Science.gov

Sample records for effect background correction

  1. Reducing background effects in orchards through spectral vegetation index correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beek, Jonathan; Tits, Laurent; Somers, Ben; Deckers, Tom; Janssens, Pieter; Coppin, Pol

    2015-02-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides an alternative to time-consuming and labor intensive in situ measurements of biophysical variables in agricultural crops required for precision agriculture applications. In orchards, however, the spatial resolution causes mixtures of canopies and background (i.e. soil, grass and shadow), hampering the estimation of these biophysical variables. Furthermore, variable background mixtures obstruct meaningful comparisons between different orchard blocks, rows or within each row. Current correction methodologies use spectral differences between canopies and background, but struggle with a vegetated orchard floor. This background influence and the lack of a generic solution are addressed in this study. Firstly, the problem was demonstrated in a controlled environment for vegetation indices sensitive to chlorophyll content, water content and leaf area index. Afterwards, traditional background correction methods (i.e. soil-adjusted vegetation indices and signal unmixing) were compared to the proposed vegetation index correction. This correction was based on the mixing degree of each pixel (i.e. tree cover fraction) to rescale the vegetation indices accordingly and was applied to synthetic and WorldView-2 satellite imagery. Through the correction, the effect of background admixture for vegetation indices was reduced, and the estimation of biophysical variables was improved (ΔR2 = 0.2-0.31).

  2. Vegetation index correction to reduce background effects in orchards with high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beek, Jonathan; Tits, Laurent; Somers, Ben; Deckers, Tom; Janssens, Pieter; Coppin, Pol

    2014-10-01

    High spatial resolution satellite imagery provides an alternative for time consuming and labor intensive in situ measurements of biophysical variables, such as chlorophyll and water content. However, despite the high spatial resolution of current satellite sensors, mixtures of canopies and backgrounds will be present, hampering the estimation of biophysical variables. Traditional correction methodologies use spectral differences between canopies and backgrounds, but fail with spectrally similar canopies and backgrounds. In this study, the lack of a generic solution to reduce background effects is tackled. Through synthetic imagery, the mixture problem was demonstrated with regards to the estimation of biophysical variables. A correction method was proposed, rescaling vegetation indices based on the canopy cover fraction. Furthermore, the proposed method was compared to traditional background correction methodologies (i.e. soil-adjusted vegetation indices and signal unmixing) for different background scenarios. The results of a soil background scenario showed the inability of soil-adjusted vegetation indices to reduce background admixture effects, while signal unmixing and the proposed method removed background influences for chlorophyll (ΔR2 = ~0.3; ΔRMSE = ~1.6 μg/cm2) and water (ΔR2 = ~0.3; ΔRMSE = ~0.5 mg/cm2) related vegetation indices. For the weed background scenario, signal unmixing was unable to remove the background influences for chlorophyll content (ΔR2 = -0.1; ΔRMSE = -0.6 μg/cm 2 ), while the proposed correction method reduced background effects (ΔR2= 0.1; ΔRMSE = 0.4 μg/cm2). Overall, the proposed vegetation index correction method reduced the background influence irrespective of background type, making useful comparison between management blocks possible.

  3. Whole blood thallium determination by GFAAS with high-frequency modulation polarization Zeeman effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Nikolay D; Ivanenko, Natalya B; Ivanenko, Anatoly A

    2011-10-01

    A new technique of blood thallium direct determination based on graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background absorption correction system was designed. The developed technique does not require sample digestion. Sample treatment includes only a fivefold per volume dilution of blood sample with 0.1% (m/v) Triton X-100. L'vov integrated platform was modified with 400 μg of Rh. Matrix modifier (200 μg NH(4)NO(3) and 160 μg Pd(NO(3))(2)) was suggested for coping chloride and blood organic matter interferences. Standard reference material (Clincheck® Plasma Control for trace elements) analysis was used for validation. Additional validation was performed by analyzing spiked blood samples in the whole dynamic range. The dynamic range was 2-50 μg/L. Precision (RSD) was found <12%. Blood thallium limit of detection was 0.2 μg/L.

  4. Determination of nickel in saliva by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using various chemical modifiers with Zeeman-effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Burguera, E; Sanchez de Briceño, A; Rondon, C E; Burguera, J L; Burguera, M; Carrero, P

    1998-07-01

    The profile of nickel signal using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium and Zeeman-effect background correction is presented. The Zeeman effect system of background correction offered definitive advantages and therefore was used for the determination of nickel in saliva in the presence of various isomorphous metals. The highest nickel absorbance values corresponded at 200, 300, 300, 300, 600, and 200 ng of Tb, Mg, Sm, Lu, Tm, and Pd, respectively. On the other hand, the addition of Eu, Er, and Ho decreased the nickel signal. The presence on each modifier alone does not eliminate the matrix interference. However, the use of 200 ng of Pd in conjuction with 300 ng of Lu has a higher sensitivity, offers an advantage against interference from the background of saliva matrix and produces good recoveries (98 to 102% from unspiked and spiked saliva samples). The limit of detection was 0.11 micrograms/L for a characteristic mass of 16.6 pg of nickel using Pd-Lu as modifier. The within-batch precision varied between 0.8 and 1.5% relative standard deviations. The analysis of thirty samples of whole saliva gave an average of 0.81 +/- 0.30 of micrograms/L of Ni (range from 0.5 to 2.0 micrograms/L of Ni). The agreement between the observed and certified values obtained from a Seronorm Blood Serum Standard Reference Material was good.

  5. Chromium determination in pharmaceutical grade barium sulfate by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Bolzan, Rodrigo Cordeiro; Rodrigues, Luis Frederico; Mattos, Júlio Cezar Paz de; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes

    2007-11-15

    A procedure for chromium (Cr) determination in pharmaceutical grade barium sulfate by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (DSS-ET AAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction was developed. Operational conditions for the proposed procedure and the use of citric acid, ammonium phosphate, palladium and magnesium nitrate as chemical modifiers were evaluated. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were set at 1500 and 2400 degrees C, respectively and the use of matrix modifiers did not improve these conditions. Graphite platform presented high degradation rate, but minima changes were observed in the sensitivity or signal profile. Samples (0.3-1 mg) were weighted and introduced into the furnace using a manual solid sampling system. The linear concentration range of the calibration curve was from 100 to 1800 pg (R(2)>0.995). The characteristic mass was 7.7 pg and the limit of detection was 2.4 pg. Chromium concentration in commercial samples ranged from 0.45 to 1.06 microg g(-1) and these results were confirmed by standard addition method. The mean reproducibility was 12% (n=20 in a 3-day period) and repeatability was less than 9%. Results obtained using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after extraction with HNO3 were around 20% lower than those obtained by the proposed procedure. It was assumed that the low results were due to incomplete extraction even using hard conditions related to temperature and pressure. The proposed procedure by DSS-ET AAS provided some advantages related to recommended pharmacopoeias methodology, as lower risks of contamination and analyte losses, higher specificity, accuracy and sensitivity, no toxic or unstable reagents are required, and calibration with aqueous standards was feasible.

  6. Morphological weighted penalized least squares for background correction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Zhan, De-Jian; Wang, Jia-Jun; Huang, Jing; Xu, Qing-Song; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Yi-Bao; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Wang, Hong

    2013-08-21

    Backgrounds existing in the analytical signal always impair the effectiveness of signals and compromise selectivity and sensitivity of analytical methods. In order to perform further qualitative or quantitative analysis, the background should be corrected with a reasonable method. For this purpose, a new automatic method for background correction, which is based on morphological operations and weighted penalized least squares (MPLS), has been developed in this paper. It requires neither prior knowledge about the background nor an iteration procedure or manual selection of a suitable local minimum value. The method has been successfully applied to simulated datasets as well as experimental datasets from different instruments. The results show that the method is quite flexible and could handle different kinds of backgrounds. The proposed MPLS method is implemented and available as an open source package at http://code.google.com/p/mpls.

  7. Influence of experimental parameters on the determination of antimony in seawater by atomic absorption spectrometry using a transversely heated graphite furnace with Zeeman-effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Cabon, Jean Yves

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic and electrothermal conditions for the determination of antimony in seawater using a transversely heated graphite furnace with Zeeman-effect background correction have been optimized with the use of an a priori calculation of the detection limit. The lowest limit of detection was obtained with a 2 nm spectral curvatures bandwidth and the use of an electrodeless discharge lamp; however, these experimental conditions resulted in strong premature curvature of calibration curves. Pd(NO(3))(2) can be recommended as a chemical modifier because seawater interference effects are minimized and pretreatment curves up to 1500 degrees C can be used permitting the removal of the major part of the saline matrix before atomization. Under optimized spectroscopic and electrothermal conditions the obtained limit of detection of Sb in seawater was about 0.4 microg L(-1).

  8. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dilution air background emission correction. 1065.667 Section 1065.667 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements §...

  13. Political Correctness: Background, Perspective, and Implications for Student Affairs Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forney, Deanna S.

    1996-01-01

    Provides background information about the Political Correctness debate, encourages student affairs administrators to reflect on their own perceptions and actions, offers ideas and suggestions about the debate, and explores the debate's implications for student affairs staff. Is intended to promote both individual reflection and group discussions…

  14. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Aline R.; Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH4H2PO4 and NH4NO3/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH4H2PO4 was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH4NO3/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g- 1 using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g- 1 using NH4NO3/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g- 1 Pb for Ir and 10 ng g- 1 Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH4NO3/Pd.

  15. Star formation history, dust correction, and the extragalactic background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2016-01-01

    The intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL) from X-rays to infrared wavelengths is of a fundamental importance to study the physics of the intergalactic medium and the distant γ-ray sources. At any given epoch, it carries an imprint of the integrated cosmic star formation rate and quasar activity till that epoch. The EBL cannot be observed directly because of its low surface brightness beyond the local universe and one has to rely on the theoretical estimates. To obtain the EBL theoretically, one requires an accurate estimate of the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD), and the quasar emissivity. The estimates of SFRD are known to be degenerate with the amount of dust correction. To resolve this degeneracy, we present a novel 'progressive fitting method', which uses observed multi-wavelength and multi-epoch galaxy luminosity function measurements and determines a unique combination of the average SFRD(z) and dust attenuation AFUV(z) in the far ultraviolet band (FUV band; central wavelength~1500 Angstrom) for a given extinction curve. Using this method and the available observations, we determine the combinations of SFRD(z) and AFUV(z) up to z~8 for five well known extinction curves. The comparison with the independent SFRD(z), AFUV(z) and local infrared emissivity measurements from the literature with our predictions favor an extinction curve similar to that of Large Magellanic Cloud Supershell (LMC2). We update the quasar emissivity using the recent quasar luminosity function (QLF) measurements which show a factor of ~2 increase as compared to the previous QLFs at z<2. We show, the EBL estimated using this updated quasar emissivity and the SFRD(z) for LMC2 extinction curve resolves the problem of 'photon underproduction crisis' at low redshift. The EBL consistently reproduces the recent measurements of γ-ray horizon and the pair-production optical depths of γ-rays from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The effect of the updated EBL on the

  16. Determination of selenium in biological tissue samples rich in phosphorus using electrothermal atomization with Zeeman-effect background correction and (NH 4) 3RhCl 6+citric acid as a mixed chemical modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Li; Zhe-ming, Ni; Zhu, Rao

    1998-09-01

    Spectral interferences from phosphorus on the determination of selenium in biological tissue materials were not observed when a Zeeman-effect background correction was used with rhodium as a chemical modifier. A suppression effect on the selenium signal resulted when the concentration of phosphorus present was greater than 1.0 mg ml -1. Rhodium was found to be more effective than palladium in overcoming the phosphate interference. Analytical procedures for the direct determination of trace selenium in standard reference materials by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry following sample dissolution in nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide using a microwave oven has been described. The results obtained agreed favourably with the certified values.

  17. R2 corrections to holographic Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-qiang; Ma, Chong; Hou, De-fu; Chen, Gang

    2017-07-01

    We study R2 corrections to the holographic Schwinger effect in an AdS black hole background and a confining D3-brane background, respectively. The potential analysis for these backgrounds is presented. The critical values for the electric field are obtained. It is shown that for both backgrounds increasing the Gauss-Bonnet parameter the Schwinger effect is enhanced. Moreover, the results provide an estimate of how the Schwinger effect changes with the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, η / s, at strong coupling.

  18. Effect of different precursors on generation of reference spectra for structural molecular background correction by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: Determination of antimony in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Barros, Ariane Isis; Victor de Babos, Diego; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2016-12-01

    Different precursors were evaluated for the generation of reference spectra and correction of the background caused by SiO molecules in the determination of Sb in facial cosmetics by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry employing direct solid sample analysis. Zeolite and mica were the most effective precursors for background correction during Sb determination using the 217.581nm and 231.147nm lines. Full 2(3) factorial design and central composite design were used to optimize the atomizer temperature program. The optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1500 and 2100°C, respectively. A Pd(NO3)2/Mg(NO3)2 mixture was employed as the chemical modifier, and calibration was performed at 217.581nm with aqueous standards containing Sb in the range 0.5-2.25ng, resulting in a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 and a slope of 0.1548s ng(-1). The sample mass was in the range 0.15-0.25mg. The accuracy of the method was determined by analysis of Montana Soil (II) certified reference material, together with addition/recovery tests. The Sb concentration found was in agreement with the certified value, at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test). Recoveries of Sb added to the samples were in the range 82-108%. The limit of quantification was 0.9mgkg(-1) and the relative standard deviation (n=3) ranged from 0.5% to 7.1%. From thirteen analyzed samples, Sb was not detected in ten samples (blush, eye shadow and compact powder); three samples (two blush and one eye shadow) presented Sb concentration in the 9.1-14.5mgkg(-1) range.

  19. Van Allen Probes ECT/MagEIS Background Corrected Electron Flux Measurements: Methods and Initial Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Looper, M. D.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument, part ofthe Energetic Composition and Thermal Plasma (ECT) Suite, onboard the NASA Van AllenProbes spacecraft. The ECT/MagEIS instrument measures radiation belt electrons in the ~20-4000 keV energy range and protons in the ~60-1000 keV energy range, with high resolution inboth energy and pitch-angle. In addition, the MagEIS electron measurement technique allowsfor a full quantification of the source(s) of background contamination in the measurement.MagEIS is thus able to make clean, reliable electron flux observations in the presence of strongpenetrating backgrounds, for example, contamination from relativistic protons in the inner zoneand inner slot region. We summarize our background correction algorithm, describe the varioussources of background contamination, and present an overview of our initial findings using thebackground corrected data set. Understanding the causes and effects of backgroundcontamination in the MagEIS electron data set is crucial for the interpretation and proper use ofsuch data. The techniques described will facilitate new investigations into the dynamics of theEarth's electron radiation belts, which have thus far not been possible.

  20. Balanced calibration of resonant piezoelectric RL shunts with quasi-static background flexibility correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høgsberg, Jan; Krenk, Steen

    2015-04-01

    Resonant RL shunt circuits constitute a robust approach to piezoelectric damping, where the performance with respect to damping of flexible structures requires a precise calibration of the corresponding circuit components. The balanced calibration procedure of the present paper is based on equal damping of the two modes associated with the resonant vibration form of the structure, when including a quasi-static contribution from non-resonant vibration modes via a single background flexibility parameter. Explicit calibration formulae are presented, and it is demonstrated by a numerical example that the procedure leads to equal modal damping and effective response reduction, even for rather indirect placement of the transducer, provided that the correction for background flexibility is included in the calibration procedure.

  1. Background on Wisconsin's Prison and Community Corrections System. Staff Brief 86-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogar, Anne; Shannon, Pam

    This report was prepared for the Wisconsin State Legislative Council's Special Committee on Community Corrections Issues. It provides background information on the Wisconsin prison system for adults and the Wisconsin community corrections system for adults. Part I examines the prison system, focusing on administration of the system, sentencing…

  2. A Simple Robust Orthogonal Background Correction Method for Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Marcelo R.; Castells, Cecilia; Carr, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Background correction is a very important step that must be done before peak detection or any quantification procedure. When successful, this step greatly simplifies such procedures and enhances the accuracy of quantification. In the past, much effort has been invested to correct drifting baseline in one dimensional chromatography. In fast online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) coupled with diode array detector (DAD), the change in the refractive index (RI) of the mobile phase in very fast gradients causes extremely serious baseline disturbances. The method reported here can be combined with many of existing baseline correction methods for one dimensional (1D) chromatography in two dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography and recreate the background structure for further correction. When such methods are applied orthogonally to the second dimension (2D), the background correction is dramatically improved. It results in an almost zero mean background level and it provides better background correction than does a simple subtraction of a blank. Indeed, the method proposed does not require running a blank sample. PMID:22702415

  3. Stringy corrections to a time-dependent background solution of string and M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Niz, Gustavo; Turok, Neil

    2007-06-15

    We consider one of the simplest time-dependent backgrounds in M theory, describing the shrinking away of the M-theory dimension with the other spatial dimensions static. As the M-theory dimension becomes small, the situation becomes well described by string theory in a singular cosmological background where the string coupling tends to zero but the {alpha}{sup '} corrections become large, near the cosmic singularity. We compute these {alpha}{sup '} corrections, both for the background and for linearized perturbations, in heterotic string theory, and show that they may be reproduced by a map from 11-dimensional M theory.

  4. A comprehensive numerical analysis of background phase correction with V-SHARP.

    PubMed

    Özbay, Pinar Senay; Deistung, Andreas; Feng, Xiang; Nanz, Daniel; Reichenbach, Jürgen Rainer; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2017-04-01

    Sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data (SHARP) is a method to remove background field contributions in MRI phase images, which is an essential processing step for quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). To perform SHARP, a spherical kernel radius and a regularization parameter need to be defined. In this study, we carried out an extensive analysis of the effect of these two parameters on the corrected phase images and on the reconstructed susceptibility maps. As a result of the dependence of the parameters on acquisition and processing characteristics, we propose a new SHARP scheme with generalized parameters. The new SHARP scheme uses a high-pass filtering approach to define the regularization parameter. We employed the variable-kernel SHARP (V-SHARP) approach, using different maximum radii (Rm ) between 1 and 15 mm and varying regularization parameters (f) in a numerical brain model. The local root-mean-square error (RMSE) between the ground-truth, background-corrected field map and the results from SHARP decreased towards the center of the brain. RMSE of susceptibility maps calculated with a spatial domain algorithm was smallest for Rm between 6 and 10 mm and f between 0 and 0.01 mm(-1) , and for maps calculated with a Fourier domain algorithm for Rm between 10 and 15 mm and f between 0 and 0.0091 mm(-1) . We demonstrated and confirmed the new parameter scheme in vivo. The novel regularization scheme allows the use of the same regularization parameter irrespective of other imaging parameters, such as image resolution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Research and application of air mercury measurement based on transverse Zeeman background correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Si, Fuqi; Zeng, Yi; Li, Chuangxin; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-10-01

    Mercury is known as a highly toxic metal, which will have a significant health hazard to the human body. To monitor the trace mercury pollution in air, the development of monitoring instruments has been conducted. In this paper the mercury analyzer is developed based on the cold atomic absorption spectrometry theory by exploiting the transverse Zeeman-Effect background correction technology. The experiments have been done to test the performance of the system. At the same time, the same experiments with RA-915 mercury analyzer have been done to compare with the results. First, zero gas was measured for an hour and high concentration mercury sample gas was measured for four days. The results of zero gas shows that the detection limit of the system is 2.19ng/m3 and the standard deviation is 0.73. The concentration fluctuation is within a tight range of +/-1.5ng/m3. The results of high concentration sample gas are in good agreement with the results of RA-915, and the correlation coefficient is 0.95. Second, laboratory air was measured for 12 hours. The results compared with RA-915 are in good agreement and have the same variation trend. Additionally, the atmospheric mercury concentration near the non-ferrous metal smelter in Tongling city has been measured by the system and the RA-915. The measurement results from two analyzers have a good linear correlation with correlation coefficient of 0.98 and slope of 1.027. It indicates that the system has accurate background correction ability, low detection limit and is applicable to long-term air mercury on-line monitoring.

  6. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method

    PubMed Central

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17–19 mCi of 99mTc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of 99mTc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan. PMID:26955568

  7. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method.

    PubMed

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17-19 mCi of (99m)Tc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of (99m)Tc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan.

  8. ENmix: a novel background correction method for Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zongli; Niu, Liang; Li, Leping; Taylor, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip is increasingly utilized in epigenome-wide association studies, however, this array-based measurement of DNA methylation is subject to measurement variation. Appropriate data preprocessing to remove background noise is important for detecting the small changes that may be associated with disease. We developed a novel background correction method, ENmix, that uses a mixture of exponential and truncated normal distributions to flexibly model signal intensity and uses a truncated normal distribution to model background noise. Depending on data availability, we employ three approaches to estimate background normal distribution parameters using (i) internal chip negative controls, (ii) out-of-band Infinium I probe intensities or (iii) combined methylated and unmethylated intensities. We evaluate ENmix against other available methods for both reproducibility among duplicate samples and accuracy of methylation measurement among laboratory control samples. ENmix out-performed other background correction methods for both these measures and substantially reduced the probe-design type bias between Infinium I and II probes. In reanalysis of existing EWAS data we show that ENmix can identify additional CpGs, and results in smaller P-value estimates for previously-validated CpGs. We incorporated the method into R package ENmix, which is freely available from Bioconductor website. PMID:26384415

  9. Efficient Photometry In-Frame Calibration (EPIC) Gaussian Corrections for Automated Background Normalization of Rate-Tracked Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Wetterer, C.; Sydney, P.; Gerber, J.

    Photometric processing of non-resolved Electro-Optical (EO) images has commonly required the use of dark and flat calibration frames that are obtained to correct for charge coupled device (CCD) dark (thermal) noise and CCD quantum efficiency/optical path vignetting effects respectively. It is necessary to account/calibrate for these effects so that the brightness of objects of interest (e.g. stars or resident space objects (RSOs)) may be measured in a consistent manner across the CCD field of view. Detected objects typically require further calibration using aperture photometry to compensate for sky background (shot noise). For this, annuluses are measured around each detected object whose contained pixels are used to estimate an average background level that is subtracted from the detected pixel measurements. In a new photometric calibration software tool developed for AFRL/RD, called Efficient Photometry In-Frame Calibration (EPIC), an automated background normalization technique is proposed that eliminates the requirement to capture dark and flat calibration images. The proposed technique simultaneously corrects for dark noise, shot noise, and CCD quantum efficiency/optical path vignetting effects. With this, a constant detection threshold may be applied for constant false alarm rate (CFAR) object detection without the need for aperture photometry corrections. The detected pixels may be simply summed (without further correction) for an accurate instrumental magnitude estimate. The noise distribution associated with each pixel is assumed to be sampled from a Poisson distribution. Since Poisson distributed data closely resembles Gaussian data for parameterized means greater than 10, the data may be corrected by applying bias subtraction and standard-deviation division. EPIC performs automated background normalization on rate-tracked satellite images using the following technique. A deck of approximately 50-100 images is combined by performing an independent median

  10. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; ...

