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Sample records for efeitos od laser

  1. Multi-frequency, 3D ODS measurement by continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Ben; Ewins, David

    2015-06-01

    Continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) is a technique which has been described and explored in the literature for over two decades, but remains niche compared to SLDV inspection by a series of discrete-point measurements. This is in part because of the unavoidable phenomenon of laser speckle, which deteriorates signal quality when velocity data is captured from a moving spot measurement. Further, applicability of CSLDV has typically been limited to line scans and rectangular areas by the application of sine, step, or ramp functions to the scanning mirrors which control the location of the measurement laser spot. In this paper it is shown that arbitrary functions to scan any area can easily be derived from a basic calibration routine, equivalent to the calibration performed in conventional discrete-point laser vibrometry. This is extended by performing the same scan path upon a test surface from three independent locations of the laser head, and decomposing the three sets of one-dimensional deflection shapes into a single set of three-dimensional deflection shapes. The test was performed with multi-sine excitation, yielding 34 operating deflection shapes from each scan.

  2. Training and OD Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendenhall, Mark; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Reviews current organizational development and training practices in two articles of a special section. The first compares OD philosophy with McGregor's integrative approach. The second article discusses contributions OD practice can make to theory, including modifying existing theories, addressing new problems, and exploring the internal logic of…

  3. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-07-01

    Since oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl-based alloys have sufficient creep strength and good oxidation resistance at the very high temperatures of interest for the primary heat exchanger in advanced, closed-cycle gas turbine systems, they constitute viable alternative candidates to ceramics. A major life-limiting factor of these alloys is the ability to continue to form a protective scale of aluminum oxide, a factor proportional to the total amount of aluminum contained in the alloy. Fe{sub 3}Al has oxidation resistance comparable to that of the FeCrAl-based alloys, and significantly superior sulfidation resistance. Also, because of its larger reservoir of aluminum, Fe{sub 3}Al would be expected to exhibit longer lifetimes at the temperatures of interest. Since the strengthening effects of ODS processing are expected to confer similar high-temperature creep properties to those found for the FeCrAl-based alloys, ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al is considered to have excellent potential for the very high-temperature heat exchanger application. The program effort on ODS Fe{sub 3}Al includes examination of the properties of available ODS-FeCrAl alloys; development of mechanical alloying parameters for ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al; determination of the effects of a dispersion of reactive element oxides on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al; and evaluation of methods for joining them.

  4. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-08-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200{degrees}C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The program has two main thrusts: (a) alloy processing, which involves mechanical alloying and thermomechanical processing to achieve the desired size and distribution of the oxide dispersoid, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. Control of the grain size and shape in the final alloy is very dependent on the homogeneity of the alloy powder, in terms of the size and distribution of the dispersed oxide particles, and on the level of strain and temperature applied in the recrystallization step. Studies of the effects of these variables are being made using mechanically-alloyed powder from two sources: a commercial powder metallurgy alloy vendor and an in-house, controlled environment high-energy mill. The effects of milling parameters on the microstructure and composition of the powder and consolidated alloy are described. Comparison of the oxidation kinetics of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys with commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys in air at 1000-1300{degrees}C indicated that the best Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys oxidized isothermally at the same rate as the ODS-FeCrAl alloys but, under thermal cycling conditions, the oxidation rate of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al was faster. The main difference was that the ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al experienced significantly more scale spallation above 1000{degrees}C. The differences in oxidation behavior were translated into expected lifetimes which indicated that, for an alloy section thickness of 2.5 mm, the scale spallation of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al leads to an expected service lifetime similar to that for the INCO alloy MA956 at 1100 to 1300{degrees}C.

  5. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1996-06-01

    Interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system, has led to investigation of materials for heat exchangers capable of operation at temperatures of the order of 1200 to 1300{degrees}C. The candidate materials are ceramics and, possibly, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys. An ODS FeCrAl alloy was found to meet the strength requirements for such an application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C over a tube length of 4 m. The oxidation life of ODS FeCrAl alloys is determined by their ability to form or reform a protective alumina scale, and can be related to the time for the aluminum content of the alloy to be depleted to some minimum level. As a result, the service life is a function of the available aluminum content of the alloys and the minimum aluminum level at which breakaway oxidation occurs, hence there is a limit on the minimum cross section which can be safely employed at temperatures above 1200{degrees}C. Because of their significantly higher aluminum content ({ge}28 atom %/{ge}16 wt. percent compared to {approx}9 atom %15 wt. percent), alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al afford a potentially larger reservoir of aluminum to sustain oxidation resistance at higher temperatures and, therefore, offer a possible improvement over the currently-available ODS FeCrAl alloys, providing they can be strengthened in a similar manner.

  6. ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; McKamey, C.G.; Pint, B.A.

    1995-06-01

    There has been a recent increase of interest in advanced cycles that involve indirectly-fired gas turbines, in which coal- or gas-fired high-temperature heat exchangers are used to heat a working fluid in a closed system. In a program conducted as part of the European COST-501 Concerted Action Project, available alloys based on FeCrAl-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated for use in the main heat exchanger in a similar closed-cycle gas turbine application. One of the currently available ODS FeCrAl alloys was found to meet the strength requirements for this application, in which the working fluid at 0.9 MPa (131 psi) flowing at 5,889 kg/hr (12,955 lb/hr) was to be heated from 800 to 1100{degrees}C (1472 to 2012{degrees}F) over a tube length of 4 m (13 ft).

  7. OD: Perspectives, Processes and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kur, C. Edward

    1981-01-01

    Reviewing the development of organizational development (OD) since 1969, the author describes the emerging values and historical perspectives of the field, provides a cross-section of processes and theories, and clarifies the changing relationship between the organizational development and human resource development fields. (LRA)

  8. Characterization of Two ODS Alloys: Chromium-18 ODS and Chromium-9 ODS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Julianne

    ODS alloys, or oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, are made from elemental or pre-alloyed metal powders mechanically alloyed with oxide powders in a high-energy attributor mill, and then consolidated by either hot isostatic pressing or hot extrusion causing the production of nanometer scale oxide and carbide particles within the alloy matrix; crystalline properties such as creep strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, tensile strength, swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement are all observed to be improved by the presence of nanoparticles in the matrix. The presented research uses various methods to observe and characterize the microstructural and microchemical properties of two experimental ODS alloys, 18Cr ODS and 9Cr ODS. The results found aid in assessing the influence of chemical and structural variations on the effectiveness of the alloy, and further aid in the optimization of these advanced alloys for future use in nuclear cladding and structural applications in Generation IV nuclear reactors. Characterization of these alloys has been conducted in order to identify the second-phase small precipitates through FESEM, TEM, EDS, Synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis, and CuKalpha XRD analysis of bulk samples and of nanoparticles after extraction from the alloy matrix. Comparison of results from these methods allows further substantiation of the accuracy of observed nanoparticle composition and identification. Also, TEM samples of the two alloys have been irradiated in-situ with 1 MeV Kr and 300 keV Fe ions to various doses and temperatures at the IVEM-Tandem TEM at Argonne National Laboratory and post-irradiated characterization has been conducted and compared to the pre-irradiated characterization results in order to observe the microstructural and microchemical evolution of nanoparticles under irradiation. Overall in the as-received state, the initial Y2O3 is not found anymore and in addition to oxide particles the alloys contain carbides

  9. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  10. A Results-Oriented Approach to OD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moravec, Milan

    1978-01-01

    Describes Bechtel Corporation's Organization Development (OD) system, which focuses on action/task identification, planning, operating decisions, and productivity. Presents eight-step process through which OD specialists help managers assess work-related problems (largely through interviews), action planning, implementation, and followup. Process…

  11. A Profile of the OD Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegan, Daniel; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Provides relevant data on the field of organizational development (OD) from a sample survey of Organizational Development Network members. The 165 respondents described their careers, satisfactions, stresses, training, and education. The survey suggested that OD may be an amorphous field with many transitory participants, not a profession. (JAC)

  12. The Changing Role of OD Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    The role of the organization development (OD) practitioner is evaluated based on their activities in the area of management. Changes in the OD role are suggested: (1) a more results-oriented approach, (2) "I'm OK--You're OK" methods, (3) program start-up improvements, and (4) improved followup planning. (EC)

  13. SEDS Tether M/OD Damage Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.; Hill, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) was designed to deploy an endmass at the end of a 20-km-long tether which acts as an upper stage rocket, and the threats from the meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) particle environments on SEDS components are important issues for the safety and success of any SEDS mission. However, the possibility of severing the tether due to M/OD particle impacts is an even more serious concern, since the SEDS tether has a relatively large exposed area to the M/OD environments although its diameter is quite small. The threats from the M/OD environments became a very important issue for the third SEDS mission, since the project office proposed using the shuttle orbiter as a launch platform instead of the second stage of a Delta II expendable rocket, which was used for the first two SEDS missions. A series of hyper-velocity impact tests were performed at the Johnson Space Center and Arnold Engineering Development Center to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The computer hydrodynamic code or hydrocode called CTH, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories, was also used to simulate the damage on the SEDS tether caused by both the orbital debris and test particle impacts. The CTH hydrocode simulation results provided the much needed information to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The M/OD particle sizes required to sever the tether were estimated to be less than 0.1 cm in diameter from these studies, and these size particles are more abundant in low-Earth orbit than larger size particles. Finally, the authors performed the M/OD damage analyses for the three SEDS missions; i.e., SEDS-1, -2, and -3 missions, by using the information obtained from the hypervelocity impact test and hydrocode simulations results.

  14. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ritherdon, J

    2003-11-17

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes work regarding the manipulation of grain structures via deformation processing and further results gathered during powder separation trials involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-IV''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out except for some of that dependent on the acquisition of materials from other sources. However, wherever omissions from the ''Plan of Action'' detailed in the ''Statement of Work'' have occurred due to lack of suitable materials, other related experimental work has been devised to fill the gaps where possible. All work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  15. Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.R.; Ritherdon, J.; Prior, D.J.

    2003-04-22

    In order to develop FeCrAl-based ODS alloy tubing with the coarse, high aspect ratio, appropriately oriented grain structures likely to deliver enhanced high temperature (11000C) hoop creep strength compared to conventionally formed ODS alloy tubing, flow forming techniques were explored in a European funded programme. The evolution of microstructure in PM2000 alloy tubing formed by warm flow forming techniques has been the subject of continuing investigation and more detailed study in the current work. The warm flow formed tubes investigated were produced by reverse flow forming using three, 1200 opposed rollers described around a tube preform supported on a driven mandrel. This produced a complex pattern of shape changing deformation, driven from the outer surface of the tube preforms. The grain size and shape together with the pattern of nucleation and growth of secondary recrystallization that developed through the thickness of the tube wall during the subsequent high temperature annealing (13800C) of these warm flow formed samples is described, as are the textures that formed. The unusual pattern and shape of secondary recrystallized grain structures that formed on the outer surfaces of the flow formed tubes closely follows the pattern and pitch of the flow forming rollers. The local texture, grain shape and pattern of misorientation in the surface of warm flow formed tubes that was associated with the development of these outer surface microstructures are described. Parallel studies have continued on the influence of microstructural inhomogeneities on the development of secondary recrystallized grain structures in ODS alloys. As part of this work, a separate variant of PM2000 alloy with additions of 1 wt.% ODS-free Fe powder have been manufactured as extruded bar by Plansee GmbH. The initial recrystallization behavior of the variant has been studied and cross-compared with the recrystallization behavior found in a prototype ODS-Fe3Al alloy, notably where the

  16. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  17. Re-sampling of continuous scanning LDV data for ODS extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, P.; Sopranzetti, F.; Martarelli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a method for processing data obtained by Continuous Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry (CSLDV) that makes it possible to measure vibrations combining spatial and temporal information. Since the laser continuously scans the structure under test over time and space, it measures a vibration signal modulated by the Operational Deflection Shape (ODS) of the structure. CSLDV time history can then be re-sampled at an arbitrary spatial resolution in order to recover the vibration data at several positions on the trajectory swept by the laser. The main drawback of such method is that the actual sampling rate of the re-sampled vibration signals is dictated by frequencies of the mirrors, which determine the laser scanning speed. The paper presents a method for the automatic recognition of "aliased" natural frequencies and recovery of the actual un-aliased natural frequencies. Once those frequencies are determined, the corresponding ODSs are recovered.

  18. 46 CFR 280.4 - Standards governing payment of ODS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., ODS shall be paid in full to the operator for vessel operations on the inbound and outbound legs of..., are earned from the carriage of competitive cargo. (b) Reduction in payment—(1) Inbound leg of service. The amount of ODS payable for the inbound leg of a service for the calendar year shall be reduced...

  19. 46 CFR 280.4 - Standards governing payment of ODS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., ODS shall be paid in full to the operator for vessel operations on the inbound and outbound legs of..., are earned from the carriage of competitive cargo. (b) Reduction in payment—(1) Inbound leg of service. The amount of ODS payable for the inbound leg of a service for the calendar year shall be reduced...

  20. The oxidation behavior of ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-05-01

    Oxide-dispersed Fe-28at.%Al-2%Cr alloys were produced by a powder metallurgy technique followed by hot extrusion. A variety of stable oxides were added to the base alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C in air and O{sub 2}. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion flattened the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, but produced none of the other reactive element effects and had an adverse influence on the long-term oxidation behavior. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the alumina scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition at 1200{degrees} and 1300{degrees}C. However, the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion was not as effective in improving scale adhesion in Fe{sub 3}Al as it is in FeCrAl. This inferior performance is attributed to a larger amount of interfacial void formation on ODS Fe{sub 3}Al.

  1. Strangeness Photoproduction at the BGO-OD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jude, T. C.; Alef, S.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Boese, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.; Zimmermann, T.

    BGO-OD is a newly commissioned experiment to investigate the internal structure of the nucleon, using an energy tagged bremsstrahlung photon beam at the ELSA electron facility. The setup consists of a highly segmented BGO calorimeter surrounding the target, with a particle tracking magnetic spectrometer at forward angles. BGO-OD is ideal for investigating meson photoproduction. The extensive physics programme for open strangeness photoproduction is introduced, and preliminary analysis presented.

  2. The Optical Depth Sensor (ODS) for Mars atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-10-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in both Martian and Earth environments. The principal goal of ODS is to carry out the opacity due to the Martian dust as well as to characterize the high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in understanding of Martian meteorology. The instrument was initially designed for the failed MARS96 Russian mission, and also was included in the payload of several other missions [1]. Until recently, it was selected (NASA/ESA AO) in the payload of the atmospheric package DREAMS onboard the MARS 2016 mission. But following a decision of the CNES, it is no more included in the payload. In order to study the performance of ODS under a wide range of conditions as well as its capable to provide daily measurements of both dust optical thickness and high altitude clouds properties, the instrument has participated in different terrestrial campaigns. A good performance of ODS prototype (Figure 1) on cirrus clouds detection and in dust opacity estimation was previously archived in Africa during 2004-2005 and in Brasil from 2012 to nowadays. Moreover, a campaign in the arctic is expected before 2016 where fifteen ODSs will be part of an integrated observing system over the Arctic Ocean, allowing test the ODS performance in extreme conditions. In this presentation we present main principle of the retrieval, the instrumental concept, the result of the tests performed and the principal objectives of ODS in Mars.

  3. Inhibited Aluminization of an ODS FeCr Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Pint, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for fusion energy applications both for compatibility with liquid Pb-Li and to form an alumina layer that acts as a tritium permeation barrier. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are a structural material candidate for commercial reactor concepts expected to operate above 600 C. Aluminizing was conducted in a laboratory scale chemical vapor deposition reactor using accepted conditions for coating Fe- and Ni-base alloys. However, the measured mass gains on the current batch of ODS Fe-14Cr were extremely low compared to other conventional and ODS alloys. After aluminizing at two different Al activities at 900 C and at 1100 C, characterization showed that the ODS Fe-14Cr specimens formed a dense, primarily AlN layer that prevented Al uptake. This alloy batch contained a higher (> 5000 ppma) N content than the other alloys coated and this is the most likely reason for the inhibited aluminization. Other factors such as the high O content, small ({approx} 140 nm) grain size and Y-Ti oxide nano-clusters in ODS Fe-14Cr also could have contributed to the observed behavior. Examples of typical aluminide coatings formed on conventional and ODS Fe- and Ni-base alloys are shown for comparison.

  4. Thermal stability of oxide particles in 12Cr ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaodong; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Sung Soo; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Jang, Jinsung

    2012-09-01

    12Cr ferritic ODS steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA), hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and hot rolling processes. Thermal stability of the oxide particles in the ODS steel sample was evaluated by isothermal annealing at 1250 °C for 500 h. High density YTaO4 particles with a mean size of about 9 nm were observed in the as hipped sample. A significant coarsening of the YTaO4 particles was observed after hot rolling at 1200 °C. Additional coarsening, as well as phase transformation from monoclinic YTaO4 to cubic Y3TaO7 was detected after isothermal annealing at 1250 °C. These results imply that heat treatment temperatures of the ODS steel during fabrication processes should be controlled as low as possible to avoid the undesirable coarsening of oxide precipitates.

  5. Development of ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, I.G.; Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; McKamey, C.G.

    1997-12-01

    The overall goal of this program is to develop an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) version of Fe{sub 3}Al that has sufficient creep strength and resistance to oxidation at temperatures in the range 1000 to 1200 C to be suitable for application as heat exchanger tubing in advanced power generation cycles. The main areas being addressed are: (a) alloy processing to achieve the desired alloy grain size and shape, and (b) optimization of the oxidation behavior to provide increased service life compared to semi-commercial ODS-FeCrAl alloys intended for the same applications. The recent studies have focused on mechanically-alloyed powder from a commercial alloy vendor. These starting alloy powders were very clean in terms of oxygen content compared to ORNL-produced powders, but contained similar levels of carbon picked up during the milling process. The specific environment used in milling the powder appears to exert a considerable influence on the post-consolidation recrystallization behavior of the alloy. A milling environment which produced powder particles having a high surface carbon content resulted in a consolidated alloy which readily recrystallized, whereas powder with a low surface carbon level after milling resulted in no recrystallization even at 1380 C. A feature of these alloys was the appearance of voids or porosity after the recrystallization anneal, as had been found with ORNL-produced alloys. Adjustment of the recrystallization parameters did not reveal any range of conditions where recrystallization could be accomplished without the formation of voids. Initial creep tests of specimens of the recrystallized alloys indicated a significant increase in creep strength compared to cast or wrought Fe{sub 3}Al, but the specimens failed prematurely by a mechanism that involved brittle fracture of one of the two grains in the test cross section, followed by ductile fracture of the remaining grain. The reasons for this behavior are not yet understood. The

  6. 75 FR 9232 - Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) 2010-2014 Strategic Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) 2010-2014 Strategic Plan ACTION: Notice of availability of the ODS Strategic Plan for 2010-2014. SUMMARY: The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has completed a strategic...

  7. 46 CFR 280.3 - Standards governing award of an ODS agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards governing award of an ODS agreement. 280.3 Section 280.3 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING... LINER OPERATORS § 280.3 Standards governing award of an ODS agreement. No ODS agreement, including...

  8. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  9. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  10. Ovulation-inhibiting properties of Org OD 14.

    PubMed

    Franchimont, P; Franchi, F; Luisi, M; Kicovic, P M

    1982-01-01

    Org OD 14 has recently been shown to be an interesting new steroid for the treatment of menopausal women. In view of the importance of treatment of perimenopausal women, in whom ovulation might occur, the aim of the present study was to assess whether or not Org OD 14, administered orally in a daily dose of 2.5 mg for 21 days, inhibits ovulation. Sixteen healthy female volunteers, aged 20-34 years and with established ovulatory cycles, were studied during a control cycle and a treatment cycle. Daily measurements of the plasma levels of FSH, LH, E2, P and PRL were made. Endometrial specimens were obtained from nine of the volunteers between 23rd and 25th day of both cycles. The criteria for an ovulatory cycle were: (1) mid-cycle FSH, LH and E2 peaks; (2) criteria (1) followed by a rise in the P levels of greater than 10 ng/ml; (3) a luteal phase of at least 12 days; (4) biphasic behaviour of E2; and, (5) secretory endometrium on days 23-25 of the cycle. All control cycles were ovulatory. During the treatment the mid-cycle FSH, LH and E2 peaks disappeared, and P levels remained very low. PRL levels showed an occasional moderate rise in some of the volunteers. Endometrial specimens showed a secretory pattern during the control cycle, and different degrees of proliferation during the treatment cycle in all nine volunteers. It was concluded that Org OD 14 inhibited ovulation in all 16 volunteers.

  11. Laser-induced oxidation of Zn and Zn alloy films for direct-write grayscale photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Chang, Marian; Tu, Yuqiang; Poon, David K.; Chapman, Glenn H.; Choo, Chinheng; Peng, Jun

    2006-02-01

    Previous research showed that bimetallic Bi/In and Sn/In films exhibit good grayscale levels after laser exposure due to controlled film oxidation. While giving a large alteration in optical density (OD) from 3.0OD to 0.22OD at 365 nm, Bi/In and Sn/In films show a very nonlinear OD change with laser power, making fine control of grayscale writing difficult at some gray levels. This paper studies Zn and Zn alloy films as possible candidates for improved direct-write grayscale photomask applications. Zn and Zn alloys laser oxidation have been reported previously, but without grayscale optical measurements and applications. In this paper Zn films (50 nm ~ 240 nm), Sn/Zn (100 nm), Al/Zn (100 nm), Bi/Zn (100 nm) and In/Zn (100 nm) were DC- and RF-sputtered onto glass slides and then were scanned by argon ion CW laser (488 nm). Among these films, the highest OD change, 3OD (from 3.2OD before exposure to 0.2OD after laser exposure) at 365 nm, was found in the In/Zn (25/75 nm or 84at% Zn) film. The characterization of grayscale level to laser power modulation in Zn and Zn alloy films with various thickness or composition ratios were investigated. The Zn OD change versus laser power curve is more linear than those of Sn/In and Bi/In films. In/Zn films have better characterization of grayscale level versus laser writing power than pure Zn film. Among these four Zn alloy films, Zn/Al shows most linear relation of OD at 365 nm to laser power modulation.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of ODS and non-ODS Fe-14Cr model alloys produced by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M. A.; de Castro, V.; Leguey, T.; Muñoz, A.; Pareja, R.

    2013-05-01

    In this work the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique has been explored as an alternative consolidation route for producing ultra-fine grained Fe-14Cr model alloys containing a dispersion of oxide nanoparticles. Elemental powders of Fe and Cr, and nanosized Y2O3 powder have been mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill and rapidly sintered in a spark plasma furnace. Two alloys, with nominal compositions Fe-14%Cr and Fe-14%Cr-0.3%Y2O3 (wt.%), have been fabricated and their microstructure and mechanical properties investigated. The results have been compared with those obtained for other powder metallurgy processed alloys of the same composition but consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. The SPS technique under the present conditions has produced Fe-14Cr materials that apparently exhibit different microstructures yielding inferior mechanical properties than the counterpart material consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. Although the presence of a dispersion of Y-rich particles is evident, the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-14Cr alloy consolidated by SPS exhibits poor tensile properties. The extensive decoration of the powder particle surfaces with Cr-rich precipitates and the residual porosity appear to be responsible for the impaired properties of this ODS alloy consolidated by SPS.

  13. Microstructural study of a mechanically alloyed ODS superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujahid, M.; Gater, C. A.; Martin, J. W.

    1998-08-01

    Extruded bars of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA-6000 have been annealed isothermally as well as in temperature gradients. The temperatures used for annealing produced secondary recrystallization in all the samples, although the final grain aspect ratio was different for each annealing process. Interrupted gradient anneal experiments showed a curved secondary recrystallization front, with the surface recrystallizing at a lower temperature than the interior. It is believed this is caused indirectly by the strain gradients arising during extrusion. Grain-orientation analysis of recrystallized material revealed that a <110> fiber texture is present. A progressive grain reorientation toward <110> has been measured behind the recrystallization front using microbeam electron diffraction. In addition, changes in the distribution, size, and morphology of different types of precipitates and particles occurring during various stages of annealing have also been studied. Grain-boundary pinning by the stable oxide particles plays an important role in determining the grain growth behavior at high temperatures.

  14. Organon OD 14 (tibolone) and menopausal dynamic hormone profiles.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, H I; Hart, D M; Lindsay, R; Beastall, G H

    1986-03-01

    Hormonal profiles were studied in 15 post-menopausal women, 7 of whom had been treated with Organon OD 14 (Tibolone) and 8 with placebo tablets for 3 yr. In the Tibolone-treated group, the sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were significantly lower, while the estimated free testosterone levels, the testosterone/SHBG ratio and the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) were significantly higher than in the placebo group. Prolactin and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations were lower in the actively treated group, although the differences were not statistically significant. No significant differences were observed with respect to thyroxine (T4), TSH, basal cortisol or cortisol response to synacthen.

  15. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  16. Behavior of Fe-ODS Alloys After Thermal Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Garcia, Marta; Hernández-Mayoral, Mercedes; Esparraguera, Elvira Oñorbe

    2016-06-01

    Oxide dispersion alloys are one of the candidates as cladding materials for Gen IV fast reactors, due to their high strength at high temperature, good creep properties, and swelling resistance. This good performance is mainly due to a fine dispersion of nano-oxide particles on the microstructure and to non-grained structure. The microstructural stability and the mechanical properties of a Fe-ODS alloy are studied after different thermal aging experiments at 973 K (700 °C), 5000 hours; 973 K (700 °C), 10,000 hours; and 1123 K (850 °C), 10,000 hours. SEM/EBSD and TEM together with tensile and impact tests on the as-received and thermally aged material have been carried out. In general, for all the tested conditions, a slight softening effect is observed attributed to the changes in the grain structure as well as to the changes in the amount and size of nano-oxide particles. In addition, the aged material shows a lower impact USE value while the DBTT is maintained.

  17. Cyclic creep and anelastic relaxation analysis of an ODS superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, Vincent C.; Kimmerle, William L.; Tien, John K.

    1986-09-01

    This paper documents the effect of stress and temperature on the cyclic minimum strain rate at two different loading frequencies for the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy, INCONEL* MA 6000. The apparent stress exponent and activation energy for cyclic creep at both frequencies studied are shown to be greater than values observed for static creep. The large values of the stress exponent and activation energy for cyclic creep are proposed to result from anelastic strain storage delaying nonrecoverable creep during the on-load portion of the cyclic creep loading, such that the “effective stress” driving nonrecoverable creep is only a small fraction of the applied stress. In addition, the temperature dependence of the anelastic relaxation that occurs during the off-load portion of the cyclic creep loading is determined. The activation energy found for the relaxation process is equal to about one-half that for self-diffusion in nickel. A mechanism of localized climb of dislocations over the oxide dispersoids present in INCONEL MA 6000 is postulated to account for the observed activation energy of the relaxation process.

  18. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

    2011-08-09

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  19. Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderegg, J.W.; Shechtman, D.

    2009-12-01

    In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strength- ened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

  20. [Enantioseparation behavior of chiral stationary phases AD, AS and OD].

    PubMed

    Li, Liqun; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Tai; He, Jianfeng; Zhang, Weiguang

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, HPLC enantioseparation with chiral stationary phases (CSPs) has been widely applied in chiral analysis and preparation of new pharmaceuticals, pesticides, food, etc. Herein, enantioseparation of 20 chiral compounds have been carried out on three polysaccharide-based CSPs (EnantioPak AD, AS and OD) with normal phases by HPLC, separately. The influences of skeletal structure and the kinds of derivative groups on separation behaviors of these CSPs have been studied in detail. As results indicated, except for compound 13, the other compounds were baseline separated on EnantioPak AD, with most of resolution over 2. 0; in addition, better separation for acidic or basic compounds was achieved through adding acidic/basic additives into the mobile phase of hexane-alcohol. For four aromatic alcohols (compounds 13-16), their retention in the EnantioPak AD column showed a weakening tendency with increase of carbon number in side chain group, and the reverse trend of their resolution was observed. Furthermore, EnantioPak AD showed much better separation performance for eight compounds (13-20) than the others. In short, these results have provided some references for further investigation of separation behavior and applications of polysaccharide-based CSPs. PMID:27319174

  1. Radiation effects on the microstructure of a 9Cr-ODS alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, J.; Allen, T. R.; Birtcher, R. C.; Shutthanandan, S.; Thevothasan, S.; Materials Science Division; INL; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; PNNL

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are prime candidates for high-temperature, high-dose cladding in advanced nuclear reactors. When a 9Cr-ODS alloy was irradiated with 5 MeV nickel ions at temperatures of 500-700 C to doses up to 150 dpa, there was no significant change in the dislocation arrangement. For oxide particles, there is a small shrinkage in size and increase in density with increasing irradiation dose. This work confirms that oxide particles and the microstructure of the 9Cr-ODS show minimal changes under irradiation at temperatures up to 700 C and doses up to 150 dpa.

  2. Effects of mechanical alloying time on microstructure and properties of 9Cr-ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Rui; Lu, Zheng; Lu, Chenyang; Liu, Chunming

    2014-12-01

    Pre-alloyed powders of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels were produced by atomization. The atomized powders without mechanical alloying (MA) and with short-time MA were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The morphology and microstructure of the atomized and the MA powders were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of 9Cr-ODS steels with different MA time was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and atom probe tomography (APT). The results showed that high-density of nanosized precipitates and ultrafine grains are formed in the ODS steels using the processing route, which remarkably reduce MA time. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of ODS steels are improved with the increase of MA time.

  3. Microstructural and mechanical property characterization of ingot metallurgy ODS iron aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Howell, C.R.; Hall, F.; Valykeo, J.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with a novel, lower cost method of producing a oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron-aluminide alloy. A large 250-kg batch of ODS iron-aluminide alloy designated as FAS was produced by Hoskins Manufacturing Company (Hoskins) [Hamburg, Michigan] using the new process. Plate and bar stock of the ODS alloy were the two major products received. Each of the products was characterized for its microstructure, including grain size and uniformity of oxide dispersion. Tensile tests were completed from room temperature to 1100 C. Only 100-h creep tests were completed at 800 and 1000 C. The results of these tests are compared with the commercial ODS alloy designated as MA-956. An assessment of these data is used to develop future plans for additional work and identifying applications.

  4. Placebo-controlled cross-over study of effects of Org OD 14 in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kicovic, P M; Cortés-Prieto, J; Luisi, M; Milojevic, S; Franchi, F

    1982-01-01

    A double-blind cross-over study with Org OD 14 and placebo was performed in 82 menopausal patients presenting with hot flushes and associated symptoms. Patients were randomly allocated to Org OD 14 or placebo as first treatment, and switched to placebo or Org OD 14 as second treatment. Each treatment period lasted for 16 weeks; no wash-out period was introduced. Tablets containing 2.5 mg of Org OD 14 or matched placebo tablets were supplied. Data on the following variables were obtained and analysed by the non-parametric randomization test for paired observations: hot flushes, sweating, dizziness, palpitations, fatiguability, headache, sleeplessness, irritability, breathlessness, backache and loss of libido and, in 16 patients, on circulating levels of FSH, LH, PRL, T3, T4, cortisol (F), SHBG, TBG and CBG. Twenty patients (13 placebo, 7 Org OD 14) withdrew, because their symptoms did not improve and one patient withdrew for reasons unrelated to treatment, so that 61 patients completed the study. The data demonstrated a good clinical effect and statistically significant differences in favour of Org OD 14 for hot flushes and a number of associated symptoms. Many patients reported on a general feeling of well being and a mood-elevating effect following Org OD 14. Org OD 14 significantly suppressed FSH and LH levels, while those of PRL remained unchanged. Although there was slight suppression of TBG and T4 which attained statistical significance, there was no influence on the most important parameter, T3. SHBG levels were slightly suppressed, whereas F and CBG levels were unaffected.

  5. Chemical engineering and structural and pharmacological characterization of the α-scorpion toxin OD1.

    PubMed

    Durek, Thomas; Vetter, Irina; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Motin, Leonid; Knapp, Oliver; Adams, David J; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion α-toxins are invaluable pharmacological tools for studying voltage-gated sodium channels, but few structure-function studies have been undertaken due to their challenging synthesis. To address this deficiency, we report a chemical engineering strategy based upon native chemical ligation. The chemical synthesis of α-toxin OD1 was achieved by chemical ligation of three unprotected peptide segments. A high resolution X-ray structure (1.8 Å) of synthetic OD1 showed the typical βαββ α-toxin fold and revealed important conformational differences in the pharmacophore region when compared with other α-toxin structures. Pharmacological analysis of synthetic OD1 revealed potent α-toxin activity (inhibition of fast inactivation) at Nav1.7, as well as Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. In addition, OD1 also produced potent β-toxin activity at Nav1.4 and Nav1.6 (shift of channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction), indicating that OD1 might interact at more than one site with Nav1.4 and Nav1.6. Investigation of nine OD1 mutants revealed that three residues in the reverse turn contributed significantly to selectivity, with the triple OD1 mutant (D9K, D10P, K11H) being 40-fold more selective for Nav1.7 over Nav1.6, while OD1 K11V was 5-fold more selective for Nav1.6 than Nav1.7. This switch in selectivity highlights the importance of the reverse turn for engineering α-toxins with altered selectivity at Nav subtypes.

  6. Detection of OD towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, B.; Du, F.; Liu, F.-C.; Belloche, A.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Hübers, H.-W.; Klein, B.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Although water is an essential and widespread molecule in star-forming regions, its chemical formation pathways are still not very well constrained. Observing the level of deuterium fractionation of OH, a radical involved in the water chemical network, is a promising way to infer its chemical origin. Aims: We aim at understanding the formation mechanisms of water by investigating the origin of its deuterium fractionation. This can be achieved by observing the abundance of OD towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422, where the HDO distribution is already known. Methods: Using the GREAT receiver on board SOFIA, we observed the ground-state OD transition at 1391.5 GHz towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422. We also present the detection of the HDO 111-000 line using the APEX telescope. We compare the OD/HDO abundance ratio inferred from these observations with the predictions of chemical models. Results: The OD line is detected in absorption towards the source continuum. This is the first detection of OD outside the solar system. The SOFIA observation, coupled to the observation of the HDO 111-000 line, provides an estimate of the abundance ratio OD/HDO ~ 17-90 in the gas where the absorption takes place. This value is fairly high compared with model predictions. This may be reconciled if reprocessing in the gas by means of the dissociative recombination of H2DO+ further fractionates OH with respect to water. Conclusions: The present observation demonstrates the capability of the SOFIA/GREAT instrument to detect the ground transition of OD towards star-forming regions in a frequency range that was not accessible before. Dissociative recombination of H2DO+ may play an important role in setting a high OD abundance. Measuring the branching ratios of this reaction in the laboratory will be of great value for chemical models. Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Continuation of Studies on Development of ODS Heat Exchanger Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Brown; David Workman; Bimal Kad; Gaylord Smith; Archie Robertson; Ian Wright

    2008-04-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Center (NETL), has initiated a strategic plan for the development of advanced technologies needed to design and build fossil fuel plants with very high efficiency and environmental performance. These plants, referred to as 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs by DOE, will produce electricity, chemicals, fuels, or a combination of these products, and possibly secondary products such as steam/heat for industrial use. MA956 is a prime candidate material being considered for a high temperature heat exchanger in the 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs. This material is an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy; however, there are some gaps in the data required to commit to the use of these alloys in a full-size plant. To fill the technology gaps for commercial production and use of the material for 'Advanced Power Generation Systems' this project has performed development activity to significant increase in circumferential strength of MA956 as compared to currently available material, investigated bonding technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints through joining development, and performed tensile, creep and fire-side corrosion tests to validate the use and fabrication processes of MA956 to heat exchanger tubing applications. Development activities within this projected has demonstrated increased circumferential strength of MA956 tubes through flow form processing. Of the six fabrication technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints, inertia friction welding (IFW) and flash butt welding (FBW) were identified as processes for joining MA956 tubes. Tensile, creep, and fire-side corrosion test data were generated for both base metal and weld joints. The data can be used for design of future systems employing MA956. Based upon the positive development activities, two test probes were designed and fabricated for field exposure testing at 1204 C ({approx}2200 F) flue gas. The probes contained tube portions with FBW

  8. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Robertson, Ian; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Gewirth, Andrew

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  9. Dual Wavelength Laser Writing and Measurement Methodology for High Resolution Bimetallic Grayscale Photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qarehbaghi, Reza

    Grayscale bimetallic photomasks consist of bi-layer thermal resists (Bismuth-on-Indium or Tin-on-Indium) which become controllably transparent when exposed to a focused laser beam as a function of the absorbed power changing from ~3OD (unexposed) to <0.22OD (fully exposed). To achieve high accuracy grayscale pattern, the OD must be measured and controlled while writing. This thesis investigates using two wavelength beams for mask writing (514.5nm) and OD measurement (457.9nm) separated from a multi-line Argon ion laser source: a Dual Wavelength Writing and Measurement System. The writing laser profile was modified to a top-hat using a beam shaper. Several mask patterns tested the creation of high resolution grayscale masks. Finally, for creation of 3D structures in photoresist, the mask transparency to resist thickness requirements was formulated and linear slope patterns were successfully created.

  10. In situ synchrotron tensile investigations on 14YWT, MA957, and 9-Cr ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun-Li; Mo, Kun; Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Hoelzer, David T.; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced ODS alloys provide exceptional radiation tolerance and high-temperature mechanical properties when compared to traditional ferritic and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Their remarkable properties result from ultrahigh density and ultrafine size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within the ferritic matrix. In this work, we applied a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray to study the deformation process of three advanced ODS materials including 14YWT, MA957, and 9-Cr ODS steel. Only the relatively large nanoparticles in the 9-Cr ODS were observed in the synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The nanoclusters in both 14YWT and MA957 were invisible in the measurement due to their non-stoichiometric nature. Due to the different sizes of nanoparticles and nanoclusters in the materials, the Orowan looping was considered to be the major strengthening mechanism in the 9-Cr ODS, while the dispersed-barrier-hardening is dominant strengthening mechanism in both 14YWT and MA957, This analysis was inferred from the different build-up rates of dislocation density when plastic deformation was initiated. Finally, the dislocation densities interpreted from the X-ray measurements were successfully modeled using the Bergström's dislocation models.

  11. Irradiation creep and microstructural changes in an advanced ODS ferritic steel during helium implantation under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Pouchon, M. A.; Kimura, A.; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2009-04-01

    An advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with very fine oxide particles has been homogeneously implanted with helium under uniaxial tensile stresses from 20 to 250 MPa to a maximum dose of about 0.38 dpa (1650 appm-He) with displacement damage rates of 4.4 × 10 -6 dpa/s at temperatures of 573 and 773 K. The samples were in the form of miniaturized dog-bones, where during the helium implantation the straining and the electrical resistance were monitored simultaneously. Creep compliances were measured to be 4.0 × 10 -6 and 11 × 10 -6 dpa -1 MPa -1 at 573 and 773 K, respectively. The resistivity of ODS steel samples decreased with dose, indicating segregation and/or precipitation. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was studied in detail by TEM. The effects of ODS particle size on irradiation creep and microstructural changes was investigated by comparing the results from the present advanced ODS (K1) to a commercial ODS ferritic steels (PM2000) with much bigger oxide particles.

