undergoes transverse fission via polarity reversal, the first time this form of fission has been reported in E. lineata.

  8. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  9. Pathogenesis of infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, S; Bischoff, J

    2013-07-01

    Haemangioma is a vascular tumour of infancy that is well known for its rapid growth during the first weeks to months of a child's life, followed by a spontaneous but slow involution. During the proliferative phase, the vessels are disorganized and composed of immature endothelial cells. When the tumour involutes, the vessels mature and enlarge but are reduced in number. Fat, fibroblasts and connective tissue replace the vascular tissue, with few, large, feeding and draining vessels evident. Both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the neovascularization in haemangioma tumours. In recent years, several of the 'building blocks', the cells comprising the haemangioma, have been isolated. Among them are haemangioma progenitor/stem cells, endothelial cells and pericytes. This review focuses on these cell types, and the molecular pathways within these cells that have been implicated in driving the pathogenesis of infantile haemangioma.

  10. Pathogenesis of glomerular haematuria.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Claudia; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Sevillano, Angel Manuel; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro-Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; Praga, Manuel; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Haematuria was known as a benign hallmark of some glomerular diseases, but over the last decade, new evidences pointed its negative implications on kidney disease progression. Cytotoxic effects of oxidative stress induced by hemoglobin, heme, or iron released from red blood cells may account for the tubular injury observed in human biopsy specimens. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for haematuria remain unclear. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) with irregular contours and shape in the urine indicates RBCs egression from the glomerular capillary into the urinary space. Therefore glomerular haematuria may be a marker of glomerular filtration barrier dysfunction or damage. In this review we describe some key issues regarding epidemiology and pathogenesis of haematuric diseases as well as their renal morphological findings. PMID:25949932

  11. Fungal Sex and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Human fungal pathogens are associated with diseases ranging from dandruff and skin colonization to invasive bloodstream infections. The major human pathogens belong to the Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus clades, and infections have high and increasing morbidity and mortality. Many human fungal pathogens were originally assumed to be asexual. However, recent advances in genome sequencing, which revealed that many species have retained the genes required for the sexual machinery, have dramatically influenced our understanding of the biology of these organisms. Predictions of a rare or cryptic sexual cycle have been supported experimentally for some species. Here, I examine the evidence that human pathogens reproduce sexually. The evolution of the mating-type locus in ascomycetes (including Candida and Aspergillus species) and basidiomycetes (Malassezia and Cryptococcus) is discussed. I provide an overview of how sex is suppressed in different species and discuss the potential associations with pathogenesis. PMID:20065328

  12. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, Alessandra; Gentilini, Alessandra; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:27657051

  13. Fungal sex and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Butler, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    Human fungal pathogens are associated with diseases ranging from dandruff and skin colonization to invasive bloodstream infections. The major human pathogens belong to the Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus clades, and infections have high and increasing morbidity and mortality. Many human fungal pathogens were originally assumed to be asexual. However, recent advances in genome sequencing, which revealed that many species have retained the genes required for the sexual machinery, have dramatically influenced our understanding of the biology of these organisms. Predictions of a rare or cryptic sexual cycle have been supported experimentally for some species. Here, I examine the evidence that human pathogens reproduce sexually. The evolution of the mating-type locus in ascomycetes (including Candida and Aspergillus species) and basidiomycetes (Malassezia and Cryptococcus) is discussed. I provide an overview of how sex is suppressed in different species and discuss the potential associations with pathogenesis. PMID:20065328

  14. Microbial pathogenesis meets biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Charles-Orszag, Arthur; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy; Duménil, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    Introducing concepts from soft matter physics and mechanics has largely contributed to our understanding of a variety of biological processes. In this review, we argue that this holds true for bacterial pathogenesis. We base this argument on three examples of bacterial pathogens and their interaction with host cells during infection: (i) Shigella flexneri exploits actin-dependent forces to come into close contact with epithelial cells prior to invasion of the epithelium; (ii) Neisseria meningitidis manipulates endothelial cells to resist shear stress during vascular colonization; (iii) bacterial toxins take advantage of the biophysical properties of the host cell plasma membrane to generate transcellular macroapertures in the vascular wall. Together, these examples show that a multidisciplinary approach integrating physics and biology is more necessary than ever to understand complex infectious phenomena. Moreover, this avenue of research will allow the exploration of general processes in cell biology, highlighted by pathogens, in the context of other non-communicable human diseases. PMID:26849533

  15. The pathogenesis of measles.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Rory D; Mesman, Annelies W; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Duprex, W Paul; de Swart, Rik L

    2012-06-01

    Measles is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Measles virus (MV) is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease. Over the last decade, identification of new cellular receptors and studies in animal models have challenged the historic concepts of measles pathogenesis. It is thought that MV enters the host by infection of alveolar macrophages and/or dendritic cells in the airways, and is amplified in local lymphoid tissues. Viremia mediated by infected CD150+ lymphocytes results in systemic dissemination. Infection of lymphocytes and dendritic cells in the respiratory submucosa facilitates basolateral infection of epithelial cells via the newly identified receptor Nectin-4. Concomitant and extensive epithelial damage may contribute to efficient transmission to the next host.

  16. Molecular pathogenesis of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2008-01-01

    Emphysema is one manifestation of a group of chronic, obstructive, and frequently progressive destructive lung diseases. Cigarette smoking and air pollution are the main causes of emphysema in humans, and cigarette smoking causes emphysema in rodents. This review examines the concept of a homeostatically active lung structure maintenance program that, when attacked by proteases and oxidants, leads to the loss of alveolar septal cells and airspace enlargement. Inflammatory and noninflammatory mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, as well as the role of the innate and adaptive immune systems, are being explored in genetically altered animals and in exposure models of this disease. These recent scientific advances support a model whereby alveolar destruction resulting from a coalescence of mechanical forces, such as hyperinflation, and more recently recognized cellular and molecular events, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, and failed lung tissue repair, produces the clinically recognized syndrome of emphysema. PMID:18246188

  17. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  18. The D519G Polymorphism of Glyceronephosphate O-Acyltransferase Is a Risk Factor for Familial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Colin P.; Overbey, Jessica R.; Naik, Hetanshi; Nance, Danielle; McLaren, Gordon D.; McLaren, Christine E.; Zhou, Luming; Desnick, Robert J.; Parker, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Both familial and sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) are iron dependent diseases. Symptoms of PCT resolve when iron stores are depleted by phlebotomy, and a sequence variant of HFE (C282Y, c.843G>A, rs1800562) that enhances iron aborption by reducing hepcidin expression is a risk factor for PCT. Recently, a polymorphic variant (D519G, c.1556A>G, rs11558492) of glyceronephosphate O-acyltransferase (GNPAT) was shown to be enriched in male patients with type I hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE C282Y homozygotes) who presented with a high iron phenotype, suggesting that GNPAT D519G, like HFE C282Y, is a modifier of iron homeostasis that favors iron absorption. To challenge this hypothesis, we investigated the frequency of GNPAT D519G in patients with both familial and sporadic PCT. Patients were screened for GNPAT D519G and allelic variants of HFE (both C282Y and H63D). Nucleotide sequencing of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) identified mutant alleles. Patients with low erythrocyte URO-D activity or a damaging URO-D variant were classified as familial PCT (fPCT) and those with wild-type URO-D were classified as sporadic PCT (sPCT). GNPAT D519G was significantly enriched in the fPCT patient population (p = 0.0014) but not in the sPCT population (p = 0.4477). Both HFE C282Y and H63D (c.187C>G, rs1799945) were enriched in both PCT patient populations (p<0.0001) but showed no greater association with fPCT than with sPCT. Conclusion: GNPAT D519G is a risk factor for fPCT, but not for sPCT. PMID:27661980

  19. Pathogenesis of rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Eifan, A O; Durham, S R

    2016-09-01

    Rhinitis is a heterogeneous condition that has been associated with inflammatory responses as in allergic rhinitis but can also occur in the absence of inflammation such as in so-called idiopathic (previously 'vasomotor') rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis affects approximately one in four of the population of westernized countries and is characterized by typical symptoms of nasal itching, sneezing, watery discharge and congestion. The intention of this review is to illustrate key concepts of the pathogenesis of rhinitis. Imbalance in innate and adaptive immunity together with environmental factors is likely to play major roles. In allergic rhinitis, initial allergen exposure and sensitization involves antigen-presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes and results in the generation of allergen-specific T cells and allergen-specific IgE antibodies. On re-exposure to relevant allergens, cross-linking of IgE on mast cells results in the release of mediators of hypersensitivity such as histamine and immediate nasal symptoms. Within hours, there is an infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly Th2 T lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils into nasal mucosal tissue that results in the late-phase allergic response. Evidence for nasal priming and whether or not remodelling may be a feature of allergic rhinitis will be reviewed. The occurrence of so-called local allergic rhinitis in the absence of systemic IgE will be discussed. Non-allergic (non-IgE-mediated) rhinitis will be considered in the context of inflammatory and non-inflammatory disorders. PMID:27434218

  20. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions. PMID:24966602

  1. Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a necro-inflammatory response that ensues when hepatocytes are injured by lipids (lipotoxicity). NASH is a potential outcome of nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), a condition that occurs when lipids accumulate in hepatocytes. NASH may be reversible, but it can also result in cirrhosis and primary liver cancer. We are beginning to learn about the mechanisms of progression of NAFL and NASH. NAFL does not inevitably lead to NASH because NAFL is a heterogeneous condition. This heterogeneity exists because different types of lipids with different cytotoxic potential accumulate in the NAFL, and individuals with NAFL differ in their ability to defend against lipotoxicity. There are no tests that reliably predict which patients with NAFL will develop lipotoxicity. However, NASH encompasses the spectrum of wound-healing responses induced by lipotoxic hepatocytes. Differences in these wound-healing responses among individuals determine whether lipotoxic livers regenerate, leading to stabilization or resolution of NASH, or develop progressive scarring, cirrhosis, and possibly liver cancer. We review concepts that are central to the pathogenesis of NASH.

  2. Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most frequently encountered member of the coagulase-negative staphylococci on human epithelial surfaces. It has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen, especially in infections of indwelling medical devices. The mechanisms that S. epidermidis uses to survive during infection are in general of a passive nature, reflecting their possible origin in the commensal life of this bacterium. Most importantly, S. epidermidis excels in forming biofilms, sticky agglomerations that inhibit major host defense mechanisms. Furthermore, S. epidermidis produces a series of protective surface polymers and exoenzymes. Moreover, S. epidermidis has the capacity to secrete strongly cytolytic members of the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) family, but PSMs in S. epidermidis overall appear to participate primarily in biofilm development. Finally, there is evidence for a virulence gene reservoir function of S. epidermidis, as it appears to have transferred important immune evasion and antibiotic resistance factors to Staphylococcus aureus. Conversely, S. epidermidis also has a beneficial role in balancing the microflora on human epithelial surfaces by controlling outgrowth of harmful bacteria such as in particular S. aureus. Recent research yielded detailed insight into key S. epidermidis virulence determinants and their regulation, in particular as far as biofilm formation is concerned, but we still have a serious lack of understanding of the in vivo relevance of many pathogenesis mechanisms and the factors that govern the commensal life of S. epidermidis.

  3. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-06-21

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions.

  4. Pathogenesis of Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Brad; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection that occurs in patients who are immunocompromised because of diabetic ketoacidosis, neutropenia, organ transplantation, and/or increased serum levels of available iron. Because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, cancer, and organ transplantation, the number of patients at risk for this deadly infection is increasing. Despite aggressive therapy, which includes disfiguring surgical debridement and frequently adjunctive toxic antifungal therapy, the overall mortality rate is high. New strategies to prevent and treat mucormycosis are urgently needed. Understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and the host response to invading hyphae ultimately will provide targets for novel therapeutic interventions. In this supplement, we review the current knowledge about the virulence traits used by the most common etiologic agent of mucormycosis, Rhizopus oryzae. Because patients with elevated serum levels of available iron are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis and these infections are highly angioinvasive, emphasis is placed on the ability of the organism to acquire iron from the host and on its interactions with endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Several promising therapeutic strategies in preclinical stages are identified. PMID:22247441

  5. Recent progress in melasma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ai-Young

    2015-11-01

    Melasma is a common skin pigmentation condition. Given therapeutic difficulty as one of the biggest concerns, understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of melasma becomes essential. UV irradiation, female sex hormones, and inflammatory processes are addressed as triggering factors with genetic predisposition. The mechanism of UV-induced melanogenesis has been extensively investigated as a model system to study melasma pathogenesis. Hitherto, treatment modalities for melasma are similar to other hyperpigmentation disorders. However, individual triggering factors induce a separate pigmentation disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms and clinical phenotypes are different from the ones encountered in melasma. Fortunately, there have been ongoing updates on melasma pathogenesis with regard to major triggering factors. Presence of certain factors working independently of UV exposure and role of dermal factors and microRNAs are being identified as novel discoveries about melasma pathogenesis. In this review, the melasma pathogenesis is reviewed in association with updated and new findings.

  6. Pathogenesis of bovine neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Buxton, D; Wouda, W

    2006-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is a major pathogen of cattle and dogs, being a significant cause of abortion in cattle in many countries. It is one of the most efficiently transmitted parasites, with up to 90% of cattle infected in some herds. The pathogenesis of abortion due to Neospora is complex and only partially understood. Losses occur after a primary infection during pregnancy but more commonly as the result of recrudescence of a persistent infection during pregnancy. Parasitaemia is followed by invasion of the placenta and fetus. It is suggested that abortion occurs when primary parasite-induced placental damage jeopardises fetal survival directly or causes release of maternal prostaglandins that in turn cause luteolysis and abortion. Fetal damage may also occur due to primary tissue damage caused by the multiplication of N. caninum in the fetus or due to insufficient oxygen/nutrition, secondary to placental damage. In addition, maternal immune expulsion of the fetus may occur associated with maternal placental inflammation and the release of maternal pro-inflammatory cytokines in the placenta. Thus N. caninum is a primary pathogen capable of causing abortion either through maternal placental inflammation, maternal and fetal placental necrosis, fetal damage, or a combination of all three. The question of how N. caninum kills the fetus exposes the complex and finely balanced biological processes that have evolved to permit bovine and other mammalian pregnancies to occur. Defining these immunological mechanisms will shed light on potential methods of control of bovine neosporosis and enrich our understanding of the continuity of mammalian and protozoal survival. PMID:16712863

  7. Pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2010-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a serious infection of the cornea. At present, diagnosis of the disease is not straightforward and treatment is very demanding. While contact lens wear is the leading risk factor for AK, Acanthamoeba parasites are increasingly recognized as an important cause of keratitis in non-contact lens wearers. The first critical step in the pathogenesis of infection is the adhesion of the microbe to the surface of the host tissues. Acanthamoebae express a major virulence protein, the mannose-binding protein (MBP), which mediates the adhesion of amoebae to the surface of the cornea. The MBP is a transmembrane protein with characteristics of a typical cell surface receptor. Subsequent to the MBP-mediated adhesion to host cells, the amoebae produce a contact-dependent metalloproteinase and several contact-independent serine proteinases. These proteinases work in concert to produce a potent cytopathic effect (CPE) involving killing of the host cells, degradation of epithelial basement membrane and underlying stromal matrix, and penetration into the deeper layers of the cornea. In the hamster animal model, oral immunization with the recombinant MBP protects against AK, and this protection is associated with an increased level of anti-MBP IgA in tears of protected animals. Normal human tear fluid contains IgA antibodies against Acanthamoeba MBP that is likely to provide protection by inhibiting the adhesion of parasites to host cells. Indeed, in in vitro CPE assays, even a low concentration of tears (10 [MU]μL of undiluted tears per milliliter of media) almost completely inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced CPE. In addition to adherence-inhibiting, IgA-mediated protection, human tears also contain IgA-independent factors that provide protection against Acanthamoeba-induced CPE by inhibiting the activity of cytotoxic proteinases. Characterization of the CPE-inhibitory factors of human tears should lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the

  8. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  9. Huntington disease: pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dayalu, Praveen; Albin, Roger L

    2015-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor, behavioral, and cognitive decline, culminating in death. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Even years before symptoms become overt, mutation carriers show subtle but progressive striatal and cerebral white matter atrophy by volumetric MRI. Although there is currently no direct treatment of HD, management options are available for several symptoms. A better understanding of HD pathogenesis, and more sophisticated clinical trials using newer biomarkers, may lead to meaningful treatments. This article reviews the current knowledge of HD pathogenesis and treatment.

  10. [Latest aspects in psoriasis pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Prinz, J C

    2003-03-01

    During recent years the understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis has changed essentially. Psoriasis is now considered as a T cell mediated inflammation of the skin. Genetic predisposition and microbial environment cooperate in the induction of an antigen-specific T cell mediated immune response which may persist lifelong. The phenotype of the psoriatic inflammation is determined by the particular functional differentiation of the pathogenic T cells. The progress in understanding the pathogenesis of psoriasis has identified T cells and T cell-derived cytokines as targets for causal treatment approaches that in the near future will change psoriasis therapy considerably.

  11. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UROD in the liver. Hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder, also can predispose individuals to PCT. Symptoms ... centers regardless of whether there is confirmed iron overload. A phlebotomy is a simple and safe procedure ...

  12. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  13. Nutritional rickets: pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Pettifor, John M

    2013-06-01

    Nutritional rickets remains a public health concern in many areas of the world despite cheap and effective means of preventing the disease. The roles of vitamin D deficiency, low dietary calcium intakes and the interrelationships between the two in the pathogenesis of the disease are discussed. It is now recognized that vitamin D deficiency in the pregnant and lactating mother predisposes to the development of rickets in the breastfed infant, and that cultural and social factors are important in the pathogenesis of the disease during the adolescent growth spurt. Prevention of rickets is dependent on the awareness of the medical profession and the general public of the need to ensure adequate intakes of vitamin D in at-risk populations, and of the importance of increasing dietary intakes of calcium using locally available and inexpensive foods in communities in which dietary calcium deficiency rickets is prevalent.

  14. [Pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi

    2012-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a life-threatening disease. The development of invasive fungal disease is dependent on multiple factors, such us colonization and efficient host immune response. We aimed to review the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections, in particular, those caused by Candida and Aspergillus. For this we propose, to describe the fungal characteristics, to detail the host defence mechanisms against fungus and to analyse the host risk factors for invasive fungal infection.

  15. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  16. Pathogenesis of eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Said Ahmad; Ishinaga, Hajime; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (ECRS) is considered a refractory and intractable disease. Patients with ECRS present with thick mucus production, long-term nasal congestion, loss of sense of smell, and intermittent acute exacerbations secondary to bacterial infections. Despite medical and surgical interventions, there is a high rate of recurrence with significant impairment to quality of life. The recent increasing prevalence of ECRS in south Asian countries and the strong tendency of ECRS to reoccur after surgery should be considered. The majority of cases need repeat surgery, and histological examinations of these cases show eosinophilic-dominant inflammation. The degradation and accumulation of eosinophils, release of cytokines, and mucus secretion have important roles in the pathogenesis of ECRS. ECRS differs from non-ECRS, in which eosinophils are not involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, and also in terms of many clinical characteristics, blood examination and nasal polyp histological findings, clinical features of the disease after surgery, efficacy of medications, and computed tomography findings. This review describes the clinical course, diagnosis, and treatment of ECRS as well as its pathophysiology and the role of eosinophils, mucus, cytokines, and other mediators in the pathogenesis of ECRS. PMID:27053925

  17. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry based identification of Edwardsiella ictaluri isolated from Vietnamese striped catfish (Pangasius hypothalamus)

    PubMed Central

    Nhu, Truong Quynh; Park, Seong Bin; Kim, Si Won; Lee, Jung Seok; Im, Se Pyeong; Lazarte, Jassy Mary S.; Seo, Jong Pyo; Lee, Woo-Jai; Kim, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella (E.) ictaluri is a major bacterial pathogen that affects commercially farmed striped catfish (Pangasius hypothalamus) in Vietnam. In a previous study, 19 strains of E. ictaluri collected from striped catfish were biochemically identified with an API-20E system. Here, the same 19 strains were used to assess the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS; applied using a MALDI Biotyper) to conduct rapid, easy and accurate identification of E. ictaluri. MALDI-TOF MS could directly detect the specific peptide patterns of cultured E. ictaluri colonies with high (> 2.0, indicating species-level identification) scores. MALDI Biotyper 3.0 software revealed that all of the strains examined in this study possessed highly similar peptide peak patterns. In addition, electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and subsequent immuno-blotting using a specific chicken antibody (IgY) against E. ictaluri revealed that the isolates had highly similar protein profiles and antigenic banding profiles. The results of this study suggest that E. ictaluri isolated from striped catfish in Vietnam have homologous protein compositions. This is important, because it indicates that MALDI-TOF MS analysis could potentially outperform the conventional methods of identifying E. ictaluri. PMID:26726022

  18. Identification and expression profile of multiple genes in the anterior kidney of channel catfish induced by modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Shoemaker, Craig A; Klesius, Phillip H

    2010-04-15

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 57 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from 240 clones of a modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccinated vs. sham-vaccinated channel catfish anterior kidney subtractive library. The transcription levels of the 57 ESTs in response to E. ictaluri vaccination were then evaluated by quantitative PCR (QPCR). Of the 57 ESTs, 43 were induced at least 2-fold higher in all three vaccinated fish compared to unvaccinated control fish. Of the 43 upregulated genes, five were consistently upregulated greater than 10-fold, including two highly upregulated (>20-fold) glycosyltransferase and Toll-like receptor 5. The transcriptional levels of GTPase 1, coatomer protein complex zeta 1, and type II arginine deiminase were consistently induced greater than 10-fold. MHC class I alpha chain and transposase were upregulated greater than 10-fold in two of the three vaccinated fish. The 43 upregulated genes also included 19 moderately upregulated (3-10-fold) and 17 slightly upregulated (2-3-fold). Our results suggest that subtractive cDNA hybridization and QPCR are powerful cost-effective techniques to identify differentially expressed genes in response to modified live E. ictaluri vaccination.

  19. Chitin synthesis and fungal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lenardon, Megan D; Munro, Carol A; Gow, Neil AR

    2010-01-01

    Chitin is an essential part of the carbohydrate skeleton of the fungal cell wall and is a molecule that is not represented in humans and other vertebrates. Complex regulatory mechanisms enable chitin to be positioned at specific sites throughout the cell cycle to maintain the overall strength of the wall and enable rapid, life-saving modifications to be made under cell wall stress conditions. Chitin has also recently emerged as a significant player in the activation and attenuation of immune responses to fungi and other chitin-containing parasites. This review summarises latest advances in the analysis of chitin synthesis regulation in the context of fungal pathogenesis. PMID:20561815

  20. Molecular pathogenesis of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqi; Pu, Chunwen; Lang, Lang; Qiao, Liang; Abdullahi, Mohanud Abukar Haji; Jiang, Chunmeng

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an inherited iron overload disorder characterized by normal iron-driven erythropoiesis and abnormal iron metabolism, leading to excess iron deposited in parenchymal cells of liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Iron hormone, hepcidin, plays a critical role in iron homeostasis through interaction with ferroportin (FPN), a major cellular iron exporter. Hepcidin is encoded by hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP). Mutations in hepcidin and any genes that regulate the biology of hepcidin, including hemochromatosis genes (HFE), Hemojuvelin (HJV), transferring receptor 2 (TFR2) and FPN, result in hemochromatosis. The identification of hepcidin and its role will provide a better understanding for pathogenesis of HH.

  1. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  2. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens.

  3. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens. PMID:22229971

  4. A skin disease, a blood disease or something in between? An exploratory focus group study of patients' experiences with porphyria cutanea tarda*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J; Gjengedal, E; Sandberg, S; Råheim, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by fragile skin with blistering on sun-exposed areas. Symptoms typically develop in late adulthood and can be triggered by iron overload, alcohol intake, oestrogens and various liver diseases. Treatment consists of phlebotomy to reduce iron, or increasing urinary porphyrin excretion by administering chlorochin. To optimize patient care, health personnel need to understand the subjective experiences of PCT. Objectives To explore the experiences of persons with PCT with regard to symptoms, treatment, follow-up and prevention of the disease. Methods Interpretive description was used as a qualitative approach. Twenty-one participants attended three focus groups. All participants had experienced PCT symptoms during the last 5 years. Results Participants' experiences varied from trivializing symptoms and fragile skin to what was described as a desperate situation, with huge blisters, skin falling off and feeling as if one was in a ‘horror movie’. For some, itching was very troublesome, preventing sleep and delaying skin healing. In managing PCT a shift in focus from skin to blood was described. PCT was perceived as a chronic and systemic disease causing a range of health problems. Strategies for preventing symptoms ranged from doing nothing to frequent controls and check-ups. Conclusions Participants had a systemic perception of PCT, and a tendency to attribute a range of health problems to the condition. This study adds insight into the experiences patients have with PCT. PMID:24958197

  5. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jesper B

    2015-02-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop with no apparent etiological background. The impact of the stromal compartment on tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy is in vogue, and the epithelial-stromal crosstalk may present a target for novel treatment strategies. As such, the complexity of tumor cellularity and the molecular mechanisms underlying the diversity of growth patterns of this malignancy remain a clinical concern. It is crucial to advance our present understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CCA to improve current clinical strategies and patient outcome. This will facilitate the delineation of patient subsets and individualization for precision therapies. Many questions persevere as to the evolutionary process and cellular origin of the initial transforming event, the context of intratumoral plasticity and the causal driver action. Next-generation sequencing has begun to underline the persistent alterations, which may be the trigger of acquired drug resistance, and the cause of metastasis and disease recurrence. A complex issue that remains is to account for the heterogeneous pool of "backseat" aberrations, which in chromosomal proximity to the causative variant are likely to influence, for example, drug response. This review explores the recent advances in defining the molecular pathways implicated in the development of this devastating disease and, which present putative clinical strategies. PMID:25174625

  6. Pathogenesis of Varicelloviruses in primates

    PubMed Central

    Ouwendijk, Werner J.D.; Verjans, Georges M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation. PMID:25255989

  7. Molecular Pathogenesis of Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Wajih; Barnett, Michael H; Prain, Kerri; Broadley, Simon A

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare autoimmune disorder, distinct from multiple sclerosis, causing inflammatory lesions in the optic nerves and spinal cord. An autoantibody (NMO IgG) against aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel expressed on astrocytes is thought to be causative. Peripheral production of the antibody is triggered by an unknown process in genetically susceptible individuals. Anti-AQP4 antibody enters the central nervous system (CNS) when the blood brain barrier is made permeable and has high affinity for orthogonal array particles of AQP4. Like other autoimmune diseases, Th17 cells and their effector cytokines (such as interleukin 6) have been implicated in pathogenesis. AQP4 expressing peripheral organs are not affected by NMO IgG, but the antibody causes extensive astrocytic loss in specific regions of the CNS through complement mediated cytotoxicity. Demyelination occurs during the inflammatory process and is probably secondary to oligodendrocyte apoptosis subsequent to loss of trophic support from astrocytes. Ultimately, extensive axonal injury leads to severe disability. Despite rapid advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis, unanswered questions remain, particularly with regards to disease mechanisms in NMO IgG seronegative cases. Increasing knowledge of the molecular pathology is leading to improved treatment strategies. PMID:23202933

  8. Pathogenesis and Immunobiology of Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    de Figueiredo, Paul; Ficht, Thomas A.; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Adams, L. Garry

    2016-01-01

    This review of Brucella–host interactions and immunobiology discusses recent discoveries as the basis for pathogenesis-informed rationales to prevent or treat brucellosis. Brucella spp., as animal pathogens, cause human brucellosis, a zoonosis that results in worldwide economic losses, human morbidity, and poverty. Although Brucella spp. infect humans as an incidental host, 500,000 new human infections occur annually, and no patient-friendly treatments or approved human vaccines are reported. Brucellae display strong tissue tropism for lymphoreticular and reproductive systems with an intracellular lifestyle that limits exposure to innate and adaptive immune responses, sequesters the organism from the effects of antibiotics, and drives clinical disease manifestations and pathology. Stealthy brucellae exploit strategies to establish infection, including i) evasion of intracellular destruction by restricting fusion of type IV secretion system-dependent Brucella-containing vacuoles with lysosomal compartments, ii) inhibition of apoptosis of infected mononuclear cells, and iii) prevention of dendritic cell maturation, antigen presentation, and activation of naive T cells, pathogenesis lessons that may be informative for other intracellular pathogens. Data sets of next-generation sequences of Brucella and host time-series global expression fused with proteomics and metabolomics data from in vitro and in vivo experiments now inform interactive cellular pathways and gene regulatory networks enabling full-scale systems biology analysis. The newly identified effector proteins of Brucella may represent targets for improved, safer brucellosis vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:25892682

  9. Expression profiles of toll-like receptors in anterior kidney of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), acutely infected by Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, J W; Russo, R; Shoemaker, C A; Klesius, P H

    2010-06-01

    Using quantitative PCR (QPCR), the relative transcriptional levels of five toll-like receptors (TLR2, TLR3, TLR5, TLR20a and TLR21) were studied in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), under uninfected and acutely infected conditions [1-, 2-, 4-, 6-, 12-, 24-, 36- and 48-h post-injection (hpi)]. Under uninfected conditions, the transcriptional levels of the five TLRs were significantly lower than that of 18S rRNA (P < 0.001). QPCR results also revealed that the transcriptional levels of TLR20a and TLR5 were higher than those of TLR2, TLR3 or TLR21. The transcriptional level of TLR3 was significantly lower than that of the other four TLRs (P < 0.001). However, when channel catfish were acutely infected by Edwardsiella ictaluri through intraperitoneal injection, the transcriptional levels of TLRs increased significantly (P < 0.005) at 6 hpi. Among the five TLRs studied, the transcriptional levels of TLR3, TLR5 and TLR21 were never significantly lower than under uninfected conditions (P = 0.16, 0.27 and 0.19, respectively), suggesting these three TLRs might play important roles in host defence against infection by E. ictaluri. The amount of E. ictaluri in the anterior kidney increased at 12 and 24 hpi but decreased at 36 and 48 hpi. Our results suggest that TLRs are important components in the immune system in the channel catfish, and their rapid transcriptional upregulation (within 6 hpi) in response to acute E. ictaluri infection might be important for survival from enteric septicaemia of catfish.

  10. Molecular Pathogenesis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Daniel Wai-Hung; Lo, Regina Cheuk-Lam; Chan, Lo-Kong; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a multistep process involving the progressive accumulation of molecular alterations pinpointing different molecular and cellular events. The next-generation sequencing technology is facilitating the global and systematic evaluation of molecular landscapes in HCC. There is emerging evidence supporting the importance of cancer metabolism and tumor microenvironment in providing a favorable and supportive niche to expedite HCC development. Moreover, recent studies have identified distinct surface markers of cancer stem cell (CSC) in HCC, and they also put forward the profound involvement of altered signaling pathways and epigenetic modifications in CSCs, in addition to the concomitant drug resistance and metastasis. Taken together, multiple key genetic and non-genetic factors, as well as liver CSCs, result in the development and progression of HCC. PMID:27781201

  11. Pathogenesis of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    KOMIYAMA, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) represent a high risk of intracranial hemorrhages, which are substantial causes of morbidity and mortality of bAVMs, especially in children and young adults. Although a variety of factors leading to hemorrhages of bAVMs are investigated extensively, their pathogenesis is still not well elucidated. The author has reviewed the updated data of genetic aspects of bAVMs, especially focusing on clinical and experimental knowledge from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which is the representative genetic disease presenting with bAVMs caused by loss-of-function in one of the two genes: endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. This knowledge may allow us to infer the pathogensis of sporadic bAVMs and in the development of new medical therapies for them. PMID:27076383

  12. Raynaud's phenomenon: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Bakst, Richard; Merola, Joseph F; Franks, Andrew G; Sanchez, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common clinical disorder for which patients frequently seek the expertise and care of dermatologists. It is manifested by recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes, often associated with exposure to cold temperature or emotional stress. The phenomenon is named after Maurice Raynaud, who, as a medical student, defined the first case in 1862 as episodic, symmetric, acral vasospasm characterized by pallor, cyanosis, suffusion, and a sense of fullness or tautness, which may be painful. Despite more than 140 years of research, the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon continues to elude investigators. Accordingly, although many pharmacologic treatments have been reported, there is still no cure or gold standard therapy. Further, response to treatment varies and is difficult to predict. Recently, there has been renewed interest in finding the pathogenetic mechanisms of Raynaud's phenomenon, an effort that has led to more potential targeted therapeutics. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent breakthroughs in the pathogenesis and treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  13. Neisseria meningitidis: pathogenesis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    2015-02-01

    The recent advances in cellular microbiology, genomics, and immunology has opened new horizons in the understanding of meningococcal pathogenesis and in the definition of new prophylactic intervention. It is now clear that Neissera meningitidis has evolved a number of surface structures to mediate interaction with host cells and a number of mechanisms to subvert the immune system and escape complement-mediated killing. In this review we report the more recent findings on meningococcal adhesion and on the bacteria-complement interaction highlighting the redundancy of these mechanisms. An effective vaccine against meningococcus B, based on multiple antigens with different function, has been recently licensed. The antibodies induced by the 4CMenB vaccine could mediate bacterial killing by activating directly the classical complement pathway or, indirectly, by preventing binding of fH on the bacterial surface and interfering with colonization.