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less

  11. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  12. Cubic smoothing splines background correction in on-line liquid chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuligowski, Julia; Carrión, David; Quintás, Guillermo; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2010-10-22

    A background correction method for the on-line coupling of gradient liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (LC-FTIR) is proposed. The developed approach applies univariate background correction to each variable (i.e. each wave number) individually. Spectra measured in the region before and after each peak cluster are used as knots to model the variation of the eluent absorption intensity with time using cubic smoothing splines (CSS) functions. The new approach has been successfully tested on simulated as well as on real data sets obtained from injections of standard mixtures of polyethylene glycols with four different molecular weights in methanol:water, 2-propanol:water and ethanol:water gradients ranging from 30 to 90, 10 to 25 and from 10 to 40% (v/v) of organic modifier, respectively. Calibration lines showed high linearity with coefficients of determination higher than 0.98 and limits of detection between 0.4 and 1.4, 0.9 and 1.8, and 1.1 and 2.7 mgmL⁻¹ in methanol:water, 2-propanol:water and ethanol:water, respectively. Furthermore the method performance has been compared with a univariate background correction approach based on the use of a reference spectra matrix (UBC-RSM) to discuss the potential as well as pitfalls and drawbacks of the proposed approach. This method works without previous variable selection and provides minimal user-interaction, thus increasing drastically the feasibility of on-line coupling of gradient LC-FTIR. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Background music: effects on attention performance.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yi-Nuo; Huang, Rong-Hwa; Chiang, Hsin-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that noise may affect worker attention. However, some background music in the work environment can increase worker satisfaction and productivity. This study compared how music with, and without, lyrics affects human attention. One hundred and two participants, aged 20-24 years, were recruited into this study. Fifty-six males and 46 females participated in this study. Background music with, and without lyrics, was tested for effects on listener concentration in attention testing using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) study. The comparison results revealed that background music with lyrics had significant negative effects on concentration and attention. The findings suggest that, if background music is played in the work environment, music without lyrics is preferable because songs with lyrics are likely to reduce worker attention and performance.

  14. Piecing together the X-ray background: bolometric corrections for active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R. V.; Fabian, A. C.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray background can be used to constrain the accretion history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGN), with the SMBH mass density related to the energy density due to accretion. A knowledge of the hard X-ray bolometric correction, κ2-10keV, is a vital input into these studies, as it allows us to constrain the parameters of the accretion responsible for SMBH growth. Earlier studies assumed a constant bolometric correction for all AGN, and more recent work has suggested accounting for a dependence on AGN luminosity. Until recently, the variations in the disc emission in the ultraviolet (UV) have not been taken into account in this calculation; we show that such variations are important by construction of optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions for 54 AGN. In particular, we use Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) UV and X-ray data from the literature to constrain the disc emission as well as possible. We find evidence for very significant spread in the bolometric corrections, with no simple dependence on luminosity being evident. Populations of AGN such as narrow-line Seyfert 1 nuclei, radio-loud and X-ray-weak AGN may have bolometric corrections which differ systematically from the rest of the AGN population. We identify other sources of uncertainty including intrinsic extinction in the optical-UV, X-ray and UV variability and uncertainties in SMBH mass estimates. Our results suggest a more well-defined relationship between the bolometric correction and Eddington ratio in AGN, with a transitional region at an Eddington ratio of ~0.1, below which the bolometric correction is typically 15-25, and above which it is typically 40-70. We consider the potential-implied parallels with the low/hard and high/soft states in Galactic black hole (GBH) accretion, and present bolometric corrections for the GBH binary GX 339-4 for comparison. Our findings reinforce previous studies proposing a multistate description of AGN

  15. A distribution-free convolution model for background correction of oligonucleotide microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongxue; McGee, Monnie; Liu, Qingzhong; Kong, Megan; Deng, Youping; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Affymetrix GeneChip® high-density oligonucleotide arrays are widely used in biological and medical research because of production reproducibility, which facilitates the comparison of results between experiment runs. In order to obtain high-level classification and cluster analysis that can be trusted, it is important to perform various pre-processing steps on the probe-level data to control for variability in sample processing and array hybridization. Many proposed preprocessing methods are parametric, in that they assume that the background noise generated by microarray data is a random sample from a statistical distribution, typically a normal distribution. The quality of the final results depends on the validity of such assumptions. Results We propose a Distribution Free Convolution Model (DFCM) to circumvent observed deficiencies in meeting and validating distribution assumptions of parametric methods. Knowledge of array structure and the biological function of the probes indicate that the intensities of mismatched (MM) probes that correspond to the smallest perfect match (PM) intensities can be used to estimate the background noise. Specifically, we obtain the smallest q2 percent of the MM intensities that are associated with the lowest q1 percent PM intensities, and use these intensities to estimate background. Conclusion Using the Affymetrix Latin Square spike-in experiments, we show that the background noise generated by microarray experiments typically is not well modeled by a single overall normal distribution. We further show that the signal is not exponentially distributed, as is also commonly assumed. Therefore, DFCM has better sensitivity and specificity, as measured by ROC curves and area under the curve (AUC) than MAS 5.0, RMA, RMA with no background correction (RMA-noBG), GCRMA, PLIER, and dChip (MBEI) for preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data. These results hold for two spike-in data sets and one real data set that were

  16. Iterative Correction Scheme Based on Discrete Cosine Transform and L1 Regularization for Fluorescence Molecular Tomography With Background Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiulou; Shi, Junwei; Guang, Huizhi; Zuo, Simin; Liu, Fei; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-06-01

    High-intensity background fluorescence is generally encountered in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), because of the accumulation of fluorescent probes in nontarget tissues or the existence of autofluorescence in biological tissues. The reconstruction results are affected or even distorted by the background fluorescence, especially when the distribution of fluorescent targets is relatively sparse. The purpose of this paper is to reduce the negative effect of background fluorescence on FMT reconstruction. After each iteration of the Tikhonov regularization algorithm, 3-D discrete cosine transform is adopted to filter the intermediate results. And then, a sparsity constraint step based on L1 regularization is applied to restrain the energy of the objective function. Phantom experiments with different fluorescence intensities of homogeneous and heterogeneous background are carried out to validate the performance of the proposed scheme. The results show that the reconstruction quality can be improved with the proposed iterative correction scheme. The influence of background fluorescence in FMT can be reduced effectively because of the filtering of the intermediate results, the detail preservation, and noise suppression of L1 regularization.

  17. [Atmospheric adjacency effect correction of ETM images].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-yu; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Shu-qing; Gao, Ji-yue

    2010-09-01

    It is an important precondition to retrieve the ground surface reflectance exactly for improving the subsequent product of remote sensing images and the quantitative application of remote sensing. However, because the electromagnetic wave is scattered by the atmosphere during its transmission from the ground surface to the sensor, the electromagnetic wave signal of the target received by the sensor contained the signal of the background. The adjacency effect emerges. Because of the adjacency effect, the remote sensing images become blurry, and their contrast reduces. So the ground surface reflectance retrieved from the remote sensing images is also inaccurate. Finally, the quality of subsequent product of remote sensing images and the accuracy of quantitative application of remote sensing might decrease. In the present paper, according to the radiative transfer equation, the atmospheric adjacency effect correction experiment of ETM images was carried out by using the point spread function method. The result of the experiment indicated that the contrast of the corrected ETM images increased, and the ground surface reflectance retrieved from those images was more accurate.

  18. New background correction method for liquid chromatography with diode array detection, infrared spectroscopic detection and Raman spectroscopic detection.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Hans F M; Dijkstra, Reyer J; Eilers, Paul H C; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Westerhuis, Johan A

    2004-11-19

    A new method to eliminate the background spectrum (EBS) during analyte elution in column liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to spectroscopic techniques is proposed. This method takes into account the shape and also intensity differences of the background eluent spectrum. This allows the EBS method to make a better estimation of the background eluent spectrum during analyte elution. This is an advantage for quantification as well as for identification of analytes. The EBS method uses a two-step procedure. First, the baseline spectra are modeled using a limited number of principal components (PCs). Subsequently, an asymmetric least squares (asLS) regression method is applied using these principal components to correct the measured spectra during elution for the background contribution. The asymmetric least squares regression needs one parameter, the asymmetry factor p. This asymmetry factor determines relative weight of positive and negative residuals. Simulations are performed to test the EBS method in well-defined situations. The effect of spectral noise on the performance and the sensitivity of the EBS method for the value of the asymmetry factorp is tested. Two applications of the EBS method are discussed. In the first application, the goal is to extract the analyte spectrum from an LC-Raman analysis. In this case, the EBS method facilitates easy identification of unknown analytes using spectral libraries. In a second application, the EBS method is used for baseline correction in LC-diode array detection (DAD) analysis of polymeric standards during a gradient elution separation. It is shown that the EBS method yields a good baseline correction, without the need to perform a blank chromatographic run.

  19. Effect of Communicator Background on Credibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzica, Norman

    1973-01-01

    To help assess the effect of a communicator's perceived background on his credibility, students were asked to rate a speaker on drug abuse. Half the students were led to believe that the speaker had himself used psychotropic drugs regularly. The others were told he had used no such drugs. Differences in mean ratings did not show statistical…

  20. Effective Use of Correctives in Mastery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeese, Sean V.; Randolph, Justus J.

    2011-01-01

    Mastery learning is a formative assessment strategy that involves the use of specific interventions, called correctives, to address the specific comprehension needs of the learner. Effective correctives are crucial for the effectiveness of mastery learning, so it is important that teachers make good decisions about what activities and strategies…

  1. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 Background Information and Comparison to Corrective Action Site 09-99-06

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-26

    Corrective Action Site (CAS) 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly, is associated with nuclear test MULLET. MULLET was an underground safety test conducted on October 17, 1963. The experiment also involved prompt sampling of particulate material from the detonation, similar to CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly, which is associated with PLAYER/YORK. The sampling system at MULLET was similar to that of PLAYER/YORK and was used to convey gas from the MULLET emplacement hole (U2ag) to a sampling assembly. Beyond the sampling assembly, the system had a 'Y' junction with one branch running to a filter unit and the other running to a scrubber unit. The total system length was approximately 250 feet and is depicted on the attached drawing. According to the available background information, retrieval of the sample material from the MULLET event caused significant alpha (plutonium) contamination, limited to an area near ground zero (GZ). Test support Radiological Control Technicians did not detect contamination outside the immediate GZ area. In addition, vehicles, equipment, and workers that were contaminated were decontaminated on site. Soil contamination was addressed through the application of oil, and the site was decommissioned after the test. Any equipment that could be successfully decontaminated and had a future use was removed from the site. The contaminated equipment and temporary buildings erected to support the test were buried on site, most likely in the area under the dirt berm. The exact location of the buried equipment and temporary buildings is unknown. No information was found describing the disposition of the filter and scrubber, but they are not known to be at the site. The COMMODORE test was conducted at U2am on May 20, 1967, and formed the crater next to CAS 02-37-02. The COMMODORE test area had been surveyed prior to the test, and alpha contamination was not identified. Furthermore, alpha contamination was not identified during the COMMODORE re

  2. Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect Thruster Internal Acceleration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) August 2013- September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect...Conference 2013, Washington, D.C., 6-10 October 2013. 14. ABSTRACT This study uses krypton propellant in a medium power Hall effect to amplify the...effect of background pressure due to the greater mobility of neutral krypton compared to neutral xenon. The use of krypton amplifies the effect of

  3. A novel calibration strategy based on background correction for quantitative circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Qi; Xiong, Shun; Chen, Zeng-Ping; Chen, Yao; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2017-11-01

    When using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy for quantitative analysis, the samples to be analyzed must be free of light-absorbing interferences. However, in real-world samples, the presence of background absorbers is practically unavoidable. The difference in the matrices between the real-world samples to be analyzed and the standard samples (on which either univariate or multivariate calibration model was built) would result in systematic errors in the quantification results of CD spectroscopy. In this contribution, a novel calibration strategy for quantitative CD spectroscopic analysis was proposed. The main idea of the proposed calibration strategy is to project the CD spectra of both the standard samples and the real-world sample to be analyzed onto a projection space orthogonal to the space spanned by the background CD spectrum of the real-world sample and then build a multivariate calibration model on the transformed CD spectra of the standard samples. The performance of the proposed calibration strategy was tested and compared with conventional univariate and multivariate calibration methods in the quantification of Pb(2+) in cosmetic samples using CD spectroscopy in combination with a G-quadruplex DNAzyme (e.g. PS2.M). Experiments results revealed that the proposed calibration strategy could mitigate the influence of the difference in the matrices between the standard samples and cosmetic samples and realized quantitative analysis of Pb(2+) in cosmetic samples, with precision and accuracy comparable to atomic absorption spectroscopy. The proposed calibration strategy has the features of simplicity and effectiveness, its combination with CD spectroscopic probes can realize accurate and precise quantification of analytes in complex samples using CD spectroscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Background correction in separation techniques hyphenated to high-resolution mass spectrometry - Thorough correction with MS scans recorded as profile spectra.

    PubMed

    Erny, Guillaume L; Acunha, Tanize; Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Alves, Arminda

    2017-03-01

    Separation techniques hyphenated with high-resolution mass spectrometry have been a true revolution in analytical separation techniques. Such instruments not only provide unmatched resolution, but they also allow measuring the peaks accurate masses that permit identifying monoisotopic formulae. However, data files can be large, with a major contribution from background noise and background ions. Such unnecessary contribution to the overall signal can hide important features as well as decrease the accuracy of the centroid determination, especially with minor features. Thus, noise and baseline correction can be a valuable pre-processing step. The methodology that is described here, unlike any other approach, is used to correct the original dataset with the MS scans recorded as profiles spectrum. Using urine metabolic studies as examples, we demonstrate that this thorough correction reduces the data complexity by more than 90%. Such correction not only permits an improved visualisation of secondary peaks in the chromatographic domain, but it also facilitates the complete assignment of each MS scan which is invaluable to detect possible comigration/coeluting species.

  5. Effect of background electrolytes on gypsum dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the dissolution behaviour of gypsum (CaSO4· 2H2O) in aqueous solutions is of primary importance in many natural and technological processes (Pachon-Rodriguez and Colombani, 2007), including the weathering of rocks and gypsum karst formations, deformation of gypsum-bearing rocks, the quality of drinking water, amelioration of soil acidity, scale formation in the oil and gas industry or measurement of water motion in oceanography. Specific ions in aqueous solutions can play important but very different roles on mineral dissolution. For example, the dissolution rates and the morphology of dissolution features may be considerably modified by the presence of the foreign ions in the solution, which adsorb at the surface and hinder the detachment of the ions building the crystal. Dissolution processes in the aqueous environment are closely related to the rearrangement of water molecules around solute ions and the interaction between the solvent molecules themselves. The rearrangement of water molecules with respect to solute species has been recognized as the main kinetic barrier for crystal dissolution in many systems (Davis, 2000; De Yoreo and Dove 2004; Wasylenki et al. 2005). Current research suggest that the control that electrolytes exert on water structure is limited to the local environment surrounding the ions and is not related to long-range electric fields emanating from the ions but results from effects associated with the hydration shell(s) of the ions (Collins et al. 2007) and the ions' capacity to break or structure water (i.e. chaotropic and kosmotropic ions, respectively). These effects will ultimately affect the kinetics of crystal dissolution, and could be correlated with the water affinity of the respective background ions following a trend known as the lyotropic or Hofmeister series (Kunz et al. 2004; Dove and Craven, 2005). In situ macroscopic and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted at a

  6. Effective Temperature Scale and Bolometric Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The conversion from an observational quantity, such as the color index or the spectral type, to the effective temperature (Teff) of a star is known as the effective TEMPERATURE SCALE. Bolometric corrections are required in the calculation of the luminosity of a star if the flux from the star has not been observed over the entire ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM....

  7. Landsat TM memory effect characterization and correction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, D.; Boncyk, W.; Morfitt, R.

    1997-01-01

    Before radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data can be done accurately, it is necessary to minimize the effects of artifacts present in the data that originate in the instrument's signal processing path. These artifacts have been observed in downlinked image data since shortly after launch of Landsat 4 and 5. However, no comprehensive work has been done to characterize all the artifacts and develop methods for their correction. In this paper, the most problematic artifact is discussed: memory effect (ME). Characterization of this artifact is presented, including the parameters necessary for its correction. In addition, a correction algorithm is described that removes the artifact from TM imagery. It will be shown that this artifact causes significant radiometry errors, but the effect can be removed in a straightforward manner.

  8. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Pamela C.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2007-03-01

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass ( m0), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 ± 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 ± 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 ± 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection limits (3

  9. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-07-27

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC.

  10. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W.; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC. PMID:28749450

  11. GafChromic EBT film dosimetry with flatbed CCD scanner: a novel background correction method and full dose uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed

    Saur, Sigrun; Frengen, Jomar

    2008-07-01

    Film dosimetry using radiochromic EBT film in combination with a flatbed charge coupled device scanner is a useful method both for two-dimensional verification of intensity-modulated radiation treatment plans and for general quality assurance of treatment planning systems and linear accelerators. Unfortunately, the response over the scanner area is nonuniform, and when not corrected for, this results in a systematic error in the measured dose which is both dose and position dependent. In this study a novel method for background correction is presented. The method is based on the subtraction of a correction matrix, a matrix that is based on scans of films that are irradiated to nine dose levels in the range 0.08-2.93 Gy. Because the response of the film is dependent on the film's orientation with respect to the scanner, correction matrices for both landscape oriented and portrait oriented scans were made. In addition to the background correction method, a full dose uncertainty analysis of the film dosimetry procedure was performed. This analysis takes into account the fit uncertainty of the calibration curve, the variation in response for different film sheets, the nonuniformity after background correction, and the noise in the scanned films. The film analysis was performed for film pieces of size 16 x 16 cm, all with the same lot number, and all irradiations were done perpendicular onto the films. The results show that the 2-sigma dose uncertainty at 2 Gy is about 5% and 3.5% for landscape and portrait scans, respectively. The uncertainty gradually increases as the dose decreases, but at 1 Gy the 2-sigma dose uncertainty is still as good as 6% and 4% for landscape and portrait scans, respectively. The study shows that film dosimetry using GafChromic EBT film, an Epson Expression 1680 Professional scanner and a dedicated background correction technique gives precise and accurate results. For the purpose of dosimetric verification, the calculated dose distribution

  12. A probabilistic cell model in background corrected image sequences for single cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Methods of manual cell localization and outlining are so onerous that automated tracking methods would seem mandatory for handling huge image sequences, nevertheless manual tracking is, astonishingly, still widely practiced in areas such as cell biology which are outside the influence of most image processing research. The goal of our research is to address this gap by developing automated methods of cell tracking, localization, and segmentation. Since even an optimal frame-to-frame association method cannot compensate and recover from poor detection, it is clear that the quality of cell tracking depends on the quality of cell detection within each frame. Methods Cell detection performs poorly where the background is not uniform and includes temporal illumination variations, spatial non-uniformities, and stationary objects such as well boundaries (which confine the cells under study). To improve cell detection, the signal to noise ratio of the input image can be increased via accurate background estimation. In this paper we investigate background estimation, for the purpose of cell detection. We propose a cell model and a method for background estimation, driven by the proposed cell model, such that well structure can be identified, and explicitly rejected, when estimating the background. Results The resulting background-removed images have fewer artifacts and allow cells to be localized and detected more reliably. The experimental results generated by applying the proposed method to different Hematopoietic Stem Cell (HSC) image sequences are quite promising. Conclusion The understanding of cell behavior relies on precise information about the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of cells. Such information may play a key role in disease research and regenerative medicine, so automated methods for observation and measurement of cells from microscopic images are in high demand. The proposed method in this paper is capable of localizing single cells

  13. Metabolic correction: a functional biochemical mechanism against disease--Part 1: concept and historical background.

    PubMed

    González, Michael J; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R; Duconge, Jorge; Allende-Vigo, Myriam Z; Jiménez-Ramírez, Francisco J; Cintrón, Kenneth; Rodríguez-Gómez, Jose R; Rosario, Glorivee; Ricart, Carlos; Santiago-Cornier, Juan A; Zaragoza-Urdaz, Rafael; Vázquez, Alex; Hickey, Steve; Jabbar-Berdiel, Miguel; Riordan, Neil; Ichim, Thomas; Santiago, Oscar; Alvarado, Gilberto; Vora, Pramod

    2015-03-01

    Human physiology depends on countless biochemical reactions, numerous of which are co-dependent and interrelated. The speed and level of completion of reactions usually depend on the availability of precursors and enzymes. The enzymatic activity depends on the bioavailability of micronutrient cofactors such as vitamins and minerals. In order to achieve a healthy physiological state, the organism requires that biochemical reactions occur at a controlled rate. To achieve this state it is required that metabolic reactions reach what can be considered an optimal metabolic equilibrium. A combination of genetic makeup, dietary patterns, trauma, disease, toxins, medications, and environmental stressors can elevate the demand for the nutrients needed to reach this optimal metabolic equilibrium. In this, part 1, the general concept of metabolic correction is presented with an elaboration explaining how this concept is increasing in importance as we become aware of the presence of genetic variants that affect enzymatic reactions causing metabolic disturbances that themselves favor or promote the disease state. In addition, part 1 reviews how prominent scientists have contributed in fundamental ways to our understanding of the importance of micronutrients in health and disease and in the development of the metabolic correction concept.

  14. Logarithmic Correction to Scaling for Multispin Strings in the AdS5 Black Hole Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, A. L.

    We find new explicit solutions describing closed strings spinning with equal angular momentum in two independent planes in the AdS5 black hole space-time. These are 2n-folded strings in the radial direction and also winding m times around an angular direction. We specially consider these solutions in the long string and high temperature limit, where it is shown that there is a logarithmic correction to the scaling between energy and spin. This is similar to the one-spin case. The strings are spinning, or actually orbiting around the black hole of the AdS5 black hole space-time, similar to the solutions previously found in black hole space-times.

  15. Effects of background noise on earphone thresholds.

    PubMed

    Frank, T; Williams, D L

    1993-05-01

    Real-ear attenuation at threshold (REAT) and monaural pure-tone thresholds were determined for normally hearing adults using a supra-aural, Audiocup, and insert earphone. The thresholds were obtained in quiet and in background noises approximating the maximum permissible ambient noise levels (MPANLs) allowed in an audiometric test room specified by ANSI S3.1-1991 and OSHA (1983). The supra-aural REAT was less than the Audiocup, which was less than the insert earphone. The mean threshold shifts were negligible regardless of earphone type in the ANSI noise and for the insert earphone in the OSHA noise. Thresholds can be obtained down to 0 dB HL in ANSI 1991 MPANLs using a supra-aural, Audiocup, or insert earphone and in OSHA MPANLs using an insert earphone. However, the OSHA MPANLs are too high and the REAT is too low for a supra-aural earphone and Audiocup for testing down to 0 dB HL.

  16. Electroweak Corrections to pp→μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}+X at the LHC: A Higgs Boson Background Study.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, B; Denner, A; Dittmaier, S; Hofer, L; Jäger, B

    2016-04-22

    The first complete calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to four-lepton production at the LHC is presented, where all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons and photons are taken into account. Focusing on the mixed final state μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}, we study differential cross sections that are particularly interesting for Higgs boson analyses. The electroweak corrections are divided into photonic and purely weak corrections. The former exhibit patterns familiar from similar W- or Z-boson production processes with very large radiative tails near resonances and kinematical shoulders. The weak corrections are of the generic size of 5% and show interesting variations, in particular, a sign change between the regions of resonant Z-pair production and the Higgs signal.

  17. Gravitational radiative corrections from effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Ross, Andreas

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we construct an effective field theory (EFT) that describes long wavelength gravitational radiation from compact systems. To leading order, this EFT consists of the multipole expansion, which we describe in terms of a diffeomorphism invariant point particle Lagrangian. The EFT also systematically captures 'post-Minkowskian' corrections to the multipole expansion due to nonlinear terms in general relativity. Specifically, we compute long distance corrections from the coupling of the (mass) monopole moment to the quadrupole moment, including up to two mass insertions. Along the way, we encounter both logarithmic short distance (UV) and long wavelength (IR) divergences. We show that the UV divergences can be (1) absorbed into a renormalization of the multipole moments and (2) resummed via the renormalization group. The IR singularities are shown to cancel from properly defined physical observables. As a concrete example of the formalism, we use this EFT to reproduce a number of post-Newtonian corrections to the gravitational wave energy flux from nonrelativistic binaries, including long distance effects up to 3 post-Newtonian (v{sup 6}) order. Our results verify that the factorization of scales proposed in the NRGR framework of Goldberger and Rothstein is consistent up to order 3PN.