  12. Advanced characterizations of austenitic oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels for high-temperature reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin

    Future advanced nuclear systems involve higher operation temperatures, intenser neutron flux, and more aggressive coolants, calling for structural materials with excellent performances in multiple aspects. Embedded with densely and dispersedly distributed oxide nanoparticles that are capable of not only pinning dislocations but also trapping radiation-induced defects, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels provide excellence in mechanical strength, creep resistance, and radiation tolerance. In order to develop ODS steels with qualifications required by advanced nuclear applications, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of the enhancement of ODS steels in mechanical properties. In this dissertation, a series of austenitic ODS stainless steels were investigated by coordinated state-of-the-art techniques. A series of different precipitate phases, including multiple Y-Ti-O, Y-Al-O, and Y-Ti-Hf-O complex oxides, were observed to form during mechanical alloying. Small precipitates are likely to have coherent or cubic-on-cubic orientation relationships with the matrix, allowing the dislocation to shear through. The Orowan looping mechanism is the dominant particle-dislocation interaction mode as the temperature is low, whereas the shearing mechanism and the Hirsch mechanism are also observed. Interactions between the particles and the dislocations result in the load-partitioning phenomenon. Smaller particles were found to have the stronger loading-partitioning effect. More importantly, the load-partitioning of large size particles are marginal at elevated temperatures, while the small size particles remain sustaining higher load, explaining the excellent high temperature mechanical performance of ODS steels.

  13. HRTEM Study of the Role of Nanoparticles in ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Tumey, S; Fluss, M; Serruys, Y; Willaime, F

    2011-08-30

    Structures of nanoparticles and their role in dual-ion irradiated Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (K3) ODS ferritic steel produced by mechanical alloying (MA) were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The observation of Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} complex-oxide nanoparticles in the ODS steel imply that decomposition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. HRTEM observations of crystalline and partially crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous cluster-domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of nanoparticles/clusters in MA/ODS steels, which we believe involves solid-state amorphization and re-crystallization. The role of nanoparticles/clusters in suppressing radiation-induced swelling is revealed through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in (Fe + He) dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS steel. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoparticle/clusters in dual-ion irradiated K3-ODS are presented.

  14. Twinning of three Fe-PNP pincer complexes interpreted according to order-disorder (OD) theory.

    PubMed

    Bichler, Bernhard; Holzhacker, Christian; Glatz, Mathias; Stöger, Berthold; Kirchner, Karl

    2015-10-01

    The systematic twinning of three 2,6-diaminopyridine-based Fe-PNP complexes is interpreted using order-disorder (OD) theory. The monoclinic [Fe(0)(PNP(Et)-(i)Pr)(CO)2] [P112(1)/b, Z' = 4] possesses pseudo-orthorhombic metrics and crystallizes as a reflection twin by pseudo-merohedry with the twin plane (100). The structure is made up of layers with idealized p2(1)a(b) symmetry. The a glide planes of adjacent layers do not overlap, leading to OD polytypism. trans-[Fe(II)(PNP-Et)Br2(CO)] [P2(1)/n, Z' = 1] is systematically twinned via twofold rotation about [001]. It is made up of OD layers with idealized p2(1)2(1)(2) symmetry. OD polytypism is caused by the twofold rotation axes of adjacent layers which do not overlap. [Fe(II)(κ(2)P,N-PNP-(i)Pr,TAD)Cl2]·THF [P1, Z^{\\prime} = 2] is systematically twinned via a twofold rotation about [010]. It is made up of layers with idealized p121(1) symmetry. OD polytypism is caused by screw rotations relating adjacent layers with an intrinsic translation along a fourth of a primitive lattice vector. In all three structures the twin individuals are a polytype with a maximum degree of order (MDO) and at the twin interface is located a fragment of the second MDO polytype.

  15. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Zr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, K. A.; Kapoor, M.; Kotan, H.; Hornbuckle, B. C.; Walck, S. D.; Thompson, G. B.; Tschopp, M. A.; Kecskes, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    A series of bulk nanostructured Fe-Ni-Zr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys were synthesized using high energy mechanical alloying and consolidated using high temperature equal channel angular extrusion. The resultant microstructures are composed of nano/ultrafine or micrometer-sized grains with larger intermetallic precipitates and small Zr oxide clusters (<10 nm diameter, measured and confirmed by atom probe tomography). The ODS alloys possess elevated compression properties, e.g., 1.2 and 2.4 GPa compressive yield stress at room temperature for samples consolidated at 700 °C and 1000 °C, respectively. This work highlights the relationship between processing, microstructure, and properties for this class of ferritic ODS alloys.

  17. Response of nanoclusters in a 9Cr ODS steel to 1 dpa, 525 ?C proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Certain, Alicia; Field, Kevin G; Allen, Todd R.; Sridharan, K.; Miller, Michael K; Bentley, James; Busby, Jeremy T

    2010-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F/M) alloys are expected to play an important role as cladding or structural components in Generation IV and other advanced nuclear systems operating in the temperature range 350-700 C and to doses up to 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have been developed to operate at higher temperatures than traditional F/M steels. These steels contain nanometer-sized Y-Ti-O nanoclusters for additional strengthening. A proton irradiation to 1 dpa at 525 C has been performed on a 9Cr ODS steel to determine the nanocluster stability at low dose. The evolution of the nanocluster population and the composition at the nanocluster-matrix interface were studied using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The data from this study are contrasted to those from a previous study on heavy-ion irradiated 9Cr ODS steel.

  18. A characterization of some alternating groups A p+8 of degree p + 8 by OD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shitian; Zhang, Zhanghua

    2016-01-01

    Let [Formula: see text] be an alternating group of degree n. We know that [Formula: see text] is 2-fold OD-characterizable and [Formula: see text] is 6-fold OD-characterizable. In this note, we first show that [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are 14-fold and 7-fold OD-characterizable, respectively, and second show that certain groups [Formula: see text] with that [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], are OD-characterizable. The first gives a negative answer to Open Problem of Kogani-Moghaddam and Moghaddamfar.

  19. Optimization of High Temperature Hoop Creep Response in ODS-Fe3Al Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, B.K.; Heatherington, J.H.; McKamey, C.; Wright, I.; Sikka, V.; Judkins, R.

    2003-04-22

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe3Al alloys are currently being developed for heat-exchanger tubes for eventual use at operating temperatures of up to 1100 C in the power generation industry. The development challenges include (a) efforts to produce thin walled ODS-Fe3Al tubes, employing powder extrusion methodologies, with (b) adequate increased strength for service at operating temperatures to (c) mitigate creep failures by enhancing the as-processed grain size. A detailed and comprehensive research and development methodology is prescribed to produce ODS-Fe3Al thin walled tubes. Current single step extrusion consolidation methodologies typically yield 8ft. lengths of 1-3/8 inch diameter, 1/8 inch wall thickness ODS-Fe3Al tubes. The process parameters for such consolidation methodologies have been prescribed and evaluated as being routinely reproducible. Recrystallization treatments at 1200 C produce elongated grains (with their long axis parallel to the extrusion axis), typically 200-2000 {micro}m in diameter, and several millimeters long. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloys requires an understanding and manipulating the factors that control grain alignment and recrystallization behavior. Current efforts are focused on examining the processing dependent longitudinal vs. transverse creep anisotropy, and exploring post-extrusion methods to improve hoop creep response in ODS-Fe3Al alloy tubes. In this report we examine the mechanisms of hoop creep failure and describe our efforts to improve creep performance via variations in thermal-mechanical treatments.

  20. Experimental study of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals: kinetics and products.

    PubMed

    Braure, Tristan; Bedjanian, Yuri; Romanias, Manolis N; Morin, Julien; Riffault, Véronique; Tomas, Alexandre; Coddeville, Patrice

    2014-10-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals has been studied using a low-pressure flow tube reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + C10H16 → products (1), OD + C10H16 → products (2). The rate constants of the title reactions were determined using four different approaches: either monitoring the kinetics of OH (OD) radicals or limonene consumption in excess of limonene or of the radicals, respectively (absolute method), and by the relative rate method using either the reaction OH (OD) + Br2 or OH (OD) + DMDS (dimethyl disulfide) as the reference one and following HOBr (DOBr) formation or DMDS and limonene consumption, respectively. As a result of the absolute and relative measurements, the overall rate coefficients, k1 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(-11) exp((515 ± 50)/T) and k2 = (2.5 ± 0.6) × 10(-11) exp((575 ± 60)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), were determined at a pressure of 1 Torr of helium over the temperature ranges 220-360 and 233-353 K, respectively. k1 was found to be pressure independent over the range 0.5-5 Torr. There are two possible pathways for the reaction between OH (OD) and limonene: addition of the radical to one of the limonene double bonds (reactions 1a and 2a ) and abstraction of a hydrogen atom (reactions 1b and 2b ), resulting in the formation of H2O (HOD). Measurements of the HOD yield as a function of temperature led to the following branching ratio of the H atom abstraction channel: k2b/k2 = (0.07 ± 0.03) × exp((460 ± 140)/T) for T = (253-355) K.

  1. Development of ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Hoelzer, David T.; Pint, Bruce A.; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2015-09-18

    FeCrAl alloys are prime candidates for accident-tolerant fuel cladding due to their excellent oxidation resistance up to 1400 C and good mechanical properties at intermediate temperature. Former commercial oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys such as PM2000 exhibit significantly better tensile strength than wrought FeCrAl alloys, which would alloy for the fabrication of a very thin (~250 m) ODS FeCrAl cladding and limit the neutronic penalty from the replacement of Zr-based alloys by Fe-based alloys. Several Fe-12-Cr-5Al ODS alloys where therefore fabricated by ball milling FeCrAl powders with Y2O3 and additional oxides such as TiO2 or ZrO2. The new Fe-12Cr-5Al ODS alloys showed excellent tensile strength up to 800 C but limited ductility. Good oxidation resistance in steam at 1200 and 1400 C was observed except for one ODS FeCrAl alloy containing Ti. Rolling trials were conducted at 300, 600 C and 800 C to simulate the fabrication of thin tube cladding and a plate thickness of ~0.6mm was reached before the formation of multiple edge cracks. Hardness measurements at different stages of the rolling process, before and after annealing for 1h at 1000 C, showed that a thinner plate thickness could likely be achieved by using a multi-step approach combining warm rolling and high temperature annealing. Finally, new Fe-10-12Cr-5.5-6Al-Z gas atomized powders have been purchased to fabricate the second generation of low-Cr ODS FeCrAl alloys. The main goals are to assess the effect of O, C, N and Zr contents on the ODS FeCrAl microstructure and mechanical properties, and to optimize the fabrication process to improve the ductility of the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl while maintaining good mechanical strength and oxidation resistance.

  2. Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Feng, Zhili

    2007-08-01

    Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

  3. The photodissociation lifetimes of the OH and OD radicals in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, P. D.; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Dalgarno, A.

    1983-01-01

    The photodissociation rates of OH and OD molecules due to absorption of solar radiation in the X(2)Pi-A(2)Sigma(+) electronic transition are calculated to lie between 3.5 and 6.7 x 10 to the -6th/sec for OH for heliocentric velocities between -60 and +60 km/sec and at about 4.7 x 10 to the -7th/sec for OD at 1 AU from the sun. The corresponding lifetimes, which are upper bounds to the actual lifetimes, are generally consistent with the observational cometary data.

  4. Radiation Stability of Nanoclusters in Nano-structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Certain, Alicia G.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Shutthanandan, V.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-03-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered candidates for nuclear fission and fusion applications at high temperature and dose. The complex oxide nanoclusters in these alloys provide high-temperature strength and are expected to afford better radiation resistance. Proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiations have been performed to evaluate cluster stability in 14YWT and 9CrODS steel under a range of irradiation conditions. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used in this work to analyze the evolution of the oxide population.

  5. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  6. A stable, high power optically pumped far infrared laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1988-01-01

    The generation of 1.25 watts of CW laser power at the 119-micron (2522.8 GHz) methanol line is reported. The maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. This laser has also been tested on numerous other lines ranging from 403.7 GHz (HCOOH) to 5260 GHz (CH3OD) with improved power and stability.

  7. The optical depth sensor (ODS) for column dust opacity measurements and cloud detection on martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Foujols, T.

    2016-08-01

    A lightweight and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) able to measure alternatively scattered flux at zenith and the sum of the direct flux and the scattered flux in blue and red has been developed to work in martian environment. The principal goals of ODS are to perform measurements of the daily mean dust opacity and to retrieve the altitude and optical depth of high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in the understanding of martian meteorology. The retrieval procedure of dust opacity is based on the use of radiative transfer simulations reproducing observed changes in the solar flux during the day as a function of 4 free parameters: dust opacity in blue and red, and effective radius and effective width of dust size distribution. The detection of clouds is undertaken by looking at the time variation of the color index (CI), defined as the ratio between red and blue ODS channels, at twilight. The retrieval of altitude and optical depth of clouds is carried out using a radiative transfer model in spherical geometry to simulate the CI time variation at twilight. Here the different retrieval procedures to analyze ODS signals, as well as the results obtained in different sensitivity analysis are presented and discussed.

  8. 46 CFR 280.9 - Special rules for last year of ODS agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for last year of ODS agreement. 280.9 Section 280.9 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND OPERATORS LIMITATIONS ON THE AWARD AND PAYMENT OF OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY...

  9. odò: weed management issues in North American edamame

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the fact that the United States is a global leader in commodity soybean production, most of the vegetable soybean (i.e. edamame or máodò) consumed in North America is imported from Asia. Interest in domestically grown edamame is on the rise among consumers; however, the U.S. vegetable proces...

  10. Differences in ODS formatting for HTML with Proc Print and Proc Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While proc print is a terrific tool for data checking and data summary, proc report is similar to, but more powerful because it can do some basic calculations or statistics and data can be broken more effectively into manageable fields. The ODS procedure can produce HTML files from either procedure...

  11. Assessment of a new fabrication route for Fe-9Cr-1W ODS cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toualbi, L.; Cayron, C.; Olier, P.; Malaplate, J.; Praud, M.; Mathon, M.-H.; Bossu, D.; Rouesne, E.; Montani, A.; Logé, R.; de Carlan, Y.

    2012-09-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels are developed as future cladding materials for Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors. ODS alloys are elaborated by powder metallurgy, consolidated by hot extrusion and manufactured into tube cladding using cold rolling process. ODS steels present low ductility and high hardness at room temperature which complicate their manufacturing. Cold working leads to the hardening of the tube which needs to be softened by heat treatment. A new high temperature fabrication route performed on a Fe-9Cr-1W-Ti-Y2O3-ODS martensitic steel has been designed by following the hardness values, the morphological and crystallographic anisotropy and the nano-precipitation size evolution at each step of the fabrication route. Observations show that phase transformation from ferrite (α) to austenite (γ) is crucial to reduce the morphological and the crystallographic anisotropy induced by the manufacturing processes. The high temperature heat treatments permit to make the austenitic grain grow leading to an improvement of the cold workability. Ultimate Tensile Strength values obtained in the hoop direction remain about 315 MPa at 650 °C which is slightly lower compared to other Fe-9Cr ODS tubes but the new microstructure could be more favorable for creep properties.

  12. Deep catalytic oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) with oxalate-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    PubMed

    Lü, Hongying; Li, Pengcheng; Deng, Changliang; Ren, Wanzhong; Wang, Shunan; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Han

    2015-07-01

    An oxalate-based DES with a tetrabutyl ammonium chloride and oxalate acid molar ratio of 1/2 (TBO1 : 2) exhibited high activity in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) under mild reaction conditions. It is potentially a promising and highly environmentally friendly approach for desulfurization of fuels. PMID:26051675

  13. A Level-Headed Look: The Potential of OD-ROM in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiscox, Michael D.; Hiscox, Suzanne B.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews 15 potential uses of optical disc read-only memory (OD-ROM) in education, including instructional, curriculum, assessment, administrative, and counseling applications. Need for the product, cost of development, size of audience, critical competitor, and potential profitability to suppliers are noted for each application. (MBR)

  14. Isotope branching and tunneling in O(3P)+HD-->OH+D; OD+H reactions.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, Renat A; Balakrishnan, N

    2004-12-01

    The O((3)P)+HD and O((3)P)+D(2) reactions are studied using quantum scattering calculations and chemically accurate potential energy surfaces developed for the O((3)P)+H(2) system by Rogers et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2308 (2000)]. Cross sections and rate coefficients for OH and OD products are calculated using accurate quantum methods as well as the J-shifting approximation. The J-shifting approach is found to work remarkably well for both O+HD and O+D(2) collisions. The reactions are dominated by tunneling at low temperatures and for the O+HD reaction the hydrogen atom transfer leading to the OH product dominates at low temperatures. Our result for the OH/OD branching ratio is in close agreement with previous calculations over a wide range of temperatures. The computed OH/OD branching ratios are also in close agreement with experimental results of Robie et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 134, 579 (1987)] at temperatures above 400 K but the theoretical results do not reproduce the rapid rise in the experimental values of the branching ratio for temperatures lower than 350 K. We believe that new measurements could resolve the long-standing discrepancy between experiment and theory for this benchmark reaction.

  15. Advanced ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Unocic, Kinga A; Hoelzer, David T; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-09-01

    ODS FeCrAl alloys are being developed with optimum composition and properties for accident tolerant fuel cladding. Two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-15Cr-5Al+Y2O3 alloys were fabricated by ball milling and extrusion of gas atomized metallic powder mixed with Y2O3 powder. To assess the impact of Mo on the alloy mechanical properties, one alloy contained 1%Mo. The hardness and tensile properties of the two alloys were close and higher than the values reported for fine grain PM2000 alloy. This is likely due to the combination of a very fine grain structure and the presence of nano oxide precipitates. The nano oxide dispersion was however not sufficient to prevent grain boundary sliding at 800 C and the creep properties of the alloys were similar or only slightly superior to fine grain PM2000 alloy. Both alloys formed a protective alumina scale at 1200 C in air and steam and the mass gain curves were similar to curves generated with 12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+Hf or Zr) ODS alloys fabricated for a different project. To estimate the maximum temperature limit of use for the two alloys in steam, ramp tests at a rate of 5 C/min were carried out in steam. Like other ODS alloys, the two alloys showed a significant increase of the mas gains at T~ 1380 C compared with ~1480 C for wrought alloys of similar composition. The beneficial effect of Yttrium for wrought FeCrAl does not seem effective for most ODS FeCrAl alloys. Characterization of the hardness of annealed specimens revealed that the microstructure of the two alloys was not stable above 1000 C. Concurrent radiation results suggested that Cr levels <15wt% are desirable and the creep and oxidation results from the 12Cr ODS alloys indicate that a lower Cr, high strength ODS alloy with a higher maximum use temperature could be achieved.

  16. Computing rotational energy transfers of OD-/OH- in collisions with Rb: isotopic effects and inelastic rates at cold ion-trap conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sánchez, L.; Gianturco, F. A.; Carelli, F.; Wester, R.

    2015-12-01

    We report close-coupling (CC) quantum dynamics calculations for collisional excitation/de-excitation of the lowest four rotational levels of OD- and of OH- interacting with Rb atoms in a cold ion trap. The calculations are carried out over a range of energies capable of yielding the corresponding rates for state-changing events over a rather broad interval of temperatures which cover those reached in earlier cold trap experiments. They involved sympathetic cooling of the molecular anion through a cloud of laser-cooled Rb atoms, an experiment which is currently being run again through a Heidelberg-Innsbruck collaboration. The significance of isotopic effects is analysed by comparing both systems and the range of temperatures examined in the calculations is extended up to 400 K, starting from a few mK. Both cross sections and rates are found to be markedly larger than in the case of OD-/OH- interacting the He atoms under the same conditions, and the isotopic effects are also seen to be rather significant at the energies examined in the present study. Such findings are discussed in the light of the observed trap losses of molecular anions.

  17. Time-resolved laser-induced incandescence from multiwalled carbon nanotubes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrani, J. M.; Shneider, M. N.

    2015-01-26

    We observed temporal laser-induced incandescence (LII) signals from multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) suspended in ambient air. Unlike previous LII experiments with soot particles, which showed that primary particles with larger diameters cool at slower timescales relative to smaller particles, we observed that thicker MWCNTs with larger outer diameters (ODs) cool at faster timescales relative to thinner MWCNTs with smaller ODs. We suggested a simple explanation of this effect, based on the solution of one-dimensional nonstationary heat conduction equation for the initial non-uniform heating of MWCNTs with ODs greater than the skin depth.

  18. CROSS-ROLL FLOW FORMING OF ODS ALLOY HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES FOR HOOP CREEP ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-06-27

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in cross-rolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (i) prescribe extrusion consolidation methodologies via detailed

  19. O(D-1) production in ozone photolysis near 310 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Demore, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Relative quantum yields of O(D-1)production, phi, in ozone photolysis from 275 nm to 334 nm were determined in the gas phase at 233 K. The O(D-1) was monitored by means of its reaction with isobutane to form isobutyl alcohol. The light source was a high pressure mercury lamp combined with a monochromator, with a bandwidth of 1.6 nm. The results show a constant phi below 300 nm, which is taken as unity on the basis of previous work. There is a very sharp fall-off in phi which is centered at 308 nm. At 313 nm phi is not greater than 0.1.

  20. Effect of yttrium addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ODS RAF steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M. A.; de Castro, V.; Leguey, T.; Tarcísio-Costa, J.; Monge, M. A.; Muñoz, A.; Pareja, R.

    2014-12-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy with nominal composition Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.24Y (wt.%) was produced by mechanical alloying using elemental powders, and subsequent hot isostatic pressing. The microstructure of the material and characteristics of the oxide particle dispersion were investigated by electron microscopy. The effect of heat treatments on the microhardness and tensile properties at room temperature was also studied. The results show that a fine dispersion of Y-O-rich nanoparticles is achieved, together with larger (Cr, Ti)-rich precipitates. The absence of Ti is apparent in the majority of these nanoparticles, in contrast with reported results for ODS Ti-modified steels processed with Y2O3 addition.

  1. Nanostructure evolution in ODS Eurofer steel under irradiation up to 32 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhkin, S. V.; Orlov, N. N.; Aleev, A. A.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Kozodaev, M. A.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Chalykh, B. B.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.

    2015-01-01

    The nanostructure of the ODS Eurofer steel (9% CrWVTa + 0.5% Y2O3) has been studied after irradiation by iron ions to a damaging dose of 32 dpa. This steel in the initial state is characterized by the presence of a significant amount (˜1024 m-3) of nanosized (2-4 nm) clusters containing atoms of V, Y, O, and N. An analysis of the distribution of various chemical elements in the tested volumes has revealed variations in the composition of the matrix and of the nanosized clusters during irradiation. The data obtained were compared with the results for the ODS Eurofer steel subjected to reactor irradiation to a dose of 32 dpa.

  2. STS-79 Ku-band antenna, ODS and Spacehab module at PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The orbiter Ku-band antenna looms large in this view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay. Visible just past the antenna system -- stowed on the starboard side of the payload bay wall -- is the Orbiter Docking System (ODS), and connected to the ODS via a tunnel is the Spacehab Double Module in the aft area of the payload bay. This photograph was taken from the starboard wing platform on the fifth level of the Payload Changeout Room (PCR) at Launch Pad 39A. Work is under way in the PCR to close Atlantis' payload bay doors for flight. Atlantis currently is being targeted for liftoff on Mission STS-79, the fourth docking of the U.S. Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir, around September 12.

  3. Terahertz-visible two-photon rotational spectroscopy of cold OD-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Hauser, Daniel; Lakhmanskaya, Olga; Spieler, Steffen; Endres, Eric S.; Geistlinger, Katharina; Kumar, Sunil S.; Wester, Roland

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to measure rotational transitions of molecular anions in the terahertz domain by sequential two-photon absorption. Ion excitation by bound-bound terahertz absorption is probed by absorption in the visible on a bound-free transition. The visible frequency is tuned to a state-selective photodetachment transition of the excited anions. This provides a terahertz action spectrum for just a few hundred molecular ions. To demonstrate this we measure the two lowest rotational transitions, J =1 ←0 and J =2 ←1 of OD- anions in a cryogenic 22-pole trap. We obtain rotational transition frequencies of 598 596.08(19) MHz for J =1 ←0 and 1 196 791.57(27) MHz for J =2 ←1 of OD-, in good agreement with their only previous measurement. This two-photon scheme opens up terahertz rovibrational spectroscopy for a range of molecular anions, in particular for polyatomic and cluster anions.

  4. In Situ Synchrotron Tensile Investigations on 14YWT, MA957 and 9-Cr ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jun-Li; Mo, Kun; Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Huijuan; Hoelzer, David T; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) provide exceptional radiation tolerance and high-temperature mechanical properties when compared to traditional ferritic and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Their remarkable properties result from ultrahigh density and ultrafine size of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within the ferritic matrix. In this work, we applied a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray to study the deformation process of two NFAs including 14YWT and MA957, and a 9-Cr ODS steel. Only the relatively large nanoparticles in the 9-Cr ODS were observed in the synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The nanoclusters in both 14 YWT and MA957 were invisible in the measurement due to their non-stoichiometric nature. Due to the different sizes of nanoparticles and nanoclusters in the materials, the Orowan looping was considered to be the major strengthening mechanism in the 9-Cr ODS, while the dispersed-barrier-hardening is dominant strengthening mechanism in both 14YWT and MA957, respectively. This analysis was inferred from the different build-up rates of dislocation density when plastic deformation was initiated. Finally, the dislocation densities interpreted from the X-ray measurements were successfully modeled using the Bergstr m s dislocation models.

  5. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    DOE PAGES

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is amore » general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.« less

  6. Microstructure examination of Fe-14Cr ODS ferritic steels produced through different processing routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Hosemann, P.; Vogel, S. C.; Baluc, N.

    2014-08-01

    Various thermo-mechanical treatments were applied to refine and homogenise grain size and improve mechanical properties of hot-isostatically pressed (HIP) 14%Cr ODS ferritic steel. The grain size was reduced, improving mechanical properties, tensile strength and Charpy impact, however bimodal-like distribution was also observed. As a result, larger, frequently elongated grains with size above 1 μm and refined, equiaxed grains with a diameter ranging from 250 to 500 nm. Neutron diffraction measurements revealed that for HIP followed by hydrostatic extrusion material the strongest fiber texture was observed oriented parallel to the extrusion direction. In comparison with hot rolling and hot pressing methods, this material exhibited promising mechanical properties: the ultimate tensile strength of 1350 MPa, yield strength of 1280 MPa, total elongation of 21.7% and Charpy impact energy of 5.8 J. Inferior Charpy impact energy of ∼3.0 J was measured for HIP and hot rolled material, emphasising that parameters of this manufacturing process still have to be optimised. As an alternative manufacturing route, due to the uniform microstructure and simplicity of the process, hot pressing might be a promising method for production of smaller parts of ODS ferritic steels. Besides, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of all thermo-mechanically treated materials, in comparison with as-HIPped ODS steel, was improved by more than 50%, the transition temperature ranging from 50 to 70 °C (323 and 343 K) remains still unsatisfactory.

  7. Hot deformation behavior and processing map of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of 9Cr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel fabricated through the process of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) as investigated through hot compression deformation tests on the Gleeble-1500D simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. The relationship between the rheological stress and the strain rate was also studied. The activation energy and the stress and material parameters of the hyperbolic-sine equation were resolved according to the data obtained. The processing map was also proposed. The results show that the flow stress decreases as the temperature increases, and that decreasing of the strain rate of the 9Cr ODS steel results in a positive strain rate sensitivity. It is clear that dynamic recrystallization is influenced by both temperature and strain rate. The results of this study may provide a good reference for the selection of hot working parameters for 9Cr ODS steel. The optimum processing domains are at 1200 °C with a strain rate of 1 s-1 and in the range of 1080-1100 °C with a strain rate between 0.018 s-1 and 0.05 s-1.

  8. Distinct and diverse anaerobic bacterial communities in boreal lakes dominated by candidate division OD1

    PubMed Central

    Peura, Sari; Eiler, Alexander; Bertilsson, Stefan; Nykänen, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja; Jones, Roger I

    2012-01-01

    Lakes have a central role in the carbon cycle of the boreal landscape. These systems typically stratify in summer and their hypolimnetic microbial communities influence burial of biogenic organic matter in sediments. The composition of bacterial communities in these suboxic habitats was studied by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons from five lakes with variable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. Bacterioplankton communities in the hypolimnetic waters were clearly different from the surface layer with candidate division OD1, Chlorobi and Bacteroidetes as dominant community members. Several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with candidate division OD1 were abundant and consistently present in the suboxic hypolimnion in these boreal lakes. The overall representation of this group was positively correlated with DOC and methane concentrations. Network analysis of time-series data revealed contrasting temporal patterns but suggested similar ecological roles among the abundant OTUs affiliated with candidate division OD1. Together, stable isotope data and taxonomic classification point to methane oxidation and autotrophic denitrification as important processes in the suboxic zone of boreal lakes. Our data revealed that while hypolimnetic bacterial communities are less dynamic, they appear to be more diverse than communities from the oxic surface layer. An appreciable proportion of the hypolimnetic bacteria belong to poorly described phyla. PMID:22418623

  9. Development of ODS FeCrAl for Compatibility in Fusion and Fission Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pint, B. A.; Dryepondt, S.; Unocic, K. A.; Hoelzer, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12-15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  10. Development of ODS FeCrAl for compatibility in fusion and fission energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys with 12–15% Cr are being evaluated for improved compatibility with Pb-Li for a fusion energy application and with high temperature steam for a more accident-tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding application. A 12% Cr content alloy showed low mass losses in static Pb-Li at 700°C, where a LiAlO2 surface oxide formed and inhibited dissolution into the liquid metal. All the evaluated compositions formed a protective scale in steam at 1200°C, which is not possible with ODS FeCr alloys. However, most of the compositions were not protective at 1400°C, which is a general and somewhat surprising problem with ODS FeCrAl alloys that is still being studied. More work is needed to optimize the alloy composition, microstructure and oxide dispersion, but initial promising tensile and creep results have been obtained with mixed oxide additions, i.e. Y2O3 with ZrO2, HfO2 or TiO2.

  11. Computer Output Laser Disk (COLD) Systems--COM Replacement Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolnick, Franklin I.

    1993-01-01

    Explains the COLD (Computer Output Laser Disk) system and describes current applications. Use of the COLD system to replace COM (Computer Output Microfilm) is discussed; advantages and disadvantages of the COLD system are considered; optical disks OD-WORM (Optical Disk-Write Once Read Many) versus CD-ROM are compared; and equipment and software…

  12. Hydrogen-induced crack nucleation in tensile testing of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitckii, Evgenii; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Hänninen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of continuous hydrogen charging on tensile properties of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels was studied at room and elevated temperatures of 100 °C and 300 °C. The hydrogen effect decreases with increase of the temperature for ODS-EUROFER steel, while susceptibility to hydrogen of EUROFER 97 steel remains approximately the same at all testing temperatures. Continuous hydrogen charging results in a reduction of the grain boundary cohesion of the EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels tested at RT. With increase of the testing temperature up to 300 °C EUROFER 97 steel exhibits relatively high amount of micro-cracks which agglomerate in sub-micrometer size cracks, while the hydrogen-induced intergranular crack nucleation in ODS-EUROFER steel is effectively suppressed. Possible mechanism of the hydrogen-induced crack nucleation and propagation under applied external stress is discussed.

  13. R&D of ferritic-martensitic steel EP450 ODS for fuel pin claddings of prospective fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Chukanov, A. P.; Tsvelev, V. V.; Porezanov, N. P.; Kruglov, O. A.

    2012-09-01

    Present paper performs research results of structure and mechanical properties of the ODS steel on the base of steel EP450 (Fe-13Cr-2Mo-Nb-V-B-0,12C) on all stages of producing: from powders to thin-walled tubes. Also, the results of research on method of sealing thin-walled tubes from steel EP450 ODS by pressurized resistance welding are shown.

  14. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  15. Infrared spectroscopy of OD vibrators in minerals at natural dilution: hydroxyl groups in talc and kaolinite, and structural water in beryl and emerald.

    PubMed

    de Donato, Philippe; Cheilletz, Alain; Barres, Odile; Yvon, Jacques

    2004-05-01

    An infrared (IR) study of natural deuteration is conducted on minerals containing hydroxyl groups (talc and kaolinite) and channel-water-bearing minerals (beryl and emerald). In talc, the OD valence vibration is located at 2710 cm(-1), corresponding to OD groups surrounded by 3 Mg atoms. In kaolinite, the OD valence vibrations are located at 2671 cm(-1) (inner OD group), 2712, 2706, and 2700 cm(-1) (three inner-surface OD groups). In beryl and emerald, natural deuteration of channel water is observed for the first time by infrared microspectroscopy. In beryl from Minas Gerais (Brazil), the OD profiles are characterized by four bands at 2735, 2686, 2672, and 2641 cm(-1). In emeralds from Colombia and Brazil, the OD profiles are characterized by five or four bands, respectively, at 2816, 2737, 2685, 2673, and 2641 cm(-1) (Colombia) and 2730, 2684, 2672, and 2640 cm(-1) (Brazil). The band at 2816 cm(-1) can be assigned to -OD or OD(-), and bands at 2686-2684, 2673-2672, and 2641-2640 cm(-1) can be assigned to type-I and type-II HOD molecules. The band at 2737-2730 cm(-1) is partially disturbed by combination bands of the mineral. Such OD profiles are different from those obtained by artificial deuteration at higher OD dilution. PMID:15165327

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of OD vibrators in minerals at natural dilution: hydroxyl groups in talc and kaolinite, and structural water in beryl and emerald.

    PubMed

    de Donato, Philippe; Cheilletz, Alain; Barres, Odile; Yvon, Jacques

    2004-05-01

    An infrared (IR) study of natural deuteration is conducted on minerals containing hydroxyl groups (talc and kaolinite) and channel-water-bearing minerals (beryl and emerald). In talc, the OD valence vibration is located at 2710 cm(-1), corresponding to OD groups surrounded by 3 Mg atoms. In kaolinite, the OD valence vibrations are located at 2671 cm(-1) (inner OD group), 2712, 2706, and 2700 cm(-1) (three inner-surface OD groups). In beryl and emerald, natural deuteration of channel water is observed for the first time by infrared microspectroscopy. In beryl from Minas Gerais (Brazil), the OD profiles are characterized by four bands at 2735, 2686, 2672, and 2641 cm(-1). In emeralds from Colombia and Brazil, the OD profiles are characterized by five or four bands, respectively, at 2816, 2737, 2685, 2673, and 2641 cm(-1) (Colombia) and 2730, 2684, 2672, and 2640 cm(-1) (Brazil). The band at 2816 cm(-1) can be assigned to -OD or OD(-), and bands at 2686-2684, 2673-2672, and 2641-2640 cm(-1) can be assigned to type-I and type-II HOD molecules. The band at 2737-2730 cm(-1) is partially disturbed by combination bands of the mineral. Such OD profiles are different from those obtained by artificial deuteration at higher OD dilution.

  17. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2005-11-23

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. Recent studies in crossrolled ODS-alloy sheets (produced from flattened tubes) indicate that transverse creep is significantly enhanced via controlled transverse grain fibering, and similar improvements are expected for cross-rolled tubes. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to

  18. Development of two color laser diagnostics for the ITER poloidal polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, K; Akiyama, T; Tanaka, K; Nakayama, K; Okajima, S

    2010-10-01

    Two color laser diagnostics using terahertz laser sources are under development for a high performance operation of the Large Helical Device and for future fusion devices such as ITER. So far, we have achieved high power laser oscillation lines simultaneously oscillating at 57.2 and 47.7 μm by using a twin optically pumped CH(3)OD laser, and confirmed the original function, compensation of mechanical vibration, of the two color laser interferometer. In this article, application of the two color laser diagnostics to the ITER poloidal polarimeter and recent hardware developments will be described.

  19. [Odón de Buen: forty-five years of commitment to the university].

    PubMed

    Gomis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aragonese naturalist Odón de Buen y del Cos for twenty-two annual academic courses professor of natural history at the University of Barcelona and for twenty-three of the University of Madrid. Strong supporter of Darwin's evolutionary theory, experimental work in the field and laboratory, in this paper puts the value of their efforts, as an educator, to popularize the natural sciences and thus separated from the concerns, superstition and fanaticism, which they were basic reasons of the moral and material backwardness in which Spain was found. PMID:22371988

  20. Investigation of eddy current examination on OD fatigue crack for steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yuying; Ding, Boyuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Jinhong; Chen, Huaidong; Meyendorf, Norbert G.

    2015-03-01

    The opening width of fatigue crack was very small, and conventional Bobbin probe was very difficult to detect it in steam generator tubes. Different sizes of 8 fatigue cracks were inspected using bobbin probe rotating probe. The analysis results showed that, bobbin probe was not sensitive for fatigue crack even for small through wall crack mixed with denting signal. On the other hand, the rotating probe was easily to detect all cracks. Finally, the OD phase to depth curve for fatigue crack using rotating probe was established and the results agreed very well with the true crack size.

  1. Laser Safety and Hazard Analysis for the Trailer (B70) Based AURA Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    2003-01-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the AURA laser system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for ''Safe Use of Lasers'' and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The trailer based AURA laser system is a mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The trailer (B70) based AURA laser system is generally operated on the United State Air Force Starfire Optical Range (SOR) at Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), New Mexico. The laser is used to perform laser interaction testing inside the laser trailer as well as outside the trailer at target sites located at various distances from the exit telescope. In order to protect personnel, who work inside the Nominal Hazard Zone (NHZ), from hazardous laser emission exposures it was necessary to determine the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) for each laser wavelength (wavelength bands) and calculate the appropriate minimum Optical Density (OD{sub min}) of the laser safety eyewear used by authorized personnel and the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) to protect unauthorized personnel who may have violated the boundaries of the control area and enter into the laser's NHZ.

  2. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-09-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  3. Torsional energy levels of CH{sub 3}OH{sup +}/CH{sub 3}OD{sup +}/CD{sub 3}OD{sup +} studied by zero-kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Zuyang; Gao, Shuming; Wang, Jia; Mo, Yuxiang

    2014-10-14

    The torsional energy levels of CH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, CH{sub 3}OD{sup +}, and CD{sub 3}OD{sup +} have been determined for the first time using one-photon zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The adiabatic ionization energies for CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}OD, and CD{sub 3}OD are determined as 10.8396, 10.8455, and 10.8732 eV with uncertainties of 0.0005 eV, respectively. Theoretical calculations have also been performed to obtain the torsional energy levels for the three isotopologues using a one-dimensional model with approximate zero-point energy corrections of the torsional potential energy curves. The calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental data. The barrier height of the torsional potential energy without zero-point energy correction was calculated as 157 cm{sup −1}, which is about half of that of the neutral (340 cm{sup −1}). The calculations showed that the cation has eclipsed conformation at the energy minimum and staggered one at the saddle point, which is the opposite of what is observed in the neutral molecule. The fundamental C–O stretch vibrational energy level for CD{sub 3}OD{sup +} has also been determined. The energy levels for the combinational excitation of the torsional vibration and the fundamental C–O stretch vibration indicate a strong torsion-vibration coupling.