  14. Climate envelope predictions indicate an enlarged suitable wintering distribution for Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii) in China for the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Chunrong; Falk, Huettmann

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing climate makes humans realize that there is a critical need to incorporate climate change adaptation into conservation planning. Whether the wintering habitats of Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii), a globally endangered migratory subspecies whose population is approximately 1,500–2,200 individuals in China, would be still suitable in a changing climate environment, and where this could be found, is an important protection issue. In this study, we selected the most suitable species distribution model for bustards using climate envelopes from four machine learning models, combining two modelling approaches (TreeNet and Random Forest) with two sets of variables (correlated variables removed or not). We used common evaluation methods area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and the True Skill Statistic (TSS) as well as independent test data to identify the most suitable model. As often found elsewhere, we found Random Forest with all environmental variables outperformed in all assessment methods. When we projected the best model to the latest IPCC-CMIP5 climate scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 in three Global Circulation Models (GCMs)), and averaged the project results of the three models, we found that suitable wintering habitats in the current bustard distribution would increase during the 21st century. The Northeast Plain and the south of North China were projected to become two major wintering areas for bustards. However, the models suggest that some currently suitable habitats will experience a reduction, such as Dongting Lake and Poyang Lake in the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Basin. Although our results suggested that suitable habitats in China would widen with climate change, greater efforts should be undertaken to assess and mitigate unstudied human disturbance, such as pollution, hunting, agricultural development, infrastructure construction, habitat fragmentation, and

  15. Climate envelope predictions indicate an enlarged suitable wintering distribution for Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii) in China for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mi, Chunrong; Falk, Huettmann; Guo, Yumin

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing climate makes humans realize that there is a critical need to incorporate climate change adaptation into conservation planning. Whether the wintering habitats of Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii), a globally endangered migratory subspecies whose population is approximately 1,500-2,200 individuals in China, would be still suitable in a changing climate environment, and where this could be found, is an important protection issue. In this study, we selected the most suitable species distribution model for bustards using climate envelopes from four machine learning models, combining two modelling approaches (TreeNet and Random Forest) with two sets of variables (correlated variables removed or not). We used common evaluation methods area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and the True Skill Statistic (TSS) as well as independent test data to identify the most suitable model. As often found elsewhere, we found Random Forest with all environmental variables outperformed in all assessment methods. When we projected the best model to the latest IPCC-CMIP5 climate scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 in three Global Circulation Models (GCMs)), and averaged the project results of the three models, we found that suitable wintering habitats in the current bustard distribution would increase during the 21st century. The Northeast Plain and the south of North China were projected to become two major wintering areas for bustards. However, the models suggest that some currently suitable habitats will experience a reduction, such as Dongting Lake and Poyang Lake in the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Basin. Although our results suggested that suitable habitats in China would widen with climate change, greater efforts should be undertaken to assess and mitigate unstudied human disturbance, such as pollution, hunting, agricultural development, infrastructure construction, habitat fragmentation, and oil

  16. Climate envelope predictions indicate an enlarged suitable wintering distribution for Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii) in China for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mi, Chunrong; Falk, Huettmann; Guo, Yumin

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly changing climate makes humans realize that there is a critical need to incorporate climate change adaptation into conservation planning. Whether the wintering habitats of Great Bustards (Otis tarda dybowskii), a globally endangered migratory subspecies whose population is approximately 1,500-2,200 individuals in China, would be still suitable in a changing climate environment, and where this could be found, is an important protection issue. In this study, we selected the most suitable species distribution model for bustards using climate envelopes from four machine learning models, combining two modelling approaches (TreeNet and Random Forest) with two sets of variables (correlated variables removed or not). We used common evaluation methods area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and the True Skill Statistic (TSS) as well as independent test data to identify the most suitable model. As often found elsewhere, we found Random Forest with all environmental variables outperformed in all assessment methods. When we projected the best model to the latest IPCC-CMIP5 climate scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 in three Global Circulation Models (GCMs)), and averaged the project results of the three models, we found that suitable wintering habitats in the current bustard distribution would increase during the 21st century. The Northeast Plain and the south of North China were projected to become two major wintering areas for bustards. However, the models suggest that some currently suitable habitats will experience a reduction, such as Dongting Lake and Poyang Lake in the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Basin. Although our results suggested that suitable habitats in China would widen with climate change, greater efforts should be undertaken to assess and mitigate unstudied human disturbance, such as pollution, hunting, agricultural development, infrastructure construction, habitat fragmentation, and oil

  17. Leigh syndrome: neuropathology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lake, Nicole J; Bird, Matthew J; Isohanni, Pirjo; Paetau, Anders

    2015-06-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is the most common pediatric presentation of a defined mitochondrial disease. This progressive encephalopathy is characterized pathologically by the development of bilateral symmetrical lesions in the brainstem and basal ganglia that show gliosis, vacuolation, capillary proliferation, relative neuronal preservation, and by hyperlacticacidemia in the blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this unique pathology has been challenging, particularly in view of the heterogeneous and not yet fully determined genetic basis of LS. Moreover, animal models that mimic features of LS have only been created relatively recently. Here, we review the pathology of LS and consider what might be the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis. Data from a wide range of sources, including patient samples, animal models, and studies of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (a condition that shares features with LS), were used to provide insight into the pathogenic mechanisms that may drive lesion development. Based on current data, we suggest that severe ATP depletion, gliosis, hyperlacticacidemia, reactive oxygen species, and potentially excitotoxicity cumulatively contribute to the neuropathogenesis of LS. An intimate understanding of the molecular mechanisms causing LS is required to accelerate the development of LS treatments.

  18. Pathogenesis of benign adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Vezzosi, Delphine; Bertherat, Jérôme; Groussin, Lionel

    2010-12-01

    Most adrenocortical tumors (ACT) are benign unilateral adrenocortical adenomas, often discovered incidentally. Exceptionally, ACT are bilateral. However bilateral ACT have been very helpful to progress in the pathophysiology of ACT. Although most ACT are of sporadic origin, they may also be part of syndromic and/or hereditary disorders. The identification of the genetics of familial diseases associated with benign ACT has been helpful to define somatic alterations in sporadic ACT: for example, identification of PRKAR1A mutations in Carney complex or alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Coli. Components of the cAMP signaling pathway-for example, adrenocorticotropic-hormone receptors and other membrane receptors, Gs protein, phosphodiesterases and protein kinase A-can be altered to various degrees in benign cortisol-secreting ACT. These progress have been important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of benign ACT, but already have profound implications for clinical management, for example in unraveling the genetic origin of disease in some patients with ACT. They also have therapeutic consequences, and should help to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:21115158

  19. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Backert, Steffen; Neddermann, Matthias; Maubach, Gunter; Naumann, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is estimated to infect more than half of the worlds human population and represents a major risk factor for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection and clinical consequences are controlled by highly complex interactions between the host, colonizing bacteria, and environmental parameters. Important bacterial determinants linked with gastric disease development include the cag pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS), the translocated effector protein CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, adhesin BabA, urease, serine protease HtrA, secreted outer membrane vesicles, and many others. The high quantity of these factors and allelic changes in the corresponding genes reveals a sophisticated picture and problems in evaluating the impact of each distinct component. Extensive work has been performed to pinpoint molecular processes related to H. pylori-triggered pathogenesis using Mongolian gerbils, mice, primary tissues, as well as novel in vitro model systems such as gastroids. The manipulation of host signaling cascades by the bacterium appears to be crucial for inducing pathogenic downstream activities and gastric disease progression. Here, we review the most recent advances in this important research area. PMID:27531534

  20. Pathogenicity islands in bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Herbert; Hensel, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we focus on a group of mobile genetic elements designated pathogenicity islands (PAI). These elements play a pivotal role in the virulence of bacterial pathogens of humans and are also essential for virulence in pathogens of animals and plants. Characteristic molecular features of PAI of important human pathogens and their role in pathogenesis are described. The availability of a large number of genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and their benign relatives currently offers a unique opportunity for the identification of novel pathogen-specific genomic islands. However, this knowledge has to be complemented by improved model systems for the analysis of virulence functions of bacterial pathogens. PAI apparently have been acquired during the speciation of pathogens from their nonpathogenic or environmental ancestors. The acquisition of PAI not only is an ancient evolutionary event that led to the appearance of bacterial pathogens on a timescale of millions of years but also may represent a mechanism that contributes to the appearance of new pathogens within a human life span. The acquisition of knowledge about PAI, their structure, their mobility, and the pathogenicity factors they encode not only is helpful in gaining a better understanding of bacterial evolution and interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells but also may have important practical implications such as providing delivery systems for vaccination, tools for cell biology, and tools for the development of new strategies for therapy of bacterial infections.

  1. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Johannes G; van Vliet, Arnoud H M; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2006-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection represents a key factor in the etiology of various gastrointestinal diseases, ranging from chronic active gastritis without clinical symptoms to peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is the result of the complex interplay between the host and the bacterium. Host immune gene polymorphisms and gastric acid secretion largely determine the bacterium's ability to colonize a specific gastric niche. Bacterial virulence factors such as the cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island-encoded protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA aid in this colonization of the gastric mucosa and subsequently seem to modulate the host's immune system. This review focuses on the microbiological, clinical, immunological, and biochemical aspects of the pathogenesis of H. pylori.

  2. Molecular pathogenesis of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Jiro

    2015-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), one of the most intractable malignancies, is characterized by the infiltration and growth of plasma cells, the most differentiated cells in the B-cell lineage, in the bone marrow. Despite the introduction of novel therapeutic agents, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, the prognosis of patients with MM is still worse than that of most hematological malignancies. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease is essential to achieve any improvement of treatment outcome of MM patients. All MM cases pass through the phase of asymptomatic expansion of clonal plasma cells, referred to as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). It has long been believed that MM evolves linearly from MGUS to terminal phases, such as extramedullary tumors and plasma cell leukemia via the accumulation of novel mutations. However, recent studies using next-generation sequencing have disclosed the complex genomic architecture of the disease. At each step of progression, the acquisition of novel mutations is accompanied by subclonal evolution from reservoir clones with branching patterns. Each subclone may carry novel mutations and distinct phenotypes, including drug sensitivity. In addition, minor clones already exist at the MGUS stage, which could expand later in the clinical course, resulting in relapse and/or leukemic conversion. The ultimate goal of treatment is to eradicate all clones, including subclonal populations with distinct biological characteristics. This goal could be achieved by further improving treatment strategies that reflect the genomic landscape of the disease.

  3. The pathogenesis of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul; Baraniak, Ilona; Reeves, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a recognized cause of disease in the fetus, the allograft recipient and AIDS patients. More recently, it has been recognized as a pathogen for those admitted to intensive care units, for the elderly and for the general population. The epidemiology and molecular and cellular pathology of this virus are summarized to provide an overarching model of pathogenesis, able to account for these varying clinical presentations. In brief, HCMV has the potential to spread in the bloodstream to all organs, but only produces overt disease if the viral load increases to high levels. This is normally prevented by a robust immune response, so that the infected individual usually remains asymptomatic. However, this benefit comes at the cost of committing more and more immunological resources to controlling HCMV with time, so that the overall function of the immune system is impaired. Fortunately, recent progress in developing novel antiviral drugs and vaccines suggests the possibility that the diverse effects of HCMV may soon become controllable at the individual and population level, respectively.

  4. Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Herbert; Hensel, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we focus on a group of mobile genetic elements designated pathogenicity islands (PAI). These elements play a pivotal role in the virulence of bacterial pathogens of humans and are also essential for virulence in pathogens of animals and plants. Characteristic molecular features of PAI of important human pathogens and their role in pathogenesis are described. The availability of a large number of genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and their benign relatives currently offers a unique opportunity for the identification of novel pathogen-specific genomic islands. However, this knowledge has to be complemented by improved model systems for the analysis of virulence functions of bacterial pathogens. PAI apparently have been acquired during the speciation of pathogens from their nonpathogenic or environmental ancestors. The acquisition of PAI not only is an ancient evolutionary event that led to the appearance of bacterial pathogens on a timescale of millions of years but also may represent a mechanism that contributes to the appearance of new pathogens within a human life span. The acquisition of knowledge about PAI, their structure, their mobility, and the pathogenicity factors they encode not only is helpful in gaining a better understanding of bacterial evolution and interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells but also may have important practical implications such as providing delivery systems for vaccination, tools for cell biology, and tools for the development of new strategies for therapy of bacterial infections. PMID:14726454

  5. The pathogenesis of measles revisited.

    PubMed

    de Swart, Rik L

    2008-10-01

    Measles continues to be an important cause of childhood mortality in developing countries. The causative agent, measles virus (MV), is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus, and is spread via the respiratory route. MV was originally thought to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, CD150), which has been identified as the main receptor for wild-type MV. Measles has a relatively long incubation time, which makes it difficult to study the early stages of MV infection in humans. The animal models that best reflect the pathogenesis of measles are based on nonhuman primates. The use of recombinant MV strains expressing fluorescent proteins has greatly facilitated studies on viral tropism in macaques. These studies indicate that dendritic cells and lymphocytes expressing CD150 are the primary target cells for MV infection. At late stages of the infection MV also infects epithelial cells, despite the fact that these do not express CD150. Whether these cells express an as yet unidentified additional MV receptor remains unclear. On basis of these data it could be envisaged that dendritic cells are the first target cells for MV infection. These antigen-presenting cells may traffic the virus to the regional lymph nodes where they can transmit the virus to lymphocytes, which during viremia disseminate the virus throughout the body.

  6. Pathogenesis of gut virus infection.

    PubMed

    Salim, A F; Phillips, A D; Farthing, M J

    1990-09-01

    In summary, the pathogenesis of many gut virus infections remains uncertain. However, human and animal studies indicate that the majority of gut viruses infect villous enterocytes. Viruses appear to have different affinities for enterocytes at different sites on the villus. Infection of enterocytes leads to cell death, extrusion into the lumen, and villous atrophy when the rate of cell production in the crypts cannot keep pace with the rate of enterocyte loss. This results in a reduced surface area as well as impairment of digestive and absorptive functions. This may also result in a net secretory state. All these changes, along with others such as reduced enzymatic activity and reduced epithelial integrity, may contribute to the induction of an acute but transient malabsorptive diarrhoea which may persist until the digestive/absorptive functions of the enterocyte are restored. However, if colonic compensation is sufficient to handle the increased fluid load, diarrhoea may not be evident. The roles of villous ischaemia, altered countercurrent exchanger of altered immune responses still remain uncertain and require further investigation. PMID:1962725

  7. The Pathogenesis of Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cardiac interstitium and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. This review manuscript discusses the cellular effectors and molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Although activated myofibroblasts are the main effector cells in the fibrotic heart, monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes, mast cells, vascular cells and cardiomyocytes may also contribute to the fibrotic response by secreting key fibrogenic mediators. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, reactive oxygen species, mast cell-derived proteases, endothelin-1, the renin/angiotensin/aldosterone system, matricellular proteins and growth factors (such as TGF-β and PDGF) are some of the best-studied mediators implicated in cardiac fibrosis. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cardiac fibrotic alterations may be reversible. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for initiation, progression and resolution of cardiac fibrosis is crucial to design anti-fibrotic treatment strategies for patients with heart disease. PMID:23649149

  8. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    polishing by Karl Habel (a superb senior virologist who left the National Institutes of Health and came to Scripps), and the gifted postdoctoral fellows who joined my laboratory over four decades form the log of my scientific voyage. The strong friendships and collaborations developed with other young but growing experimentalists like Bernie Fields and Abner Notkins are the fabric of the tale I will weave and were pivotal in the establishment of viral pathogenesis as a discipline. PMID:26514062

  9. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    with relapse. Furthermore, we found that the frequency of translocations involving the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci is low in ocular region MALT lymphoma (2 of 42, 5%), but may predict increased risk of relapse (Sjo et al. 2008b). In conclusion the incidence of ophthalmic lymphoma is increasing at a high rate in Denmark. Ophthalmic lymphoma consists primarily of MALT lymphoma. The molecular pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region rarely involves translocations in the MALT1- and IGH-gene loci.

  10. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    polishing by Karl Habel (a superb senior virologist who left the National Institutes of Health and came to Scripps), and the gifted postdoctoral fellows who joined my laboratory over four decades form the log of my scientific voyage. The strong friendships and collaborations developed with other young but growing experimentalists like Bernie Fields and Abner Notkins are the fabric of the tale I will weave and were pivotal in the establishment of viral pathogenesis as a discipline.

  11. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy) may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics. PMID:25617802

  12. A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazear, Helen M; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Platt, Derek J; Fernandez, Estefania; Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-11

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic and unexpected clinical outcomes, including Guillain-Barré syndrome and birth defects, has brought an urgent need for animal models. We evaluated infection and pathogenesis with contemporary and historical ZIKV strains in immunocompetent mice and mice lacking components of the antiviral response. Four- to six-week-old Irf3(-/-)Irf5(-/-)Irf7(-/-) triple knockout mice, which produce little interferon α/β, and mice lacking the interferon receptor (Ifnar1(-/-)) developed neurological disease and succumbed to ZIKV infection, whereas single Irf3(-/-), Irf5(-/-), and Mavs(-/-) knockout mice exhibited no overt illness. Ifnar1(-/-) mice sustained high viral loads in the brain and spinal cord, consistent with evidence that ZIKV causes neurodevelopmental defects in human fetuses. The testes of Ifnar1(-/-) mice had the highest viral loads, which is relevant to sexual transmission of ZIKV. This model of ZIKV pathogenesis will be valuable for evaluating vaccines and therapeutics as well as understanding disease pathogenesis.

  13. The pathogenesis of ulnar polydactyly in humans.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M; Al-Motairi, M I

    2013-11-01

    The pathogenesis of ulnar polydactyly in humans is not known. There are numerous syndromes that are associated with ulnar polydactyly. We have noted that the genetic defects in these syndromes lead to a disturbance of the normal balance between the two forms of the Gli3 protein (the active and repressor forms of Gli3, which are known as Gli3-A and Gli3-R, respectively), leading to a relative increase in the Gli3-R protein. We offer the hypothesis of a unified pathogenesis of ulnar polydactyly through the relative predominance of Gli3-R.

  14. Bordetella pertussis pathogenesis: current and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Jeffrey A.; Scheller, Erich V.; Miller, Jeff F.; Cotter, Peggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis, or whooping cough, has recently reemerged as a major public health threat despite high levels of vaccination against the etiological agent, Bordetella pertussis. In this Review, we describe the pathogenesis of this disease, with a focus on recent mechanistic insights into virulence factor function. We also discuss the changing epidemiology of pertussis and the challenges of vaccine development. Despite decades of research, many aspects of B. pertussis physiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. We highlight knowledge gaps that must be addressed to develop improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24608338

  15. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27573580

  16. Osteoporosis in liver disease: pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Holecki, Michał; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Duława, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects a substantial proportion of patients with chronic liver disease. Pathologic fracture in osteoporosis significantly affects quality of life and life expectancy. By some estimates, 40% of patients with chronic liver disease may experience osteoporotic fracture. In this study we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of specific liver disease entities and their relation to osteoporosis. PMID:27293541

  17. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  18. Pathogenesis of Machupo virus infection in primates.

    PubMed

    Eddy, G A; Scott, S K; Wagner, F S; Brand, O M

    1975-01-01

    Experimental Machupo virus infection of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys produced a severe illness consisting of an initial clinical phase and a later neurological phase. Cumulative mortality during the two phases was 80% and 95% respectively. Attempts to alter the pathogenesis with decomplementation or immunosuppression resulted in earlier deaths of the monkeys.

  19. Psoriasis: Pathogenesis, Assessment, and Therapeutic Update.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic condition that affects more than 7 million Americans. This article explores the pathogenesis and physical signs of psoriasis. Over the past 2 decades enhanced understanding of the immunologic basis of psoriasis has led to the development of new systemic agents that have revolutionized the management of this disease, and these modalities, along with traditional therapies, are described.

  20. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors in human disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Brian A; Rott, Alena; Butcher, Eugene C

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of leukocyte attractant ligands and cognate heptahelical receptors specify the systemic recruitment of circulating cells by triggering integrin-dependent adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting extravasation, and directing specific intratissue localization via gradient-driven chemotaxis. Chemoattractant receptors also control leukocyte egress from lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues. In this article, we summarize the fundamental mechanics of leukocyte trafficking, from the evolution of multistep models of leukocyte recruitment and navigation to the regulation of chemoattractant availability and function by atypical heptahelical receptors. To provide a more complete picture of the migratory circuits involved in leukocyte trafficking, we integrate a number of nonchemokine chemoattractant receptors into our discussion. Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors play key roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, allergy, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. We review recent advances in our understanding of chemoattractant receptors in disease pathogenesis, with a focus on genome-wide association studies in humans and the translational implications of mechanistic studies in animal disease models.

  1. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  2. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Theories on the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Sourial, Samer; Tempest, Nicola; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease defined by the presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue. The aetiology of endometriosis is complex and multifactorial, where several not fully confirmed theories describe its pathogenesis. This review examines existing theories on the initiation and propagation of different types of endometriotic lesions, as well as critically appraises the myriad of biologically relevant evidence that support or oppose each of the proposed theories. The current literature suggests that stem cells, dysfunctional immune response, genetic predisposition, and aberrant peritoneal environment may all be involved in the establishment and propagation of endometriotic lesions. An orchestrated scientific and clinical effort is needed to consider all factors involved in the pathogenesis of this multifaceted disease and to propose novel therapeutic targets to reach effective treatments for this distressing condition. PMID:25763392

  4. Theories on the Pathogenesis of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Samer; Hapangama, Dharani K.

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease defined by the presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue. The aetiology of endometriosis is complex and multifactorial, where several not fully confirmed theories describe its pathogenesis. This review examines existing theories on the initiation and propagation of different types of endometriotic lesions, as well as critically appraises the myriad of biologically relevant evidence that support or oppose each of the proposed theories. The current literature suggests that stem cells, dysfunctional immune response, genetic predisposition, and aberrant peritoneal environment may all be involved in the establishment and propagation of endometriotic lesions. An orchestrated scientific and clinical effort is needed to consider all factors involved in the pathogenesis of this multifaceted disease and to propose novel therapeutic targets to reach effective treatments for this distressing condition. PMID:25763392

  5. [Necrotizing enterocolitis. Pathogenesis and iatrogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Obladen, M

    1986-08-01

    Following clinical observations, measurements of osmolarity of liquid drugs, and determination of blood loss due to sampling in very low birthweight infants, the following hypothesis on iatrogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis is proposed: Due to diagnostic blood sampling during intensive care, premature infants may become severely anemic. Therefore their intestinal perfusion is reduced, causing hypoxia and hypoperfusion in the submucosa. Especially in infants with oral feeding and hyperosmolar medication, mechanical factors, hyperosmolarity and infection can affect the mucosa from the luminal side. Simultaneous hypoperfusion and hyperosmolar load may contribute to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis. This hypothesis, which needs experimental verification, explains the different incidence of the disease in different hospitals.

  6. STAT3 Regulation of Glioblastoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    de la Iglesia, Núria; Puram, Sidharth V.; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Despite efforts to find effective treatments, these tumors remain incurable. The failure of malignant gliomas to respond to conventional cancer therapies may reflect the unique biology of these tumors, underscoring the need for new approaches in their investigation. Recently, progress has been made in characterization of the molecular pathogenesis of glioblastoma using a developmental neurobiological perspective, by exploring the role of signaling pathways that control the differentiation of neural stem cells along the glial lineage. The transcription factor STAT3, which has an established function in neural stem cell and astrocyte development, has been found to play dual tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles in glial malignancy depending on the mutational profile of the tumor. These findings establish a novel developmental paradigm in the study of glioblastoma pathogenesis and provide the rationale for patient-tailored therapy in the treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:19601808

  7. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkareem, Imran Haruna

    2013-01-01

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease. PMID:24665149

  8. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Dileep K; Prakash, Ravi; Mullen, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder seen in patients with advanced liver disease or porto-systemic shunts. Based on etiology and severity of HE, the World Congress of Gastroenterology has divided HE into categories and sub-categories. Many user-friendly computer-based neuropsychiatric tests are being validated for diagnosing covert HE. Currently, emphasis is being given to view HE deficits as a continuous spectrum rather than distinct stages. Ammonia is believed to play crucial role in pathogenesis of HE via astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, evidence has been building up which supports the synergistic role of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurosteroids in pathogenesis of HE. At present, treatment of HE aims at decreasing the production and intestinal absorption of ammonia. But as the role of new pathogenetic mechanisms becomes clear, many potential new treatment strategies may become available for clinician. PMID:25755319

  9. Genetic and epigenetic basis of psoriasis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Aditi; Ray, Aditi; Senapati, Swapan; Chatterjee, Raghunath

    2015-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease whose prevalence varies among different populations worldwide. It is a complex multi-factorial disease and the exact etiology is largely unknown. Family based studies have indicated a genetic predisposition; however they cannot fully explain the disease pathogenesis. In addition to genetic susceptibility, environmental as well as gender and age related factors were also been found to be associated. Recently, imbalances in epigenetic networks are indicated to be causative elements in psoriasis. The present knowledge of epigenetic involvement, mainly the DNA methylation, chromatin modifications and miRNA deregulation is surveyed here. An integrated approach considering genetic and epigenetic anomalies in the light of immunological network may explore the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  10. Pathogenesis of Aspergillus fumigatus in Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Dagenais, Taylor R. T.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aspergillus species are globally ubiquitous saprophytes found in a variety of ecological niches. Almost 200 species of aspergilli have been identified, less than 20 of which are known to cause human disease. Among them, Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent and is largely responsible for the increased incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in the immunocompromised patient population. IA is a devastating illness, with mortality rates in some patient groups reaching as high as 90%. Studies identifying and assessing the roles of specific factors of A. fumigatus that contribute to the pathogenesis of IA have traditionally focused on single-gene deletion and mutant characterization. In combination with recent large-scale approaches analyzing global fungal responses to distinct environmental or host conditions, these studies have identified many factors that contribute to the overall pathogenic potential of A. fumigatus. Here, we provide an overview of the significant findings regarding A. fumigatus pathogenesis as it pertains to invasive disease. PMID:19597008

  11. Pathogenesis of diabetic cerebral vascular disease complication

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most potent independent risk factors for the development of diabetic cerebral vascular disease (CVD). Many evidences suggested that hyperglycemia caused excess free fatty acids, the loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, insulin resistance, the prothrombotic state, endothelial dysfunction, the abnormal release of endothelial vasoactivators, vascular smooth muscle dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the downregulation of miRs participated in vessel generation and recovery as well as the balance of endotheliocytes. In turn, these abnormalities, mainly via phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, polyol, hexosamine, protein kinase C activation, and increased generation of advanced glycosylation end products pathway, play an important role in inducing diabetic CVD complication. A deeper comprehension of pathogenesis producing diabetic CVD could offer base for developing new therapeutic ways preventing diabetic CVD complications, therefore, in the paper we mainly reviewed present information about the possible pathogenesis of diabetic CVD complication. PMID:25685278

  12. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: pathogenesis, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julie A.; McFarland, Janice G.; Curtis, Brian R.; Aster, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, (NAIT) is caused by maternal antibodies raised against alloantigens carried on fetal platelets. Although many cases are mild, NAIT is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in newborns and is the most common cause of intracranial haemorrhage in full-term infants. In this report, we review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis and prenatal and post-natal management of NAIT and highlight areas of controversy that deserve the attention of clinical and laboratory investigators. PMID:23384054

  13. [Pathogenesis of posterior capsule opacification in pseudophakia].

    PubMed

    Łukaszewska-Smyk, Agnieszka; Kałuzny, Józef

    2009-01-01

    The lens epithelial cells of A and E type are involved in pathogenesis of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). They undergo metaplasia into microfibroblasts, then migrate towards posterior capsule where they proliferate and form opacification. These processes are stimulated by cytokines and interleukines. The extracellular matrix which constitutes a scaffold for migration and attachment of epithelial cells plays an important role in PCO formation. Integrines intercede in this process.

  14. [Morphological effects of weightlessness and their pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kaplanskiĭ, A S; Savina, E A

    1981-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of morphological and histochemical investigations of rats flown onboard the Soviet biological satellites of the Cosmos series. The changes in different functional systems and organs have been found to be related. The paper contains hypotheses concerning the pathogenesis of the changes detected. It is emphasized that most changes are induced by a reduction of load upon the musculoskeletal system in weightlessness.

  15. Mechanism of Mycobacterium avium complex pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V M

    1998-06-08

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) group of microorganisms are the most common opportunistic bacterial pathogens causing disseminated disease in HIV infected patients. These microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and are acquired by respiratory and oral routes. Pathogenesis of MAC depends on the ability of the organisms to colonize intestinal/respiratory mucosa, penetrate the protective barriers and resist intracellular killing by macrophages. Transient and reversible variation of colony morphology is one the characteristic feature of MAC that plays a significant role in the virulence and pathogenesis of these microorganisms. Isogenic colony variants of MAC differ in their virulence, susceptibility to antibiotics, stimulation of oxygen radicals and cytokines. The virulent smooth transparent colony variants are more frequently isolated from AIDS patients, more efficient in mucosal colonization, and adhere more efficiently to epithelial cells as compared to the less virulent smooth opaque variants. However, both the isogenic variants bind to the mucosal epithelial cells through the same multiple receptors. In addition, both the isogenic variants of MAC also bind to intestinal mucus through a single receptor. Study of the interaction of MAC with the host cells and characterization of MAC adhesins and host cell receptors facilitates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in MAC pathogenesis.

  16. Streptococcus-Zebrafish Model of Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Melody N.; Pfeifer, John D.; Caparon, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Due to its small size, rapid generation time, powerful genetic systems, and genomic resources, the zebrafish has emerged as an important model of vertebrate development and human disease. Its well-developed adaptive and innate cellular immune systems make the zebrafish an ideal model for the study of infectious diseases. With a natural and important pathogen of fish, Streptococcus iniae, we have established a streptococcus- zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis. Following injection into the dorsal muscle, zebrafish developed a lethal infection, with a 50% lethal dose of 103 CFU, and died within 2 to 3 days. The pathogenesis of infection resembled that of S. iniae in farmed fish populations and that of several important human streptococcal diseases and was characterized by an initial focal necrotic lesion that rapidly progressed to invasion of the pathogen into all major organ systems, including the brain. Zebrafish were also susceptible to infection by the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, disease was characterized by a marked absence of inflammation, large numbers of extracellular streptococci in the dorsal muscle, and extensive myonecrosis that occurred far in advance of any systemic invasion. The genetic systems available for streptococci, including a novel method of mutagenesis which targets genes whose products are exported, were used to identify several mutants attenuated for virulence in zebrafish. This combination of a genetically amenable pathogen with a well-defined vertebrate host makes the streptococcus-zebrafish model of bacterial pathogenesis a powerful model for analysis of infectious disease. PMID:12065534

  17. A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazear, Helen M; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Platt, Derek J; Fernandez, Estefania; Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-11

    The ongoing Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic and unexpected clinical outcomes, including Guillain-Barré syndrome and birth defects, has brought an urgent need for animal models. We evaluated infection and pathogenesis with contemporary and historical ZIKV strains in immunocompetent mice and mice lacking components of the antiviral response. Four- to six-week-old Irf3(-/-)Irf5(-/-)Irf7(-/-) triple knockout mice, which produce little interferon α/β, and mice lacking the interferon receptor (Ifnar1(-/-)) developed neurological disease and succumbed to ZIKV infection, whereas single Irf3(-/-), Irf5(-/-), and Mavs(-/-) knockout mice exhibited no overt illness. Ifnar1(-/-) mice sustained high viral loads in the brain and spinal cord, consistent with evidence that ZIKV causes neurodevelopmental defects in human fetuses. The testes of Ifnar1(-/-) mice had the highest viral loads, which is relevant to sexual transmission of ZIKV. This model of ZIKV pathogenesis will be valuable for evaluating vaccines and therapeutics as well as understanding disease pathogenesis. PMID:27066744

  18. Autoimmune pathogenesis in dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Cheng, Hsien-Jen; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) caused by dengue virus (DV) infection remain unresolved. Patients with DHF/DSS are characterized by several manifestations, including severe thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and hepatomegaly. In addition to the effect of virus load and virus variation, abnormal immune responses of the host after DV infection may also account for the progression of DHF/DSS. Actually, viral autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous viral infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, human hepatitis C virus, human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and DV. In this review, we discuss the implications of autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis. Antibodies directed against DV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) showed cross-reactivity with human platelets and endothelial cells, which lead to platelet and endothelial cell damage and inflammatory activation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that anti-DV NS1 is involved in the pathogenesis of DF and DHF/DSS, and this may provide important information in dengue vaccine development.