  18. Finite nucleus effects on relativistic energy corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of using a finite nucleus model in quantum-chemical calculations is examined. Relativistic corrections from the first order Foldy-Wouthuysen terms are affected indirectly by the change in wavefunction, but also directly as a result of revised expressions for the Darwin and spin-orbit terms due to the change in nuclear potential. A calculation for the Rn atom indicates that the mass-velocity and Darwin corrections are much more sensitive to the finite nucleus than the non-relativistic total energy, but that the total contribution for these two terms is quite stable provided the revised form of the Darwin term is used. The spin-orbit interaction is not greatly affected by the choice of nuclear model.

  19. A generalised background correction algorithm for a Halo Doppler lidar and its application to data from Finland

    DOE PAGES

    Manninen, Antti J.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Vakkari, Ville; ...

    2016-03-03

    Current commercially available Doppler lidars provide an economical and robust solution for measuring vertical and horizontal wind velocities, together with the ability to provide co- and cross-polarised backscatter profiles. The high temporal resolution of these instruments allows turbulent properties to be obtained from studying the variation in radial velocities. However, the instrument specifications mean that certain characteristics, especially the background noise behaviour, become a limiting factor for the instrument sensitivity in regions where the aerosol load is low. Turbulent calculations require an accurate estimate of the contribution from velocity uncertainty estimates, which are directly related to the signal-to-noise ratio. Anymore » bias in the signal-to-noise ratio will propagate through as a bias in turbulent properties. In this paper we present a method to correct for artefacts in the background noise behaviour of commercially available Doppler lidars and reduce the signal-to-noise ratio threshold used to discriminate between noise, and cloud or aerosol signals. We show that, for Doppler lidars operating continuously at a number of locations in Finland, the data availability can be increased by as much as 50 % after performing this background correction and subsequent reduction in the threshold. Furthermore the reduction in bias also greatly improves subsequent calculations of turbulent properties in weak signal regimes.« less

  20. A generalised background correction algorithm for a Halo Doppler lidar and its application to data from Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Antti J.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Vakkari, Ville; Petaja, Tuukka

    2016-03-03

    Current commercially available Doppler lidars provide an economical and robust solution for measuring vertical and horizontal wind velocities, together with the ability to provide co- and cross-polarised backscatter profiles. The high temporal resolution of these instruments allows turbulent properties to be obtained from studying the variation in radial velocities. However, the instrument specifications mean that certain characteristics, especially the background noise behaviour, become a limiting factor for the instrument sensitivity in regions where the aerosol load is low. Turbulent calculations require an accurate estimate of the contribution from velocity uncertainty estimates, which are directly related to the signal-to-noise ratio. Any bias in the signal-to-noise ratio will propagate through as a bias in turbulent properties. In this paper we present a method to correct for artefacts in the background noise behaviour of commercially available Doppler lidars and reduce the signal-to-noise ratio threshold used to discriminate between noise, and cloud or aerosol signals. We show that, for Doppler lidars operating continuously at a number of locations in Finland, the data availability can be increased by as much as 50 % after performing this background correction and subsequent reduction in the threshold. Furthermore the reduction in bias also greatly improves subsequent calculations of turbulent properties in weak signal regimes.

  1. Environmental context effects of background color in free recall.

    PubMed

    Isarida, Taeo; Isarin, Tosmko K

    2007-10-01

    In four experiments, we investigated background-color context effects in free recall. A total of 194 undergraduates studied words presented one by one against a background color, and oral free recall was tested after a 30-sec filled retention interval. A signal for recall was presented against a background color throughout the test. Recalled items were classified as same- and different-context items according to whether the background colors at study and test were the same or different. Significant context effects were found in Experiments I and 2, in which two background colors were randomly alternated word by word. No context effects were found in Experiments 3 and 4, in which a common background color was presented for all items (Experiment 3) or for a number of successive items (Experiment 4). The results indicate that a change in background colors is necessary and sufficient to produce context effects. Implications of the present findings are discussed.

  2. Background correction in atomic emission spectrometry using repetitive harmonic wavelength scanning and applying Fourier analysis—I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthee, T.; Visser, K.

    1995-07-01

    Repetitive wavelength scanning can be used as a means of detecting and correcting for unwanted background in atomic emission spectrometry (AES). This paper deals with the theory underlying such harmonic wavelength scanning in time and stresses the relative importance of the relevant parameters. A set of integrated Turbo Pascal programs for an IBM PC was developed to provide a numerical simulation for the deconvolution of a detected spectral profile during repetitive harmonic wavelength scanning. By applying this numerical analysis the theory for separating the net spectral emission signal and the background radiation by filtering specific frequency components is investigated. It is concluded that, barring the dc component, repetitive scanning over a symmetric spectral profile leads to the generation of even-numbered Fourier harmonics at the modulation frequency, while an asymmetric spectral profile generates odd-numbered Fourier harmonics.

  3. [Systems analysis of colour music corrective effect].

    PubMed

    Gumeniuk, V A; Batova, N Ia; Mel'nikova, T S; Glazachev, O S; Golubeva, N K; Klimina, N V; Hubner, P

    1998-01-01

    In the context of P. K. Anokhin's theory of functional systems, the corrective effects of various combinations of medical therapeutical resonance music (MTRM) and dynamic colour exposure were analyzed. As compared to rehabilitative music programmes, MRTM was shown to have a more pronounced relaxing effect as manifested both in the optimization of emotion and in the activity of autonomic regulation of cardiovascular functions. On combined MRTM and dynamic colour flow exposures, the relaxing effect is most marked. In the examinees, the personality and situation anxieties diminish, mood improves, cardiovascular parameters become normal, the rate of metabolic processes and muscular rigidity reduce, the spectral power of alpha-rhythm increases, these occurring predominantly in the anterior region of the brain. The findings suggest the high efficiency of the chosen way of normalizing the functional status of man.

  4. Quark mass correction to chiral separation effect and pseudoscalar condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We derived an analytic structure of the quark mass correction to chiral separation effect (CSE) in small mass regime. We confirmed this structure by a D3/D7 holographic model study in a finite density, finite magnetic field background. The quark mass correction to CSE can be related to correlators of pseudo-scalar condensate, quark number density and quark condensate in static limit. We found scaling relations of these correlators with spatial momentum in the small momentum regime. They characterize medium responses to electric field, inhomogeneous quark mass and chiral shift. Beyond the small momentum regime, we found existence of normalizable mode, which possibly leads to formation of spiral phase. The normalizable mode exists beyond a critical magnetic field, whose magnitude decreases with quark chemical potential.

  5. Proximity effect correction concerning forward scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Dai; Shoji, Masahiro; Tsunoe, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    The Proximity Effect is a critical problem in EB Lithography which is used in Photomask writing. Proximity Effect means that an electron shot by gun scatters by collided with resist molecule or substrate atom causes CD variation depending on pattern density [1]. Scattering by collision with resist molecule is called as "forward scattering", that affects in dozens of nanometer range, and with substrate atom is called as "backward scattering, that affects approximately 10 micrometer in 50keV acceleration voltage respectively. In conventional Proximity Effect Correction (PEC) for mask writing, we don't need to think forward scattering effect. However we should think about forward scattering because of smaller feature size. We have proposed a PEC software product named "PATACON PC-Cluster"[2], which can concern forward scattering and calculate optimum dose modulation. In this communication, we explain the PEC processing throughput when the that takes forward scattering into account. The key technique is to use different processing field size for forward scattering calculation. Additionally, the possibility is shown that effective PEC may be available by connecting forward scattering and backward scattering.

  6. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    Seismic images of the Brooks Range, Arctic Alaska, reveal crustal-scale duplexing: Correction Geology, v. 23, p. 65 68 (January 1995) The correct Figure 4A, for the loose insert, is given here. See Figure 4A below. Corrected inserts will be available to those requesting copies of the article from the senior author, Gary S. Fuis, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Figure 4A. P-wave velocity model of Brooks Range region (thin gray contours) with migrated wide-angle reflections (heavy red lines) and migreated vertical-incidence reflections (short black lines) superimposed. Velocity contour interval is 0.25 km/s; 4,5, and 6 km/s contours are labeled. Estimated error in velocities is one contour interval. Symbols on faults shown at top are as in Figure 2 caption.

  7. Auditory intensity processing: Effect of MRI background noise.

    PubMed

    Angenstein, Nicole; Stadler, Jörg; Brechmann, André

    2016-03-01

    Studies on active auditory intensity discrimination in humans showed equivocal results regarding the lateralization of processing. Whereas experiments with a moderate background found evidence for right lateralized processing of intensity, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies with background scanner noise suggest more left lateralized processing. With the present fMRI study, we compared the task dependent lateralization of intensity processing between a conventional continuous echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence with a loud background scanner noise and a fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence with a soft background scanner noise. To determine the lateralization of the processing, we employed the contralateral noise procedure. Linearly frequency modulated (FM) tones were presented monaurally with and without contralateral noise. During both the EPI and the FLASH measurement, the left auditory cortex was more strongly involved than the right auditory cortex while participants categorized the intensity of FM tones. This was shown by a strong effect of the additional contralateral noise on the activity in the left auditory cortex. This means a massive reduction in background scanner noise still leads to a significant left lateralized effect. This suggests that the reversed lateralization in fMRI studies with loud background noise in contrast to studies with softer background cannot be fully explained by the MRI background noise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of solution mass transport on the ECC ozonesonde background current. [Electrochemical Concentration Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, D. C.; Niazy, N.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the effective mass transport parameter for the electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde in order to determine the mass transport rate constant for the ECC as a function of pressure. It is shown that a pressure dependent factor in the background current originates in a convective mass transport parameter. It is determined that for atmospheric pressures greater than 100 mb the mass transport parameter is a constant, while at pressures less than 100 mb it decreases logarithmically with pressure. It is suggested that the background current correction is directly correlated to the mass transport parameter pressure dependence. The presently used background current correction, which is based on the partial pressure of oxygen, is found to lead to an overestimation of the integrated ozone value in the troposphere for the ECC ozonesonde data.

  9. Corrections.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Lai Y-S, Biedermann P, Ekpo UF, et al. Spatial distribution of schistosomiasis and treatment needs in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and geostatistical analysis. Lancet Infect Dis 2015; published online May 22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00066-3—Figure 1 of this Article should have contained a box stating ‘100 references added’ with an arrow pointing inwards, rather than a box stating ‘199 records excluded’, and an asterisk should have been added after ‘1473 records extracted into GNTD’. Additionally, the positioning of the ‘§ and ‘†’ footnotes has been corrected in table 1. These corrections have been made to the online version as of June 4, 2015.

  10. Correction.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In the article by Guessous et al (Guessous I, Pruijm M, Ponte B, Ackermann D, Ehret G, Ansermot N, Vuistiner P, Staessen J, Gu Y, Paccaud F, Mohaupt M, Vogt B, Pechère-Bertschi A, Martin PY, Burnier M, Eap CB, Bochud M. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions. Hypertension. 2015;65:691–696. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04512), which published online ahead of print December 8, 2014, and appeared in the March 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed.One of the author surnames was misspelled. Antoinette Pechère-Berstchi has been corrected to read Antoinette Pechère-Bertschi.The authors apologize for this error.

  11. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    Alleged mosasaur bite marks on Late Cretaceous ammonites are limpet (patellogastropod) home scars Geology, v. 26, p. 947 950 (October 1998) This article had the following printing errors: p. 947, Abstract, line 11, “sepia” should be “septa” p. 947, 1st paragraph under Introduction, line 2, “creep” should be “deep” p. 948, column 1, 2nd paragraph, line 7, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 1, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 5, “19774” should be “1977)” p. 949, column 1, 4th paragraph, line 7, “in particular” should be “In particular” CORRECTION Mammalian community response to the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: An isotaphonomic study in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Geology, v. 26, p. 1011 1014 (November 1998) An error appeared in the References Cited. The correct reference appears below: Fricke, H. C., Clyde, W. C., O'Neil, J. R., and Gingerich, P. D., 1998, Evidence for rapid climate change in North America during the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphate from the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming): Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 160, p. 193 208.

  12. Background Speech Effects on Sentence Processing during Reading: An Eye Movement Study

    PubMed Central

    Hyönä, Jukka; Ekholm, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Effects of background speech on reading were examined by playing aloud different types of background speech, while participants read long, syntactically complex and less complex sentences embedded in text. Readers’ eye movement patterns were used to study online sentence comprehension. Effects of background speech were primarily seen in rereading time. In Experiment 1, foreign-language background speech did not disrupt sentence processing. Experiment 2 demonstrated robust disruption in reading as a result of semantically and syntactically anomalous scrambled background speech preserving normal sentence-like intonation. Scrambled speech that was constructed from the text to-be read did not disrupt reading more than scrambled speech constructed from a different, semantically unrelated text. Experiment 3 showed that scrambled speech exacerbated the syntactic complexity effect more than coherent background speech, which also interfered with reading. Experiment 4 demonstrated that both semantically and syntactically anomalous speech produced no more disruption in reading than semantically anomalous but syntactically correct background speech. The pattern of results is best explained by a semantic account that stresses the importance of similarity in semantic processing, but not similarity in semantic content, between the reading task and background speech. PMID:27003410

  13. Effects of placement point of background music on shopping website.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chien-Jung; Chiang, Chia-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Consumer on-line behaviors are more important than ever due to highly growth of on-line shopping. The purposes of this study were to design placement methods of background music for shopping website and examine the effect on browsers' emotional and cognitive response. Three placement points of background music during the browsing, i.e. 2 min., 4 min., and 6 min. from the start of browsing were considered for entry points. Both browsing without music (no music) and browsing with constant music volume (full music) were treated as control groups. Participants' emotional state, approach-avoidance behavior intention, and action to adjust music volume were collected. Results showed that participants had a higher level of pleasure, arousal and approach behavior intention for the three placement points than for no music and full music. Most of the participants for full music (5/6) adjusted the background music. Only 16.7% (3/18) participants for other levels turn off the background music. The results indicate that playing background music after the start of browsing is benefit for on-line shopping atmosphere. It is inappropriate to place background music at the start of browsing shopping website. The marketer must manipulated placement methods of background music for a web store carefully.

  14. Multi-talker background and semantic priming effect

    PubMed Central

    Dekerle, Marie; Boulenger, Véronique; Hoen, Michel; Meunier, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    The reported studies have aimed to investigate whether informational masking in a multi-talker background relies on semantic interference between the background and target using an adapted semantic priming paradigm. In 3 experiments, participants were required to perform a lexical decision task on a target item embedded in backgrounds composed of 1–4 voices. These voices were Semantically Consistent (SC) voices (i.e., pronouncing words sharing semantic features with the target) or Semantically Inconsistent (SI) voices (i.e., pronouncing words semantically unrelated to each other and to the target). In the first experiment, backgrounds consisted of 1 or 2 SC voices. One and 2 SI voices were added in Experiments 2 and 3, respectively. The results showed a semantic priming effect only in the conditions where the number of SC voices was greater than the number of SI voices, suggesting that semantic priming depended on prime intelligibility and strategic processes. However, even if backgrounds were composed of 3 or 4 voices, reducing intelligibility, participants were able to recognize words from these backgrounds, although no semantic priming effect on the targets was observed. Overall this finding suggests that informational masking can occur at a semantic level if intelligibility is sufficient. Based on the Effortfulness Hypothesis, we also suggest that when there is an increased difficulty in extracting target signals (caused by a relatively high number of voices in the background), more cognitive resources were allocated to formal processes (i.e., acoustic and phonological), leading to a decrease in available resources for deeper semantic processing of background words, therefore preventing semantic priming from occurring. PMID:25400572

  15. Self-corrected elaboration and spacing effects in incidental memory.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Hiroshi

    2006-04-01

    The present study investigated the effect of self-corrected elaboration on incidental memory as a function of types of presentation (massed vs spaced) and sentence frames (image vs nonimage). The subjects were presented a target word and an incongruous sentence frame and asked to correct the target to make a common sentence in the self-corrected elaboration condition, whereas in the experimenter-corrected elaboration condition they were asked to rate the appropriateness of the congruous word presented, followed by free recall test. The superiority of the self-corrected elaboration to the experimenter-corrected elaboration was observed only in some situations of combinations by the types of presentation and sentence frames. These results were discussed in terms of the effectiveness of the self-corrected elaboration.

  16. Boundary effect correction in k-nearest-neighbor estimation.

    PubMed

    Alizad Rahvar, A R; Ardakani, M

    2011-05-01

    The problem of the boundary effect for the k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) estimation is addressed, and a correction method is suggested. The correction is proposed for bounded distributions, but it can be used for any set of bounded samples. We apply the proposed correction to entropy estimation of multidimensional distributions and time series, and this correction reduces considerably the bias and statistical errors in the estimation. For a small sample size or high-dimensional data, the corrected estimator outperforms the uncorrected estimator significantly. This advantage makes the kNN method applicable to more real-life situations, e.g., the analysis of biological and molecular data.

  17. Boundary effect correction in k-nearest-neighbor estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizad Rahvar, A. R.; Ardakani, M.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of the boundary effect for the k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) estimation is addressed, and a correction method is suggested. The correction is proposed for bounded distributions, but it can be used for any set of bounded samples. We apply the proposed correction to entropy estimation of multidimensional distributions and time series, and this correction reduces considerably the bias and statistical errors in the estimation. For a small sample size or high-dimensional data, the corrected estimator outperforms the uncorrected estimator significantly. This advantage makes the kNN method applicable to more real-life situations, e.g., the analysis of biological and molecular data.

  18. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  19. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  20. Peltier-Effect-Induced Correction to Ohmic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2001-02-01

    The standard ohmic measurements by means of two extra leads contain an additional thermal correction to resistance. The current results in heating(cooling) at first(second) sample contact due to Peltier effect. The contacts temperatures are different. The measured voltage is the sum of the ohmic voltage swing and Peltier effect induced thermopower which is linear on current. As a result, the thermal correction to resistance measured exists at $I\\to 0$. The correction should be in comparison with ohmic resistance. Above some critical frequency dependent on thermal inertial effects the thermal correction disappears.

  1. Dynamical Casimir effect and loop corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. T.; Alexeev, S. O.

    2017-09-01

    We calculate quantum loop corrections to the stress-energy flux caused by moving mirrors. We consider massless, self-interacting, ϕ4, real scalar theory. In these calculations we encounter new and quite unexpected subtleties due to the absence of global hyperbolicity in the presence of mirrors. We attempt to clearly phrase as many hidden assumptions and complications as possible that appear while solving the problem in question. On top of that, we find that quantum loop corrections to the stress-energy flux grow with time and are not suppressed in comparison with the semiclassical contributions. Thus, we observe the breakdown of the perturbation theory, and we discuss its physical origin and ways to deal with such a situation. As a byproduct, we observe a similarity of the problem in question with that for the minimally coupled, massless scalar field in de Sitter space.

  2. Atlas and Catalog of Dark Clouds Based on the 2 Micron All Sky Survey. II. Correction of the Background Using the Besançon Galaxy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, K.; Marshall, D. J.; Shimoikura, T.; Bernard, J.

    2013-10-01

    We have applied a correction to the background of the all-sky color excess maps of E(J-H) and E(H-KS) as well as extinction maps of AJ, AH, and AKS derived by Dobashi (2011) utilizing the 2 Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The correction was made using a simulated star catalog produced based on the Besançon Galaxy Model (Robin et al. 2003; Marshall et al. 2006; Reylé et al. 2009; Robin et al. 2012). The method of the correction is fully described in our forthcoming paper (Dobashi et al. 2013), and the new color excess and extinction maps corrected for the background are open to the public at our website.

  3. Quantum gravity corrections to the conformally coupled scalar self-mass-squared on de Sitter background. II. Kinetic conformal cross terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boran, Sibel; Kahya, Emre Onur; Park, Sohyun

    2017-07-01

    The present work is the second part of a series of computations for the self-mass-squared of the conformally coupled (CC) scalar interacting with gravitons. This work includes the kinetic-kinetic and kinetic-conformal parts, and thus completes the full scalar self-mass-squared at one loop order in de Sitter background when combined with the conformal-conformal part previously evaluated. We use dimensional regularization and renormalize the results by subtracting appropriate counterterms. The self-mass squared is finally ready to quantum-correct the CC scalar field equation so that one can study the effect of inflationary produced gravitons on the CC scalar and its observational consequences.

  4. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  5. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  6. Effects of Family Background Characteristics on Educational Participation in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jeroen; Hosgor, Ayse Gunduz

    2006-01-01

    We study family background effects on participation in primary and secondary education of children in Turkey using large representative data sets. Educational participation, especially of girls, is found to be still a major concern, with non-enrollment being especially high in the countryside and the eastern part of the country. Parental…

  7. Effects of Family Background Characteristics on Educational Participation in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jeroen; Hosgor, Ayse Gunduz

    2006-01-01

    We study family background effects on participation in primary and secondary education of children in Turkey using large representative data sets. Educational participation, especially of girls, is found to be still a major concern, with non-enrollment being especially high in the countryside and the eastern part of the country. Parental…

  8. Second Language Comprehensibility Revisited: Investigating the Effects of Learner Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Dustin; Trofimovich, Pavel; Saito, Kazuya; Isaacs, Talia

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated first language (L1) effects on listener judgment of comprehensibility and accentedness in second language (L2) speech. The participants were 45 university-level adult speakers of English from three L1 backgrounds (Chinese, Hindi, Farsi), performing a picture narrative task. Ten native English listeners used…

  9. Second Language Comprehensibility Revisited: Investigating the Effects of Learner Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Dustin; Trofimovich, Pavel; Saito, Kazuya; Isaacs, Talia

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated first language (L1) effects on listener judgment of comprehensibility and accentedness in second language (L2) speech. The participants were 45 university-level adult speakers of English from three L1 backgrounds (Chinese, Hindi, Farsi), performing a picture narrative task. Ten native English listeners used…

  10. Non-Gaussian microwave background fluctuations from nonlinear gravitational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salopek, D. S.; Kunstatter, G. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Whether the statistics of primordial fluctuations for structure formation are Gaussian or otherwise may be determined if the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Satellite makes a detection of the cosmic microwave-background temperature anisotropy delta T(sub CMB)/T(sub CMB). Non-Gaussian fluctuations may be generated in the chaotic inflationary model if two scalar fields interact nonlinearly with gravity. Theoretical contour maps are calculated for the resulting Sachs-Wolfe temperature fluctuations at large angular scales (greater than 3 degrees). In the long-wavelength approximation, one can confidently determine the nonlinear evolution of quantum noise with gravity during the inflationary epoch because: (1) different spatial points are no longer in causal contact; and (2) quantum gravity corrections are typically small-- it is sufficient to model the system using classical random fields. If the potential for two scalar fields V(phi sub 1, phi sub 2) possesses a sharp feature, then non-Gaussian fluctuations may arise. An explicit model is given where cold spots in delta T(sub CMB)/T(sub CMB) maps are suppressed as compared to the Gaussian case. The fluctuations are essentially scale-invariant.

  11. Integrating proximity effect corrections with photomask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Oberdan W.; Henderson, Richard C.

    1995-05-01

    In an earlier work we demonstrated the feasibility of automated software correction for imaging and process proximity effects by precompensating mask layout data. As correction techniques and algorithms continue to be refined, it is important to deal with integrating the correction computation into the manufacturing data flow. This paper addresses issues such as computational speed, data volumes, management of the data hierarchy, and the need for geometric operations between various CAD layers within the context of a data hierarchy manager.