  4. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in K3-ODS Ferritic Steel Developed for Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Tumey, S; Kuntz, J; El-Dasher, B; Wall, M; Choi, W; Kimura, A; Willaime, F; Serruys, Y

    2009-11-02

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles and radiation damage in 16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and the matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles and multiple crystalline domains formed within a nanoparticle lead us to propose a three-stage mechanism to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels. Effects of nanoparticle size and density on cavity formation induced by (Fe{sup 8+} + He{sup +}) dual-beam irradiation are briefly addressed.

  5. Health-care organizations as "patients": transforming the fundamental od paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Irwin M

    2011-01-01

    Hidden behind such frequently used phrases as "The system/policy requires...," "The organization has decided..." is one simple fact. Systems/policies don't drop from the sky etched in stone tablets and organizations don't decide anything. People make decisions and design systems and write policies. Embracing this fact increases the likelihood that the provision of health-care emanates from a "care dealership" in contrast to a "car dealership." Ignoring this fact leads to less humane, less effective, and more costly health-care. This chapter will challenge all of us concerned with caring for all of us--from Organizational Development (OD). Practitioners to CEOs to ... to ... all of us at some point in our lives--to step up to the need to transform our most basic paradigms. To remind ourselves that human beings give birth to, nurture, sustain, and care for that which we call an organization. In so doing, we will be able to begin to act from the premise that a health-care organization is itself a living breathing human organism, a "Patient" in need of care. The quality of care we afford this "Patient" directly and inevitably impacts the quality of care we are afforded as patients. Acting from this premise will transform all of health-care, all "care dealerships" ... and potentially "car dealerships" as well. OD professionals, therefore, can propel us all to a fourth dimension of caring for all of us.

  6. Influence of consolidation methods on the recrystallization kinetics of a Fe-14Cr based ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadé, M.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; De Geuser, F.; Lochet, N.; Deschamps, A.

    2016-04-01

    The recrystallization behavior during thermal annealing with or without prior cold work has been investigated in a 14%Cr ODS steel consolidated by two different methods, hot extrusion (HE) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). We show that a 1400°C-1 h annealing induces an increase of the oxide nanoparticles radius from 1.3 to 3 nm, however the grain size remain stable despite a recovery of sub-grain boundaries for the hot extruded material. When pre-deformation is applied before annealing, almost full recrystallization can be achieved on the HE ODS steel. In this study, we show recrystallization after 40% cold deformation and annealing 30 min at 1450 °C together with coarsening of oxide particles. At lower temperature and higher pre-deformation (70%-1150 °C/30 min), we show that recrystallization can be achieved without change of the oxide size distribution. We show that due to a lower initial dislocation density, recrystallization is strongly delayed, by at least 250 °C, in the HIP material. Finally, we show that the evolution of the size of the oxide precipitates is controlled by the time and temperature of annealing and are independent on the pre-deformation and occurrence of recrystallization.

  7. A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding materials for AFCI/GNEP Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Indrajit Charit; Megan Frary; Darryl Butt; K.L. Murty; Larry Zirker; James Cole; Mitchell Meyer; Rajiv S. Mishra; Mark Woltz

    2011-03-31

    This research project involved working on the pressure resistance welding of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys which will have a large role to play in advanced nuclear reactors. The project also demonstrated the research collaboration between four universities and one nation laboratory (Idaho National Laboratory) with participation from an industry for developing for ODS alloys. These alloys contain a high number density of very fine oxide particles that can impart high temperature strength and radiation damage resistance suitable for in-core applications in advanced reactors. The conventional fusion welding techniques tend to produce porosity-laden microstructure in the weld region and lead to the agglomeration and non-uniform distribution of the neededoxide particles. That is why two solid state welding methods - pressure resistance welding (PRW) and friction stir welding (FSW) - were chosen to be evaluated in this project. The proposal is expected to support the development of Advanced Burner Reactors (ABR) under the GNEP program (now incorporated in Fuel Cycle R&D program). The outcomes of the concluded research include training of graduate and undergraduate students and get them interested in nuclear related research.

  8. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal Kad

    2007-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program were to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined was iterative and intended to systematically (i) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, to be (ii) evaluated at 'in-service' loads at service temperatures and environments. Our report outlines the significant hoop creep enhancements possible via secondary cross-rolling and/or flow-forming operations. Each of the

  9. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes For Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-09-30

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (a) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (b) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. In this 12th quarter of performance, program activities are concluded for Task 2 and continuing for Tasks 3, 4 and

  10. Cross-Roll Flow Forming of ODS Alloy Heat Exchanger Tubes for Hoop Creep Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Bimal K. Kad

    2006-04-10

    Mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al alloy thin walled tubes and sheets, produced via powder processing and consolidation methodologies, are promising materials for eventual use at temperatures up to 1200 C in the power generation industry, far above the temperature capabilities of conventional alloys. Target end-uses range from gas turbine combustor liners to high aspect ratio (L/D) heat exchanger tubes. Grain boundary creep processes at service temperatures, particularly those acting in the hoop direction, are the dominant failure mechanisms for such components. The processed microstructure of ODS alloys consists of high aspect ratio grains aligned parallel to the tube axis, a result of dominant axial metal flow which aligns the dispersoid particles and other impurities in the longitudinal direction. The dispersion distribution is unaltered on a micro scale by recrystallization thermal treatments, but the high aspect ratio grain shape typically obtained limits transverse grain spacing and consequently the hoop creep response. Improving hoop creep in ODS-alloy components will require understanding and manipulating the factors that control the recrystallization behavior, and represents a critical materials design and development challenge that must be overcome in order to fully exploit the potential of ODS alloys. The objectives of this program are to (1) increase creep-strength at temperature in ODS-alloy tube and liner components by 100% via, (2) preferential cross-roll flow forming and grain/particle fibering in the critical hoop direction. The research program outlined here is iterative in nature and is intended to systematically (1) examine and identify post-extrusion forming methodologies to create hoop strengthened tubes, which will be (2) evaluated at ''in-service'' loads at service temperatures and environments. This research program is being conducted in collaboration with the DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the vested

  11. The Change in the hardness of LCAC. TZM, and ODS molybdenum in the post-irradiated and annealed conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, Brian V; Smith, Richard W; Byun, Thak Sang; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2009-01-01

    Hardness measurements were performed on wrought Low Carbon Arc Cast (LCAC), TZM, and Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum in the post-irradiated and post-irradiated + annealed condition to determine the recovery kinetics. Irradiations performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at nominally 300 C and 600 C to neutron fluence levels that range from 10.5 to 246 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) resulted in relatively large increases in hardness (77-109%), while small increases in hardness (<18%) were observed for irradiations at 870-1100 C. The hardness recovery for ODS and LCAC irradiated at 300 C and 600 C were shown to be complete at 980 C and {approx} 1100-1250 C, respectively. Isothermal annealing at 700 C was used to determine the activation energy for recovery of LCAC and ODS (3.70-4.88 eV {+-} 0.28-0.77 eV), which is comparable to values reported in the literature for molybdenum vacancy self-diffusion. This suggests that recovery of LCAC and ODS is controlled by the solid-state diffusion of vacancies in the bulk, and that the finer grain size and particle size ODS does not affect this mechanism. TZM exhibited slower recovery kinetics, which can be explained by the solute atoms (titanium and zirconium) inhibiting vacancy diffusion.

  12. A flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence study of the formation of O(D-1) in the photolysis of water and reaction of O(D-1) with H2, Ar and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Klemm, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The relative importance of two primary processes in the photolyis of water: (1) H2O + h (nu) yields H + OH, and (2) H2O + h (nu) yields H2 + OD-1 were determined in a direct manner by time resolved detection (via resonance fluorescence) of H and O formed in processes 1 and 2 respectively. The initially formed OD-1 was deactivated to ground state OP-3 prior to detection via resonance fluorescence. The relative quantum yields for processes 1 and 2 are 0.89 and 0.11 for the wavelength interval 105 to 145nm and = to or greater than 0.99, and = to or less than 0.01 for the wavelength interval 145 to 185nm. Rate constants at 300 K for the reactions OD-1 + H2, + Ar, and + He are presented.

  13. Oxidation resistance in LBE and air and tensile properties of ODS ferritic steels containing Al/Zr elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Xia, L. L.; Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of Al and Zr addition on improvement of oxidation resistance in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and in air as well as the tensile properties were investigated for the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. The 16Cr-4Al-0.8Zr-ODS steel samples were fabricated by a sol-gel method combining with spark plasma sintering technique. The tests in LBE at 600 °C for 1000 h indicate the good oxidation resistance comparing with the specimens without Zr/Al elements. The samples also exhibit superior oxidation resistance in air due to formation of dense and continuous aluminum oxide film. Minor Zr addition prevents the Al element induced coarsening of the oxide particles in ODS steels and significantly improves the ultimate tensile stress and total elongation of the samples.

  14. Vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) of organosulfur compounds over supported metal oxide catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwon

    Sulfur in transportation fuels remains a leading source of SOx emissions from vehicle engines and is a major source of air pollution. The very low levels of sulfur globally mandated for transportation fuels in the near future cannot be achieved by current practices of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) for sulfur removal, which operate under severe conditions (high T, P) and use valuable H2. Novel vapor-phase catalytic oxidesulfurization (ODS) processes of selectively oxidizing various organosulfur compounds (carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), thiophene, 2,5-dimenthylthiophene) typically found in various industrial streams (e.g., petroleum refining, pulp and paper) into valuable chemical intermediates (H 2CO, CO, H2, maleic anhydride and concentrated SO2) has been extensively studied. This research has primarily focused on establishing the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of these selective oxidation reactions over well-defined supported metal oxide catalysts. The selective oxidation reactions of COS + O2 → CO + SO2; 2CS2 + 5O2 → 2CO + 4SO2; CH3SH + 2O 2 → H2CO + SO2 + H2O; C4 H4S + 3O2 → C4H2O 3 + H2O + SO2; were studied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the supported metal oxide phases were 100% dispersed on the oxide substrate. All the catalysts were highly active and selective for the oxidesulfurization of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, methanethiol, and thiophene between 290--330°C, 230--270°C, 350--400°C, and 250--400°C, respectively and did not deactivate. The TOFs (turnover frequency, normalized activity per active catalytic site) for all ODS reactions over supported vanadia catalysts, only containing molecularly dispersed surface vanadia species, varied within one order of magnitude and revealed the V-O-Support bridging bond was involved in the critical rate-determining kinetic steps. The surface reaction mechanism for each reaction was revealed by in situ IR (infrared) and

  15. Corrosion behavior of 9Cr-ODS steel in stagnant liquid lithium and lead-lithium at 873 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanfen; Abe, Hiroaki; Nagasaka, Takuya; Muroga, Takeo; Kondo, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    Corrosion experiments of 9Cr-ODS steel were carried out in static Li at 873 K for 250 h and compared with those of 9Cr-ODS in Pb-Li at the same exposure conditions. After exposure to liquid Li, 9Cr-ODS showed slight weight loss and decrease in hardness near surface. The tensile property exhibited a negligible change at 973 K and the creep property degraded at 973 K. By metallurgical analyses, 9Cr-ODS demonstrated a non-uniform corrosion behavior by preferential grain boundary attack and pronounced nodule-like morphology. The slight depletion of Cr was detected to about 15 μm in depth by chemical composition analyses. According to the calculation of free energy of formation, the nano-scale oxide particles of TiO2 in 9Cr-ODS were thermodynamically less stable while Y2O3 were more stable compared with those of Li2O in Li environment. However, Y2O3 may be reacted with Li to form YLiO2. The mechanism of corrosion was proposed as the slight dissolution of Cr and Fe in matrix into liquid Li, chemical interaction of nano-scale oxide particles with Li, preferential grain boundary attack and penetration of Li, and finally development of extreme nodule-like structure during cleaning of Li. On the contrary, 9Cr-ODS showed much larger weight loss and depletion of Cr near surface but less marked corroded morphology in Pb-Li than in Li, which may be derived from higher solubility of Cr and Fe and lower activity of Li in Pb-Li than in Li.

  16. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  17. High resolution spectroscopy of SrOD radical by supersonic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hajigeorgiou, P.; Hepburn, J.W.; Bernath, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    The high resolution spectrum of gas phase SrOD has been recorded in a supersonic beam spectrometer. The B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} (000)-(000) and (100)-(000) bands have been rotationally analyzed. The accuracy of the rotational line positions was about 0.003 cm{sup -1}. The measured line positions together with the microwave data for the ground state have been fitted to give molecular constants for both electronic states. The Q branch of the (000)-(000) band was resolved for the first time and the ratio between the perpendicular and parallel transition dipole moments was estimated to be about 0.2.

  18. The effect of high frequencies on the cyclic creep behavior of an ODS superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stefani, J.A.; Nardone, V.C.; Tien, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The anelastic strain controlled model is capable of explaining the behavior of the cyclic creep rate as a function of frequency for the ODS superalloy MA 6000, especially the sharp drop in cyclic creep rate that occurs at a frequency of about 0.2 cycles/h. The success of the anelastic strain model depends upon the plausibility of assuming that anelastic strain storage completely delays nonrecoverable strain, i.e., that anelastic and nonrecoverable strain storage are a series process. This is an important point since, as seen in the comparison of the predicted and obtained cyclic creep results, there is the excellent fit of the data in the region where there is a sharp drop in the cyclic creep rate but a poorer fit in the higher frequency region. In the higher frequency regime, there is an observed positive cyclic creep rate when the refined anelastic model predicts a zero strain rate.

  19. Reactions of Deuterated Methanol (CD3OD) on Fe3O4(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhisheng; Potapenko, Denis V.; Rim, Kwang T.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Flynn, George; Osgood, Richard; Wen, Xiaodong; Batista, Enrique R.

    2015-01-15

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the decomposition (partial oxidation) of deuterated methanol (CD3OD) on a single-crystal Fe3O4(111) surface. The crystal surface contains majority areas of a Fe-terminated Fe3O4(111) surface as well as smaller regions of O-terminated FeO(111) or biphase surface reconstruction. Our investigation uses a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, and density functional theory calculations to examine the surface reactions and adsorbates as a function of coverage. Our studies show that the reaction of methanol on this iron–oxide surface is highly sensitive to atomic-level surface reconstructions

  20. Progress toward determining the potential of ODS alloys for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Hoppin, G., III; Sheffler, K.

    1983-01-01

    The Materials for Advanced Turbine Engine (MATE) Program managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center is supporting two projects to evaluate the potential of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for aircraft gas turbine applications. One project involves the evaluation of Incoloy (TM) MA-956 for application as a combustor liner material. An assessment of advanced engine potential will be conducted by means of a test in a P&WA 2037 turbofan engine. The other project involves the evaluation of Inconel (TM) MA 6000 for application as a high pressure turbine blade material and includes a test in a Garrett TFE 731 turbofan engine. Both projects are progressing toward these engine tests in 1984.

  1. On the neutron scattering length density of proteins in H2O/D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, Y. M.; van Well, A. A.; Hanefeld, U.; Wierczinski, B.; Bouwman, W. G.

    2004-07-01

    The structure of the protein layers adsorbed at different interfaces can be determined by using neutron-reflection and small-angle neutron scattering. For highlighting the adsorbed protein layer at the interface, the technique of contrast-variation by changing the H2O/D2O ratio, is often used. For determining the scattering length density, both the protein volume in solution and the total scattering length of the protein is needed. The volume is calculated from the amino-acid sequence. For calculating the scattering length, the H/D exchange of the labile protons of the protein should be taken into account. For monitoring the H/D exchange, Positive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectroscopy was applied. We compare experimental results for the exchange in lysozyme and β-casein with theoretical calculations. The importance of using the correct protein scattering-length density is elucidated by simultaneous model fitting to neutron reflection data at different water contrasts.

  2. Response of 9Cr-ODS Steel to Proton Irradiation at 400 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; Y. Q. Wu

    2014-09-01

    The stability of Y–Ti–O nanoclusters, dislocation structure, and grain boundary segregation in 9Cr-ODS steels has been investigated following proton irradiation at 400 °C with damage levels up to 3.7 dpa. A slight coarsening and a decrease in number density of nanoclusters were observed as a result of irradiation. The composition of nanoclusters was also observed to change with a slight increase of Y and Cr concentration in the nanoclusters following irradiation. Size, density, and composition of the nanoclusters were investigated as a function of nanocluster size, specifically classified to three groups. In addition to the changes in nanoclusters, dislocation loops were observed after irradiation. Finally, radiation-induced enrichment of Cr and depletion of W were observed at grain boundaries after irradiation.

  3. Polarised Photon Beams for the BGO-OD Experiment at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, T.; Bella, A.; Alef, S.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bielefeldt, P.; Boese, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.

    The new BGO-OD experiment at the electron accelerator ELSA, of the University of Bonn, is designed to study the reaction dynamics of nucleon excitations in meson photoproduction. It consists of a central BGO calorimeter with a magnetic spectrometer in forward direction. The physics programme includes the measurement of polarisation observables using linearly and circularly polarised photon beams. Linear polarisation is obtained by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal, and circular polarisation is obtained via bremsstrahlung from longitudinally polarised electrons. The degree of linear polarisation is determined from the bremsstrahlung spectrum itself. To determine the polarisation of the circularly polarised photon beam, the polarisation of the electron beam is measured by a Møller polarimeter. As a preliminary consistency check, the (linear) polarisation observable, Σ, was compared to world data for π0 and η photoproduction. To determine the degree of circular polarisation, a Møller polarimeter was setup and first measurements of the electron beam polarisation performed.

  4. Advanced TEM characterization of oxide nanoparticles in ODS Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Pint, Bruce A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2016-07-11

    For oxide nanoparticles present in three oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe–12Cr–5Al alloys containing additions of (1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), and (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), were investigated using transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, in all three alloys nano-sized (<3.5 nm) oxide particles distributed uniformly throughout the microstructure were characterized using advanced electron microscopy techniques. In the 125Y alloy, mainly Al2O3 and yttrium–aluminum garnet (YAG) phases (Y3Al5O12) were present, while in the 125YZ alloy, additional Zr(C,N) precipitates were identified. The 125YH alloy had the most complex precipitation sequence whereby in addition to the YAG and Al2O3 phases,more » Hf(C,N), Y2Hf2O7, and HfO2 precipitates were also found. The presence of HfO2 was mainly due to the incomplete incorporation of HfO2 powder during mechanical alloying of the 125YH alloy. The alloy having the highest total number density of the oxides, the smallest grain size, and the highest Vickers hardness was the 125YZ alloy indicating, that Y2O3 + ZrO2 additions had the strongest effect on grain size and tensile properties. Finally, high-temperature mechanical testing will be addressed in the near future, while irradiation studies are underway to investigate the irradiation resistance of these new ODS FeCrAl alloys.« less

  5. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum. PMID:26257709

  6. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. ‘Housekeeping’ genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  7. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.

  8. The reduced genomes of Parcubacteria (OD1) contain signatures of a symbiotic lifestyle

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, William C.; Stegen, James C.

    2015-07-21

    Candidate phylum OD1 bacteria (also referred to as Parcubacteria) have been identified in a broad range of anoxic environments through community survey analysis. Although none of these species have been isolated in the laboratory, several genome sequences have been reconstructed from metagenomic sequence data and single-cell sequencing. The organisms have small (generally <1 Mb) genomes with severely reduced metabolic capabilities. We have reconstructed 8 partial to near-complete OD1 genomes from oxic groundwater samples, and compared them against existing genomic data. The conserved core gene set comprises 202 genes, or ~28% of the genomic complement. “Housekeeping” genes and genes for biosynthesismore » of peptidoglycan and Type IV pilus production are conserved. Gene sets for biosynthesis of cofactors, amino acids, nucleotides, and fatty acids are absent entirely or greatly reduced. The only aspects of energy metabolism conserved are the non-oxidative branch of the pentose-phosphate shunt and central glycolysis. These organisms also lack some activities conserved in almost all other known bacterial genomes, including signal recognition particle, pseudouridine synthase A, and FAD synthase. Pan-genome analysis indicates a broad genotypic diversity and perhaps a highly fluid gene complement, indicating historical adaptation to a wide range of growth environments and a high degree of specialization. The genomes were examined for signatures suggesting either a free-living, streamlined lifestyle, or a symbiotic lifestyle. The lack of biosynthetic capabilities and DNA repair, along with the presence of potential attachment and adhesion proteins suggest that the Parcubacteria are ectosymbionts or parasites of other organisms. The wide diversity of genes that potentially mediate cell-cell contact suggests a broad range of partner/prey organisms across the phylum.« less

  9. Evaluation of Pb-17Li compatibility of ODS Fe-12Cr-5Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL: eutectic Pb-17Li and He) blanket concept requires improved Pb-17Li compatibility with ferritic steels in order to demonstrate acceptable performance in fusion reactors. As an initial step, static Pb-17at.%Li (Pb-17Li) capsule experiments were conducted on new oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys ((1) Y2O3 (125Y), (2) Y2O3 + ZrO2 (125YZ), (3) Y2O3 + HfO2 (125YH), and (4) Y2O3 + TiO2 (125YT)) produced at ORNL via mechanical alloying (MA). Tests were conducted in static Pb-17Li for 1000 h at 700 °C. Alloys showed promising compatibility with Pb-17Li with small mass change after testing for 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT, while the 125Y alloy experienced the highest mass loss associated with some oxide spallation and subsequent alloy dissolution. X-ray diffraction methods identified the surface reaction product as LiAlO2 on all four alloys. A small decrease (∼1 at.%) in Al content beneath the oxide scale was observed in all four ODS alloys, which extended 60 μm beneath the oxide/metal interface. This indicates improvements in alloy dissolution by decreasing the amount of Al loss from the alloy. Scales formed on 125YZ, 125YH and 125YT were examined via scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and revealed incorporation of Zr-, Hf-, and Ti-rich precipitates within the LiAlO2 product, respectively. This indicates an inward scale growth mechanism. Future work in flowing Pb-17Li is needed to further evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy in a test blanket module.

  10. Three-dimensional characterization of ODS ferritic steel using by FIB-SEM serial sectioning method.

    PubMed

    Endo, T; Sugino, Y; Ohono, N; Ukai, S; Miyazaki, N; Wang, Y; Ohnuki, S

    2014-11-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to the research of the electron tomography due to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of materials [1]. One of the electron tomography techniques, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) imaging has advantages of high resolutions (10 nm), large area observation (μm order) and simultaneous energy dispersive x- ray microanalysis (EDS)/ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. The purpose of this study, three-dimensional EBSD analysis of ODS ferritic steel which carried out cold work using FIB-SEM equipment was conducted, and it aimed at analyzing the microstructure obtained there. The zone annealing tests were conducted for ferritic steel [2,3], which were produced through mechanical alloying and hot-extrusion. After zone annealing, specimens were mechanically polished with #400∼4000 emery paper, 1 µm diamond paste and alumina colloidal silica. The serial sectioning and the 3D-electron backscattering diffraction (3D-EBSD) analysis were carried out. We made the micro pillar (30 x 30 x 15 µm). The EBSD measurements were carried out in each layer after serial sectioning at a step size and milling depth was 80 nm with 30 slices. After EBSD analysis, the series of cross-sectional images were aligned according to arbitrarily specified areas and then stacked up to form a volume. Consequently, we obtained the 3D-IPF maps for ODS ferritic steel. In this specimen, the {111} and {001} grains are layered by turns. In addition, the volume fraction value of both plane are similar. The aspect ratio increases with specimen depth. The 3D-EBSD mapping is useful to analysis of the bulk material since this method obtain many microstructure information, such a shape, volume and orientation of the crystal, grain boundary.

  11. Spectrally narrowed lasing of a self-injection KrF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yasuhiro; Wani, Koichi; Miki, Tadaaki; Kawahara, Hidehito; Mimasu, Mutsumi; Ogata, Yoshiro

    1990-08-01

    Spectrally nantwed lasing of a KrF excimer laser has teen ahieved by a self-injection technique using abeam splitter for power extraction aixi intravity etalons for spectral-narrowing. The laser cavity is divithi into an amplifying branch aix! a spectralnarrowing branch. The spectral bandwidth was narrowed to <3pm FWHM with air-sed etalons placed in the spectral-narrowing branch. A laser propagation model was intrOdUced for describing the laser intensity traveling in the laser cavity. The calculated intensityincident onthe intracavityetalons wassmaller thanthat in theconventional Fabry-Perotcavity withplane-parallel mirrors.

  12. Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T.; Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I.

    2013-07-01

    Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

  13. A Safe Place to Stay Sharp: Action Learning Meets Cooperative Inquiry in the Service of NHS OD Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traeger, James; Norgate, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This is an account of practice. It explores the meeting point between action learning and action research, as a way of doing capacity building in organisational development (OD) in the NHS in the UK. The authors were part of a short cooperative inquiry (Heron, J. 1996. "Co-operative Inquiry: Research into the Human Condition." London:…

  14. Atomistic simulations of P(NDI2OD-T2) morphologies: from single chain to condensed phases.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Fazzi, Daniele; Caironi, Mario; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2014-10-30

    We investigate theoretically the structure, crystallinity, and solubility of a high-mobility n-type semiconducting copolymer, P(NDI2OD-T2), and we propose a set of new force field parameters. The force field is reparametrized against density functional theory (DFT) calculations, with the aim to reproduce the correct torsional angles that govern the polymer chain flexibility and morphology. We simulate P(NDI2OD-T2) oligomers in different environments, namely, in vacuo, in the bulk phase, and in liquid toluene and chloronaphthalene solution. The choice of these solvents is motivated by the fact that they induce different kinds of molecular preaggregates during the casting procedures, resulting in variable device performances. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data; the polymer bulk structure, in which the chains are quite planar, is correcly reproduced, yet the isolated chains are flexible enough to fold in vacuo. We also calculate the solubility of P(NDI2OD-T2) in toluene and chloronaphthalene, predicting a much better solubility of the polymer in the latter, also in accordance to experimental observations. Different morphologies and dynamics of the oligomers in the two solvents have been observed. The proposed parameters make it possible to obtain the description of P(NDI2OD-T2) in different environments and can serve as a basis for extensive studies of this polymer semiconductor, such as, for example, the dynamics of aggregation in solvent. PMID:25264852

  15. Responding to regulatory permitting requirements and notices of deficiencies for open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, K.D.; Rajic, P.I.; Tope, T.J.; Dandeneau, M.

    1995-12-31

    Manufacturers and users of energetic material [i.e., propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics (PEP)] generate unserviceable, obsolete, off-specification, and damaged items that are characterized as reactive waste. These items must be safely treated and disposed of or reclaimed/recycled, thereby controlling existing waste inventories at manageable levels. The most commonly used disposal and treatment method, particularly at US Department of Defense (DoD) installations, is open burning/open detonation (OB/OD). However, regulatory constraints and the inability of operators to obtain permits required for treating these waste has led to the recent reductions and limited use of OB/OD treatment at many installations. The discussion herein includes human health and environmental protection concerns that must be addressed in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subpart X permit applications. Determining the potential impacts of OB/OD on these areas of concern was performed using data obtained from the Dugway Proving Grounds Propellant, Explosive and Pyrotechnic Thermal Treatment Evaluation and Test Facility, commonly referred to as the BangBox. Specifically, data from the testing of munition items in the BangBox facility were used to support waste characterization, air modeling, and risk assessments required to resolve notice of deficiencies and prepare permit applications for OB/OD facilities at US Air Force (USAF) installations.

  16. Ion-molecule reaction dynamics: Velocity map imaging studies of N+ and O+ with CD3OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a study of the charge transfer reactions of the atomic ions N+and O+ with methanol in the collision energy range from ˜2 to 4 eV. Charge transfer is driven primarily by energy resonance, although the widths of the product kinetic energy distributions suggest that significant interchange between relative translation and product vibration occurs. Charge transfer with CD3OD is more exoergic for N+, and the nascent parent ion products appear to be formed in excited B ˜ and C ˜ electronic states, and fragment to CD2OD+ by internal conversion and vibrational relaxation to the ground electronic state. The internal excitation imparted to the parent ion is sufficient to result in loss of one or two D atoms from the carbon atom. The less exoergic charge transfer reaction of O+ forms nascent parent ions in the excited A ˜ state, and internal conversion to the ground state only results in ejection of single D atom. Selected isotopomers of methanol were employed to identify reaction products, demonstrating that deuterium atom loss from nascent parent ions occurs by C-D bond cleavage. Comparison of the kinetic energy distributions for charge transfer to form CD3OD+ and CD2OD+ by D atom loss with the known dynamics for hydride abstraction from a carbon atom provides strong evidence that the D loss products are formed by dissociative charge transfer rather than hydride (deuteride) transfer. Isotopic labeling also demonstrates that chemical reaction in the N+ + CD3OD system to form NO+ + CD4 does not occur in the energy range of these experiments, contrary to earlier speculation in the literature.

  17. CO2 laser welding fused silica.

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Scott T.; MacCallum, Danny O'Neill; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert

    2005-08-01

    The feasibility of laser welding of fused silica (aka quartz) has been demonstrated recently by others. An application requiring hermetic sealing of a thin, pressure-bearing quartz diaphragm to a thicker frame led us to explore this technique. We found that laser welding techniques normally used for metallic parts caused scorching and uneven melting. Contrary to standard practices (near focus, high travel speed, high power density), successful welds in fused silica required a broad heat source applied over a large area under a slow rotation to gradually heat the glass through the annealing, softening and finally working temperatures. Furthermore, good mechanical contact between the parts to be joined played an even more important role in this process than in typical metallic joints. A 50 W CO2 laser with 4 f.l. ZnSe2 lens and rotary head was used to weld 0.425 OD, 0.006-0.010 thick, disks to 0.500 OD tubing with 0.125 walls. Several joint geometries and beam orientations were investigated. Temperature profiles were measured and compared to an FEM thermal model. We will discuss the effects of laser power, travel speed, number of passes, joint geometry and part thicknesses on achieving hermeticity and cosmetically-acceptable joints.

  18. Triplet extinction coefficients of some laser dyes I

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlopoulos, T.G.; Golich, D.J.

    1988-07-15

    We measured the triplet extinction coefficients epsilon/sub T/ over the laser action spectral region of Rhodamine 6G; Rhodamine B; Rhodamine 110; Fluorol-7GA; Coumarin 540A; Coumarin 522; Coumarin 1; Coumarin 120; 4,4'-diphenyl stilbene; and 2,7-bis-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-9,9-dipropylfluorene. We employed the different lines from an argon ion cw laser for excitation. McClure's method was used to obtain the triplet extinction coefficients epsilon/sub T/. The method requires the measurement of triplet optical densities OD/sub T/ as a function of different cw laser excitation intensities (powers) I/sub ex/ . The importance of triplet-state losses on dye laser efficiency is reviewed. The laser action properties of the laser dyes we studied are briefly discussed as they relate to the measured epsilon/sub T/ values.

  19. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  20. PHASE SEPARATION IN PM 2000 FE-BASE ODS ALLOY: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AT THE ATOMIC LEVEL

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F; Chao, J.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    The coarsening of the three-dimensional microstructure resulting from phase separation during ageing at 748 K of a Fe-based PM 2000{trademark} oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel has been investigated by atom probe tomography and hardness measurements. Phase separation resulted in the formation of isolated particles of the chromium-enriched {alpha}{prime} phase. The aluminum and titanium were found to preferential partition to the iron-rich {alpha} phase. The partitioning of aluminum is consistent with theoretical calculations. The change in the scale of the chromium-enriched {alpha}{prime} phase was found to fit a power law with a time exponent of 0.32 in accordance with that predicted by the classical Lifshitz, Slyozov and Wagner (LSW) theory. The solute concentrations of the coexisting {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases were estimated from concentration frequency distributions with the Langer-Bar-on-Miller (LBM) method and proximity histograms. The hardness was linearly related to the chromium content of the {alpha}{prime} phase.

  1. Temporal trends and spatial variations of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Blake, Donald; Simpson, Isobel

    2014-05-01

    Long-term observation of mixing ratios of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) in ambient air can help to assess the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and Its Amendments in regional and national scales. Here we present our measurement of ODS such as CFCs, HCFCs, halons and other halocarbons in ambient air since 2000 in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, one of the most densely populated and highly industrialized regions that was supposed to be a hotspot for ODS emission in China. These halocarbons in the PRD region were found to have 5-348% enhancements when compared to their global background levels. CFC-12 and CFC-11 in the region, for example, were 37-56% and 12-43%, respectively, above their global background levels. CFC replacement compounds showed even larger enhancements. In average mixing ratios of HCFC-22, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b were 89%, 87%, and 86% above their background levels of 148 ppt, 12.1 ppt, and 12.1 ppt in the year of 2000, respectively; and 72%, 125%, and 52% over their background levels of 205 ppt, 20.2 ppt, and 20.0 ppt in the year of 2009, respectively. During 2000-2009, CFCs in the PRD region showed decline trends with the decreasing rates of -3.0, -5.9, and -9.4 ppt/yr for CFC-12, CFC-11, and CFC-113, respectively; these rates were faster than that at the global background sites, which were -0.91, -2.12, and -0.69 ppt/yr, respectively. The CFCs substitutes HCFC-22, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b, however, showed increasing trends with the increasing rates of 8.0, 2.6, and 0.9 ppt/yr, respectively. HFC-134a, a refrigerant used for mobile air conditioning, showed rapid increase with a rate of 15 ppt/yr from 2000 to 2009 in the region. As for other halocarbons, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride decreased with rates of 21 and 1 ppt/yr during the period. The mixing ratios of methyl chloride in the region showed unusual rapid increase at a rate of 64 ppt/yr when compared to its increasing rate of 1.3 ppt/yr at the global background

  2. [Enhancing stimulated Raman scattering of water and heavy water lattice vibration by laser induced plasma].

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao-Ning; Men, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Mi; Sun, Cheng-Lin; Li, Zuo-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ding; Li, Zhan-Long

    2013-08-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering was studied in water and heavy water using pulse laser at the wavelength of 532nm, not only obtaining the stimulated Raman of O-H and O-D stretching vibration, but also obtaining the stimulated Raman lattice vibration. When the laser energy was 130 mJ, the low frequency Stokes and anti-Stokes 313 cm(-1) line of water could be observed; When the laser energy was 160 mJ, the low frequnecy Stokes and anti-Stokes 280 cm(-1) line of heavy water could be observed. The results were explained by physics mechanism of laser induced plasma.

  3. Microstructure and oxidation properties of 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel prepared by sol-gel and spark plasma sintering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y. P.; Wang, X. P.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, Q. X.; Zhang, T.; Fang, Q. F.; Hao, T.; Liu, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The 16Cr-5Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was fabricated by sol-gel method in combination with hydrogen reduction, mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) techniques. The phase characterization, microstructure and oxidation resistance of the 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel were investigated in comparison with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that the Al free and Al added 16Cr-ODS steels exhibited typical ferritic characteristic structure. The microstructure analysis investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) revealed that Y-Ti-O complexes with particle size of 10-30 nm were formed in the Al free matrix and Y-Al-O complexes with particle size of 20-100 nm were formed in the Al contained high-Cr ODS steel matrix. These complexes are homogeneously distributed in the matrices. The fabricated 16Cr-5Al-ODS steel exhibited superior oxidation resistance compared with the Al free 16Cr-ODS steel and the commercial 304 stainless steel owing to the formation of continuous and dense Al2O3 film on the surface.

  4. Understanding lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gibilisco, S.

    1989-01-01

    Covering all different types of laser applications-Gibilisco offers an overview of this fascinating phenomenon of light. Here he describes what lasers are and how they work and examines in detail the different kinds of lasers in use today. Topics of particular interest include: the way lasers work; the different kinds of lasers; infrared, ultraviolet and x-ray lasers; use of lasers in industry and manufacturing; use of lasers for long-distance communications; fiberoptic communications; the way laser shows work; the reality of Star Wars; lasers in surgical and medical applications; and holography and the future of laser technology.

  5. A photoionization study of OH and OD from 680A to 950A: An analysis of the Rydberg series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, J. N.; He, Z. X.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The photoionization spectra of OH(+) and OD(+) have been reported from 680 to 950 A (18.23 to 13.05 eV) at a wavelength resolution of 0.07 A. Through interpretation of both spectra, the Rydberg series and their higher vibrational members have been reported for three of the excited ionic states, a(sup 1)Delta, A(sup 3)Pi(i), and b(sup 1) Sigma(sup +). A vibrational progression has also been observed in both OH(+) and OD(+) which is apparently related to a fourth excited ionic state, c(sup 1)Pi. Finally, the dissociative ionization limits, corrected to 0 K,for H2O AND D2O have been measured to be 18.11+/-0.01 and 18.21+/-0.01 eV, respectively, and shown to be in good agreement with previously reported results.

  6. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean -Francois; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean -Christophe

    2015-04-23

    In this study, we present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ– ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extractedmore » and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.« less

  7. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-28

    We present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X{sup 3}Σ{sup −} ground state of the OH{sup +} and OD{sup +} cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  8. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean -Francois; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean -Christophe

    2015-04-23

    In this study, we present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  9. The H2O/D2O isotope effect in crystalline lanthanide sulfates at photo-, radio-, and triboluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, G. L.; Tukhbatullin, A. A.; Mescheryakova, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    We comparatively studied the H2O/D2O isotope effect of lanthanide sulfate crystallohydrates on photo-, radio-, and triboluminescence and lifetimes of the excited Ln3+ ions. Replacing H2O by D2O leads to an increase in the luminescence intensity whereas this process does not affect the maxima positions in photo-, radio-, and triboluminescence spectra. This isotope effect agrees with the known concepts of changes in luminescence quantum yields of the Ln3+ ions being the main emitters. The bands of OH and OD radicals arise in triboluminescence spectra of lanthanide sulfate crystallohydrates (with H2O or D2O) registered in argon atmosphere in UV region. This supports the proposition that water destruction occurs at the degradation of the crystallohydrates.