  19. [Pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy have been clarified in this decade, although many unknown mechanisms remain to be elucidated. According to progress of MRI and neuroimmunological analysis and the observation of clinical findings, many new syndromes were found, which enhanced our understanding of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy. The pathogenesis of encephalitis is divided into infection and immune mediated mechanisms. The antibodies to neuronal surface antigens(NSA) such as NMDA receptors, leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and aquaporin 4 were demonstrated in specific encephalitis, limbic encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica. Anti-NSA antibody encephalitis should be treated by immunotherapy such as corticosteroid and plasmapheresis. Acute encephalitis with refractory repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a devastating postinfectious disease in children and adults, although the pathogenesis of AERRPS is poorly understood. Influenza associated encephalopathy(IAE) is characterized by it's high incidence in Japanese children between 1 year and 5 years of age, its onset in the first or the second day of illness and its high mortality (15-30%) and morbidity (25-40%). We proposed the classification of IAE with poor prognosis from the neuroradiological findings. Four types of encephalopathy seem to be differentiated from each other, acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) type, hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) type, acute brain swelling (ABS) type, febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) type. The notable radiological features are thalamic lesions in ANE, diffuse cerebral cortical cytotoxic edema in HSES, reversible cerebral swelling in ABS which sometimes reaches lethal brain herniation, and in FCSE type, dendritic high signal in subcortical white matter by DWI ("bright tree appearance") appears simultaneously with the later onset of repetitive focal seizure. These four types are

  20. Precursors and pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, D; Oliva, E

    2013-04-01

    The ultimate goal of defining cancer specific precursors is to facilitate early detection and intervention before the development of invasive malignancy. Unlike other malignancies involving the female genital tract such as cervical or endometrial carcinomas, precursor lesions of ovarian carcinomas have not been well characterised, resulting in a failure to develop effective screening programs. Recent clinicopathological and molecular studies have provided new insight into the origin and pathogenesis of ovarian carcinomas. It has been shown that ovarian cancer is comprised of different tumour types differing not only in morphology, but also in pathogenesis, molecular alterations and clinical progression. A dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis has been proposed. Type I tumours which include low grade serous, low grade endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous carcinomas and Brenner tumours, are generally indolent and tend to be genetically stable, although clear cell carcinoma would probably belong to an intermediate category. They demonstrate a step-wise progression from a benign precursor such as a benign to borderline tumour or endometriosis and are characterised by genetic aberrations targeting specific cell signalling pathways. Type II tumours comprise high grade serous, high grade endometrioid, and undifferentiated carcinomas as well as malignant mixed mesodermal tumours. They are clinically aggressive and exhibit high genetic instability with frequent p53 mutations. Mounting evidence suggests that many high grade serous carcinomas originate from the epithelium of the distal fallopian tube, and that serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) represents the putative precursor of these neoplasms. Low grade serous carcinomas arise via transformation of benign and borderline serous tumours, thought to be derived from inclusion cysts originating from the ovarian surface or tubal epithelium. Recently it has been suggested that papillary tubal hyperplasia may be a

  1. The Pathogenesis of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, J. Ashley; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2014-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a histological pattern of injury on renal biopsy that can arise from a diverse range of causes and mechanisms. Although primary and secondary forms are described based on the underlying cause, there are many common factors that underlie the development of this segmental injury. In this review we will describe the currently accepted model for the pathogenesis of classic FSGS and review the data supporting this model. Although the podocyte is considered the major target of injury in FSGS, we will also highlight the contributions of other resident glomerular cells in the development of FSGS. PMID:25168829

  2. Some observations on the pathogenesis of syringomyelia.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, P K; Terenty, T R; Foster, J B

    1981-01-01

    The pathogenesis of most cases of syringomyelia remains obscure although a modification of the hydrodynamic theory of Gardner allows a logical surgical approach to treatment. Data are presented confirming a high incidence of traumatic birth in patients with syringomyelia who have a Chiari malformation or basal arachnoiditis, but demonstrating no increase in traumatic birth in patients with the Chiari malformation but no syringomyelia. A traumatic birth may be the factor responsible for creating the potential for syringomyelia in those individuals with the embryological defect of the Chiari anomaly. Images PMID:7334396

  3. Pathogenesis of postoperative oral surgical pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pain is a major postoperative symptom in many oral surgical procedures. It is a complex and variable phenomenon that can be influenced by many factors. Good management of oral surgical pain requires a detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of surgical pain. This article aims at reviewing postoperative pain from a broad perspective by looking into the nociception, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology of pain. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence from the literature for maximizing the efficacy of pain management techniques for oral surgical pain. PMID:12722900

  4. Atopic Dermatitis; Etio-Pathogenesis, An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Khurana, Ananta; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Saxena, Deepti; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a well-recognized clinical entity, several facets of which continue to be mystified. Accordingly, its etio-pathogenesis is largely elusive. It appears to be an outcome of interplay of several undertones, namely: genetics, maternal factor and inheritance, pregnancy/intrauterine, environmental factors, immune dysregulation, immuno-globulins, role of diet, and infection. Besides, recent innovative breakthroughs consisting of nutritional supplementation, the highlights of which were considered worthwhile to take stock of to define its current status. An endeavor to enlighten the audience has been made for their benefit. PMID:26288398

  5. Tubo-Ovarian Abscess: Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Newton G.

    1986-01-01

    That a female patient with abdominal pain is often considered to have pelvic inflammatory disease until proven otherwise is ubiquitous in the medical literature. This view is dangerous and should be challenged because it has resulted in episodes of ruptured appendix, death from ruptured ectopic pregnancies, and serious morbidity from delayed diagnoses of such entities as diverticulitis and endometriosis. Proper diagnostic steps should be taken for all patients with abdominal pain of unclear etiology. This article reviews the pathogenesis of tubo-ovarian abscesses so as to separate and clearly identify fact from fiction. Diagnostic steps and management guidelines are discussed. PMID:3537321

  6. The bacterial pathogenesis and treatment of pouchitis

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, S. D.; Clark, S. K.; Tekkis, P. P.; Nicholls, R. J.; Ciclitira, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the operation of choice for patients with ulcerative colitis. Pouchitis is the most common cause of pouch dysfunction. Although the pathogenesis of this disease is not well understood, bacteria have been implicated in the disease process. Numerous bacterial studies have been reported over the last 25 years with few unifying findings. In addition, many different treatments for pouchitis have been reported with varying results. Antibiotic treatment remains the most studied and is the mainstay of treatment. In this article we review the aetiology of pouchitis and the evidenced-based treatment options. PMID:21180613

  7. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of chikungunya pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lum, Fok-Moon; Ng, Lisa F P

    2015-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus that causes chikungunya fever, a disease characterized by the onset of fever and rashes, with arthralgia as its hallmark symptom. CHIKV has re-emerged over the past decade, causing numerous outbreaks around the world. Since late 2013, CHIKV has reached the shores of the Americas, causing more than a million cases of infection. Despite concentrated efforts to understand the pathogenesis of the disease, further outbreaks remain a threat. This review highlights important findings regarding CHIKV-associated immunopathogenesis and offers important insights into future directions. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Chikungunya discovers the New World."

  8. Pathogenesis of nasal polyps: an update.

    PubMed

    Pawliczak, Rafal; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2005-11-01

    The cause of nasal polyp formation is still unknown. Genetic predisposition has been suggested, but there are scanty data to support such theories. Activated epithelial cells may be the major source of mediators inducing influx of inflammatory cells (mostly eosinophils) and proliferation and activation of fibroblasts leading to nasal polyp formation. Infectious agents (including viruses, bacteria, or fungi) may be potential primary factors activating nasal epithelial cells. Proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors play important roles in the persistence of mucosal inflammation associated with nasal polyps. Arachidonic acid metabolites seem to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps in patients with aspirin hypersensitivity rhinosinusitis/asthma syndrome. PMID:16216171

  9. Physiology and pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Dean J; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems treated by primary care physicians. Almost 20% of the population in the United States experiences occasional regurgitation, heartburn, or retrosternal pain because of GERD. Reflux disease is complex, and the physiology and pathogenesis are still incompletely understood. However, abnormalities of any one or a combination of the three physiologic processes, namely, esophageal motility, lower esophageal sphincter function, and gastric motility or emptying, can lead to GERD. There are many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD today, but more studies are needed to better understand this complex disease process.

  10. Ewing sarcoma: a chronicle of molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyum; Park, Yong-Koo

    2016-09-01

    Sarcomas have traditionally been classified according to their chromosomal alterations regardless of whether they accompany simple or complex genetic changes. Ewing sarcoma, a classic small round cell bone tumor, is a well-known mesenchymal malignancy that results from simple sarcoma-specific genetic alterations. The genetic alterations are translocations between genes of the TET/FET family (TLS/FUS, EWSR1, and TAF15) and genes of the E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family. In this review, we intend to summarize a chronicle of molecular findings of Ewing sarcoma including recent advances and explain resultant molecular pathogenesis. PMID:27246176

  11. Pathogenesis and management of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Harada, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Hepatolenticular degeneration, commonly known as Wilson disease, is an autosomal recessive inherited disease of abnormal copper metabolism, characterized by the accumulation of copper in the body due to decreased biliary excretion of copper from hepatocytes. Wilson disease protein, ATP7B, functions in copper excretion into bile and in copper secretion to the bloodstream coupled with ceruloplasmin synthesis. Various kinds of mutations of ATP7B cause Wilson disease. Wilson disease is a rare genetic disease that can be treated pharmacologically. Recognition and prompt diagnosis are very important, because Wilson disease is fatal if left untreated. In this review, I summarize the pathogenesis and management of Wilson disease.

  12. Pathogenesis of tendinopathies: inflammation or degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Gravare-Silbernagel, Karin; Siljeholm, Carl; Di Iorio, Angelo; De Amicis, Daniele; Salini, Vincenzo; Werner, Suzanne; Paganelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The intrinsic pathogenetic mechanisms of tendinopathies are largely unknown and whether inflammation or degeneration has the prominent role is still a matter of debate. Assuming that there is a continuum from physiology to pathology, overuse may be considered as the initial disease factor; in this context, microruptures of tendon fibers occur and several molecules are expressed, some of which promote the healing process, while others, including inflammatory cytokines, act as disease mediators. Neural in-growth that accompanies the neovessels explains the occurrence of pain and triggers neurogenic-mediated inflammation. It is conceivable that inflammation and degeneration are not mutually exclusive, but work together in the pathogenesis of tendinopathies. PMID:19591655

  13. Dengue viral infections; pathogenesis and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McBride, W J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H

    2000-07-01

    Dengue viral infections affect up to 100 million individuals per year. Dengue haemorrhagic fever is a clinical form of disease characterised by intravascular fluid loss. There has been a marked increase in the incidence of this form of the disease over the last few decades, associated with significant mortality, particularly in the paediatric population. A number of theories relating to the pathogenesis of dengue haemorrhagic fever exist that have evolved from the analysis of the epidemiology of this disease. Virological and immunopathological factors are both important but the exact mechanisms for the disease are unknown.

  14. Recent advances in understanding norovirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Tibbetts, Scott A

    2016-11-01

    Noroviruses constitute a family of ubiquitous and highly efficient human pathogens. In spite of decades of dedicated research, human noroviruses remain a major cause of gastroenteritis and severe diarrheal disease around the world. Recent findings have begun to unravel the complex mechanisms that regulate norovirus pathogenesis and persistent infection, including the important interplay between the virus, the host immune system, and commensal bacteria. Herein, we will summarize recent research developments regarding norovirus cell tropism, the use of M cells, and commensal bacteria to facilitate norovirus infection, and virus, host, and bacterial determinants of persistent norovirus infections. J. Med. Virol. 88:1837-1843, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27110852

  15. Recent advances in understanding norovirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Tibbetts, Scott A

    2016-11-01

    Noroviruses constitute a family of ubiquitous and highly efficient human pathogens. In spite of decades of dedicated research, human noroviruses remain a major cause of gastroenteritis and severe diarrheal disease around the world. Recent findings have begun to unravel the complex mechanisms that regulate norovirus pathogenesis and persistent infection, including the important interplay between the virus, the host immune system, and commensal bacteria. Herein, we will summarize recent research developments regarding norovirus cell tropism, the use of M cells, and commensal bacteria to facilitate norovirus infection, and virus, host, and bacterial determinants of persistent norovirus infections. J. Med. Virol. 88:1837-1843, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  17. Pathogenesis of Apical Periodontitis: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lodiene, Greta; Maciulskiene, Vita

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This review article discusses the host response in apical periodontitis with the main focus on cytokines, produced under this pathological condition and contributing to the degradation of periradicular tissues. The pace of research in this field has greatly accelerated in the last decade. Here we provide an analysis of studies published in this area during this period. Material and methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic database. The keywords used for search were pathogenesis of apical periodontitis cytokines, periapical granuloma cytokines, inflammatory infiltrate apical periodontitis. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1999 to December 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the cytokine production, cytokine functions and periapical tissue destruction in the journals and books was performed. Results In total, 97 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The topics covered in this article include cellular composition of an inflammatory infiltrate in the periapical lesions, mechanisms of the formation of the innate and specific immune response. Studies which investigated cytokine secretion and functions were identified and cellular and molecular interactions in the course of apical periodontitis described. Conclusions The abundance and interactions of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules can influence and alter the state and progression of the disease. Therefore, periapical inflammatory response offers a model, suited for the study of many facets of pathogenesis, biocompatibility of different materials to periapical tissues and development of novel treatment methods, based on the regulation of cytokines expression PMID:24421998

  18. Oligodendrocytes in HIV-associated pain pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuqiang; Shu, Jianhong; Liang, Zongsuo; Yuan, Subo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the contributions of microglia and astrocytes to chronic pain pathogenesis have been a focal point of investigation in recent years, the potential role of oligodendrocytes, another major type of glial cells in the CNS that generates myelin, remains largely unknown. Results We report here that cell markers of the oligodendrocyte lineage, including NG2, PDGFRα, and Olig2, are significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horn of HIV patients who developed chronic pain. The levels of myelin proteins myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein are also aberrant in the spinal dorsal horn of “pain-positive” HIV patients. Similarly, the oligodendrocyte and myelin markers are up-regulated in the spinal dorsal horn of a mouse model of HIV-1 gp120-induced pain. Surprisingly, the expression of gp120-induced mechanical allodynia appears intact up to 4 h after myelin basic protein is knocked down or knocked out. Conclusion These findings suggest that oligodendrocytes are reactive during the pathogenesis of HIV-associated pain. However, interfering with myelination does not alter the induction of gp120-induced pain. PMID:27306410

  19. Channelopathy pathogenesis in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schmunk, Galina; Gargus, J. Jay

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies) in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole-genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Moreover, animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects. PMID:24204377

  20. Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J.; England, John D.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Martin, Dale S.; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  1. Redox Control of Prion and Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay; Das, Dola; Mohan, Maradumane L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Imbalance of brain metal homeostasis and associated oxidative stress by redox-active metals like iron and copper is an important trigger of neurotoxicity in several neurodegenerative conditions, including prion disorders. Whereas some reports attribute this to end-stage disease, others provide evidence for specific mechanisms leading to brain metal dyshomeostasis during disease progression. In prion disorders, imbalance of brain-iron homeostasis is observed before end-stage disease and worsens with disease progression, implicating iron-induced oxidative stress in disease pathogenesis. This is an unexpected observation, because the underlying cause of brain pathology in all prion disorders is PrP-scrapie (PrPSc), a β-sheet–rich conformation of a normal glycoprotein, the prion protein (PrPC). Whether brain-iron dyshomeostasis occurs because of gain of toxic function by PrPSc or loss of normal function of PrPC remains unclear. In this review, we summarize available evidence suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress in prion-disease pathogenesis. Subsequently, we review the biology of PrPC to highlight its possible role in maintaining brain metal homeostasis during health and the contribution of PrPSc in inducing brain metal imbalance with disease progression. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic avenues directed at restoring brain metal homeostasis and alleviating metal-induced oxidative stress in prion disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1271–1294. PMID:19803746

  2. The pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and represents an increasing burden on health care resources. Understanding underlying pathogenic mechanisms of OSA will ultimately allow for the development of rational therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review current concepts about the pathogenesis of OSA. Specifically, we consider the evidence that the upper airway plays a primary role in OSA pathogenesis and provide a framework for modelling its biomechanical properties and propensity to collapse during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular factors that modulate upper airway obstruction are also discussed. Finally, we consider models of periodic breathing, and elaborate generalizable mechanisms by which upper airway obstruction destabilizes respiratory patterns during sleep. In our model, upper airway obstruction triggers a mismatch between ventilatory supply and demand. In this model, trade-offs between maintaining sleep stability or ventilation can account for a full range of OSA disease severity and expression. Recurrent arousals and transient increases in airway patency may restore ventilation between periods of sleep, while alterations in neuromuscular and arousal responses to upper airway obstruction may improve sleep stability at still suboptimal levels of ventilation. PMID:26380762

  3. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26205405

  4. Channelopathy pathogenesis in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Schmunk, Galina; Gargus, J Jay

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies) in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole-genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Moreover, animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects. PMID:24204377

  5. Measles Virus Host Invasion and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laksono, Brigitta M.; de Vries, Rory D.; McQuaid, Stephen; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and conjunctivitis. A hallmark of measles is the transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. At the same time, the disease is paradoxically associated with induction of a robust virus-specific immune response, resulting in lifelong immunity to measles. Identification of CD150 and nectin-4 as cellular receptors for measles virus has led to new perspectives on tropism and pathogenesis. In vivo studies in non-human primates have shown that the virus initially infects CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells, both in circulation and in lymphoid tissues, followed by virus transmission to nectin-4 expressing epithelial cells. The abilities of the virus to cause systemic infection, to transmit to numerous new hosts via droplets or aerosols and to suppress the host immune response for several months or even years after infection make measles a remarkable disease. This review briefly highlights current topics in studies of measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis. PMID:27483301

  6. [Bronchial asthma pathogenesis and genetic prognosis development].

    PubMed

    Balmasova, I P; Sepiashvili, R I; Sepiashvili, Ia R; Malova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review is dedicated to an actual problem--genetic prognosis of risk of bronchial asthma development that is quite a complex aspect of studies from a methodological viewpoint. Bronchial asthma--heterogeneous disease by both etiology and clinical characteristics. At the same time genetic prognosis is based on the unity of pathogenetic mechanisms of development, though in immunological reactions that are the base of this disease, alternative variants are possible. The aim of this review is carrying out parallels between modern achievements in the field of deciphering trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma pathogenesis and object of genetic studies based on these mechanisms. Among the examined conceptions--role of epithelial tissue in trigger mechanisms of bronchial asthma, variants of key role of immune system cells, first of all, T-helpers of various types for further development of inflammatory-effector reactions with damage characteristic for this disease. Compliance of contemporary approaches of genetic studies and novel concepts of bronchial asthma pathogenesis is shown.

  7. Pathogenesis and Treatment of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gien, Jason; Kinsella, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease of infancy affecting mostly premature infants with significant morbidity and mortality. Improved survival of very immature infants has led to increased numbers of infants with this disorder. Acute and chronic lung injury and impaired postnatal lung growth are thought to be responsible for the development of BPD. While changes in clinical practice have improved the clinical course and outcomes for infants with BPD, over the last decade, the overall incidence of BPD has not changed. This review will describe the pre and postnatal factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of BPD as well as current and experimental therapies for treatment of BPD. Recent findings The factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of BPD are well described, however recent studies have better defined how these factors modulate lung growth. Inflammation, proinflammatory cytokines and altered angiogenic gene signaling contribute to lung injury and impair pre and postnatal lung growth resulting in BPD, however to date no therapy has been identified that potently and consistently prevents or reverses their effects on lung growth. We will discuss the cell signaling pathways affected in BPD and current therapies available for modulating these pathways. Summary Despite current advances in neonatal care, BPD remains a heavy burden on health care resources. New treatments directed either at reducing lung injury or improving lung growth are under study. PMID:21494147

  8. The pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Pham, Luu V; Schwartz, Alan R

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and represents an increasing burden on health care resources. Understanding underlying pathogenic mechanisms of OSA will ultimately allow for the development of rational therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review current concepts about the pathogenesis of OSA. Specifically, we consider the evidence that the upper airway plays a primary role in OSA pathogenesis and provide a framework for modelling its biomechanical properties and propensity to collapse during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular factors that modulate upper airway obstruction are also discussed. Finally, we consider models of periodic breathing, and elaborate generalizable mechanisms by which upper airway obstruction destabilizes respiratory patterns during sleep. In our model, upper airway obstruction triggers a mismatch between ventilatory supply and demand. In this model, trade-offs between maintaining sleep stability or ventilation can account for a full range of OSA disease severity and expression. Recurrent arousals and transient increases in airway patency may restore ventilation between periods of sleep, while alterations in neuromuscular and arousal responses to upper airway obstruction may improve sleep stability at still suboptimal levels of ventilation. PMID:26380762

  9. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  10. Measles Virus Host Invasion and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Laksono, Brigitta M; de Vries, Rory D; McQuaid, Stephen; Duprex, W Paul; de Swart, Rik L

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and conjunctivitis. A hallmark of measles is the transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. At the same time, the disease is paradoxically associated with induction of a robust virus-specific immune response, resulting in lifelong immunity to measles. Identification of CD150 and nectin-4 as cellular receptors for measles virus has led to new perspectives on tropism and pathogenesis. In vivo studies in non-human primates have shown that the virus initially infects CD150⁺ lymphocytes and dendritic cells, both in circulation and in lymphoid tissues, followed by virus transmission to nectin-4 expressing epithelial cells. The abilities of the virus to cause systemic infection, to transmit to numerous new hosts via droplets or aerosols and to suppress the host immune response for several months or even years after infection make measles a remarkable disease. This review briefly highlights current topics in studies of measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis. PMID:27483301

  11. Exosomes: Implications in HIV-1 Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-07-20

    Exosomes are membranous nanovesicles of endocytic origin that carry host and pathogen derived genomic, proteomic, and lipid cargos. Exosomes are secreted by most cell types into the extracellular milieu and are subsequently internalized by recipient cells. Upon internalization, exosomes condition recipient cells by donating their cargos and/or activating various signal transduction pathways, consequently regulating physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of exosomes in viral pathogenesis, especially human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] is beginning to unravel. Recent research reports suggest that exosomes from various sources play important but different roles in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. From these reports, it appears that the source of exosomes is the defining factor for the exosomal effect on HIV-1. In this review, we will describe how HIV-1 infection is modulated by exosomes and in turn how exosomes are targeted by HIV-1 factors. Finally, we will discuss potentially emerging therapeutic options based on exosomal cargos that may have promise in preventing HIV-1 transmission.

  12. Noncanonical and canonical splice sites: a novel mutation at the rare noncanonical splice-donor cut site (IVS4+1A>G) of SEDL causes variable splicing isoforms in X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Feng; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jun; Liu, Yun; Feng, Guoyin; Fang, Wenli; Chang, Hongfen; Xie, Jiang; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Tingyu; He, Lin

    2009-01-01

    X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda can be caused by mutations in the SEDL gene. This study describes an interesting novel mutation (IVS4+1A>G) located exactly at the rare noncanonical AT–AC consensus splicing donor point of SEDL, which regained the canonical GT–AG consensus splicing junction in addition to several other rarer noncanonical splice patterns. The mutation activated several cryptic splice sites and generated the production of seven erroneous splicing isoforms, which we confirmed by sequencing of RT-PCR products and resequencing of cDNA clones. All the practical splice donors/acceptors were further assessed using FSPLICE 1.0 and SPL(M) Platforms to predict potential splice sites in genomic DNA. Subsequently, the expression levels of SEDL among the affected patients, carriers and controls were estimated using real-time quantitative PCR. Expression analyses showed that the expression levels of SEDL in both patients and carriers were decreased. Taken together, these results illustrated how disruption of the AT donor site in a rare AT–AC intron, leading to a canonical GT donor site, resulted in a multitude of aberrant transcripts, thus impairing exon definition. The unexpected splicing patterns resulting from the special mutation provide additional challenges and opportunities for understanding splicing mechanisms and specificity. PMID:19002213

  13. Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis: A Review of Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingjiang; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jushi; Hu, Songfeng; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent chronic joint disease, increases in prevalence with age, and affects majority of individuals over the age of 65 and is a leading musculoskeletal cause of impaired mobility in the elderly. Because the precise molecular mechanisms which are involved in the degradation of cartilage matrix and development of OA are poorly understood and there are currently no effective interventions to decelerate the progression of OA or retard the irreversible degradation of cartilage except for total joint replacement surgery. In this paper, the important molecular mechanisms related to OA pathogenesis will be summarized and new insights into potential molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of OA will be provided. PMID:25311420

  14. Environmental predators as models for bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilbi, Hubert; Weber, Stefan S; Ragaz, Curdin; Nyfeler, Yves; Urwyler, Simon

    2007-03-01

    Environmental bacteria are constantly threatened by bacterivorous predators such as free-living protozoa and nematodes. In the course of their coevolution with environmental predators, some bacteria developed sophisticated defence mechanisms, including the secretion of toxins, or the capacity to avoid lysosomal killing and to replicate intracellularly within protozoa. To analyse the interactions with bacterial pathogens on a molecular, cellular or organismic level, protozoa and other non-mammalian hosts are increasingly used. These include amoebae, as well as genetically tractable hosts, such as the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Using these hosts, the virulence mechanisms of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria such as Legionella, Mycobacterium, Pseudomonas or Vibrio were found to be not only relevant for the interactions of the bacteria with protozoa, nematodes and insect phagocytes, but also with mammalian hosts including humans. Thus, non-mammalian model hosts provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of environmental bacteria. PMID:17298357

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae: virulence factors, pathogenesis, and vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    AlonsoDeVelasco, E; Verheul, A F; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1995-01-01

    Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are close to being licensed, a more profound knowledge of the virulence factors responsible for the morbidity and mortality caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is necessary. This review deals with the major structures of pneumococci involved in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease and their interference with the defense mechanisms of the host. It is well known that protection against S. pneumoniae is the result of phagocytosis of invading pathogens. For this process, complement and anticapsular polysaccharide antibodies are required. Besides, relatively recent experimental data suggest that protection is also mediated by the removal of disintegrating pneumococci and their degradation products (cell wall, pneumolysin). These structures seem to be major contributors to illness and death caused by pneumococci. An effective conjugate vaccine should therefore preferably include the capsular polysaccharide and at least one of these inflammatory factors. PMID:8531887

  16. Hormones and pathogenesis of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fernando M; Bloise, Enrrico; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tânia M

    2016-07-01

    The role of ovarian steroid hormones in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids is supported by epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence. Estradiol and progesterone induce mature leiomyoma cells to release mitogenic stimuli to adjacent immature cells, thereby providing uterine leiomyoma with undifferentiated cells that are likely to support tumor growth. Progesterone action is required for the complete development and proliferation of leiomyoma cells, while estradiol predominantly increases tissue sensitivity to progesterone by increasing the availability of progesterone receptors (PRs). The selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene and the selective PR modulators (SPRMs) mifepristone, asoprisnil, and ulipristal acetate have been shown in clinical trials to inhibit fibroid growth. The role of sex steroids is critical for leiomyoma development and maintenance, but a number of autocrine and paracrine messengers are involved in this process; hence, numerous pathways remain to be explored in therapeutic innovations for treating this common disease. PMID:26725037

  17. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  18. Advances in the Pathogenesis of Adhesion Development

    PubMed Central

    Awonuga, Awoniyi O.; Belotte, Jimmy; Abuanzeh, Suleiman; Fletcher, Nicole M.; Diamond, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been increasing recognition that pathogenesis of adhesion development includes significant contributions of hypoxia induced at the site of surgery, the resulting oxidative stress, and the subsequent free radical production. Mitochondrial dysfunction generated by surgically induced tissue hypoxia and inflammation can lead to the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase which when optimal have the potential to abrogate mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, preventing the cascade of events leading to the development of adhesions in injured peritoneum. There is a significant cross talk between the several processes leading to whether or not adhesions would eventually develop. Several of these processes present avenues for the development of measures that can help in abrogating adhesion formation or reformation after intraabdominal surgery. PMID:24520085

  19. Roadblocks to translational challenges on viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Steven; Drosten, Christian; Picker, Louis; Subbarao, Kanta; Suzich, Joann

    2013-01-01

    Distinct roadblocks prevent translating basic findings in viral pathogenesis into therapies and implementing potential solutions in the clinic. An ongoing partnership between the Volkswagen Foundation and Nature Medicine resulted in an interactive meeting in 2012, as part of the "Herrenhausen Symposia" series. Current challenges for various fields of viral research were recognized and discussed with a goal in mind--to identify solutions and propose an agenda to address the translational barriers. Here, some of the researchers who participated at the meeting provide a concise outlook at the most pressing unmet research and clinical needs, identifying these key obstacles is a necessary step towards the prevention and cure of human viral diseases. PMID:23296014

  20. [Traction maculopathies--pathogenesis and diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Wylegała, Edward; Woyna-Orlewicz, Anna; Piłat, Jarosław; Teper, Sławomir; Ludyga, Aneta

    2006-01-01

    Traction maculopathies are a group of age-related degenerative diseases characterized by pathology of vitreomacular interface including idiopathic epimacular membranes, vitreomacular traction syndrome and idiopathic macular hole. The disorders develop due to mechanical forces caused by focal condensation or incomplete detachement of vitreous and shrinkage of pathological membranes. The forces can be tangential to retinal surface in epiretinal membranes, anterior-posterior in vitreomacular traction syndrome and oblique (trampoline) in idiopathic macular hole. Authors discuss pathogenesis and diagnostics of traction maculopathies with use of optical coherence tomography and microperimetry, based on current literature. This work presents also idiopathic macular hole classification with use of optical coherence tomography images compared with biomicroscopic classification by Gass.

  1. Current frontiers in systemic sclerosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ciechomska, Marzena; van Laar, Jacob; O'Reilly, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterised by vascular dysfunction, impaired angiogenesis, inflammation and fibrosis. There is no currently accepted disease-modifying treatment with only autologous stem cell transplant showing clinically meaningful benefit. The lack of treatment options reflects our lack of understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms occurring in the disease. Recent investigations have begun to decipher the molecular pathways underpinning the different aspects of the disease and may provide a rational clinical target(s). Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of the disease is important in understanding systemic sclerosis treatment. The aim of this review was to examine the current thinking in SSc pathogenesis and will offer novel areas for research which may yield novel therapeutics.

  2. The Pathogenesis of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galton, D. A. G.

    1966-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was examined in a series of 88 cases observed during a 15-year period. In untreated cases the trend of the absolute lymphocyte counts followed two main patterns. In the type I trend, the counts rose throughout the observation period; in the type II trend, the tendency to rise ceased and the counts stabilized above and below a mean value, the stationary trend being maintained for months or years. The type II trend was associated with relatively benign disease. The development of lymphocytosis was correlated with the progression of lymphadenopathy. It is suggested that lymphocytosis may result from the physiological process of recirculation and that the accumulation of lymphocytes may result from the proliferation of a single slightly abnormal cell-line. The abnormal cells might survive an unusually long time because they are unable to respond to stimuli which cause normal lymphocytes to transform. PMID:4952384

  3. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans.

  4. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans. PMID:27012512

  5. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Novakova, Jana; Slaby, Ondrej; Vyzula, Rostislav; Michalek, Jaroslav

    2009-08-14

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  6. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Michael; Grant, Ashley; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-04-01

    The etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), Machupo virus (MACV) is reported to have a mortality rate of 25-35%. First identified in 1959, BHF was the cause of a localized outbreak in San Joaquin until rodent population controls were implemented in 1964. The rodent Calomys collosus was identified as the primary vector and reservoir for the virus. Multiple animal models were considered during the 1970s with the most human-like disease identified in Rhesus macaques but minimal characterization of the pathogenesis has been published since. A reemergence of reported BHF cases has been reported in recent years, which necessitates the further study and development of a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks.