  12. QED effective action in magnetic field backgrounds and electromagnetic duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2011-09-01

    In the in-out formalism we advance a method of the inverse scattering matrix for calculating effective actions in pure magnetic field backgrounds. The one-loop effective actions are found in a localized magnetic field of Sauter type and approximately in a general magnetic field by applying the uniform semiclassical approximation. The effective actions exhibit the electromagnetic duality between a constant electric field and a constant magnetic field and between E(x)=Esech2(x/L) and B(x)=Bsech2(x/L).

  13. Correcting x ray spectra obtained from the AXAF VETA-I mirror calibration for pileup, continuum, background and deadtime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartas, G.; Flanagan, Kathy; Hughes, John P.; Kellogg, Edwin M.; Nguyen, D.; Zombeck, M.; Joy, M.; Kolodziejezak, J.

    1992-01-01

    The VETA-I mirror was calibrated with the use of a collimated soft X-ray source produced by electron bombardment of various anode materials. The FWHM, effective area and encircled energy were measured with the use of proportional counters that were scanned with a set of circular apertures. The pulsers from the proportional counters were sent through a multichannel analyzer that produced a pulse height spectrum. In order to characterize the properties of the mirror at different discrete photon energies one desires to extract from the pulse height distribution only those photons that originated from the characteristic line emission of the X-ray target source. We have developed a code that fits a modeled spectrum to the observed X-ray data, extracts the counts that originated from the line emission, and estimates the error in these counts. The function that is fitted to the X-ray spectra includes a Prescott function for the resolution of the detector a second Prescott function for a pileup peak and a X-ray continuum function. The continuum component is determined by calculating the absorption of the target Bremsstrahlung through various filters correcting for the reflectivity of the mirror and convolving with the detector response.

  14. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  15. Temporal behavior of peripheral organ distribution volume in mammillary systems. II. Application to background correction in separate glomerular filtration rate estimation in man

    SciTech Connect

    Decostre, P.L.; Salmon, Y. )

    1990-10-01

    An original approach to background subtraction is presented for 99mTc-DTPA separate glomerular filtration rate (SGFR) estimation in man. The method is based on the properties of the peripheral organ distribution volume (PODV) in mammillary systems. These PODV properties allow easy separation of the components of the renogram, i.e., interstitial fluid, plasma and renal activities. The proposed algorithm takes advantage of the linear time dependence of the kidney distribution volume, during the renal uptake phase, to correct for the plasma residual activity, which always remains after classical background correction. Theoretically, the ratio between kidney uptake and SGFR should be identical for both left and right kidneys, even for very asymmetrical kidney functions. This is best verified when the proposed plasma residual activity correction is applied.

  16. How to Correct a Task Error: Task-Switch Effects Following Different Types of Error Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhauser, Marco

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that switch costs in task switching reflect the strengthening of task-related associations and that strengthening is triggered by response execution. The present study tested the hypothesis that only task-related responses are able to trigger strengthening. Effects of task strengthening caused by error corrections were…

  17. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  18. The Effects of Behavioral Counseling Training on Correctional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosford, Ray E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This study looks at the effects of two types of inservice training--live and videotape instruction--on the subsequent acquisition of knowledge and counseling skills of correctional staff assigned to work with imprisoned adult offenders. (Author/RM)

  19. Peripheral prism glasses: effects of dominance, suppression, and background.

    PubMed

    Ross, Nicole C; Bowers, Alex R; Peli, Eli

    2012-09-01

    Unilateral peripheral prisms for homonymous hemianopia (HH) place different images on corresponding peripheral retinal points, a rivalrous situation in which local suppression of the prism image could occur and thus limit device functionality. Detection with peripheral prisms has primarily been evaluated using conventional perimetry, where binocular rivalry is unlikely to occur. We quantified detection over more visually complex backgrounds and examined the effects of ocular dominance. Detection rates of eight participants with HH or quadranopia and normal binocularity wearing unilateral peripheral prism glasses were determined for static perimetry targets briefly presented in the prism expansion area (in the blind hemifield) and the seeing hemifield, under monocular and binocular viewing, over uniform gray and more complex patterned backgrounds. Participants with normal binocularity had mixed sensory ocular dominance, demonstrated no difference in detection rates when prisms were fitted on the side of the HH or the opposite side (p > 0.2), and had detection rates in the expansion area that were not different for monocular and binocular viewing over both backgrounds (p > 0.4). However, two participants with abnormal binocularity and strong ocular dominance demonstrated reduced detection in the expansion area when prisms were fitted in front of the non-dominant eye. We found little evidence of local suppression of the peripheral prism image for HH patients with normal binocularity. However, in cases of strong ocular dominance, consideration should be given to fitting prisms before the dominant eye. Although these results are promising, further testing in more realistic conditions including image motion is needed.

  20. Various background pattern-effect on saccadic suppression.

    PubMed

    Mitrani, L; Radil-Weiss, T; Yakimoff, N; Mateeff, S; Bozkov, V

    1975-09-01

    It has been proved that the saccadic suppression is a phenomenon closely related to the presence of contours and structures in the visual field. Experiments were performed to clarify whether the structured background influences the pattern of attention distribution (making the stimulus detection more difficult) or whether the elevation of visual threshold is due to the "masking' effect of the moving background image over the retina. Two types of backgrounds were used therefore: those with symbolic meaning in the processing of which "psychological' mechanisms are presumably involved like picture reproductions of famous painters and photographs of nudes, and those lacking semantic significance like computer figures composed of randomly distributed black and white squares with different grain expressed as the entropy of the pattern. The results show that saccadic suppression is primarily a consequence of peripheral mechanisms, probably of lateral inhibition in the visual field occurring in the presence of moving edges over the retina. Psychological factors have to be excluded as being fundamental for saccadic suppression.

  1. Comparison of Accuracy in Calculation of Absorbed Dose to Patients Following Bone Scan with 99mTc-Marked Diphosphonates by Two Different Background Correction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Damoori, Mehri; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Moslehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of the activity quantification and the image quality in scintigraphy, scatter correction is a vital procedure. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy in calculation of absorbed dose to patients following bone scan with 99mTc-marked diphosphonates (99mTc-MDP) by two different methods of background correction in conjugate view method. This study involved 22 patients referring to the Nuclear Medicine Center of Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. After the injection of 99mTc-MDP, whole-body images from patients were acquired at 10, 60, 90, and 180 min. Organ activities were calculated using the conjugate view method by Buijs and conventional background correction. Finally, the absorbed dose was calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) technique. The results of this study showed that the absorbed dose per unit of injected activity (rad/mCi) ± standard deviation for pelvis bone, bladder, and kidneys by Buijs method was 0.19 ± 0.05, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.03 ± 0.01 and by conventional method was 0.13 ± 0.04, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.024 ± 0.01, respectively. This showed that Buijs background correction method had a high accuracy compared to conventional method for the estimated absorbed dose of bone and kidneys whereas, for the bladder, its accuracy was low. PMID:27014610

  2. Extended Glauert tip correction to include vortex rollup effects

    SciTech Connect

    Maniaci, David; Schmitz, Sven

    2016-10-03

    Wind turbine loads predictions by blade-element momentum theory using the standard tip-loss correction have been shown to over-predict loading near the blade tip in comparison to experimental data. This over-prediction is theorized to be due to the assumption of light rotor loading, inherent in the standard tip-loss correction model of Glauert. A higher- order free-wake method, WindDVE, is used to compute the rollup process of the trailing vortex sheets downstream of wind turbine blades. Results obtained serve an exact correction function to the Glauert tip correction used in blade-element momentum methods. Lastly, it is found that accounting for the effects of tip vortex rollup within the Glauert tip correction indeed results in improved prediction of blade tip loads computed by blade-element momentum methods.

  3. [Primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society--part I. Scientific background of the posture correction exercise scheme].

    PubMed

    Gardi, Zsuzsa; Feszthammer, Artúrné; Darabosné Tim, Irma; Tóthné Steinhausz, Viktória; Somhegyi, Annamária; Varga, Péter Pál

    2005-03-20

    The primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society aims to increase awareness of the need to develop and automatically maintain a biomechanically correct posture for all school children. The biomechanically correct posture is a dynamic balance based on a correct middle position of the pelvis and on muscle balance. In this position three important anatomical points--the left and right anterior superior iliac spines and the upper medial point of the pubic bone--form one frontal plane. From side-view the imaginary weight median of the body crosses the 2nd to 5th lumbar and the 2nd to 5th cervical vertebral bodies. When the muscles involved in posture are in balance, their strength and flexibility are just appropriate for the almost continuous work required against gravity. In case of static and/or dynamic under- or overload tonic muscles become shortened, and phasic muscles become stretched, and are no longer able to work optimally. Since many muscles and muscle parts that are involved in normal posture maintenance are not satisfactorily challenged in regular physical exercises and sport activities, the preventive exercise scheme of the Hungarian Spine Society aimed to involve these rarely used muscles in special strengthening and stretching exercises. The scheme is based on 12 test exercises that assess the strength and flexibility of postural muscles. A person who is able to do all test exercises correctly has no problem with his or her muscle balance. In order to counteract the harm caused by sedentary lifestyle already in childhood, regular use of this posture correction scheme in physical education starting from preschool throughout the school-years is recommended for all children.

  4. Background fish feminization effects in European remote sites.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Sergio; Quirós, Laia; Grimalt, Joan O; Gallego, Eva; Catalan, Jordi; Lackner, Reinhard; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-06-10

    Human activity has spread trace amounts of chemically stable endocrine-disrupting pollutants throughout the biosphere. These compounds have generated a background level of estrogenic activity that needs to be assessed. Fish are adequate sentinels for feminization effects as male specimens are more sensitive than humans to exogenous estrogenic compounds. High mountain lakes, the most distant environments of continental areas, only receive semi-volatile compounds from atmospheric deposition. We analyzed the expression levels of estrogen-regulated genes in male fish from these mountain lakes in Europe. Incipient feminization involving expression of estrogen receptor and zona radiata genes revealed a widespread diffuse estrogenic impact. This effect was correlated with the concentrations of some organochlorine compounds in fish and was consistent with the persistent occurrence of these tropospheric pollutants in the most remote planet regions. These results should be of general concern given the increasing endocrine disruption effects in human populations.

  5. Background fish feminization effects in European remote sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarque, Sergio; Quirós, Laia; Grimalt, Joan O.; Gallego, Eva; Catalan, Jordi; Lackner, Reinhard; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    Human activity has spread trace amounts of chemically stable endocrine-disrupting pollutants throughout the biosphere. These compounds have generated a background level of estrogenic activity that needs to be assessed. Fish are adequate sentinels for feminization effects as male specimens are more sensitive than humans to exogenous estrogenic compounds. High mountain lakes, the most distant environments of continental areas, only receive semi-volatile compounds from atmospheric deposition. We analyzed the expression levels of estrogen-regulated genes in male fish from these mountain lakes in Europe. Incipient feminization involving expression of estrogen receptor and zona radiata genes revealed a widespread diffuse estrogenic impact. This effect was correlated with the concentrations of some organochlorine compounds in fish and was consistent with the persistent occurrence of these tropospheric pollutants in the most remote planet regions. These results should be of general concern given the increasing endocrine disruption effects in human populations.

  6. Improvement of Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over Hong Kong from a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Using Critical Reflectance with Background Optical Depth Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Jhoon; Wong, Man Sing; Yoon, Jongmin; Lee, Jaehwa; Wu, Dong L.; Chan, P.W.; Nichol, Janet E.; Chung, Chu-Yong; Ou, Mi-Lim

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous efforts to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) using a conventional 5-channelmeteorological imager in geostationary orbit, the accuracy in urban areas has been poorer than other areas primarily due to complex urban surface properties and mixed aerosol types from different emission sources. The two largest error sources in aerosol retrieval have been aerosol type selection and surface reflectance. In selecting the aerosol type from a single visible channel, the season-dependent aerosol optical properties were adopted from longterm measurements of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-photometers. With the aerosol optical properties obtained fromthe AERONET inversion data, look-up tableswere calculated by using a radiative transfer code: the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). Surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method, awidely used technique for geostationary retrievals. Over East Asia, the AOD retrieved from the Meteorological Imager showed good agreement, although the values were affected by cloud contamination errors. However, the conventional retrieval of the AOD over Hong Kong was largely underestimated due to the lack of information on the aerosol type and surface properties. To detect spatial and temporal variation of aerosol type over the area, the critical reflectance method, a technique to retrieve single scattering albedo (SSA), was applied. Additionally, the background aerosol effect was corrected to improve the accuracy of the surface reflectance over Hong Kong. The AOD retrieved froma modified algorithmwas compared to the collocated data measured by AERONET in Hong Kong. The comparison showed that the new aerosol type selection using the critical reflectance and the corrected surface reflectance significantly improved the accuracy of AODs in Hong Kong areas,with a correlation coefficient increase from0.65 to 0.76 and a regression line change from tMI [basic algorithm] = 0

  7. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for

  8. The effect of background music on the taste of wine.

    PubMed

    North, Adrian C

    2012-08-01

    Research concerning cross-modal influences on perception has neglected auditory influences on perceptions of non-auditory objects, although a small number of studies indicate that auditory stimuli can influence perceptions of the freshness of foodstuffs. Consistent with this, the results reported here indicate that independent groups' ratings of the taste of the wine reflected the emotional connotations of the background music played while they drank it. These results indicate that the symbolic function of auditory stimuli (in this case music) may influence perception in other modalities (in this case gustation); and are discussed in terms of possible future research that might investigate those aspects of music that induce such effects in a particular manner, and how such effects might be influenced by participants' pre-existing knowledge and expertise with regard to the target object in question.

  9. Peripheral prism glasses: effects of moving and stationary backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jieming; Peli, Eli; Bowers, Alex R

    2015-04-01

    Unilateral peripheral prisms for homonymous hemianopia (HH) expand the visual field through peripheral binocular visual confusion, a stimulus for binocular rivalry that could lead to reduced predominance and partial suppression of the prism image, thereby limiting device functionality. Using natural-scene images and motion videos, we evaluated whether detection was reduced in binocular compared with monocular viewing. Detection rates of nine participants with HH or quadranopia and normal binocularity wearing peripheral prisms were determined for static checkerboard perimetry targets briefly presented in the prism expansion area and the seeing hemifield. Perimetry was conducted under monocular and binocular viewing with targets presented over videos of real-world driving scenes and still frame images derived from those videos. With unilateral prisms, detection rates in the prism expansion area were significantly lower in binocular than in monocular (prism eye) viewing on the motion background (medians, 13 and 58%, respectively, p = 0.008) but not the still frame background (medians, 63 and 68%, p = 0.123). When the stimulus for binocular rivalry was reduced by fitting prisms bilaterally in one HH and one normally sighted subject with simulated HH, prism-area detection rates on the motion background were not significantly different (p > 0.6) in binocular and monocular viewing. Conflicting binocular motion appears to be a stimulus for reduced predominance of the prism image in binocular viewing when using unilateral peripheral prisms. However, the effect was only found for relatively small targets. Further testing is needed to determine the extent to which this phenomenon might affect the functionality of unilateral peripheral prisms in more real-world situations.

  10. Peripheral Prism Glasses: Effects of Moving and Stationary Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jieming; Peli, Eli; Bowers, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Unilateral peripheral prisms for homonymous hemianopia (HH) expand the visual field through peripheral binocular visual confusion, a stimulus for binocular rivalry that could lead to reduced predominance (partial local suppression) of the prism image and limit device functionality. Using natural-scene images and motion videos, we evaluated whether detection was reduced in binocular compared to monocular viewing. Methods Detection rates of nine participants with HH or quadranopia and normal binocularity wearing peripheral prisms were determined for static checkerboard perimetry targets briefly presented in the prism expansion area and the seeing hemifield. Perimetry was conducted under monocular and binocular viewing with targets presented over videos of real-world driving scenes and still frame images derived from those videos. Results With unilateral prisms, detection rates in the prism expansion area were significantly lower in binocular than monocular (prism eye) viewing on the motion background (medians 13% and 58%, respectively, p = 0.008), but not the still frame background (63% and 68%, p = 0.123). When the stimulus for binocular rivalry was reduced by fitting prisms bilaterally in 1 HH and 1 normally-sighted subject with simulated HH, prism-area detection rates on the motion background were not significantly different (p > 0.6) in binocular and monocular viewing. Conclusions Conflicting binocular motion appears to be a stimulus for reduced predominance of the prism image in binocular viewing when using unilateral peripheral prisms. However, the effect was only found for relatively small targets. Further testing is needed to determine the extent to which this phenomenon might affect the functionality of unilateral peripheral prisms in more real-world situations. PMID:25785533

  11. Peripheral Prism Glasses: Effects of Dominance, Suppression and Background

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nicole C.; Bowers, Alex R.; Optom, M.C.; Peli, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Unilateral peripheral prisms for homonymous hemianopia (HH) place different images on corresponding peripheral retinal points, a rivalrous situation in which local suppression of the prism image could occur and thus limit device functionality. Detection with peripheral prisms has primarily been evaluated using conventional perimetry where binocular rivalry is unlikely to occur. We quantified detection over more visually complex backgrounds and examined the effects of ocular dominance. Methods Detection rates of 8 participants with HH or quadranopia and normal binocularity wearing unilateral peripheral prism glasses were determined for static perimetry targets briefly presented in the prism expansion area (in the blind hemifield) and the seeing hemifield, under monocular and binocular viewing, over uniform gray and more complex patterned backgrounds. Results Participants with normal binocularity had mixed sensory ocular dominance, demonstrated no difference in detection rates when prisms were fitted on the side of the HH or the opposite side (p>0.2), and had detection rates in the expansion area that were not different for monocular and binocular viewing over both backgrounds (p>0.4). However, two participants with abnormal binocularity and strong ocular dominance demonstrated reduced detection in the expansion area when prisms were fitted in front of the non-dominant eye. Conclusions We found little evidence of local suppression of the peripheral prism image for HH patients with normal binocularity. However, in cases of strong ocular dominance, consideration should be given to fitting prisms before the dominant eye. Although these results are promising, further testing in more realistic conditions including image motion is needed. PMID:22885783

  12. Comparison of diverse methods for the correction of atmospheric effects on LANDSAT and SKYLAB images. [radiometric correction in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Camara, G.; Dias, L. A. V.; Mascarenhas, N. D. D.; Desouza, R. C. M.; Pereira, A. E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Earth's atmosphere reduces a sensors ability in currently discriminating targets. Using radiometric correction to reduce the atmospheric effects may improve considerably the performance of an automatic image interpreter. Several methods for radiometric correction from the open literature are compared leading to the development of an atmospheric correction system.

  13. A New Angle on Object-Background Effects in Vection

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Michael T. T.

    2016-01-01

    We considered whether optic flow generated by 3D relief of a foreground surface might influence visually-mediated self-motion perception (vection). We generated background motion consistent with self-rotation, and a foreground object with bumpy relief was either rotated with the observer (ego-centric) or fixed in world coordinates (world-centric). We found that vection strength ratings were greater in conditions with world-centric retinal motion of the foreground object, despite generating flow that was opposite to background motion. This effect was explained by observer judgments of the axis self-rotation in depth; whereas ego-centric flow generated experiences of more on-axis self-rotation, world-centric flow generated experiences of centrifugal rotation around the foreground object. These data suggest that foreground object motion can increase the perception of self-motion generated by optic flow, even when they reduce net retinal motion coherence and promote conditions for multisensory conflict. This finding supports the view that self-motion perception depends on mid-level representations of whole-scene motion. PMID:27433322

  14. A two-step atomizer system using a transversely heated furnace with Zeeman background correction: Design and first solid sampling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, K.-Ch.; Huang, M. D.; Schlemmer, G.; Krivan, V.

    2006-09-01

    A two-step-atomizer consisting of a transversely heated graphite atomization tube and a movable vaporizer graphite cup is described. The atomizer is placed between the poles of an electromagnetic field providing longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction capability. The tube and the cup are heated by independent power supplies enabling the performance of atomic absorption measurements at temporally and spatially isothermal conditions. The design of the vaporizer provides several advantageous features including direct introduction of solid and liquid samples with extremely low contamination risk and a sampling volume of up to 105 μl. The performance of this system was assessed by analysis of the bovine liver NIST SRM 1577b and of a well characterized titanium dioxide material. Calibration curves for quantification were recorded by using aqueous standards. In comparison of the results obtained by this method with the certified values and with the results of independent methods, excellent to reasonable agreement was achieved. For the elements Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na and Zn in titanium dioxide, the achievable limits of detection were between 60 pg g - 1 (Mg) and 0.7 ng g - 1 (Fe).

  15. Social Background Effects on School and Job Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampieri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a theory on how students' social background affects their school attainment and job opportunities. I study a set-up where students differ in ability and social background, and I analyse the interaction between a school and an employer. Students with disadvantaged background are penalised compared to other students: they receive…

  16. Social Background Effects on School and Job Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampieri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a theory on how students' social background affects their school attainment and job opportunities. I study a set-up where students differ in ability and social background, and I analyse the interaction between a school and an employer. Students with disadvantaged background are penalised compared to other students: they receive…

  17. The Effect of Background Music and Background Noise on the Task Performance of Introverts and Extraverts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Gianna; MacDonald, Raymond A. R.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of music with high arousal potential and negative affect (HA), music with low arousal potential and positive affect (LA), and everyday noise, on the cognitive task performance of introverts and extraverts. Forty participants completed five cognitive tasks: immediate recall, free recall, numerical and delayed…

  18. The Effect of Background Music and Background Noise on the Task Performance of Introverts and Extraverts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Gianna; MacDonald, Raymond A. R.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of music with high arousal potential and negative affect (HA), music with low arousal potential and positive affect (LA), and everyday noise, on the cognitive task performance of introverts and extraverts. Forty participants completed five cognitive tasks: immediate recall, free recall, numerical and delayed…

  19. Effects of background music on concentration of workers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong-Hwa; Shih, Yi-Nuo

    2011-01-01

    Background music is a common element in daily living and the workplace. Determination of whether background music affects human work concentration is a relevant concern. Studies have found background music influences human behavior, and this study attempts to understand how background music and listener fondness for types of music affects worker concentration. This study analyzes how different types of background music--and how listeners' degree of preference for the background music--can affect listener concentration in attention testing through Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT). Data were collected from 89 workers. The participants ranged in age between 19 and 28 years old, with an average age of 24 years old. We conclude background music influenced listener attention. This influence has more to do with listener fondness for the music than with type of music. Compared to situations without background music, the likelihood of background music affecting test-taker attention performance is likely to increase with the degree to which the test-taker likes or dislikes the music. It is important not to select music that workers strongly like or dislike when making a selection of background music to avoid negatively affecting worker concentration.

  20. Improvement of optical proximity-effect correction model accuracy by hybrid optical proximity-effect correction modeling and shrink correction technique for 10-nm node process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, Keiichiro; Halle, Scott; Miller, Marshal; Graur, Ioana; Saulnier, Nicole; Dunn, Derren; Okai, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Atuko; Komuro, Hitoshi; Ishimoto, Toru; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Hojo, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    The model accuracy of optical proximity-effect correction (OPC) was investigated by two modeling methods for a 10-nm node process. The first method is to use contours of two-dimensional structures extracted from critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) images combined with conventional CDs of one-dimensional structures. The accuracy of this hybrid OPC model was compared with that of a conventional OPC model, which was created with only CD data, in terms of root-mean-square (RMS) error for metal and contact layers of 10-nm node logic devices. Results showed improvement of model accuracy with the use of hybrid OPC modeling by 23% for contact layer and 18% for metal layer, respectively. The second method is to apply a correction technique for resist shrinkage caused by CD-SEM measurement to extracted contours for improving OPC model accuracy. The accuracy of OPC model with shrink correction was compared with that without shrink correction, and total RMS error was decreased by 12% by using the shrink correction technique. It can be concluded that the use of CD-SEM contours and the shrink correction of contours are effective to improve the accuracy of OPC model for the 10-nm node process.