  10. Synchrotron-based double imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectroscopy of radicals produced in a flow tube: OH and OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Gustavo A.; Tang, Xiaofeng; Gil, Jean-François; Nahon, Laurent; Ward, Michael; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    We present a microwave discharge flow tube coupled with a double imaging electron/ion coincidence device and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The system has been applied to the study of the photoelectron spectroscopy of the well-known radicals OH and OD. The coincidence imaging scheme provides a high selectivity and yields the spectra of the pure radicals, removing the ever-present contributions from excess reactants, background, or secondary products, and therefore obviating the need for a prior knowledge of all possible byproducts. The photoelectron spectra encompassing the X3Σ- ground state of the OH+ and OD+ cations have been extracted and the vibrational constants compared satisfactorily to existing literature values. Future advantages of this approach include measurement of high resolution VUV spectroscopy of radicals, their absolute photoionization cross section, and species/isomer identification in chemical reactions as a function of time.

  11. Branching Ratios and Vibrational Distributions in Water-Forming Reactions of OH and OD Radicals with Methylamines.

    PubMed

    Butkovskaya, N I; Setser, D W

    2016-09-01

    Reactions of OH and OD radicals with (CH3)3N, (CH3)2NH, and CH3NH2 were studied by Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR) of the water product molecules from a fast-flow reactor at 298 K. The rate constants (4.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-11), (5.2 ± 0.8) × 10(-11), and (2.0 ± 0.4) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) were determined for OD + (CH3)3N, (CH3)2NH, and CH3NH2, respectively, by comparing the HOD emission intensities to the HOD intensity from the OD reaction with H2S. Abstraction from the nitrogen site competes with abstraction from the methyl group, as obtained from an analysis of the HOD and D2O emission intensities from the OD reactions with the deuterated reactants, (CD3)2NH and CD3NH2. After adjustment for the hydrogen-deuterium kinetic isotope effect, the product branching fractions of the hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen for di- and monomethylamine were found to be 0.34 ± 0.04 and 0.26 ± 0.05, respectively. Vibrational distributions of the H2O, HOD, and D2O molecules are typical for direct hydrogen atom abstraction from polar molecules, even though activation energies are negative because of the formation of pre-transition-state complexes. Comparison is made to the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with ammonia and with other compounds with primary C-H bonds to discuss specific features of disposal of energy to water product. PMID:27504785

  12. Time-Resolved Frequency Comb Spectroscopy for Studying the Kinetics and Branching Ratio of OD+CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Thinh Quoc; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Changala, Bryan; Spaun, Ben; Okumura, Mitchio; Ye, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The chemical kinetics of the OH+CO reaction plays important roles in combustion and atmospheric processes. OH+CO has two product channels, H+CO_2 and the stabilized HOCO intermediate, with a branching ratio that is highly pressure dependent. Therefore, establishing an accurate kinetic model for this chemical system requires knowledge of the reaction rates and product yields, and the lifetimes of all molecules along a particular reaction pathway. We report the application of time-resolved frequency comb spectroscopy (TRFCS) in the mid-infrared (3.7 μm) spectral region to address the complex reaction kinetics of OD+CO at room temperature. We use the deuterated forms to avoid atmospheric water interference. This technique allows us to detect the lowest energy conformer trans-DOCO intermediate with high time-resolution and sensitivity while also permitting the direct determination of rotational state distributions of all relevant molecules. We simultaneously observe the time-dependent concentrations of trans-DOCO, OD, and D_2O which are used in conjunction with kinetics modeling to obtain the pressure- and collision partner-dependent branching ratio of OD+CO.

  13. Microstructure of HIPed and SPSed 9Cr-ODS steel and its effect on helium bubble formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Lu, Zheng; Xie, Rui; Liu, Chunming; Wang, Lumin

    2016-06-01

    Two 9Cr-ODS steels with the same nominal composition were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP, named COS-1) and spark plasma sintering (SPS, named COS-2). Helium ions were implanted into COS-1, COS-2 and non-ODS Eurofer 97 steels up at 673 K. Microstructures before and after helium ion implantations were carefully characterized. The results show a bimodal grain size distribution in COS-2 and a more uniform grain size distribution in COS-1. Nanoscale clusters of GP-zone type Y-Ti-O and Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore as well as large spinel Mn(Ti)Cr2O4 particles are all observed in the two ODS steels. The Y-Ti-enriched nano-oxides in COS-1 exhibit higher number density and smaller size than in COS-2. The Y-Ti-enriched nano-oxides in fine grains of COS-2 show higher number density and smaller size than that in coarse grains of COS-2. Nano-oxides effectively trap helium atoms and lead to the formation of high density and ultra-fine helium bubbles.

  14. Microstructural characterization of a new mechanically alloyed Ni-base ODS superalloy powder

    SciTech Connect

    Seyyed Aghamiri, S.M.; Shahverdi, H.R.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Taya, K.; Miura, S.; Hayashi, S.; Okuda, T.

    2015-02-15

    The microstructure of a new Ni-base oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy powder was studied for high temperature gas turbine applications after the mechanical alloying process. In this study, an atomized powder with a composition similar to the CMSX-10 superalloy was mechanically alloyed with yttria and Hf powders. The mechanically alloyed powder included only the supersaturated solid solution γ phase without γ′ and yttria provided by severe plastic deformation, while after the 3-step aging, the γ′ phase was precipitated due to the partitioning of Al and Ta to the γ′ and Co, Cr, Re, W, and Mo to the γ phase. Mechanical alloying modified the morphology of γ′ to the new coherent γ–γ′ nanoscale lamellar structure to minimize the elastic strain energy of the precipitation, which yielded a low lattice misfit of 0.16% at high temperature. The γ′ lamellae aligned preferentially along the elastically soft [100] direction. Also, the precipitated oxide particles were refined in the γ phase by adding Hf from large incoherent YAlO{sub 3} to fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles with the average size of 7 nm and low interparticle spacing of 76 nm. - Highlights: • A new Ni-base ODS superalloy powder was produced by mechanical alloying. • The nanoscale γ–γ′ lamellar structure was precipitated after the aging treatment. • Fine semi-coherent Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxide particles were precipitated by addition of Hf.

  15. A Real-Time Orbit Determination Method for Smooth Transition from Optical Tracking to Laser Ranging of Debris.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    A critical requirement to achieve high efficiency of debris laser tracking is to have sufficiently accurate orbit predictions (OP) in both the pointing direction (better than 20 arc seconds) and distance from the tracking station to the debris objects, with the former more important than the latter because of the narrow laser beam. When the two line element (TLE) is used to provide the orbit predictions, the resultant pointing errors are usually on the order of tens to hundreds of arc seconds. In practice, therefore, angular observations of debris objects are first collected using an optical tracking sensor, and then used to guide the laser beam pointing to the objects. The manual guidance may cause interrupts to the laser tracking, and consequently loss of valuable laser tracking data. This paper presents a real-time orbit determination (OD) and prediction method to realize smooth and efficient debris laser tracking. The method uses TLE-computed positions and angles over a short-arc of less than 2 min as observations in an OD process where simplified force models are considered. After the OD convergence, the OP is performed from the last observation epoch to the end of the tracking pass. Simulation and real tracking data processing results show that the pointing prediction errors are usually less than 10″, and the distance errors less than 100 m, therefore, the prediction accuracy is sufficient for the blind laser tracking. PMID:27347958

  16. A Real-Time Orbit Determination Method for Smooth Transition from Optical Tracking to Laser Ranging of Debris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    A critical requirement to achieve high efficiency of debris laser tracking is to have sufficiently accurate orbit predictions (OP) in both the pointing direction (better than 20 arc seconds) and distance from the tracking station to the debris objects, with the former more important than the latter because of the narrow laser beam. When the two line element (TLE) is used to provide the orbit predictions, the resultant pointing errors are usually on the order of tens to hundreds of arc seconds. In practice, therefore, angular observations of debris objects are first collected using an optical tracking sensor, and then used to guide the laser beam pointing to the objects. The manual guidance may cause interrupts to the laser tracking, and consequently loss of valuable laser tracking data. This paper presents a real-time orbit determination (OD) and prediction method to realize smooth and efficient debris laser tracking. The method uses TLE-computed positions and angles over a short-arc of less than 2 min as observations in an OD process where simplified force models are considered. After the OD convergence, the OP is performed from the last observation epoch to the end of the tracking pass. Simulation and real tracking data processing results show that the pointing prediction errors are usually less than 10″, and the distance errors less than 100 m, therefore, the prediction accuracy is sufficient for the blind laser tracking. PMID:27347958

  17. Variable-temperature Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) Imaging spectroscopy of the diffusion process of butanol(OD) into polyamide 11.

    PubMed

    Unger, Miriam; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Siesler, Heinz W

    2011-09-01

    Time-resolved Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopic imaging was applied to the diffusion process of butanol(OD) into polyamide 11 (PA11) with a novel sheet-structured variable-temperature-controlled sample holder in order to demonstrate the significant differences of diffusion rate below and above the glass transition temperature of PA11. The diffusant butanol(OD) was chosen for two reasons: (1) it allows the diffusion front to be monitored by the intensity decrease of a NH-specific absorption band of PA11 due to the NH/ND isotope exchange and (2) under the measurement conditions the diffusion of butanol(OD) into PA11 takes place in an experimentally manageable time frame. Apart from the in situ visualization of the diffusion front in the time-resolved FT-NIR images, the type of diffusion and the diffusion coefficient of butanol(OD) into PA11 have been determined.

  18. Effect of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acid additives to the mobile phase on enantioseparations of some basic drugs on a Chiralcel OD column.

    PubMed

    Bielejewska, A; Duszczyk, K; Zukowski, J

    2005-08-12

    This paper describes the modification of Chiralcel OD column properties by adsorption of (+) or (-) camphorsulfonic acids (CSAs) used as additives to the mobile phase. The effects on retention, selectivity and efficiency, of adsorption of (+) and (-) CSAs on a Chiralcel OD column were examined. Racemic anti-histamines, anti-malarial and anti-fungal drugs, namely doxylamine, miconazole, sulconazole, hydroxyzine, homochlorcyclizine, methoxypheniramine, cyclopentolate and ephedrine were investigated as chiral tested compounds. All the studied drugs have an amino nitrogen atom in their structure. Only the enantioseparation of ephedrine enantiomers with CSAs alone was studied on the Nucleosil stationary phase, and these results were compared with the results obtained on the Chiralcel OD phase. A new dynamically generated stationary phase, with very good enantioseparation ability towards the studied compounds, was obtained by the adsorption of (-) CSA on the Chiralcel OD column. PMID:16078699

  19. Accumulation and annealing of radiation defects under low-temperature electron and neutron irradiation of ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Goshchitskii, B. N.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Danilov, S. E.; Kar'kin, A. E.

    2010-10-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects at low-temperature (77 K) electron and neutron irradiation and their effect on the physicomechanical properties of Fe-Cr alloys and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel have been studied. It has been shown that the behavior of radiation defects in ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys is qualitatively similar. Above 250 K, radiation-induced processes of the solid solution decomposition become conspicuous. These processes are much less pronounced in ODS steel because of specific features of its microstructure. Processes related to the overlapping of displacement cascades under neutron irradiation have been considered. It has been shown that, in this case, it is the increase in the size of vacancy clusters, rather than the growth of their concentration, that is prevailing. Possible mechanisms of the radiation hardening of the ODS steel and the Fe-13Cr alloy upon irradiation and subsequent annealing have been discussed.

  20. Evaluating the Good Ontology Design Guideline (GoodOD) with the Ontology Quality Requirements and Evaluation Method and Metrics (OQuaRE)

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Ramos, Astrid; Boeker, Martin; Jansen, Ludger; Schulz, Stefan; Iniesta, Miguela; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Objective To (1) evaluate the GoodOD guideline for ontology development by applying the OQuaRE evaluation method and metrics to the ontology artefacts that were produced by students in a randomized controlled trial, and (2) informally compare the OQuaRE evaluation method with gold standard and competency questions based evaluation methods, respectively. Background In the last decades many methods for ontology construction and ontology evaluation have been proposed. However, none of them has become a standard and there is no empirical evidence of comparative evaluation of such methods. This paper brings together GoodOD and OQuaRE. GoodOD is a guideline for developing robust ontologies. It was previously evaluated in a randomized controlled trial employing metrics based on gold standard ontologies and competency questions as outcome parameters. OQuaRE is a method for ontology quality evaluation which adapts the SQuaRE standard for software product quality to ontologies and has been successfully used for evaluating the quality of ontologies. Methods In this paper, we evaluate the effect of training in ontology construction based on the GoodOD guideline within the OQuaRE quality evaluation framework and compare the results with those obtained for the previous studies based on the same data. Results Our results show a significant effect of the GoodOD training over developed ontologies by topics: (a) a highly significant effect was detected in three topics from the analysis of the ontologies of untrained and trained students; (b) both positive and negative training effects with respect to the gold standard were found for five topics. Conclusion The GoodOD guideline had a significant effect over the quality of the ontologies developed. Our results show that GoodOD ontologies can be effectively evaluated using OQuaRE and that OQuaRE is able to provide additional useful information about the quality of the GoodOD ontologies. PMID:25148262

  1. Fourier transform far infrared spectrum of CD 3OD: detailed analysis in the torsional ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indranath; Duan, Yun-Bo; Klee, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    High resolution Fourier transform (FT) far infrared (FIR) spectra of CD 3OD isotopomer of methanol have been measured in the range 20-350 cm -1 at a resolution of 0.0017 cm -1 using a Bruker spectrometer. The spectra were recorded in various runs at pressure in the range of 0.2-0.8 mbar both at room temperature and at -60 °C. The spectra show complicated splitting due to strong torsional-rotational interactions in the molecule. Detailed assignments have been achieved mainly for the torsional ground state levels. The assigned transition wavenumbers along with the previously known microwave (MW) [J. Chem. Phys. 23 (1955) 1195; J. Chem. Phys. 56 (1972) 5887; Spectrochim. Acta A 54 (1998) 1375], and recently measured millimeter-wave (MMW) lines [I. Mukhopadhyay, R.A.H. Butler, F.C. DeLucia, E. Herbst, in preparation], were fit to an eighth order Hamiltonian [J. Chem. Phys. 104 (1996) 3914; J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1999) 927; J. Mol. Spectrosc. 193 (1999) 418; Chem. Phys. 263 (2001) 263; Chem. Phys. 257 (2000) 91; Chem. Phys. 280 (2002) 119; Chem. Phys. (2003) in press] with 62 varied parameters. The data set consisted of a total of 3211 transitions with 2959 FIR transitions from the ground torsional state with rotational angular momentum K ranging from 0 to 19 and J ranging from 0 to 45, and 237 MW and MMW transitions. The fit converged with a standard deviation of 0.0007 cm -1 for the FIR component of the data and the standard deviation for the MW and MMW transitions was 560 kHz. The standard deviation for the FIR lines is well compared with the estimated experimental accuracy of 0.0002 cm -1 for clean unblended lines. Here we report the actual measured wavenumbers with their assignments, some of these were not included in the fit. The complete data set fitted is not included here for the sake of economy of space but can be obtained from IM.

  2. Oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Jeremy

    Ferritic-martensitic and ODS alloys are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural material in Generation IV nuclear power plants, especially the supercritical water reactor. One of the main in-service degradation mechanisms for these alloys is uniform corrosion, thus this project focuses on understanding the oxidation behavior of these alloys in the supercritical water (SCW) environment. This understanding is acquired through the analysis of the oxide microstructure using microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence associated with electron microscopy (both SEM and TEM). The microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence technique provides unique microstructural data of the oxide. This technique simultaneously probes elemental and phase information step by step with a sub-micron spatial resolution throughout the oxide layers. Thus we were able to locate specific phases, such as Cr2O3, at specific locations in the oxide layer, mainly the interfaces. The electron microscopy complemented this analysis by imaging the oxide layers, to yield detailed information on the oxide morphology. All the alloys studied exhibited the same three-layer structure with an outer layer containing only Fe3O4, an inner layer containing a mixture of Fe3O4 and FeCr2O 4, and a diffusion layer containing a mixture of chromium-rich precipitates (Cr2O3 and FeCr2O4) and metal grains. By analyzing samples with various exposure times, we were able to follow the evolution of the oxide microstructure with exposure time. To obtain the corroded samples, several corrosion experiments were performed: some in supercritical water (at 500°C and 600°C) and one experiment in 500°C steam. The test in steam was undertaken to obtain more data points in the kinetic curves, because we thought the corrosion in steam and supercritical water at the same temperature would result in similar kinetics. This turned out not to be the case and the samples in supercritical

  3. Dissociative photoionization mechanism of methanol isotopologues (CH3OH, CD3OH, CH3OD and CD3OD) by iPEPICO: energetics, statistical and non-statistical kinetics and isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Sampada; Sztáray, Bálint; Bodi, Andras

    2011-07-28

    The dissociative photoionization of energy selected methanol isotopologue (CH(3)OH, CD(3)OH, CH(3)OD and CD(3)OD) cations was investigated using imaging Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (iPEPICO) spectroscopy. The first dissociation is an H/D-atom loss from the carbon, also confirmed by partial deuteration. Somewhat above 12 eV, a parallel H(2)-loss channel weakly asserts itself. At photon energies above 15 eV, in a consecutive hydrogen molecule loss to the first H-atom loss, the formation of CHO(+)/CDO(+) dominates as opposed to COH(+)/COD(+) formation. We see little evidence for H-atom scrambling in these processes. In the photon energy range corresponding to the B[combining tilde] and C[combining tilde] ion states, a hydroxyl radical loss appears yielding CH(3)(+)/CD(3)(+). Based on the branching ratios, statistical considerations and ab initio calculations, this process is confirmed to take place on the first electronically excited Ã(2)A' ion state. Uncharacteristically, internal conversion is outcompeted by unimolecular dissociation due to the apparently weak Renner-Teller-like coupling between the X[combining tilde] and the à ion states. The experimental 0 K appearance energies of the ions CH(2)OH(+), CD(2)OH(+), CH(2)OD(+) and CD(2)OD(+) are measured to be 11.646 ± 0.003 eV, 11.739 ± 0.003 eV, 11.642 ± 0.003 eV and 11.737 ± 0.003 eV, respectively. The E(0)(CH(2)OH(+)) = 11.6454 ± 0.0017 eV was obtained based on the independently measured isotopologue results and calculated zero point effects. The 0 K heat of formation of CH(2)OH(+), protonated formaldehyde, was determined to be 717.7 ± 0.7 kJ mol(-1). This yields a 0 K heat of formation of CH(2)OH of -11.1 ± 0.9 kJ mol(-1) and an experimental 298 K proton affinity of formaldehyde of 711.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol(-1). The reverse barrier to homonuclear H(2)-loss from CH(3)OH(+) is determined to be 36 kJ mol(-1), whereas for heteronuclear H(2)-loss from CH(2)OH(+) it is found to be 210 kJ mol(-1).

  4. CO + OH --> CO2 + H: The relative reaction rate of five CO isotopologues with OH and OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilberg, K. L.; Nielsen, C. J.; Griffith, D. W.; Johnson, M. S.

    2003-04-01

    The reaction of carbon monoxide with the hydroxyl radical (CO + OH) plays a central role in tropospheric chemistry. While the analysis of stable isotope enrichment has been used to refine models of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO and CO_2, less is known about the mechanism behind the enrichment [T. Röckmann et al., 1998]. We have previously reported the relative reaction rate of five CO isotopologues with OH radicals [K. L. Feilberg et al. 2002]; the present work is an expansion of the previous work in which the relative reaction rate with OD as well as with OH is measured using an improved technique. The hydroxyl radical was generated by the UV photolysis of ozone in the presence of hydrogen gas. The concentrations of the carbon monoxide isotopologues as a function of photolysis time is determined using a global fit of the rovibrationally resolved FTIR spectrum of the gas mixture in a stainless steel smog chamber. The observed inverse kinetic isotope effect is best understood in terms of the effect of isotopic substitution on the relative rate of unimolecular dissociation of the HOCO intermediate to reform reagents versus dissociate to products. In addition, we present the results of a quantum dressed classical mechanics calculation for the reaction CO + OD rightarrow CO_2 + D analogous to a previously published calculation for the reaction CO + OD rightarrow CO_2 + H [K. L. Feilberg et al. 2001]. References T. Röckmann, C. A. M. Brenninkmeijer, G. Saueressig, P. Bergamaschi, J. N. Crowley, H. Fischer and P. J. Crutzen, Science, 1998, 281, 544. K. L. Feilberg, C. J. Nielsen, D. W. T. Griffith and M. S. Johnson, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 4, 4687-4693, 2002. K. L. Feilberg, G. D. Billing and M. S. Johnson, Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 105(50), 11171, 2001.

  5. Selective laser sintering of MA956 oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan M.; Kramer, Kevin J.; El-Dasher, Bassem

    2015-09-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels' qualities of radiation damage resistance and high strength at high temperature make them promising nuclear structural materials. However, the dispersed yttria that gives ODS steel its beneficial qualities are generally compromised during joining processes, making fabrication difficult and expensive. The selective laser sintering process offers a potential path through this barrier by which net-shape parts can feasibly be built via additive manufacturing without fully melting the structure. Rastering a 400 W laser over a 110 μm MA956 ODS steel powder bed, we additively built parts with varying build conditions. Although density was achieved to within 97% of the wrought MA956, ultimate tensile strengths achieved only 65% of the wrought strength. Spectroscopy analysis points to the agglomeration of the yttria nano-particles as a possible explanation for the loss in strength. Further study might benefit from exploration of other parameters such as thinner powder build layers which would require less energy input to achieve sintering while minimizing time above the melting temperature.

  6. Cyclic oxidation of coated Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys in high velocity gas streams at 1100 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Several overlay coatings on ODS NiCrAl's were tested in Mach 1 and Mach 0.3 burner rigs to examine oxidation and thermal fatigue performance. The coatings were applied by various methods. Based on weight change, macroscopic, and metallographic observations in Mach 1 tests Nascoat 70 on TD-NiCrAl exhibited the best oxidation resistance. In Mach 0.3 tests PWA 267 and ATD-1, about equally, were the best coatings on YD-NiCrAl (Nascoat 70 was not tested in Mach 0.3 rigs).

  7. Phase Stability under Irradiation of Precipitates and Solid Solutions in Model ALloys and in ODS Alloys Relevant for Gen IV

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert C. Birtcher

    2007-10-17

    The overall objective of this program is to investigate the irradiation-altered phase stability of oxide precipitates in ODS steels and of model alloy solid solutions of associated systems. This information can be used to determine whether the favorable mechanical propertiies of these steels are maintained under irradiation, thus addressing one of the main materials research issues for this class of steels as identified by the GenIV working groups. The research program will also create fundamental understanding of the irradiation precipitation/dissolution problem by studying a "model" system in which the variables can be controlled and their effects understood individually.

  8. Mechanical and Microstructure Study of Nickel-Based ODS Alloys Processed by Mechano-Chemical Bonding and Ball Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amare, Belachew N.

    Due to the need to increase the efficiency of modern power plants, land-based gas turbines are designed to operate at high temperature creating harsh environments for structural materials. The elevated turbine inlet temperature directly affects the materials at the hottest sections, which includes combustion chamber, blades, and vanes. Therefore, the hottest sections should satisfy a number of material requirements such as high creep strength, ductility at low temperature, high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance. Such requirements are nowadays satisfied by implementing superalloys coated by high temperature thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems to protect from high operating temperature required to obtain an increased efficiency. Oxide dispersive strengthened (ODS) alloys are being considered due to their high temperature creep strength, good oxidation and corrosion resistance for high temperature applications in advanced power plants. These alloys operating at high temperature are subjected to different loading systems such as thermal, mechanical, and thermo-mechanical combined loads at operation. Thus, it is critical to study the high temperature mechanical and microstructure properties of such alloys for their structural integrity. The primary objective of this research work is to investigate the mechanical and microstructure properties of nickel-based ODS alloys produced by combined mechano-chemical bonding (MCB) and ball milling subjected to high temperature oxidation, which are expected to be applied for high temperature turbine coating with micro-channel cooling system. Stiffness response and microstructure evaluation of such alloy systems was studied along with their oxidation mechanism and structural integrity through thermal cyclic exposure. Another objective is to analyze the heat transfer of ODS alloy coatings with micro-channel cooling system using finite element analysis (FEA) to determine their feasibility as a stand-alone structural

  9. Triplet-extinction coefficients of some laser dyes. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlopoulos, T.G.; Golich, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    For flashlamp-pumped dye lasers, the negative effect of triplet-state losses on laser action efficiency is well known. Oscilloscope traces of laser pulses showed that laser action diminishes much sooner than the flashlamp excitation pulse. This effect was attributed to the buildup of triplet-state dye molecules during the excitation from the flashlamp pulse. Triplet-extinction coefficients epsilon(T) were measured over the laser-action spectral region of Rhodamine 6G; Rhodamine B; Rhodamine 110; Fluorol-7GA; Coumarin 540A; Coumarin 522; Coumarin 1; Coumarin 120; 4,4'-diphenyl stilbene; and 2,7-bis(4-methoxy-phenyl)-9,9-dipropylfluorene. The different lines from an argon-ion cw laser were employed for excitation. McClure's method was used to obtain the triplet extinction coefficients Epsilon(T). The method requires the measurement of triplet optical densities OD(T) as a function of different cw laser-excitation intensities (powers) I(ex). The importance of triplet-state losses on dye-laser efficiency is reviewed. The laser action properties of the laser dyes studied are briefly discussed as they relate to the measured epsilon=(T) values.

  10. Post-Irradiation Fracture Toughness of Unalloyed Molybdenum, ODS molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum following irradiation at 244C to 507C

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, Brian V; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available unalloyed molybdenum (Low Carbon Arc Cast (LCAC)), Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum were neutron irradiated at temperatures of nominally 244 C, 407 C, and 509 C to neutron fluences between 1.0 to 4.6x1025 n/m2 (E>0.1 MeV). Post-irradiation fracture toughness testing was performed. All alloys exhibited a Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature that was defined to occur at 30 4 MPa-m1/2. The highest post-irradiated fracture toughness values (26-107 MPa-m1/2) and lowest DBTT (100-150 C) was observed for ODS molybdenum in the L-T orientation. The finer grain size for ODS molybdenum results in fine laminates that improve the ductile laminate toughening. The results for ODS molybdenum are anisotropic with lower post-irradiated toughness values (20-30 MPa-m1/2) and higher DBTT (450-600 C) in the T-L orientation. The results for T-L ODS molybdenum are consistent or slightly better than those for LCAC molybdenum (21-71 MPa-m1/2 and 450-800 C DBTT). The fracture toughness values measured for LCAC and T-L ODS molybdenum at temperatures below the DBTT were determined to be 8-18 MPa-m1/2. Lower non-irradiated fracture toughness values were measured for TZM molybdenum that are attributed to the large carbide precipitates serving as preferential fracture initiation sites. The role of microstructure and grain size on post-irradiated fracture toughness was evaluated by comparing the results for LCAC molybdenum and ODS molybdenum.

  11. Latent tracks of swift heavy ions in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuratov, V. A.; Sohatsky, A. S.; O'Connell, J. H.; Kornieieva, K.; Nikitina, A. A.; Uglov, V. V.; Neethling, J. H.; Ageev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The radiation stability of dielectric nanoparticles embedded into a metallic matrix is of considerable practical value due to the growing interest in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as promising nuclear reactor materials. In this report the results of a TEM study of structural changes in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in several ODS alloys irradiated with 1.2 MeV/amu Xe and 3.4 MeV/amu Bi ions is presented. It was found that swift heavy ion irradiation leads to the formation of amorphous latent tracks in both materials. The upper limit of the threshold electronic stopping power for track formation in carbides is estimated to be around 35 keV/nm. Multiple ion track overlapping leads to complete amorphization of carbide and Y-Ti oxide nanoparticles. Microstructural analysis have revealed a strong influence of the ferritic matrix on track morphology in Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles in pre-thinned TEM targets after postradiation annealing and irradiation at elevated temperatures.

  12. High temperature deformation mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels at cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The ODS ferritic steels realize potentially higher operating temperature due to structural stability by the dispersed nano-size oxide particles. The deformation process and mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels were investigated at 1073 K and 1173 K for the cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions. Tensile and creep tests were conducted at the stress in parallel (LD) and perpendicular (TD) directions to the grain boundaries. Strain rate varied from 10-1 to 10-9 s-1. For the LD specimens, deformation in the cold rolled and recrystallized conditions is reinforced by finely dispersed oxide particles. The dominant deformation process for the recrystallized TD specimen is controlled through the grain boundary sliding and stress accommodation via diffusional creep at temperature of 1173 K and lower strain rate less than 10-4 s-1. The grain boundary sliding couldn't be rate-controlling process at 1073 K for the as-cold rolled TD specimen, where a dynamic recovery of the dislocation produced by cold-rolling is related to the deformation process.

  13. Chiral HPLC versus chiral SFC: evaluation of long-term stability and selectivity of Chiralcel OD using various eluents.

    PubMed

    Lynam, K G; Nicolas, E C

    1993-01-01

    The long-term stability of Chiralcel OD columns under varying HPLC and SFC conditions was evaluated. Two new columns from the same supplier lot were procured, and one was installed in an HPLC system, and the other was installed in an SFC system. Enantiomeric mixtures of trans-stilbene oxide and carbobenzyloxy phenylalaninol were repeatedly injected in both systems over several days. For HPLC, hexane was the primary solvent used, along with IPA, EtOH, MeOH/IPA, or EtOH/TFA modifier. Carbon dioxide was the primary SFC solvent, together with the similar modifiers as the HPLC. Column performance was monitored by measuring resolution, theoretical plate number, and alpha between enantiomeric peaks. It was observed that, when the eluent strengths were adjusted to provide comparable retention times, the Chiralcel OD gave superior enantiomeric resolution when used in the SFC than the HPLC. Equilibration in between solvents was faster with SFC. The columns were demonstrated to be quite stable in both systems. PMID:8123734

  14. State-to-state dynamics for O(1D)+D2-->OD+D: evidence for a collinear abstraction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Lin, J J; Harich, S A; Yang, X

    2001-01-15

    The O(1D)+D2-->OD+D reaction at two different collisional energies, 2.0 and 3.2 kcal/mol, is investigated by using the H(D) Rydberg "tagging" time-of-flight technique. Experimental results in this study indicate that the OD product is clearly more backward scattered relative to the O(1D) beam direction at the collisional energy of 3.2 kcal/mol. The extra backward scattered OD products are mostly in the highly vibrationally excited states (upsilon = 4,5,6), which is typical of a collinear abstraction mechanism. The experimental results in this work also provide a good testing bed for quantitative theoretical investigations of this benchmark system.

  15. The OD/OH Isotope Ratio in Comets 8P/Tuttle and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselot, Philippe; Jehin, Emmanuel; Hutsemekers, Damien; Manfroid, Jean; Decock, Alice; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique

    2016-10-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios in solar system objects is an important source of information about their origin, especially for comets. Among these ratios the D/H is of particular importance because of its sensitivity to fractionation processes and physical environment, and the abundance of hydrogen in the solar system. The main molecule used to derive this ratio in comets is water. So far, apart water, only HCN has permitted to derive D/H ratio and not only upper limits.Most of the existing determinations of D/H in water molecules have been obtained by spectroscopic observations of water lines in the sub-mm or near infrared range [1,2]. So far only one measurement has been based on OD/OH emission lines radicals in the near-UV [3] and another one on the Lyman-alpha D emission [4]. In situ measurements have also been obtained in comets 1P/Halley and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using mass spectrometer [5,6,7,8].In this work we have used the OH and OD ultraviolet bands at 310 nm observed with the ESO 8-m Very Large Telescope feeding the Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) for measuring the D/H ratio in comets 8P/Tuttle and C/2012 F6 (Lemmon). The OH and OD being the photodissociation products of H2O and HDO such observations allow to derive D/H ratio for water molecules. This work constitutes an independant determination of the D/H ratios already published for these comets and based on observations performed in the sub-mm and near infrared range of H2O and HDO lines. We present our modeling, data analysis and numerical values obtained for this ratio.[1] D. Bockelée-Morvan et al., 2015, SSR 197, 47-83 [2] N. Biver et al., 2016, A&A 589, id A78, 11p [3] D. Hutsemékers et al., 2008, A&A 490, L31 [4] H.A. Weaver et al., 2008, LPI Contributions 1405, 8216 [5] H. Balsiger, K. Altwegg, J. Geiss, 1995, JGR 100, 5827 [6] P. Eberhardt et al., 1995, A&A 302, 301 [7] R.H. Brown et al., 2012, PSS 60, 166 [8] K. Alwegg et al., 2015, Science 347, article id. 1261952

  16. Effect of Y2O3 content on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al-based ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar

    2003-02-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the cyclic oxidation behavior of two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al based alloys containing 0.17 wt.% and 0.7 wt.% Y2O3. The alloys were oxidized in air for 100 h at 1200°C based on a 24 h cycle period. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structure, morphology, and composition of the oxide scales. Both alloys formed highly adherent and continuous layers of α-Al2O3 exhibiting a morphology indicative of inward scale growth. The role of Y2O3 was to promote adherence by segregating to the grain boundaries within the oxide. Concurrently, Y2O3 generated micro-porosity resulting in a scale of comparatively higher thickness in the alloy with 0.7 wt.% Y2O3.

  17. Raman Laser Spectrometer internal Optical Head current status: opto-mechanical redesign to minimize the excitation laser trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Miguel; Ramos, Gonzalo; Moral, Andoni; Pérez, Carlos; Belenguer, Tomás; del Rosario Canchal, María; Zuluaga, Pablo; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Santiago, Amaia; Rull, Fernando; Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Universidad de Valladolid (UVa), Ingeniería de Sistemas para la Defesa de España S.A. (ISDEFE)

    2016-10-01

    Raman Laser Spectrometer (RLS) is the Pasteur Payload instruments of the ExoMars mission, within the ESA's Aurora Exploration Programme, that will perform for the first time in an out planetary mission Raman spectroscopy. RLS is composed by SPU (Spectrometer Unit), iOH (Internal Optical Head), and ICEU (Instrument Control and Excitation Unit). iOH focuses the excitation laser on the samples (excitation path), and collects the Raman emission from the sample (collection path, composed on collimation system and filtering system). The original design presented a high laser trace reaching to the detector, and although a certain level of laser trace was required for calibration purposes, the high level degrades the Signal to Noise Ratio confounding some Raman peaks.The investigation revealing that the laser trace was not properly filtered as well as the iOH opto-mechanical redesign are reported on. After the study of the Long Pass Filters Optical Density (OD) as a function of the filtering stage to the detector distance, a new set of filters (Notch filters) was decided to be evaluated. Finally, and in order to minimize the laser trace, a new collection path design (mainly consisting on that the collimation and filtering stages are now separated in two barrels, and on the kind of filters to be used) was required. Distance between filters and collimation stage first lens was increased, increasing the OD. With this new design and using two Notch filters, the laser trace was reduced to assumable values, as can be observed in the functional test comparison also reported on this paper.

  18. Laser Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Dopant level analysis is important to the laser system designer because it allows him to model the laser's performance. It also allows the end user to determine what went wrong when a laser fails to perform as expected. Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Scientific Materials Corporation has developed a process for producing uniform laser rods in which the amount of water trapped in the crystal during growth is reduced. This research led to the formation of a subsidiary company, Montana Analytical Services, which conducts analysis of laser rods for dopant ion concentrations. This is a significant advance in laser technology.

  19. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  20. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  1. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  2. Characteristic results and prospects of the 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2009-04-01

    For specific blanket and divertor applications in future fusion power reactors a replacement of presently considered reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels as structural material by suitable oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic steels would allow a substantial increase of the operating temperature from ˜550 °C to about 650 °C. Temperatures above 700 °C in the He cooled modular divertor concept necessitates the use of ferritic (RAF) ODS steels, which are not limited by a phase transition. Therefore a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ferritic ODS steel is being developed, using an Attritor with varying milling parameters. Afterwards the mechanically alloyed powders were encapsulated, sealed and consolidated in a hot isostatic press device. In this work, the effects of several parameter variations on the microstructure of the produced ferritic ODS-alloys, analysed by optical microscopy (OM) and high resolution TEM, as well as results of conducted mechanical tests are presented.

  3. Developing an OD-Intervention Metric System with the Use of Applied Theory-Building Methodology: A Work/Life-Intervention Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Michael Lane; Storberg-Walker, Julia; McMillan, Heather S.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new model, generated through applied theory-building research methods, that helps human resource development (HRD) practitioners evaluate the return on investment (ROI) of organization development (OD) interventions. This model, called organization development human-capital accounting system (ODHCAS), identifies…

  4. A Miniaturized, 1.9F Integrated Optical Fiber and Stone Basket for Use in Thulium Fiber Laser Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher R; Hutchens, Thomas C; Hardy, Luke A; Irby, Pierce B; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2015-10-01

    The thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored as an alternative laser lithotripter to the standard holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The more uniform beam profile of the TFL enables higher power transmission through smaller fibers. In this study, a 100-μm core, 140-μm outer-diameter (OD) silica fiber with 5-mm length hollow steel tip was integrated with 1.3F (0.433-mm OD) nitinol wire basket to form a 1.9F (0.633-mm OD) device. TFL energy of 30 mJ, 500 μs pulse duration, and 500 Hz pulse rate was delivered to human uric acid stones, ex vivo. Stone ablation rates measured 1.5 ± 0.2 mg/s, comparable to 1.7 ± 0.3 mg/s using bare fiber tips separately with stone basket. With further development, this device may minimize stone retropulsion, allowing more efficient TFL lithotripsy at higher pulse rates. It may also provide increased flexibility, higher saline irrigation rates through the ureteroscope working channel, reduce fiber degradation compared with separate fiber and basket manipulation, and reduce laser-induced nitinol wire damage.

  5. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al

  6. Atmospheric Chemistry of Tetrahydrofuran, 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran, and 2,5-Dimethyltetrahydrofuran: Kinetics of Reactions with Chlorine Atoms, OD Radicals, and Ozone.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christina; Nielsen, Ole John; Østerstrøm, Freja F; Ausmeel, Stina; Nilsson, Elna J K; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P

    2016-09-22

    FTIR smog chamber techniques were used to study the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of Cl atoms, OD radicals, and O3 with the five-membered ring-structured compounds tetrahydrofuran (C4H8O, THF), 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (CH3C4H7O, 2-MTHF), 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran ((CH3)2C4H5O, 2,5-DMTHF), and furan (C4H4O). The rate coefficients determined using relative rate methods were kTHF+Cl = (1.96 ± 0.24) × 10(-10), kTHF+OD = (1.81 ± 0.27) × 10(-11), kTHF+O3 = (6.41 ± 2.90) × 10(-21), k2-MTHF+Cl = (2.65 ± 0.43) × 10(-10), k2-MTHF+OD = (2.41 ± 0.51) × 10(-11), k2-MTHF+O3 = (1.87 ± 0.82) × 10(-20), k2,5-DMTHF+OD = (4.56 ± 0.68) × 10(-11), k2,5-DMTHF+Cl = (2.84 ± 0.34) × 10(-10), k2,5-DMTHF+O3 = (4.58 ± 2.18), kfuran+Cl = (2.39 ± 0.27) × 10(-10), and kfuran+O3 = (2.60 ± 0.31) × 10(-18) molecules cm(-3) s(-1). Rate coefficients of the reactions with ozone were also determined using the absolute rate method under pseudo-first-order conditions. OD radicals, in place of OH radicals, were produced from CD3ONO to avoid spectral overlap of isopropyl and methyl nitrite with the reactants. The kinetics of OD radical reactions are expected to resemble the kinetics of OH radical reactions, and the rate coefficients of the reactions with OD radicals were used to calculate the atmospheric lifetimes with respect to reactions with OH radicals. The lifetimes of THF, 2-MTHF, and 2,5-DMTHF are approximately 15, 12, and 6 h, respectively. PMID:27556743

  7. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  8. Cutaneous lasers.