  7. Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael; Grant, Ashley; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), Machupo virus (MACV) is reported to have a mortality rate of 25 to 35%. First identified in 1959, BHF was the cause of a localized outbreak in San Joaquin until rodent population controls were implemented in 1964. The rodent Calomys collosus was identified as the primary vector and reservoir for the virus. Multiple animal models were considered during the 1970’s with the most human-like disease identified in Rhesus macaques but minimal characterization of the pathogenesis has been published since. A reemergence of reported BHF cases has been reported in recent years, which necessitates the further study and development of a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24636947

  8. The Pathogenesis and Immunobiology of Mousepox.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Luis J

    2016-01-01

    Ectromelia virus is a mouse-specific orthopoxvirus that, following footpad infection or natural transmission, causes mousepox in most strains of mice, while a few strains, such as C57BL/6, are resistant to the disease but not to the infection. Mousepox is an acute, systemic, highly lethal disease of remarkable semblance to smallpox, caused by the human-specific variola virus. Starting in 1929 with its discovery by Marchal, work with ECTV has provided essential information for our current understanding on how viruses spread lympho-hematogenously, the genetic control of antiviral resistance, the role of different components of the innate and adaptive immune system in the control of primary and secondary infections with acute viruses, and how the mechanisms of immune evasion deployed by the virus affect virulence in vivo. Here, I review the literature on the pathogenesis and immunobiology of ECTV infection in vivo. PMID:26791861

  9. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment of Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heinz; Henninger, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common cause of chronic liver disease and HFE genotyping allows decisive and non-invasive diagnosis. Molecular and clinical genetic studies have led to the identification of genes other than HFE in patients with inherited diseases associated with increased hepatic iron storage that can cause hemochromatosis, which adds complexity to a diagnostic approach to patients with suspected hemochromatosis. Despite major advances in genetics, hepatic iron quantification by non-invasive methods therefore remains the key to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Although associated with homozygosity for the C282Y polymorphism in the HFE gene in >80% of patients, hemochromatosis is a complex genetic disease with strong environmental disease modifiers. Testing for mutations in the non-HFE hemochromatosis genes transferrin receptor 2, hemojuvelin, HAMP and SLC40A1 is complex, costly and time-consuming. Demonstration of hepatic iron overload by liver biopsy or MRI is therefore required before such complex tests are carried out. The pathogenesis of chronic liver disease in hemochromatosis is mainly attributed to the redox potential of tissue iron, and only the more recent studies have focused on the toxic properties of circulating iron. Considering the fact that an increased saturation of transferrin and high iron in plasma are the hallmark of all hemochromatosis forms, an alternative view would be that toxic iron in the circulation is involved in the pathogenesis of hemochromatosis. Recent studies have shown an increased concentration of redox-active iron in plasma in patients with increased transferrin saturation. This finding supports the hypothesis that tissue iron may be the 'smoking gun' of iron-induced organ damage. Taken together, caring for patients with suspected or established hemochromatosis still remains a challenge, where understanding the genetics, biochemistry and cell biology of hemochromatosis will aid better diagnosis and treatment of affected

  10. Henipavirus Pathogenesis in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Carmical, J. Russ; Prusak, Deborah; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are deadly zoonotic viruses for which no vaccines or therapeutics are licensed for human use. Henipavirus infection causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis. Although the exact route of transmission in human is unknown, epidemiological studies and in vivo studies suggest that the respiratory tract is important for virus replication. However, the target cells in the respiratory tract are unknown, as are the mechanisms by which henipaviruses can cause disease. In this study, we characterized henipavirus pathogenesis using primary cells derived from the human respiratory tract. The growth kinetics of NiV-Malaysia, NiV-Bangladesh, and HeV were determined in bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC). In addition, host responses to infection were assessed by gene expression analysis and immunoassays. Viruses replicated efficiently in both cell types and induced large syncytia. The host response to henipavirus infection in NHBE and SAEC highlighted a difference in the inflammatory response between HeV and NiV strains as well as intrinsic differences in the ability to mount an inflammatory response between NHBE and SAEC. These responses were highest during HeV infection in SAEC, as characterized by the levels of key cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and colony-stimulating factors) responsible for immune cell recruitment. Finally, we identified virus strain-dependent variability in type I interferon antagonism in NHBE and SAEC: NiV-Malaysia counteracted this pathway more efficiently than NiV-Bangladesh and HeV. These results provide crucial new information in the understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis in the human respiratory tract at an early stage of infection. PMID:23302882

  11. The molecular basis of leptospiral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gerald L

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in leptospirosis are poorly defined. Recent developments in the application of genetic tools in the study of Leptospira have advanced our understanding by allowing the assessment of mutants in animal models. As a result, a small number of essential virulence factors have been identified, though most do not have a clearly defined function. Significant advances have also been made in the in vitro characterization of leptospiral interaction with host structures, including extracellular matrix proteins (such as laminin, elastin, fibronectin, collagens), proteins related to hemostasis (fibrinogen, plasmin), and soluble mediators of complement resistance (factor H, C4b-binding protein), although none of these in vitro findings has been translated to the host animal. Binding to host structures may permit colonization of the host, prevention of blood clotting may contribute to hemorrhage, while interaction with complement resistance mediators may contribute to survival in serum. While not a classical intracellular pathogen, the interaction of leptospires and phagocytic cells appears complex, with bacteria surviving uptake and promoting apoptosis; mutants relating to these processes (such as cell invasion and oxidative stress resistance) are attenuated in vivo. Another feature of leptospiral biology is the high degree of functional redundancy and the surprising lack of attenuation of mutants in what appear to be certain virulence factors, such as LipL32 and LigB. While many advances have been made, there remains a lack of understanding of how Leptospira causes tissue pathology. It is likely that leptospires have many novel pathogenesis mechanisms that are yet to be identified.

  12. The molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have greatly illuminated the genomic landscape of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and the pace of discovery is accelerating. The most common mutations found in MDS occur in genes involved in RNA splicing (including SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, and ZRSR2) and epigenetic modification (including TET2, ASXL1, and DNMT3A). The identification of spliceosome mutations in approximately half of all patients with MDS implicates abnormalities of RNA splicing, a pathway not previously known as a target for mutation, in the MDS pathogenesis. Several regulators of signal transduction (NRAS, JAK2) and transcription factors (RUNX1, TP53) are also frequently mutated in MDS. The complex patterns of associations between gene mutations identified have revealed epistatic interactions between spliceosome components and epigenetic modifiers in MDS. The cytogenetic abnormalities found in MDS are characterized by the loss of genetic material, whereas translocations are rare. The cytogenetic deletion maps of MDS (e.g., 5q-, 7q-, 20q-) provide us with circumstantial evidence for the presence of tumor suppressor genes. It is now recognized that haploinsufficiency (a gene dosage effect) resulting from gene deletions or inactivating mutations is an important disease mechanism in MDS. Haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 plays a critical role in the development of anemia in the 5q- syndrome, and haploinsufficiency of CUX1 is important in some patients with MDS and AML with complete or partial loss of chromosome 7. Gene expression profiling has identified key deregulated genes and pathways and new prognostic gene signatures in MDS. Recent advances in the molecular pathogenesis of MDS are leading to new biological, clinical, and therapeutic insights.

  13. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease. PMID:15868023

  14. The molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have greatly illuminated the genomic landscape of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and the pace of discovery is accelerating. The most common mutations found in MDS occur in genes involved in RNA splicing (including SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, and ZRSR2) and epigenetic modification (including TET2, ASXL1, and DNMT3A). The identification of spliceosome mutations in approximately half of all patients with MDS implicates abnormalities of RNA splicing, a pathway not previously known as a target for mutation, in the MDS pathogenesis. Several regulators of signal transduction (NRAS, JAK2) and transcription factors (RUNX1, TP53) are also frequently mutated in MDS. The complex patterns of associations between gene mutations identified have revealed epistatic interactions between spliceosome components and epigenetic modifiers in MDS. The cytogenetic abnormalities found in MDS are characterized by the loss of genetic material, whereas translocations are rare. The cytogenetic deletion maps of MDS (e.g., 5q-, 7q-, 20q-) provide us with circumstantial evidence for the presence of tumor suppressor genes. It is now recognized that haploinsufficiency (a gene dosage effect) resulting from gene deletions or inactivating mutations is an important disease mechanism in MDS. Haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 plays a critical role in the development of anemia in the 5q- syndrome, and haploinsufficiency of CUX1 is important in some patients with MDS and AML with complete or partial loss of chromosome 7. Gene expression profiling has identified key deregulated genes and pathways and new prognostic gene signatures in MDS. Recent advances in the molecular pathogenesis of MDS are leading to new biological, clinical, and therapeutic insights. PMID:25645650

  15. Bovine viral diarrhoea: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Hill, Fraser I; Reichel, Michael P; Brownlie, Joe

    2014-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is the most prevalent infectious disease of cattle. It causes financial losses from a variety of clinical manifestations and is the subject of a number of mitigation and eradication schemes around the world. The pathogenesis of BVDV infection is complex, with infection pre- and post-gestation leading to different outcomes. Infection of the dam during gestation results in fetal infection, which may lead to embryonic death, teratogenic effects or the birth of persistently infected (PI) calves. PI animals shed BVDV in their excretions and secretions throughout life and are the primary route of transmission of the virus. These animals can usually be readily detected by virus or viral antigen detection assays (RT-PCR, ELISA), except in the immediate post-natal period where colostral antibodies may mask virus presence. PI calves in utero (the 'Trojan cow' scenario) currently defy detection with available diagnostic tests, although dams carrying PI calves have been shown to have higher antibody levels than seropositive cows carrying non-PI calves. Acute infection with BVDV results in transient viraemia prior to seroconversion and can lead to reproductive dysfunction and immunosuppression leading to an increased incidence of secondary disease. Antibody assays readily detect virus exposure at the individual level and can also be used in pooled samples (serum and milk) to determine herd exposure or immunity. Diagnostic tests can be used to diagnose clinical cases, establish disease prevalence in groups and detect apparently normal but persistently infected animals. This review outlines the pathogenesis and pathology of BVD viral infection and uses this knowledge to select the best diagnostic tests for clinical diagnosis, monitoring, control and eradication efforts. Test methods, types of samples and problems areas of BVDV diagnosis are discussed.

  16. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, John R

    2005-04-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease.

  17. Type 1 diabetes pathogenesis – Prevention???

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, C. S. Muralidhara; Srikanta, S.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes is multi-faceted, including, autoimmunity, genetics and environment. Autoimmunity directed against pancreatic islet cells results in slowly progressive selective beta-cell destruction (“Primary autoimmune insulitis”), culminating over years in clinically manifested insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Circulating serum autoantibodies directed against the endocrine cells of the islets of Langerhans (Islet cell autoantibodies - ICAb) are an important hallmark of this disease. Assays for islet cell autoantibodies have facilitated the investigation and understanding of several facets in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Their applications have extended into clinical practice and have opened new avenues for early preclinical prediction and preventive prophylaxis in IDDM/type 1 DM. Recently, surprisingly, differences in insulin content between T1DM islets, as well as, ‘patchy’ or ‘lobular’ destruction of islets have been described. These unique pathobiological phenomena, suggest that beta cell destruction may not always be inexorable and inevitably complete/total, and thus raise hopes for possible therapeutic interruption of beta cell autoimmunity – destruction and cure of type 1 diabetes. “Recurrent or secondary autoimmune insulitis” refers to the rapid reappearance of islet cell autoantibodies post pancreas transplant, and selective islet beta cell destruction in the grafted pancreas [never forgetting or “anamnestic” beta cell destructive memory], in the absence of any graft pancreas rejection [monozygotic twin to twin transplantation]. The one definite environmental factor is congenital rubella, because of which a subset of children subsequently develop type 1 diabetes. The putative predisposing factors are viruses, gluten and cow's milk. The putative protective factors include gut flora, helminths, viral infections, and Vitamin D. Prevention of T1DM can include: Primary prevention strategies before

  18. Pathogenesis of Nervous and Mental Diseases in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Ernest, Ed.

    Major pathogenic sources of mental diseases in children and a classification of these diseases are considered. Contributions include the following: pathogenesis of mental diseases in childhood by Ernest Harms, organ inferiority and psychiatric disorders by Bernard Shulman and Howard Klapman, pathogenesis of neurological disorders by George Gold,…

  19. Causes and pathogenesis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fogo, Agnes B.

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) describes both a common lesion in progressive kidney disease, and a disease characterized by marked proteinuria and podocyte injury. The initial injuries vary widely. Monogenetic forms of FSGS are largely due to alterations in structural genes of the podocyte, many of which result in early onset of disease. Genetic risk alleles in apolipoprotein L1 are especially prevalent in African Americans, and are linked not only to adult-onset FSGS but also to progression of some other kidney diseases. The recurrence of FSGS in some transplant recipients whose end-stage renal disease was caused by FSGS points to circulating factors in disease pathogenesis, which remain incompletely understood. In addition, infection, drug use, and secondary maladaptive responses after loss of nephrons from any cause may also cause FSGS. Varying phenotypes of the sclerosis are also manifest, with varying prognosis. The so-called tip lesion has the best prognosis, whereas the collapsing type of FSGS has the worst prognosis. New insights into glomerular cell injury response and repair may pave the way for possible therapeutic strategies. PMID:25447132

  20. Pathogenesis of Multiple Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe critical illness syndrome that arises from infectious insults. While the host immune system is generally beneficial, an overshooting and unregulated immune response can cause serious organ tissue injury. During sepsis, systemic hypotension, disturbed perfusion of the microcirculation, and direct tissue-toxicity caused by inflammatory immune reaction can occur and contribute to organ failure. The failure of two or more vital organ systems is termed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and resembles a very critical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Importantly, no specific treatment strategy exists to efficiently prevent the development of MODS during sepsis. In this review, we aim to identify the relevant molecular immunological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MODS during sepsis. We believe that a detailed understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of new treatment approaches for septic patients. In particular, knowledge of the endogenous regulators keeping the balance between necessary immune system activation to combat infections and prevention of host tissue damage would greatly improve the chances for the development of effective interventions.

  1. Premature ovarian insufficiency: Pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Anna J.

    2015-01-01

    The term premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) describes a continuum of declining ovarian function in a young woman, resulting in an earlier than average menopause. It is a term that reflects the variable nature of the condition and is substantially less emotive than the formerly used “premature ovarian failure” which signaled a single event in time. Contrary to the decline in the age of menarche seen over the last 3-4 decades there has been no similar change in the age of menopause. In developed nations, the average age for cessation of menstrual cycles is 50-52 years. The age is younger among women from developing nations. Much has been written about POI despite a lack of good data on the incidence of this condition. It is believed that 1% of women under the age of 40 years and 0.1% under the age of 30 years will develop POI. Research is increasingly providing information about the pathogenesis and treatments are being developed to better preserve ovarian function during cancer treatment and to improve fertility options. This narrative review summarizes the current literature to provide an approach to best practice management of POI. PMID:26903753

  2. Molecular pathogenesis of sporadic duodenal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Achille, A.; Baron, A.; Zamboni, G.; Orlandini, S.; Bogina, G.; Bassi, C.; Iacono, C.; Scarpa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Whether duodenal adenocarcinoma should be considered as a gastrointestinal or as a peripancreatic cancer is a matter of debate, as is the opportunity and type of treatment. We investigated 12 such cancers for the genetic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal malignancies, including (a) those occurring in common-type cancers - allelic losses at chromosomes 3p, 5q, 17p and 18q, and Ki-ras and p53 alterations; and (b) those characteristic of mutator-phenotype cancers - microsatellite instability and TGF-betaRII gene mutations. We found Ki-ras and p53 mutations in five (42%) and eight cancers (67%), respectively; chromosome 3p, 5q, 17p and 18q allelic losses in two of nine (22%), six of ten (60%), six of nine (67%) and three of ten (30%) informative cancers, respectively. Finally, three cancers (25%) showed widespread microsatellite instability and two of them had a TGF-betaRII gene mutation. Our data suggest that duodenal cancers may arise from either of the two known pathogenetic molecular pathways of gastric and colorectal cancers. The majority of our cases were highly aggressive cancers with frequent chromosomal changes and p53 mutations as observed in the common-type gastrointestinal malignancies, while widespread subtle alterations characteristic of mutator-phenotype cancers occurred in a minority, which also showed a favourable long-term outcome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9514055

  3. Adult zebrafish model for pneumococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Saralahti, Anni; Piippo, Hannaleena; Parikka, Mataleena; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Rämet, Mika; Rounioja, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a leading cause of community acquired pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. Due to incomplete understanding of the host and bacterial factors contributing to these diseases optimal treatment and prevention methods are lacking. In the present study we examined whether the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) can be used to investigate the pathophysiology of pneumococcal diseases. Here we show that both intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections of the pneumococcal strain TIGR4 cause a fulminant, dose-dependent infection in adult zebrafish, while isogenic mutant bacteria lacking the polysaccharide capsule, autolysin, or pneumolysin are attenuated in the model. Infection through the intraperitoneal route is characterized by rapid expansion of pneumococci in the bloodstream, followed by penetration of the blood-brain barrier and progression to meningitis. Using Rag1 mutant zebrafish, which are devoid of somatic recombination and thus lack adaptive immune responses, we show that clearance of pneumococci in adult zebrafish depends mainly on innate immune responses. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the adult zebrafish can be used as a model for a pneumococcal infection, and that it can be used to study both host and bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis. However, our results do not support the use of the zebrafish in studies on the role of adaptive immunity in pneumococcal disease or in the development of new pneumococcal vaccines.

  4. Pathogenesis of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Smits, Saskia L; Haagmans, Bart L

    2015-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (CoVs) mostly cause a common cold that is mild and self-limiting. Zoonotic transmission of CoVs such as the recently identified Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV, on the other hand, may be associated with severe lower respiratory tract infection. This article reviews the clinical and pathological data available on MERS and compares it to SARS. Most importantly, chest radiographs and imaging results of patients with MERS show features that resemble the findings of organizing pneumonia, different from the lesions in SARS patients, which show fibrocellular intra-alveolar organization with a bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia-like pattern. These findings are in line with differences in the induction of cytopathological changes, induction of host gene responses and sensitivity to the antiviral effect of interferons in vitro when comparing both MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. The challenge will be to translate these findings into an integrated picture of MERS pathogenesis in humans and to develop intervention strategies that will eventually allow the effective control of this newly emerging infectious disease.

  5. Celiac disease: prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan B R

    2012-11-14

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either "typical" or "atypical". In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  6. Recent advances in understanding ichthyosis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marukian, Nareh V.; Choate, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    The ichthyoses, also known as disorders of keratinization (DOK), encompass a heterogeneous group of skin diseases linked by the common finding of abnormal barrier function, which initiates a default compensatory pathway of hyperproliferation, resulting in the characteristic clinical manifestation of localized and/or generalized scaling. Additional cutaneous findings frequently seen in ichthyoses include generalized xerosis, erythroderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, hypohydrosis, and recurrent infections. In 2009, the Ichthyosis Consensus Conference established a classification consensus for DOK based on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and mode of inheritance. This nomenclature system divides DOK into two main groups: nonsyndromic forms, with clinical findings limited to the skin, and syndromic forms, with involvement of additional organ systems. Advances in next-generation sequencing technology have allowed for more rapid and cost-effective genetic analysis, leading to the identification of novel, rare mutations that cause DOK, many of which represent phenotypic expansion. This review focuses on new findings in syndromic and nonsyndromic ichthyoses, with emphasis on novel genetic discoveries that provide insight into disease pathogenesis. PMID:27408699

  7. Recent advances in understanding ichthyosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marukian, Nareh V; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    The ichthyoses, also known as disorders of keratinization (DOK), encompass a heterogeneous group of skin diseases linked by the common finding of abnormal barrier function, which initiates a default compensatory pathway of hyperproliferation, resulting in the characteristic clinical manifestation of localized and/or generalized scaling. Additional cutaneous findings frequently seen in ichthyoses include generalized xerosis, erythroderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, hypohydrosis, and recurrent infections. In 2009, the Ichthyosis Consensus Conference established a classification consensus for DOK based on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and mode of inheritance. This nomenclature system divides DOK into two main groups: nonsyndromic forms, with clinical findings limited to the skin, and syndromic forms, with involvement of additional organ systems. Advances in next-generation sequencing technology have allowed for more rapid and cost-effective genetic analysis, leading to the identification of novel, rare mutations that cause DOK, many of which represent phenotypic expansion. This review focuses on new findings in syndromic and nonsyndromic ichthyoses, with emphasis on novel genetic discoveries that provide insight into disease pathogenesis. PMID:27408699

  8. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Children: Pathogenesis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder in children that is characterized by persistent fever, splenomegaly with cytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Increased levels of various cytokines and soluble interleukin-2 receptor are biological markers of HLH. HLH can be classified into two major forms: primary and secondary. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), a type of primary HLH, is an autosomal recessive disorder that typically occurs in infancy and can be classified into five different subtypes (FHL types 1–5). In Japan, >80% of patients with FHL have either PRF1 (FHL type 2) or UNC13D (FHL type 3) defects. FHL is considered to be a disorder of T-cell function because the activity of NK cells or cytotoxic T lymphocytes as target cells is usually impaired. Moreover, Epstein–Barr virus-associated HLH (EBV-HLH) is considered a major subtype of secondary HLH. Any genetic background could have an effect on the pathogenesis of secondary HLH because EBV-HLH is considered to be particularly prevalent in Asian countries. For primary HLH, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only accepted curative therapy, although cord blood transplantation with a reduced-conditioning regimen has been used with superior outcomes. For secondary HLH, including EBV-HLH, immunochemotherapy based on the HLH-2004 protocol has been used. In the near future, the entire mechanism of HLH should be clarified to establish less toxic therapies, including cell therapy and gene targeting therapy. PMID:27242976

  9. The hepatitis delta virus: Replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sureau, Camille; Negro, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective virus and a satellite of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Its RNA genome is unique among animal viruses, but it shares common features with some plant viroids, including a replication mechanism that uses a host RNA polymerase. In infected cells, HDV genome replication and formation of a nucleocapsid-like ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are independent of HBV. But the RNP cannot exit, and therefore propagate, in the absence of HBV, as the latter supplies the propagation mechanism, from coating the HDV RNP with the HBV envelope proteins for cell egress to delivery of the HDV virions to the human hepatocyte target. HDV is therefore an obligate satellite of HBV; it infects humans either concomitantly with HBV or after HBV infection. HDV affects an estimated 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide, and the clinical significance of HDV infection is more severe forms of viral hepatitis--acute or chronic--, and a higher risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison to HBV monoinfection. This review covers molecular aspects of HDV replication cycle, including its interaction with the helper HBV and the pathogenesis of infection in humans. PMID:27084031

  10. Naegleria fowleri: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America.

  11. Naegleria fowleri: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  12. ASTROCYTES: EMERGING STARS IN LEUKODYSTROPHY PATHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Aloisi, Francesca; Ambrosini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant glial cell population in the central nervous system (CNS). Once considered only passive scaffolding elements, astrocytes are now recognised as cells playing essential roles in CNS development and function. They control extracellular water and ion homeostasis, provide substrates for energy metabolism, and regulate neurogenesis, myelination and synaptic transmission. Due to these multiple activities astrocytes have been implicated in almost all brain pathologies, contributing to various aspects of disease initiation, progression and resolution. Evidence is emerging that astrocyte dysfunction can be the direct cause of neurodegeneration, as shown in Alexander’s disease where myelin degeneration is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the astrocyte-specific cytoskeleton protein glial fibrillary acidic protein. Recent studies point to a primary role for astrocytes in the pathogenesis of other genetic leukodystrophies such as megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts and vanishing white matter disease. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiological role of astrocytes focusing on their contribution to the development of the above mentioned leukodystrophies and on new perspectives for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:24340223

  13. Naegleria fowleri: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  14. Histoplasma capsulatum surmounts obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Garfoot, Andrew L; Rappleye, Chad A

    2016-02-01

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and disseminated disease, even in immunocompetent hosts. In contrast to opportunistic pathogens, which are readily controlled by phagocytic cells, H. capsulatum yeasts are able to infect macrophages, survive antimicrobial defenses, and proliferate as an intracellular pathogen. In this review, we discuss some of the molecular mechanisms that enable H. capsulatum yeasts to overcome obstacles to intracellular pathogenesis. H. capsulatum yeasts gain refuge from extracellular obstacles such as antimicrobial lung surfactant proteins by engaging the β-integrin family of phagocytic receptors to promote entry into macrophages. In addition, H. capsulatum yeasts conceal immunostimulatory β-glucans to avoid triggering signaling receptors such as the β-glucan receptor Dectin-1. H. capsulatum yeasts counteract phagocyte-produced reactive oxygen species by expression of oxidative stress defense enzymes including an extracellular superoxide dismutase and an extracellular catalase. Within the phagosome, H. capsulatum yeasts block phagosome acidification, acquire essential metals such as iron and zinc, and utilize de novo biosynthesis pathways to overcome nutritional limitations. These mechanisms explain how H. capsulatum yeasts avoid and negate macrophage defense strategies and establish a hospitable intracellular niche, making H. capsulatum a successful intracellular pathogen of macrophages. PMID:26235362

  15. Pulmonary fibrosis: pathogenesis, etiology and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, MS; Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and architectural remodeling of tissues can severely disrupt lung function, often with fatal consequences. The etiology of pulmonary fibrotic diseases is varied, with an array of triggers including allergens, chemicals, radiation and environmental particles. However, the cause of one of the most common pulmonary fibrotic conditions, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is still unclear. This review examines common mechanisms of pulmonary wound-healing responses following lung injury, and highlights the pathogenesis of some of the most widespread pulmonary fibrotic diseases. A three phase model of wound repair is reviewed that includes; (1) injury; (2) inflammation; and (3) repair. In most pulmonary fibrotic conditions dysregulation at one or more of these phases has been reported. Chronic inflammation can lead to an imbalance in the production of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and disrupt cellular recruitment. These changes coupled with excessive pro-fibrotic IL-13 and/or TGFβ1 production can turn a well-controlled healing response into a pathogenic fibrotic response. Endogenous regulatory mechanisms are discussed including novel areas of therapeutic intervention. Restoring homeostasis to these dysregulated healing responses, or simply neutralizing the key pro-fibrotic mediators may prevent or slow the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19129758

  16. Pathogenesis of central nervous system tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Be, Nicholas A; Kim, Kwang Sik; Bishai, William R; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-03-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) tuberculosis is a serious, often fatal form of tuberculosis, predominantly affecting young children. HIV co-infection and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are making the diagnosis and treatment of CNS tuberculosis more complicated. Current concepts about the pathogenesis of CNS tuberculosis are based on necropsy studies done in 1933, which suggest that tuberculous meningitis develops subsequent to the rupture into the cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculomas that form around M. tuberculosis deposited in the brain parenchyma and meninges during the initial hematogenous dissemination. Foreign antigens including pathogens deposited in the brain parenchyma are not detected efficiently by the immune system in the CNS. These experimental data may explain the clinical observation of delayed "paradoxical" enlargement or development of intracranial tuberculomas, observed several weeks to months in patients receiving anti-tuberculous therapy. Since severe sequelae are observed even when CNS tuberculosis is treated effectively, it is important to develop preventive strategies for this disease. Recent data utilizing animal models suggests that, in addition to host factors, M. tuberculosis genes and their encoded proteins may contribute specifically to bacterial invasion and survival in the CNS. Understanding how these microbial factors affect CNS disease would be essential to developing such preventive strategies.

  17. Raynaud's phenomenon: from molecular pathogenesis to therapy.

    PubMed

    Prete, Marcella; Fatone, Maria Celeste; Favoino, Elvira; Perosa, Federico

    2014-06-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is a well defined clinical syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of digital vasospasm triggered by exposure to physical/chemical or emotional stress. RP has been classified as primary or secondary, depending on whether it occurs as an isolated condition (pRP) or is associated to an underlying disease, mainly a connective tissue disease (CTD-RP). In both cases, it manifests with unique "triple" (pallor, cyanosis and erythema), or "double" color changes. pRP is usually a benign condition, while sRP can evolve and be complicated by acral digital ulcers and gangrene, which may require surgical treatment. The pathogenesis of RP has not yet been entirely clarified, nor is it known whether autoantibodies have a role in RP. Even so, recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology have highlighted novel potential therapeutic targets. The aim of this review is to discuss the etiology, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, recently disclosed pathogenic mechanisms underlying RP and their correlation with the available therapeutic options, focusing primarily on pRP and CTD-RP.

  18. Systemic sclerosis: from pathogenesis to targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Denton, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) leads to morbidity and mortality through a combination of inflammation, fibrosis and vascular damage leading to internal organ complications affecting the heart, lung, kidneys and bowel. More than half of those diagnosed ultimately die from the disease. Current treatments focus on broad spectrum immunosuppression or organ-based therapy for complication such as lung fibrosis, pulmonary or systemic hypertension. Targeting peptide mediators such as endothelin-1 have already led to licensed effective therapies for SSc vasculopathy. Outcomes are improving but as well as providing a major clinical challenge there are great opportunities for research translation that can be expected to improve understanding of the pathogenesis of SSc and also develop better and more targeted therapy. Key pathways and mediators can be identified within the skin and blood vessels and these are now being examined in early stage clinical trials. Promising results are emerging from targeting cytokine signalling, including IL-6, and from other immune-inflammatory therapies including lipid mediators such as LPA1. Other approaches to modulate TGFbeta and other profibrotic pathways also have potential although safety and toxicity remain to be determined. Since many profibrotic pathways have important physiological roles the assessment of safety and toxicity will be paramount. Nevertheless, advances in understanding the interplay between different pathological processes and progress in clinical trial design and patients stratification mean that targeted therapies are emerging and likely to be further developed and refined to have application in other important clinical contexts such as lung fibrosis.

  19. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  20. Celiac disease: Prevalence, diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gujral, Naiyana; Freeman, Hugh J; Thomson, Alan BR

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is one of the most common diseases, resulting from both environmental (gluten) and genetic factors [human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genes]. The prevalence of CD has been estimated to approximate 0.5%-1% in different parts of the world. However, the population with diabetes, autoimmune disorder or relatives of CD individuals have even higher risk for the development of CD, at least in part, because of shared HLA typing. Gliadin gains access to the basal surface of the epithelium, and interact directly with the immune system, via both trans- and para-cellular routes. From a diagnostic perspective, symptoms may be viewed as either “typical” or “atypical”. In both positive serological screening results suggestive of CD, should lead to small bowel biopsy followed by a favourable clinical and serological response to the gluten-free diet (GFD) to confirm the diagnosis. Positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody or anti-endomysial antibody during the clinical course helps to confirm the diagnosis of CD because of their over 99% specificities when small bowel villous atrophy is present on biopsy. Currently, the only treatment available for CD individuals is a strict life-long GFD. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of CD allows alternative future CD treatments to hydrolyse toxic gliadin peptide, prevent toxic gliadin peptide absorption, blockage of selective deamidation of specific glutamine residues by tissue, restore immune tolerance towards gluten, modulation of immune response to dietary gliadin, and restoration of intestinal architecture. PMID:23155333

  1. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060521

  2. Apoptosis in cancer: from pathogenesis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an ordered and orchestrated cellular process that occurs in physiological and pathological conditions. It is also one of the most studied topics among cell biologists. An understanding of the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is important as it plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In some, the problem is due to too much apoptosis, such as in the case of degenerative diseases while in others, too little apoptosis is the culprit. Cancer is one of the scenarios where too little apoptosis occurs, resulting in malignant cells that will not die. The mechanism of apoptosis is complex and involves many pathways. Defects can occur at any point along these pathways, leading to malignant transformation of the affected cells, tumour metastasis and resistance to anticancer drugs. Despite being the cause of problem, apoptosis plays an important role in the treatment of cancer as it is a popular target of many treatment strategies. The abundance of literature suggests that targeting apoptosis in cancer is feasible. However, many troubling questions arise with the use of new drugs or treatment strategies that are designed to enhance apoptosis and critical tests must be passed before they can be used safely in human subjects. PMID:21943236

  3. Nuclear receptors and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Polvani, Simone; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tempesti, Sara; Galli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease with a median overall survival time of 5 mo and the five years survival less than 5%, a rate essentially unchanged over the course of the years. A well defined progression model of accumulation of genetic alterations ranging from single point mutations to gross chromosomal abnormalities has been introduced to describe the origin of this disease. However, due to the its subtle nature and concurring events PDAC cure remains elusive. Nuclear receptors (NR) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily conserved ligand-regulated DNA-binding transcription factors functionally involved in important cellular functions ranging from regulation of metabolism, to growth and development. Given the nature of their ligands, NR are very tempting drug targets and their pharmacological modulation has been widely exploited for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. There are now clear evidences that both classical ligand-activated and orphan NR are involved in the pathogenesis of PDAC from its very early stages; nonetheless many aspects of their role are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight the striking connections that link peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, retinoic acid receptors, retinoid X receptor, androgen receptor, estrogen receptors and the orphan NR Nur, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II and the liver receptor homologue-1 receptor to PDAC development, connections that could lead to the identification of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:25232244

  4. Neisseria Prophage Repressor Implicated in Gonococcal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; Mcclure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the −10 and −35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:23876804

  5. Treatment and pathogenesis of acute hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Mushiyakh, Yelena; Dangaria, Harsh; Qavi, Shahbaz; Ali, Noorjahan; Pannone, John; Tompkins, David

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and various treatment modalities for acute hyperkalemia and presents a systematic approach to selecting a treatment strategy. Hyperkalemia, a life-threatening condition caused by extracellular potassium shift or decreased renal potassium excretion, usually presents with non-specific symptoms. Early recognition of moderate to severe hyperkalemia is vital in preventing fatal cardiac arrhythmias and muscle paralysis. Management of hyperkalemia includes the elimination of reversible causes (diet, medications), rapidly acting therapies that shift potassium into cells and block the cardiac membrane effects of hyperkalemia, and measures to facilitate removal of potassium from the body (saline diuresis, oral binding resins, and hemodialysis). Hyperkalemia with potassium level more than 6.5 mEq/L or EKG changes is a medical emergency and should be treated accordingly. Treatment should be started with calcium gluconate to stabilize cardiomyocyte membranes, followed by insulin injection, and b-agonists administration. Hemodialysis remains the most reliable method to remove potassium from the body and should be used in cases refractory to medical treatment. Prompt detection and proper treatment are crucial in preventing lethal outcomes. PMID:23882341

  6. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  7. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae: Emergence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lance E.; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT While significant protection from pneumococcal disease has been achieved by the use of polysaccharide and polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines, capsule-independent protection has been limited by serotype replacement along with disease caused by nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp). NESp strains compose approximately 3% to 19% of asymptomatic carriage isolates and harbor multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Surface proteins unique to NESp enhance colonization and virulence despite the lack of a capsule even though the capsule has been thought to be required for pneumococcal pathogenesis. Genes for pneumococcal surface proteins replace the capsular polysaccharide (cps) locus in some NESp isolates, and these proteins aid in pneumococcal colonization and otitis media (OM). NESp strains have been isolated from patients with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal disease, but noninvasive diseases, specifically, conjunctivitis (85%) and OM (8%), are of higher prevalence. Conjunctival strains are commonly of the so-called classical NESp lineages defined by multilocus sequence types (STs) ST344 and ST448, while sporadic NESp lineages such as ST1106 are more commonly isolated from patients with other diseases. Interestingly, sporadic lineages have significantly higher rates of recombination than classical lineages. Higher rates of recombination can lead to increased acquisition of antibiotic resistance and virulence factors, increasing the risk of disease and hindering treatment. NESp strains are a significant proportion of the pneumococcal population, can cause disease, and may be increasing in prevalence in the population due to effects on the pneumococcal niche caused by pneumococcal vaccines. Current vaccines are ineffective against NESp, and further research is necessary to develop vaccines effective against both encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci. PMID:27006456