  1. Effects of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain Background on Complement Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hyams, Catherine; Opel, Sophia; Hanage, William; Yuste, Jose; Bax, Katie; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Spratt, Brian G.; Brown, Jeremy S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Immunity to infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is dependent on complement. There are wide variations in sensitivity to complement between S. pneumoniae strains that could affect their ability to cause invasive infections. Although capsular serotype is one important factor causing differences in complement resistance between strains, there is also considerable other genetic variation between S. pneumoniae strains that may affect complement-mediated immunity. We have therefore investigated whether genetically distinct S. pneumoniae strains with the same capsular serotype vary in their sensitivity to complement mediated immunity. Methodology and Principal Findings C3b/iC3b deposition and neutrophil association were measured using flow cytometry assays for S. pneumoniae strains with different genetic backgrounds for each of eight capsular serotypes. For some capsular serotypes there was marked variation in C3b/iC3b deposition between different strains that was independent of capsule thickness and correlated closely to susceptibility to neutrophil association. C3b/iC3b deposition results also correlated weakly with the degree of IgG binding to each strain. However, the binding of C1q (the first component of the classical pathway) correlated more closely with C3b/iC3b deposition, and large differences remained in complement sensitivity between strains with the same capsular serotype in sera in which IgG had been cleaved with IdeS. Conclusions These data demonstrate that bacterial factors independent of the capsule and recognition by IgG have strong effects on the susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to complement, and could therefore potentially account for some of the differences in virulence between strains. PMID:22022358

  2. Change in Effective Leg Length after Angular Deformity Correction by Hemiepiphyseal Stapling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Choi, In Ho; Chung, Chin Youb; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok; Bae, Jung Yun

    2010-01-01

    Background The hemiepiphyseal stapling has both positive and negative effects on effective leg length. The purpose of this study was to analyze change in effective leg length after angular correction by hemiepiphyseal stapling, and to validate in clinical cases. Methods Mathematical analysis of a hemiepiphyseal stapling model was conducted. The induced formula was validated in 6 cases fulfilling the assumptions of the model. Anatomical parameters involved in this formula were measured in additional 21 cases undergoing hemiepiphyseal stapling or hemiepiphysiodesis. Results Effective leg length increased or decreased according to three parameters in this model: 1) limb length distal to the operated physis (L), 2) width of the operated physis (d), and 3) the amount of angular deformity to be corrected (θ). Actual change in effective leg length of 6 cases similar to this model coincided with the predicted change at least in its direction. L/d ratio was 4.82 ± 0.51. Conclusions Considering the narrow range of the L/d ratio, hemiepiphyseal stapling is likely to decrease effective leg length if the amount of angular correction is less than 10°, whereas to increase it if the amount of angular correction is larger than 16°. This should be taken into consideration when selecting the surgical method for angular deformity correction in skeletally immature patients. PMID:20514265

  3. Proposal of an extended loading effect correction for EBM-8000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kato, Yasuo; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Yoshitake, Shusuke; Hattori, Kiyoshi

    2012-11-01

    To enhance global CDU attained by our EB mask writer EBM-8000, we examined extending the loading effect correction (LEC) function to treat plural of loading effects, for instance, develop and etch loading. Here, we propose a LEC dose composition method, assuming uniquely-defined relation between amount of dose modulation and resultant CD change. Sets of LEC dose maps (pairs of base dose maps and proximity backscattering ratio maps) are converted to sets of CD change maps which are summarized to create a set of dose maps used for writing. This paper describes the correction procedure and possible applications of the method.

  4. Effects of Gravitational Correction on Neutron Stars with Antikaon Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wen-Bo; Hou, Jia-Wei; Qi, Zhan-Qiang; E, Shan-Shan; Bao, Tmurbagan; Liu, Guang-Zhou; Yu, Zi; Zhao, En-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Effects of gravitational correction through the introduction of U bosons on neutron stars with antikaon condensation are studied in the relativistic mean held theory. How the global properties of neutron stars, redshift and the momentum of inertia are modified by gravitational correction and antikaon condensation are discussed here. Results show that antikaon condensation can occur at the core of pulsar PSR J1614-2230. Gravitational correction and antikaon condensation influence each other, and when coupling constant of U bosons and baryons becomes very high, effects of antikaon condensation almost vanish. Moreover, both the redshift and the momentum of inertia of neutron stars are sensitive to the constant of U bosons. Combining with observation data, we can provide a further constraint on coupling constant of U bosons. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11265009, 11271055, and 11175077, and General Project of Liaoning Provincial Department of Education under Grant No. L2015005

  5. SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN POLARIZING FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS FOR COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Peter C.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan

    2015-11-15

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  6. Systematic Effects in Polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometers for Cosmic Microwave Background Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Peter C.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan; Tucker, Gregory S.

    2015-11-01

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  7. Effect of Background and Personality of Teachers on Teaching Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, David F.

    Background and personality characteristics which are associated with successful team teaching were investigated for this study. Members of 31 secondary school teaching teams were rated by judges (who were principals, deans, and college consultants) individually and as teams on the bases of 10 background characteristics and eight personality…

  8. Effect of background ionization on plasma ignition dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Y.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of background ionization on the ignition dynamics of the pulsed plasma plume is studied. The ignition delay time of each pulse is investigated by recording the voltage signal and the light emission signal. By changing the frequency, the relationship between the pulse-off time and the ignition delay time is revealed. This indicates that residual active species produced in the previous discharge play a role in the next one. With the decrease in the frequency, both time delay and ignition delay time increase. This is due to the decay of the reactive species densities in the pulse-off time. Lower concentrations of these species lead to a longer ignition delay time. The functions for calculating the ignition delay time are utilized to explain the effect of residual species. The independent data of each discharge also evidence the impact of the previous pulse. The exotic relationship between the ignition delay times of the first two pulses may be due to the electrode configuration used in this work. For a pin-to-plane electrode structure, the active species produced during the breakdown are accumulated around the anode (pin-point) where the discharge initiated for the asymmetrical electric field distribution.

  9. Surface-effect corrections for oscillation frequencies of evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. H.; Gizon, L.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Accurate modelling of solar-like oscillators requires that modelled mode frequencies are corrected for the systematic shift caused by improper modelling of the near-surface layers, known as the surface effect. Several parametrizations of the surface effect are now available but they have not yet been systematically compared with observations of stars showing modes with mixed g- and p-mode character. Aims: We investigate how much additional uncertainty is introduced to stellar model parameters by our uncertainty about the functional form of the surface effect. At the same time, we test whether any of the parametrizations is significantly better or worse at modelling observed subgiants and low-luminosity red giants. Methods: We model six stars observed by Kepler that show clear mixed modes. We fix the input physics of the stellar models and vary the choice of surface correction between five parametrizations. Results: Models using a solar-calibrated power law correction consistently fit the observations more poorly than the other four corrections. Models with the remaining four corrections generally fit the observations about equally well, with the combined surface correction by Ball & Gizon perhaps being marginally superior. The fits broadly agree on the model parameters within about the 2σ uncertainties, with discrepancies between the modified Lorentzian and free power law corrections occasionally exceeding the 3σ level. Relative to the best-fitting values, the total uncertainties on the masses, radii and ages of the stars are all less than 2, 1 and 6 per cent, respectively. Conclusions: A solar-calibrated power law, as formulated by Kjeldsen et al., appears unsuitable for use with more evolved solar-like oscillators. Among the remaining surface corrections, the uncertainty in the model parameters introduced by the surface effects is about twice as large as the uncertainty in the individual fits for these six stars. Though the fits are thus somewhat less

  10. Attenuation correction effects on SPECT/CT procedures: phantoms studies.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M L; Seren, M E G; Rocha, F C; Brunetto, S Q; Ramos, C D; Button, V L S N

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation correction is widely used in SPECT/CT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) procedures, especially for imaging of the thorax region. Different compensation methods have been developed and introduced into clinical practice. Most of them use attenuation maps obtained using transmission scanning systems. However, this gives extra dose of radiation to the patient. The purpose of this study was to identify when attenuation correction is really important during SPECT/CT procedures.For this purpose, we used Jaszczak phantom and phantom with three line sources, filled with technetium ((99m)-Tc), with scattering materials, like air, water and acrylic, in different detectors configurations. In all images acquired were applied analytic and iterative reconstruction algorithms; the last one with or without attenuation correction. We analyzed parameters such as eccentricity, contrast and spatial resolution in the images.The best reconstruction algorithm on average was iterative, for images with 128 × 128 and 64 × 64 matrixes. The analytical algorithm was effective only to improve eccentricity in 64 × 64 matrix and matrix in contrast 128 × 128 with low statistics. Turning to the clinical routine examinations, on average, for 128 × 128 matrix and low statistics counting, the best algorithm was the iterative, without attenuation correction,improving in 150% the three parameters analyzed and, for the same matrix size, but with high statistical counting, iterative algorithm with attenuation correction was 25% better than that without correction. We can conclude that using the iterative algorithm with attenuation correction in the water, and its extra dose given, is not justified for the procedures of low statistic counting, being relevant only if the intention is to prioritize contrast in acquisitions with high statistic counting.

  11. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  12. Effects of background music on the remembering of filmed events.

    PubMed

    Boltz, M; Schulkind, M; Kantra, S

    1991-11-01

    The use of background music within films provides a naturalistic setting in which to investigate certain issues of schematic processing. Here, the relative placement of music was manipulated such that music either accompanied a scene's outcome, and thereby accentuated its affective meaning, or foreshadowed the same scene, and thereby created expectancies about the future course of events. In addition, background music was either congruent or incongruent with the affect of an episode's outcome. When subjects were later asked to recall the series of filmed episodes, results showed that expectancy violations arising from mood-incongruent relations led to better memory in the foreshadowing condition, while mood-congruent relations led to better performance in the accompanying condition. Results from a recognition task further revealed that scenes unavailable for recall could be recognized when cued by background music. These overall findings are discussed in terms of selective-attending processes that are differentially directed as a function of background music.

  13. A multiresolution image based approach for correction of partial volume effects in emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Boussion, N; Hatt, M; Lamare, F; Bizais, Y; Turzo, A; Cheze-Le Rest, C; Visvikis, D

    2006-04-07

    Partial volume effects (PVEs) are consequences of the limited spatial resolution in emission tomography. They lead to a loss of signal in tissues of size similar to the point spread function and induce activity spillover between regions. Although PVE can be corrected for by using algorithms that provide the correct radioactivity concentration in a series of regions of interest (ROIs), so far little attention has been given to the possibility of creating improved images as a result of PVE correction. Potential advantages of PVE-corrected images include the ability to accurately delineate functional volumes as well as improving tumour-to-background ratio, resulting in an associated improvement in the analysis of response to therapy studies and diagnostic examinations, respectively. The objective of our study was therefore to develop a methodology for PVE correction not only to enable the accurate recuperation of activity concentrations, but also to generate PVE-corrected images. In the multiresolution analysis that we define here, details of a high-resolution image H (MRI or CT) are extracted, transformed and integrated in a low-resolution image L (PET or SPECT). A discrete wavelet transform of both H and L images is performed by using the "à trous" algorithm, which allows the spatial frequencies (details, edges, textures) to be obtained easily at a level of resolution common to H and L. A model is then inferred to build the lacking details of L from the high-frequency details in H. The process was successfully tested on synthetic and simulated data, proving the ability to obtain accurately corrected images. Quantitative PVE correction was found to be comparable with a method considered as a reference but limited to ROI analyses. Visual improvement and quantitative correction were also obtained in two examples of clinical images, the first using a combined PET/CT scanner with a lymphoma patient and the second using a FDG brain PET and corresponding T1-weighted MRI

  14. A multiresolution image based approach for correction of partial volume effects in emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussion, N.; Hatt, M.; Lamare, F.; Bizais, Y.; Turzo, A.; Cheze-LeRest, C.; Visvikis, D.

    2006-04-01

    Partial volume effects (PVEs) are consequences of the limited spatial resolution in emission tomography. They lead to a loss of signal in tissues of size similar to the point spread function and induce activity spillover between regions. Although PVE can be corrected for by using algorithms that provide the correct radioactivity concentration in a series of regions of interest (ROIs), so far little attention has been given to the possibility of creating improved images as a result of PVE correction. Potential advantages of PVE-corrected images include the ability to accurately delineate functional volumes as well as improving tumour-to-background ratio, resulting in an associated improvement in the analysis of response to therapy studies and diagnostic examinations, respectively. The objective of our study was therefore to develop a methodology for PVE correction not only to enable the accurate recuperation of activity concentrations, but also to generate PVE-corrected images. In the multiresolution analysis that we define here, details of a high-resolution image H (MRI or CT) are extracted, transformed and integrated in a low-resolution image L (PET or SPECT). A discrete wavelet transform of both H and L images is performed by using the 'à trous' algorithm, which allows the spatial frequencies (details, edges, textures) to be obtained easily at a level of resolution common to H and L. A model is then inferred to build the lacking details of L from the high-frequency details in H. The process was successfully tested on synthetic and simulated data, proving the ability to obtain accurately corrected images. Quantitative PVE correction was found to be comparable with a method considered as a reference but limited to ROI analyses. Visual improvement and quantitative correction were also obtained in two examples of clinical images, the first using a combined PET/CT scanner with a lymphoma patient and the second using a FDG brain PET and corresponding T1-weighted MRI

  15. High Precision Pulsar Timing: Effects of ISM Correction Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Willie; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Shannon, R.; Stinebring, D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are one of the leading methods in the search for gravitational waves (GWs). However a significant issue facing this method is the effect of the interstellar medium (ISM). There are multiple methodologies being used to correct for these effects but their efficacy has not been carefully studied. We conducted an initial study of biases induced by correcting for the interstellar medium. We simulated times of arrival (TOAs) with white noise and added ISM delays. We measure the ISM effects as is done with normal data, and created a model of these effects using polynomial fitting. This modeling method is most commonly used in the European Pulsar Timing Array. We then remove these measured ISM effects and compare final and initial TOAs. Ideally they should be the same; however, the differences between the 'corrected' TOAs and original TOAs reveal the weaknesses of this method. In preliminary results we concluded that the higher order polynomials do a better job, yet there is a limit as to how high an order one can use. We also found no significant systematic parameter bias induced by using this method. However, it is clear that certain parameters are more affected by this process of correction. The parameters most affected were the frequency and frequency derivative of the pulsar, but biases in these parameters are not important because the power due to them gets removed in the standard timing analysis. We are continuing this research by comparing and contrasting ISM correction schemes, as well as studying the actual behavior of the ISM in more detail. This research is supported by an NSF-PIRE and an NSF-AST grant.

  16. Genetic Background Influences Fluoride’s Effects on Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dong; Gurumurthy, Aruna; Wright, Maggie; Pfeiler, T. Wayne; Loboa, Elizabeth G.; Everett, Eric T.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive fluoride (F) can lead to abnormal bone biology. Numerous studies have focused on the anabolic action of F yet little is known regarding any action on osteoclastogenesis. Little is known regarding the influence of an individual’s genetic background on the responses of bone cells to F. Four-week old C57BL/6J (B6) and C3H/HeJ (C3H) female mice were treated with NaF in the drinking water (0ppm, 50ppm and 100ppm F ion) for 3 weeks. Bone marrow cells were harvested for osteoclastogenesis and hematopoietic colony-forming cell assays. Sera were analyzed for biochemical and bone markers. Femurs, tibiae and lumbar vertebrae were subjected to microCT analysis. Tibiae and femurs were subjected to histology and biomechanical testing, respectively. The results demonstrated new actions of F on osteoclastogenesis and hematopoietic cell differentiation. Strain specific responses were observed. The anabolic action of F was favored in B6 mice exhibiting dose dependent increases in serum ALP activity (p < 0.001); in proximal tibia trabecular and vertebral BMD (tibia at 50&100ppm, p = 0.001; vertebrae at 50&100ppm, p = 0.023&0.019, respectively); and decrease in intact PTH and sRANKL (p = 0.045 and p < 0.001, respectively). F treatment in B6 mice also resulted in increased numbers of CFU-GEMM colonies (p = 0.025). Strain specific accumulations in bone [F] were observed. For C3H mice, dose dependent increases were observed in osteoclast potential (p < 0.001), in situ trabecular osteoclast number (p = 0.007), hematopoietic colony forming units (CFU-GEMM: p < 0.001, CFU-GM: p = 0.006, CFU-M: p < 0.001), and serum markers for osteoclastogenesis (intact PTH: p = 0.004, RANKL: p = 0.022, TRAP5b: p < 0.001). A concordant decrease in serum OPG (p = 0.005) was also observed. Fluoride treatment had no significant effects on bone morphology, BMD and serum PYD crosslinks in C3H suggesting a lack of significant bone resorption. Mechanical properties were also unaltered in C3H. In

  17. Correcting electrode impedance effects in broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference <0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  18. Correction of Rayleigh Scattering Effects in Cloud Optical Thickness Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng-Hua; King, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    We present results that demonstrate the effects of Rayleigh scattering on the 9 retrieval of cloud optical thickness at a visible wavelength (0.66 Am). The sensor-measured radiance at a visible wavelength (0.66 Am) is usually used to infer remotely the cloud optical thickness from aircraft or satellite instruments. For example, we find that without removing Rayleigh scattering effects, errors in the retrieved cloud optical thickness for a thin water cloud layer (T = 2.0) range from 15 to 60%, depending on solar zenith angle and viewing geometry. For an optically thick cloud (T = 10), on the other hand, errors can range from 10 to 60% for large solar zenith angles (0-60 deg) because of enhanced Rayleigh scattering. It is therefore particularly important to correct for Rayleigh scattering contributions to the reflected signal from a cloud layer both (1) for the case of thin clouds and (2) for large solar zenith angles and all clouds. On the basis of the single scattering approximation, we propose an iterative method for effectively removing Rayleigh scattering contributions from the measured radiance signal in cloud optical thickness retrievals. The proposed correction algorithm works very well and can easily be incorporated into any cloud retrieval algorithm. The Rayleigh correction method is applicable to cloud at any pressure, providing that the cloud top pressure is known to within +/- 100 bPa. With the Rayleigh correction the errors in retrieved cloud optical thickness are usually reduced to within 3%. In cases of both thin cloud layers and thick ,clouds with large solar zenith angles, the errors are usually reduced by a factor of about 2 to over 10. The Rayleigh correction algorithm has been tested with simulations for realistic cloud optical and microphysical properties with different solar and viewing geometries. We apply the Rayleigh correction algorithm to the cloud optical thickness retrievals from experimental data obtained during the Atlantic

  19. Correction of Rayleigh Scattering Effects in Cloud Optical Thickness Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng-Hua; King, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    We present results that demonstrate the effects of Rayleigh scattering on the 9 retrieval of cloud optical thickness at a visible wavelength (0.66 Am). The sensor-measured radiance at a visible wavelength (0.66 Am) is usually used to infer remotely the cloud optical thickness from aircraft or satellite instruments. For example, we find that without removing Rayleigh scattering effects, errors in the retrieved cloud optical thickness for a thin water cloud layer (T = 2.0) range from 15 to 60%, depending on solar zenith angle and viewing geometry. For an optically thick cloud (T = 10), on the other hand, errors can range from 10 to 60% for large solar zenith angles (0-60 deg) because of enhanced Rayleigh scattering. It is therefore particularly important to correct for Rayleigh scattering contributions to the reflected signal from a cloud layer both (1) for the case of thin clouds and (2) for large solar zenith angles and all clouds. On the basis of the single scattering approximation, we propose an iterative method for effectively removing Rayleigh scattering contributions from the measured radiance signal in cloud optical thickness retrievals. The proposed correction algorithm works very well and can easily be incorporated into any cloud retrieval algorithm. The Rayleigh correction method is applicable to cloud at any pressure, providing that the cloud top pressure is known to within +/- 100 bPa. With the Rayleigh correction the errors in retrieved cloud optical thickness are usually reduced to within 3%. In cases of both thin cloud layers and thick ,clouds with large solar zenith angles, the errors are usually reduced by a factor of about 2 to over 10. The Rayleigh correction algorithm has been tested with simulations for realistic cloud optical and microphysical properties with different solar and viewing geometries. We apply the Rayleigh correction algorithm to the cloud optical thickness retrievals from experimental data obtained during the Atlantic

  20. On the covariant formalism of the effective field theory of gravity and leading order corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-11-01

    We construct the covariant effective field theory of gravity as an expansion in inverse powers of the Planck mass, identifying the leading and next-to-leading quantum corrections. We determine the form of the effective action for the cases of pure gravity with cosmological constant as well as gravity coupled to matter. By means of heat kernel methods we renormalize and compute the leading quantum corrections to quadratic order in a curvature expansion. The final effective action in our covariant formalism is generally non-local and can be readily used to understand the phenomenology on different spacetimes. In particular, we point out that on curved backgrounds the observable leading quantum gravitational effects are less suppressed than on Minkowski spacetime.

  1. Effects of Background Factors on Attitude Change During Professional Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayson, David

    The relationship of race, sex, religion, college, and socio-economic factors to modifications in attitudes of three consecutive Cornell University Medical College classes was investigated. Results indicated that: (1) background factors are more important in attitude changes toward self than toward environment; (2) students with lower…

  2. Topic and Background Knowledge Effects on Performance in Speaking Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khabbazbashi, Nahal

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which topic and background knowledge of topic affect spoken performance in a high-stakes speaking test. It is argued that evidence of a substantial influence may introduce construct-irrelevant variance and undermine test fairness. Data were collected from 81 non-native speakers of English who performed on 10…

  3. Effect of Atmospheric Background Aerosols on Biological Agent Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    aerosol concentrations in near real time in order to identify a passing aerosol cloud. Detection algorithms are designed to monitor the ambient...characterize specific background properties. The aerosol concentration fluctuations over time are important to the biological agent detection ...A key assumption used in many detection systems is that the concentration change over time from a passing artificially generated aerosol cloud is

  4. Topic and Background Knowledge Effects on Performance in Speaking Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khabbazbashi, Nahal

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which topic and background knowledge of topic affect spoken performance in a high-stakes speaking test. It is argued that evidence of a substantial influence may introduce construct-irrelevant variance and undermine test fairness. Data were collected from 81 non-native speakers of English who performed on 10…

  5. Effect of backgrounding system on beef calf performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the Midwest, opportunity to integrate cattle production into cropping systems abounds. Two winter forage sources are corn residues and double cropped cool season annuals planted after corn silage harvest. The objective of this study was to evaluate backgrounding spring born calves using these fee...

  6. The Differential Effect of Two Types of Direct Written Corrective Feedback on Noticing and Uptake: Reformulation vs. Error Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Maria; Lopez-Serrano, Sonia; Manchon, Rosa M.

    2010-01-01

    Framed in a cognitively-oriented strand of research on corrective feedback (CF) in SLA, the controlled three-stage (composition/comparison-noticing/revision) study reported in this paper investigated the effects of two forms of direct CF (error correction and reformulation) on noticing and uptake, as evidenced in the written output produced by a…

  7. Aerosol effects and corrections in the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark E.; Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Daniels, John; Drayson, S. Roland; Park, Jae H.