    PubMed

    Fedok, Fred G; Garritano, Frank; Portela, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    There has been a remarkable development and evolution of laser technology, leading to adaptation of lasers for medical use and the treatment of skin problems and disorders. Many treatments that required incisional surgery and other invasive methods are now preferentially treated with a laser. Although laser advances have resulted in the availability of some amazing tools, they require the clinical skill and judgment of the clinician for their optimal use. This article provides a clinically oriented overview of many of the lasers valuable in facial plastic surgery. Basic science, clinical adaptations, and patient management topics are covered.

  9. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  10. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  11. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  12. Fragmentation of doubly-protonated peptide ion populations labeled by H/D exchange with CD3OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kristin A.; Kuppannan, Krishna; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2006-03-01

    Doubly-protonated bradykinin (RPPGFSPFR) and an angiotensin III analogue (RVYIFPF) were subjected to hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange with CD3OD in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. A bimodal distribution of deuterium incorporation was present for bradykinin after H/D exchange for 90 s at a CD3OD pressure of 4 × 10-7 Torr, indicating the existence of at least two distinct populations. Bradykinin ion populations corresponding to 0-2 and 5-11 deuteriums (i.e., D0, D1, D2, D5, D6, D7, D8, D9, D10, and D11) were each monoisotopically selected and fragmented via sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) collision-induced dissociation (CID). The D0-D2 ion populations, which correspond to the slower exchanging population, consistently require lower SORI amplitude to achieve a similar precursor ion survival yield as the faster-reacting (D5-D11) populations. These results demonstrate that conformation/protonation motif has an effect on fragmentation efficiency for bradykinin. Also, the partitioning of the deuterium atoms into fragment ions suggests that the C-terminal arginine residue exchanges more rapidly than the N-terminal arginine. Total deuterium incorporation in the b1/y8 and b2/y7 ion pairs matches very closely the theoretical values for all ion populations studied, indicating that the ions of a complementary pair are likely formed during the same fragmentation event, or that no scrambling occurs upon SORI. Deuterium incorporation into the y1/a8 pseudo-ion pair does not closely match the expected theoretical values. The other peptide, doubly-protonated RVYIFPF, has a trimodal distribution of deuterium incorporation upon H/D exchange with CD3OD at a pressure of 1 × 10-7 Torr for 600 s, indicating at least three distinct ion populations. After 90 s of H/D exchange where at least two distinct populations are detected, the D0-D7 ion populations were monoisotopically selected and fragmented via SORI-CID over a range of SORI

  13. Structural change of heavy water by laser-induced plasma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Hiroharu; Fujinami, Masanori; Kitamori, Takehiko; Sawada, Tsuguo

    1999-07-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of -OD stretching vibration has been studied when laser-induced plasma is formed in heavy water by focusing an intense picosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (wavelength 532 nm, pulse duration 80 ps) at room temperature. The main peak of the SRS shows a remarkable blue-shift and an asymmetric intensity distribution. The Raman shift and active modes of the SRS indicate that the ice VII structure is formed and lasts 20-30 ps in the focal volume of the pumping beam in heavy water.

  14. Retinal detachment as a complication of neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet laser cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Geyer, O; Neudorfer, M; Lazar, M

    1993-05-01

    We report a traction retinal detachment that developed within one month of transscleral neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser cyclophotocoagulation, a previously unreported complication of the new cyclodestructive procedure. A 17-year-old boy was referred to our department with uncontrolled aphakic glaucoma OD after having undergone cyclocryotherapy twice. Three treatments with transscleral Nd:YAG cyclophotocoagulation were done over nine months to lower his intraocular pressure. Hypotony and traction retinal detachment occurred after the third laser treatment and was managed successfully by vitrectomy with a fluid-gas exchange. Thus, the possibility of this additional complication should be remembered when doing transscleral Nd:YAG cyclophotocoagulation. PMID:8517586

  15. Development of an HPLC Method with an ODS Column to Determine Low Levels of Aspartame Diastereomers in Aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Ryoichiro; Kubo, Satoru; Otabe, Akira; Oobayashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Shoko; Yoshida, Mika; Yoshida, Mitsuya; Tatebe, Chiye; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    α-L-Aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester (L, D-APM) and α-D-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (D, L-APM) are diastereomers of aspartame (N-L-α-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester, L, L-APM). The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has set 0.04 wt% as the maximum permitted level of the sum of L, D-APM and D, L-APM in commercially available L, L-APM. In this study, we developed and validated a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an ODS column to determine L, D-APM and D, L-APM in L, L-APM. The limits of detection and quantification, respectively, of L, D-APM and D, L-APM were found to be 0.0012 wt% and 0.004 wt%. This method gave excellent accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility in a recovery test performed on five different days. Moreover, the method was successfully applied to the determination of these diastereomers in commercial L, L-APM samples. Thus, the developed method is a simple, useful, and practical tool for determining L, D-APM and D, L-APM levels in L, L-APM.

  16. Development of an HPLC Method with an ODS Column to Determine Low Levels of Aspartame Diastereomers in Aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Ryoichiro; Kubo, Satoru; Otabe, Akira; Oobayashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Shoko; Yoshida, Mika; Yoshida, Mitsuya; Tatebe, Chiye; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    α-L-Aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester (L, D-APM) and α-D-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (D, L-APM) are diastereomers of aspartame (N-L-α-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester, L, L-APM). The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has set 0.04 wt% as the maximum permitted level of the sum of L, D-APM and D, L-APM in commercially available L, L-APM. In this study, we developed and validated a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an ODS column to determine L, D-APM and D, L-APM in L, L-APM. The limits of detection and quantification, respectively, of L, D-APM and D, L-APM were found to be 0.0012 wt% and 0.004 wt%. This method gave excellent accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility in a recovery test performed on five different days. Moreover, the method was successfully applied to the determination of these diastereomers in commercial L, L-APM samples. Thus, the developed method is a simple, useful, and practical tool for determining L, D-APM and D, L-APM levels in L, L-APM. PMID:27015640

  17. Development of an HPLC Method with an ODS Column to Determine Low Levels of Aspartame Diastereomers in Aspartame

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Ryoichiro; Kubo, Satoru; Otabe, Akira; Oobayashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Shoko; Yoshida, Mika; Yoshida, Mitsuya; Tatebe, Chiye; Sato, Kyoko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    α-L-Aspartyl-D-phenylalanine methyl ester (L, D-APM) and α-D-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (D, L-APM) are diastereomers of aspartame (N-L-α-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine-1-methyl ester, L, L-APM). The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has set 0.04 wt% as the maximum permitted level of the sum of L, D-APM and D, L-APM in commercially available L, L-APM. In this study, we developed and validated a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using an ODS column to determine L, D-APM and D, L-APM in L, L-APM. The limits of detection and quantification, respectively, of L, D-APM and D, L-APM were found to be 0.0012 wt% and 0.004 wt%. This method gave excellent accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility in a recovery test performed on five different days. Moreover, the method was successfully applied to the determination of these diastereomers in commercial L, L-APM samples. Thus, the developed method is a simple, useful, and practical tool for determining L, D-APM and D, L-APM levels in L, L-APM. PMID:27015640

  18. Morphology-dependent optical anisotropies in the n -type polymer P(NDI2OD-T2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven J.; Schlitz, Ruth A.; Chabinyc, Michael L.; Schuller, Jon A.

    2016-10-01

    Organic semiconductors tend to self-assemble into highly ordered and oriented morphologies with anisotropic optical properties. Studying these optical anisotropies provides insight into processing-dependent structural properties and informs the photonic design of organic photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Here we measure the anisotropic optical properties of spin-cast films of the n -type polymer P(NDI2OD-T2) using momentum-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopies. We quantify differences in the optical anisotropies of films deposited with distinct face-on and edge-on morphologies. In particular, we infer a substantially larger out-of-plane tilt angle of the optical transition dipole moment in high temperature annealed, edge-on films. Measurements of spectral differences between in-plane and out-of-plane dipoles, further indicate regions of disordered polymers in low temperature annealed face-on films that are otherwise obscured in traditional x-ray and optical characterization techniques. The methods and analysis developed in this work provide a way to identify and quantify subtle optical and structural anisotropies in organic semiconductors that are important for understanding and designing highly efficient thin film devices.

  19. Active annular-beam laser autocollimator system.

    PubMed

    Yoder, P R; Schlesinger, E R; Chickvary, J L

    1975-08-01

    An autocollimator using an axicon and a beam expander telescope to generate a 12.5-cm. o.d. annular beam of helium-neon laser light with high (25:1) diameter-to-width ratio has been developed. It is used with a two-axis, electromagnetically actuated mirror assembly to acquire automatically and maintain dynamically autocollimation from a nearby but separately mounted annular mirror. The servo system controls beam alignment even though angular vibratory motions of the annular mirror make it appear to tilt relative to the autocollimator as much as 7 mrad at frequencies below 300 Hz. This paper describes the optical system and the alignment sensing and control system.

  20. Laser Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tunable diode lasers are employed as radiation sources in high resolution infrared spectroscopy to determine spectral characteristics of gaseous compounds. With other laser systems, they are produced by Spectra-Physics, and used to monitor chemical processes, monitor production of quantity halogen lamps, etc. The Laser Analytics Division of Spectra-Physics credits the system's reliability to a program funded by Langley in the 1970s. Company no longer U.S.-owned. 5/22/97

  1. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  2. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  3. Laser apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  4. Laser safety in design of near-infrared scanning LIDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Elgin, D.

    2015-05-01

    3D LIDARs (Light Detection and Ranging) with 1.5μm nanosecond pulse lasers have been increasingly used in different applications. The main reason for their popularity is that these LIDARs have high performance while at the same time can be made eye-safe. Because the laser hazard effect on eyes or skin at this wavelength region (<1.4μm) is mainly from the thermal effect accumulated from many individual pulses over a period of seconds, scanning can effectively reduce the laser beam hazard effect from the LIDARs. Neptec LIDARs have been used in docking to the International Space Station, military helicopter landing and industrial mining applications. We have incorporated the laser safety requirements in the LIDAR design and conducted laser safety analysis for different operational scenarios. While 1.5μm is normally said to be the eye-safe wavelength, in reality a high performance 3D LIDAR needs high pulse energy, small beam size and high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) to achieve long range, high resolution and high density images. The resulting radiant exposure of its stationary beam could be many times higher than the limit for a Class 1 laser device. Without carefully choosing laser and scanning parameters, including field-of-view, scan speed and pattern, a scanning LIDAR can't be eye- or skin-safe based only on its wavelength. This paper discusses the laser safety considerations in the design of eye-safe scanning LIDARs, including laser pulse energy, PRF, beam size and scanning parameters in two basic designs of scanning mechanisms, i.e. galvanometer based scanner and Risley prism based scanner. The laser safety is discussed in terms of device classification, nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD) and safety glasses optical density (OD).

  5. Observation of the Q(3/2) Λ-doublet transitions for X2Π3/2 OD in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raston, Paul L.; Liang, Tao; Douberly, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    The deuteroxyl radical (OD) has been isolated in superfluid helium nanodroplets and characterised by infrared depletion spectroscopy. Two resolved Q(3/2) lines are observed, with a separation that is 4.88 (10) times larger than in the gas phase. This is similar to that previously reported for He-solvated OH (5.30 (2)), for which it was shown that the splitting could be reproduced by a model that assumes a small parity dependence of the rotor's effective moment of inertia [P.L. Raston, T. Liang, and G.E. Douberly, J. Phys. Chem. A (2013). DOI:10.1021/jp312335q]. With this model, the OD Λ-doublet splitting in liquid He is reproduced with Be and Bf rotational constants that differ by ≈0.24%.

  6. Imaging the O(1D) + CD4 → OD + CD3 reaction dynamics: Probing vibrationally and rotationally excited CD3 products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Quan; Pan, Huilin; Yang, Jiayue; Zhang, Dong; Jiang, Bo; Dai, Dongxu; Yang, Xueming

    2012-12-01

    The dynamics of the O(1D) + CD4 → OD + CD3 reaction has been studied using the crossed molecular beam technique with sliced velocity map imaging. Internally excited CD3 products were detected using a (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization with state resolution. Dual reaction mechanisms, insertion and abstraction, were only observed for CD3 products with its umbrella mode (v2) excited or in its ground state, while CD3 products with other vibrational mode excited do not show any evidence of contributions from the abstraction pathway. Experimental results indicate that even though the insertion channel dominates the reaction, the abstraction channel contributes relatively more to vibrationally excited CD3 products. The state-to-state correlation between the two reaction products, OD and CD3, was determined for the abstraction channel at different collision energies. In addition, we measured rotationally hot CD3 products and found that these products are only produced via the insertion channel.

  7. Lasers in Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment On This Page What is laser light? What is laser therapy, and how is it ... future hold for laser therapy? What is laser light? The term “ laser ” stands for light amplification by ...

  8. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  9. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  10. Laser Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  11. Laser Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Lightning Optical Corporation, under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) agreement with Langley Research Center, manufactures oxide and fluoride laser gain crystals, as well as various nonlinear materials. The ultimate result of this research program is the commercial availability in the marketplace of a reliable source of high-quality, damage resistant laser material, primarily for diode-pumping applications.

  12. Study of the photochemical transformation of 2-ethylhexyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (OD-PABA) under conditions relevant to surface waters.

    PubMed

    Calza, P; Vione, D; Galli, F; Fabbri, D; Dal Bello, F; Medana, C

    2016-01-01

    We studied the aquatic environmental fate of 2-ethylhexyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (OD-PABA), a widespread sunscreen, to assess its environmental persistence and photoinduced transformation. Direct photolysis is shown to play a key role in phototransformation, and this fast process is expected to be the main attenuation route of OD-PABA in sunlit surface waters. The generation of transformation products (TPs) was followed via HPLC/HRMS. Five (or four) TPs were detected in the samples exposed to UVB (or UVA) radiation, respectively. The main detected TPs of OD-PABA, at least as far as HPLC-HRMS peak areas are concerned, would involve a dealkylation or hydroxylation/oxidation process in both direct photolysis and indirect phototransformation. The latter was simulated by using TiO2-based heterogeneous photocatalysis, involving the formation of nine additional TPs. Most of them resulted from the further degradation of the primary TPs that can also be formed by direct photolysis. Therefore, these secondary TPs might also occur as later transformation intermediates in natural aquatic systems.

  13. Study of the photochemical transformation of 2-ethylhexyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (OD-PABA) under conditions relevant to surface waters.

    PubMed

    Calza, P; Vione, D; Galli, F; Fabbri, D; Dal Bello, F; Medana, C

    2016-01-01

    We studied the aquatic environmental fate of 2-ethylhexyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (OD-PABA), a widespread sunscreen, to assess its environmental persistence and photoinduced transformation. Direct photolysis is shown to play a key role in phototransformation, and this fast process is expected to be the main attenuation route of OD-PABA in sunlit surface waters. The generation of transformation products (TPs) was followed via HPLC/HRMS. Five (or four) TPs were detected in the samples exposed to UVB (or UVA) radiation, respectively. The main detected TPs of OD-PABA, at least as far as HPLC-HRMS peak areas are concerned, would involve a dealkylation or hydroxylation/oxidation process in both direct photolysis and indirect phototransformation. The latter was simulated by using TiO2-based heterogeneous photocatalysis, involving the formation of nine additional TPs. Most of them resulted from the further degradation of the primary TPs that can also be formed by direct photolysis. Therefore, these secondary TPs might also occur as later transformation intermediates in natural aquatic systems. PMID:26512801

  14. An accurate classical simulation of a two-dimensional vibrational spectrum: OD stretch spectrum of a hydrated HOD molecule.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-07-17

    An accurate computational method for the classical simulation of the two-dimensional vibrational spectra is presented. The method refines our previous computational method for the third order vibrational response function in the classical limit, and it enables capturing the diagonal elongation and its waiting time (T) dependence widely observed in experimental two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectra of intramolecular modes. The improvement is achieved by a series of new developments including (i) a block algorithm for the stability matrix computation, (ii) new equations of motion for the position-perturbed molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory, and (iii) enhanced sampling efficiency by exploiting the time-reversal invariance of MD trajectories. The method is applied to the simulation of 2D IR spectra of the OD stretch mode in a hydrated HOD molecule, employing a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical force field. The simulated spectra exhibit diagonal elongation of the 2D IR signal at small T, reflecting the correlation of individual transitions among the inhomogeneously broadened ensemble. The slopes of the nodal lines of the elongated signals are found to decay with a time scale of 1.6 ps as T increases, in reasonable agreement with the frequency correlation decay time of 1.2 ps. The amplitudes of the positive and negative peaks also decay as T increases, due to vibrational population relaxation and molecular rotation. The peak positions tend to blue shift with increasing T, reflecting the different relaxation rates of the strongly and weakly solvated HOD species. These results indicate that the present method can reliably predict the waiting-time-dependent changes of 2D IR spectra of a single vibrational chromophore in solution. PMID:24601590

  15. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2008-08-19

    A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

  16. Autokeratomileusis Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Seymour P.

    1987-03-01

    Refractive defects such as myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism may be corrected by laser milling of the cornea. An apparatus combining automatic refraction/keratometry and an excimer type laser for precision reshaping of corneal surfaces has been developed for testing. When electronically linked to a refractometer or keratometer or holographic imaging device, the laser is capable of rapidly milling or ablating corneal surfaces to preselected dioptric power shapes without the surgical errors characteristic of radial keratotomy, cryokeratomileusis or epikeratophakia. The excimer laser simultaneously generates a synthetic Bowman's like layer or corneal condensate which appears to support re-epithelialization of the corneal surface. An electronic feedback arrangement between the measuring instrument and the laser enables real time control of the ablative milling process for precise refractive changes in the low to very high dioptric ranges. One of numerous options is the use of a rotating aperture wheel with reflective portions providing rapid alternate ablation/measurement interfaced to both laser and measurement instrumentation. The need for the eye to be fixated is eliminated or minimized. In addition to reshaping corneal surfaces, the laser milling apparatus may also be used in the process of milling both synthetic and natural corneal inlays for lamellar transplants.

  17. Laser goniometer

    DOEpatents

    Fairer, George M.; Boernge, James M.; Harris, David W.; Campbell, DeWayne A.; Tuttle, Gene E.; McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  18. Explosive laser

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  19. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    -destructive tests (ultrasonic and eddy currents) were also developed. In-pile creep in argon and in liquid sodium was deeply studied on pressurized segments irradiated up to 75 dpaNRT. Finally two fuel assemblies cladded with such ODS alloys were irradiated in Phenix to the max dose of 90 dpa. Creep deformation and swelling were limited but the irradiation-induced embrittlement became acute. The programme was stopped shortly after the Chernobyl disaster, before the embrittlement problem was solved.

  20. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  1. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  2. Laser bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, D R; Harrell, J H

    2001-11-01

    Because the lung cancer epidemic shows no signs of abating, little doubt exists that the need for interventional bronchoscopists will persist for many years to come. The Nd:YAG laser and the rigid bronchoscope remain crucial weapons in the fight against lung cancer. With more than 4000 published interventions pertaining to it, this combination is ideal for treating central airways obstruction. The safety and efficacy of laser bronchoscopy has been well established, and the reported incidence of complications is impressively low. If complications were to arise, a skilled bronchoscopist can manage them easily by using the beneficial attributes of the rigid bronchoscope. Many complications can be avoided by implementing the established safety procedures and techniques. A solid understanding of laser physics and tissue interactions is a necessity to anyone performing laser surgery. The team approach, relying on communication among the bronchoscopist, anesthesiologist, laser technician, and nurses, leads to a safer and more successful procedure. It is important to remember, however, that this is typically a palliative procedure, and therefore the focus should be on alleviating symptoms and improving quality of life. Unfortunately, because not every patient is a candidate for laser bronchoscopy, there are specific characteristics of endobronchial lesions that make them more or less amenable to resection. Each year a promising new technology is being developed, such as argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, and endobronchial electrosurgery. Although it is unclear what role these technologies will have, prospective controlled studies must be done to help clarify this question. The future may lay in combining these various technologies along with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy to maximize the therapeutic, palliative, and possibly even curative effect. As the experience of the medical community with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy continues to grow and as more health-care professionals

  3. Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Amoco Laser Company, a subsidiary of Amoco Corporation, has developed microlasers for the commercial market based on a JPL concept for optical communications over interplanetary distances. Lasers emit narrow, intense beams of light or other radiation. The beams transmit communication signals, drill, cut or melt materials or remove diseased body tissue. The microlasers cover a broad portion of the spectrum, and performance is improved significantly. Current applications include medical instrumentation, color separation equipment, telecommunications, etc.

  4. Laser optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors. PMID:26333804

  5. Laser Angioplasty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The principal method of dealing with coronary artery blockage is bypass surgery. A non-surgical alternative available to some patients is balloon angioplasty. For several years, medical researchers have been exploring another alternative that would help a wider circle of patients than the balloon treatment and entail less risk than bypass surgery. A research group is on the verge of an exciting development: laser angioplasty with a 'cool' type of laser, called an excimer laser, that does not damage blood vessel walls and offers non-surgical cleansing of clogged arteries with extraordinary precision. The system is the Dymer 200+ Excimer Laser Angioplasty System, developed by Advanced Intraventional Systems. Used in human clinical tests since 1987, the system is the first fully integrated 'cool' laser capable of generating the requisite laser energy and delivering the energy to target arteries. Thirteen research hospitals in the U.S. have purchased Dymer 200+ systems and used them in clinical trials in 121 peripheral and 555 coronary artery cases. The success rate in opening blocked coronary arteries is 85 percent, with fewer complications than in balloon angioplasty. Food and Drug Administration approval for the system is hoped for in the latter part of 1990. * Advanced Intraventional Systems became Spectranetics in 1994 and discontinued the product.

  6. Laser neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, O.G.

    1986-06-17

    Laser photodetachment of the excess electron to neutralize relativistic ions offers many advantages over the more conventional collisional methods using gases or thin foils as the neutralization agents. Probably the two most important advantages of laser photodetachment are the generation of a compact and low divergence beam, and the production of intense neutral beams at very high efficiency (approximately 90%). The high intensities or high current densities of the neutral beam result from the fixed maximum divergence that can be added to the beam by photodetachment of the charge using laser intensity of fixed wavelength and incident angle. The high neutralization efficiency is possible because there is no theoretical maximum to the neutralization efficiency, although higher efficiencies require higher laser powers and, therefore, costs. Additional advantages include focusability of the laser light onto the ion beam to maximize its efficacy. There certainly is no residual gas left in the particle beam path as is typical with gas neutralizers. The photodetachment process leaves the neutral atoms in the ground state so there is no excited state fluorescence to interfere with the subsequent beam sensing. Finally, since the beams to be neutralized are very high powered, for a large range of neutralization efficiencies the neutral beam can be increased more by increasing the power to the laser neutralizer than by adding an equal amount of power to the primary accelerator. 26 figs.

  7. Laser optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weijian; Adair Gerke, Stephen; Wei Ng, Kar; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2015-09-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors.

  8. Laser optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Gerke, Stephen Adair; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the interaction between optical field and mechanical motion. So far, this interaction has relied on the detuning between a passive optical resonator and an external pump laser. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator supporting the mirror of a laser and the optical field generated by the laser itself. The optically active cavity greatly enhances the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we use an electrically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity. We observe >550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micromechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical, and correspondingly a 23 nm laser wavelength sweep. In addition to its immediate applications as a high-speed wavelength-swept source, this scheme also offers a new approach for integrated on-chip sensors.

  9. Tri-wave laser therapy for spinal cord injury, neuropathic pain management, and restoration of motor function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chariff, Mark D.; Olszak, Peter

    2015-03-01

    A laser therapy device using three combined wavelengths 532nm, 808nm, and 1064nm has been demonstrated in clinical studies. Primarily, therapeutic lasers have used wavelengths in the ranges of 632nm through 1064nm, where the optical density (OD) < 5, to achieve pain relief and tissue regeneration. Conventional wisdom would argue against using wavelengths in the region of 532nm, due to poor penetration (OD ~ 8); however, the author's observations are to the contrary. The 532nm light is efficiently absorbed by chromophores such as oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and cytochrome c oxidase thereby providing energy to accelerate the healing process. The 808nm light is known to result in Nitric Oxide production thereby reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. All three laser wavelengths likely contribute to pain relief by inhibiting nerve conduction; however, the 1064nm has the deepest penetration. Through the use of this device on over 1000 patients with a variety of acute and chronic neuro-musculoskeletal disorders, the author observed that a majority of these individuals experienced rapid relief from their presenting conditions and most patients reported a tingling sensation upon irradiation. Patient testimonials and thermal images have been collected to document the results of the laser therapy. These studies demonstrate the ability of laser therapy to rapidly alleviate pain from both acute and chronic conditions.

  10. Computational simulation of temperature elevations in tumors using Monte Carlo method and comparison to experimental measurements in laser photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Manuchehrabadi, Navid; Chen, Yonghui; Lebrun, Alexander; Ma, Ronghui; Zhu, Liang

    2013-12-01

    Accurate simulation of temperature distribution in tumors induced by gold nanorods during laser photothermal therapy relies on precise measurements of thermal, optical, and physiological properties of the tumor with or without nanorods present. In this study, a computational Monte Carlo simulation algorithm is developed to simulate photon propagation in a spherical tumor to calculate laser energy absorption in the tumor and examine the effects of the absorption (μ(a)) and scattering (μ(s)) coefficients of tumors on the generated heating pattern in the tumor. The laser-generated energy deposition distribution is then incorporated into a 3D finite-element model of prostatic tumors embedded in a mouse body to simulate temperature elevations during laser photothermal therapy using gold nanorods. The simulated temperature elevations are compared with measured temperatures in PC3 prostatic tumors in our previous in vivo experimental studies to extract the optical properties of PC3 tumors containing different concentrations of gold nanorods. It has been shown that the total laser energy deposited in the tumor is dominated by μ(a), while both μ(a) and μ(s) shift the distribution of the energy deposition in the tumor. Three sets of μ(a) and μ(s) are extracted, representing the corresponding optical properties of PC3 tumors containing different concentrations of nanorods to laser irradiance at 808 nm wavelength. With the injection of 0.1 cc of a 250 optical density (OD) nanorod solution, the total laser energy absorption rate is increased by 30% from the case of injecting 0.1 cc of a 50 OD nanorod solution, and by 125% from the control case without nanorod injection. Based on the simulated temperature elevations in the tumor, it is likely that after heating for 15 min, permanent thermal damage occurs in the tumor injected with the 250 OD nanorod solution, while thermal damage to the control tumor and the one injected with the 50 OD nanorod solution may be

  11. Effects of in vivo exposure to UV filters (4-MBC, OMC, BP-3, 4-HB, OC, OD-PABA) on endocrine signaling genes in the insect Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    There is increasing evidence indicating that several UV filters might have endocrine disruptive effects. Numerous studies have evaluated hormonal effects in vertebrates, mainly reporting estrogenic and androgenic activities in mammals and fishes. There is only limited knowledge about potential endocrine activity in invertebrate hormonal systems. In this work, the effects on endocrine signaling genes of six frequently used UV filters were investigated in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. The UV filters studied were: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also called 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC); benzophenone-3 (BP-3); 4-hidroxybenzophenone (4-HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). After in vivo exposure at different dosages, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR), the ultraspiracle (usp, ortholog of the RXR) and the estrogen-related receptor (ERR) were quantified by Real Time PCR. The EcR gene was significantly upregulated by 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA, with a dose-related response following 24h exposure. In contrast, the benzophenones, BP-3 and 4-HB, as well as OC did not alter this gene at the same exposure conditions. The transcription profiles of the usp and ERR genes were not significantly affected, except for BP-3 that inhibited the usp gene at the highest concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence in invertebrates of a direct effect of UV filters on endocrine-related genes, and is consistent with the known effects on vertebrate hormonal receptor genes. The capability of 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA to stimulate the expression of the ecdysone receptor, a key transcription factor for the ecdysone-genomic response in arthropods, suggests the possibility of a broad and long-term effect on this hormonal pathway. These findings strengthen the need for further research about the ecotoxicological implications

  12. Simultaneous spectral and temporal analyses of kinetic energies in nonequilibrium systems: theory and application to vibrational relaxation of O-D stretch mode of HOD in water.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jonggu; Lim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    A time series of kinetic energies (KE) from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation contains fundamental information on system dynamics. It can also be analyzed in the frequency domain through Fourier transformation (FT) of velocity correlation functions, providing energy content of different spectral regions. By limiting the FT time span, we have previously shown that spectral resolution of KE evolution is possible in the nonequilibrium situations [Jeon and Cho, J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 135, 214504]. In this paper, we refine the method by employing the concept of instantaneous power spectra, extending it to reflect an instantaneous time-correlation of velocities with those in the future as well as with those in the past, and present a new method to obtain the instantaneous spectral density of KE (iKESD). This approach enables the simultaneous spectral and temporal resolution of KE with unlimited time precision. We discuss the formal and novel properties of the new iKESD approaches and how to optimize computational methods and determine parameters for practical applications. The method is specifically applied to the nonequilibrium MD simulation of vibrational relaxation of the OD stretch mode in a hydrated HOD molecule by employing a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potential. We directly compare the computational results with the OD band population relaxation time profiles extracted from the IR pump-probe measurements for 5% HOD in water. The calculated iKESD yields the OD bond relaxation time scale ∼30% larger than the experimental value, and this decay is largely frequency-independent if the classical anharmonicity is accounted for. From the integrated iKESD over intra- and intermolecular bands, the major energy transfer pathways were found to involve the HOD bending mode in the subps range, then the internal modes of the solvent until 5 ps after excitation, and eventually the solvent intermolecular modes. Also, strong hydrogen

  13. In-situ Fracture Studies and Modeling of the Toughening Mechanism Present in Wrought LCAC, TZM, and ODS Molybdenum Flat Products

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerman, B. V. and Chan, K. S.

    2007-07-01

    In-situ testing, ultrasonic C-scans, and metallography were used to show that a crack-divider delamination form of thin-sheet toughening occurs in wrought Low Carbon Arc Cast (LCAC) unalloyed molybdenum, Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum, and TZM molybdenum at temperatures {ge} the Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT). Cracking along boundaries relieves mechanical constraint to free ligaments that may plastically stretch to produce toughening. Anisotropy in fracture toughness with lower values in the short-transverse direction is shown to produce the crack divider delaminations at the crack tip in the LT and TL orientations. The delamination zone increases with increasing stress-intensity to sizes significantly larger than the plastic zone, which leads to large increases in fracture toughness by the thin sheet toughening mechanism. Fracture in ODS Mo-alloys proceeds mainly along grain boundaries to produce small ligaments that exhibit ductility for both LT and TL orientations resulting in a lower DBTT and higher toughness values at lower temperatures than observed in LCAC and TZM. A combination of grain boundary fracture and cleavage is prevalent in LCAC molybdenum and TZM. The predominance for microcracking along grain boundaries to leave fine, ductile ligaments in ODS molybdenum can be attributed to a fine-grained microstructure with {approx} 1-2 {micro}m thickness of sheet-like grains. The presence of mixed grain boundary fracture and cleavage in LCAC and TZM can be attributed to a microstructure with a larger thickness of sheet-like grains (4-15 {micro}m).

  14. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  15. Laser physics and laser-tissue interaction.

    PubMed

    Welch, A J; Torres, J H; Cheong, W F

    1989-01-01

    Within the last few years, lasers have gained increasing use in the management of cardiovascular disease, and laser angioplasty has become a widely performed procedure. For this reason, a basic knowledge of lasers and their applications is essential to vascular surgeons, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. To elucidate some fundamental concepts regarding laser physics, we describe how laser light is generated and review the properties that make lasers useful in medicine. We also discuss beam profile and spotsize, as well as dosimetric specifications for laser angioplasty. After considering laser-tissue interaction and light propagation in tissue, we explain how the aforementioned concepts apply to direct laser angioplasty and laser-balloon angioplasty. An understanding of these issues should prove useful not only in performing laser angioplasty but in comparing the reported results of various laser applications.

  16. External and Intraparticle Diffusion of Coumarin 102 with Surfactant in the ODS-silica Gel/water System by Single Microparticle Injection and Confocal Fluorescence Microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kiyoharu; Matsuta, Emi

    2015-01-01

    The release mechanism of coumarin 102 from a single ODS-silica gel microparticle into the water phase in the presence of Triton X-100 was investigated by confocal fluorescence microspectroscopy combined with the single microparticle injection technique. The release rate significantly depended on the Triton X-100 concentration in the water phase and was not limited by diffusion in the pores of the microparticle. The release rate constant was inversely proportional to the microparticle radius squared, indicating that the rate-determining step is the external diffusion between the microparticle and the water phase.

  17. [The search for "od." Karl Ludwig Freiheer von Reichenbach (1788-1869) and Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer (1806-1853), two joined against Justus von Liebig].

    PubMed

    Habacher, M

    1980-05-01

    The author describes the controversy between Justus von Liebig on one side and Reichenbach and Mayrhofer on the other side. It is a controversy about problems of science and medicine which are characteristic for the late 18th and the first half of the 19th century, when Mesmerism and similar ideas of occultic and comparative phenomenona were discussed and often refused as being "not scientific". Justus von Liebig and Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Reichenbach were both chemists, both interested in scientific progress and working in this field. They were friends in the years 1830 to 1848. But later on this friendship ended when Reichenbach--who in the mean time moved to Vienna--became more and more interested in phenomenons seen by sensitive persons concerning effects of light. Although Reichenbach himself was not able to recognize the phenomenons he was sure that other persons had this ability. He had the impression that there is a special force floating through the universe, and this force he called "od". Liebig, who was not able to follow this theory and rejected it has speculation, turned against Reichenbach in 1852-3. So the controversy began and their old friendship came to an end. Reichenbach's theory of the "od", characteristic for the time of the romanticism and leading back to Mesmerism was accepted and supported by the Austrian physician Dr. Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer who had aroused his interest by describing similar phenomenos some of this patients had. The letters of both men, the chemist and the doctor, which are well preserved (Technical Museum of Vienna) and discussed here, give a good impression of Reichenbach's ideas concerning his theory of the "od" and his philosophical ideas. As Reichenbach tried to find a philosophy corresponding to his theory and as he meant to have found this in the philosophy of Friedrich Eduard Beneke his remarks in those letters give a good information about Beneke's discussion of Reichenbach's theory. Mayrhofer, on the other hand

  18. [The search for "od." Karl Ludwig Freiheer von Reichenbach (1788-1869) and Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer (1806-1853), two joined against Justus von Liebig].

    PubMed

    Habacher, M

    1980-05-01

    The author describes the controversy between Justus von Liebig on one side and Reichenbach and Mayrhofer on the other side. It is a controversy about problems of science and medicine which are characteristic for the late 18th and the first half of the 19th century, when Mesmerism and similar ideas of occultic and comparative phenomenona were discussed and often refused as being "not scientific". Justus von Liebig and Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Reichenbach were both chemists, both interested in scientific progress and working in this field. They were friends in the years 1830 to 1848. But later on this friendship ended when Reichenbach--who in the mean time moved to Vienna--became more and more interested in phenomenons seen by sensitive persons concerning effects of light. Although Reichenbach himself was not able to recognize the phenomenons he was sure that other persons had this ability. He had the impression that there is a special force floating through the universe, and this force he called "od". Liebig, who was not able to follow this theory and rejected it has speculation, turned against Reichenbach in 1852-3. So the controversy began and their old friendship came to an end. Reichenbach's theory of the "od", characteristic for the time of the romanticism and leading back to Mesmerism was accepted and supported by the Austrian physician Dr. Karl Wilhelm Mayrhofer who had aroused his interest by describing similar phenomenos some of this patients had. The letters of both men, the chemist and the doctor, which are well preserved (Technical Museum of Vienna) and discussed here, give a good impression of Reichenbach's ideas concerning his theory of the "od" and his philosophical ideas. As Reichenbach tried to find a philosophy corresponding to his theory and as he meant to have found this in the philosophy of Friedrich Eduard Beneke his remarks in those letters give a good information about Beneke's discussion of Reichenbach's theory. Mayrhofer, on the other hand

  19. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  20. Header For Laser Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Spadin, Paul L.

    1990-01-01

    Header designed to contain laser diode. Output combined incoherently with outputs of other laser diodes in grating laser-beam combiner in optical communication system. Provides electrical connections to laser diode, cooling to thermally stabilize laser operation, and optomechanical adjustments that steer and focus laser beam. Range of adjustments provides for correction of worst-case decentering and defocusing of laser beam encountered with laser diodes. Mechanical configuration made simple to promote stability and keep cost low.

  1. Laser barometer

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Kevin R.; Shiels, David; Rash, Tim

    2001-02-06

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  2. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation into the possibility of achieving CW discharge pumped excimer laser oscillation is reported. Detailed theoretical modeling of capillary discharge pumping of the XeF and KXe and K2 excimer systems was carried out which predicted the required discharge parameters for reaching laser threshold on these systems. Capillary discharge pumping of the XeF excimer system was investigated experimentally. The experiments revealed a lower excimer level population density than predicted theoretically by about an order of magnitude. The experiments also revealed a fluorine consumption problem in the discharge in agreement with theory.

  3. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  4. Fiber optic illumination of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheath flow cuvette for diode laser induced fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Cameron D

    2015-02-01

    A Tee configuration sheath flow cuvette with square cross-section channels has been produced in PDMS for CE detection. The output of a 1.4 W laser diode operating at 450 nm was focused onto the 300 μm core of a 370 μm od fiber optic whose end was inserted into one arm of the Tee for LIF. The optimal configuration had the fiber optic positioned 500 μm downstream from the intersection and the end of the 35 cm 50 μm id 365 μm od capillary just outside the intersection and in the leg of the Tee, resulting in a 90° configuration. Detection limits of 50 and 3 pM and linear calibrations of at least three orders of magnitude were obtained for Lucifer Yellow and fluorescein, respectively.