  8. Pathogenesis of preeclampsia: a comprehensive model.

    PubMed

    van Beck, E; Peeters, L L

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this review was to provide a comprehensive and practical concept on the pathogenesis of preeclampsia on the basis of the currently available scientific evidence. A MEDLINE search was performed of English-language articles published between 1966 and 1997, supplemented with references cited in relevant research articles. Using our data sources, we developed a scheme describing the sequence of events between implantation and the time of manifest clinical disease characterized by generalized endothelial cell dysfunction. A yet unidentified toxic circulating factor released by the ischemic placenta, is held responsible for the impaired endothelial cell function. Particularly, epidemiological studies point to a concept in which immune maladaptation to the fetal allograft plays a key role in causing defective placentation leading to placental ischaemia. The incidence of preeclampsia in sisters and daughters of women who had had preeclampsia is raised. Disease states with vascular involvement, like chronic hypertension and diabetes mellites, are associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia. Recently subclinical abnormalities in hemostasis, metabolism and volume homeostasis have been described in patients with a history of preeclampsia. Placental ischemia secondary to defective placentation, a prerequisite for the development of preeclampsia, has a multifactorial origin consisting of three major components: immune maladaptation, genetic predisposition, and vascular mediated factors. Probably, a summation of these factors will determine whether a pregnant woman is to develop the syndrome. The recently described subclinical abnormalities in hemostasis, metabolism, and vascular function in patients with a history of preeclampsia might give the clinician the opportunity to reduce the recurrence risk by pharmacotherapeutic intervention. PMID:9560833

  9. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  10. Pathogenesis of noroviruses, emerging RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M

    2010-03-01

    Human noroviruses in the family Caliciviridae are a major cause of epidemic gastroenteritis. They are responsible for at least 95% of viral outbreaks and over 50% of all outbreaks worldwide. Transmission of these highly infectious plus-stranded RNA viruses occurs primarily through contaminated food or water, but also through person-to-person contact and exposure to fomites. Norovirus infections are typically acute and self-limited. However, disease can be much more severe and prolonged in infants, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Norovirus outbreaks frequently occur in semi-closed communities such as nursing homes, military settings, schools, hospitals, cruise ships, and disaster relief situations. Noroviruses are classified as Category B biodefense agents because they are highly contagious, extremely stable in the environment, resistant to common disinfectants, and associated with debilitating illness. The number of reported norovirus outbreaks has risen sharply since 2002 suggesting the emergence of more infectious strains. There has also been increased recognition that noroviruses are important causes of childhood hospitalization. Moreover, noroviruses have recently been associated with multiple clinical outcomes other than gastroenteritis. It is unclear whether these new observations are due to improved norovirus diagnostics or to the emergence of more virulent norovirus strains. Regardless, it is clear that human noroviruses cause considerable morbidity worldwide, have significant economic impact, and are clinically important emerging pathogens. Despite the impact of human norovirus-induced disease and the potential for emergence of highly virulent strains, the pathogenic features of infection are not well understood due to the lack of a cell culture system and previous lack of animal models. This review summarizes the current understanding of norovirus pathogenesis from the histological to the molecular level, including contributions from new model

  11. The pathogenesis of thrombosis in venous prostheses.

    PubMed

    Itoh, T; Shiba, E; Kambayashi, J; Watase, M; Kawasaki, T; Sakon, M; Mori, T

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the pathogenesis of thrombosis formation in synthetic venous grafts, the inferior vena cava of rabbits were replaced by woven Tetron (polyethylene terephtalate) grafts. Six animals were assigned as controls without medication (Group A), and 48 animals were randomly assigned to experimental groups as follows: ticlopidine hydrochloride (100 mg/kg/day) was administered orally from 5 days prior to operation to the end of the experiment (Group B); warfarin sodium (0.33 mg/kg/day) was given orally for the same period (Group C); and a combination of ticlopidine hydrochloride (50 mg/kg/day) and warfarin sodium (0.16 mg/kg/day) was administered for the same period (Group D). All the grafts in group A occluded within 3 h. All grafts harvested from groups B and D remained patent at least until the twenty-eighth day after grafting but the lumen was narrowed by intimal hyperplasia. Although the grafts from group C were patent at the seventh day, all grafts occluded with intimal hyperplasia on day 14 and day 28. The dry weight of thrombus in the graft in group B and group D was 39 +/- 3 mg and 30 +/- 2 mg, respectively on day 28. These figures were significantly lower than that of the control group 59 +/- 9 mg at 5 h after the initial heparinisation. Ultrastructural studies with scanning electron microscopy showed that the thrombus in the graft of the control group was composed of platelet aggregates anchored to synthetic fibres and of erythrocytes entrapped in the fibrin network. By day 7, in the groups modified with drugs, sheets of endothelial-like cells extended across both suture lines from the host stumps and extended to the middle of the graft thereafter. Light microscopy revealed that the initimal hyperplasia in groups B, C and D on day 28 were mainly composed of fibroblasts, myoblasts, collagenous fibres and micro-capillaries.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2279573

  12. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  13. Pathogenesis of Bacterial Vaginosis: Discussion of Current Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina A; Schwebke, Jane R

    2016-08-15

    In April 2015, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases hosted an experts technical consultation on bacterial vaginosis (BV), where data regarding controversies over the pathogenesis of BV were discussed. The discussion on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of BV is presented here, and several hypotheses on its pathogenesis are critiqued. Rigorous hypothesis-driven studies are needed to ultimately determine the cause of BV. This information is vital for the prevention and control of this important infection and its adverse public health consequences.

  14. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  15. [Latest Advance of Study on Pathogenesis of Immune Thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Liu, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is recognized as a multifactorial cell-specific autoimmune disorder, and its pathogenesis is still not very clear. Traditional concept suggests that the platelet destruction mediated by autoantibodies is the pathophysiology mechanism of ITP, while many studies in recent years have shown that the abnormities of T lymphocyte, dendritic cell (DC), natural killer cell (NK), cytokine, programmed cell death (PCD), oxidative stress (OS), infection, pregnancy and drugs etc play an important role in the pathogenesis of ITP. Since the study of ITP has made a series of important achievements in recent years, this review focuses on the latest advance of studies on pathogenesis of ITP. PMID:27342542

  16. Pathogenesis of Bacterial Vaginosis: Discussion of Current Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina A; Schwebke, Jane R

    2016-08-15

    In April 2015, the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases hosted an experts technical consultation on bacterial vaginosis (BV), where data regarding controversies over the pathogenesis of BV were discussed. The discussion on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of BV is presented here, and several hypotheses on its pathogenesis are critiqued. Rigorous hypothesis-driven studies are needed to ultimately determine the cause of BV. This information is vital for the prevention and control of this important infection and its adverse public health consequences. PMID:27449868

  17. Aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Arends, M J; Buckley, C H; Wells, M

    1998-01-01

    typing of cells recovered from cervical scrapes can be made; however, a rigorous cost-benefit analysis of introducing HPV typing into the cervical screening programme is required. Prophylactic and therapeutic HPV vaccines are under development. This article reviews the aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of cervical neoplasia, emphasising the role of HPVs. PMID:9602680

  18. Role of perfumes in pathogenesis of autism.

    PubMed

    Bagasra, Omar; Golkar, Zhabiz; Garcia, Miranda; Rice, Lakya N; Pace, Donald Gene

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are developmental conditions characterized by deficits in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and obsessive/stereotyped patterns of behavior. Although there is no reliable neurophysiological marker associated with ASDs, dysfunction of the parieto-frontal mirror neuron system and underdeveloped olfactory bulb (OB) has been associated with the disorder. It has been reported that the number of children who have ASD has increased considerably since the early 1990 s. In developed countries, it is now reported that 1-1.5% of children have ASD, and in the US it is estimated that one in 88 children suffer from ASD. Currently, there is no known cause for ASD. During the last three decades, the most commonly accepted paradigm about autism is that it is a genetically inherited disease. The recent trio analyses, in which both biological parents and the autistic child's exomes are sequenced, do not support this paradigm. On the other hand, the environmental factors that may induce genetic mutations in vitro have not been clearly identified, and there is little irrefutable evidence that pesticides, water born chemicals, or food preservatives play critical roles in inducing the genetic mutations associated with known intellectual deficiencies that have been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we hypothesize and provide scientific evidence that ASD is the result of exposure to perfumes and cosmetics. The highly mutagenic, neurotoxic, and neuromodulatory chemicals found in perfumes are often overlooked and ignored as a result of a giant loophole in the Federal Fair Packaging and Labeling Act of 1973, which explicitly exempts fragrance producers from having to disclose perfume ingredients on product labels. We hypothesize that perfumes and cosmetics may be important factors in the pathogenesis of ASD. Synthetic perfumes have gained global utility not only as perfumes but also as essential chemicals in detergents

  19. Pathogenesis of infection with varicella vaccine.

    PubMed

    Grose, C

    1996-09-01

    Because of its exanthem, the disease varicella has been known since antiquity. Even late in the 19th century, however, there remained considerable confusion between mild smallpox and chickenpox. The name varicella itself is an irregular diminutive form of variola. Yet, early in the 20th century, detailed histologic studies began to differentiate the exanthems. The investigation of the varicella vesicle by Tyzzer 90 years ago remains a classic example (see Fig. 2). Although the pathogenesis of varicella vaccine virus infection appears to mimic that of wt VZV infection, a vaccine virus-related exanthem is more common in immunized children with an underlying immunosuppressive condition, such as leukemia, than in normal children. Those immunized children who never develop a rash presumably have an abrogated infection in which the host immune response has eliminated the virus prior to a major viremic spread. There may be a correlation between the presence of an exanthem and the ability of an immunized child to spread the varicella vaccine virus. The differences in capsid structure and assembly may explain in part the attenuation of the vaccine strain. Because the majority of varicella vaccine virus particles in the nucleus have aberrant cores lacking an electron-dense center, they are never enveloped. Therefore, they do not become infectious virions. In a recent article, Grose et al applied the technique of three-dimensional (3-D) computer modeling in an attempt to reconstruct an aberrant VZV capsid with the hubcap or pinwheel core. Each 3-D model was then sliced by computer to obtain a series of two-dimensional models that represented the images commonly seen by traditional electron microscopy. The 3-D model that best represented the capsid with a pinwheel core contained particulate matter in each of the 12 vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Fig. 14). This model strongly suggested that VZV may form in the nucleus an intermediary or end-stage capsid with an aberrant

  20. Aetiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lieber, C S

    1993-09-01

    carcinogens and even nutritional factors such as vitamin A. Ethanol causes not only vitamin A depletion but it also enhances its hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, induction of the microsomal pathway contributes to increased acetaldehyde generation, with formation of protein adducts, resulting in antibody production, enzyme inactivation and decreased DNA repair; it is also associated with a striking impairment of the capacity of the liver to utilize oxygen. Moreover, acetaldehyde promotes glutathione depletion, free-radical mediated toxicity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, acetaldehyde affects hepatic collagen synthesis: both in vivo and in vitro (in cultured myofibroblasts and lipocytes), ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde were found to increase collagen accumulation and mRNA levels for collagen. This new understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease may eventually improve therapy with drugs and nutrients.

  1. Reflections on the pathogenesis of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Opitz, J M; Gilbert-Barness, E F

    1990-01-01

    Present efforts to identify, isolate, and characterize in molecular terms the "consensus" segment of 21q sufficient to cause most of the major and some of the most characteristic minor manifestations of Down syndrome will soon provide answers to many questions. However, we think that a reductionist approach to explain the Down syndrome phenotype in a "linear" manner from the DNA sequence of the segment will be doomed to failure from the outset because of the open, complex, nonlinear, hierarchical nature of morphogenetic systems. Neo-Darwinism is under strong attack; most genetic changes accumulated over time may very well be of neutral effect, and detailed studies in several related groups of vertebrate species has shown that molecular and organismal evolution are largely independent of one another. It has been pointed out recently that biology lacks a theory of ontogenetic and phylogenetic development, and that a purely "genocentric" view of biology at the expense of the complexly hierarchical intrinsic epigenetic attributes of developmental systems is "out of focus with respect to ... biological organization and morphogenesis," and may be "a residue of nineteenth century romantic idealism." Down syndrome impresses us as a paradigm of increased developmental variability due to a deceleration of the rate of development (neoteny) with many anomalies of incomplete morphogenesis (vestigia), atavisms, increased morphometric variability with many decreased means, increased variances, and increased fluctuating asymmetry. These abnormalities, together with highly increased risk of prenatal death and postnatal morbidity, impaired growth, and abnormal CNS and gonadal structure and function characteristic of most aneuploidy syndromes, suggest to us that the pathogenesis of Down syndrome is best viewed in terms of the mechanisms of speciation. Transgenic experiment involving sequential or overlapping pieces of "the consensus segment" on distal 21q22.1-22.3 may help decide to

  2. Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Kuhn, Michael; Berche, Patrick; Chakraborty, Trinad; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Goebel, Werner; González-Zorn, Bruno; Wehland, Jürgen; Kreft, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    , rapid intracytoplasmic multiplication, bacterially induced actin-based motility, and direct spread to neighboring cells, in which they reinitiate the cycle. In this way, listeriae disseminate in host tissues sheltered from the humoral arm of the immune system. Over the last 15 years, a number of virulence factors involved in key steps of this intracellular life cycle have been identified. This review describes in detail the molecular determinants of Listeria virulence and their mechanism of action and summarizes the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of listeriosis and the cell biology and host cell responses to Listeria infection. This article provides an updated perspective of the development of our understanding of Listeria pathogenesis from the first molecular genetic analyses of virulence mechanisms reported in 1985 until the start of the genomic era of Listeria research. PMID:11432815

  3. A Mitochondrial Perspective of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shadel, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) encompasses several clinical syndromes, most notably emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Most of the current treatments fail to attenuate severity and progression of the disease, thereby requiring better mechanistic understandings of pathogenesis to develop disease-modifying therapeutics. A number of theories on COPD pathogenesis have been promulgated wherein an increase in protease burden from chronic inflammation, exaggerated production of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidant injury, or superfluous cell death responses caused by enhanced cellular injury/damage were proposed as the culprit. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive and together likely represent the multifaceted biological processes involved in COPD pathogenesis. Recent studies demonstrate that mitochondria are involved in innate immune signaling that plays important roles in cigarette smoke-induced inflammasome activation, pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodeling responses. These responses are reviewed herein and synthesized into a view of COPD pathogenesis whereby mitochondria play a central role. PMID:27790272

  4. Oral candidiasis: pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Patton, Lauren L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a clinical fungal infection that is the most common opportunistic infection affecting the human oral cavity. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical presentations, diagnosis and treatmentstrategies for oral candidiasis.

  5. Water hardness influences Flavobacterium columnare pathogenesis in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to determine aspects of water chemistry responsible for large differences in pathogenesis and mortality rates in challenges of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus with Flavobacterium columnare; challenges were conducted in water supplying the Stuttgart National Aquaculture Res...

  6. Recent advances in dengue pathogenesis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Cameron P; McPherson, Kirsty; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Hoai Tam, D T; Young, Paul; Mackenzie, Jason; Wills, Bridget

    2015-12-10

    This review describes and commentates on recent advances in the understanding of dengue pathogenesis and immunity, plus clinical research on vaccines and therapeutics. We expand specifically on the role of the dermis in dengue virus infection, the contribution of cellular and humoral immune responses to pathogenesis and immunity, NS1 and mechanisms of virus immune evasion. Additionally we review a series of therapeutic intervention trials for dengue, as well as recent clinical research aimed at improving clinical diagnosis, risk prediction and disease classification.

  7. Cardiac syndrome X. Diagnosis, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Juan Carlos; Aldama, Guillermo; Cosín-Sales, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Patients with cardiac syndrome X (typical chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) represent a heterogeneous syndrome, which encompasses different pathogenic mechanisms. Although symptoms in most patients with cardiac syndrome X are non-cardiac, a sizable proportion of them have angina pectoris due to transient myocardial ischemia. Thus radionuclide myocardial perfusion defects, coronary sinus oxygen saturation abnormalities and pH changes, myocardial lactate production and stress-induced alterations of cardiac high energy phosphate suggest an ischemic origin of symptoms in at least a proportion of patients with cardiac syndrome X. Microvascular abnormalities, caused by endothelial dysfunction, appear to be responsible for myocardial ischemia in patients with cardiac syndrome X. Endothelial dysfunction is likely to be multifactorial in these patients and it is conceivable that risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus and smoking can contribute to its development. Most patients with cardiac syndrome X are postmenopausal women and estrogen deficiency has been therefore proposed as a pathogenic factor in female patients. Additional factors such as abnormal pain perception may contribute to the pathogenesis of chest pain in patients with angina pectoris and normal coronary angiograms. Although prognosis is good regarding survival, patients with cardiac syndrome X have an impaired quality of life. Management of this syndrome represents a major challenge to the treating physician. Understanding the mechanism underlying the condition is of vital importance for patient management. Thus diagnostic tests should aim at identifying the cause of the symptoms in the individual patient, i.e. myocardial ischemia, increased pain perception, abnormalities of adrenergic tone, non-cardiac mechanisms, etc. Moreover, it is important to bear in mind that treatment of cardiac syndrome X should be mainly directed towards improving quality of life, as

  8. [Pathogenesis and epidemiology of arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Pardell, H; Armario, P; Hernández, R

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of arterial hypertension is more clearly understood today because of the availability of data enabling identification of a certain number of precipitating factors. From a genetic standpoint, hypertension would appear to be a multifactorial polygenic disorder with a tendency to interact with certain environmental factors. The latter are mainly related to lifestyle and are potentially modifiable. Obesity during childhood and adolescence is the main predictive factor for hypertension. It has been suggested that the underlying mechanism could well be hyperinsulinaemia, which induces hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. The mechanisms of the relationship between hypertension and alcohol are still unclear. However, in many countries, excessive alcohol consumption has been reported to be a significant factor in the development of arterial hypertension. The negative effect of a sedentary lifestyle on blood pressure has been widely demonstrated. In addition, it has also been shown that regular physical exercise under aerobic conditions leads to a reduction in blood pressure levels. An excessive sodium intake is also responsible for inducing arterial hypertension through increases in cardiac output and effects on vascular reactivity and contractility. Similarly, restricting sodium intake leads to a reduction in blood pressure levels. Smoking--namely, certain components of tobacco smoke--would appear to have both short and long term effects on blood pressure. These contributing factors all have specific effects on cardiac output and peripheral resistance in individuals. At the community level, the impact of hypertension is particularly significant. Prevalence is strongly influenced by the type of population studied, although it is generally estimated that this disease affects between 10 and 20% of the adult population and is responsible for 5.8% of all deaths worldwide. The direct and indirect costs of the disease are particularly high and are

  9. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease: relevance to pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been documented for a long time. However, the inflammation hypothesis in relation to AD pathology has emerged relatively recently. Even in this hypothesis, the inflammatory reaction is still considered to be a downstream effect of the accumulated proteins (amyloid beta (Aβ) and tau). This review aims to highlight the importance of the immune processes involved in AD pathogenesis based on the outcomes of the two major inflammation-relevant treatment strategies against AD developed and tested to date in animal studies and human clinical trials - the use of anti-inflammatory drugs and immunisation against Aβ. PMID:20122289

  10. Advances in the Understanding of the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Acne.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is the most common skin disorder. It was traditionally thought that AV lesions developed after abnormal desquamation of the keratinocytes that line the sebaceous follicle, leading to hyperkeratinization and microcomedone formation. However, in recent years there has been a paradigm shift with regard to understanding the pathogenesis of AV, and it is now viewed as a primary inflammatory skin disorder. Research has implicated the presence of subclinical inflammation in the normal skin of acne patients, even before microcomedone formation. This article will review the novel concepts that play a role in the new pathogenesis of acne vulgaris.

  11. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome; Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2011-01-01

    Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS) is a rare disease with a well-characterized pathogenesis. In 50% of the patients, LEMS is a paraneoplastic manifestation and caused by a small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Both LEMS patients with SCLC and those without this tumour have in 85% of cases pathogenetic antibodies of very high LEMS specificity against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the cell membrane of the presynaptic motor nerve terminal. Better understanding of LEMS pathogenesis has lead to targeted symptomatic therapy aimed at the neuromuscular junction and to semispecific immuno-suppression. For SCLC LEMS, tumour therapy is essential. PMID:21969911

  12. Immunomodulatory role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tyler A; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Kovilam, Oormila; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, preeclampsia is a significant health risk to both pregnant women and their unborn children. Despite scientific advances, the exact pathogenesis of preeclampsia is not yet fully understood. Meanwhile, the incidence of preeclampsia is expected to increase. A series of potential etiologies for preeclampsia has been identified, including endothelial dysfunction, immunological dysregulation and trophoblastic invasion. In this literature review, we have critically reviewed existing literature regarding the research findings that link the role of vitamin D to the pathogenesis and immunoregulation of preeclampsia. The relationship of vitamin D with the suspected etiologies of preeclampsia underscores its clinical potential in the diagnosis and treatment of preeclampsia.

  13. Role of viruses in the pathogenesis of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, T

    2000-05-01

    To date there is ample evidence suggesting a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the pathogenesis of AOM. Respiratory viral infection appears to initiate the cascade of events that finally leads to development of AOM (Fig. 1). The pathogenesis of AOM is complicated, involving a network of factors, some probably not yet identified, which affect each other in a time-dependent manner. Increased knowledge of the detailed mechanisms of viral infection, the host inflammatory response during URI and the interaction between viruses and bacteria could lead to major advances in the prevention of AOM.

  14. The paradox of feline coronavirus pathogenesis: a review.

    PubMed

    Myrrha, Luciana Wanderley; Silva, Fernanda Miquelitto Figueira; Peternelli, Ethel Fernandes de Oliveira; Junior, Abelardo Silva; Resende, Maurício; de Almeida, Márcia Rogéria

    2011-01-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is an enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, of the family Coronaviridae and the order Nidovirales. FCoV is an important pathogen of wild and domestic cats and can cause a mild or apparently symptomless enteric infection, especially in kittens. FCoV is also associated with a lethal, systemic disease known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Although the precise cause of FIP pathogenesis remains unclear, some hypotheses have been suggested. In this review we present results from different FCoV studies and attempt to elucidate existing theories on the pathogenesis of FCoV infection.

  15. Recent advances in dengue pathogenesis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Cameron P; McPherson, Kirsty; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Hoai Tam, D T; Young, Paul; Mackenzie, Jason; Wills, Bridget

    2015-12-10

    This review describes and commentates on recent advances in the understanding of dengue pathogenesis and immunity, plus clinical research on vaccines and therapeutics. We expand specifically on the role of the dermis in dengue virus infection, the contribution of cellular and humoral immune responses to pathogenesis and immunity, NS1 and mechanisms of virus immune evasion. Additionally we review a series of therapeutic intervention trials for dengue, as well as recent clinical research aimed at improving clinical diagnosis, risk prediction and disease classification. PMID:26458808

  16. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and histopathology of fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Levene, Adam P; Goldin, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Fatty liver disease includes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), each of which is increasing in prevalence. Each represents a histological spectrum that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance, and is considered to be the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and ALD involves cytokines, adipokines, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Histopathology is the gold standard for assessing the severity of liver damage in NAFLD and ALD. We have reviewed the literature, and described and compared the epidemiology, natural disease history, pathogenesis and histopathology of NAFLD and ALD.

  17. [Polonium-210 acute and chronic pathomorphology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kvacheva, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, the data on the pathology of acute and chronic polonium injuries available from the an open-access domestic and foreign literature are primarily systemized and analyzed. The historical background of the research is presented in brief. On the basis of clinical and experimental generalizations, the current concept regarding the pathogenesis of polonium intoxication has been developed.

  18. An Hypothesis of the Pathogenesis of Curb in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    An hypothesis on the pathogenesis of curb in horses is considered in the light of conformation, work and the appropriate mechanics. Prevention consists of graded work until the planter tarsal ligament has strengthened sufficiently to withstand maximum normal forces. PMID:7343069

  19. Autoimmune pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease: looking back, looking ahead.

    PubMed

    Bonney, Kevin M; Engman, David M

    2015-06-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors-autoimmunity-has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Beal, M. Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis. PMID:19059336

  1. [Polonium-210 acute and chronic pathomorphology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kvacheva, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, the data on the pathology of acute and chronic polonium injuries available from the an open-access domestic and foreign literature are primarily systemized and analyzed. The historical background of the research is presented in brief. On the basis of clinical and experimental generalizations, the current concept regarding the pathogenesis of polonium intoxication has been developed. PMID:26856053

  2. Pathogenesis of the intravertebral vacuum of Kümmell's disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Dengwei; Yu, Weiyang; Chen, Zhenzhong; Li, Liangchen; Zhu, Kejun; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we explored the progress of the pathogenesis of Kümmell's disease intravertebral vacuum. Using different expressions of the same disease including ‘Kümmell's disease’, ‘avascular necrosis after vertebral compression fracture (VCF)’, ‘post-traumatic vertebral osteonecrosis’, ‘vertebral pseudarthrosis’, ‘intravertebral vacuum (cleft or gas)’, ‘delayed vertebral collapse’, ‘VCF nonunion’, and by conducting a search of the PubMed database, we analyzed the results to examine the pathogenesis of the intravertebral vacuum of Kümmell's disease after referring to pertinent literature on intravertebral vacuum of ischemic necrosis after VCF, and exploring the progress of pathogenesis of this disease. A number of discrepancies were identified within the pathogenesis of the intravertebral vacuum after VCF. There were statements such as avascular necrosis of the vertebral body, bone biomechanics, gas forming and other types of claims, all of which obtained clinical and biomechanical supporting evidence. Collectively, most of the researchers believe that Kümmell vertebral fracture syndrome was the comprehensive effect of multiple factors including osteoporosis, avascular necrosis of the vertebral body, and biomechanical changes following fracture. However, there are a number of discrepancies to be resolved and future studies are therefore needed. PMID:27446290

  3. The pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The greatest segment of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies that are specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental invest...

  4. Taming the Elephant: Salmonella Biology, Pathogenesis, and Prevention▿

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; McCormick, Beth A.; Fang, Ferric C.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella infections continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality throughout the world. However, recent discoveries and new paradigms promise to lead to novel strategies to diagnose, treat, and prevent Salmonella infections. This review provides an update of the Salmonella field based on oral presentations given at the recent 3rd ASM Conference on Salmonella: Biology, Pathogenesis and Prevention. PMID:20385760

  5. [AETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS GASTRO-DUODENALES ULCERATIVE LESIONS IN ELDERLY].

    PubMed

    Chernekhovskaya, N E; Povalayev, A V; Layshenko, G A

    2015-01-01

    In review today conceptions of view to aetiology and pathogenesis gastro-duodenales ulcerative lesions in elderly. Atherosclerosis, ischemic disease of the heart and hypertension are reasons of acute ulcers and erosions in elderly. The breaking of microcirculation are very importance.

  6. Pathogenesis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Hydrodynamics of the Chiari I Malformation.

    PubMed

    Buell, Thomas J; Heiss, John D; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-10-01

    This article summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the Chiari I malformation that is based on observations of the anatomy visualized by modern imaging with MRI and prospective studies of the physiology of patients before and after surgery. The pathogenesis of a Chiari I malformation of the cerebellar tonsils is grouped into 4 general mechanisms.

  7. Deciphering the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a three-stages process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of "tendinopathy" is based on fragmented evidences like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. We propose a "failed healing theory" to knit these fragments together, which can explain previous observations. We also propose that albeit "overuse injury" and other insidious "micro trauma" may well be primary triggers of the process, "tendinopathy" is not an "overuse injury" per se. The typical clinical, histological and biochemical presentation relates to a localized chronic pain condition which may lead to tendon rupture, the latter attributed to mechanical weakness. Characterization of pathological "tendinotic" tissues revealed coexistence of collagenolytic injuries and an active healing process, focal hypervascularity and tissue metaplasia. These observations suggest a failed healing process as response to a triggering injury. The pathogenesis of tendinopathy can be described as a three stage process: injury, failed healing and clinical presentation. It is likely that some of these "initial injuries" heal well and we speculate that predisposing intrinsic or extrinsic factors may be involved. The injury stage involves a progressive collagenolytic tendon injury. The failed healing stage mainly refers to prolonged activation and failed resolution of the normal healing process. Finally, the matrix disturbances, increased focal vascularity and abnormal cytokine profiles contribute to the clinical presentations of chronic tendon pain or rupture. With this integrative pathogenesis theory, we can relate the known manifestations of tendinopathy and point to the "missing links". This model may guide future research on tendinopathy, until we could ultimately decipher the complete pathogenesis process and provide better treatments. PMID:21144004

  8. In brief: the (molecular) pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is a metaplastic change, such that the normal squamous epithelial lining of the oesophagus is replaced by specialized columnar-lined epithelium. Barrett's oesophagus is clinically significant and has a high health economic impact as it is associated with heightened risk of progression to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. This review discusses the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus with an emphasis on the underlying molecular events.

  9. Sweet Bones: The Pathogenesis of Bone Alteration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have increased fracture risk. The pathogenesis underlying the status of bone alterations in diabetes mellitus is not completely understood but is multifactorial. The major deficits appear to be related to a deficit in mineralized surface area, a decrement in the rate of mineral apposition, deceased osteoid surface, depressed osteoblast activity, and decreased numbers of osteoclasts due to abnormal insulin signaling pathway. Other prominent features of diabetes mellitus are an increased urinary excretion of calcium and magnesium, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, and oxidative stress leading to sweet bones (altered bone's strength, metabolism, and structure). Every diabetic patient should be assessed for risk factors for fractures and osteoporosis. The pathogenesis of the bone alterations in diabetes mellitus as well as their molecular mechanisms needs further study. PMID:27777961

  10. Pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune disease: the role of cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana Maria; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are two very common organ-specific autoimmune diseases which are characterized by circulating antibodies and lymphocyte infiltration. Although humoral and cellular mechanisms have been classically considered separately in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), recent research suggests a close reciprocal relationship between these two immune pathways. Several B- and T-cell activation pathways through antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and cytokine production lead to specific differentiation of T helper (Th) and T regulatory (Treg) cells. This review will focus on the cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AITD. Specifically, it will provide reasons for discarding the traditional simplistic dichotomous view of the T helper type 1 and 2 pathways (Th1/Th2) and will focus on the role of the recently characterized T cells, Treg and Th17 lymphocytes, as well as B lymphocytes and APCs, especially dendritic cells (DCs).

  11. Behavioral Contributions to the Pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Cook, Lauren; O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Page, Kathleen A.; Quinn, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral Contributions to the pathogenesis of prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) include lifestyle behaviors including dietary intake, exercise, sedentariness, sleep, and stress. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence for the metabolic pathways by which the behavior is linked to T2D. Evidence for interventions which change each of the lifestyle behaviors is discussed. The article will close with a brief discussion on how new technologies may provide opportunities to better understand relationships between moment-to-moment fluctuations in behaviors and diabetes pathogenesis, as well as provide opportunities to personalize and adapt interventions to achieve successful behavior change and maintenance of that change. Especially promising are new technologies which assist in tracking lifestyle behaviors along with clinical and metabolic outcomes. PMID:24604714

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Tony J; Robinson, Philip C; Haroon, Nigil

    2015-09-01

    There has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. The advent of genome-wide association studies has increased the known loci associated with AS to more than 40. The endoplasmic reticulum resident aminopeptidases (ERAP) 1 and 2 were identified in this manner and are of particular interest. There appears to be a genetic as well as a functional interaction of ERAP1 and 2 with HLA-B27 based on the known functions of these molecules. Recent studies on the structure, immunological effects and the peptide-trimming properties of ERAP 1 and 2 have helped to provide insight into their pathogenic potential in AS. In this review, we explore the role of ERAP 1 and 2 in the pathogenesis of AS.

  13. Neuronal vulnerability, pathogenesis and Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David; Surmeier, D. James

    2012-01-01

    Although there have been significant advances, pathogenesis in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still poorly understood. Potential clues about pathogenesis that have not been systematically pursued are suggested by the restricted pattern of neuronal pathology in the disease. In addition to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), a significant number of other central and peripheral neuronal populations exhibit Lewy pathology (LP), phenotypic dysregulation or frank degeneration in PD patients. Drawing on this literature, there appears to be a small number of risk factors contributing to vulnerability. These include autonomous activity, broad action potentials, low intrinsic calcium buffering capacity, poorly myelinated long highly branched axons and terminal fields, and use of a monoamine neurotransmitter, often with the catecholamine-derived neuromelanin pigment. Of these phenotypic traits, only the physiological ones appear to provide a reachable therapeutic target at present. PMID:22791686

  14. Diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment of myositis: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, P-O; Schmidt, J

    2014-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), necrotizing myopathy (NM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM) are four distinct subtypes of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies – in short myositis. Recent studies have shed some light on the unique pathogenesis of each entity. Some of the clinical features are distinct, but muscle biopsy is indispensable for making a reliable diagnosis. The use of magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscles and detection of myositis-specific autoantibodies have become useful additions to our diagnostic repertoire. Only few controlled trials are available to substantiate current treatment approaches for myositis and hopes are high that novel modalities will become available within the next few years. In this review we provide an up-to-date overview of the pathogenesis and diagnostic approach of myositis. We aim to present a guide towards therapeutic and general management. PMID:23981102

  15. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  16. Uveitis and glaucoma: new insights in the pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sng, Chelvin C A; Ang, Marcus; Barton, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding complication of uveitis, where intraocular inflammation, secondary corticosteroid response, and varying types and degrees of angle abnormalities contribute to its pathogenesis. Management of uveitic glaucoma remains challenging. Treatment is targeted at reducing the inflammation and lowering the intraocular pressure. Recent studies have highlighted the role of viruses, such as cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and more recently Ebola virus, in the pathogenesis of uveitic glaucoma. Antiviral therapy may be beneficial in eyes with detectable viral DNA. The success of glaucoma surgery is decreased in eyes with uveitic glaucoma, and surgical interventions are associated with a higher incidence of postoperative complications. Novel glaucoma surgical and laser treatments may improve the predictability of surgery for uveitic glaucoma, but these require further evaluation.