    1995-01-01

    The eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991 increased stratospheric aerosol loading by a factor of 30, affecting chemistry, radiative transfer, and remote measurements of the stratosphere. The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument on board Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) makes measurements globally for inferring profiles of NO2, H2O, O3, HF, HCl, CH4, NO, and temperature in addition to aerosol extinction at five wavelengths. Understanding and removing the aerosol extinction is essential for obtaining accurate retrievals from the radiometer channels of NO2, H2O and O3 in the lower stratosphere since these measurements are severely affected by contaminant aerosol absorption. If ignored, aerosol absorption in the radiometer measurements is interpreted as additional absorption by the target gas, resulting in anomalously large mixing ratios. To correct the radiometer measurements for aerosol effects, a retrieved aerosol extinction profile is extrapolated to the radiometer wavelengths and then included as continuum attenuation. The sensitivity of the extrapolation to size distribution and composition is small for certain wavelength combinations, reducing the correction uncertainty. The aerosol corrections extend the usable range of profiles retrieved from the radiometer channels to the tropopause with results that agree well with correlative measurements. In situations of heavy aerosol loading, errors due to aerosol in the retrieved mixing ratios are reduced to values of about 15, 25, and 60% in H2O, O3, and NO2, respectively, levels that are much less than the correction magnitude.

  8. Aerosol effects and corrections in the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark E.; Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Daniels, John; Drayson, S. Roland; Park, Jae H.

    1995-01-01

    The eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991 increased stratospheric aerosol loading by a factor of 30, affecting chemistry, radiative transfer, and remote measurements of the stratosphere. The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument on board Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) makes measurements globally for inferring profiles of NO2, H2O, O3, HF, HCl, CH4, NO, and temperature in addition to aerosol extinction at five wavelengths. Understanding and removing the aerosol extinction is essential for obtaining accurate retrievals from the radiometer channels of NO2, H2O and O3 in the lower stratosphere since these measurements are severely affected by contaminant aerosol absorption. If ignored, aerosol absorption in the radiometer measurements is interpreted as additional absorption by the target gas, resulting in anomalously large mixing ratios. To correct the radiometer measurements for aerosol effects, a retrieved aerosol extinction profile is extrapolated to the radiometer wavelengths and then included as continuum attenuation. The sensitivity of the extrapolation to size distribution and composition is small for certain wavelength combinations, reducing the correction uncertainty. The aerosol corrections extend the usable range of profiles retrieved from the radiometer channels to the tropopause with results that agree well with correlative measurements. In situations of heavy aerosol loading, errors due to aerosol in the retrieved mixing ratios are reduced to values of about 15, 25, and 60% in H2O, O3, and NO2, respectively, levels that are much less than the correction magnitude.

  9. Improved correction of VIPERS angular selection effects in clustering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzotta, A.; Granett, B. R.; Bel, J.; Guzzo, L.; de la Torre, S.; Aff004

    2016-10-01

    Clustering estimates in galaxy redshift surveys need to account and correct for the way targets are selected from the general population, as to avoid biasing the measured values of cosmological parameters. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) is no exception to this, involving slit collisions and masking effects. Pushed by the increasing precision of the measurements, e.g. of the growth rate f, we have been re-assessing these effects in detail. We present here an improved correction for the two-point correlation function, capable to recover the amplitude of the monopole of the two-point correlation function ξ(r) above 1 h-1 Mpc to better than 2.

  10. Correcting Satellite Image Derived Surface Model for Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William; Baldwin, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This project was a continuation of the project entitled "Resolution Earth Surface Features from Repeat Moderate Resolution Satellite Imagery". In the previous study, a Bayesian Maximum Posterior Estimate (BMPE) algorithm was used to obtain a composite series of repeat imagery from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). The spatial resolution of the resulting composite was significantly greater than the 1 km resolution of the individual AVHRR images. The BMPE algorithm utilized a simple, no-atmosphere geometrical model for the short-wave radiation budget at the Earth's surface. A necessary assumption of the algorithm is that all non geometrical parameters remain static over the compositing period. This assumption is of course violated by temporal variations in both the surface albedo and the atmospheric medium. The effect of the albedo variations is expected to be minimal since the variations are on a fairly long time scale compared to the compositing period, however, the atmospheric variability occurs on a relatively short time scale and can be expected to cause significant errors in the surface reconstruction. The current project proposed to incorporate an atmospheric correction into the BMPE algorithm for the purpose of investigating the effects of a variable atmosphere on the surface reconstructions. Once the atmospheric effects were determined, the investigation could be extended to include corrections various cloud effects, including short wave radiation through thin cirrus clouds. The original proposal was written for a three year project, funded one year at a time. The first year of the project focused on developing an understanding of atmospheric corrections and choosing an appropriate correction model. Several models were considered and the list was narrowed to the two best suited. These were the 5S and 6S shortwave radiation models developed at NASA/GODDARD and tested extensively with data from the AVHRR instrument. Although the 6S model

  11. The effective action of a spin 1/2 field in the background of a nontopological soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baacke, J.

    1990-12-01

    We generalize a new method of calculating the effective action for fields in a spherically symmetric background to the case of a spin 1/2 field whose mass is a function of r=| x|, as it is the case in the nontopological soliton model of Friedberg and Lee. The quantum corrections to the soliton energy are sizeable, of the same order as the bound state energies that stabilize the soliton.

  12. False fame prevented: avoiding fluency effects without judgmental correction.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2010-05-01

    Three studies show a way to prevent fluency effects independently of judgmental correction strategies by identifying and procedurally blocking the sources of fluency variations, which are assumed to be embodied in nature. For verbal stimuli, covert pronunciations are assumed to be the crucial source of fluency gains. As a consequence, blocking such pronunciation simulations through a secondary oral motor task decreased the false-fame effect for repeatedly presented names of actors (Experiment 1) as well as prevented increases in trust due to repetition for brand names and names of shares in the stock market (Experiment 2). Extending this evidence beyond repeated exposure, we demonstrated that blocking oral motor simulations also prevented fluency effects of word pronunciation on judgments of hazardousness (Experiment 3). Concerning the realm of judgment correction, this procedural blocking of (biasing) associative processes is a decontamination method not considered before in the literature, because it is independent of exposure control, mood, motivation, and post hoc correction strategies. The present results also have implications for applied issues, such as advertising and investment decisions. 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Vitamin D status in primary hyperparathyroidism: effect of genetic background.

    PubMed

    Battista, Claudia; Guarnieri, Vito; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Baorda, Filomena; Pileri, Mauro; Garrubba, Maria; Salcuni, Antonio S; Chiodini, Iacopo; Minisola, Salvatore; Romagnoli, Elisabetta; Eller-Vainicher, Cristina; Santini, Stefano A; Parisi, Salvatore; Frusciante, Vincenzo; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Scillitani, Alfredo; Cole, David E C

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is associated with hypovitaminosis D as assessed by serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (TotalD) levels. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether this is also the case for the calculated bioavailable 25-hydroxyvitamin D (BioD) or free 25-hydroxyvitamin D (FreeD), and whether the vitamin D status is influenced by genetic background. We compared vitamin D status of 88 PHPT patients each with a matched healthy family member sharing genetic background, i.e., first-degree relative (FDR), or not, namely an in-law relative (ILR). We compared TotalD and vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), using the latter to calculate BioD and FreeD. We also genotyped two common DBP polymorphisms (rs7041 and rs4588) likely to affect the affinity for and levels of vitamin D metabolites. TotalD was lower (p < 0.001) in PHPT (12.3 ± 6.6 ng/mL) than either family member group (FDR: 19.4 ± 12.1 and ILR: 23.2 ± 14.1), whether adjusted for DBP or not. DBP levels were also significantly lower (p < 0.001) in PHPT (323 ± 73 mg/L) versus FDR (377 ± 98) or ILR (382 ± 101). The differences between PHPT and control groups for TotalD, BioD, and FreeD were maintained after adjustment for season, gender, and serum creatinine. 25-hydroxyvitamin D, evaluated as total, free, or bioavailable fractions, is decreased in PHPT. No difference was seen between first-degree relative and in-law controls, suggesting that neither genetic nor non-genetic background greatly influences the genesis of the hypovitaminosis D seen in PHPT.

  14. Comparative effectiveness of correction strategies in connected discourse tracking.

    PubMed

    Lunato, K E; Weisenberger, J M

    1994-10-01

    The effectiveness of four correction strategies commonly used in connected discourse tracking was investigated in the present study. The strategies were 1) verbatim repetition of a word or phrase; 2) use of antonyms or synonyms as cues; 3) use of phonemic cues, with no whole word repetition; and 4) going back or ahead in the text, with no repetition of the missed segment. Four normal-hearing adults served as listeners. Live-voice presentation of text by two female talkers was employed for all conditions. Listeners were tested in two stimulus presentation modes, speechreading alone and speechreading plus a multichannel tactile aid. Results indicated that strategy 1, repetition of the missed segment, produced the highest tracking rates, significantly higher than any of the other strategies. Strategy 2 produced the lowest tracking rates. Strategies 1 and 3 yielded the lowest percentage of initially missed words, or blockages, and strategy 4 the highest percentage. Significantly higher tracking rates were found under the speechreading plus tactile aid presentation mode, compared with speechreading alone. Further, tracking rates increased significantly from the beginning to the end of training. Data were compared with a more typical CDT task, in which all correction strategies were operative, and results showed little difference in tracking rates between this task and the constrained CDT employing only strategy 1. Overall, results suggest that simple repetition of missed segments is an effective correction strategy for CDT and argue for its inclusion in computer-assisted tracking implementations.

  15. Correction for acoustic attenuation effects in optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-07-01

    The feasibility of correcting for the effects of acoustic attenuation in optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained with model-based inversion is shown in this work. Acoustic attenuation is a physical phenomenon that takes place inevitably in actual acoustic media and becomes significant at high ultrasonic frequencies. The frequency dependence of acoustic attenuation and the associated dispersion lead to reduction of amplitude and broadening of the optoacoustic signals, which in turn cause, respectively, quantification errors and loss of resolution in the reconstructed images. In this work we imaged an agar phantom with embedded microparticles in three different scenarios, namely with the signals acquired with no attenuation, with the signals collected by placing an attenuating sample in between the phantom and the ultrasonic transducer and with the signals corrected for the effects of acoustic attenuation. The results obtained show that the quantification inaccuracies and the loss of resolution of the images can be partially corrected at the expense of introducing noise at high spatial frequencies due to the amplification of the high frequency components of the noise in the signals.

  16. Accounting for Chromatic Atmospheric Effects on Barycentric Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Ryan T.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Fischer, Debra A.; Jurgenson, Colby A.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric effects on stellar radial velocity measurements for exoplanet discovery and characterization have not yet been fully investigated for extreme precision levels. We carry out calculations to determine the wavelength dependence of barycentric corrections across optical wavelengths, due to the ubiquitous variations in air mass during observations. We demonstrate that radial velocity errors of at least several cm s‑1 can be incurred if the wavelength dependence is not included in the photon-weighted barycentric corrections. A minimum of four wavelength channels across optical spectra (380–680 nm) are required to account for this effect at the 10 cm s‑1 level, with polynomial fits of the barycentric corrections applied to cover all wavelengths. Additional channels may be required in poor observing conditions or to avoid strong telluric absorption features. Furthermore, consistent flux sampling on the order of seconds throughout the observation is necessary to ensure that accurate photon weights are obtained. Finally, we describe how a multiple-channel exposure meter will be implemented in the EXtreme PREcision Spectrograph (EXPRES).

  17. Correcting the MoCA for education: effect on sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Genevieve; Hansen, Kevin T; Woolmore-Goodwin, Sarah; Gutmanis, Iris; Wells, Jennie; Borrie, Michael; Fogarty, Jennifer

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of the suggested education correction on the sensitivity and specificity of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Twenty-five outpatients with dementia and 39 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) underwent a diagnostic evaluation, which included the MoCA. Thirty-seven healthy controls also completed the MoCA and psychiatric, medical, neurological, functional, and cognitive difficulties were ruled out. For the total MoCA score, unadjusted for education, a cut-off score of 26 yielded the best balance between sensitivity and specificity (80% and 89% respectively) in identifying cognitive impairment (people with either dementia or aMCI, versus controls). When applying the education correction, sensitivity decreased from 80% to 69% for a small specificity increase (89% to 92%). The cut-off score yielding the best balance between sensitivity and specificity for the education adjusted MoCA score fell to 25 (61% and 97%, respectively). Adjusting the MoCA total score for education had a detrimental effect on sensitivity with only a slight increase in specificity. Clinically, this loss in sensitivity can lead to an increased number of false negatives, as education level does not always correlate to premorbid intellectual function. Clinical judgment about premorbid status should guide interpretation. However, as this effect may be cohort specific, age and education corrected norms and cut-offs should be developed to help guide MoCA interpretation.

  18. Initial state effects on the cosmic microwave background and trans-Planckian physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Kevin; Lowe, David A.

    2003-03-01

    There exists a one complex parameter family of de Sitter invariant vacua, known as α vacua. In the context of slow roll inflation, we show that all but the Bunch-Davies vacuum generates unacceptable production of high energy particles at the end of inflation. As a simple model for the effects of trans-Planckian physics, we go on to consider non de Sitter invariant vacua obtained by patching modes in the Bunch-Davies vacuum above some momentum scale Mc, with modes in an α vacuum below Mc. Choosing Mc near the Planck scale MPl, we find acceptable levels of hard particle production, and corrections to the cosmic microwave perturbations at the level of HMPl/M2c, where H is the Hubble parameter during inflation. More general initial states of this type with H≪Mc≪MPl can give corrections to the spectrum of cosmic microwave background perturbations at order 1. The parameter characterizing the α vacuum during inflation is a new cosmological observable.

  19. Rapid and effective correction of RF inhomogeneity for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M S; DuBois, R M; Zeineh, M M

    2000-08-01

    The well-known variability in the distribution of high frequency electromagnetic fields in the human body causes problems in the analysis of structural information in high field magnetic resonance images. We describe a method of compensating for the purely intensity-based effects. In our simple and rapid correction algorithm, we first use statistical means to determine the background image noise level and the edges of the image features. We next populate all "noise" pixels with the mean signal intensity of the image features. These data are then smoothed by convolution with a gaussian filter using Fourier methods. Finally, the original data that are above the noise level are normalized to the smoothed images, thereby eliminating the lowest spatial frequencies in the final, corrected data. Processing of a 124 slice, 256 x 256 volume dataset requires under 70 sec on a laptop personal computer. Overall, the method is less prone to artifacts from edges or from sensitivity to absolute head position than are other correction techniques. Following intensity correction, the images demonstrated obvious qualitative improvement and, when subjected to automated segmentation tools, the accuracy of segmentation improved, in one example, from 35.3% to 84.7% correct, as compared to a manually-constructed gold standard.

  20. Non-Maxwellian background effects in gyrokinetic simulations with GENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Siena, A.; Görier, T.; Doerk, H.; Citrin, J.; Johnson, T.; Schneider, M.; Poli, E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between fast particles and core turbulence has been established as a central issue for a tokamak reactor. Recent results predict significant enhancement of electromagnetic stabilisation of ITG turbulence in the presence of fast ions. However, most of these simulations were performed with the assumption of equivalent Maxwellian distributed particles, whereas to rigorously model fast ions, a non-Maxwellian background distribution function is needed. To this aim, the underlying equations in the gyrokinetic code GENE have been re-derived and implemented for a completely general background distribution function. After verification studies, a previous investigation on a particular JET plasma has been revised with linear simulations. The plasma is composed by Deuterium, electron, Carbon impurities, NBI fast Deuterium and ICRH 3He. Fast particle distributions have been modelled with a number of different analytic choices in order to study the impact of non-Maxwellian distributions on the plasma turbulence: slowing down and anisotropic Maxwellian. Linear growth rates are studied as a function of the wave number and compared with those obtained using an equivalent Maxwellian. Generally, the choice of the 3He distribution seems to have a stronger impact on the microinstabilities than that of the fast Deuterium.

  1. Quantum Corrections and Effective Action in Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    1998-07-01

    In this Thesis we study quantum corrections to the classical dynamics for mean values in field theory. To that end we make use of the formalism of the closed time path effective action to get real and causal equations of motion. We introduce a coarse grained effective action, which is useful in the study of phase transitions in field theory. We derive an exact renormalization group equation that describes how this action varies with the coarse graining scale. We develop different approximation methods to solve that equation, and we obtain non perturbative improvements to the effective potential for a self interacting scalar field theory. We also discuss the stochastic aspects contained in this action. On the other hand, using the effective action, we find low energy and large distance quantum corrections for the gravitational potential, treating relativity as an effective low energy theory. We include the effect of scalar fields, fermions and gravitons. The inclusion of metric fluctuations causes Einstein semiclassical equations to depend on the gauge fixing parameters, and they are therefore non physical. We solve this problem identifying as a physical observable the trayectory of a test particle. We explicitly show that the geodesic equation for such particle is independent of the arbitrary parameters of the gauge fixing.

  2. Frequency-domain optical mammography: edge effect corrections.

    PubMed

    Fantini, S; Franceschini, M A; Gaida, G; Gratton, E; Jess, H; Mantulin, W W; Moesta, K T; Schlag, P M; Kaschke, M

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the problem of edge effects in laser-beam transillumination scanning of the human breast. Edge effects arise from tissue thickness variability along the scanned area, and from lateral photon losses through the sides of the breast. Edge effects can be effectively corrected in frequency-domain measurements by employing a two-step procedure: (1) use of the phase information to calculate an effective tissue thickness for each pixel location; (2) application of the knowledge of tissue thickness to calculate an edge-corrected optical image from the ac signal image. The measurements were conducted with a light mammography apparatus (LIMA) designed for feasibility tests in the clinical environment. Operating in the frequency-domain (110 MHz), this instrument performs a transillumination optical scan at two wavelengths (685 and 825 nm). We applied the proposed two-step procedure to data from breast phantoms and from human breasts. The processed images provide higher contrast and detectability in optical mammography with respect to raw data breast images.

  3. Effect of natural background radiation on dermatoglyphic traits.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, M K; Malik, S L; Grewal, M S; Singh, I P; Sudarshan, K J; Kochupillai, N; Verma, I C

    1980-01-01

    Long term exposure to natural background radiation could cause gross abnormalities in individuals and at the population level. Studies conducted on the coastal Kerala population which is known to be receiving fifteen times the normal permissible dose of radiation support this. This study aims at understanding the deviations, if any, in the normal human variation as a result of such high natural radiation. A detailed quantitative and qualitative dermatoglyphic study was done on two communities i.e. Hindus and Christians, living separately in the radiation area. The significant differences were observed between control and exposed groups with regard to d-t ridge count, distances c-t and angle atd. The susceptibility of the axial triradius to environmental distrubances is discussed.

  4. Correction on the effect of numerical aperture in optical scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqi; Liu, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chuanwei; Chen, Xiuguo; Gu, Honggang

    2013-10-01

    Optical scatterometry, also referred to as optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology, has been introduced for critical dimension (CD) monitoring and overlay metrology with great success in recent years. Forward modeling to calculate the optical signature from the measured diffractive structure is one of the most important issues in OCD metrology. To simplify the forward modeling approach, such as rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), the incidence and azimuthal angles are usually assumed to be constant. However, since some focusing elements, such as focusing lens or parabolic mirrors with finite numerical aperture (NA), are always used to gain a sufficient small spot size onto the sample, this assumption is not true in the whole exit pupil of the focusing elements, leading to a modeling error in forward modeling, and finally leading to a fitting error in OCD metrology. In this paper, we propose a correction method with consideration of the effect of NA to decrease the modeling error in the forward modeling. The correction method is an average integral method based on Gaussian quadrature in two dimensions inside a circle, and is performed on forward modeling with varied incidence and azimuthal angles over the exit pupil. Experiments performed on silicon gratings with a Mueller matrix polarimeter have demonstrated that the proposed correction method achieves a higher accuracy in OCD metrology.

  5. Effects of age, gender and educational background on strength of motivation for medical school.

    PubMed

    Kusurkar, Rashmi; Kruitwagen, Cas; ten Cate, Olle; Croiset, Gerda

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of selection, educational background, age and gender on strength of motivation to attend and pursue medical school. Graduate entry (GE) medical students (having Bachelor's degree in Life Sciences or related field) and Non-Graduate Entry (NGE) medical students (having only completed high school), were asked to fill out the Strength of Motivation for Medical School (SMMS) questionnaire at the start of medical school. The questionnaire measures the willingness of the medical students to pursue medical education even in the face of difficulty and sacrifice. GE students (59.64 ± 7.30) had higher strength of motivation as compared to NGE students (55.26 ± 8.33), so did females (57.05 ± 8.28) as compared to males (54.30 ± 8.08). 7.9% of the variance in the SMMS scores could be explained with the help of a linear regression model with age, gender and educational background/selection as predictor variables. Age was the single largest predictor. Maturity, taking developmental differences between sexes into account, was used as a predictor to correct for differences in the maturation of males and females. Still, the gender differences prevailed, though they were reduced. Pre-entrance educational background and selection also predicted the strength of motivation, but the effect of the two was confounded. Strength of motivation appears to be a dynamic entity, changing primarily with age and maturity and to a small extent with gender and experience.

  6. LRO Diviner Nonlinear Response and Opposition Effect Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyalay, S.; Aye, K. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment measures thermal radiation to determine the brightness temperature of the lunar surface. As with the Mars Climate Sounder (upon which Diviner is based), we use pre-flight calibration data to correct for the nonlinear response in Diviner's detectors, which in-turn accounts for much of the detector non-uniformity within channels. Furthermore, channels 8 and 9 exhibit unexpectedly high brightness temperatures close to the equator around midday, with even higher brightness temperatures when observing lunar highlands as opposed to maria. Unexpectedly high brightness temperatures around midday at the equator is reminiscent of the opposition effect known to exist on the Moon at low phase angles in Visual to Near Infra-Red (VNIR) wavelengths. Diviner channel 2 data (which detects solar radiation reflected by the Moon) shows this opposition effect, which is more pronounced in the highlands than the maria. We interpret a correlation we observe between channel 2 detected radiance and channel 8 and 9 brightness temperature as due to incomplete blocking of reflected solar radiation. This leads us to an opposition effect correction for Diviner channels 8 and 9 dependent on Diviner's solar channel data. Whether this is a direct leak of VNIR light upon the detectors, or solar heating of blocking filters, which then radiate infrared radiation upon the detectors, is yet to be determined. We can use the nonlinearity and opposition effect corrections to recharacterize the spectral emissivity of the lunar regolith, which we can then compare to laboratory spectra.

  7. ON THE EFFECT OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND IN HIGH-REDSHIFT (SUB-)MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Da Cunha, Elisabete; Groves, Brent; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Rix, Hans-Walter; Weiss, Axel; Bertoldi, Frank; Carilli, Chris; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark; Maiolino, Roberto; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian

    2013-03-20

    Modern (sub-)millimeter interferometers enable the measurement of the cool gas and dust emission of high-redshift galaxies (z > 5). However, at these redshifts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature is higher, approaching, and even exceeding, the temperature of cold dust and molecular gas observed in the local universe. In this paper, we discuss the impact of the warmer CMB on (sub-)millimeter observations of high-redshift galaxies. The CMB affects the observed (sub-)millimeter dust continuum and the line emission (e.g., carbon monoxide, CO) in two ways: (1) it provides an additional source of (both dust and gas) heating and (2) it is a non-negligible background against which the line and continuum emission are measured. We show that these two competing processes affect the way we interpret the dust and gas properties of high-redshift galaxies using spectral energy distribution models. We quantify these effects and provide correction factors to compute what fraction of the intrinsic dust (and line) emission can be detected against the CMB as a function of frequency, redshift, and temperature. We discuss implications on the derived properties of high-redshift galaxies from (sub-)millimeter data. Specifically, the inferred dust and molecular gas masses can be severely underestimated for cold systems if the impact of the CMB is not properly taken into account.