  5. Numerical determination of non-Langmuirian adsorption isotherms of ibuprofen enantiomers on Chiralcel OD column using ultraviolet-circular dichroism dual detector.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Wei; Chen, Yongtao; Yu, Weifang; Xu, Jin

    2016-02-26

    Competitive adsorption isotherm of ibuprofen enantiomers on Chiralcel OD stationary phase at 298K was determined by the application of inverse method. Transport dispersive (TD) chromatography model was used to describe mass balances of the enatiomers. Axial dispersion and mass transfer coefficients were estimated from a series of linear pulse experiments. It was found that the overloaded elution profile of total concentration of racemic ibuprofen cannot be satisfactorily fitted by substituting bi-Langmuir model, the most widely used isotherm model for enantiomers, into TD model and tuning the isotherm parameters. UV-CD dual detector setup was then applied to obtain the individual overloaded elution profiles of both enantiomers. The more informative experimental data revealed non-Langmuirian adsorption behavior of ibuprofen enantiomers on chiralcel OD stationary phase. Two analytical binary isotherm models, both accounting for adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and having the feature of inflection points, were then evaluated. A comparison between quadratic model and Moreau model showed that the former gives better fitting results. The six parameters involved in quadratic model were determined stepwisely. Three of them were first obtained by fitting overloaded elution profiles of S-ibuprofen. The other three were then acquired by fitting overloaded elution profiles of both enantiomers recorded by UV-CD dual detector for racemic ibuprofen. A further attempt was also made at reducing the number of quadratic model parameters. PMID:26846132

  6. Numerical determination of non-Langmuirian adsorption isotherms of ibuprofen enantiomers on Chiralcel OD column using ultraviolet-circular dichroism dual detector.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Wei; Chen, Yongtao; Yu, Weifang; Xu, Jin

    2016-02-26

    Competitive adsorption isotherm of ibuprofen enantiomers on Chiralcel OD stationary phase at 298K was determined by the application of inverse method. Transport dispersive (TD) chromatography model was used to describe mass balances of the enatiomers. Axial dispersion and mass transfer coefficients were estimated from a series of linear pulse experiments. It was found that the overloaded elution profile of total concentration of racemic ibuprofen cannot be satisfactorily fitted by substituting bi-Langmuir model, the most widely used isotherm model for enantiomers, into TD model and tuning the isotherm parameters. UV-CD dual detector setup was then applied to obtain the individual overloaded elution profiles of both enantiomers. The more informative experimental data revealed non-Langmuirian adsorption behavior of ibuprofen enantiomers on chiralcel OD stationary phase. Two analytical binary isotherm models, both accounting for adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and having the feature of inflection points, were then evaluated. A comparison between quadratic model and Moreau model showed that the former gives better fitting results. The six parameters involved in quadratic model were determined stepwisely. Three of them were first obtained by fitting overloaded elution profiles of S-ibuprofen. The other three were then acquired by fitting overloaded elution profiles of both enantiomers recorded by UV-CD dual detector for racemic ibuprofen. A further attempt was also made at reducing the number of quadratic model parameters.

  7. HRTEM Study of Oxide Nanoparticles in 16Cr-4Al-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3 ODS Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Wall, M; Kimura, A

    2009-11-18

    Crystal and interfacial structures of oxide nanoparticles in 16Cr-4Al-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS ferritic steel have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Oxide nanoparticles with a complex-oxide core and an amorphous shell were frequently observed. The crystal structure of complex-oxide core is identified to be mainly monoclinic Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) oxide compound. Orientation relationships between the oxide and matrix are found to be dependent on the particle size. Large particles (> 20 nm) tend to be incoherent and have a spherical shape, whereas small particles (< 10 nm) tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have a faceted interface. The observations of partially amorphous nanoparticles lead us to propose three-stage mechanisms to rationalize the formation of oxide nanoparticles containing core/shell structures in as-fabricated ODS steels.

  8. "Candidatus Sonnebornia yantaiensis", a member of candidate division OD1, as intracellular bacteria of the ciliated protist Paramecium bursaria (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea).

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Qing, Yao; Guo, Xiaohong; Warren, Alan

    2014-02-01

    An intracellular bacterium was discovered in an isolate of Paramecium bursaria from a freshwater pond in Yantai, China. The bacteria were abundant and exclusively found in the cytoplasm of the host which, along with the green alga Chlorella, formed a three-partner consortium that could survive in pure water for at least one week. Cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene showed that the bacterium belonged to the uncultured candidate division OD1, which usually forms part of the rare biosphere. Transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific probes showed that the bacteria were usually located close to the perialgal membranes of endosymbiotic Chlorella cells, and occasionally irregularly distributed throughout the host cytoplasm. The name "Candidatus Sonnebornia yantaiensis" gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for the new bacterium. A strongly supported monophyletic subclade, OD1-p, which included the new species, was recognized and this study highlights that protists can be important hosts for rare bacterial taxa.

  9. Helical order and multiferroicity in the S =1/2 quasi-kagome system KCu3As2O7(OD)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, G. J.; Okamoto, Y.; Ishikawa, H.; Simonet, V.; Colin, C. V.; Cano, A.; Chapon, L. C.; Hansen, T.; Mutka, H.; Hiroi, Z.

    2014-04-01

    Several Cu2+ hydroxide minerals have been recently identified as candidate realizations of the S=1/2 kagome Heisenberg model. In this context, we have studied the distorted system KCu3As2O7(OD)3 using neutron scattering and bulk measurements. Although the distortion favors magnetic order over a spin liquid ground state, refinement of the magnetic diffraction pattern below TN1=7.05(5) K yields a complex helical structure with k =(0.77,0,0.11). This structure, as well as the spin excitation spectrum, are well described by a classical Heisenberg model with ferromagnetic nearest neighbor couplings. Multiferroicity is observed below TN1, with an unusual crossover between improper and pseudoproper behavior occurring at TN2=5.5 K. The polarization at T =2 K is P =1.5μCm-2. The properties of KCu3As2O7(OD)3 highlight the variety of physics which arise from the interplay of spin and orbital degrees of freedom in Cu2+ kagome systems.

  10. Selective fluorescence functionalization of dye-doped polymerized structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Martí; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated with Direct Laser Writing (DLW) lithography. Well-defined fluorescent pixels (area = 0.24 μm2) were written inside a polymer matrix with the help of a femtosecond pulsed laser (multiphoton absorption) via a thermally-induced di-aggregation of a fluorescent dye. Moreover, we have accomplished a fine control of the fluorescence intensity which can increase the storage capacity of ODS systems fabricated with this approach.The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated

  11. Laser capture.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  12. Laser Balancing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical Technology, Incorporated developed a fully automatic laser machining process that allows more precise balancing removes metal faster, eliminates excess metal removal and other operator induced inaccuracies, and provides significant reduction in balancing time. Manufacturing costs are reduced as a result.

  13. Excimer lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Hess, L. D.; Stephens, R. R.; Pepper, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a two-year investigation into the possibility of developing continuous wave excimer lasers are reported. The program included the evaluation and selection of candidate molecular systems and discharge pumping techniques. The K Ar/K2 excimer dimer molecules and the xenon fluoride excimer molecule were selected for study; each used a transverse and capillary discharges pumping technique. Experimental and theoretical studies of each of the two discharge techniques applied to each of the two molecular systems are reported. Discharge stability and fluorine consumption were found to be the principle impediments to extending the XeF excimer laser into the continuous wave regime. Potassium vapor handling problems were the principal difficulty in achieving laser action on the K Ar/K2 system. Of the four molecular systems and pumping techniques explored, the capillary discharge pumped K Ar/K2 system appears to be the most likely candidate for demonstrating continuous wave excimer laser action primarily because of its predicted lower pumping threshold and a demonstrated discharge stability advantage.

  14. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  15. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  16. Development of Irradiation hardening of Unalloyed and ODS molybdenum during neurtron irradiation to low doses at 300C and 600C

    SciTech Connect

    B. V. Cockeran, R. W. Smith, L.L. Snead

    2007-11-21

    Unalloyed molybdenum and Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum were irradiated at 300 C and 600 C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) to neutron fluences of 0.2, 2.1, and 24.3 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV), producing damage levels of 0.01, 0.1 and 1.3 Mo-dpa. Hardness measurements, electrical resistivity measurements, tensile testing, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to assess the defect structure. Irradiation hardening was evident even at a damage level of 0.01 dpa resulting in a significant increase in yield stress, decrease in ductility, and elevation of the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT). The observed size and number density of voids and loops as well as the measured irradiation hardening and electrical resistivity were found to increase sub-linearly with fluence over the range of exposure investigated. This supports the idea that the formation of the extended defects that produce irradiation hardening in molybdenum are the result of a nucleation and growth process rather than the formation of sessile defects directly from the displacement damage cascades. The formation of sessile defect clusters in the displacement cascade would be expected to result in a linear fluence dependence for the number density of defects followed by saturation at fluences less than 1-dpa. This conclusion is supported by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of cascade damage which do not reveal large clusters forming directly as a result of the short-term collapse of the cascade. The finer grain size for the unalloyed Mo and ODS Mo compared to Low Carbon Arc Cast molybdenum results in slightly less irradiation hardening and slightly lower DBTT values. The unalloyed molybdenum used in this work had a low impurity interstitial content that correlates with a slightly lower void size and void number density, less irradiation hardening and lower change in electrical resistivity in this fluence range than is observed for ODS Mo

  17. Heterodyne laser diagnostic system

    DOEpatents

    Globig, Michael A.; Johnson, Michael A.; Wyeth, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

  18. Making a Laser Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how to construct a laser level. This laser level can be made using a typical 4' (or shorter) bubble level and a small laser point. The laser unit is detachable, so the bubble level can also be used in the conventional way. However, the laser level works better than a simple bubble level. Making this inexpensive device is an…

  19. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  20. Project LASER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  1. Characterization of two epimers, 4alpha and 4beta, of a novel podophyllotoxin-4-O-(D)-6-acetylglucopyranoside from Podophyllum hexandrum by LC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Puri, S C; Handa, G; Bhat, B A; Dhar, K L; Spiteller, Michael; Qazi, G N

    2006-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection interfaced to electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is applied to identify the two epimers of a novel and minor constituent, podophyllotoxin-4-O-(D)-6-acetylglucopyraniside from high-altitude Podophyllum hexandrum for the first time. This is done by matching the structural information from the tandem MS data with the reported lignan markers. The results show that LC-MS-MS is the method of choice for fast detection and detailed chemical analysis of mixtures in the crude extracts of Podophyllum. The method can be employed in the absence of reference standards for the markers and is particularly useful in view of the scarcity of these rare chemical standards.

  2. Hypersonic gasdynamic laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, K.M.; Maciulaitis, A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a visible, or near to mid infra-red, hypersonic gas dynamic laser system. It comprises: a hypersonic vehicle for carrying the hypersonic gas dynamic laser system, and also providing high energy ram air for thermodynamic excitation and supply of the laser gas; a laser cavity defined within the hypersonic vehicle and having a laser cavity inlet for the laser cavity formed by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle, such that ram air directed through the laser cavity opening supports gas dynamic lasing operations at wavelengths less than 10.6{mu} meters in the laser cavity; and an optical train for collecting the laser radiation from the laser cavity and directing it as a substantially collimated laser beam to an output aperture defined by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle to allow the laser beam to be directed against a target.

  3. Lasers in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Described are the characteristics of the laser and its effects on the body. Discussed are examples of laser treatments, including angioplasty, ophthalmology, and dermatology. A discussion of lasers of clinical interest and their applications is presented. (YP)

  4. Laser therapy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  5. The Laser Marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitz, C. B.

    1986-11-01

    The total value of all lasers sold during 1986 in the non-Communist world will exceed US $600 million. This paper examines these sales and categorizes them according to application and according to type of laser. The results are presented both in terms of numbers of lasers sold, and in terms of the value of those lasers. The data are based on extensive interviews with laser manufacturers and laser users.

  6. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  7. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  8. New laser protective eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLear, Mark

    1996-04-01

    Laser technology has significantly impacted our everyday life. Lasers are now used to correct your vision, clear your arteries, and are used in the manufacturing of such diverse products as automobiles, cigarettes, and computers. Lasers are no longer a research tool looking for an application. They are now an integral part of manufacturing. In the case of Class IV lasers, this explosion in laser applications has exposed thousands of individuals to potential safety hazards including eye damage. Specific protective eyewear designed to attenuate the energy of the laser beam below the maximum permissible exposure is required for Class 3B and Class IV lasers according to laser safety standards.

  9. [Laser physics].

    PubMed

    Banús Gassol, J M

    2008-11-01

    The commission of this article plunged me into doubt. First I should confess that I don't find excuse to escape this part if somebody wants to minimally deepen in the knowledge of the biological effects of this energy source. Secondly, when we talk about results, we use terms made and defined by Physics. Often we have polemics about results, and what really happens is that we don't reach agreements because we refer to different terms to explain the same observation; in conclusion we cannot understand each other because we do not know the adequate terms; for example, hypoxemia as oxygen deficit, which is true in an anemic patient as well as in a low oxygen saturation rate. In consequence, a good review of these concepts seems necessary to me. The third reason is the confusion that exists in our environment, I think sometimes of interest, about properties and effects of different types of laser. Only a minimal knowledge of physics will help us to state the scientific basis for understanding. The problems, nevertheless, accumulate due to the fact that the universe to which this article is directed is formed by urologists. What Physics education should we suppose they have? Superficial? Medium? Is it a collective with a uniform knowledge, being it whatever it is? The implication is clear. The article depth will depend on the answers to these questions. Nevertheless, the aim of the authors is to give a base enough to know what the laser is and how it acts. For that, the answer I gave to my questions is that the reader should understand the article and have enough base for, at least, reading critically the articles about laser published in urological journals.

  10. Laser biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    This issue of Quantum Electronics presents the papers that reflect the state-of-the-art of laser technologies used in biomedical studies and medical practice. Among the new technologies, one can note the methods of correlation and Doppler spectroscopy, as well as THz spectroscopy, in which biologically significant molecules are characterised by specific resonances. The latter topic is considered in the paper by Nazarov et al., where the dielectric function of aqueous solutions of glucose and albumin is studied using pulsed THz spectroscopy.

  11. Maxillary Overdentures Supported by Four Splinted Direct Metal Laser Sintering Implants: A 3-Year Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Francesco; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Nowadays, the advancements in direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technology allow the fabrication of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate implant survival, complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss of DMLS implants used to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures. Materials and Methods. Over a 2-year period, 120 implants were placed in the maxilla of 30 patients (18 males, 12 females) to support bar-retained maxillary overdentures (ODs). Each OD was supported by 4 implants splinted by a rigid cobalt-chrome bar. At each annual follow-up session, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. The outcome measures were implant failure, biological and prosthetic complications, and peri-implant marginal bone loss (distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-to-implant contact, DIB). Results. The 3-year implant survival rate was 97.4% (implant-based) and 92.9% (patient-based). Three implants failed. The incidence of biological complication was 3.5% (implant-based) and 7.1% (patient-based). The incidence of prosthetic complication was 17.8% (patient-based). No detrimental effects on marginal bone level were evidenced. Conclusions. The use of 4 DMLS titanium implants to support bar-retained maxillary ODs seems to represent a safe and successful procedure. Long-term clinical studies on a larger sample of patients are needed to confirm these results. PMID:25580124

  12. Selective fluorescence functionalization of dye-doped polymerized structures fabricated by direct laser writing (DLW) lithography.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Duocastella, Martí; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-12-21

    The continuous development of the vast arsenal of fabrication techniques is a pivotal factor in the breakthrough of nanotechnology. Although the broad interest is generally focused on the reduction of the dimensions of the fabricated structures, localized functionalization of the nanomaterials emerges as a key factor closely linked to their potential applications. In particular, fabrication of spatially selective fluorescence nanostructures is highly demanded in nanophotonics, as for example in three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage (ODS), where massive storage capacity and fast writing-reading processes are promised. We have developed an innovative method to control the location and intensity of the fluorescence signal in dye-doped photopolymerized structures fabricated with Direct Laser Writing (DLW) lithography. Well-defined fluorescent pixels (area = 0.24 μm(2)) were written inside a polymer matrix with the help of a femtosecond pulsed laser (multiphoton absorption) via a thermally-induced di-aggregation of a fluorescent dye. Moreover, we have accomplished a fine control of the fluorescence intensity which can increase the storage capacity of ODS systems fabricated with this approach. PMID:26572098

  13. Laser Propulsion - Quo Vadis

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Willy L.

    2008-04-28

    First, an introductory overview of the different types of laser propulsion techniques will be given and illustrated by some historical examples. Second, laser devices available for basic experiments will be reviewed ranging from low power lasers sources to inertial confinement laser facilities. Subsequently, a status of work will show the impasse in which the laser propulsion community is currently engaged. Revisiting the basic relations leads to new avenues in ablative and direct laser propulsion for ground based and space based applications. Hereby, special attention will be devoted to the impact of emerging ultra-short pulse lasers on the coupling coefficient and specific impulse. In particular, laser sources and laser propulsion techniques will be tested in microgravity environment. A novel approach to debris removal will be discussed with respect to the Satellite Laser Ranging (SRL) facilities. Finally, some non technical issues will be raised aimed at the future prospects of laser propulsion in the international community.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of Campylobacter jejuni Strains OD267 and WP2202 Isolated from Retail Chicken Livers and Gizzards Reveal the Presence of Novel 116-Kilobase and 119-Kilobase Megaplasmids with Type VI Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Marasini, Daya

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences of Campylobacter jejuni strains OD267 and WP2202, isolated from chicken livers and gizzards, showed the presence of novel 116-kb and 119-kb megaplasmids, respectively. The two megaplasmids carry a type VI secretion system and tetracycline resistance genes. These are the largest sequenced Campylobacter plasmids to date. PMID:27688318

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Campylobacter jejuni Strains OD267 and WP2202 Isolated from Retail Chicken Livers and Gizzards Reveal the Presence of Novel 116-Kilobase and 119-Kilobase Megaplasmids with Type VI Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Marasini, Daya; Fakhr, Mohamed K

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences of Campylobacter jejuni strains OD267 and WP2202, isolated from chicken livers and gizzards, showed the presence of novel 116-kb and 119-kb megaplasmids, respectively. The two megaplasmids carry a type VI secretion system and tetracycline resistance genes. These are the largest sequenced Campylobacter plasmids to date. PMID:27688318

  16. Studies on lasers and laser devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Siegman, A. E.; Young, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to study lasers, laser devices, and uses of lasers for investigating physical phenomena are studied. The active projects included the development of a tunable, narrowband XUV light source and its application to the spectroscopy of core excited atomic states, and the development of a technique for picosecond time resolution spectroscopy of fast photophysical processes.

  17. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  18. Single Frequency, Pulsed Laser Diode Transmitter for Dial Water Vapor Measurements at 935nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Gregg W.; Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Rall, Johnathan A. R.

    1998-01-01

    We report a tunable, single frequency, narrow linewidth, pulsed laser diode transmitter at 935.68nm for remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. The transmitter consists of a CW, tunable, external cavity diode laser whose output is amplified 2OdB using a tapered diode amplifier. The output is pulsed for range resolved DIAL lidar by pulsing the drive current to the diode amplifier at 4kHz with a .5% duty cycle. The output from the transmitter is 36OnJ/pulse and is single spatial mode. It maintains a linewidth of less than 25MHz as its wavelength is tuned across the water vapor absorption line at 935.68nm. The transmitter design and its use in a water vapor measurement will be discussed.

  19. Laser physics and laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1990-04-01

    Two essential difficulties must be addressed in any low-power frequency conversion device; boosting the efficiency above that of simple single-pass bulk devices (which are typically less than 1 percent/W) and achieving phase-matching for the desired interaction. Waveguide interactions were used to increase the conversion efficiency, and explored quasi-phase-matching (QPM) as a broadly applicable approach to meeting the phasematching condition. Both oxide forrelectrics like LiNbO3 and quantum-wells in III-V semiconductors have been investigated for these applications. Second harmonic generation (SHG) of near-infrared lasers to produce green and blue radiation, as well as SHG of the 9 to 11 micrometer output of a CO2 laser have been demonstrated in these materials. These media together constitute a significant step towards the goal of generic nonlinear media for the far infrared - ultraviolet, based on readily available materials and fabricated with standard technologies, applicable to essentially any frequency conversion application.

  20. Laser photobiology and photomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Martellucci, S.; Chester, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the physical and biological basis of photobiology and photomedicine; the biological effects and applications of laser technology; photochemotherapy; photobiology and dermatology; surgical and ophthalmological applications of lasers; laser safety; and diagnostics and technological aspects of recent laser developments.

  1. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  2. Reverse laser drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Thomas R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a method for laser drilling small diameter, closely-spaced, and accurately located holes in a body of material which is transparent or substantially transparent to the laser radiation employed whereby the holes are drilled through the thickness of the body from the surface opposite to that on which the laser beam impinges to the surface of laser beam impingement.

  3. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  4. Obstacles to Laser Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-04-25

    The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

  5. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

  6. Lasers in cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pang, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Lasers have become a necessary instrument in the esthetic restorative armamentarium. This article presents smile design guidelines for soft tissue lasers, as well as an overview of hard tissue procedures that may be performed using all-tissue lasers. The goal is to help dentists determine the appropriate laser for a given clinical situations. PMID:19014026

  7. Lasers in cosmetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pang, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Lasers have become a necessary instrument in the esthetic restorative armamentarium. This article presents smile design guidelines for soft tissue lasers, as well as an overview of hard tissue procedures that may be performed using all-tissue lasers. The goal is to help dentists determine the appropriate laser for a given clinical situations.

  8. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  9. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  10. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  11. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  12. Rare gas halide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, F.

    1985-01-01

    Contents include: Basic principles of operation of E-beam-pumped KrF lasers--(Spectroscopy, Kinetic processes in E-beam-pumped KrF lasers, Absorbers in the KrF gain medium, Sprite - A 200J, 5ns KrF laser); Current topics in KrF laser research--(Target experiments with the Sprite KrF laser, Pulse compression and power multiplication of KrF lasers, Improved efficiency of E-beam-pumped KrF lasers).

  13. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu; Weng, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm(-1) as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10(-4) ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10(-4) ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I' region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  14. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu; Weng, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm(-1) as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10(-4) ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10(-4) ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I' region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser. PMID:26026512

  15. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Weng, Yuxiang; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-05-15

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm{sup −1} as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I′ region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  16. Tunable lasers- an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, B.D.; Buser, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    This overview of tunable lasers describes their applicability to spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and middle infrared ranges; to rapid on-line diagnostics by ultrashort cavity lasers; to exploration, by the free electron laser, for its wide tuning in the far infrared to submillimeter region; to remote detection, in areas such as portable pollution monitors, on-line chemical analyzers, auto exhaust analyzers, and production line controls; to photochemistry; and to other potential areas in diagnostics, communications, and medical and biological sciences. The following lasers are characterized by their tunability: solid state lasers, primarily alexandrite, with a tuning range of ca 1000 Angstroms; color center lasers; semiconductor lasers; dye lasers; gas lasers, where high-pressure CO/sub 2/ discharges are the best known example for a wide tunability range, and research is continuing in systems such as the alkali dimers; and, at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometers, the possibilities beyond Cerenkov and free electron lasers.

  17. What is a Laser?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Lucile; Schwob, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The first laser was built more than 50 years ago, inMay 1960: it was a pulsed ruby laser. It was a simple laboratory curiosity and nobody knew what its usefulness could be. Other devices were rapidly demonstrated, and the variety and number of lasers in the world increased at a huge rate. Currently, the annual laser world market is worth about 6 billion dollars. Thanks to the remarkable properties of laser light, laser applications increase steadily in the domains of industry, building, medicine, telecommunications, etc. One can find many lasers in research laboratories, and they are used more and more in our everyday life and almost everybody has already seen a laser beam. The goal of the first chapter of this book is to explain simply what a laser is, how it is built and how it operates. Firstly, let us point out the outstanding properties of the laser light.

  18. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracavity Raman lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y.B.; Ackerhalt, J.R.; Krasinski, J.S.; Heller, D.F.

    1989-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of intracavity Raman lasers are presented. Advantages of intracavity Raman lasers, particularly for low-emission cross section and broadly tunable vibronic gain media, are described. Experimental studies of a hydrogen gas Raman laser pumped inside the cavity of an alexandrite laser are presented. A theoretical model of the dynamics of a unidirectional intracavity Raman ring laser is developed and solved analytically. This model is adapted to simulate experiments.

  20. Surgical lasers in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Mindak, Marek K.

    1997-10-01

    Almost every laser for medical applications was first tried in dermatology. The efficiency of YAG, CO2, and Argon lasers on this area and their potential advantages over conventional methods were mostly evaluated by cosmetic effect of laser therapy. The indications for different laser treatment in such dermatological cases as: angiomas, telangiectasias, pigmented lesions, nevus flammeus congenitus, deep cavernous angiomas, skin neoplasms and condylomata acuminata are discussed in this paper and the results of the laser therapy are also presented.

  1. The laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, Alfons G.

    2002-10-01

    Laser is an acronym for a physical principle and means: Light Amplification by stimulated Emission of Radiation. This principle offers a lot of tissue/light effects caused by the parameters: power density/time and the special qualities of the laser light. Nowadays for diagnosis and therapy following lasers are used in urology: Krypton- and Dye-lasers as well as the Neodymium-YAG- (nd:YAG-), Holmium-YAG (Ho:YAG-), Diode-, Argon- and the CO2-lasers.

  2. Development of the Zebra load region for increased capability plasma diagnostics and improved Leopard laser access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astanovitskiy, Alexey; Presura, R.; Ivanov, V. V.; Haboub, A.; Plachaty, C.; Kindel, J. M.

    2008-11-01

    A new geometry for the load area in the Zebra (1MA pulse generator) is developed. It will form the basis for future experiments requiring Leopard (1057nm, 50TW laser) to Zebra coupling and give extended capability to z-pinch diagnostics. This required the development of a new current return, which allows laser access and installation of the OD 4'' parabolic mirror for the x-ray radiography, isochoric heating and magnetized plasma experiments, and accommodates wire-array z-pinch loads, to which the laser may then be coupled. In addition, this configuration allows diagnostics access close to the plasma, leading to a significant increase of the spatial resolution for imaging of z-pinches, as well as the photon flux in imaging and spectroscopy of laser produced plasmas. These diagnostics will allow coupling of the Leopard beam for x-ray laser probing of the pinch plasma and we will test point-projection x-ray backlighting of the pinch plasma.

  3. Quantum wave packet propagation study of the photochemistry of phenol: isotope effects (Ph-OD) and the direct excitation to the 1πσ* state.

    PubMed

    An, Heesun; Baeck, Kyoung Koo

    2011-11-24

    An earlier time-dependent quantum wave packet propagation study of the photochemistry of Ph-OH [J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 122, 224315] is extended to investigate isotope effects (for Ph-OD) and the dynamics initiated by direct (vibronically induced) excitation to the (1)πσ* state. The isotope effect is significant only when the initially excited state is (1)ππ*, that is, there are noticeable changes not only in the time scale but also in the branching ratio (Ã/X̃) for the electronic states of the product Ph-O radical. In contrast, the isotope effect on the dynamics initiated by direct excitation to the (1)πσ* state is very small. Our most important observation for the dynamics initiated by direct excitation to the (1)πσ* state is that the initial excitation of the O-H stretch mode does not result in a noticeable enhancement of the product Ph-O radical in the à state, which corresponds to a dissociating H atom with low kinetic energy. The initial excitation of the CCOH torsion mode is the main reason for the enhancement of the product Ph-O radical in the à state that was observed in a vibrationally mediated two-photon experiment [J. Chem. Phys.2008, 128, 104307].

  4. Topolology-symmetry law of structure of natural titanosilicate micas and related heterophyllosilicates based on the extended OD theory: Structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokoneva, E. L.; Topnikova, A. P.; Aksenov, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    A topology-symmetry analysis of the structures in the family of titanosilicate micas and related heterophyllosilicates based on the extended OD theory reveals their kinship with the family of rhodezite, delhayelite, and other minerals that had been analyzed earlier by distinguishing sheets common for all the structures. Like in the family studied earlier, the structural variety of a more complex titanosilicate family is determined by different local symmetries of sheets. Sheets consist of central O layers of edge-sharing octahedra and H layers formed by tetrahedra connected into diortho groups and Ti(Nb,Fe) semioctahedra (octahedra). Three patterns of connection of O and H layers correspond to sheet symmetry P2/ m, P21/ m, and . Various symmetry modes of sheet connection in the structures are analyzed. Hypothetical structures, including structures with a higher degree of disorder, which can be found in nature or obtained by crystal synthesis, are deduced. Factors responsible for structural variety, including the existence of two main sheet varieties (with P2/ m and P21/ m symmetry) are considered a consequence of the difference in the chemism of the mineral formation medium.

  5. Resveratrol-4-O-D-(2'-galloyl)-glucopyranoside isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum exhibits anti-hepatocellular carcinoma viability by inducing apoptosis via the JNK and ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qichao; Yang, Yupeng; Wang, Zhiyi; Chen, Fanglin; Zhang, Anmei; Liu, Chengcheng

    2014-01-27

    Resveratrol-4-O-D-(2'-galloyl)-glucopyranoside (RESG) is one of the active compounds isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum. The purpose of our present study was to investigate the anti-hepatocellular carcinoma effect of RESG in vitro and in vivo, and the possible mechanisms in vitro. In vitro, our results showed that RESG could significantly inhibit the human hepatocellular carcinoma viability in the MTT assay, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that RESG could induce SMMC-7721 cell apoptosis and activate caspases 3 and caspases 9 by using Annexin V-FITC staining and western blot, respectively. In vivo, RESG also showed efficacy in SMMC-7721 xenograft model in nude mice, and further molecule mechanisms were investigated in vitro. The results showed that RESG up-regulated the p-JNK expressions, whereas it down-regulated the p-ERK expressions. Above results demonstrated that RESG is a potential therapeutic agent for hepatocellular carcinoma via JNK and ERK pathway to induce apoptosis. Our finding provided a basis for further development of RESG as an anticancer agent.

  6. Resveratrol-4-O-D-(2'-galloyl)-glucopyranoside isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum exhibits anti-hepatocellular carcinoma viability by inducing apoptosis via the JNK and ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qichao; Yang, Yupeng; Wang, Zhiyi; Chen, Fanglin; Zhang, Anmei; Liu, Chengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol-4-O-D-(2'-galloyl)-glucopyranoside (RESG) is one of the active compounds isolated from Polygonum cuspidatum. The purpose of our present study was to investigate the anti-hepatocellular carcinoma effect of RESG in vitro and in vivo, and the possible mechanisms in vitro. In vitro, our results showed that RESG could significantly inhibit the human hepatocellular carcinoma viability in the MTT assay, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that RESG could induce SMMC-7721 cell apoptosis and activate caspases 3 and caspases 9 by using Annexin V-FITC staining and western blot, respectively. In vivo, RESG also showed efficacy in SMMC-7721 xenograft model in nude mice, and further molecule mechanisms were investigated in vitro. The results showed that RESG up-regulated the p-JNK expressions, whereas it down-regulated the p-ERK expressions. Above results demonstrated that RESG is a potential therapeutic agent for hepatocellular carcinoma via JNK and ERK pathway to induce apoptosis. Our finding provided a basis for further development of RESG as an anticancer agent. PMID:24473215

  7. The comparison of microstructure and nanocluster evolution in proton and neutron irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel to 3 dpa at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atom (dpa) at a temperature of 500 °C, enabling a direct comparison of ion to neutron irradiation effects at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography including cluster analysis. Both proton and neutron irradiations produced a comparable void and dislocation loop microstructure. However, the irradiation response of the Ti-Y-O oxide nanoclusters varied. Oxides remained stable under proton irradiation, but exhibited dissolution and an increase in Y:Ti composition ratio under neutron irradiation. Both proton and neutron irradiation also induced varying extents of Si, Ni, and Mn clustering at existing oxide nanoclusters. Protons are able to reproduce the void and loop microstructure of neutron irradiation carried out to the same dose and temperature. However, since nanocluster evolution is controlled by both diffusion and ballistic impacts, protons are rendered unable to reproduce the nanocluster evolution of neutron irradiation at the same dose and temperature.

  8. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  9. Infrared laser system

    DOEpatents

    Cantrell, Cyrus D.; Carbone, Robert J.; Cooper, Ralph S.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

  10. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  11. Laser Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has produced a laser-aided system for surveying land boundaries in difficult terrain. It does the job more accurately than conventional methods, takes only one-third the time normally required, and is considerably less expensive. In surveying to mark property boundaries, the objective is to establish an accurate heading between two "corner" points. This is conventionally accomplished by erecting a "range pole" at one point and sighting it from the other point through an instrument called a theodolite. But how do you take a heading between two points which are not visible to each other, for instance, when tall trees, hills or other obstacles obstruct the line of sight? That was the problem confronting the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service. The Forest Service manages 187 million acres of land in 44 states and Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, National Forest System lands are not contiguous but intermingled in complex patterns with privately-owned land. In recent years much of the private land has been undergoing development for purposes ranging from timber harvesting to vacation resorts. There is a need for precise boundary definition so that both private owners and the Forest Service can manage their properties with confidence that they are not trespassing on the other's land.

  12. Tri-length laser therapy associated to tecar therapy in the treatment of low-back pain in adults: a preliminary report of a prospective case series.

    PubMed

    Osti, Raffaella; Pari, Carlotta; Salvatori, Giada; Massari, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is very frequent, especially in active adult population. There are several different orthopaedic condition that can cause low-back pain, and the pain worsen the quality of life significantly. The treatments vary from drugs, physical therapies, kinesiology, local infiltrations, and so on. Laser therapy has an important role in the treatment of the inflammatory causes of pain, with several studies that demonstrate the efficacy of low and high energy laser therapy in the treatment of low-back pain. Sixty-six consecutive patients with low-back pain with or without leg pain were treated using a combination of Tri-length laser I-Triax® (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy) and Pharon® tecar therapy (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy). The patients were treated three times a week, every other day, for a total of 10 sessions. Clinical results were evaluated using visual analogic scale for individual pain (0 to 10) and the Oswestry disability scale (ODS). Tests started before the beginning of therapies and 8 weeks after the end of the therapies. Visual analogic scale (VAS) score significantly improved from an average value of 8.1 ± 1.58 pre-treatment to an average value 8-weeks post-treatment of 2.63 ± 2.74 (P < .01). ODS values start from a pre-treatment average value of 53.0 ± 13.0 to a post-treatment average value of 23.5 ± 19.8 (P < .01). A higher improvement both in VAS and in ODS was denoted in the group of patient with low-back pain and leg pain (respectively, VAS from 8.66 ± 1.58 to 2.86 ± 2.94 and ODS from 57.8 ± 15.5 to 23.7 ± 19.5). Low-back pain, associated or not with leg pain, is a very common clinical situation. The treatments of this condition are different, and an important role can be given to the laser therapy. The conclusion of this study is that the association between laser therapy iLux-Triax® and tecar therapy Pharon® in the treatment of low-back pain, with or without leg pain, can

  13. Alexandrite laser pumped by semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Scheps, R.; Gately, B.M.; Myers, J.F. ); Krasinski, J.S. ); Heller, D.F. )

    1990-06-04

    We report the first operation of a direct diode-pumped tunable chromium-doped solid-state laser. A small alexandrite (Cr:BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) crystal was longitudinally pumped by two visible laser diodes. The threshold pump power was 12 mW using the {ital R}{sub 1} line at 680.4 nm for the pump transition, and the slope efficiency was 25%. The measured laser output bandwidth was 2.1 nm.

  14. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  15. Tunable chromium lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, L.L.; Payne, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    During the decade that has passed since the discovery of the alexandrite laser, many other tunable vibronic sideband lasers based on Cr/sup 3 +/ have been developed. These lasers span the wavelength range from 700 nm to at least 1235 nm. Experimental and theoretical research has provided an understanding of the important factors that influence the performance of these Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers and other solid state vibronic lasers. The intrinsic performance levels of some of the most promising Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers are evaluated from extrapolated slope efficiency measurements. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Laser Safety Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A major focus of work done at Air Products and Chemicals' Laser Application Laboratory is on use of ultraviolet radiation using high energy excimer lasers. Because light within the wavelength of excimer lasers is invisible, it can cause serious damage to eyes and tissue. To contain the laser beam, Air Products Incorporated a Jet Propulsion Laboratory invention described in a technical support package into its beam stops. The technology interrupts the laser pathway and allows workers to remain in the target area without shutting off the laser.

  17. Lasers in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-08-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20(th) century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics.

  18. Lasers in chemical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.I.

    1982-04-15

    The high cost of laser energy is the crucial issue in any potential laser-processing application. It is expensive relative to other forms of energy and to most bulk chemicals. We show those factors that have previously frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser-induced processes for the production of materials. Having identified the general criteria to be satisfied by an economically successful laser process and shown how these imply the laser-system requirements, we present a status report on the uranium laser isotope separation (LIS) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  19. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  20. Controlling Chaotic Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gills, Zelda; Roy, Rajarshi

    1995-01-01

    Irregular fluctuations in intensity have long plagued the operation of a wide variety of solid-state lasers. We are exploring the possibility of exploiting rather than avoiding a laser's chaotic output. As an important step in that direction, we have applied a novel control technique to stabilize a solid state laser. By making small periodic changes in only one input parameter of the laser, we are able to stabilize complex periodic waveforms and steady state behavior in the laser output. We demonstrate the application of this approach in a diode pumped Nd:/YAG laser system.

  1. Laser peening of metals- enabling laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; Daly, J.; Harrisson, J.

    1997-11-13

    Laser peening, a surface treatment for metals, employs laser induced shocks to create deep and intense residual stresses in critical components. In many applications this technology is proving to be superior to conventional treatments such as shot peening. The laser peening process has generated sufficiently impressive results to move it from a laboratory demonstration phase into a significant industrial process. However until now this evolution has been slowed because a laser system meeting the average power requirements for a high throughput process has been lacking.