  17. Controversies in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Nelson, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The two most common HIV-associated renal diseases, HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV-immune-complex kidney disease, share the common pathologic finding of hyperplasia within the glomerulus. Podocyte injury is central to the pathogenesis of these diseases; however, the source of the proliferating glomerular epithelial cell remains a topic of debate. Parenchymal injury has been linked to direct infection of renal epithelial cells by HIV-1, although the mechanism of viral entry into this non-lymphoid compartment is unclear. Although transgenic rodent models have provided insight into viral proteins responsible for inducing renal disease, such models have important limitations. Rodent HIV-1 models, for instance, cannot replicate all aspects of immune activation, a process that could have an important role in the pathogenesis PMID:19776779

  18. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus transmission and effect on pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darci R; Aguilar, Patricia V; Coffey, Lark L; Gromowski, Gregory D; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott C

    2006-08-01

    Quantifying the dose of an arbovirus transmitted by mosquitoes is essential for designing pathogenesis studies simulating natural infection of vertebrates. Titration of saliva collected in vitro from infected mosquitoes may not accurately estimate titers transmitted during blood feeding, and infection by needle injection may affect vertebrate pathogenesis. We compared the amount of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus collected from the saliva of Aedes taeniorhynchus to the amount injected into a mouse during blood feeding. Less virus was transmitted by mosquitoes in vivo (geometric mean 11 PFU) than was found for comparable times of salivation in vitro (mean saliva titer 74 PFU). We also observed slightly lower early and late viremia titers in mice that were needle injected with 8 PFU, which represents the low end of the in vivo transmission range. No differences in survival were detected, regardless of the dose or infection route.

  19. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Wang; Chaoshu, Tang; Hongfang, Jin; Junbao, Du

    2010-05-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H{sub 2}S and inflammatory processes. The role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerosis.

  20. PPAR Could Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Osamu; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    Viral hepatitis with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus and chronic liver disease such as alcoholic or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis are critical factors in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Furthermore, diabetes is known as an independent risk factor for HCC. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is known to have an important role in fatty liver, and the mechanism of carcinogenesis has been clarified. PPAR controls ligand-dependent transcription, and three subtypes (α, δ, and γ) in humans are known. PPARs could contribute to the mechanisms of cell cycling, anti-inflammatory responses, and apoptosis. Therefore, to clarify the pathogenesis of HCC, we should examine PPAR signaling. In this paper, we have summarized the relevance of PPARs to the pathogenesis of HCC and cancer stem cells and possible therapeutic options through modifying PPAR signaling. PMID:23316217

  1. PPAR Could Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Osamu; Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    Viral hepatitis with hepatitis C virus or hepatitis B virus and chronic liver disease such as alcoholic or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis are critical factors in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Furthermore, diabetes is known as an independent risk factor for HCC. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is known to have an important role in fatty liver, and the mechanism of carcinogenesis has been clarified. PPAR controls ligand-dependent transcription, and three subtypes (α, δ, and γ) in humans are known. PPARs could contribute to the mechanisms of cell cycling, anti-inflammatory responses, and apoptosis. Therefore, to clarify the pathogenesis of HCC, we should examine PPAR signaling. In this paper, we have summarized the relevance of PPARs to the pathogenesis of HCC and cancer stem cells and possible therapeutic options through modifying PPAR signaling. PMID:23316217

  2. Biological factors in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Berton, Alessandra; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2011-09-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common, and lead to shoulder pain and functional impairment. Despite their frequency and related disability, etiology and pathogenesis are still debated. Multiple factors contribute to tears of the rotator cuff. Extrinsic factors are anatomic variables, such as acromial morphologic characteristics, os acromiale, and acromial spurs that compress the rotator cuff by bony impingement or direct pressure from the surrounding soft tissue. Intrinsic factors arise from the tendon itself, because of tensile overload, aging, microvascular supply, traumatisms, or degeneration. Little information is available from a cellular and molecular point of view. We reviewed the biological factors involved in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff tears. Understanding the mechanism of rotator cuff pathology would facilitate the rationale for therapeutic interventions, by guiding the design, selection, and implementation of treatment strategies such as biologic modulation and preventive measures.

  3. Actin-associated Proteins in the Pathogenesis of Podocyte Injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Fang-Fang; Chen, Shan; Su, Hua; Meng, Xian-Fang; Zhang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes have a complex cellular architecture with interdigitating processes maintained by a precise organization of actin filaments. The actin-based foot processes of podocytes and the interposed slit diaphragm form the final barrier to proteinuria. The function of podocytes is largely based on the maintenance of the normal foot process structure with actin cytoskeleton. Cytoskeletal dynamics play important roles during normal podocyte development, in maintenance of the healthy glomerular filtration barrier, and in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. In this review, we focused on recent findings on the mechanisms of organization and reorganization of these actin-related molecules in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury and potential therapeutics targeting the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in podocytopathies. PMID:24396279

  4. Regulatory T cells in vitiligo: Implications for pathogenesis and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mitesh; Kemp, E Helen; Laddha, Naresh C; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Weetman, Anthony P; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a hypomelanotic autoimmune skin disease arising from a breakdown in immunological self-tolerance, which leads to aberrant immune responses against melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial to the development of self-tolerance and so are major foci in the study of autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo. This review will summarise recent findings concerning the role of Tregs in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. In addition, as antigen-specific Tregs are a potential route for the reinstatement of immune tolerance, new strategies that expand or induce de novo generation of Tregs and which are currently being investigated as therapies for other autoimmune diseases, will be discussed. These approaches will highlight the opportunities for Treg cell-based therapeutics in vitiligo.

  5. Vitamin D and the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Bechtold, Matthew L; Nguyen, Douglas L

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D has traditionally been known for its role in bone metabolism, but emerging evidence has suggested a broader role for vitamin D in immune regulation. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with the pathogenesis of diverse autoimmune disorders and has similarly been implicated as a contributor to inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we discuss animal, in vitro, genetic, and epidemiologic studies that have linked vitamin D deficiency with inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis or severity. Nonetheless, we present the caveat in interpreting these studies in the context of reverse causation: Does vitamin D deficiency lead to gastrointestinal disease, or does gastrointestinal disease (with related changes in dietary choices, intestinal absorption, nutritional status, lifestyle) lead to vitamin D deficiency? PMID:27538982

  6. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  7. Pivotal Functions of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Systemic Autoimmune Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei

    2014-04-22

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were initially identified as the prominent natural type I interferon-producing cells during viral infection. Over the past decade, the aberrant production of interferon α/β by pDCs in response to self-derived molecular entities has been critically implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and recognized as a general feature underlying other autoimmune diseases. On top of imperative studies on human pDCs, the functional involvement and mechanism by which the pDC-interferon α/β pathway facilitates the progression of autoimmunity have been unraveled recently from investigations with several experimental lupus models. This article reviews correlating information obtained from human in vitro characterization and murine in vivo studies and highlights the fundamental and multifaceted contribution of pDCs to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune manifestation.

  8. MicroRNAs in the Cholangiopathies: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo Pisarello, Maria Jose; Loarca, Lorena; Ivanics, Tommy; Morton, Leslie; LaRusso, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The cholangiopathies are a group of liver diseases resulting from different etiologies but with the cholangiocyte as the primary target. As a group, the cholangiopathies result in significant morbidity and mortality and represent one of the main indications for liver transplant in both children and adults. Contributing to this situation is the absence of a thorough understanding of their pathogenesis and a lack of adequate diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that modify gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including the cholangiopathies. Thus, in this review we provide an overview of the literature on miRNAs in the cholangiopathies and discuss future research directions. PMID:26343736

  9. Venous thromboembolism and pancreatic cancer: incidence, pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Moro, Cecilia; Labianca, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is still a major clinical challenge. Recent efforts to improve survival in locally advanced and metastatic disease have focused on combining cytotoxic drugs with targeted therapies. One of the major complications of pancreatic cancer is venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite the general perception that patients with mucinous carcinoma of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract present a high incidence of thromboembolic complications, there is little data regarding the incidence and pathogenesis of VTE in pancreatic cancer patients. Clinical data suggest that, among patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, the occurrence of VTE may be associated with reduced overall survival. Furthermore emerging clinical data strongly suggest that anticoagulant treatments may improve cancer patient survival by decreasing thromboembolic complications as well as by anticancer effects. Given the lack of extensive data and the clinical relevance of this topic for both physicians and basic research scientists, this overview focuses attention on the incidence, pathogenesis and clinical implications of VTE in pancreatic cancer patients.

  10. Periodontitis, Porphyromonas, and the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, D; Butcher, J P; Culshaw, S

    2012-03-01

    Epidemiological data indicate a link between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). In vitro and in vivo studies have sought to dissect potential mechanisms by which PD may contribute to initiation and progression of RA. However, these are both multifactorial, chronic diseases, and their complex etiologies and pathogenesis themselves remain incompletely understood. Could there really be an etiological link or does this simply represent a statistical coincidence muddied by common risk factors? This review seeks to provide background on these two diseases in the context of recent discoveries suggesting that their pathogenesis may be related. In particular, the process of citrullination, a post-translational protein modification, has been highlighted as a process common to both diseases. The evidence for a relationship between the diseases is explored and its potential mechanisms discussed. PMID:22274780

  11. Interplay between viroid-induced pathogenesis and RNA silencing pathways.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Gustavo; Martínez, Germán; Pallás, Vicente

    2009-05-01

    Of all known plant pathogens, viroids have the lowest biological complexity. Their genome consists of a naked RNA without protein-encoding capacity. However, viroids contain sufficient genetic information to establish infection in susceptible hosts. The process by which this tiny RNA subverts the plant cell machinery by coercing the host to express symptoms of viroid infection is the 'Holy Grail' that has been searched for since the first viroid-induced disease was described. Recently, a large body of evidence has led to the emergent view that RNA silencing has a crucial role in viroid pathogenesis and evolution. Here, we chronologically analyse the relevant findings supporting this idea and propose a model to explain the possible interrelation between the trans-acting small interfering RNA (ta-siRNA) biogenesis pathway and viroid replication and pathogenesis.

  12. Role of stem cells in spondyloarthritis: Pathogenesis, treatment and complications.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rebecca S Y

    2015-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a family of interrelated inflammatory arthritis that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, arthritis related to inflammatory bowel disease and undifferentiated SpA. The classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of SpA have been extensively reviewed in the published literature. Reviews on the use of stem cells in various autoimmune diseases in general are also common. However, a review on the role of stem cells in SpA is currently lacking. This review focuses on the involvement of stem cells in the pathogenesis of SpA and the application of different types of stem cells in the treatment of SpA. It also addresses some of the complications which may arise as a result of the use of stem cells in the treatment of SpA.

  13. Molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and impact of therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Bandoh, Salome; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality and has an increasing incidence worldwide. HCC can be induced by multiple etiologies, is influenced by many risk factors, and has a complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, HCCs exhibit substantial heterogeneity, which compounds the difficulties in developing effective therapies against this highly lethal cancer. With advances in cancer biology and molecular and genetic profiling, a number of different mechanisms involved in the development and progression of HCC have been identified. Despite the advances in this area, the molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma is still not completely understood. This review aims to elaborate our current understanding of the most relevant genetic alterations and molecular pathways involved in the development and progression of HCC, and anticipate the potential impact of future advances on therapeutic drug development. PMID:27239288

  14. [Lymphangioleiomyomatosis - new concepts on pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Sobiecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic lung disease presenting with cough, dyspnea on exertion and recurrent pneumothorax. Substantial achievements have been made during the past two decades regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of this disorder. LAM, affecting almost exclusively women, is associated with inactivating tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) gene mutations in LAM cells, resulting in activation of mTOR that controls cell proliferation, growth and motility. Many parallels have been identified between LAM pathogenesis and neoplasia; inactivating mutations, the ability of LAM cells to metastasise, the induction of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, invasion of the lung. Recent reports suggest that VEGF-D levels have diagnostic utility in LAM patients. Partial response of TSC-associated tumors and decrease the rate of lung function decline in females with LAM due to inhibition of mTOR pathway with sirolimus have been demonstrated. PMID:27421126

  15. Genetic Mapping of Pathogenesis Determinants in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Michael S; Dubey, J P; Sibley, L David

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite of warm-blooded vertebrates that also causes opportunistic infections in humans. Rodents are a natural host for asexually replicating forms, whereas cats serve as the definitive host for sexual development. The laboratory mouse provides a model to study pathogenesis. Strains of T. gondii are globally diverse, with more than 16 distinct haplogroups clustered into 6 major clades. Forward genetic analysis of genetic crosses between different lineages has been used to define the molecular basis of acute virulence in the mouse. These studies have identified a family of secretory serine/threonine rhoptry kinases that target innate immune pathways to protect intracellular parasites from destruction. Rhoptry kinases target immunity-related GTPases, a family of immune effectors that is expanded in rodents. Similar forward genetic studies may be useful to define the basis of pathogenesis in other hosts, including humans, where infections of different strains present with variable clinical severity.

  16. Membrane proteins of Mycoplasma bovis and their role in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adamu, James Y; Wawegama, Nadeeka K; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2013-10-01

    Mycoplasma membrane proteins influence cell shape, cell division, motility and adhesion to host cells, and are thought to be integrally involved in the pathogenesis of mycoplasmoses. Many of the membrane proteins predicted from mycoplasma genome sequences remain hypothetical, as their presence in cellular protein preparations is yet to be established experimentally. Recent genome sequences of several strains of Mycoplasma bovis have provided further insight into the potential role of the membrane proteins of this pathogen in colonisation and infection. This review highlights recent advances in knowledge about the influence of M. bovis membrane proteins on the pathogenesis of infection with this species and identifies future research directions for enhancing our understanding of the role of these proteins. PMID:23810376

  17. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  18. Inflammatory bowel diseases: from pathogenesis to laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Basso, Daniela; Zambon, Carlo-Federico; Plebani, Mario

    2014-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), which comprise the two major clinical subtypes, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, incur high morbidity and potential mortality. The present study reviews data on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of IBDs. The pathogenesis depends on complex interactions between susceptibility genes, environmental factors, and innate and adaptive immunity, the understanding of which is crucial to discovering novel laboratory biomarkers. Traditional laboratory tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and assessment of disease activity of IBDs are reported on, and the biochemical properties, pre-analytical and analytical aspects and clinical utility of the fecal markers lactoferrin and calprotectin are described. DNA testing and established (ASCA and pANCA) and emerging (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, OmpC) serum markers are described; a further aspect to be addressed is the clinical use of pharmacogenetics for the treatment of IBDs.

  19. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M.; Wang, Ping Z.; Bai, Xue F.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  20. Pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Helmar C; Meyer Zu Horste, Gerd; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2009-07-01

    Immune-mediated neuropathies represent a heterogeneous spectrum of peripheral nerve disorders that can be classified according to time course, predominant involvement of motor/sensory fibers, distribution of deficits and paraclinical parameters such as electrophysiology and serum antibodies. In the last few years, significant advances have been achieved in elucidating underlying pathomechanisms, which made it possible to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the latest development in pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies.

  1. Rosacea: part I. Introduction, categorization, histology, pathogenesis, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Two, Aimee M; Wu, Wiggin; Gallo, Richard L; Hata, Tissa R

    2015-05-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects approximately 16 million Americans. Four distinct subtypes of rosacea have been recognized, with transient and nontransient facial flushing, telangiectasia, and inflammatory papules and pustules being among the more commonly recognized features. Although the exact pathogenesis of rosacea is unknown, dysregulation of the innate immune system, overgrowth of commensal skin organisms, and aberrant neurovascular signaling may all have a role in promoting the clinical features of rosacea.

  2. [EBOLA HEMORRHAGIC FEVER; ETIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, AND CLINICAL SYMPTOMS].

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, K W; Zakharenko, S M; Kovalenko, A N; Semenov, A V; Fusin, A Ya

    2015-01-01

    The data on the prevalence of disease caused by Ebola virus, biological features of its pathogen, character of the epidemiological process, pathogenesis and clinical symptoms are presented. The disease is characterized by suppression of protective immunological mechanisms and systemic inflammatory reaction accounting for the lesions of vascular endothelium, hemostatic and immune systems. It eventually leads to polyorgan insufficiency and severe shock. Lethality amounts to 50%.

  3. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  4. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M; Wang, Ping Z; Bai, Xue F

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed. PMID:26870699

  5. Theories of the Pathogenesis of Inclusion Body Myositis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inclusion body myositis is a progressive disease of the skeletal muscle. Here, specific theories of its pathogenesis are reviewed and general considerations pertaining to modeling of this disease discussed. Understanding of inclusion body myositis disease mechanism remains extremely poor. Current published animal models do not represent the disease. Future studies need to consider the critical role of biomarkers and methodologic issues in their discovery. PMID:20425523

  6. The fundamental role of endothelial cells in hantavirus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hepojoki, Jussi; Vaheri, Antti; Strandin, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus, a genus of rodent- and insectivore-borne viruses in the family Bunyaviridae, is a group of emerging zoonotic pathogens. Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in man, often with severe consequences. Vascular leakage is evident in severe hantavirus infections, and increased permeability contributes to the pathogenesis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on hantavirus interactions with hematopoietic and endothelial cells, and their effects on the increased vascular permeability. PMID:25566236

  7. Understanding Zika virus pathogenesis: an interview with Catherine Spong.

    PubMed

    Spong, Catherine Y

    2016-01-01

    A recent outbreak of Zika virus has been linked to fetal abnormalities in pregnant women who have been infected. The scientific community is working toward understanding Zika virus pathogenesis to better manage affected women and children. In an interview with Dr. Catherine Spong, we discuss the aims and challenges of a forthcoming longitudinal study of a cohort of pregnant women in areas of current active Zika virus transmission.

  8. Understanding Zika virus pathogenesis: an interview with Catherine Spong.

    PubMed

    Spong, Catherine Y

    2016-01-01

    A recent outbreak of Zika virus has been linked to fetal abnormalities in pregnant women who have been infected. The scientific community is working toward understanding Zika virus pathogenesis to better manage affected women and children. In an interview with Dr. Catherine Spong, we discuss the aims and challenges of a forthcoming longitudinal study of a cohort of pregnant women in areas of current active Zika virus transmission. PMID:27268016

  9. Understanding Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis using “Omics” approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pruneau, Ludovic; Moumène, Amal; Meyer, Damien F.; Marcelino, Isabel; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiéry, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how “Omics” approaches improve our understanding of Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis, through a global and integrative strategy to identify genes and proteins involved in biochemical pathways key for pathogen-host-vector interactions. The Anaplasmataceae family comprises obligate intracellular bacteria mainly transmitted by arthropods. These bacteria are responsible for major human and animal endemic and emerging infectious diseases with important economic and public health impacts. In order to improve disease control strategies, it is essential to better understand their pathogenesis. Our work focused on four Anaplasmataceae, which cause important animal, human and zoonotic diseases: Anaplasma marginale, A. phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and E. ruminantium. Wolbachia spp. an endosymbiont of arthropods was also included in this review as a model of a non-pathogenic Anaplasmataceae. A gap analysis on “Omics” approaches on Anaplasmataceae was performed, which highlighted a lack of studies on the genes and proteins involved in the infection of hosts and vectors. Furthermore, most of the studies have been done on the pathogen itself, mainly on infectious free-living forms and rarely on intracellular forms. In order to perform a transcriptomic analysis of the intracellular stage of development, researchers developed methods to enrich bacterial transcripts from infected cells. These methods are described in this paper. Bacterial genes encoding outer membrane proteins, post-translational modifications, eukaryotic repeated motif proteins, proteins involved in osmotic and oxidative stress and hypothetical proteins have been identified to play a key role in Anaplasmataceae pathogenesis. Further investigations on the function of these outer membrane proteins and hypothetical proteins will be essential to confirm their role in the pathogenesis. Our work underlines the need for further studies in this domain and on host and vector responses to

  10. SARCOPENIA: ITS ASSESSMENT, ETIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, CONSEQUENCES AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    ROLLAND, Y.; CZERWINSKI, S.; VAN KAN, G. ABELLAN; MORLEY, J.E.; CESARI, M.; ONDER, G.; WOO, J.; BAUMGARTNER, R.; PILLARD, F.; BOIRIE, Y.; CHUMLEA, W.M.C.; VELLAS, B.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of muscle protein mass and loss of muscle function. It occurs with increasing age, being a major component in the development of frailty. Current knowledge on its assessment, etiology, pathogenesis, consequences and future perspectives are reported in the present review. On-going and future clinical trials on sarcopenia may radically change our preventive and therapeutic approaches of mobility disability in older people. PMID:18615225

  11. Booster vaccinations: can immunologic memory outpace disease pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2009-12-01

    Almost all current vaccines work by the induction of antibodies in serum or on the mucosa to block adherence of pathogens to epithelial cells or interfere with microbial invasion of the bloodstream. However, antibody levels usually decline after vaccination to undetectable amounts if further vaccination does not occur. Persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies usually goes well beyond the time when they should have decayed to undetectable levels because of ongoing "natural" boosting or other immunologic mechanisms. The production of memory B and T cells is of clear importance, but the likelihood that a memory response will be fast enough in the absence of a protective circulating antibody level likely depends on the pace of pathogenesis of a specific organism. This concept is discussed with regard to Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis; hepatitis A and B; diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis; polio, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella; rotavirus; and human papilloma virus. With infectious diseases for which the pace of pathogenesis is less rapid, some individuals will contract infection before the memory response is fully activated and implemented. With infectious diseases for which the pace of pathogenesis is slow, immune memory should be sufficient to prevent disease.

  12. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L; Doran, John T; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M; Lindsay, David S; Allen, Irving C

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc (-/-) and Casp11 (-/-) mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc (-/-) mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11 (-/-) mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  13. Caspase-11 Modulates Inflammation and Attenuates Toxoplasma gondii Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coutermarsh-Ott, Sheryl L.; Doran, John T.; Campbell, Caroline; Williams, Tere M.; Lindsay, David S.; Allen, Irving C.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that is the etiologic agent responsible for toxoplasmosis. Infection with T. gondii results in activation of nucleotide binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs). NLR activation leads to inflammasome formation, the activation of caspase-1, and the subsequent cleavage of IL-1β and IL-18. Recently, a noncanonical inflammasome has been characterized which functions through caspase-11 and appears to augment many biological functions previously considered to be dependent upon the canonical inflammasome. To better elucidate the function of this noncanonical inflammasome in toxoplasmosis, we utilized Asc−/− and Casp11−/− mice and infected these animals with T. gondii. Our data indicates that caspase-11 modulates the innate immune response to T. gondii through a mechanism which is distinct from that currently described for the canonical inflammasome. Asc−/− mice demonstrated increased disease pathogenesis during the acute phase of T. gondii infection, whereas Casp11−/− mice demonstrated significantly attenuated disease pathogenesis and reduced inflammation. This attenuated host response was associated with reduced local and systemic cytokine production, including diminished IL-1β. During the chronic phase of infection, caspase-11 deficiency resulted in increased neuroinflammation and tissue cyst burden in the brain. Together, our data suggest that caspase-11 functions to protect the host by enhancing inflammation during the early phase of infection in an effort to minimize disease pathogenesis during later stages of toxoplasmosis. PMID:27378827

  14. New advances in the pathogenesis and therapy of essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Ross L; Heaney, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a hematopoietic disorder that manifests clinically as thrombocytosis, and patients with ET are at increased risk for developing thrombosis, myelofibrosis, and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Although ET was recognized as a distinct clinical syndrome more than 6 decades ago and was classified as a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) by William Dameshek in 1951, the molecular pathogenesis of ET remained unknown until 2005, when activating mutations in the JAK2 tyrosine kinase (JAK2V617F) were identified in a significant proportion of patients with ET, polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). In addition, subsequent studies have identified gain-of-function mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor (MPL) in a subset of patients with JAK2V617F-negative ET, suggesting that JAK2 activation by distinct mechanisms contributes to the pathogenesis of ET. Despite these important observations, important questions remain regarding the role of JAK2/MPL mutations in ET pathogenesis, the etiology of JAK2/MPL negative ET, the factors that distinguish ET from other MPNs with the JAK2V617F mutation, and the role of JAK2-targeted therapies for the treatment of these MPNs.

  15. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  16. Novel Insights into the Pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's-associated Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Chun-Lei; Chen, Xu-Yong; Feng, Jie-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically summary the updated results about the pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's-associated enterocolitis (HAEC). Besides, we discussed the research key and direction based on these results. Data Sources: Our data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed from 1975 to 2015, with keywords “Hirschsprung enterocolitis”, “Hirschsprung's enterocolitis”, “Hirschsprung's-associated enterocolitis”, “Hirschsprung-associated enterocolitis”, “HAEC”, and “EC”. Study Selection: Articles regarding the pathogenesis of HAEC were selected, and the articles mainly regarding the diagnosis, surgical approach, treatment, and follow-up were excluded. Results: Several factors, mainly including mucus barrier, intestinal microbiota, and immune function, as well as some other factors such as genetic variations and surgical reasons, have been found to be related to the pathogenesis of HAEC. Changed quantity and barrier property of mucus, different composition of microbiota, and an abnormal immune state work together or separately trigger HAEC. Conclusions: The maintenance of intestinal homeostasis is due to a well cooperation of microbiota, mucus barrier, and immune system. If any part presents abnormal, intestinal homeostasis will be broken. Meanwhile, for patients with Hirschsprung's disease or HAEC, dysfunction of these parts has been found. Thus, the happening of HAEC may be mainly attributed to the disorders of intestinal microbiota, mucus barrier, and immune system. PMID:27270548

  17. Neutrophils in the pathogenesis and manifestations of SLE.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2011-09-27

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unclear etiology that affects mostly women of childbearing age. Profound abnormalities in both innate and adaptive immunity triggered by genetic and environmental factors are well documented to play an important part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Nonetheless, the role of neutrophils--the most abundant immune cell type--in the pathology of this disease has been unclear. Over the past decade, compelling evidence has emerged that implicates neutrophils in the initiation and perpetuation of SLE and also in the resultant organ damage frequently observed in patients with this disease. SLE-derived low-density granulocytes (LDGs) induce vascular damage and synthesize increased amounts of type I interferons and, as such, could play a prominent part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Furthermore, increased cell death and enhanced extracellular trap formation observed in SLE-derived neutrophils might have key roles in the induction of autoimmunity and the development of organ damage in patients with SLE. Together, these events could have significant deleterious effects and promote aberrant immune responses in this disease. This Review highlights the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of SLE, with a particular focus on the putative deleterious effects of LDGs and neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

  18. Rethinking the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Yuan; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2015-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects approximately 375 million people worldwide. Current antiviral treatment effectively controls, but rarely clears chronic HBV infection. In addition, a significant portion of chronic HBV infected patients are not suitable for currently available antiviral therapy, and still face higher risk for cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The poorly understood pathogenesis of HBV infection is the main barrier for developing more effective treatment strategies. HBV has long been viewed as non-cytopathic and the central hypothesis for HBV pathogenesis lies in the belief that hepatitis B is a host specific immunity-mediated liver disease. However, this view has been challenged by the accumulating experimental and clinical data that support a model of cytopathic HBV replication. In this article we systematically review the pathogenic role of HBV replication in hepatitis B and suggest possible HBV replication related mechanisms for HBV-mediated liver injury. We propose that a full understanding of HBV pathogenesis should consider the following elements. I. Liver injury can be caused by high levels of HBV replication and accumulation of viral products in the infected hepatocytes. II. HBV infection can be either directly cytopathic, non-cytopathic, or a mix of both in an individual patient depending upon accumulation levels of viral products that are usually associated with HBV replication activity in individual infected hepatocytes.

  19. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cytochrome P450 in HIV pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. S. S.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    High prevalence of cigarette smoking in HIV patients is associated with increased HIV pathogenesis and disease progression. While the effect of smoking on the occurrence of lung cancer has been studied extensively, the association between smoking and HIV pathogenesis is poorly studied. We have recently shown the possible role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) in smoking/nicotine-mediated viral replication. In this review, we focus on the potential role of CYP pathway in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), important constituents of cigarette smoke, mediated HIV pathogenesis. More specifically, we will discuss the role of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which are the major PAH-activating CYP enzymes. Our results have shown that treatment with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) increases viral replication in HIV-infected macrophages. CSC contains PAH, which are known to be activated by CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 into procarcinogens/toxic metabolites. The expression of these CYPs is regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHR), the cellular target of PAH, and an important player in various diseases including cancer. We propose that PAH/AHR-mediated CYP pathway is a novel target to develop new interventions for HIV positive smokers. PMID:26082767

  1. Semi-automated confocal imaging of fungal pathogenesis on plants: microscopic analysis of macroscopic specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contextualizing natural genetic variation in plant disease resistance in terms of pathogenesis can provide information about the function of causal genes. Cellular mechanisms associated with pathogenesis can be elucidated with confocal microscopy, but systematic phenotyping platforms—from sample pro...

  2. The Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; de Los Santos, Teresa; Rodriguez, Luis L; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or to predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV) infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx) than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in contrast to

  3. The Pathogenesis of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; de los Santos, Teresa; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The greatest proportion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) clinical research has been dedicated to elucidating pathogenesis and enhancing vaccine protection in cattle with less efforts invested in studies specific to pigs. However, accumulated evidence from FMD outbreaks and experimental investigations suggest that critical components of FMD pathogenesis, immunology, and vaccinology cannot be extrapolated from investigations performed in cattle to explain or to predict outcomes of infection or vaccination in pigs. Furthermore, it has been shown that failure to account for these differences may have substantial consequences when FMD outbreaks occur in areas with dense pig populations. Recent experimental studies have confirmed some aspects of conventional wisdom by demonstrating that pigs are more susceptible to FMD virus (FMDV) infection via exposure of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oropharynx) than through inhalation of virus. The infection spreads rapidly within groups of pigs that are housed together, although efficiency of transmission may vary depending on virus strain and exposure intensity. Multiple investigations have demonstrated that physical separation of pigs is sufficient to prevent virus transmission under experimental conditions. Detailed pathogenesis studies have recently demonstrated that specialized epithelium within porcine oropharyngeal tonsils constitute the primary infection sites following simulated natural virus exposure. Furthermore, epithelium of the tonsil of the soft palate supports substantial virus replication during the clinical phase of infection, thus providing large amounts of virus that can be shed into the environment. Due to massive amplification and shedding of virus, acutely infected pigs constitute a considerable source of contagion. FMDV infection results in modulation of several components of the host immune response. The infection is ultimately cleared in association with a strong humoral response and, in contrast to

  4. The use of animal infection models to study the pathogenesis of melioidosis and glanders.

    PubMed

    Woods, Donald E

    2002-11-01

    The use of animal infection models is central to the study of microbial pathogenesis. In combination with genetic, immunological and antigen purification techniques, much can be learned regarding the pathogenesis of diseases caused by microorganisms. This update focuses on the recent use of animal infection models to study the pathogenesis of melioidosis and glanders.

  5. The Pathogenesis of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Further Developments in our Understanding.

    PubMed

    Ajjan, R A; Weetman, A P

    2015-09-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is part of a spectrum of thyroid autoimmune conditions and this review provides an update on the latest developments in the field. HT has a genetic predisposition with a number of immune-related and thyroid-specific genes conferring disease susceptibility. However, disentangling genes with protective and predisposing effect is a complex process that requires further work. The recent increase in the incidence of HT implicates environmental factors in disease pathogenesis including improved hygiene, increased dietary iodine intake, new treatment modalities and chemical agents. Additional unmodifiable predisposing factors include stress, climate, age and gender. Both cellular and humoral immunity play a role in HT pathogenesis. Defects in T regulatory cells and increased activation of follicular helper T cells may have a role in disease initiation/perpetuation. Infiltrating lymphocytes can be directly cytotoxic to thyroid follicular cells (TFC) or may affect cell viability/function indirectly through cytokine production, which alters TFC integrity and modulates their metabolic and immune function. Thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies are present in the majority of HT patients and help with management decisions. Antibodies against the sodium iodide symporter and pendrin are present in a minority with little known about their clinical relevance. In addition to immune cells, recent work has identified DNA fragments, generated following cell death, and micro RNA as potential factors in HT pathogenesis. Despite the large number of studies, the mechanistic pathways in HT are still not fully understood and further work is required to enhance our knowledge and identify novel preventative and therapeutic clinical targets. PMID:26361257

  6. Ammon's horn sclerosis: its pathogenesis and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Sano, K; Kirino, T

    1990-08-01

    Sclerosis of the cornu Ammonis or Ammon's horn sclerosis (AHS) is an "often-described, yet hitherto enigmatic phenomena" as Spielmyer put it in 1927. It has been found in cases with ischemia, anoxia or hypoglycemia and in more than half of the epileptic brains examined at autopsy. Various theories about its pathogenesis have been propounded. Among them, the "Pathoklise" theory of the Vogts and the vascular theory of Spielmeyer and his associates were prevailing until recently. In 1953, two articles were published to contribute to the pathogenesis of ictal automatism (a type of complex partial or temporal lobe seizures). One is the incisural sclerosis theory by Penfield and his associates and the other is the Ammon's horn sclerosis theory by Sano and Malamud. The former authors described a diffuse sclerosis of the infero-mesial temporal structures without, however, specifically relating it to AHS. They considered it was the result of localized anoxia of that portion of the brain caused by incisural herniation occurring during parturition. Sano and Malamud maintained that AHS is a result of convulsions, a distinct scar adjacent to which epileptogenic foci may develop in the course of time to cause ictal automatism. The latter theory was corroborated by Sano, Falconer and others. Falconer expanded the theory to the assertion that not only ictal automatism but other types of intractable epilepsy may be due to "mesial temporal (Ammon's horn) sclerosis". The most recent development in the pathogenesis of AHS is the excitotoxicity theory. Namely, AHS is caused by excessive excitation of neurons, probably by putative excitatory neurotransmitters, especially, glutamate. For this theory, there is a significant body of evidence. The problem of AHS, an old research subject and a matter of long-lasting controversy, has now been updated and become one of the newest topics in the field of experimental neurobiology.