  8. Conflict Background Triggered Congruency Sequence Effects in Graphic Judgment Task

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yonghui

    2013-01-01

    Congruency sequence effects refer to the reduction of congruency effects when following an incongruent trial than following a congruent trial. The conflict monitoring account, one of the most influential contributions to this effect, assumes that the sequential modulations are evoked by response conflict. The present study aimed at exploring the congruency sequence effects in the absence of response conflict. We found congruency sequence effects occurred in graphic judgment task, in which the conflict stimuli acted as irrelevant information. The findings reveal that processing task-irrelevant conflict stimulus features could also induce sequential modulations of interference. The results do not support the interpretation of conflict monitoring and favor a feature integration account that the congruency sequence effects are attributed to the repetitions of stimulus and response features. PMID:23372766

  9. Conflict background triggered congruency sequence effects in graphic judgment task.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yonghui

    2013-01-01

    Congruency sequence effects refer to the reduction of congruency effects when following an incongruent trial than following a congruent trial. The conflict monitoring account, one of the most influential contributions to this effect, assumes that the sequential modulations are evoked by response conflict. The present study aimed at exploring the congruency sequence effects in the absence of response conflict. We found congruency sequence effects occurred in graphic judgment task, in which the conflict stimuli acted as irrelevant information. The findings reveal that processing task-irrelevant conflict stimulus features could also induce sequential modulations of interference. The results do not support the interpretation of conflict monitoring and favor a feature integration account that the congruency sequence effects are attributed to the repetitions of stimulus and response features.

  10. Effects on Reading Comprehension of Building Background Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Patricia

    1982-01-01

    The effects on reading comprehension of prior cultural experience were assessed in a study of 72 advanced ESL students reading about Halloween. Prior cultural experience was found to be helpful, but exposure to meanings of target vocabulary words had no significant effect on comprehension. (Author/MSE)

  11. A corrected effective density fluid model for gassy sediments.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guangying; Huang, Yiwang; Hua, Jian; Xu, Xiuyu; Wang, Fei

    2017-01-01

    A corrected effective density fluid model is developed for predicting sound speed dispersion and attenuation coefficient in gassy sediments. An acoustic experiment was undertaken to measure the attenuation coefficient in a frequency band of 600 to 3000 Hz in gassy unsaturated sand. The measured frequency spectra of the attenuation coefficient show four peaks due to bubble resonance. Then a method of using several modified Gaussian functions to model bubble size distribution is proposed to fit measured attenuation data, which shows that the magnitudes of the fitted model attenuation coefficients are broadly in agreement with those measured attenuation data.

  12. Atmospheric effect on spectral signature - Measurements and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric effect on the spectral signature of surface cover were conducted during hazy conditions over the Chesapeake Bay and its eastern shore. In the experiment the upward radiance was measured by an airborne scanning radiometer in nine spectral bands between 465 and 773 nm, above and below the haze layer. Simultaneous measurements of the aerosol optical thickness and its vertical distribution were conducted. The results of the measurements are used to study the spectral dependence of the atmospheric effect on remote sensing of water bodies and vegetated fields (forest, corn field, and pasture), and to verify theoretical predictions. It is suggested that the radiances over dark areas (e.g., water in the near IR and forest in the visible) can be used to derive the aerosol optical thickness as is done over oceans with the CZCS satellite images. Combined with climatological information, the derived optical thickness can be used to perform corrections of the atmospheric effect. Examples of the derivation of the aerosol optical thickness and correction of the upward radiances are given.

  13. Differential effects of main error correction versus secondary error correction on motor pattern of running.

    PubMed

    Corte, Stefano; Cavedon, Valentina; Milanese, Chiara

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of how the run pattern varies as a consequence to main error correction versus secondary error correction. Twenty-two university students were randomly assigned to one of two training-conditions: 'main error' (ME) and 'secondary error' (SE) correction. The rear-foot strike at touchdown was hypothesized as the 'main error', whereas an incorrect shoulder position (i.e., behind the base of support) as the 'secondary error'. In order to evaluate any changes in run pattern at the foot touchdown instant, the ankle, knee and hip joint angles, the height of toe and heel (with respect to the ground), and the horizontal distance from the heel to the projected center of mass on the ground were measured. After the training-intervention, the ME group showed a significant improvement in the run pattern at the foot touchdown instant in all kinematic parameters, whereas no significant changes were found in the SE group. The results support the hypothesis that the main error can have a greater influence on the movement patterns than a secondary error. Furthermore, the findings highlight that a correct diagnosis and the correction of the 'main error' are fundamental for greater run pattern improvement.

  14. Atlas and Catalog of Dark Clouds Based on the 2 Micron All Sky Survey. II. Correction of the Background Using the Besançon Galaxy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Kazuhito; Marshall, Douglas J.; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we give a correction to the large scale color excess maps of E (J - H) and E (H - Ks) derived by Dobashi (2011, PASJ, 63, S1) based on the 2 Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). These maps were produced using a new technique named X percentile method, and they cover all of the sky at the 1" grid. The maps, however, suffer from an apparent error on a large scale arising from an ambiguity in determining the background star colors. The error is relatively large in the inner region of the Galaxy at |l| ≲ 90° , and the maps may overestimate the true extinction by a few magnitudes in AV in this region. To improve the background determination, we performed a Monte Carlo simulation to generate a star catalog equivalent to the 2MASS PSC based on the Besançon Galaxy Model described by Robin et al. (2003, A&A, 409, 523). The simulated catalog contains ˜ 7.7 × 108 stars whose apparent magnitudes in the J , H , and KS bands are calculated assuming no interstellar dust throughout the Galaxy. We applied the X percentile method to the simulated star catalog, and regarded the resulting star color maps as the background. As a result, the overestimation in the original color excess maps has been significantly improved. Extinction maps of AJ , AH , and AKS made by Dobashi (2011) were also improved utilizing the resulting color excess maps. In this paper, we further investigated possible errors arising from the X percentile method itself by setting an artificial diffuse dust disk in the simulated star catalog, and found that the diffuse dust on a large scale can be underestimated by ˜ 20% for the galactic latitude range |b| > 5° at most, which should be noted when the color excess maps are compared with other dataset including the far-infrared dust emission detected by Planck and Herschel satellites.

  15. Effects of Mandating Benefits Packages. Background Paper No. 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Olivia S.

    This study of the potential labor market consequences of government mandating of employee benefits suggests that mandating benefits will increase benefit coverage and generosity for insurance coverage will not be helped; even when mandating benefits does improve benefit provision, there will be other offsetting effects, including wage and other…

  16. Memory effects and virial corrections in nonequilibrium dense systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morawetz, K.; Roepke, G.

    1995-05-01

    A dense interacting Bose or Fermi gas is considered. Within the Kadanoff-Baym real-time Green-function technique a generalized kinetic equation is derived in the nonequilibrium ladder approximation. As a Markovian limit the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation is recovered. The relevance of retardation effects in the kinetic equation of dense systems is shown. It turns out that the stationary solution of the generalized kinetic equation reproduces the second virial coefficient of the equation of state, including the Beth-Uhlenbeck quantum corrections. We establish a generalized kinetic equation describing correlation effects in a consistent approach to nonequilibrium for Bose and Fermi systems. In this way we give a generalization of the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula that applies to nonequilibrium and to finite systems. The derivation makes use of the time dependent {ital T}-matrix equation, which establishes a generalization of the Bethe-Goldstone equation. The correlated parts of the density and energy, which can be interpreted as virial corrections, are thermodynamically consistent. In this way global energy conservation is fulfilled.

  17. Effect of parallactic refraction correction on station height determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, F. J.; Huston, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of omitting the parallactic refraction correction for satellite optical observations in the determination of station coordinates is analyzed for a large satellite data distribution. A significant error effect is seen in station heights. A geodetic satellite data distribution of 23 close earth satellites, containing 30,000 optical observations obtained by 13 principal Baker-Nunn camera sites, is employed. This distribution was used in a preliminary Goddard Earth Model (GEM 1) for the determination of the gravity field of the earth and geocentric tracking station locations. The parallactic refraction correction is modeled as an error on the above satellite data and a least squares adjustment for station locations is obtained for each of the 13 Baker-Nunn sites. Results show an average station height shift of +8 meters with a dispersion of plus or minus 0.7 meters for individual sites. Station latitude and longitude shifts amounted to less than a meter. Similar results are obtained from a theoretical method employing a probability distribution for the satellite optical observations.

  18. Adolescent scoliosis patients. Personality patterns and effects of corrective surgery.

    PubMed

    Clayson, D; Levine, D B

    1976-05-01

    Personality patterns of 84 adolescent scoliosis patients were assessed and an evaluation made of certain psychological effects of corrective surgery. Results indicate the following: Scoliosis has fewer psychologically debilitating effects on younger adolescents (those under 16) than it does on older adolescents; scoliotic boys show comparatively better general personality integration than girls; scoliotic girls are less disturbed in psychosexual development than are boys. Postoperatively, boys can be expected to show less overt incapacitation than girls; psychologically, boys will require a longer period of recuperation than will girls; boys can be expected to present fewer immediate management problems than girls; the internalization of a sense of "difference" from the normal in adolescent scoliotics increases in direct relation to age. Consequently, the eariler surgical correction can be undertaken the better. Important differences exist between the psychological "set" of male and female adolescent patients. For boys, self-acceptance is at the core. Postoperative surgical care should thus focus on reinforcing characteristics of personal adequacy, namely, the ability to compete, and fulfill reasonable goals. For girls, acceptance by others is paramount. Postoperative care is best directed toward strengthening feelings of attractiveness (of any personal characteristic), worth, and, above all, future interpersonal possibilities.

  19. Memory effects and virial corrections in nonequilibrium dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, K.; Roepke, G.

    1995-05-01

    A dense interacting Bose or Fermi gas is considered. Within the Kadanoff-Baym real-time Green-function technique a generalized kinetic equation is derived in the nonequilibrium ladder approximation. As a Markovian limit the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation is recovered. The relevance of retardation effects in the kinetic equation of dense systems is shown. It turns out that the stationary solution of the generalized kinetic equation reproduces the second virial coefficient of the equation of state, including the Beth-Uhlenbeck quantum corrections. We establish a generalized kinetic equation describing correlation effects in a consistent approach to nonequilibrium for Bose and Fermi systems. In this way we give a generalization of the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula that applies to nonequilibrium and to finite systems. The derivation makes use of the time dependent T-matrix equation, which establishes a generalization of the Bethe-Goldstone equation. The correlated parts of the density and energy, which can be interpreted as virial corrections, are thermodynamically consistent. In this way global energy conservation is fulfilled.

  20. The “Living Will”: Legal Background and Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Bernard M.

    1987-01-01

    Living wills are made by those who wish to resist terminal care that involves use of mechanical means and other invasive life-sustaining treatments. This article reviews the legal right to natural death and the extent to which living wills can be legally effective. It considers the limitations of living wills and alternatives such as Natural Death Acts and “durable” powers of attorney. PMID:21267338

  1. The Effect of Postural Correction and Subsequent Balloon Inflation in Deformity Correction of Acute Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hai-Xiao; Xu, Cong; Shang, Ping; Shen, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine deformity correction by postural correction and subsequent balloon inflation in acute vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) and to examine the effect of bone mineral density on deformity correction. Methods A totol of 50 acute OVCFs received balloon kyphoplasty. Lateral radiographs were taken and analyzed at five different time points : 1) preoperative, 2) after placing the patient in prone hyperextended position, 3) after balloon inflation, 4) after deposition of the cement, and 5) postoperative. All fractures were analyzed for height restoration of anterior (Ha), middle (Hm) and posterior (Hp) vertebra as well as Cobb angle and Kyphotic angle. The bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. According to the T-score, the patients were divided into two groups which were osteoporosis group and osteopenia group. Results Postoperative measurements of Ha, Hm and the Cobb angle demonstrated significant reduction of 4.62 mm, 3.66 mm and 5.34° compared with the preoperative measurements, respectively (each p<0.05). Postural correction significantly increased Ha by 5.51 mm, Hm by 4.35 mm and improved the Cobb angle by 8.32° (each p<0.05). Balloon inflation did not demonstrate a significant improvement of Ha, Hm or the Cobb angle compared with baseline prone hyperextended. Postural correction led to greater improvements of Ha, Hm and Cobb angle in osteoporosis group than osteopenia group (each p<0.05). Conclusion In acute OVCFs, the height restoration was mainly attributed to postural correction rather than deformity correction by balloon inflation. BMD affected deformity correction in the process of postural correction. PMID:25237429

  2. Correction of marine air temperature observations for solar radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, E.C.; Tiddy, R.J.; Taylor, P.K.

    1993-12-01

    The effect of incoming solar radiation on merchant ships` observations of air temperature was assessed as part of the Voluntary Observing Ships` Special Observing Project for the North Atlantic (VSOP-NA). The ships` reports were compared with interpolated output from a numerical weather model. Differences between the ship values and the model values for air temperature (Delta T(sub a)) were found, in the mean, to be independent of instrument type, ship size, and, except for very badly exposed sensors, exposure. The differences were related to the relative wind speed over the ship (V) and the incoming shortwave radiation (R). The formula derived for the radiative heating error delta T was delta T = 2.7 x 10(exp -3) R - 3.2 x 10(exp -5) RV, where delta t has units of degrees Celsius, R is in watts per square meter, and V is in knots. After correcting the Delta T(sub a) values, an approximately constant bias remained with the ship reports on average 0.4 C lower than the model air temperatures. This offset probably represents a mean bias in the model estimates; however, a residual bias in the ship observations is also a possibility. There was also evidence that heat generated by the ship caused a temperature overestimate of about 0.4 C at zero relative wind, decreasing to a negligible level at a relative wind speed of 20 kt. For the North Atlantic dataset used, the correction reduced daytime marine air temperature reports by 0.63 C on average. Applying the correction to the VSOP-NA air temperature data was found to significantly change estimates of sensible and latent heat fluxes.

  3. Effectiveness of false correction strategy on science reading comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, Cynthia Anne

    False-correction reading strategy theoretically prompted college students to activate their prior knowledge when provided false statements linked to a portion of their biology textbook. This strategy is based in elaborative interrogation theory, which suggests that prompting readers to answer interrogatives about text students are reading increases their comprehension of that text. These interrogatives always asked "why" statements pulled from a text, one sentence in length, were "true." True statements in this study based on a text were converted by the experimenter into false statements, one sentence in length. Students were requested to rewrite each statement (n=12) on average every 200 words in a text as they were reading, converting each false statement into a true statement. These students outperformed other students requested to reread the same biology text twice (an established placebo-control strategy). These students, in turn, outperformed still other students reading an unrelated control text taken from the same textbook used only to establish a prior knowledge baseline for all students included in this study. Students participating in this study were enrolled students in an undergraduate introductory general biology course designed for non-majors. A three-group, posttest-only, randomized experimental control-group design was used to prevent pretest activation of students' prior knowledge thus increasing chances of producing evidence of false-correction effectiveness and to begin augmenting potential generalizability to science classrooms. Students' (n=357) general biology knowledge, verbal ability, and attempts to use the false correction strategy were collected and analyzed. Eight of the participants were interviewed by the researcher in a first attempt in this domain to collect data on participants' points of view about the strategy. The results of this study are not yet recommended for use in authentic school settings as further research is indicated.

  4. The effectiveness of correcting codes in reception in the whole in additive normal white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtarkov, Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    Some possible criteria for estimating the effectiveness of correcting codes are presented, and the energy effectiveness of correcting codes is studied for symbol-by-symbol reception. Expressions for the energetic effectiveness of binary correcting codes for reception in the whole are produced. Asymptotic energetic effectiveness and finite signal/noise ratio cases are considered.

  5. Effects of transverse photon exchange in helium Rydberg states - Corrections beyond the Coulomb-Breit interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Au, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    The Breit correction only accounts for part of the transverse photon exchange correction in the calculation of the energy levels in helium Rydberg states. The remaining leading corrections are identified and each is expressed in an effective potential form. The relevance to the Casimir correction potential in various limits is also discussed.

  6. Vacuum polarization corrections to low energy quark effective couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Ademar; Braghin, Fabio L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work corrections to low energy punctual effective quark couplings up to the eighth order are calculated by considering vacuum polarization effects with the scalar quark-antiquark condensate. The departing point is a QCD-based Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. By separating the quark field into two components, one that condenses and another one for interacting quarks, the former is integrated out with the help of usual auxiliary fields and an effective action in terms of interacting quark fields is found. The scalar auxiliary field reduces to the quark-antiquark condensate in the vacuum and the determinant is expanded in powers of the quark-antiquark bilinears generating chiral invariant effective 2N-quark interactions (N =2,3…). The corresponding coupling constants and effective masses are estimated, and the general trend is that for increasing the effective gluon mass the values of the effective coupling constants decrease. All the values are in good agreement with phenomenological fits.

  7. Articulation effects in lightness: historical background and theoretical implications.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Alan L; Annan, Vidal

    2002-01-01

    The concept of articulation was first introduced by Katz [1935 The World of Colour (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co)] to refer to the degree of complexity within a field. Katz, who created the basic research methods for studying lightness constancy, found that the greater the degree of articulation within a field of illumination, the greater the degree of constancy. Even though this concept has been largely forgotten, there is much empirical evidence for Katz's principle, and the effects on lightness are very strong. However, when articulation is increased within a framework that does not coincide with a region of illumination, constancy is weakened. Kardos (1934 Zeitschrift für Psychologie Ergänzungband 23) advanced the concept of co-determination, according to which the lightness of a surface is determined relative to more than one field of illumination. Gilchrist et al (1999 Psychological Review 106 795-834) argue that the fields concept should be replaced by the more operational frameworks concept and that a wide variety of lightness errors can be explained by a modification of the Katz principle: the greater the articulation within a perceptual framework, the stronger the anchoring of lightness values within that framework.

  8. Oral Contraceptive Use and the ECG: Evidence of an Adverse QT Effect on Corrected QT Interval

    PubMed Central

    Sedlak, Tara; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Iribarren, Carlos; Lyon, Liisa L; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2013-01-01

    Background A prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval is a marker for an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. We evaluated the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) use, type of OC, and QTc interval. Methods We identified 410,782 ECGs performed at Northern California Kaiser Permanente on female patients between 15–53 years from January, 1995 to June, 2008. QT was corrected for heart rate using log-linear regression. OC generation (first, second and third) was classified by increasing progestin androgenic potency, while the fourth generation was classified as anti-androgenic. Results Among 410,782 women, 8.4% were on OC. In multivariate analysis after correction for comorbidities, there was an independent shortening effect of OCs overall (slope = −0.5ms; SE = 0.12, p<0.0002). Users of first and second generation progestins had a significantly shorter QTc than non-users (p<0.0001), while users of fourth generation had a significantly longer QTc than non-users (slope = 3.6ms, SE = 0.35, p<0.0001). Conclusion Overall, OC use has a shortening effect on the QTc. Shorter QTc is seen with first and second generation OC while fourth generation OC use has a lengthening effect on the QTc. Careful examination of adverse event rates in fourth generation OC users is needed. PMID:23879279

  9. Effects of supersymmetric threshold corrections on the Yukawa matrix unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrzyński, Mateusz

    2015-02-01

    We present an updated analysis of the Yukawa matrix unification within the renormalizable R-parity-conserving Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. It is assumed that the soft terms are non-universal but flavour-diagonal in the super-CKM basis at the GUT scale. Trilinear Higgs-squark-squark -terms can generate large threshold corrections to the Yukawa matrix at the superpartner decoupling scale. In effect, the boundary condition at the GUT scale can be satisfied. However, such large trilinear terms make the usual Higgs vacuum metastable (though long-lived). We broaden previous studies by including results from the first LHC phase, notably the measurement of the Higgs particle mass, as well as a quantitative investigation of flavour observables.

  10. Determination of selenium in plasma, urine and tissues, of standard diet-fed rats and dogs by ETA-atomic absorption spectroscopy with Zeeman background correction.

    PubMed

    Giachetti, C; Assandri, A; Testa, B; Lombardini, E; Zanolo, G

    1996-09-01

    The method described was developed to be applied in determination of selenium in biological matrices (plasma, urine and tissues) using ETA-AAS with Zeeman background correction. These matrices were obtained from non-fasting S.D. rats and Beagle dogs of both sexes in order to acquire data on the endogenous levels of selenium in these laboratory animals when fed with standard diets. For tissue digestion, a simple procedure using the strong organic base, Soluene 350, was adopted. Precision assays were carried out monitoring Se(IV) levels in spiked matrices (range from 25 to 200 ng) and obtaining relative standard deviations (RSD%) in the range from 3.2% to 14.5% (intra-day) and from 7.6% to 15.9% (inter-day). Accuracy assays gave relative errors (RE%) in the range from -6.5 to 4.2% (intra-day) and from -5.5% to 5.7% (inter-day). The validity of the method was checked on reference material (NBS SRM 1577 bovine liver) and the values obtained correlated with the certified ones. The detection limit assumed was 0.9 ng/ml, whereas the quantitation limit of selenium in matrices ranged from 2 to 5 ng/ml (or g), depending on the kind of sample.

  11. Study of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference in the selenium determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela

    2002-02-01

    The use of ammonium molybdate to minimize the phosphate interference when measuring selenium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) with deuterium background correction was evaluated. Ammonium molybdate did not produce a selenium thermal stabilization; however, the presence of ammonium molybdate decreased the phosphate interference. The study was carried out with mussel acid digests and mussel slurries. Pd-Mg(NO 3) 2 was used as a chemical modifier at optimum concentrations of 300 and 250 mg l -1, respectively, yielding optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 and 2100 °C, respectively. A yellow solid (ammonium molybdophosphate) was obtained when adding ammonium molybdate to mussel acid digest solutions. This precipitate can be removed after centrifugation prior to ETAAS determination. Additionally, studies on the sampling of the solid ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) together with the liquid phase, as a slurry, were also developed. The volatilization of the solid AMP was not reached at temperatures lower than 2500 °C. By this way, phosphate, as AMP, is not present in the vapor phase at the atomization temperature (2100 °C), yielding a reduction of the spectral interference by phosphate. The proposed method was validated analyzing three reference materials of marine origin (DORM-1, DOLT-1 and TORT-1). Good agreement with the certified selenium contents was reached for all cases.

  12. MWR Retrievals Performance Improvement after Smear Effect Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labanda, M. F.; Jacob, M. M.; Farrar, S.; Raimondo, H.; Jones, L.