  2. Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollberg, Leo; Bergquist, James Charles; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    Degenerate gases. Probing vortex pair sizes in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless regime on a two-dimensional lattice of Bose-Einstein condensates / V. Schweikhard ... [et al.]. Interacting Bose-Einstein condensates in random potentials / P. Bouyer ... [et al.]. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms in optical lattices / I. Bloch -- Precision measurement and fundamental physics. T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / E. N. Fortson -- Quantum information and control I. Quantum information processing and ramsey spectroscopy with trapped ions / C. F. Roos ... [et al.]. Quantum non-demolition counting of photons in a cavity / S. Haroche ... [et al.] -- Ultra-fast control and spectroscopy. Frequency-Comb- assisted mid-infrared spectroscopy / P. de Natale ... [et al.] -- Precision measurement and applications. Precision gravity tests by atom interferometry / G. M. Tino ... [et al.] -- Novel spectroscopic applications. On a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio / W. Ubachs ... [et al.] -- Quantum information and control II. Quantum interface between light and atomic ensembles / H. Krauter ... [et al.] -- Degenerate Fermi gases. An atomic Fermi gas near a P-wave Feshbach resonance / D. S. Jin, J. P. Gaebler and J. T. Stewart. Bragg scattering of correlated atoms from a degenerate Fermi gas / R. J. Ballagh, K. J. Challis and C. W. Gardiner -- Spectroscopy and control of atoms and molecules. Stark and Zeeman deceleration of neutral atoms and molecules / S. D. Hogan ... [et al.]. Generation of coherent, broadband and tunable soft x-ray continuum at the leading edge of the driver laser pulse / A. Jullien ... [et al.]. Controlling neural atoms and photons with optical conveyor belts and ultrathin optical fibers / D. Meschede. W. Alt and A. Rauschenbeutel -- Spectroscopy on the small scale. Wide-field cars-microscopy / C. Heinrich ... [et al.]. Atom nano-optics and nano-lithography / V. I. Balykin ... [et al

  3. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  4. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  5. Diffusing, side-firing, and radial delivery laser balloon catheters for creating subsurface thermal lesions in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Hung; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared lasers have been used in combination with applied cooling methods to preserve superficial skin layers during cosmetic surgery. Similarly, combined laser irradiation and tissue cooling may also allow development of minimally invasive laser therapies beyond dermatology. This study compares diffusing, side-firing, and radial delivery laser balloon catheter designs for creation of subsurface lesions in tissue, ex vivo, using a near-IR laser and applied contact cooling. An Ytterbium fiber laser with 1075 nm wavelength delivered energy through custom built 18 Fr (6-mm-OD) balloon catheters incorporating either 10-mm-long diffusing fiber tip, 90 degree side-firing fiber, or radial delivery cone mirror, through a central lumen. A chilled solution was flowed through a separate lumen into 9-mm-diameter balloon to keep probe cooled at 7°C. Porcine liver tissue samples were used as preliminary tissue model for immediate observation of thermal lesion creation. The diffusing fiber produced subsurface thermal lesions measuring 49.3 +/- 10.0 mm2 and preserved 0.8 +/- 0.1 mm of surface tissue. The side-firing fiber produced subsurface thermal lesions of 2.4 +/- 0.9 mm2 diameter and preserved 0.5 +/- 0.1 mm of surface tissue. The radial delivery probe assembly failed to produce subsurface thermal lesions, presumably due to the small effective spot diameter at the tissue surface, which limited optical penetration depth. Optimal laser power and irradiation time measured 15 W and 100 s for diffusing fiber and 1.4 W and 20 s, for side-firing fiber, respectively. Diffusing and side-firing laser balloon catheter designs provided subsurface thermal lesions in tissue. However, the divergent laser beam in both designs limited the ability to preserve a thicker layer of tissue surface. Further optimization of laser and cooling parameters may be necessary to preserve thicker surface tissue layers.

  6. Phased laser array for generating a powerful laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ruggiero, Anthony J.

    2004-02-17

    A first injection laser signal and a first part of a reference laser beam are injected into a first laser element. At least one additional injection laser signal and at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are injected into at least one additional laser element. The first part of a reference laser beam and the at least one additional part of a reference laser beam are amplified and phase conjugated producing a first amplified output laser beam emanating from the first laser element and an additional amplified output laser beam emanating from the at least one additional laser element. The first amplified output laser beam and the additional amplified output laser beam are combined into a powerful laser beam.

  7. MESSENGER Laser Altimeter

    NASA Video Gallery

    MESSENGER's Mercury Laser Altimeter sends out laser pulses that hit the ground and return to the instrument. The amount of light that returns for each pulse gives the reflectance at that point on t...

  8. Laser device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J. D.

    1985-06-25

    A simplified, relatively inexpensive laser device, wherein the laser elements are fixed in a body exoskeleton of electrical insulating material having a low coefficient of thermal expansion. The preferred embodiment includes a shotgun type laser filter having parallel bores which receive the laser flashlamp and laser rod in fixed relation in a body chamber. The reflector surrounds the laser filter and retains the filter within the body chamber. In the preferred method of this invention, several controlled lasing pulses are generated with each illumination pulse of the flashlamp, substantially increasing the efficiency of the laser device. The number of pulses is generally controlled by increasing the voltage to the flashlamp. The rapid multiple lasing pulses generate an elongated plasma in a fluid medium, such as the vitreous fluid body of an eye which makes the laser device extemely efficient for treating glaucoma and other medical treatments.

  9. Laser therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Compared to surgery, laser therapy has some benefits. Laser therapy: Takes less time Is more precise and causes less damage to tissues Leads to less pain, bleeding, infections, and scarring Can often be done ...

  10. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vascular Access for Hemodialysis Ventricular Assist Devices Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Like every other organ or tissue in ... bypass surgery, there is a procedure called transmyocardial laser revascularization, also called TMLR or TMR. TMLR cannot ...

  11. Laser Radar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Laser and radar instruments aboard NASA aircraft provide measurements of the snow and ice surface and down to the bedrock under the ice. Lasers, with a shorter wavelength, measure the surface eleva...

  12. Laser surgery - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  13. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ...

  14. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  15. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  16. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  17. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  18. Modern retinal laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor; Luttrull, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal lasers are a standard source of light to produce retinal tissue photocoagulation to treat retinovascular disease. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were large randomized clinical trials that have shown beneficial effect of retinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy and have dictated the standard of care for decades. However, current treatment protocols undergo modifications. Types of lasers used in treatment of retinal diseases include argon, diode, dye and multicolor lasers, micropulse lasers and lasers for photodynamic therapy. Delivery systems include contact lens slit-lamp laser delivery, indirect ophthalmocope based laser photocoagulation and camera based navigated retinal photocoagulation with retinal eye-tracking. Selective targeted photocoagulation could be a future alternative to panretinal photocoagulation. PMID:25892934

  19. Laser hair removal.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, there have been numerous advances in hair laser removal that utilize melanin as a chromophore. All of the devices on the market may be used in patients with light skin (phototypes I-III) and yield hair reduction near 75%. The ruby (694 nm) laser, alexandrite (755 nm) laser, and diode (810 nm) laser, as well as intense pulsed light are commonly used devices for hair laser removal. The long-pulsed Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser represents the safest device for hair removal in dark-skinned patients because of its long wavelength, although the diode laser, alexandrite laser, and intense pulse light may be used. For treatment of light hair, combination radiofrequency and optical devices as well as photodynamic therapy are under investigation. PMID:16229722

  20. Tunable semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor lasers are disclosed requiring minimized coupling regions. Multiple laser embodiments employ ring resonators or ring resonator pairs using only a single coupling region with the gain medium are detailed. Tuning can be performed by changing the phase of the coupling coefficient between the gain medium and a ring resonator of the laser. Another embodiment provides a tunable laser including two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series and a reflector coupled to a gain medium.

  1. Laser cutting system

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  2. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  3. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  4. Carbon dioxide slab laser

    SciTech Connect

    Tulip, J.

    1988-01-12

    A gas slab laser is described comprising: first and second elongated electrodes each including a planar light reflecting surface disposed so as to form a light guide only in a plane perpendicular to the planar surface and to define a gas discharge gap therebetween; a laser gas disposed in the gap; and means for applying a radio frequency current between the first and second electrodes to establish a laser-exciting discharge in the laser gas.

  5. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  6. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver. PMID:25036135

  7. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver.

  8. Sorption and degradation of selected organic UV filters (BM-DBM, 4-MBC, and OD-PABA) in laboratory water-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lu, Guanghua; Xie, Zhengxin; Ding, Jiannan; Liu, Jianchao; Li, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Organic UV filters that have been widely used in sunscreens and other personal care products have drawn much public concern because of their widespread contamination in the environment and their potential ecological risks to ecosystems. We selected three UV filters with high frequency of detection in the environment, namely butyl methoxy dibenzoylmethane (BM-DBM), ethylhexyl dimethyl p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA), and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), to investigate the sorption and degradation behaviors of these compounds in lab-scale water-sediment systems set up with natural water and sediment samples collected from different rivers and lakes (i.e., Yangtze River, Qinhuai River, Xuanwu Lake, and Mochou Lake) in Nanjing, East China. The sorption isotherms of these UV filters were well described by the Freundlich equation (C s   = K f  × C w (n) ). The sorption of three UV filters in four sediments was all linear or close to it, with n values between 0.92 and 1.13. A moderate to strong sorption affinity was observed for these compounds, and the sorption appears to be irreversible. For the combined sorption and degradation studies, sorption was found to be a primary mechanism for the disappearance of these UV filters from the water phase, and biotransformation appears to be the predominant factor for the degradation of the target compounds in the water-sediment systems. All three UV filters were found to be slightly resistant to the microbes in these systems, with DT50total and DT90total values-the disappearance time (DT) describes the time in which the initial total mass of the UV filters in the whole system is reduced by 50 and 90 %-ranging between 18 and 31 days and 68 and 101 days, respectively. PMID:26846244

  9. Sorption and degradation of selected organic UV filters (BM-DBM, 4-MBC, and OD-PABA) in laboratory water-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lu, Guanghua; Xie, Zhengxin; Ding, Jiannan; Liu, Jianchao; Li, Yi

    2016-05-01

    Organic UV filters that have been widely used in sunscreens and other personal care products have drawn much public concern because of their widespread contamination in the environment and their potential ecological risks to ecosystems. We selected three UV filters with high frequency of detection in the environment, namely butyl methoxy dibenzoylmethane (BM-DBM), ethylhexyl dimethyl p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA), and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), to investigate the sorption and degradation behaviors of these compounds in lab-scale water-sediment systems set up with natural water and sediment samples collected from different rivers and lakes (i.e., Yangtze River, Qinhuai River, Xuanwu Lake, and Mochou Lake) in Nanjing, East China. The sorption isotherms of these UV filters were well described by the Freundlich equation (C s   = K f  × C w (n) ). The sorption of three UV filters in four sediments was all linear or close to it, with n values between 0.92 and 1.13. A moderate to strong sorption affinity was observed for these compounds, and the sorption appears to be irreversible. For the combined sorption and degradation studies, sorption was found to be a primary mechanism for the disappearance of these UV filters from the water phase, and biotransformation appears to be the predominant factor for the degradation of the target compounds in the water-sediment systems. All three UV filters were found to be slightly resistant to the microbes in these systems, with DT50total and DT90total values-the disappearance time (DT) describes the time in which the initial total mass of the UV filters in the whole system is reduced by 50 and 90 %-ranging between 18 and 31 days and 68 and 101 days, respectively.

  10. Coatings for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-12-18

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors.

  11. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  12. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  13. Zone Refining by Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    System developed for studying use of laser beam for zone-refining semiconductors and metals. Specimen scanned with focused CO2 laser beam in such way that thin zone of molten material moves along specimen sweeps impurities with it. Zone-melting system comprises microcomputer, laser, electromechanical and optical components for beam control, vacuum chamber that holds specimen, and sensor for determining specimen temperature.

  14. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  15. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  16. Optically biased laser gyro

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.Z.; Chow, W.W.; Scully, M.O.; Sanders, V.E.

    1980-10-01

    We describe a four-mode ring laser that exhibits none of the mode-locking characteristics that plague laser gyros. This laser is characterized by a bias that changes sign with a change in the direction of rotation and prevents the counterpropagating modes from locking. A theoretical analysis explaining the experimental results is outlined.

  17. Excimer Lasers In Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Saidi, Iyad S.; Pettit, George H.; Wisoff, P. J.; Sauerbrey, Roland A.

    1989-06-01

    Excimer lasers emit light energy, short optical pulses at ultraviolet wavelengths, that results in a unique laser tissue interaction. This has led to an increasing number of studies into medical applications of these lasers in fields such as ophthalmology, urology, cardiology and neurology.

  18. Laser power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Edmund J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of previous studies related to laser power transmission is presented. Particular attention is given to the use of solar pumped lasers for space power applications. Three general laser mechanisms are addressed: photodissociation lasing driven by sunlight, photoexcitation lasing driven directly by sunlight, and photoexcitation lasing driven by thermal radiation.

  19. Lasers for nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Various versions of nonlinear microscopy are revolutionizing the life sciences, almost all of which are made possible because of the development of ultrafast lasers. In this article, the main properties and technical features of short-pulse lasers used in nonlinear microscopy are summarized. Recent research results on fiber lasers that will impact future instruments are also discussed.

  20. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  1. Laser Fundamentals and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, W. F.; And Others

    As a result of work performed at the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory with respect to lasers, this manual was prepared in response to the increasing use of lasers in high schools and colleges. It is directed primarily toward the high school instructor who may use the text for a short course in laser fundamentals. The definition of the…

  2. Stabilized Zeeman split laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a stablized Zeeman split laser for use in a polarization profilometer is discussed. A Hewlett-Packard laser was modified to stabilize the Zeeman split beat frequency thereby increasing the phase measurement accuracy from the Hewlett-Packard 3 degrees to an accuracy of .01 degrees. The addition of a two layered inductive winding converts the laser to a current controlled oscillator whose frequency is linearly related to coil current. This linear relationship between coil current and laser frequency permits phase locking the laser frequency to a stable crystal controlled reference frequency. The stability of the system is examined and the equipment operation procedures are outlined.

  3. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  4. Laser Diode Ignition (LDI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kass, William J.; Andrews, Larry A.; Boney, Craig M.; Chow, Weng W.; Clements, James W.; Merson, John A.; Salas, F. Jim; Williams, Randy J.; Hinkle, Lane R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) program at Sandia National Labs. One watt laser diodes have been characterized for use with a single explosive actuator. Extensive measurements of the effect of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses on the laser diode optical output have been made. Characterization of optical fiber and connectors over temperature has been done. Multiple laser diodes have been packaged to ignite multiple explosive devices and an eight element laser diode array has been recently tested by igniting eight explosive devices at predetermined 100 ms intervals.

  5. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  6. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  7. Frequency discriminating laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.D.

    1987-10-20

    A laser is described for discriminating between a higher gain transition and a lower gain transition to permit the laser to lase at the lower gain transition. It consists of: a laser cavity, including more than two mirrors each of which is highly transmissive at the frequency of the higher gain transition, one of which is partially reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition, and all but the one of which are highly reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition; an active laser medium disposed within the cavity; and means for pumping the active laser medium.

  8. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  9. Lasers in otorhinolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais Clemente, Manuel P.

    1992-03-01

    Lasers are now commonly accepted and widely used surgical instruments in otorhinolaryngology. There have been a great number of technological advances with lasers that have contributed to the expansion of this new surgical modality with an increased number of medical applications. Surgical strategies have also changed and are more favorable toward conservative surgery in which less tissues is removed than with more radical resections. This combination of improving technology and medical attitudes has changed the field of otorhinolaryngology, and resulted in an expanding use of laser surgery. Since 1973 we have been using the carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of diseases of the upper aero digestive systems, learning this new surgical technique from the pioneer work of Strong, Jako, and Vaughan. It is our conviction that a laser surgeon must have a thorough knowledge of laser biophysics, instrumentation, safety protocols, and surgical indications, and have the technical skills to perform laser surgery. Laser technology continues to improve at an increased speed, and it is imperative to update knowledge of current and potential applications of lasers in our specialty. It is the purpose of this article to present our clinical experience of 18 years with the use of lasers in surgery of ORL, emphasizing the carbon dioxide laser.

  10. Laser surgery: using the carbon dioxide laser.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    In 1917 Einstein theorized tha through an atomic process a unique kind of electromagnetic radiation could be produced by stimulated emission. When such radiation is in the optical or infrared spectrum it is termed laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) light. A laser, a high-intensity light source, emits a nearly parallel electromagnetic beam of energy at a given wavelength that can be captured by a lens and concentrated in the focal spot. The wavelength determines how the laser will be used. The carbon dioxide laser is now successfully employed for some surgical procedures in gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, neurosurgery, and plastic and general surgery. The CO2 laser beam is directed through the viewing system of an operating microscope or through a hand-held laser component. Its basic action in tissue is thermal vaporization; it causes minimal damage to adjacent tissues. Surgeons require special training in the basic methods and techniques of laser surgery, as well as in the safety standards that must be observed. Images FIG. 5 PMID:7074503

  11. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics. PMID:23126904

  12. Lasers in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Nalcaci, Ruhi; Cokakoglu, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Many types of dental lasers are currently available that can be efficiently used for soft and hard tissue applications in the field of orthodontics. For achieving the desired effects in the target tissue, knowledge of laser characteristics such as power, wavelength and timing, is necessary. Laser therapy is advantageous because it often avoids bleeding, can be pain free, is non-invasive and is relatively quick. The high cost is its primary disadvantage. It is very important to take the necessary precautions to prevent possible tissue damage when using laser dental systems. Here, we reviewed the main types and characteristics of laser systems used in dental practice and discuss the applications of lasers in orthodontics, harmful effects and laser system safety. PMID:24966719

  13. Laser safety in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.

    1997-05-01

    One of the major causes of anxiety in the dental clinic is the dental handpiece. Because dentists wish to provide a method which can replace the drill there has often been a premature use of the laser in dentistry. Various lasers have been introduced into the clinic before research has shown the laser used is of clinical benefit. Any new treatment method must not compromise the health of the patient being treated. Thus a method of evaluating the clinical abilities of dentists and their understanding the limitations of the laser used must be developed. Dentist must be trained in the basic interaction of the laser on oral tissues. The training has to concentrate on the variation of the laser wavelength absorption in the different tissues of the oral cavity. Because of the differences in the optical properties of these tissues great care must be exercised by practitioners using lasers on patients.

  14. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  15. ORION laser target diagnosticsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; Wright, M. J.; Hood, B. A.; Kemshall, P.

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  16. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  17. ORION laser target diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  18. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  19. [Lasers and aesthetic dermatology].

    PubMed

    Stratigos, A J; Dover, J S; Arndt, K A

    2003-07-01

    The improved understanding of laser-tissue interaction along with the latest advances of laser technology have led to the development of sophisticated, safe, and user-friendly laser systems that provide effective treatment for a variety of aesthetic skin conditions. The use of lasers and their tissue-specific capabilities in the treatment of pigmented and vascular lesions has been greatly expanded to include rhytides, photoaged skin, atrophic scars, and unwanted hair. In addition, laser techniques have been employed in traditional "rejuvenating" procedures of aged skin, e.g., face-lifting, blepharoplasty, and hair transplantation, decreasing the intra-operative time and limiting the recovery period. These advances have led to a wide acceptance of cutaneous laser surgery by the dermatologic community and have created an increasing popularity among the public. The purpose of this article is to review the applications of lasers in aesthetic dermatology and discuss their limitations and potential side effects. PMID:12835862

  20. Lasers in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, M. M.; Forbes, A.; Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Mathye, A.

    2008-05-01

    A variety of laser applications in space, past, present, future and far future are reviewed together with the contributions of some of the scientists and engineers involved, especially those that happen to have South African connections. Historically, two of the earliest laser applications in space, were atmospheric LIDAR and lunar ranging. These applications involved atmospheric physicists, several astronauts and many of the staff recruited into the Soviet and North American lunar exploration programmes. There is a strong interest in South Africa in both LIDAR and lunar ranging. Shortly after the birth of the laser (and even just prior) theoretical work on photonic propulsion and space propulsion by laser ablation was initiated by Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz and Eugen Saenger. Present or near future experimental programs are developing in the following fields: laser ablation propulsion, possibly coupled with rail gun or gas gun propulsion; interplanetary laser transmission; laser altimetry; gravity wave detection by space based Michelson interferometry; the de-orbiting of space debris by high power lasers; atom laser interferometry in space. Far future applications of laser-photonic space-propulsion were also pioneered by Carl Sagan and Robert Forward. They envisaged means of putting Saenger's ideas into practice. Forward also invented a laser based method for manufacturing solid antimatter or SANTIM, well before the ongoing experiments at CERN with anti-hydrogen production and laser-trapping. SANTIM would be an ideal propellant for interstellar missions if it could be manufactured in sufficient quantities. It would be equally useful as a power source for the transmission of information over light year distances. We briefly mention military lasers. Last but not least, we address naturally occurring lasers in space and pose the question: "did the Big Bang lase?"

  1. Laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, B.L.; Huston, A.L.

    1996-06-01

    We report a novel laser-heated thermoluminescence dosimeter that is radically different from previous laser-heated dosimeters. The dosimeter is a semiconductor and metal ion doped silica glass that has excellent optical transparency. The high optical quality of the glass essentially eliminates laser power loss due to light scattering. This efficient utilization of the laser power permits operation of the dosimeter without strong absorption of the laser, as is required in traditional laser-heated dosimetry. Our laser-heated dosimeter does not rely on the diffusion of heat from a separate, highly absorbing substrate, but operates via intimate, localized heating within the glass dosimeter due to the absorption of the laser light by rare earth ion dopants in the glass. Following absorption of the laser light, the rare earth ions transfer energy to the surrounding glass via nonradiative relaxation processes, resulting in rapid, localized temperature increases sufficient to release all the filled traps near the ions. As the heat diffuses radially away from the rare earth ions the temperature plummets dramatically on a manometer distance scale and the release of additional filled traps subsides. A key distinguishing feature of this laser-heated dosimeter is the ability to read the dose information more than once. While laser-heating provides complete information about the radiation exposure experienced by the glass due to the release of locally heated traps, the process leaves the remaining filled bulk traps undisturbed. The bulk traps can be read using traditional bulk heating methods and can provide a direct determination of an accumulated dose, measured following any number of laser-heated readouts. Laser-heated dosimetry measurements have been performed using a solid state diode laser for the readout following radiation exposure with a {sup 60}Co source.

  2. Research of the quenched dye lasers pumped by excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shaolin; Lou Qihong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the quenched dye lasers pumped by XeCl and KrF excimer lasers were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Dye laser pulses with duration of 0.8 ns for XeCl laser pumping and 2 ns for KrF laser pumping were obtained. The dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in methyl was used as the active medium in the quenched dye laser. When the pump laser was KrF and the active medium was Coumarin 498 the quenched dye laser emitted pulse with duration of about 2 ns. The characteristics of the quenched dye laser was also investigated in detail.

  3. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Comstock, Matthew

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  4. Laser treatment in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  5. Underwater laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushina, Mark E.; Heberle, Geoff; Hope, Michael; Crittenden, Ryan M.; Bethel, Michael

    2002-03-01

    We have developed a solid-state laser operating at 532nm for underwater topographic investigations. The laser system is integrated into a torpedo-like 'towed-body', with the military designation of AQS-20. This laser, along with other sophisticated receiver opto-electronic systems enables detailed underwater bathymetry. CEO designed and manufactured the laser portion of this system. The laser sub-system is comprised of two separate parts: the LTU (Laser Transmitter Unit) and the LEU (Laser Electronics Unit). The LTU and LEU where put through Mil-standard testing for vibration, shock and temperature storage and operation extremes as well as Mil-461C EMI/EMC testing. The Nd:YAG laser operates at a 400 Hz pulse repetition frequency and is controlled remotely, tethered to the system controller in a ship or helicopter. Power monitor circuits allow real time laser health monitoring, which enables input parameter adjustments for consistent laser behavior. The towed body moves forward at a constant rate of speed while this underwater LIDAR system gathers data. All heat generated must be conducted into the outer hull of the towed-body and then, to the surrounding ambient ocean water. The water temperature may vary from 0-35 degrees C.

  6. Pulsed Laser Tissue Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Joseph T.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Jansen, E. Duco; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    Pulsed lasers, by virtue of their ability to deliver energy in a spatially and temporally confined fashion, are able to micromachine biological tissues. The clinical success of pulsed laser treatment, however, is often limited by the extent of damage that is caused to the tissue in the vicinity of the ablation crater. In general, pulsed ablation is a trade off between thermal damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively long pulses (>100 ms), and mechanical damage to surrounding tissue, caused by relatively short pulses (<1 ms). To identify the origin of pulsed laser induced damage, the possible laser tissue interactions and ablation are discussed here and in Chapter 14. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the reader with a condensed overview of the parameters that must be considered in the process of pulsed laser ablation of soft tissue. In this chapter, pulsed infrared ablation of biological soft tissue is used as a paradigm to illustrate the concepts and design considerations. Generally speaking, the absorption of laser light may lead to photothermal, photomechanical or photochemical interaction with the irradiated tissue [1-5]. The vast majority of therapeutic laser-tissue interactions is based on photothermal interactions where laser energy is converted into heat. Subsequent to thermalization of the absorbed optical energy, heat transfer mechanisms, in particular conduction allow thermal diffusion from high temperature areas to surrounding regions. When laser penetration depth is less than the laser spot radius, the thermal diffusion time, τ th, can be defined as:

  7. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  8. Lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qian; Juzeniene, Asta; Chen, Jiyao; Svaasand, Lars O.; Warloe, Trond; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Moan, Johan

    2008-05-01

    It is hard to imagine that a narrow, one-way, coherent, moving, amplified beam of light fired by excited atoms is powerful enough to slice through steel. In 1917, Albert Einstein speculated that under certain conditions atoms could absorb light and be stimulated to shed their borrowed energy. Charles Townes coined the term laser (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) in 1951. Theodore Maiman investigated the glare of a flash lamp in a rod of synthetic ruby, creating the first human-made laser in 1960. The laser involves exciting atoms and passing them through a medium such as crystal, gas or liquid. As the cascade of photon energy sweeps through the medium, bouncing off mirrors, it is reflected back and forth, and gains energy to produce a high wattage beam of light. Although lasers are today used by a large variety of professions, one of the most meaningful applications of laser technology has been through its use in medicine. Being faster and less invasive with a high precision, lasers have penetrated into most medical disciplines during the last half century including dermatology, ophthalmology, dentistry, otolaryngology, gastroenterology, urology, gynaecology, cardiology, neurosurgery and orthopaedics. In many ways the laser has revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of a disease. As a surgical tool the laser is capable of three basic functions. When focused on a point it can cauterize deeply as it cuts, reducing the surgical trauma caused by a knife. It can vaporize the surface of a tissue. Or, through optical fibres, it can permit a doctor to see inside the body. Lasers have also become an indispensable tool in biological applications from high-resolution microscopy to subcellular nanosurgery. Indeed, medical lasers are a prime example of how the movement of an idea can truly change the medical world. This review will survey various applications of lasers in medicine including four major categories: types of lasers, laser

  9. Photonic crystal microcavity lasers and laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang-Rong

    As a state-of-the-art technology, photonic crystal microcavity lasers have great potentials to resolve many semiconductor laser performance challenges, owing to their compact size, high spontaneous emission factor, and inherent advantages in dimension scalability. This thesis describes efficient numerical analyzing methods for multimode photonic crystal microcavities, including a parallel computing three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method combined with Pade interpolation, point group projection, and vectorial Green's function method. With the help of these analyzing tools, various experimental photonic crystal microcavity devices fabricated in InGaAsP/InP based materials were studies. Room temperature optical pumped InGaAsP suspended membrane photonic crystal microcavity lasers were demonstrated. Their lithographical fine-tuning, above room temperature operations, mode identifications and polarizations were demonstrated. Room temperature continuous wave (CW) optically pumped photonic crystal microcavity lasers at diameter less than 3.2 mum were demonstrated with crystalline alpha-Al 2O3 (sapphire) as a cladding layer to the InGaAsP membrane. The far-field radiation profiles from these microcavity lasers were measured and compared with our numerical modeling predictions. Two electrical injection scenes for photonic crystal microcavity lasers were introduced, together with some preliminary results including the demonstrations of optically pumped lasing of highly doped cavities and cavities with an electrical conduction post underneath. Electrically excited photonic crystal microcavity light emitting diodes (LEDs) were also experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Laser induced biological heating analyzed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Phue

    1985-08-01

    A quantitative analysis of the vaporization of tumors by pulsed CO2 lasers, incision by CW CO2 lasers, tissue coagulation by argon lasers, thermal killing of cancerous cells by He-Ne lasers, and the application of heat by CO2 lasers is presented. Although the calculations are based on a simplified skin model, it may prove useful in clinical treatments.

  11. Information computer program for laser therapy and laser puncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badovets, Nadegda N.; Medvedev, Andrei V.

    1995-03-01

    An informative computer program containing laser therapy and puncture methods has been developed. It was used successfully in connection with the compact Russian medical laser apparatus HELIOS-O1M in laser treatment and the education process.

  12. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  13. Lasers in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Elavarasu, Sugumari; Naveen, Devisree; Thangavelu, Arthiie

    2012-01-01

    Laser is one of the most captivating technologies in dental practice since Theodore Maiman in 1960 invented the ruby laser. Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three and a half decades of the 20th century. Introduced as an alternative to mechanical cutting device, laser has now become an instrument of choice in many dental applications. Evidence suggests its use in initial periodontal therapy, surgery, and more recently, its utility in salvaging implant opens up a wide range of applications. More research with better designs are a necessity before lasers can become a part of dental armamentarium. This paper gives an insight to laser in periodontics. PMID:23066266

  14. Micro-laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    A micro-laser is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide and at least one amplifying medium in the waveguide. PBG features are positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings and allow introduction of amplifying mediums into the highly resonant guided micro-laser microcavity. The micro-laser may be positioned on a die of a bulk substrate material with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a micro-laser is disclosed. A method for tuning the micro-laser is also disclosed. The micro-laser may be used as an optical regenerator, or a light source for data transfer or for optical computing.

  15. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  16. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  17. Cutaneous laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Dixon, J A; Gilbertson, J J

    1985-12-01

    The carbon dioxide laser is useful for vaporizing lesions and applying incisions, the argon laser coagulates superficial vascular lesions and the neodymium-YAG laser is used for large vascular and more deeply situated lesions. Many patients with port-wine stains have been treated with excellent to poor results, major problems consisting of incomplete color removal and hypertrophic scarring (occurring in 4% to 23% of cases). While results are imperfect, patients are satisfied with the improvement in 86% of cases. Lasers have been used with good results for treating patients with strawberry angioma of infancy, pyogenic granuloma, telangiectasia of the face, decorative tattoos, genital condylomata and warts. The results of laser treatment of essential telangiectasia of the lower extremities have generally been poor. The CO(2) laser has been effective in excising small lesions and elevating skin flaps. PMID:4090490

  18. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics. PMID:20672069

  19. Laser rocket system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

  20. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  1. Portable Laser Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    A Portable Laser Laboratory (PLL) is being designed and built for the CALIOPE Program tests which will begin in October of 1994. The PLL is designed to give maximum flexibility for evolving laser experiments and can be readily moved by loading it onto a standard truck trailer. The internal configuration for the October experiments will support a two line DIAL system running in the mid-IR. Brief descriptions of the laser and detection systems are included.

  2. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  3. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  4. The Laser Accessory Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Ashvin

    1988-09-01

    Wandering through the exhibit hall yesterday, I noticed that if you look at the laser companies and if you look at the accessory companies, there are pretty much the same number of accessory booths as well as the laser companies. There was one difference. Laser company booths are all sexy looking, very flashy, big booths. Whereas if you look at the accessories booths, they were small, not so prominent.

  5. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  6. Dental laser technology.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2008-10-01

    Dental technology is rapidly affecting the treatment options available to patients. Dental lasers are an innovative technology for both hard- and soft-tissue treatment applications. The ability to recontour soft tissues efficiently and predictably with immediate hemostatsis and minimal postoperative sequelae is of value to both the dentist and the patient. This article reviews the principles of dental lasers, criteria to consider when selecting a dental laser, and some of their clinical applications.

  7. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  8. Laser applications in phlebology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Mancini, S.; Postiglione, Marco; Postiglione, M. G.

    2001-06-01

    PURPOSE: review of laser used in phlebology METHOD: critical analysis of scientific data taken from the literature and based on 25 years personal experience. RESULTS: we have three groups of laser applications in phlebology: for the diagnosis, as physical therapy and as surgical therapy. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: the laser-doppler studies the microcirculations, the no-surgical therapy shown positive results in the treatment of venous ulcers and for the wound healing. It could be indicate also as antiphlogistic and anti-edema therapy, in superficial thrombophlebitis. The surgical laser is useful for the surgical cleaning of ulcers, for haemorroids, angiomas and telangiectases.

  9. Lasers in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.I.; Rockower, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A status report on the uranium Laser Isotope Separation (LIS) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented. Prior to this status report, process economic analysis is presented so as to understand how the unique properties of laser photons can be best utilized in the production of materials and components despite the high cost of laser energy. The characteristics of potential applications that are necessary for success are identified, and those factors that have up to now frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser induced chemical and physical process for the production of new or existing materials are pointed out.

  10. Endoscopic excimer laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, Renzo; Pini, Roberto; Vannini, Matteo; Benaim, George; Mattioli, Stefano

    1994-02-01

    Long pulse excimer laser radiation can be efficiently coupled and transmitted through optical fibers allowing the achievement of both photoablative and photomechanical effects. In this work the investigation has been focussed on the urologic surgery field to demonstrate the effectiveness of an excimer laser system for very different therapeutic tasks: recanalization of urethral stenosis and lithotripsy. The choice of the suitable radiation dosimetry and the technical solutions employed provide to the surgeon a multipurpose laser system with a wide range of utility in comparison with other laser systems.

  11. Laser Market Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Morris

    1989-06-01

    I'd like to reiterate Dr. Forrest's welcome to all of you, to what is the first of our series of market seminars for 1989. In 1988, we held three of these seminars, the counterpart to this one on the general laser market, one on the medical laser marketplace, and most recently in September, at IMTS on the industrial laser market. The first two have been published as proceedings by SPIE, and the proceedings of the industrial laser marketplace, which Dave Belforte worked on putting together, are in the process of being published by the SPIE.

  12. Laser aircraft. [using kerosene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K.; Jones, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of a laser-powered aircraft is discussed. Laser flight would be completely compatible with existing airports and air-traffic control, with the airplane using kerosene only power, up to a cruising altitude of 9 km where the laser satellite would lock on and beam laser energy to it. Two major components make up the laser turbofan, a heat exchanger for converting laser radiation into thermal energy, and conventional turbomachinery. The laser power satellite would put out 42 Mw using a solar-powered thermal engine to generate electrical power for the closed-cycle supersonic electric discharge CO laser, whose radiators, heat exchangers, supersonic diffuser, and ducting will amount to 85% of the total subsystem mass. Relay satellites will be used to intercept the beam from the laser satellite, correct outgoing beam aberrations, and direct the beam to the next target. A 300-airplane fleet with transcontinental range is projected to save enough kerosene to equal the energy content of the entire system, including power and relay satellites, in one year.

  13. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  14. LCLS Injector Drive Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Castro, J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, A.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    Requirements for the LCLS injector drive laser present significant challenges to the design of the system. While progress has been demonstrated in spatial shape, temporal shape, UV generation and rep-rate, a laser that meets all of the LCLS specifications simultaneously has yet to be demonstrated. These challenges are compounded by the stability and reliability requirements. The drive laser and transport system has been installed and tested. We will report on the current operational state of the laser and plans for future improvements.

  15. Laser eye injuries.

    PubMed

    Barkana, Y; Belkin, M

    2000-01-01

    Laser instruments are used in many spheres of human activity, including medicine, industry, laboratory research, entertainment, and, notably, the military. This widespread use of lasers has resulted in many accidental injuries. Injuries are almost always retinal, because of the concentration of visible and near-infrared radiation on the retina. The retina is therefore the body tissue most vulnerable to laser radiation. The nature and severity of this type of retinal injury is determined by multiple laser-related and eye-related factors, the most important being the duration and amount of energy delivered and the retinal location of the lesion. The clinical course of significant retinal laser injuries is characterized by sudden loss of vision, often followed by marked improvement over a few weeks, and occasionally severe late complications. Medical and surgical treatment is limited. Laser devices hazardous to the human eye are currently in widespread use by armed forces. Furthermore, lasers may be employed specifically for visual incapacitation on future battlefields. Adherence to safety practices effectively prevents accidental laser-induced ocular injuries. However, there is no practical way to prevent injuries that are maliciously inflicted, as expected from laser weapons.

  16. Trends in laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaebler, Frank; van Nunen, Joris; Held, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Laser Micromachining is well established in industry. Depending on the application lasers with pulse length from μseconds to femtoseconds and wavelengths from 1064nm and its harmonics up to 5μm or 10.6μm are used. Ultrafast laser machining using pulses with pico or femtosecond duration pulses is gaining traction, as it offers very precise processing of materials with low thermal impact. Large-scale industrial ultrafast laser applications show that the market can be divided into various sub segments. One set of applications demand low power around 10W, compact footprint and are extremely sensitive to the laser price whilst still demanding 10ps or shorter laser pulses. A second set of applications are very power hungry and only become economically feasible for large scale deployments at power levels in the 100+W class. There is also a growing demand for applications requiring fs-laser pulses. In our presentation we would like to describe these sub segments by using selected applications from the automotive and electronics industry e.g. drilling of gas/diesel injection nozzles, dicing of LED substrates. We close the presentation with an outlook to micromachining applications e.g. glass cutting and foil processing with unique new CO lasers emitting 5μm laser wavelength.

  17. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  18. Deep space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Srinivasan, Meera; Shaw, Matthew; Piazzolla, Sabino; Wright, Malcolm W.; Farr, William H.

    2016-03-01

    A number of laser communication link demonstrations from near Earth distances extending out to lunar ranges have been remarkably successful, demonstrating the augmented channel capacity that is accessible with the use of lasers for communications. The next hurdle on the path to extending laser communication and its benefits throughout the solar system and beyond is to demonstrate deep-space laser communication links. In this paper, concepts and technology development being advanced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in order to enable deep-space link demonstrations to ranges of approximately 3 AU in the next decade, will be discussed.

  19. Laser processing with specially designed laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asratyan, A. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Feofanov, I. N.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Lyabin, N. A.; Pogosyan, L. A.; Sachkov, V. I.; Zakharyan, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using laser systems to form beams with special spatial configurations has been studied. The laser systems applied had a self-conjugate cavity based on the elements of copper vapor lasers (LT-5Cu, LT-10Cu, LT-30Cu) with an average power of 5, 10, or 30 W. The active elements were pumped by current pulses of duration 80-100 ns. The duration of laser generation pulses was up to 25 ns. The generator unit included an unstable cavity, where one reflector was a special mirror with a reflecting coating. Various original optical schemes used were capable of exploring spatial configurations and energy characteristics of output laser beams in their interaction with micro- and nanoparticles fabricated from various materials. In these experiments, the beam dimensions of the obtained zones varied from 0.3 to 5 µm, which is comparable with the minimum permissible dimensions determined by the optical elements applied. This method is useful in transforming a large amount of information at the laser pulse repetition rate of 10-30 kHz. It was possible to realize the high-precision micromachining and microfabrication of microscale details by direct writing, cutting and drilling (with the cutting width and through-hole diameters ranging from 3 to 100 µm) and produce microscale, deep, intricate and narrow grooves on substrate surfaces of metals and nonmetal materials. This system is used for producing high-quality microscale details without moving the object under treatment. It can also be used for microcutting and microdrilling in a variety of metals such as molybdenum, copper and stainless steel, with a thickness of up to 300 µm, and in nonmetals such as silicon, sapphire and diamond with a thickness ranging from 10 µm to 1 mm with different thermal parameters and specially designed laser beam.