  7. Hemoglobinopathies: Slicing the Gordian Knot of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Steve M.; Cerami, Carla; Fairhurst, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria kills over 500,000 children every year and has been a scourge of humans for millennia. Owing to the co-evolution of humans and P. falciparum parasites, the human genome is imprinted with polymorphisms that not only confer innate resistance to falciparum malaria, but also cause hemoglobinopathies. These genetic traits—including hemoglobin S (HbS), hemoglobin C (HbC), and α-thalassemia—are the most common monogenic human disorders and can confer remarkable degrees of protection from severe, life-threatening falciparum malaria in African children: the risk is reduced 70% by homozygous HbC and 90% by heterozygous HbS (sickle-cell trait). Importantly, this protection is principally present for severe disease and largely absent for P. falciparum infection, suggesting that these hemoglobinopathies specifically neutralize the parasite's in vivo mechanisms of pathogenesis. These hemoglobin variants thus represent a “natural experiment” to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which P. falciparum produces clinical morbidity, which remain partially obscured due to the complexity of interactions between this parasite and its human host. Multiple lines of evidence support a restriction of parasite growth by various hemoglobinopathies, and recent data suggest this phenomenon may result from host microRNA interference with parasite metabolism. Multiple hemoglobinopathies mitigate the pathogenic potential of parasites by interfering with the export of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) to the surface of the host red blood cell. Few studies have investigated their effects upon the activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, although recent murine studies suggest a role for heme oxygenase-1 in protection. Ultimately, the identification of mechanisms of protection and pathogenesis can inform future therapeutics and preventive measures. Hemoglobinopathies slice the “Gordian knot” of host and parasite

  8. The Pathogenesis of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: Further Developments in our Understanding.

    PubMed

    Ajjan, R A; Weetman, A P

    2015-09-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is part of a spectrum of thyroid autoimmune conditions and this review provides an update on the latest developments in the field. HT has a genetic predisposition with a number of immune-related and thyroid-specific genes conferring disease susceptibility. However, disentangling genes with protective and predisposing effect is a complex process that requires further work. The recent increase in the incidence of HT implicates environmental factors in disease pathogenesis including improved hygiene, increased dietary iodine intake, new treatment modalities and chemical agents. Additional unmodifiable predisposing factors include stress, climate, age and gender. Both cellular and humoral immunity play a role in HT pathogenesis. Defects in T regulatory cells and increased activation of follicular helper T cells may have a role in disease initiation/perpetuation. Infiltrating lymphocytes can be directly cytotoxic to thyroid follicular cells (TFC) or may affect cell viability/function indirectly through cytokine production, which alters TFC integrity and modulates their metabolic and immune function. Thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies are present in the majority of HT patients and help with management decisions. Antibodies against the sodium iodide symporter and pendrin are present in a minority with little known about their clinical relevance. In addition to immune cells, recent work has identified DNA fragments, generated following cell death, and micro RNA as potential factors in HT pathogenesis. Despite the large number of studies, the mechanistic pathways in HT are still not fully understood and further work is required to enhance our knowledge and identify novel preventative and therapeutic clinical targets.

  9. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  10. Necrotic enteritis in broilers: an updated review on the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Timbermont, L; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis and related subclinical disease have become economically significant problems for the broiler industry. Fortunately, scientific interest in this topic has grown: new C. perfringens virulence factors have been discovered and new insight gained about the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. It has been shown that alpha toxin, for a long time thought to be the key virulence factor, is not essential for the development of the disease. Moreover, it is now clearly established that only certain C. perfringens strains are capable of inducing necrotic enteritis under specific conditions that predispose to the disease and they constitute only a minority in the intestinal tract of healthy chickens. A novel pore-forming toxin, NetB, has been identified in these virulent avian C. perfringens strains. Using a gene knockout mutant, it has been shown that NetB is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. In addition to toxin production, other factors have been described that contribute to the ability of certain C. perfringens strains to cause necrotic enteritis in broilers. It has been suggested that proteolytic enzymes play an important role in the initial stages of necrotic enteritis since the villi are first affected at the level of the basement membrane and the lateral domain of the enterocytes. In field outbreaks of necrotic enteritis, a single clone of C. perfringens is dominant in intestines of all affected birds, as opposed to the mixture of different C. perfringens strains that can be isolated from healthy bird intestines. It has been proposed that bacteriocin production is responsible for the dominance of a single strain in necrotic enteritis cases. Furthermore, it has been shown that virulent strains are more able to adhere to extracellular matrix molecules than non-virulent strains. The current knowledge on the pathogenesis of the disease has been summarized in this short review.

  11. The Etiologic Role of Infectious Antigens in Sarcoidosis Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Celada, Lindsay J; Hawkins, Charlene; Drake, Wonder P

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology, most commonly involving the lung, skin, lymph node, and eyes. Molecular and immunologic studies continue to strengthen the association of sarcoidosis with infectious antigens. Independent studies report the presence of microbial nucleic acids and proteins within sarcoidosis specimens. Complementary immunologic studies also support the role of infectious agents in sarcoidosis pathogenesis. Case reports and clinical trials have emerged regarding the efficacy of antimicrobials. They support increasing efforts to identify novel therapeutics, such as antimicrobials, that will have an impact on the observed increase in sarcoidosis morbidity and mortality.

  12. Alzheimer's pathogenesis and its link to the mitochondrion.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, C; Orsucci, D; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Siciliano, G; Bonuccelli, U; Mancuso, M

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. This neurodegenerative disorder is clinically characterized by impairment of cognitive functions and changes in behaviour and personality. The pathogenesis of AD is still unclear. Recent evidence supports some role of mitochondria dysfunction and oxidative stress in the development of the neurodegenerative process. In this review, we discuss the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, focusing on the mechanisms that lead to mitochondrial impairment, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration, a "vicious circle" that ends in dementia.

  13. [Juvenil idiopathic arthritis. Part 1: diagnosis, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations].

    PubMed

    Espada, Graciela

    2009-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is not a single disease and constitutes an heterogeneous group of illnesses or inflammatory disorders. This new nomenclature encompasses different disease categories, each of which has different presentation, clinical signs, symptoms, and outcome. The cause of the disease is still unknown but both environmental and genetic factors seem to be related to its pathogenesis. Is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. In this article, clinical manifestation, new classification and approach to diagnosis are reviewed.

  14. Pathogenesis of veno-occlusive liver disease after radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo, L.F.; Colby, T.V.

    1980-11-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease is characterized structurally by progressive fibrous obliteration of central veins (veno-occlusive disease (VOD)). The pathogenesis is unknown. Samples of liver from 11 patients with radiation-induced VOD were studied by light and electron microscopy for evidence of central vein thrombosis. The patients had received fractionated radiation with total doses of 1850 to 4050 rads, or single doses of 1000 rads. In addition, six patients had received chemotherapy. We postulate that ionizing radiation injures preferentially the endothelial cells of central veins, which leads to focal deposition of fibrin. The resulting fibrin network is eventually replaced by collagen, causing fibrous occlusion.

  15. Cutaneous porphyrias part I: epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, diagnosis, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Horner, Mary E; Alikhan, Ali; Tintle, Suzanne; Tortorelli, Silvia; Davis, Dawn Marie R; Hand, Jennifer L

    2013-12-01

    The porphyrias are a group of disorders characterized by defects in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Many present with skin findings including photosensitivity, bullae, hypertrichosis, and scarring. Systemic symptoms may include abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric changes, anemia, and liver disease. With advances in DNA analysis, researchers are discovering the underlying genetic causes of the porphyrias, enabling family members to be tested for genetic mutations. Here we present a comprehensive review of porphyria focusing on those with cutaneous manifestations. In Part I, we have included the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, diagnosis, and histopathology. Treatment and management options will be discussed in Part II.

  16. Update in Pathogenesis and Prospective in Treatment of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Terrin, Gianluca; Scipione, Antonella; De Curtis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is among the most common and devastating diseases in neonates and, despite the significant advances in neonatal clinical and basic science investigations, its etiology is largely understood, specific treatment strategies are lacking, and morbidity and mortality remain high. Improvements in the understanding of pathogenesis of NEC may have therapeutic consequences. Pharmacologic inhibition of toll-like receptor signaling, the use of novel nutritional strategies, and microflora modulation may represent novel promising approaches to the prevention and treatment of NEC. This review, starting from the recent acquisitions in the pathogenic mechanisms of NEC, focuses on current and possible therapeutic perspectives. PMID:25147804

  17. Infectious diseases of the nervous system: pathogenesis and worldwide impact.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Ben

    2008-11-01

    The 2008 Infectious Diseases of the Nervous System: Pathogenesis and World Impact conference was held at the Pasteur Institute of Paris, and was the first worldwide conference on neuroinfections. While viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis are being actively studied in the developed world, much less attention is paid to the often fatal nervous system infections caused by neurotropic viruses, parasites and mycobacteria that represent important health problems in tropical regions. This meeting fostered worldwide interactions between scientists and stimulated the exchange of the latest research results on these neglected neurotropic pathogens. PMID:18988120

  18. Molecular Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Norihiko; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays a crucial role in gastric carcinogenesis. H pylori exerts oncogenic effects on gastric mucosa through complex interaction between bacterial virulence factors and host inflammatory responses. On the other hand, gastric cancer develops via stepwise accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in H pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Recent comprehensive analyses of gastric cancer genomes indicate a multistep process of genetic alterations as well as possible molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Both genetic processes of gastric cancer development and molecular oncogenic pathways related to H pylori infection are important to completely understand the pathogenesis of H pylori-related gastric cancer.

  19. The Molecular Pathogenesis of Pituitary Adenomas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaobing

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary tumors represent the most common intracranial neoplasms accompanying serious morbidity through mass effects and inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones. Understanding the etiology of pituitary tumorigenesis will facilitate the development of satisfactory treatment for pituitary adenomas. Although the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas is largely unknown, considerable evidence indicates that the pituitary tumorigenesis is a complex process involving multiple factors, including genetic and epigenetic changes. This review summarized the recent progress in the study of pituitary tumorigenesis, focusing on the role of tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes and microRNAs. PMID:24396688

  20. Roles of Rack1 Proteins in Fungal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi cause diseases on various organisms. Despite their differences in life cycles, fungal pathogens use well-conserved proteins and pathways to regulate developmental and infection processes. In this review, we focus on Rack1, a multifaceted scaffolding protein involved in various biological processes. Rack1 is well conserved in eukaryotes and plays important roles in fungi, though limited studies have been conducted. To accelerate the study of Rack1 proteins in fungi, we review the functions of Rack1 proteins in model and pathogenic fungi and summarize recent progress on how Rack1 proteins are involved in fungal pathogenesis.

  1. [Recent advances in dry eye: etiology, pathogenesis and management].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Pan, Zhi-qiang

    2013-09-01

    Dry eye is one of the most common and multifactorial disease of the ocular surface that results in ocular discomfort, blurred vision, reduced quality of life, and decreased productivity. Recent advances in our knowledge of the causation of dry eye open opportunities for improving diagnosis , and disease management and for developing new, more effective therapies to manage this widely prevalent and debilitating disease state. In light of the above knowledge, the present article reviews the newer theories and reports on etiology , pathogenesis and management of dry eye.

  2. RNA Viruses: RNA Roles in Pathogenesis, Coreplication and Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Sun, Binlian; Mallardo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The review intends to present and recapitulate the current knowledge on the roles and importance of regulatory RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, RNA binding proteins and enzymes processing RNAs or activated by RNAs, in cells infected by RNA viruses. The review focuses on how non-coding RNAs are involved in RNA virus replication, pathogenesis and host response, especially in retroviruses HIV, with examples of the mechanisms of action, transcriptional regulation, and promotion of increased stability of their targets or their degradation. PMID:27047253

  3. Sirtuins as novel players in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Turkmen, Kultigin; Karagoz, Ali; Kucuk, Adem

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a systemic and complex disease with micro and macrovascular complications that result from impaired metabolic pathways and genetic susceptibilities. DM has been accepted as an epidemic worldwide during the last two decades. A substantial gap in our knowledge exists regarding the pathophysiology of this metabolic disorder despite the improved diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches. Sirtuins are a group of NAD+ dependent enzymes that are involved in cellular homeostasis due to their deacetylating activity. In the present review, we aimed to discuss the role of associated sirtuins in the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:25512793

  4. Anthrax lethal and edema toxins in anthrax pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H

    2014-06-01

    The pathophysiological effects resulting from many bacterial diseases are caused by exotoxins released by the bacteria. Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming bacterium, is such a pathogen, causing anthrax through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. B. anthracis causes natural infection in humans and animals and has been a top bioterrorism concern since the 2001 anthrax attacks in the USA. The exotoxins secreted by B. anthracis use capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) as the major toxin receptor and play essential roles in pathogenesis during the entire course of the disease. This review focuses on the activities of anthrax toxins and their roles in initial and late stages of anthrax infection.

  5. Animal models for studying dengue pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Kavishna, Ranmali; Alonso, Sylvie; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2015-11-01

    Development of a suitable animal model for dengue virus disease is critical for understanding pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of antiviral drugs and vaccines. Many laboratory animal models of dengue virus infection have been investigated, but the challenges of recapitulating the complete disease still remain. In this review, we provide a comprehensive coverage of existing models, from man to mouse, with a specific focus on recent advances in mouse models for addressing the mechanistic aspects of severe dengue in humans. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on flavivirus drug discovery. PMID:26304704

  6. Roles of Rack1 Proteins in Fungal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi cause diseases on various organisms. Despite their differences in life cycles, fungal pathogens use well-conserved proteins and pathways to regulate developmental and infection processes. In this review, we focus on Rack1, a multifaceted scaffolding protein involved in various biological processes. Rack1 is well conserved in eukaryotes and plays important roles in fungi, though limited studies have been conducted. To accelerate the study of Rack1 proteins in fungi, we review the functions of Rack1 proteins in model and pathogenic fungi and summarize recent progress on how Rack1 proteins are involved in fungal pathogenesis. PMID:27656651

  7. The Sympathetic Nervous System in the Pathogenesis of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wittstein, Ilan S

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is a unique clinical condition of acute heart failure and reversible left ventricular dysfunction frequently precipitated by sudden emotional or physical stress. There is growing evidence that exaggerated sympathetic stimulation is central to the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Precisely how catecholamines mediate myocardial stunning in takotsubo syndrome remains incompletely understood; but possible mechanisms include epicardial spasm, microvascular dysfunction, direct adrenergic-receptor-mediated myocyte injury, and systemic vascular effects that alter ventricular-arterial coupling. Risk factors that increase sympathetic tone and/or catecholamine sensitivity may render individuals particularly susceptible to takotsubo syndrome during episodes of acute stress. PMID:27638019

  8. Review of Critical Issues in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Alan D; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F; Simpson, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    About a decade age, loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin molecule were first implicated in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris and, subsequently, of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases. Since then, intensive study of the role of filaggrin null mutations have led to other milestones in understanding the pathologic pathways in these diseases, including the initiation, maintenance, and promotion of the disease processes. The result has been new and emerging clinical and pharmacologic strategies for early identification of and intervention in atopic diseases. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S89-S91. PMID:27525507

  9. New Paradigms in the Pathogenesis of Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Coticchia, James Mark; Chen, Michael; Sachdeva, Livjot; Mutchnick, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a multifactorial disease with a significant socioeconomic impact. The pathogenesis of AOM is attributed to a variety of well-established internal and extrinsic factors. Recent evidence strongly points to bacterial biofilm formation as an important contributor to this disease entity. The nasopharynx is a likely reservoir for infection with subsequent seeding of pathogens to the middle ear via planktonic shedding. Various modalities have been used to directly detect biofilm formation in the middle ear mucosa of children with AOM. Further insights into this disease may lead to new strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:24400296

  10. RNA Viruses: RNA Roles in Pathogenesis, Coreplication and Viral Load.

    PubMed

    Poltronieri, Palmiro; Sun, Binlian; Mallardo, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    The review intends to present and recapitulate the current knowledge on the roles and importance of regulatory RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, RNA binding proteins and enzymes processing RNAs or activated by RNAs, in cells infected by RNA viruses. The review focuses on how non-coding RNAs are involved in RNA virus replication, pathogenesis and host response, especially in retroviruses HIV, with examples of the mechanisms of action, transcriptional regulation, and promotion of increased stability of their targets or their degradation. PMID:27047253

  11. Animal models for studying dengue pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Kavishna, Ranmali; Alonso, Sylvie; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2015-11-01

    Development of a suitable animal model for dengue virus disease is critical for understanding pathogenesis and for preclinical testing of antiviral drugs and vaccines. Many laboratory animal models of dengue virus infection have been investigated, but the challenges of recapitulating the complete disease still remain. In this review, we provide a comprehensive coverage of existing models, from man to mouse, with a specific focus on recent advances in mouse models for addressing the mechanistic aspects of severe dengue in humans. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on flavivirus drug discovery.

  12. Clinical Presentation, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ralf J.

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune skin blistering disease. The pathogenic relevance of autoantibodies targeting type VII collagen (COL7) has been well-documented. Therefore, EBA is a prototypical autoimmune disease with a well-characterized pathogenic relevance of autoantibody binding to the target antigen. EBA is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.2 new cases per million and per year. The current treatment of EBA relies on general immunosuppressive therapy, which does not lead to remission in all cases. Therefore, there is a high, so far unmet medical need for the development of novel therapeutic options. During the last 10 years, several novel in vitro and in vivo models of EBA have been established. These models demonstrated a critical role of the genetic background, T cells, and cytokines for mediating the loss of tolerance towards COL7. Neutrophils, complement activation, Fc gamma receptor engagement, cytokines, several molecules involved in cell signaling, release of reactive oxygen species, and matrix metalloproteinases are crucial for autoantibody-induced tissue injury in EBA. Based on this growing understanding of the diseases' pathogenesis, several potential novel therapeutic targets have emerged. In this review, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options for EBA are discussed in detail. PMID:23956869

  13. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E.; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  14. Nuclear Receptor Expression and Function in Human Lung Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihye; Sato, Mitsuo; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Larsen, Jill E.; Minna, John D.; Cha, Jeong-Heon; Jeong, Yangsik

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is caused by combinations of diverse genetic mutations. Here, to understand the relevance of nuclear receptors (NRs) in the oncogene-associated lung cancer pathogenesis, we investigated the expression profile of the entire 48 NR members by using QPCR analysis in a panel of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) that included precancerous and tumorigenic HBECs harboring oncogenic K-rasV12 and/or p53 alterations. The analysis of the profile revealed that oncogenic alterations accompanied transcriptional changes in the expression of 19 NRs in precancerous HBECs and 15 NRs according to the malignant progression of HBECs. Amongst these, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a NR chosen as a proof-of-principle study, showed increased expression in precancerous HBECs, which was surprisingly reversed when these HBECs acquired full in vivo tumorigenicity. Notably, PPARγ activation by thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment reversed the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in precancerous HBECs. In fully tumorigenic HBECs with inducible expression of PPARγ, TZD treatments inhibited tumor cell growth, clonogenecity, and cell migration in a PPARγ-sumoylation dependent manner. Mechanistically, the sumoylation of liganded-PPARγ decreased COX2 expression and increased 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression. This suggests that ligand-mediated sumoylation of PPARγ plays an important role in lung cancer pathogenesis by modulating prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:26244663

  15. Problems concerning the prophylaxis, pathogenesis and therapy of diphtheria

    PubMed Central

    Tasman, A.; Lansberg, H. P.

    1957-01-01

    The first part of this article on the prophylaxis, pathogenesis and therapy of diphtheria is devoted to an epidemiological survey of the results achieved with active immunization against the disease. From these results it can be concluded that active immunization has been largely responsible for the decrease in the morbidity and mortality rates which has taken place in the past half-century. In the second part, the authors deal at length with problems relating to the pathogenesis and therapy of the disease, discussing such subjects as the different types of diphtheria bacteria, the significance of non-virulent strains, the action of bacteriophages, the plurality of diphtheria toxin, the use of antibacterial sera, and the importance of the “avidity” of antitoxic sera. Finally, taking into consideration the data presented in the preceding parts, the authors put forward their views as to the cause of diphtheria, the measures which should be taken to control it, and the most satisfactory form of therapy. PMID:13472439

  16. Aortic stenosis: insights on pathogenesis and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Carità, Patrizia; Coppola, Giuseppe; Novo, Giuseppina; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Guglielmo, Marco; Balasus, Fabio; Novo, Salvatore; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Moscarelli, Marco; Fattouch, Khalil; Corrado, Egle

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular heart disease in the Western populations, with an estimated overall prevalence of 3% in adults over 75 years. To understand its patho-biological processes represents a priority. In elderly patients, AS usually involves trileaflet valves and is referred to as degenerative calcific processes. Scientific evidence suggests the involvement of an active “atherosclerosis-like” pathogenesis in the initiation phase of degenerative AS. To the contrary, the progression could be driven by different forces (such as mechanical stress, genetic factors and interaction between inflammation and calcification). The improved understanding presents potentially new therapeutic targets for preventing and inhibiting the development and progression of the disease. Furthermore, in clinical practice the management of AS patients implies the evaluation of generalized atherosclerotic manifestations (i.e., in the coronary and carotid arteries) even for prognostic reasons. In counselling elderly patients, the risk stratification should address individual frailty beyond the generic risk scores. In these regard, the co-morbidities, and in particular those linked to the global atherosclerotic burden, should be carefully investigated in order to define the risk/benefit ratio for invasive treatment strategies. We present a detailed overview of insights in pathogenesis of AS with possible practical implications. PMID:27582763

  17. Update on Legionnaires’ disease: pathogenesis, epidemiology, detection and control

    PubMed Central

    Hilbi, Hubert; Jarraud, Sophie; Hartland, Elizabeth; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Legionellosis or Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging and often-fatal form of pneumonia that is most severe in elderly and immunocompromised people, an ever-increasing risk group for infection. In recent years, the genomics of Legionella spp. has significantly increased our knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease by providing new insights into the evolution and genetic and physiological basis of Legionella–host interactions. The 7th international conference on Legionella, Legionella 2009, illustrated many recent conceptual advances in epidemiology, pathogenesis and ecology. Experts in different fields presented new findings on basic mechanisms of pathogen–host interactions and bacterial evolution, as well as the clinical management and environmental prevalence and persistence of Legionella. The presentations revealed remarkable facts about the genetic and metabolic basis of the intracellular lifestyle of Legionella and reported on its striking ability to manipulate host cell processes by molecular mimicry. Together, these investigations will lead to new approaches for the treatment and prevention of Legionnaires’ disease. PMID:20149105

  18. Update on ankylosing spondylitis: current concepts in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is an insidiously progressive and debilitating form of arthritis involving the axial skeleton. The long delay in diagnosis and insufficient response to currently available therapeutics both advocate for a greater understanding of disease pathogenesis. Genome-wide association studies of this highly genetic disease have implicated specific immune pathways, including the interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 pathway, control of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation, amino acid trimming for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen presentation, and other genes controlling CD8 and CD4 T cell subsets. The relevance of these pathways has borne out in animal and human subject studies, in particular, the response to novel therapeutic agents. Genetics and the findings of autoantibodies in ankylosing spondylitis revisit the question of autoimmune vs. autoinflammatory etiology. As environmental partners to genetics, recent attention has focused on the roles of microbiota and biomechanical stress in initiating and perpetuating inflammation. Herein, we review these current developments in the investigation of ankylosing spondylitis pathogenesis.

  19. Hypoxia and Fungal Pathogenesis: To Air or Not To Air?

    PubMed Central

    Grahl, Nora; Shepardson, Kelly M.; Chung, Dawoon

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 3 decades, the frequency of life-threatening human fungal infections has increased as advances in medical therapies, solid-organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, an increasing geriatric population, and HIV infections have resulted in significant rises in susceptible patient populations. Although significant advances have been made in understanding how fungi cause disease, the dynamic microenvironments encountered by fungi during infection and the mechanisms by which they adapt to these microenvironments are not fully understood. As inhibiting and preventing in vivo fungal growth are main goals of antifungal therapies, understanding in vivo fungal metabolism in these host microenvironments is critical for the improvement of existing therapies or the design of new approaches. In this minireview, we focus on the emerging appreciation that pathogenic fungi like Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus are exposed to oxygen-limited or hypoxic microenvironments during fungal pathogenesis. The implications of these in vivo hypoxic microenvironments for fungal metabolism and pathogenesis are discussed with an aim toward understanding the potential impact of hypoxia on invasive fungal infection outcomes. PMID:22447924

  20. [Pathogenesis of cutaneous lupus erythematosus from LE-prone mice].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi; Yoshimasu, Takashi; Kanazawa, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models are similar but not identical to human diseases. However, they are important for research into the pathogenesis underlying autoimmune diseases because they allow us to evaluate similarities and differences between human diseases and mouse models. There are many inbred strains of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-prone mice including New Zealand Black (NZB), F1 hybrids of NZB x New Zealand White (NZW) (B/W F1), MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr), and BXSB mice. The postulated etiology of these murine diseases includes many genetic and extrinsic factors such as retroviruses, an impaired balance of T cell interaction, ultraviolet irradiation, etc. For examples, genetic studies of MRL/lpr mice revealed that the appearance of macroscopic LE-like skin lesions needs the lpr mutation plus an additional factor in an autosomal dominant fashion. The candidate is ultraviolet (UV) B light, the susceptibility to which is regulated by the genetic background. Such abnormalities described in SLE now span the spectrum from innate immunity to acquired immunity. In this review, based on historical review, we focus on skin lesions from the well-studied MRL/lpr and B/W F1 mouse and discuss how SLE-prone mice can contribute to a better understanding of cutaneous LE pathogenesis. PMID:20818144

  1. Pathogenesis, Emerging therapeutic targets and Treatment in Sialidosis

    PubMed Central

    d’Azzo, Alessandra; Machado, Eda; Annunziata, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sialidosis is a neurosomatic, lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by mutations in the NEU1 gene, encoding the lysosomal sialidase NEU1. Deficient enzyme activity results in impaired processing/degradation of sialo-glycoproteins, and accumulation of oversialylated metabolites. Sialidosis is considered an orphan disorder for which no therapy is currently available. Areas covered The review describes the clinical forms of sialidosis and the NEU1 mutations so far identified; NEU1 requirement to complex with the protective protein/cathepsin A for stability and activation; and the pathogenic effects of NEU1 deficiency. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in animal models uncovered basic cellular pathways downstream of NEU1 and its substrates, which may be implicated in more common adult (neurodegenerative) diseases. The development of a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with galactosialidosis may prove suitable for sialidosis patients with the attenuated form of the disease. Expert opinion Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the development of therapies for orphan LSDs, like sialidosis. Given the small number of potentially eligible patients, the way to treat sialidosis would be through the coordinated effort of clinical centers, which provide diagnosis and care for these patients, and the basic research labs that work towards understanding the disease pathogenesis. PMID:26949572

  2. Pathogenesis and Individualized Treatment for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome in Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Rui; Jin, Hong-Fang; Du, Jun-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is one of the major causes of orthostatic intolerance in children. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis and the progress of individualized treatment for POTS in children. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review are mainly from articles included in PubMed and EMBASE. Study Selection: The original articles and critical reviews about POTS were selected for this review. Results: Studies have shown that POTS might be related to several factors including hypovolemia, high catecholamine status, abnormal local vascular tension, and decreased skeletal muscle pump activity. In addition to exercise training, the first-line treatments mainly include oral rehydration salts, beta-adrenoreceptor blockers, and alpha-adrenoreceptor agonists. However, reports about the effectiveness of various treatments are diverse. By analyzing the patient's physiological indexes and biomarkers before the treatment, the efficacy of medication could be well predicted. Conclusions: The pathogenesis of POTS is multifactorial, including hypovolemia, abnormal catecholamine state, and vascular dysfunction. Biomarker-directed individualized treatment is an important strategy for the management of POTS children. PMID:27625098

  3. Molecular aspects of bovine cystic ovarian disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Hugo H; Marelli, Belkis E; Rey, Florencia; Amweg, Ayelen N; Díaz, Pablo U; Stangaferro, Matías L; Salvetti, Natalia R

    2015-06-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is one of the main causes of reproductive failure in cattle and causes severe economic loss to the dairy farm industry because it increases both days open in the post partum period and replacement rates due to infertility. This disease is the consequence of the failure of a mature follicle to ovulate at the time of ovulation in the estrous cycle. This review examines the evidence for the role of altered steroid and gonadotropin signaling systems and the proliferation/apoptosis balance in the ovary with cystic structures. This evidence suggests that changes in the expression of ovarian molecular components associated with these cellular mechanisms could play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of COD. The evidence also shows that gonadotropin receptor expression in bovine cystic follicles is altered, which suggests that changes in the signaling system of gonadotropins could play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD. Ovaries from animals with COD exhibit a disrupted steroid receptor pattern with modifications in the expression of coregulatory proteins. These changes in the pathways of endocrine action would trigger the changes in proliferation and apoptosis underlying the aberrant persistence of follicular cysts. Free Spanish abstract: A Spanish translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/149/6/R251/suppl/DC1.

  4. Pathogenesis beyond the cancer clone(s) in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Giada

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 4 decades, basic research has provided crucial information regarding the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. In particular, the relevance of cancer microenvironment (including both cellular and noncellular elements) and the concept of clonal evolution and heterogeneity have emerged as important in cancer pathogenesis, immunologic escape, and resistance to therapy. Multiple myeloma (MM), a cancer of terminally differentiated plasma cells, is emblematic of the impact of cancer microenvironment and the role of clonal evolution. Although genetic and epigenetic aberrations occur in MM and evolve over time under the pressure of exogenous stimuli, they are also largely present in premalignant plasma cell dyscrasia such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), suggesting that genetic mutations alone are necessary, but not sufficient, for myeloma transformation. The role of bone marrow microenvironment in mediating survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy in myeloma is well established; and although an appealing speculation, its role in fostering the evolution of MGUS or SMM into MM is yet to be proven. In this review, we discuss MM pathogenesis with a particular emphasis on the role of bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:25838343

  5. Pathogenesis beyond the cancer clone(s) in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Giada; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2015-05-14

    Over the past 4 decades, basic research has provided crucial information regarding the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. In particular, the relevance of cancer microenvironment (including both cellular and noncellular elements) and the concept of clonal evolution and heterogeneity have emerged as important in cancer pathogenesis, immunologic escape, and resistance to therapy. Multiple myeloma (MM), a cancer of terminally differentiated plasma cells, is emblematic of the impact of cancer microenvironment and the role of clonal evolution. Although genetic and epigenetic aberrations occur in MM and evolve over time under the pressure of exogenous stimuli, they are also largely present in premalignant plasma cell dyscrasia such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), suggesting that genetic mutations alone are necessary, but not sufficient, for myeloma transformation. The role of bone marrow microenvironment in mediating survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy in myeloma is well established; and although an appealing speculation, its role in fostering the evolution of MGUS or SMM into MM is yet to be proven. In this review, we discuss MM pathogenesis with a particular emphasis on the role of bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:25838343

  6. An update on necrotizing enterocolitis: pathogenesis and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is one of the most critical morbidities in preterm infants. The incidence of NEC is 7% in very-low-birth-weight infants, and its mortality is 15 to 30%. Infants who survive NEC have various complications, such as nosocomial infection, malnutrition, growth failure, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, and neurodevelopmental delays. The most important etiology in the pathogenesis of NEC is structural and immunological intestinal immaturity. In preterm infants with immature gastrointestinal tracts, development of NEC may be associated with a variety of factors, such as colonization with pathogenic bacteria, secondary ischemia, genetic polymorphisms conferring NEC susceptibility, anemia with red blood cell transfusion, and sensitization to cow milk proteins. To date, a variety of preventive strategies has been accepted or attempted in clinical practice with regard to the pathogenesis of NEC. These strategies include the use of breast feeding, various feeding strategies, probiotics, prebiotics, glutamine and arginine, and lactoferrin. There is substantial evidence for the efficacy of breast feeding and the use of probiotics in infants with birth weights above 1,000 g, and these strategies are commonly used in clinical practice. Other preventive strategies, however, require further research to establish their effect on NEC. PMID:22232629

  7. Aortic stenosis: insights on pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Carità, Patrizia; Coppola, Giuseppe; Novo, Giuseppina; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Guglielmo, Marco; Balasus, Fabio; Novo, Salvatore; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Moscarelli, Marco; Fattouch, Khalil; Corrado, Egle

    2016-09-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular heart disease in the Western populations, with an estimated overall prevalence of 3% in adults over 75 years. To understand its patho-biological processes represents a priority. In elderly patients, AS usually involves trileaflet valves and is referred to as degenerative calcific processes. Scientific evidence suggests the involvement of an active "atherosclerosis-like" pathogenesis in the initiation phase of degenerative AS. To the contrary, the progression could be driven by different forces (such as mechanical stress, genetic factors and interaction between inflammation and calcification). The improved understanding presents potentially new therapeutic targets for preventing and inhibiting the development and progression of the disease. Furthermore, in clinical practice the management of AS patients implies the evaluation of generalized atherosclerotic manifestations (i.e., in the coronary and carotid arteries) even for prognostic reasons. In counselling elderly patients, the risk stratification should address individual frailty beyond the generic risk scores. In these regard, the co-morbidities, and in particular those linked to the global atherosclerotic burden, should be carefully investigated in order to define the risk/benefit ratio for invasive treatment strategies. We present a detailed overview of insights in pathogenesis of AS with possible practical implications. PMID:27582763

  8. IL-33 signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Lukas F.; Riether, Carsten; Schürch, Christian M.; Banz, Yara; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Stuber, Regula; Theocharides, Alexandre P.; Li, Xiaohong; Xia, Yu; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Baerlocher, Gabriela M.; Manz, Markus G.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.; Beutler, Bruce; Krebs, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are characterized by the clonal expansion of one or more myeloid cell lineage. In most cases, proliferation of the malignant clone is ascribed to defined genetic alterations. MPNs are also associated with aberrant expression and activity of multiple cytokines; however, the mechanisms by which these cytokines contribute to disease pathogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we reveal a non-redundant role for steady-state IL-33 in supporting dysregulated myelopoiesis in a murine model of MPN. Genetic ablation of the IL-33 signaling pathway was sufficient and necessary to restore normal hematopoiesis and abrogate MPN-like disease in animals lacking the inositol phosphatase SHIP. Stromal cell–derived IL-33 stimulated the secretion of cytokines and growth factors by myeloid and non-hematopoietic cells of the BM, resulting in myeloproliferation in SHIP-deficient animals. Additionally, in the transgenic JAK2V617F model, the onset of MPN was delayed in animals lacking IL-33 in radio-resistant cells. In human BM, we detected increased numbers of IL-33–expressing cells, specifically in biopsies from MPN patients. Exogenous IL-33 promoted cytokine production and colony formation by primary CD34+ MPN stem/progenitor cells from patients. Moreover, IL-33 improved the survival of JAK2V617F-positive cell lines. Together, these data indicate a central role for IL-33 signaling in the pathogenesis of MPNs. PMID:26011644

  9. Exfoliative glaucoma: new evidence in the pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Miglior, Stefano; Bertuzzi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliation or pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXF) is an age-related ocular and systemic disease in which abnormal extracellular material is produced and accumulates in many tissues. PXF is the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma (OAG). PXFG is a particularly aggressive type of OAG, which runs with a faster rate of progression and poorer response to medical therapy than primary OAG (POAG). The prevalence of the condition shows huge variations among different population, Scandinavian and Mediterranean race being the most affected. Many genetics and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis and remarkable progresses in understanding the involved factors have been achieved in the past years. Population-based studies have identified mutations on the lysil-oxidase-like 1(LOXL1) gene as a risk factor for PXFS. Environmental and behavioral factors such as latitude of residence, caffeine intake, and vitamins deficiency are under investigation for a possible involvement in determining the disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Treatment options are similar to those recommended for POAG. Exfoliation syndrome predisposes to capsular rupture, zonular dehiscence, and vitreous loss during cataract extraction. Laser trabeculoplasty has been demonstrated to show good clinical outcomes in PXF patients. A review of the current literature and scientific evidences on pathogenesis and treatment is presented. PMID:26518081

  10. Renin-angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Regina Maria; dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; da Costa Dias, Filipi Leles; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões e

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is considered a common response to many chronic hepatic injuries. It is a multifunctional process that involves several cell types, cytokines, chemokines and growth factors leading to a disruption of homeostatic mechanisms that maintain the liver ecosystem. In spite of many studies regarding the development of fibrosis, the understanding of the pathogenesis remains obscure. The hepatic tissue remodeling process is highly complex, resulting from the balance between collagen degradation and synthesis. Among the many mediators that take part in this process, the components of the Renin angiotensin system (RAS) have progressively assumed an important role. Angiotensin (Ang) II acts as a profibrotic mediator and Ang-(1-7), the newly recognized RAS component, appears to exert a counter-regulatory role in liver tissue. We briefly review the liver fibrosis process and current aspects of the RAS. This review also aims to discuss some experimental evidence regarding the participation of RAS mediators in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, focusing on the putative role of the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis. PMID:19496186

  11. Clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf J

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune skin blistering disease. The pathogenic relevance of autoantibodies targeting type VII collagen (COL7) has been well-documented. Therefore, EBA is a prototypical autoimmune disease with a well-characterized pathogenic relevance of autoantibody binding to the target antigen. EBA is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.2 new cases per million and per year. The current treatment of EBA relies on general immunosuppressive therapy, which does not lead to remission in all cases. Therefore, there is a high, so far unmet medical need for the development of novel therapeutic options. During the last 10 years, several novel in vitro and in vivo models of EBA have been established. These models demonstrated a critical role of the genetic background, T cells, and cytokines for mediating the loss of tolerance towards COL7. Neutrophils, complement activation, Fc gamma receptor engagement, cytokines, several molecules involved in cell signaling, release of reactive oxygen species, and matrix metalloproteinases are crucial for autoantibody-induced tissue injury in EBA. Based on this growing understanding of the diseases' pathogenesis, several potential novel therapeutic targets have emerged. In this review, the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options for EBA are discussed in detail.

  12. Fetal/Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia: Pathogenesis, Diagnostics and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Brojer, Ewa; Husebekk, Anne; Dębska, Marzena; Uhrynowska, Małgorzata; Guz, Katarzyna; Orzińska, Agnieszka; Dębski, Romuald; Maślanka, Krystyna

    2016-08-01

    Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a relatively rare condition (1/1000-1/2000) that was granted orphan status by the European Medicines Agency in 2011. Clinical consequences of FNAIT, however, may be severe. A thrombocytopenic fetus or new-born is at risk of intracranial hemorrhage that may result in lifelong disability or death. Preventing such bleeding is thus vital and requires a solution. Anti-HPA1a antibodies are the most frequent cause of FNAIT in Caucasians. Its pathogenesis is similar to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to anti-RhD antibodies, but is characterized by platelet destruction and is more often observed in the first pregnancy. In 75 % of these women, alloimmunization by HPA-1a antigens, however, occurs at delivery, which enables development of antibody-mediated immune suppression to prevent maternal immunization. As for HDN, the recurrence rate of FNAIT is high. For advancing diagnostic efforts and treatment, it is thereby crucial to understand the pathogenesis of FNAIT, including cellular immunity involvement. This review presents the current knowledge on FNAIT. Also described is a program for HPA-1a screening in identifying HPA-1a negative pregnant women at risk of immunization. This program is now performed at the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine in cooperation with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education in Warsaw as well as the UiT The Arctic University of Norway. PMID:26564154

  13. HLA-B27 and pathogenesis of spondyloarthropathies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew J; Colbert, Robert A

    2002-07-01

    Although the influence of HLA-B27 on the development of spondyloarthropathies is undisputed, its role in pathogenesis remains unclear. New ideas have focused on abnormal characteristics of HLA-B27 resulting from aberrant folding, disulfide bond formation, or both, rather than a predilection for selecting arthritogenic peptides. This reflects, in part, unanswered questions about whether immunologic recognition of HLA-B27 is required for disease. Recent studies suggest that CD4+ T cells, immunomodulatory killer cell Ig receptors, and Ig-like transcript receptors may recognize aberrant forms of HLA-B27. Other reports suggest that HLA-B27 expression can alter cytokine production from monocytes and T cells-effects that appear unrelated to antigen presentation. Novel bioinformatics approaches have led to the identification of HLA-B27-restricted pathogen-derived peptides and may prove useful in determining whether HLA-B27 presents arthritogenic peptides. Elucidating the role of HLA-B27 in the pathogenesis of these conditions will require an integration of information from animal models, genome-wide screens for susceptibility alleles, and translational studies using human samples.

  14. Role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Soleiman; Masrour-Roudsari, Jila

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) recognized as a major cause of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, has become one of the major public health challenges worldwide. The pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome is multiple and still poorly understood. No single factor has yet been identified as an underlying causal factor. There is a growing belief, however, that obesity, especially visceral obesity, may play an important role in the development of the syndrome. Visceral adiposity seems to be an independent predictor of insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and elevated blood pressure. An increasing number of studies confirm that oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and angiogenesis all play important roles in the pathogenesis of MS. Chronic hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in tissues prone to complications in patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress occurs in a cellular system when the production of free radical moieties exceeds the antioxidant capacity of that system. If cellular antioxidants do not remove free radicals, radicals attack and damage proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The oxidized or nitrosylated products of free radical attack have decreased biological activity, leading to loss of energy metabolism, cell signaling, transport, and other major functions. These altered products are also targeted for proteosome degradation, further decreasing cellular function. Accumulation of such injury ultimately leads a cell to die through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In conclusion, a puzzle of many pieces of evidence suggests that free radical overgeneration may be considered the key in the generation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26557292

  15. Pathogenesis and therapeutics of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Tandazo, Wilson; González, José; Flores-Fortty, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a common manifestation in systemic sclerosis and is considered as one of the two main causes of death among these patients. Although the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease related to systemic sclerosis (SSc-ILD) is very complex and not yet fully understood, diverse mechanisms such as vascular injury, altered immunological response and inflammatory activation have been proposed. Vascular injury is considered as the earliest event in the pathogenesis of this disease and has been associated with an excessive formation of alveolar capillaries, circulating endothelial cells, and increased expression of endothelin-1. Different cells like myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and T lymphocytes are involved in the inflammatory activation. Meanwhile, lymphocyte activation, release of several cytokines and autoantibody production play an important role in the immunological response. To date, the treatment of SSc-ILD is not totally defined, as studies have shown mixed results. Given the high progression of the disease, it is difficult to enroll patients for clinical trials. Therefore, there is lack of evidence to guide therapeutic approaches. Throughout this paper, we present evidence supporting that the combination of glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide is considered the best regimen for patients with SSc-ILD. In addition, we present data regarding the use of azathioprine, mycophenolate, anti-fibrosing agents, bosentan, rituximab, and imatinib mesylate as alternative therapies. Finally, for patients who are unresponsive to pharmacologic interventions, we present data regarding the efficacy of highdose immunosuppression with autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, and lung transplantation.

  16. Arginine Metabolism in Bacterial Pathogenesis and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lifeng; Teng, Jade L. L.; Botelho, Michael G.; Lo, Regina C.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial resistance to infectious diseases is a significant global concern for health care organizations; along with aging populations and increasing cancer rates, it represents a great burden for government healthcare systems. Therefore, the development of therapies against bacterial infection and cancer is an important strategy for healthcare research. Pathogenic bacteria and cancer have developed a broad range of sophisticated strategies to survive or propagate inside a host and cause infection or spread disease. Bacteria can employ their own metabolism pathways to obtain nutrients from the host cells in order to survive. Similarly, cancer cells can dysregulate normal human cell metabolic pathways so that they can grow and spread. One common feature of the adaption and disruption of metabolic pathways observed in bacterial and cancer cell growth is amino acid pathways; these have recently been targeted as a novel approach to manage bacterial infections and cancer therapy. In particular, arginine metabolism has been illustrated to be important not only for bacterial pathogenesis but also for cancer therapy. Therefore, greater insights into arginine metabolism of pathogenic bacteria and cancer cells would provide possible targets for controlling of bacterial infection and cancer treatment. This review will summarize the recent progress on the relationship of arginine metabolism with bacterial pathogenesis and cancer therapy, with a particular focus on arginase and arginine deiminase pathways of arginine catabolism. PMID:26978353

  17. The Blood Nucleome in the Pathogenesis of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Pisetsky, David S.; Ullal, Anirudh J.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to DNA among other nuclear molecules. These antibodies can form immune complexes that promote pathogenesis by stimulating cytokine production and depositing in the kidney to instigate nephritis. The antigens that form these complexes arise from the blood nucleome, a pool of circulating macromolecules comprised of DNA, RNA and nuclear proteins released from cells. Cell death is a major source of these molecules, releasing DNA in a process that can be modeled in mice by the administration of cells killed ex vivo. In the mouse model, the appearance of blood DNA requires macrophages and differs between males and females. This finding raises the possibility that augmented levels of extracellular DNA and other nuclear antigens can contribute to the increased frequency of SLE in females. Extracellular DNA can occur in both a soluble and particulate form, with microparticles generated in vitro displaying antigenically active DNA. Together, these findings suggest that cell death is an important event in lupus pathogenesis and can provide a supply of blood DNA essential for immune complex formation. PMID:20659590

  18. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  19. [The role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of obesity].

    PubMed

    Zak-Gołąb, Agnieszka; Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Magdalena; Kocełak, Piotr; Chudek, Jerzy

    2014-01-24

    Obesity is a disease that develops as a result of long-term positive energy balance. In recent years, the influence of gut microflora composition, as a potential factor affecting the energy balance and contributing to fat accumulation, has been studied. It seems that bacteria can affect host energy balance through several mechanisms, such as increased fermentation of undigested polysaccharides and obtaining extra energy from the portion of food, reduced expression of FIAF (fasting-induced adipocyte factor) in the enterocytes with inhibitory activity towards intestinal lipoprotein lipase, and the increased release of peptide YY that slows the intestinal motility. It is also believed that changes in the composition of gut microflora may be one of the factors that induce systemic microinflammation in the obese, an important link in the pathogenesis of obesity related complications, including dyslipidaemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. However, the results of previous studies are inconclusive. Many of them have been carried out in an animal model and were not confirmed in studies involving humans. These discrepancies may be due to different composition of the diet, distinct physiological gut microflora and the methodology used in these studies. The present article reviews the current literature on the potential role of gut microflora in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  20. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Opazo, Fabian A.; Vergara-Pulgar, Katiana; Pérez, María José; Jara, Claudia; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Currently, there is no effective treatment for AD, which indicates the necessity to understand the pathogenic mechanism of this disorder. Extracellular aggregates of amyloid precursor protein (APP), called Aβ peptide and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by tau protein in the hyperphosphorylated form are considered the hallmarks of AD. Accumulative evidence suggests that tau pathology and Aβ affect neuronal cells compromising energy supply, antioxidant response, and synaptic activity. In this context, it has been showed that mitochondrial function could be affected by the presence of tau pathology and Aβ in AD. Mitochondria are essential for brain cells function and the improvement of mitochondrial activity contributes to preventing neurodegeneration. Several reports have suggested that mitochondria could be affected in terms of morphology, bioenergetics, and transport in AD. These defects affect mitochondrial health, which later will contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. In this review, we will discuss evidence that supports the importance of mitochondrial injury in the pathogenesis of AD and how studying these mechanisms could lead us to suggest new targets for diagnostic and therapeutic intervention against neurodegeneration. PMID:26221414

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cabezas-Opazo, Fabian A; Vergara-Pulgar, Katiana; Pérez, María José; Jara, Claudia; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Currently, there is no effective treatment for AD, which indicates the necessity to understand the pathogenic mechanism of this disorder. Extracellular aggregates of amyloid precursor protein (APP), called Aβ peptide and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by tau protein in the hyperphosphorylated form are considered the hallmarks of AD. Accumulative evidence suggests that tau pathology and Aβ affect neuronal cells compromising energy supply, antioxidant response, and synaptic activity. In this context, it has been showed that mitochondrial function could be affected by the presence of tau pathology and Aβ in AD. Mitochondria are essential for brain cells function and the improvement of mitochondrial activity contributes to preventing neurodegeneration. Several reports have suggested that mitochondria could be affected in terms of morphology, bioenergetics, and transport in AD. These defects affect mitochondrial health, which later will contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. In this review, we will discuss evidence that supports the importance of mitochondrial injury in the pathogenesis of AD and how studying these mechanisms could lead us to suggest new targets for diagnostic and therapeutic intervention against neurodegeneration.

  2. Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C During Pregnancy and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Le Campion, Armelle; Larouche, Ariane; Fauteux-Daniel, Sébastien; Soudeyns, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of HCV infection is between 1% and 8% in pregnant women and between 0.05% and 5% in children. Yet the pathogenesis of hepatitis C during pregnancy and in the neonatal period remains poorly understood. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), a leading cause of pediatric HCV infection, takes place at a rate of <10%. Factors that increase the risk of MTCT include high maternal HCV viral load and coinfection with HIV-1 but, intriguingly, not breastfeeding and mode of delivery. Pharmacological prevention of MTCT is not possible at the present time because both pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin are contraindicated for use in pregnancy and during the neonatal period. However, this may change with the recent introduction of direct acting antiviral agents. This review summarizes what is currently known about HCV infection during pregnancy and childhood. Particular emphasis is placed on how pregnancy-associated immune modulation may influence the progression of HCV disease and impact MTCT, and on the differential evolution of perinatally acquired HCV infection in children. Taken together, these developments provide insights into the pathogenesis of hepatitis C and may inform strategies to prevent the transmission of HCV from mother to child. PMID:23223189

  3. Staphylococcus aureus in Acne Pathogenesis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Khorvash, Farzin; Abdi, Fatemeh; Kashani, Hessam H.; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Narimani, Tahmineh

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is considerable evidence which suggests a possible pathogenetic role for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in acne vulgaris. Aim: The study was to determine S. aureus colonization and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in patients with acne and of healthy people. Materials and Methods: In the case-control study, a total of 324 people were screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus: 166 acne patients and 158 healthy persons. One control subject was individually matched to one case. Nasal swabs from anterior nares of individuals were cultured and identified as S. aureus. Antibiotic sensitivity was performed with recognized laboratory techniques. Results: S. aureus was detected in 21.7% of the subjects in acne, and in 26.6% of control groups. There was no statistical difference in colonization rates between two groups (P=0.3). In patient group, most of S. aureus isolates were resistant to doxicycline and tetracycline (P=0.001), and were more sensitive to rifampicin compared to other drugs. In control samples, the isolated demonstrated higher resistance to cotrimoxazole compared to patient samples (P=0.0001). There was no difference between groups regarding resistance to rifampicin, vancomycin, methicillin, and oxacillin. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether S. aureus is actually a causal agent in the pathogenesis of acne. Based on microbiological data of both healthy and acne-affected persons, we propose that contribution of S. aureus in acne pathogenesis is controversial. PMID:23181229

  4. Pathogenesis of minimal change nephrotic syndrome: an immunological concept

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Heon; Park, Se Jin; Han, Kyoung Hee; Kronbichler, Andreas; Saleem, Moin A.; Oh, Jun; Lim, Beom Jin

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) in children is characterized by massive proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia. Minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) is the most common form of INS in children. The pathogenesis of MCNS still remains unclear, however, several hypotheses have been recently proposed. For several decades, MCNS has been considered a T-cell disorder, which causes the impairment of the glomerular filtration barrier with the release of different circulating factors. Increased levels of several cytokines are also suggested. Recently, a "two-hit" theory was proposed that included the induction of CD80 (B7-1) and regulatory T-cell (Treg) dysfunction, with or without impaired autoregulatory functions of the podocyte. In contrast to the well-established involvement of T cells, the role of B cells has not been clearly identified. However, B-cell biology has recently gained more attention, because rituximab (a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20-bearing cells) demonstrated a very good therapeutic response in the treatment of childhood and adult MCNS. Here, we discuss recent insights into the pathogenesis of MCNS in children. PMID:27279884

  5. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Keun; Shin, Jin Hee; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Eui-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons associated with the abnormal aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of ALS remain unclear, however. Autophagy is a major pathway for the elimination of protein aggregates and damaged organelles and therefore contributes to cellular homeostasis. This catabolic process begins with the formation of the double membrane-bound autophagosome that engulfs portions of the cytoplasm and subsequently fuses with a lysosome to form an autolysosome, in which lysosomal enzymes digest autophagic substrates. Defects at various stages of autophagy have been associated with pathological mutations of several ALS-linked genes including SOD1, p62, TDP-43, and optineurin, suggesting that such defects may play a causative role in the pathogenesis of this condition. In this review, we summarize the dysregulation of autophagy associated with ALS as well as potential therapeutic strategies based on modulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26264610

  6. Bordetella pertussis: new concepts in pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetti, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss recent findings and selected topics of interest in Bordetella pertussis virulence and pathogenesis and treatment of pertussis. It is not intended to cover issues on immune responses to B. pertussis infection or problems with currently used pertussis vaccines. Recent findings Studies on the activities of various B. pertussis virulence factors include the immunomodulatory activities of filamentous hemagglutinin, fimbriae, and adenylate cyclase toxin. Recently emerging B. pertussis strains show evidence of genetic selection for vaccine escape mutants, with changes in vaccine antigen-expressing genes, some of which may have increased the virulence of this pathogen. Severe and fatal pertussis in young infants continues to be a problem, with several studies highlighting predictors of fatality, including the extreme leukocytosis associated with this infection. Treatments for pertussis are extremely limited, though early antibiotic intervention may be beneficial. Neutralizing pertussis toxin activity may be an effective strategy, as well as targeting two host proteins, pendrin and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, as novel potential therapeutic interventions. Summary Pertussis is reemerging as a major public health problem and continued basic research is revealing information on bacterial virulence and disease pathogenesis, as well as potential novel strategies for vaccination and targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26906206

  7. [Suitability evaluation of great bustard (Otis tarda)'s wintering habitat in Baiyangdian basin].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-xuan; Yan, Deng-hua; Weng, Bai-sha; Zhang, Biao

    2011-07-01

    Based on the related researches of great bustard's wintering habitat selection as well as the advices of related experts and the distribution records of great bustard in Baiyangdian basin, 3 first class indices and 13 second indices were chosen to characterize the key factors affecting the wintering habitat selection of great bustard, and a habitat quality evaluation model was built to assess the quality of wintering habitat selection of great bustard in Baiyangdian basin. In 2005, the suitable wintering habitats of great bustard in the basin had an area of 11907.25 km2, accounting for 34.1% of the total. Of the suitable wintering habitats, the most suitable habitats had an area of 4596.25 km2, only 13.2% of the total and comparatively concentrated in two zones, i.e., Baiyangdian Wetland Natural Reserve and its peripheral area (zone I) in the east of Baiyangdian basin, and Xingtang and Quyang counties (zone II) in the southwest of Baiyangdian basin. The total area of the most suitable habitats in zone I and zone II was 2803.55 km2, accounting for 61.0% of the most suitable habitats in the basin. To protect the wintering habitat of great bustard in the basin, proper measures should be taken according to the environmental features of the two zones. PMID:22007472

  8. [Suitability evaluation of great bustard (Otis tarda)'s wintering habitat in Baiyangdian basin].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-xuan; Yan, Deng-hua; Weng, Bai-sha; Zhang, Biao

    2011-07-01

    Based on the related researches of great bustard's wintering habitat selection as well as the advices of related experts and the distribution records of great bustard in Baiyangdian basin, 3 first class indices and 13 second indices were chosen to characterize the key factors affecting the wintering habitat selection of great bustard, and a habitat quality evaluation model was built to assess the quality of wintering habitat selection of great bustard in Baiyangdian basin. In 2005, the suitable wintering habitats of great bustard in the basin had an area of 11907.25 km2, accounting for 34.1% of the total. Of the suitable wintering habitats, the most suitable habitats had an area of 4596.25 km2, only 13.2% of the total and comparatively concentrated in two zones, i.e., Baiyangdian Wetland Natural Reserve and its peripheral area (zone I) in the east of Baiyangdian basin, and Xingtang and Quyang counties (zone II) in the southwest of Baiyangdian basin. The total area of the most suitable habitats in zone I and zone II was 2803.55 km2, accounting for 61.0% of the most suitable habitats in the basin. To protect the wintering habitat of great bustard in the basin, proper measures should be taken according to the environmental features of the two zones.

  9. Livedoid vasculopathy: A review of pathogenesis and principles of management.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Biju; Neema, Shekhar; Verma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Livedoid vasculopathy is a rare cutaneous disease manifesting as recurrent ulcers on the lower extremities. The ulceration results in atrophic, porcelain white scars termed as atrophie blanche. The pathogenesis is yet to be understood with the main mechanism being hypercoagulability and inflammation playing a secondary role. The important procoagulant factors include protein C and S deficiency, factor V Leiden mutation, antithrombin III deficiency, prothrombin gene mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. Histopathology of livedoid vasculopathy is characterized by intraluminal thrombosis, proliferation of the endothelium and segmental hyalinization of dermal vessels. The treatment is multipronged with anti-thrombotic measures such as anti-platelet drugs, systemic anticoagulants and fibrinolytic therapy taking precedence over anti-inflammatory agents. Colchicine, hydroxychloroquine, vasodilators, intravenous immunoglobulin, folic acid, immunosuppressive therapy and supportive measures are also of some benefit. A multidisciplinary approach would go a long way in the management of these patients resulting in relief from pain and physical as well as psychological scarring.

  10. Human Liver Transplantation As A Model To Study HCV Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael G.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a leading etiology of liver cancer and cause for liver transplantation. Although new therapies have improved the rates of sustained response, a large proportion of patients (~50%) fail to respond to antiviral treatment, thus remaining at risk for disease progression. While chimpanzees have been used to study HCV biology and treatments, their cost is quite high and their use is strictly regulated; indeed, the NIH no longer supports the breeding of chimpanzees for study. The development of HCV therapies has been hindered by the relative paucity of small animal models to study HCV pathogenesis. This review presents the strengths of the human liver transplant, highlighting the advances derived from this model, including insights into viral kinetics and quasispecies, viral receptor binding and entry, innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, consideration is made of current and emerging antiviral therapeutic approaches based on translational research results. PMID:19877210

  11. Pathogenesis of endometriosis: natural immunity dysfunction or autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Matarese, Giuseppe; De Placido, Giuseppe; Nikas, Yorgos; Alviggi, Carlo

    2003-05-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by implantation and growth of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. This disabling condition is considered one of the most frequent diseases in gynecology, affecting 15-20% of women in their reproductive life. Pelvic endometriosis, the most common form of the disease, is associated with increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, neo-angiogenesis, intrinsic anomalies of the refluxed endometrium and impaired function of cell-mediated natural immunity. Recently, endometriosis has also been considered to be an autoimmune disease, owing to the presence of autoantibodies, the association with other autoimmune diseases and recurrent immune-mediated abortion. These findings are in apparent contradiction with the reduced cell-mediated natural immunity observed during the disease. In this review, we focus on the multiple processes underlying the complex pathogenesis of endometriosis, with particular emphasis on the role played by the immune system with the induction of autoimmunity. PMID:12763528

  12. Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis: update on pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mirkinson, Laura J; Katona, Ildy M

    2007-05-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) accounts for a relatively small proportion of patients with juvenile arthritis. Its clinical manifestations are unique among the subsets of JIA and studies of cytokine profiles suggest differences between the underlying mechanisms of the different diseases. SoJIA may, in fact, be better classified separately from other subtypes of JIA. New biologic agents that are currently licensed or being tested, target the cytokines interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 and appear to be effective in treating SoJIA. By contrast, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy is much less, if at all, successful in this subgroup of JIA. This article reviews the current literature on the pathogenesis and treatment of SoJIA.

  13. [Clinical findings, pathogenesis and treatment of Bartter's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ploier, R; Tulzer, W

    1981-01-01

    In three children Bartter's syndrome was diagnosed on the basis of the typical laboratory findings and the characteristic histological changes of the kidney. Apart from the description of three cases especially the latest pathogenic findings are represented because of their important therapeutic consequences. In one of the patients the therapeutic effect of the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor Indomethazin was statistically proved in a balance study performed under inpatient conditions and so it was indirectly proved that the prostaglandines play an essential role in the pathogenesis of Bartter's syndrome. The patients have now received Indomethazin for a period of 11 months up to two and a half years with the result of an impressive improvement of the clinical symptoms and an unequivocal increase of the serum potassium. The fact that despite of normal renin and aldosterone levels there was no complete normalization of the serum potassium level indicates that in addition of prostaglandines probably a superior mechanism plays a part in the origin Bartter's syndrome.

  14. Psychoneuroimmunology: stress effects on pathogenesis and immunity during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, J F; Dobbs, C; Brown, D; Zwilling, B

    1994-01-01

    The mammalian response to stress involves the release of soluble products from the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Cells of the immune system respond to many of the hormones, neurotransmitters, and neuropeptides through specific receptors. The function of the immune system is critical in the mammalian response to infectious disease. A growing body of evidence identifies stress as a cofactor in infectious disease susceptibility and outcomes. It has been suggested that effects of stress on the immune system may mediate the relationship between stress and infectious disease. This article reviews recent psychoneuroimmunology literature exploring the effects of stress on the pathogenesis of, and immune response to, infectious disease in mammals. PMID:8055468

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis: pathogenesis, latest developments and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Kazushige; Sumimoto, Kimi; Mitsuyama, Toshiyuki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Takaoka, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, autoimmune pancreatitis has been classified into two subtypes. Type 1 is related to immunoglobulin G4 and type 2 is related to granulocytic epithelial lesions, but pathogenetic mechanisms in both still remain unclear. Apart from type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis, the pathological features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis with increased serum immunoglobulin G4/immunoglobulin E levels, abundant infiltration of immunoglobulin G4+plasmacytes and lymphocytes, fibrosis, and steroid responsiveness are suggestive of abnormal immunity such as allergy or autoimmunity. Although pathophysiological conditions seem to be different in each, both respond well to steroid drugs. After remission, the patients with type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis show high relapse rates (30–50% within 6–12 months), whereas those with type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis seldom relapse. After remission, the steroid maintenance therapy and therapeutic strategy for relapsing patients with type 1 is different among local expertise. In this paper, recent advances in pathogenesis and clinical guidance for therapy are discussed. PMID:24790726

  16. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  17. Thrombosis in vasculitic disorders-clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ofrat Beyar; Brenner, Benjamin; Horowitz, Netanel A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are known to affect each other in many ways. Vasculitis represents a group of disorders where blood vessels (small, medium, large or variable) are infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Accumulating evidence in the literature suggests both clinical and physiological association between vasculitis and thrombosis. Vasculitis-associated thrombosis involves arteries and veins, and a tight connection has been reported between the activity of vasculitis and the appearance of thrombosis. Pathophysiology of these relations is complex and not completely understood. While thrombophilic factors are associated with vasculitis, it remains unclear whether a true association with clinical thrombosis is present. Furthermore, several factors leading to hemostasis, endothelial injury and induction of microparticles were described as possibly accounting for thrombosis. Management of thrombosis in vasculitis patients is challenging and should be further assessed in randomized controlled studies. The current review describes clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis associated with different vasculitides.

  18. Recent molecular insights into rickettsial pathogenesis and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Sanjeev K; Narra, Hema P; Sahni, Abha; Walker, David H

    2013-01-01

    Human infections with arthropod-borne Rickettsia species remain a major global health issue, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Epidemic typhus due to Rickettsia prowazekii has an established reputation as the ‘scourge of armies’, and as a major determinant of significant ‘historical turning points’. No suitable vaccines for human use are currently available to prevent rickettsial diseases. The unique lifestyle features of rickettsiae include obligate intracellular parasitism, intracytoplasmic niche within the host cell, predilection for infection of microvascular endothelium in mammalian hosts, association with arthropods and the tendency for genomic reduction. The fundamental research in the field of Rickettsiology has witnessed significant recent progress in the areas of pathogen adhesion/invasion and host immune responses, as well as the genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, phylogenetics, motility and molecular manipulation of important rickettsial pathogens. The focus of this review article is to capture a snapshot of the latest developments pertaining to the mechanisms of rickettsial pathogenesis and immunity. PMID:24059918

  19. Pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia: when inflammation meets organ development.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Tayyab; Radajewski, Sarah; Chao, Cho-Ming; Bellusci, Saverio; Ehrhardt, Harald

    2016-12-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease of preterm infants. It is caused by the disturbance of physiologic lung development mainly in the saccular stage with lifelong restrictions of pulmonary function and an increased risk of abnormal somatic and psychomotor development. The contributors to this disease's entity are multifactorial with pre- and postnatal origin. Central to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary is the induction of a massive pulmonary inflammatory response due to mechanical ventilation and oxygen toxicity. The extent of the pro-inflammatory reaction and the disturbance of further alveolar growth and vasculogenesis vary largely and can be modified by prenatal infections, antenatal steroids, and surfactant application.This minireview summarizes the important recent research findings on the pulmonary inflammatory reaction obtained in patient cohorts and in experimental models. Unfortunately, recent changes in clinical practice based on these findings had only limited impact on the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID:27357257

  20. RNA metabolism in the pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bingwei; Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao

    2014-10-10

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson׳s disease are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. While most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause, a small percentage of disease cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations. The identification of genes associated with the familial forms of the diseases and subsequent studies of proteins encoded by the disease genes in cellular or animal models have offered much-needed insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. Recent studies of the familial Parkinson׳s disease genes have emphasized the importance of RNA metabolism, particularly mRNA translation, in the disease process. It is anticipated that continued studies on the role of RNA metabolism in Parkinson׳s disease will offer unifying mechanisms for understanding the cause of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and facilitate the development of novel and rational strategies for treating this debilitating disease.