  20. Millisecond laser machining of transparent materials assisted by nanosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunxiang; Zhang, Hongchao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2015-01-26

    A new form of double pulse composed of a nanosecond laser and a millisecond laser is proposed for laser machining transparent materials. To evaluate its advantages and disadvantages, experimental investigations are carried out and the corresponding results are compared with those of single millisecond laser. The mechanism is discussed from two aspects: material defects and effects of modifications induced by nanosecond laser on thermal stress field during millisecond laser irradiation. It is shown that the modifications of the sample generated by nanosecond laser improves the processing efficiency of subsequent millisecond laser, while limits the eventual size of modified region.

  1. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  2. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  3. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  4. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  5. [Characteristics of laser light].

    PubMed

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S

    1999-01-01

    Laser is one of the greatest technical discoveries of the 20th century. It is important in basic sciences, but particularly in diagnosis and therapy of various pathologic conditions of human organism. It is electromagnetic radiation, not X-irradiation and, as such, it is not expected to produce new generation of iatrogenic malignancies. Laser falls between infrared and ultraviolet on the spectrum mainly in the visible light spectrum. Properties of laser light are: monochromacity (the same color), coherence (all of the light waves are in phase both spatially and temporally), collimation (all rays are parallel to each other and do not diverge significantly even over long distances). Lasers were first conceived by Einstein in 1917 when he wrote his "Zur Quantum Theorie der Strahlung" (the quantum theory of radiation) which enumerated concepts of stimulated and spontaneous emission and absorption. Drs. Arthur Schawlow and Charles Townes, in 1956, extended lasers into the optical frequency range and Maiman, in 1960, operated the first laser using ruby as the active medium (ruby laser). Laser is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. To understand the acronym, it is necessary to understand the basic physics of the atom. However, if the atom that is in the excited state is struck by another photon of energy before it returns to the ground state, two photons of equal frequency and energy, travelling in the same direction and in perfect spatial and temporal harmony, are produced. This phenomenon is termed stimulated emission of radiation. An external power source hyperexcites the atoms in the laser medium so that the number of atoms possessing upper energy levels exceeds the number of atoms in a power energy level, a condition termed a population inversion. This "pumping system" which imparts additional energy to the atoms may be optical, mechanical, or chemical. These atoms in a hyperexcited state spontaneously emit photons of light. The

  6. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  7. [New lasers in dermatologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Morvay, M

    1995-04-30

    Developments in the fields of laser technology and application have significantly broadened its clinical use over the past two decades. As lasers became more smaller, more reliable and less expensive, dermatology will benefit new laser-based therapeutic and diagnostic methods. Relevant laser systems and their clinical applications are presented, as are investigational laser systems, which may be of importance for the future in dermatology. We review advances in the use of pulsed lasers for treating vascular and non-vascular, pigmented epidermal and dermal lesions, for precise cutting of tissue, for photodynamic therapy and the future role of diode lasers in dermatological laser surgery is also discussed.

  8. Lasers '83. Proceedings of the international conference

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of the semiconductor diode laser, laser material processing, nonlinear spectroscopy, recent advancements in diode lasers, laser-driven particle accelerators, laser applications in the atmospheric sciences, laser-assisted collisions, novel (garnet and alexandrite) solid state laser materials, IR molecular lasers, devices and components for fiber-optic communications, free-electron lasers and masers, and picosecond optical phenomena. Also covered are laser-stimulated materials surface processes, color center laser developments, blue-green and metal vapor lasers, laser chemistry, nonlinear effects, high energy lasers, excimer lasers, laser trapping of ions, optical cavities and propagation, laser isotope separation, laser trapping of atoms, laser applications in biochemistry, tunable coherent short wavelength radiation, laser spectroscopy, picosecond studies of condensed phase molecular systems, and combustion and plasma diagnostics.

  9. Fine welding with lasers.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  10. Laser hair removal pearls.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal. PMID:18330794

  11. Distributed ultrafast fibre laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Cui, Yudong; Han, Dongdong; Yao, Xiankun; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-01-01

    A traditional ultrafast fibre laser has a constant cavity length that is independent of the pulse wavelength. The investigation of distributed ultrafast (DUF) lasers is conceptually and technically challenging and of great interest because the laser cavity length and fundamental cavity frequency are changeable based on the wavelength. Here, we propose and demonstrate a DUF fibre laser based on a linearly chirped fibre Bragg grating, where the total cavity length is linearly changeable as a function of the pulse wavelength. The spectral sidebands in DUF lasers are enhanced greatly, including the continuous-wave (CW) and pulse components. We observe that all sidebands of the pulse experience the same round-trip time although they have different round-trip distances and refractive indices. The pulse-shaping of the DUF laser is dominated by the dissipative processes in addition to the phase modulations, which makes our ultrafast laser simple and stable. This laser provides a simple, stable, low-cost, ultrafast-pulsed source with controllable and changeable cavity frequency. PMID:25765454

  12. Laser biostimulation in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utz, Irina A.; Lagutina, L. E.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper the method and apparatus for percutaneous laser irradiation of blood (PLIB) in vessels (veins) are described. Results of clinical investigations of biostimulating effects under PLIB by red laser light (633 nm) in Cubiti and Saphena Magna veins are presented.

  13. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  14. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  15. Silicon Stokes terahertz laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, S. G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Hovenier, J. N.; Klaassen, T. O.; Carder, D. A.; Phillips, P. J.; Redlich, B.; Riemann, H.; Zhukavin, R. Kh.; Shastin, V. N.

    2007-04-10

    A Raman-type silicon laser at terahertz frequencies has been realized. Stokes-shifted stimulated emission has been observed from silicon crystals doped by antimony donors when optically excited by an infrared free electron laser. The Raman lasing was obtained due to resonant scattering on electronic states of a donor atom.

  16. Lasers in diagnostic dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorana, Brij M.

    1996-09-01

    Results of a new noninvasive technique for pulp detection that is based on monitoring the time variations in the laser speckle pattern from a human tooth are presented. The paper also contains preliminary results of experiments and attempts at mathematical modeling of multiple scattering of a laser beam from a solid cylinder.

  17. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Miller, John L.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window.

  18. Lasers for Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, C. A.

    A breadboard model of a laser display system is described in detail and its operating procedure is outlined. The system consists of: a Model 52 argon krypton ion laser and power supply; an optical breadboard comprising a pocket cell light modulator, a galvonmeter beam deflector for vertical scanning, a unique multiple reflection beam steerer for…

  19. Free-Electron Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brau, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of free-electron lasers as a source of coherent radiation over a broad range of wavelengths from the far-infrared to the far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. Discusses some applications of these lasers, including medicine and strategic defense. (TW)

  20. Coaxial short pulsed laser

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to a laser system of rugged design suitable for use in a field environment. The laser itself is of coaxial design with a solid potting material filling the space between components. A reservoir is employed to provide a gas lasing medium between an electrode pair, each of which is connected to one of the coaxial conductors. (auth)

  1. Laser hair removal pearls.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  2. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  3. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  4. Laser Chemical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zare, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews applications of laser methods to analytical problems, selecting examples from multiphoton ionization and fluorescence analysis. Indicates that laser methodologies promise to improve dramatically the detection of trace substances embedded in "real" matrices, giving the analyst a most powerful means for determining the composition of…

  5. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  6. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  7. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  8. Learning about Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Larry

    2011-01-01

    The word laser is an acronym. It stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers, invented in 1958, are used to cut and fuse materials, accurately survey long distances, communicate across fiber-optic phone lines, produce 3D pictures, make special effects, help navigation, and read bar codes for cash registers. A laser…

  9. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  10. Optofluidic chlorophyll lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Qiushu; Fan, Xudong

    2016-06-21

    Chlorophylls are essential for photosynthesis and also one of the most abundant pigments on earth. Using an optofluidic ring resonator of extremely high Q-factors (>10(7)), we investigated the unique characteristics and underlying mechanism of chlorophyll lasers. Chlorophyll lasers with dual lasing bands at 680 nm and 730 nm were observed for the first time in isolated chlorophyll a (Chla). Particularly, a laser at the 730 nm band was realized in 0.1 mM Chla with a lasing threshold of only 8 μJ mm(-2). Additionally, we observed lasing competition between the two lasing bands. The presence of laser emission at the 680 nm band can lead to quenching or significant reduction of laser emission at the 730 nm band, effectively increasing the lasing threshold for the 730 nm band. Further concentration-dependent studies, along with theoretical analysis, elucidated the mechanism that determines when and why the laser emission band appears at one of the two bands, or concomitantly at both bands. Finally, Chla was exploited as the donor in fluorescence resonance energy transfer to extend the laser emission to the near infrared regime with an unprecedented wavelength shift as large as 380 nm. Our work will open a door to the development of novel biocompatible and biodegradable chlorophyll-based lasers for various applications such as miniaturized tunable coherent light sources and in vitro/in vivo biosensing. It will also provide important insight into the chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis processes inside plants. PMID:27220992

  11. Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Darsa; Mueller, Guido; Thorpe, James; Livas, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Laser ranging and interferometry are essential technologies allowing for many astounding new spacebased missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to measure gravitational radiation emitted from distant super massive black hole mergers or distributed aperture telescopes with unprecedented angular resolution in the NIR or visible regime. The requirements on laser frequency noise depend on the residual motion and the distances between the spacecraft forming the interferometer. The intrinsic frequency stability of commercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above these requirements. Therefore, it is necessary for lasers to be stabilized to an ultrastable frequency reference so that they can be used to sense and control distances between spacecraft. Various optical frequency references and frequency stabilization schemes are considered and investigated for the applicability and usefulness for space-based interferometry missions.

  12. NASA Space Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the next two decades, the number of space based laser missions for mapping, spectroscopy, remote sensing and other scientific investigations will increase several fold. The demand for high wall-plug efficiency, low noise, narrow linewidth laser systems to meet different systems requirements that can reliably operate over the life of a mission will be high. The general trends will be for spatial quality very close to the diffraction limit, improved spectral performance, increased wall-plug efficiency and multi-beam processing. Improved spectral performance will include narrower spectral width (very near the transform limit), increased wavelength stability and or tuning (depending on application) and lasers reaching a wider range of wavelengths stretching into the mid-infrared and the near ultraviolet. We are actively developing high efficiency laser transmitter and high-sensitivity laser receiver systems that are suitable for spaceborne applications.

  13. Laser driven radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Sefcik, J.; Cowan, T.

    1997-12-20

    Intense laser (> 1021 W/cm{sup 3}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and potential cost advantage for multiple axis views. High spatial and temporal resolution is achievable as a result of the very small source size (<100 um) and short-duration of the laser pulse. We have begun a series of experiments with the Petawatt laser at LLNL to determine the photon flux achievable with these sources and assess their potential for Stewardship applications. Additionally, we are developing a conceptual design and cost estimate of a multi-pulse, multi-axis (up to five) radiographic facility utilizing the Contained Firing Facility at site 300 and existing laser hardware.

  14. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  15. IR laser chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quack, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Recent progress in IR laser chemistry is reviewed with stress on the conceptual background and experimental advances from our research group. In particular we discuss various experimental schemes in laser chemistry as related to thermal reactions and ordinary photochemistry, and new results in time and frequency resolved kinetic IR spectroscopy at the limit defined by the uncertainty relation. The recent detection of hyperfine effects in IR laser chemistry is reviewed as well as nonlinear intensity dependence over many orders of magnitude including observations of nonlinear intensity fall-off and IR laser ionization of molecules. An outlook is presented on different time scales for intramolecular processes and the resulting future possibilities of IR laser chemical reaction control.

  16. Auricular Acupuncture with Laser

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a method which has been successfully used in various fields of medicine especially in the treatment of pain relief. The introduction of lasers especially low-level lasers into medicine brought besides the already existing stimulation with needles and electricity an additional technique to auricular acupuncture. This literature research looks at the historical background, the development and the anatomical and neurological aspects of auricular acupuncture in general and auricular laser acupuncture in detail. Preliminary scientific findings on auricular acupuncture with laser have been described in detail and discussed critically in this review article. The results of the studies have shown evidence of the effect of auricular laser acupuncture. However, a comparison of these studies was impossible due to their different study designs. The most important technical as well as study parameters were described in detail in order to give more sufficient evidence and to improve the quality of future studies. PMID:23935695

  17. Regenerative similariton laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Thibault; Brès, Camille-Sophie

    2016-05-01

    Self-pulsating lasers based on cascaded reshaping and reamplification (2R) are capable of initiating ultrashort pulses despite the accumulation of large amounts of nonlinearities in all-fiber resonators. The spectral properties of pulses in self-similar propagation are compatible with cascaded 2R regeneration by offset filtering, making parabolic pulses suitable for the design of a laser of this recently introduced class. A new type of regenerative laser giving birth to similaritons is numerically investigated and shows that this laser is the analog of regenerative sources based solely on self-phase modulation and offset filtering. The regenerative similariton laser does not suffer from instabilities due to excessive nonlinearities and enables ultrashort pulse generation in a simple cavity configuration.

  18. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  19. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  20. [Laser technology in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Frentzen, M; Koort, H J

    1991-07-01

    Although dental laser treatment is receiving great attention in basic and clinical research, only very few clinical applications have emerged as accepted standard methods. The most promising range of possible applications includes diagnostics and surgery. Most laser systems developed for therapeutic use are heat-producing units, i.e. they convert electromagnetic energy into thermal energy. These systems are employed above all in oral surgery for vaporization, cutting or coagulation of soft tissues and in prosthodontics for welding. More recently, new types of lasers have been developed allowing non-thermal modes of tissue interaction. A great number of technical and biological problems will have to be solved, however, before these laser systems will be practically applicable in such clinical fields as, for instance, caries therapy. In the near future, laser systems are expected to complete and supplement conventional methods in diagnosis and treatment, but not to replace them.

  1. Super-Compact Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc. produced the portable Farfield-2 laser for field applications that require high power pulsed illumination. The compact design was conceived through research at Goddard Space Flight Center on laser instruments for space missions to carry out geoscience studies of Earth. An exclusive license to the key NASA patent for the compact laser design was assigned to Microcosm. The FarField-2 is ideal for field applications, has low power consumption, does not need water cooling or gas supplies, and produces nearly ideal beam quality. The properties of the laser also make it effective over long distances, which is one reason why NASA developed the technology for laser altimeters that can be toted aboard spacecraft. Applications for the FarField-2 include medicine, biology, and materials science and processing, as well as diamond marking, semiconductor line-cutting, chromosome surgery, and fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Krech, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of computer codes for the thrust chamber of a rocket of which the propellant gas is heated by a CW laser beam was investigated. The following results are presented: (1) simplified models of laser heated thrusters for approximate parametric studies and performance mapping; (3) computer programs for thrust chamber design; and (3) shock tube experiment to measure absorption coefficients. Two thrust chamber design programs are outlined: (1) for seeded hydrogen, with both low temperature and high temperature seeds, which absorbs the laser radiation continuously, starting at the inlet gas temperature; and (2) for hydrogen seeded with cesium, in which a laser supported combustion wave stands near the gas inlet, and heats the gas up to a temperature at which the gas can absorb the laser energy.

  3. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-12-12

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  4. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  5. Laser controlled flame stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Thomas, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

  6. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  7. Laser conservation paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    2001-10-01

    Just as lasers have found countless applications in science, industry, medicine, and entertainment, an array of real and potential uses for lasers in art-conservation analytes and practice have been investigated over the past thirty years. These include holographic recording, holographic recording, holographic nondestructive testing, laser-induced ultrasonic imaging, laser-scattering surface characterization, atomic and molecular analyses, photoacoustic spectroscopy, surface modification, as well as surface divestment and cleaning. The initial endeavors in exploring and assessing the utility of these tools for art conservation are recounted for investigations involving ruby, glass, ion, YAG, carbon dioxide, dye, and excimer lasers as well as high-intensity nonlaser light generators such as xenon flashlamps and argon pinchlamps. Initially, laser divestment/cleaning was, by general consensus, the least plausible laser application in art conservation. In the past ten years it has emerged to dominate all the other applications noted above. Today, at least a dozen firms supply user-friendly laser systems optimized for a range of art-conservation divestment applications. The first-generation laser-cleaning tools are essentially a laser, a beam-delivery device, and a debris- collection accessory. Advanced developmental work has turned in large measure to ancillary subsystems for more sophisticated process control. Of particular importance are acoustic, optical, spectral, EMP, and electronic-vision process control. Beam direction may be via manual, translational-scanner, or robotic beam positioning implemented by means of fiber optics, minors, or prisms and computer control. Substrate thermal alteration and debris redeposition may be minimized or avoided through the incorporation of a gas jet, fluid or fluid jet, or dry-ice blast.

  8. Laboratory x ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. L.

    1989-08-01

    One of the most innovative spinoffs of ICF technology and physics was the development of the x ray wavelength laser. The first incontrovertible demonstration of this type of laser came from LLNL in 1984 using the Novette laser to pump a selenium foil target. The power and energy of Novette were then needed to produce a column of plasma of sufficient length to achieve a sufficient gainlength product (approximately 5.5, this corresponds to an amplification of approximately 250X) that could unquestionably illustrate the lasing effect. LLNL ICF expertise was also required to develop time-resolved spectrometers used to view the lasing transitions at approximately 20 nm, a region of the XUV spectrum normally dominated by high backgrounds. The design of the x ray laser amplifier, which required maintaining nonequilibrium level populations in a tailored plasma having the proper conditions for gain and x ray laser beam propagation, was accomplished with modified versions of ICF kinetics and hydrodynamics codes. Since the first demonstration, progress in the development of the x ray laser was rapid. New achievements include production of megawatt power levels at 20 nm, amplified spontaneous emission levels approaching saturation intensity GL of approximately 17 at 20 nm, efficiency (x ray laser energy/pump energy) approximately 10(exp 6), the demonstration of double and triple pass amplification (hinting at the possibility of producing x ray wavelength resonators), the focusing of x ray lasers to pump other types of lasers and the first demonstration of an x ray hologram produced by an x ray laser. The generation of amplification at ever shorter wavelength is possible using various types of inversion schemes. We depict below this progress benchmarked against production of gain in the water window (2.2 to 4.4 nm,), where applications to biological imaging may be facilitated.

  9. On efeito do achatamento nos pontos de equilíbrio e na dinâmica de sistemas coorbitais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão, D. C.; Winter, O. C.; Yokoyama, T.

    2003-08-01

    Neste trabalho analisamos o efeito do achatamento do corpo principal nos pontos de equilíbrio lagrangianos e na configuração de órbitas girino-ferradura. Enfatizamos os sistemas coorbitais de satélites de Saturno, pois se encontram em relativa proximidade com o planeta, em que o efeito do achatamento se torna mais evidente. O estudo é dividido em três etapas independentes. Na primeira fase analisamos as equações de movimento do problema restrito de três corpos considerando o efeito do achatamento, e através do balanceamento de forças buscamos a nova configuração dos pontos de equilíbrio lagrangianos. Concluímos, nesta etapa, que os pontos de equilíbrio estáveis apresentam um pequeno deslocamento definido pelo parâmetro de achatamento, não podendo ser mais representados por triângulos eqüiláteros. Aplicamos este resultado aos satélites coorbitais de Tetis e Dione, encontrando as posições de equilíbrio levemente deslocadas em relação ao caso sem achatamento. Na segunda fase visamos o sistema Saturno-Jano-Epimeteu, que por se tratar de um sistema de massas comparáveis, optamos por desenvolver as equações de Yoder et al (Icarus 53, pág 431-443, 1983), que permitem determinar os pontos de equilíbrio e a amplitude de oscilação angular das órbitas girino-ferradura para o problema não-restrito de três corpos, porém, no nosso estudo consideramos o efeito do achatamento do corpo principal nestas equações. Encontramos que a distância angular entre satélites, quando em posição de equilíbrio estável, diminui quanto maior for o parâmetro de achatamento do corpo principal. Além disso, a órbita de transição girino-ferradura possui largura angular menor em relação ao caso sem achatamento. Por fim, realizamos integrações numéricas para os casos reais de coorbitais de Saturno comparando com os resultados analíticos. Nestas integrações simulamos diversas órbitas girino-ferradura com diferentes parâmetros de achatamento

  10. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  11. State-to-State Quantum Dynamics of Reactions O((3)P) + HD (v = 0-1, j = 0) → OH+D and OD+H: Reaction Mechanism and Vibrational Excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Gao, Shou-Bao; Wu, Hui; Meng, Qing-Tian

    2015-08-27

    Time-dependent quantum wave packet dynamics calculations have been performed in order to characterize the dynamics and mechanism of O((3)P) + HD (v = 0-1, j = 0) → OH+D and OD+H reactive collisions using the adiabatic potential energy surface by Rogers et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 2308] Special attention has been paid to the calculations and discussion of the state resolved integral and differential cross sections and the product state distributions. In addition, the intramolecular isotopic branching ratio has been determined. The results revealed that the OD + H is the favored product channel and the product OH has the same quantum number v as the reactant HD. For low collision energy, the product angular distributions concentrate in the backward region being consistent with a rebounding mechanism. In the case of higher collision energy, the stripping collisions with larger impact parameters tend to produce sideways and forward scatterings, especially for the HD vibrationally excited state. The cross section and intramolecular isotopic branching ratio are in agreement with the previous theoretical results. A cartoon depiction collision model is built and works well for our calculation results. PMID:26247698

  12. Consistency analysis on laser signal in laser guided weapon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ruiguang; Zhang, Wenpan; Guo, Hao; Gan, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The hardware-in-the-loop simulation is widely used in laser semi-active guidance weapon experiments, the authenticity of the laser guidance signal is the key problem of reliability. In order to evaluate the consistency of the laser guidance signal, this paper analyzes the angle of sight, laser energy density, laser spot size, atmospheric back scattering, sun radiation and SNR by comparing the different working state between actual condition and hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Based on measured data, mathematical simulation and optical simulation result, laser guidance signal effects on laser seeker are determined. By using Monte Carlo method, the laser guided weapon trajectory and impact point distribution are obtained, the influence of the systematic error are analyzed. In conclusion it is pointed out that the difference between simulation system and actual system has little influence in normal guidance, has great effect on laser jamming. The research is helpful to design and evaluation of laser guided weapon simulation.

  13. RGB lasers for laser projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollemann, Guenter; Braun, Bernhard; Dorsch, Friedhelm; Hennig, Petra; Heist, Peter; Krause, Ulf; Kutschki, Uwe; Voelckel, Hermann A.

    2000-04-01

    JENOPTIK Laser, Optik, Systeme GmbH has developed for the first industrial all-solid-state Red-Green-Blue laser system for large image projection systems. Compact in design (0.75 m3, 180 kg, 3 kW power consumption), the system consists of a modelocked oscillator amplifier subsystem with 7 ps pulse duration and 85 MHz pulse repetition frequency, an optical parametric oscillator, and several non-linear stages to generate radiation at 628 nm, 532 nm and 446 nm with an average output power above 18 W. Each of the three colors is modulated with the video signal in a contrast ratio of 1000:1 and coupled into a common low order multi mode fiber. The system architecture relies on efficiently manufacturable components. With the help of FEM analysis, new engineering design principles and subsequent climatic and mechanical tests, a length stability below 50 micrometers and an angle stability below 10 (mu) rad have been achieved. The design includes efficient laser diodes with integrated thermo- electric cooler and a lifetime above 10000 hours. The stability of the output power is better than +/- 2% in a temperature range from 5 degree(s)C to 40 degree(s)C. The system operates reliably for more than 10000 hours under field conditions. The design is based (among others) on work by Laser-Display-Technologie KG and the University of Kaiserslautern.

  14. A scaling model for plasma columns produced by CO2 laser-induced breakdown in a solenoidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlborn, B.; Vlases, G. C.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.

    1982-12-01

    An analytical model is derived for the plasma cylinder produced by a long pulse (approximately microsec) CO2 laser of power p(l) (watts) which is incident upon neutral hydrogen imbedded in a strong axial magnetic field. Under certain conditions the leading edge of the plasma propagates away from the laser as an optical detonation, where the leading shock front fully ionizes the background gas, and the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption zone immediately behind it is equivalent to the chemical energy release zone in an ordinary detonation. The front velocity is V(od) = (3E(i)/m) to the 1/2 power, where E(i) is the ionization (and dissociation) energy. This velocity is in agreement with experiments and with certain stability considerations. Radial expansion takes place immediately behind the detonation front and reduces the density to about 1/3 of the initial filling gas density. Far behind the leading edge, the laser-produced plasma acquires an equilibrium radius and steady pressure, density, and temperature determined by a balance between laser energy absorption and conduction and radiation losses. The density profile maintains a shallow minimum on axis.

  15. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  16. Laser Transmitter Design for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afzal, R. S.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W.; Lukemire, A.; Dallas, J. L.; Schroeder, B.; Green, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    NASA is embarking on a new era of laser remote sensing instruments from space. This paper focuses specifically on the laser technology involved in one of the present NASA missions. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) scheduled to launch in 2001 is a laser altimeter and lidar for the Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter for this space-based remote sensing instrument is discussed in the context of the mission requirements.

  17. Lasers in digestive endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetaud, Jean Marc; Maunoury, Vincent; Cochelard, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Lasers were introduced in digestive endoscopy to stop active gastroduodenal hemorrhages. Their use spread progressively to the treatment of chronic hemorrhages from vascular malformations and sessile tumors. Laser face competition from other endoscopic techniques such as electrocoagulation, injection techniques, dilation, stents, and brachytherapy. Many series have reported the efficacy of lasers in digestive endoscopy used for their thermal or photochemical effects. However, they were gradually abandoned for the treatment of hemorrhages because of competition from nonlaser techniques. Lasers are still used for ablation of sessile tumors, but their true impact is difficult to evaluate. Modern methods of technology assessment did not allow gastroenterologists to clearly define the place of lasers among surgery, radio-chemotherapy, and other endoscopic techniques, and data on the daily use of lasers are not available. Therefore, the conclusion can only be subjective. The best current application of thermal lasers appears to be in the treatment of rectosigmoid villous adenomas in elderly patients. Small superficial rectal cancers may also become a good subject due to the impact of endoscopic ultrasonography. Early lesions with multifocal or diffuse disease such as early esophageal cancers could be the most promising subject of application for photodynamic therapy in the future.

  18. History of lasers.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andreas J; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2007-06-01

    The developments of laser technology from the cradle of modern physics in 1900 by Planck to its latest medical boundaries is an exciting example of how basic physics finds its way into clinical practice. This article merits the protagonists and their contribution to the steps in this development. The competition between the different research groups finally led to the award of the Nobel Prize to Townes, Basov and Prokhorov in 1964 for the scientific basis on quantum electronics, which led to the construction of oscillators and amplifiers based on the laser-maser principle. Forty-three years after Einstein's first theories Maiman introduced the first ruby laser for commercial use. This marked the key step for the laser application and pioneered fruitful cooperations between basic and clinical science. The pioneers of lasers in clinical urology were Parsons in 1966 with studies in canine bladders and Mulvany 1968 with experiments in calculi fragmentation. The central technological component for the triumphal procession of lasers in urology is the endoscope. Therefore lasers are currently widely used, being the tool of choice in some areas, such as endoscopical lithotriptic stone treatment or endoluminal organ-preserving tumor ablation. Furthermore they show promising treatment alternatives for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. PMID:17564717

  19. Laser Propulsion Standardization Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Sinko, John E.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    It is a relevant issue in the research on laser propulsion that experimental results are treated seriously and that meaningful scientific comparison is possible between groups using different equipment and measurement techniques. However, critical aspects of experimental measurements are sparsely addressed in the literature. In addition, few studies so far have the benefit of independent confirmation by other laser propulsion groups. In this paper, we recommend several approaches towards standardization of published laser propulsion experiments. Such standards are particularly important for the measurement of laser ablation pulse energy, laser spot area, imparted impulse or thrust, and mass removal during ablation. Related examples are presented from experiences of an actual scientific cooperation between NU and DLR. On the basis of a given standardization, researchers may better understand and contribute their findings more clearly in the future, and compare those findings confidently with those already published in the laser propulsion literature. Relevant ISO standards are analyzed, and revised formats are recommended for application to laser propulsion studies.

  20. Laser acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.L.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W.B.; Schroeder, C.B.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1997-02-01

    This paper explores the use of the large electric fields of high-brightness lasers (e.g., up to order TV/cm) to accelerate particles. Unfortunately, as is well known, it is difficult to couple the vacuum field of the laser to particles so as to achieve a net energy gain. In principle, the energy gain near the focus of the laser can be quite high, i.e., on the order of the work done in crossing the focus {Delta}{gamma}={radical}({pi})eEw{approximately}30MeV{radical}(P/1TW), where P is the laser power. In order to retain this energy, the particles must be in the highly nonlinear regime (Vosc/c{gt}1) or must be separated from the laser within a distance on the order of a Rayleigh length from the focus. In this work, we explore the acceleration and output energy distribution of an electron beam injected at various angles and injection energies into a focused laser beam. Insight into the physical mechanism of energy gain is obtained by separating the contributions from the longitudinal and transverse laser field components. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. A borane laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdán, Luis; Braborec, Jakub; Garcia-Moreno, Inmaculada; Costela, Angel; Londesborough, Michael G. S.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from electronically excited species forms the basis for an important class of light sources—lasers. So far, commercially available solution-processed blue-emitting laser materials are based on organic compounds or semiconductor nanocrystals that have significant limitations: either low solubility, low chemical- and/or photo-stability and/or uncompetitive prices. Here we report a novel and competitive alternative to these existing laser materials that is based on boron hydrides, inorganic cluster compounds with a rich and diverse chemistry. We demonstrate that solutions of the borane anti-B18H22 show, under pulsed excitation, blue laser emission at 406 nm with an efficiency (ratio of output/input energies) of 9.5%, and a photostability superior to many of the commercially available state-of-the-art blue laser dyes. This demonstration opens the doors for the development of a whole new class of laser materials based on a previously untapped resource for laser technology—the boranes.

  2. Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer of 2,5-bis(5-ethyl-2-benzoxazolyl)-hydroquinone and its OH/OD-isotopomers studied in supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peukert, Sebastian; Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Sepioł, Jerzy

    2015-11-01

    The Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) reactions of dually fluorescent 2,5-bis(5-ethyl-2-benzoxazolyl)-hydroquinone (DE-BBHQ) and its isotopomers have been studied in the supersonic jet applying laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and fluorescence-depletion (F-D) spectroscopy. LIF-spectra measured at photo-tautomeric (red) fluorescence exhibit a characteristic triplet pattern of vibronic bands, which gradually collapses upon successive deuteration. Complementary TDDFT calculations indicate the possibility of 2 consecutive ESIPT reactions yielding an excited state diketo-tautomer. However, concerning this matter the present experimental results are not unambiguous and could be also rationalized without assuming the formation of an additional photo-tautomer.

  3. Analog Simulation of a Laser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Gary

    1982-01-01

    Presents an analog simulation of laser properties (finding time evolution of the intensity of a ruby laser pulse) which serves as the basis of a three-four hour laboratory experiment. Includes programs for solution to rate equations of a three-level laser and production of a giant pulse in a ruby laser. (Author/SK)

  4. Ultra-fast laser system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos; Lozovoy, Vadim V

    2014-01-21

    A laser system is provided which selectively excites Raman active vibrations in molecules. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and remote sensing.

  5. 1982 laser program annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.; Grow, G.R.

    1983-08-01

    This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)

  6. Piezoelectric measurement of laser power

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Johnson, John A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    A method for measuring the energy of individual laser pulses or a series of laser pulses by reading the output of a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer which has received a known fraction of the total laser pulse beam. An apparatus is disclosed that reduces the incident energy on the PZ transducer by means of a beam splitter placed in the beam of the laser pulses.

  7. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  8. Laser treatment for skin disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima; Cepulis, Vytautas; Ponomarev, Igor V.

    1996-12-01

    The correct selection of patients is the most difficult part of the laser treatment. Since 1985 the total number of patients treated by us using different laser systems was 1544. High power lasers: Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers were used by us for surgical treatment. Low power lasers: Helium-Neon, Copper vapor, gold vapor and dye lasers were applied by us to PDT or to treatment of port wine hemangiomas. this paper reports our efforts in selecting the patients with different skin lesions for the treatment with different laser systems.

  9. Optimising Laser Tattoo Removal

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Kabir; Ranjan, Rashmi; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are the standard modality for tattoo removal. Though there are various factors that determine the results, we have divided them into three logical headings, laser dependant factors such as type of laser and beam modifications, tattoo dependent factors like size and depth, colour of pigment and lastly host dependent factors, which includes primarily the presence of a robust immune response. Modifications in the existing techniques may help in better clinical outcome with minimal risk of complications. This article provides an insight into some of these techniques along with a detailed account of the factors involved in tattoo removal. PMID:25949018

  10. Ring laser gyroscope anode

    SciTech Connect

    Ljung, B.H.

    1981-03-17

    An anode for a ring laser gyroscope which provides improved current stability in the glow discharge path is disclosed. The anode of this invention permits operation at lower currents thereby allowing a reduction of heat dissipation in the ring laser gyroscope. The anode of one embodiment of this invention is characterized by a thumbtack appearance with a spherical end where the normal sharp end of the thumbtack would be located. The stem of the anode extends from the outside of the gyroscope structure to the interior of the structure such that the spherical end is substantially adjacent to the laser beam.

  11. Laser remote sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    The properties and advantages of remote sensing lasers are discussed. The theory of nonresonant techniques, which is based on the lidar equation and elastic backscatter, and their applications to aerosol and meteorological parameters are examined. The characteristics and applications of the differential absorption lidar technique, the fluorescence technique, and Raman scattering are described. The use of a laser heterodyne radiometer and fiber optics for remote sensing is studied. Future developments in the field of remote sensing, in particular the improvement of laser sources, the fabrication of compact remote sensing instruments, and space-borne applications for lidar, are considered.

  12. Diatomic gasdynamic lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Predictions from a numerical model of the vibrational relaxation of anharmonic diatomic oscillators in supersonic expansions are used to show the extent to which the small anharmonicity of gases like CO can cause significant overpopulations of upper vibrational states. When mixtures of CO and N2 are considered, radiative gain on many of the vibration-rotation transitions of CO is predicted. Experiments are described that qualitatively verify the predictions by demonstrating laser oscillation in CO-N2 expansions. The resulting CO-N2 gasdynamic laser displays performance characteristics that equal or exceed those of similar CO2 lasers.

  13. Diatomic gasdynamic lasers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Predictions from a numerical model of the vibrational relaxation of anharmonic diatomic oscillators in supersonic expansions are used to show the extent to which the small anharmonicity of gases like CO can cause significant overpopulations of upper vibrational states. When mixtures of CO and N2 are considered, radiative gain on many of the vibration-rotation transitions of CO is predicted. Experiments are described that qualitatively verify the predictions by demonstrating laser oscillation in CO-N2 expansions. The resulting CO-N2 gasdynamic laser displays performance characteristics that equal or exceed those of similar CO2 lasers.

  14. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  15. Laser adaptive holographic hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashko, R. V.; Kulchin, Yu N.; Bezruk, M. N.; Ermolaev, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new type of a laser hydrophone based on dynamic holograms, formed in a photorefractive crystal, is proposed and studied. It is shown that the use of dynamic holograms makes it unnecessary to use complex optical schemes and systems for electronic stabilisation of the interferometer operating point. This essentially simplifies the scheme of the laser hydrophone preserving its high sensitivity, which offers the possibility to use it under a strong variation of the environment parameters. The laser adaptive holographic hydrophone implemented at present possesses the sensitivity at a level of 3.3 mV Pa-1 in the frequency range from 1 to 30 kHz.

  16. Color speckle in laser displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    At the beginning of this century, lighting technology has been shifted from discharge lamps, fluorescent lamps and electric bulbs to solid-state lighting. Current solid-state lighting is based on the light emitting diodes (LED) technology, but the laser lighting technology is developing rapidly, such as, laser cinema projectors, laser TVs, laser head-up displays, laser head mounted displays, and laser headlamps for motor vehicles. One of the main issues of laser displays is the reduction of speckle noise1). For the monochromatic laser light, speckle is random interference pattern on the image plane (retina for human observer). For laser displays, RGB (red-green-blue) lasers form speckle patterns independently, which results in random distribution of chromaticity, called color speckle2).

  17. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  18. Laser applications in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Leonard J.

    1985-09-01

    The "false start" of the laser in neurosurgery should not be misconstrued as a denial of the inherent advantages of precision and gentleness in dealing with neural tissue. Rather, early investigators were frustrated by unrealistic expectations, cumbersome equipment, and a general ignorance of microtechnique. By the early 70s, microneurosurgery was well established, surgical laser equipment for free hand and microlinked application had been developed, and a more realistic view of the limitations of the laser had been established. Consequently, the late 70s really heralded the renaissance of the laser in neurosurgery. Since then, there has been an overwhelming acceptance of the tool in a variety of clinical situations, broadly categorized in five groups. 1)|Perhaps the most generally accepted area is in the removal of extra-axial tumors of the brain and spinal cord. These tumors, benign by histology but treacherous by location, do not present until a significant amount of neurological compensation has already occurred. The application of additional trauma to the neural tissue, whether by further tumor growth or surgical manipulation, frequently results in irreversible damage. Here, the ability of the laser to vaporize tissue, in a fairly hemostatic fashion, without mechanical or thermal damage to sensitive surrounding tissues, is essential. 2)|The ability to incise delicate neural tissue with minimal spread of thermal destruction to adjacent functioning tissue makes the laser the ideal instrument when tumors deep under the surface are encountered in the brain or spinal cord. Thus, the second group of applications is in the transgression of normal neural structures to arrive at deeper pathological tissue. 3)|The third area of benefit for the laser in neurosurgery has been in the performance of neuroablative procedures, calling for deliberate destruction of functioning neural tissue in a controlled fashion. Again, the precision and shape confinement of the destructive

  19. Medical applications of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancha, Sylvia D.; Keipert, Andreas; Prairie, Michael W.

    1994-06-01

    The High Power Semiconductor Laser Technology (HPSLT) program is currently developing, in-house, a belt pack medical laser. This compact semiconductor laser device provides the field paramedic or physician a unique portable laser capability. The pack consists of a completely self-contained laser system that fits inside a belt pack. Several other medical applications being investigated by the HPSLT program include urological applications, photodynamic therapy, and ophthalmic applications.

  20. The fiberoptics and laser handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safford, E. L., Jr.

    The basic principles and current applications of optical fibers (OF) and lasers are presented in a handbook intended for a general audience. Topics covered include the fundamentals of light propagation in space and media, industrial applications of OF, the manufacture and use of OF, OF experiments, the importance of lenses, the physics of lasers, basic types of lasers, laser applications (general and communications), and cable-TV applications of lasers and OF. Drawings, diagrams, and a glossary of terms are provided.