    2012-12-01

    The SAC-D/Aquarius mission is a cooperative mission developed between CoNAE (Argentine Space Agency) and NASA, that focuses on understanding the interaction between the global water cycle, ocean circulation and climate by measuring sea surface salinity (SSS). One of the main Argentinean instruments is the Microwave Radiometer (MWR), that measures the surface brightness temperature (TB) in a frequency range sensitive to geophysical parameters over the ocean (such as, surface wind speed, rain rate, water vapor, cloud liquid water, and sea ice concentration). MWR is a push-broom 3 channel, Dicke radiometer, operating at K (23.8 GHz H-Pol) and Ka (36.5 GHz, H- & V-Pol) band. The instrument has 16 beams, 8 forward-looking (36.5 GHz) and 8 aft-looking (23.8 GHz). The beams are arranged in a configuration with two incidence angles, one of 52° ( 4 odd beams) and one of 58° (4 even beams), for both forward and aft-looks. Since the first global Tb images, there has been an observed recurring anomalous effect, coined as "Smear Effect". This effect is present in all push-broom beams and results in a "smearing" of Tb observations, that is more noticeable near high contrast areas, such as land/water crossings, rain events, and in the presence of clouds. Geophysical retrieval algorithms based on radiances measured by space borne instruments play a large role in helping scientists monitor the state of the planet. In this sense accurate models are needed. After a detail analysis it was determined that the smear effect strongly affects the geophysical retrieval products. CONAE studied the effect, in a variety of cases, and developed a method to try to mitigate this smearing effect. The correction was applied to Tb counts and with this data the retrievals was reprocessed. We present in this paper a comparison between the results obtained before and after the correction with noticeable improvement in MWR products, i. e., more realistic geophysical retrieval products. The improvement

  13. Accurate and efficient correction of adjacency effects for high resolution imagery: comparison to the Lambertian correction for Landsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Alain

    2016-10-01

    The state of the art of atmospheric correction for moderate resolution and high resolution sensors is based on assuming that the surface reflectance at the bottom of the atmosphere is uniform. This assumption accounts for multiple scattering but ignores the contribution of neighboring pixels, that is it ignores adjacency effects. Its great advantage however is to substantially reduce the computational cost of performing atmospheric correction and make the problem computationally tractable. In a recent paper, (Sei, 2015) a computationally efficient method was introduced for the correction of adjacency effects through the use of fast FFT-based evaluations of singular integrals and the use of analytic continuation. It was shown that divergent Neumann series can be avoided and accurate results be obtained for clear and turbid atmospheres. We analyze in this paper the error of the standard state of the art Lambertian atmospheric correction method on Landsat imagery and compare it to our newly introduced method. We show that for high contrast scenes the state of the art atmospheric correction yields much larger errors than our method.

  14. Cosmic Microwave Background Fluctuations from the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect as a Cosmological Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunbae; Shapiro, P.; Komatsu, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a calculation of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect on of the Comic Microwave Background fluctuation. We focus on the scale at the multipole moment of l = 3000 10000 that is currently being probed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. For the post-reionization contribution of the total signal, we use the 3rd order perturbation theory (3PT) to model non-linearity of post-reionization epoch. We evaluate a non-linear expression for momentum powerspectrum in Ma and Fry (2002) with the 3PT density and velocity powerspectrum. And, we use the 3PT momentum powerspectrum to calculate the kSZ signal. We show that the 3PT is a reasonable approximation by comparing our result with previous work by Zhang, Pen and Trac (2004). For reionization contribution, we use our N-body radiative transfer simulations to take patchiness of ionization of intergalactic medium in reionization epoch into account. Using ionized fraction field in the simulation, we calculate the momentum field of the ionized gas. And, we correct for the missing power in finite size boxes of simulations. Finally, we show the kSZ calculation for different simulations with reionization scenarios. With contributions from each epoch, we predict total kSZ signal for different reionization history and put constraint on reionization scenario using an upper bound of the signal from recent SPT measurement.

  15. Corrections for 17O interference, effects on Δ47 determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; He, B.; Colman, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    The measurements of 13C on CO2 samples are routinely corrected for 17O contribution to the m/z 45 signal (Craig, 1957; Santrock, et al., 1985). The 17O abundance affects the Δ47 calculation, and the amount of 17O present is routinely determined using the relationship between 18O and 17O presented in IAEA TECDOC 825 (Dennis, et al., 2011; Huntington, et al., 2009; Gonfiantini, et al., 1995). In 2010, the IAEA released new recommendations for 17O determinations to be used for 13C corrections (Brand, et al., 2010). We compare the effect of using different ways to determine 17O interference, as well as using the currently accepted N(13C)/N(12C) value for VPDB (Brand, et al., 2010), on heated gas lines, model data, and on CO2 gases made to have similar δ47 and Δ47, but with highly contrasting δ18O and δ13C values. The 2010 IAEA recommendations give a better fit for heated gas data than the TECDOC 825 recommendations. Comparing differences in the data points relative to their respective fitted lines, we see differences on the order of 5 to 10 ppm in Δ47. That corresponds to a systematic error of 2 °C in the temperature estimate (room temperature range), and one that varies with δ13C and δ18O, but not necessarily with δ47. The preliminary work on equilibrated CO2 gases having similar δ47, but very different δ13C and δ18O, showed large (ca. 70 ppm) differences in Δ47 when using the (standard) TECDOC 825 recommendations. The Δ47 values were much closer when the 2010 IUPAC recommendations were used. This also serves as a test of the updated factors for 17O determination, as well as the overall robustness of the Δ47 measurement.

  16. Inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate growth by citrate and the effect of the background electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Matthew L.; Qiu, S. Roger; Hoyer, John R.; Casey, William H.; Nancollas, George H.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2007-08-01

    Pathological mineralization is a common phenomenon in broad range of plants and animals. In humans, kidney stone formation is a well-known example that afflicts approximately 10% of the population. Of the various calcium salt phases that comprise human kidney stones, the primary component is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). Citrate, a naturally occurring molecule in the urinary system and a common therapeutic agent for treating stone disease, is a known inhibitor of COM. Understanding the physical mechanisms of citrate inhibition requires quantification of the effects of both background electrolytes and citrate on COM step kinetics. Here we report the results of an in situ AFM study of these effects, in which we measure the effect of the electrolytes LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl, and the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration for a range of COM supersaturations. We find that varying the background electrolyte results in significant differences in the measured step speeds and in step morphology, with KCl clearly producing the smallest impact and NaCl the largest. The kinetic coefficient for the former is nearly three times larger than for the latter, while the steps change from smooth to highly serrated when KCl is changed to NaCl. The results on the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration show that citrate produces a dead zone whose width increases with citrate concentration as well as a continual reduction in kinetic coefficient with increasing citrate level. We relate these results to a molecular-scale view of inhibition that invokes a combination of kink blocking and step pinning. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the classic step-pinning model of Cabrera and Vermilyea (C-V model) does an excellent job of predicting the effect of citrate on COM step kinetics provided the model is reformulated to more realistically account for impurity adsorption, include an expression for the Gibbs-Thomson effect that is correct for all supersaturations

  17. Extended Glauert tip correction to include vortex rollup effects

    DOE PAGES

    Maniaci, David; Schmitz, Sven

    2016-10-03

    Wind turbine loads predictions by blade-element momentum theory using the standard tip-loss correction have been shown to over-predict loading near the blade tip in comparison to experimental data. This over-prediction is theorized to be due to the assumption of light rotor loading, inherent in the standard tip-loss correction model of Glauert. A higher- order free-wake method, WindDVE, is used to compute the rollup process of the trailing vortex sheets downstream of wind turbine blades. Results obtained serve an exact correction function to the Glauert tip correction used in blade-element momentum methods. Lastly, it is found that accounting for the effectsmore » of tip vortex rollup within the Glauert tip correction indeed results in improved prediction of blade tip loads computed by blade-element momentum methods.« less

  18. Effects of early visual experience on the background preference in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Hsin; Yan, Hong Young; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Although cuttlefish are capable of showing diverse camouflage body patterns against a variety of background substrates, whether they show background preference when given a choice of substrates is not well known. In this study, we characterized the background choice of post-embryonic cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) and examined the effects of rearing visual environments on their background preferences. Different rearing backgrounds (enriched, uniformly grey and checkerboard) were used to raise cuttlefish from eggs or hatchlings, and four sets of two-background-choice experiments (differences in contrast, shape, size and side) were conducted at day 1 and weeks 4, 8 and 12 post-hatch. Cuttlefish reared in the enriched environment preferred high-contrast backgrounds at all post-embryonic stages. In comparison, those reared in the impoverished environments (uniformly grey and checkerboard) had either reversed or delayed high-contrast background preference. In addition, cuttlefish raised on the uniformly grey background, exposed to a checkerboard briefly (0.5 or 3 h) at week 4 and tested at week 8 showed increased high-contrast background preference. Interestingly, cuttlefish in the enriched group preferred an object size similar to their body size at day 1 and week 4, but changed this preference to smaller objects at week 12. These results suggest that high-contrast backgrounds may be more adaptive for juvenile cuttlefish, and visually enriched environments are important for the development of these background preference behaviours. PMID:22791707

  19. Effects of early visual experience on the background preference in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsin; Yan, Hong Young; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2012-10-23

    Although cuttlefish are capable of showing diverse camouflage body patterns against a variety of background substrates, whether they show background preference when given a choice of substrates is not well known. In this study, we characterized the background choice of post-embryonic cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) and examined the effects of rearing visual environments on their background preferences. Different rearing backgrounds (enriched, uniformly grey and checkerboard) were used to raise cuttlefish from eggs or hatchlings, and four sets of two-background-choice experiments (differences in contrast, shape, size and side) were conducted at day 1 and weeks 4, 8 and 12 post-hatch. Cuttlefish reared in the enriched environment preferred high-contrast backgrounds at all post-embryonic stages. In comparison, those reared in the impoverished environments (uniformly grey and checkerboard) had either reversed or delayed high-contrast background preference. In addition, cuttlefish raised on the uniformly grey background, exposed to a checkerboard briefly (0.5 or 3 h) at week 4 and tested at week 8 showed increased high-contrast background preference. Interestingly, cuttlefish in the enriched group preferred an object size similar to their body size at day 1 and week 4, but changed this preference to smaller objects at week 12. These results suggest that high-contrast backgrounds may be more adaptive for juvenile cuttlefish, and visually enriched environments are important for the development of these background preference behaviours.

  20. Effect of presbyopic vision corrections on perceptions of driving difficulty.

    PubMed

    Chu, Byoung Sun; Wood, Joanne M; Collins, Michael J

    2009-05-01

    As the population ages, more people will be wearing presbyopic vision corrections when driving. However, little is known about the impact of these vision corrections on driving performance. This study aimed to determine the subjective driving difficulties experienced when wearing a range of common presbyopic contact lens and spectacle corrections. A questionnaire was developed and piloted that included a series of items regarding difficulties experienced while driving under daytime and nighttime conditions (rated on five-point and seven-point Likert scales). Participants included 255 presbyopic patients recruited through local optometry practices. Participants were categorized into five age-matched groups; including those wearing no vision correction for driving (n = 50), bifocal spectacles (n = 54), progressive spectacles (n = 50), monovision contact lenses (n = 53), and multifocal contact lenses (n = 48). Overall, ratings of satisfaction during daytime driving were relatively high for all correction types. However, multifocal contact lens wearers were significantly less satisfied with aspects of their vision during nighttime than daytime driving, particularly regarding disturbances from glare and haloes. Progressive spectacle lens wearers noticed more distortion of peripheral vision, whereas bifocal spectacle wearers reported more difficulties with tasks requiring changes of focus and those who wore no optical correction for driving reported problems with intermediate and near tasks. Overall, satisfaction was significantly higher for progressive spectacles than bifocal spectacles for driving. Subjective visual experiences of different presbyopic vision corrections when driving vary depending on the vision tasks and lighting level. Eye-care practitioners should be aware of the driving-related difficulties experienced with each vision correction type and the need to select corrective types that match the driving needs of their patients.

  1. Paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, Marnix F. E.; Allen, Jerry M.

    1992-01-01

    Supersonic panel methods and axisymmetric body-modeling singularity methods are presently combined with corrections for nonlinear flow phenomena to a complete missile, its airbreathing inlets, and wing-body combinations. The computer code LRCDM2 is used as an illustrative example of the methods in question. Attention is given to a preliminary method which employs panels to estimate additive drag and lift acting on supersonic rectangular inlets, as well as to the method used to correct off-body flowfields for the presence of a shock. Examples of missile applications of these methods with the appropriate nonlinear corrections are presented.

  2. Effect of the genetic background on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosome of natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, J

    1975-01-01

    Newly established test stocks made it possible to follow the effect of three different defined genetic backgrounds (first and third chromosomes) on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosomes isolated from four natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. One background was composed of the chromosomes with inversions obtained from the stock (see article) and another two backgrounds were of the standard type consisting one-half of the original chromosomes from the natural population and one-half of the chromosomes of the stocks Oregon R or Samarkand. Using the analysis of variance significant differences in RF values were found between and within populations and especially between the different backgrounds. Some simple and double interactions between the above factors played a role. The highest RF values were obtained on the background [corrected] with inversions. The effect of the different genetic backgrounds [corrected] by the action of the genetic modifiers of RF. The different genetic backgrounds affected the variations in RF values in individual populations and the different populations reacted differentially to the changed genetic background. The design of the experiment permitted an estimation of the causal compoenents of variance and heritability of RF from the sib analysis. The additive component of variance was present in only two of the populations under test; the respective estimates of heritability were very low.

  3. Symmetries and quantum corrections in heavy quark effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIrvin, Matthew James

    1997-11-01

    Finite-mass corrections to the Lagrangian of heavy quark effective field theory appear in a power series in the reciprocal of the quark mass. The running of these terms' coefficients to order 1/m2 is calculated to one loop, continuously redefining the quark field to eliminate operators vanishing according to the leading- order equation of motion. Results are found to agree with other recent calculations, and with constraints implied by reparameterization invariance. Different forms for the reparameterization transformation have appeared in the literature. A field redefinition is discussed which reveals the equivalence, at the level of the S-matrix, of a large family of reparameterization transformations. To order 1/m2 in the Lagrangian, these give differing predictions only for operators vanishing by the leading- order equation of motion. A new, very straightforward proof of the reparameterization constraints, applicable to order 1/m2 but to all orders in αs, is described. The results are compared with two previously proposed versions of reparameterization invariance.

  4. Using BRDFs for accurate albedo calculations and adjacency effect corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the authors discuss two uses of BRDFs in remote sensing: (1) in determining the clear sky top of the atmosphere (TOA) albedo, (2) in quantifying the effect of the BRDF on the adjacency point-spread function and on atmospheric corrections. The TOA spectral albedo is an important parameter retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR). Its accuracy depends mainly on how well one can model the surface BRDF for many different situations. The authors present results from an algorithm which matches several semi-empirical functions to the nine MISR measured BRFs that are then numerically integrated to yield the clear sky TOA spectral albedo in four spectral channels. They show that absolute accuracies in the albedo of better than 1% are possible for the visible and better than 2% in the near infrared channels. Using a simplified extensive radiosity model, the authors show that the shape of the adjacency point-spread function (PSF) depends on the underlying surface BRDFs. The adjacency point-spread function at a given offset (x,y) from the center pixel is given by the integral of transmission-weighted products of BRDF and scattering phase function along the line of sight.

  5. Aerosol effects and corrections in the Halogen Occultation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hervig, M.E. |; Russell, J.M. III; Park, J.H.

    1995-01-20

    The authors present corrections developed for use with the Halogen Occultation experiment, a shuttle launched mission to measure NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 3}, HF, CH{sub 4}, and NO. The system was put in orbit slightly after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. If corrections are not factored into the measurements, the increased absorptivity will bias strongly the inferred densities of these trace gases in the stratosphere.

  6. Paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, Marnix F. E.; Allen, Jerry M.

    1986-01-01

    The prediction of missile aerodynamic characteristics is presently undertaken through the application of supersonic paneling methods and nonlinear corrections to the prediction of missile aerodynamic characteristics. Attention is given to supersonic panel methods and line-singularity methods for the modeling of axisymmetric bodies, in combination with corrections for nonlinear flow phenomena, which are applied to complete missile, inlets, and wing-body combinations. The LRCDM2 computer program is used as an example of the methods presented.

  7. Phase holograms in PMMA with proximity effect correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D.; Muller, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Complex computer generated phase holograms (CGPH's) have been fabricated in PMMA by partial e-beam exposure and subsequent partial development. The CGPH was encoded as a sequence of phase delay pixels and written by the JEOL JBX-5D2 E-beam lithography system, a different dose being assigned to each value of phase delay. Following carefully controlled partial development, the pattern appeared rendered in relief in the PMMA, which then acts as the phase-delay medium. The exposure dose was in the range 20-200 micro-C/sq cm, and very aggressive development in pure acetone led to low contrast. This enabled etch depth control to better than plus or minus lambda(sub vis)/60. That result was obtained by exposing isolated 50 micron square patches and measuring resist removal over the central area where the proximity effect dose was uniform and related only to the local exposure. For complex CGPH's with pixel size of the order of the e-beam proximity effect radius, the patterns must be corrected for the extra exposure caused by electrons scattered back up out of the substrate. This has been accomplished by deconvolving the two-dimensional dose deposition function with the desired dose pattern. The deposition function, which plays much the same role as an instrument response function, was carefully measured under the exact conditions used to expose the samples. The devices fabricated were designed with 16 equal phase steps per retardation cycle, were up to 1 cm square, and consisted of up to 100 million 0.3-2.0 micron square pixels. Data files were up to 500 MB long and exposure times ranged to tens of hours. A Fresnel phase lens was fabricated that had diffraction limited optical performance with better than 85 percent efficiency.

  8. Effect of Peer Instruction on the Likelihood for Choosing the Correct Response to a Physiology Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relling, Alejandro E.; Giuliodori, Mauricio J.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to measure the effects of individual answer (correct vs. incorrect), individual answer of group members (no vs. some vs. all correct), self-confidence about the responses (low vs. mid vs. high), sex (female vs. male students), and group size (2-4 students) on the odds for change and for correctness after peer…

  9. Correction for beam divergence effect in a NRSE spectrometer with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, M.; Hino, M.; Kawabata, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Tasaki, S.; Maruyama, R.; Ebisawa, T.

    2008-03-01

    A correction for the beam divergence effect in a neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE) spectrometer will be discussed. The new type of device called 'coupling coils' is proposed to change the spin quantization axis for the correction. The feasibility of correction for the vertical divergence has been demonstrated by numerical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. Effect of Peer Instruction on the Likelihood for Choosing the Correct Response to a Physiology Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relling, Alejandro E.; Giuliodori, Mauricio J.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to measure the effects of individual answer (correct vs. incorrect), individual answer of group members (no vs. some vs. all correct), self-confidence about the responses (low vs. mid vs. high), sex (female vs. male students), and group size (2-4 students) on the odds for change and for correctness after peer…

  11. High significance detection of the tSZ effect relativistic corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurier, G.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect is produced by the interaction of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons with the hot (a few keV) and diffuse gas of electrons inside galaxy clusters integrated along the line of sight. This effect produces a distortion of CMB blackbody emission law. This distortion law depends on the electronic temperature of the intra-cluster hot gas, Te, through the so-called tSZ relativistic corrections. In this work, we have performed a statistical analysis of the tSZ spectral distortion on large galaxy cluster samples. We performed a stacking analysis for several electronic temperature bins, using both spectroscopic measurements of X-ray temperatures and a scaling relation between X-ray luminosities and electronic temperatures. We report the first high significance detection of the relativistic tSZ at a significance of 5.3σ. We also demonstrate that the observed tSZ relativistic corrections are consistent with X-ray deduced temperatures. This measurement of the tSZ spectral law demonstrates that tSZ effect spectral distorsion can be used as a probe to measure galaxy cluster temperatures.

  12. The Effect of Background Experience and an Advance Organizer on the Attainment of Certain Science Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdaragh, Mary Kathleen

    This study examined the effects of an advance organizer and background experience in science on the attainment of science concepts. Ninth-grade earth science students (N=90) were given the Dubbins Earth Science Test (DEST) and a Science Background Experience Inventory (SBEI) developed by the author. They were then placed into high, medium, and low…

  13. The Effects of Background Music on Learning Disabled Elementary School Students' Performance in Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legutko, Robert S.; Trissler, Theodore T.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated effects of background music on writing performance of nine 6th grade students with learning disabilities at one suburban public elementary school in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. A single-subject A-B-A design was utilized, and results from graded writing prompts with and without background music over 21…

  14. The Effects of Age, Object, and Cultural/Religious Background on Children's Concepts of Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candy-Gibbs, Sandra E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined concepts of death in 114 children. Significant cultural/religious background differences were found for concepts of irreversibility, universality, and inevitability. Age effects were found for universality and inevitability. Understanding of causation of death was significantly influenced by the child's age and background. (NRB)

  15. The Effects of Background Music on Learning Disabled Elementary School Students' Performance in Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legutko, Robert S.; Trissler, Theodore T.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated effects of background music on writing performance of nine 6th grade students with learning disabilities at one suburban public elementary school in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. A single-subject A-B-A design was utilized, and results from graded writing prompts with and without background music over 21…

  16. Auto-correcting for atmospherical effects in thermal hyperspectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago-Acevedo, Maria; Verhoef, Wout

    2017-04-01

    Correct estimation of soil and vegetation thermal emissivity's has been of huge importance in remote sensing studies. Field measurements of the leaf/soil and canopy emissivity can lead to estimations of water content. Consequently several studies have been performed with the objective of identifying the spectral behavior of the emissivity. However such measurements provide additional challenges before any retrieval can successfully be performed. While in laboratory the influence of the atmospheric conditions can be controlled in field experiments this cannot be done. In most cases such atmospheric correction however requires detailed knowledge of the atmospheric constituents at the time of the measurements. The objective of this research was to create an auto-atmospherically correct thermal hyperspectral emissivity measurements for retrieving canopy water content. For this hyperspectral thermal measurements were obtained during ESAs REFLEX campaign in 2012 using a MIDAC FTIR radiometer. MODTRAN simulations were used to construct a simple quadratic radiative transfer model that couples atmospheric transmissivities to the different gas constituents. This model was afterwards used to estimate the concentrations of H20 (g) and CO2 (g). The radiative measurements were afterwards corrected for these gas absorptions. Finally a temperature emissivity separation was applied to estimate the emissivities of the different land surface components. Gas concentrations were validated against measurements of a LICOR 7500 taken in parallel to the MIDAC measurements. It is observed that in general the relative errors are around 25% of the LICOR measurements, which are in the same range as the instrumental errors of the eddy-covariance system (15-30%). The correction of the absorption features proved however more difficult and resulted in overestimations of the correction-terms; 1) because spectral collocation of the simulations with the observations proved troublesome, and 2 because

  17. The Effect of Supermassive Black Hole Binary Environments on Time to Detection for the Stochastic Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeland, Sarah; Siemens, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are sensitive to the gravitational wave (GW) stochastic background produced by supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). Environmental effects such as gas and stars accelerate the evolution of SMBHBs and may deplete the stochastic background at low frequencies. How much this effects the sensitivity of PTAs to the stochastic background depends on the astrophysical mechanism and where the binary's evolution transitions from being driven by environmental effects to driven by GW emission. We will discuss how these issues impact our observing strategy and estimated time-to-detection. National Science Foundation PIRE program.

  18. The Effect of Supermassive Black Hole Binary Environments on Time to Detection for the Stochastic Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeland, Sarah; Siemens, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are sensitive to the gravitational wave (GW) stochastic background produced by supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). Environmental effects such as gas and stars accelerate the evolution of SMBHBs and may deplete the stochastic background at low frequencies. How much this effects the sensitivity of PTAs to the stochastic background depends on the astrophysical mechanism and where the binary's evolution transitions from being driven by environmental effects to driven by GW emission. We will discuss how these issues impact our observing strategy and estimated time-to-detection.

  19. Effect of anatomical backgrounds on detectability in volumetric cone beam CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minah; Park, Subok; Baek, Jongduk

    2016-03-01

    As anatomical noise is often a dominating factor affecting signal detection in medical imaging, we investigate the effects of anatomical backgrounds on signal detection in volumetric cone beam CT images. Signal detection performances are compared between transverse and longitudinal planes with either uniform or anatomical backgrounds. Sphere objects with diameters of 1mm, 5mm, 8mm, and 11mm are used as the signals. Three-dimensional (3D) anatomical backgrounds are generated using an anatomical noise power spectrum, 1/fβ, with β=3, equivalent to mammographic background [1]. The mean voxel value of the 3D anatomical backgrounds is used as an attenuation coefficient of the uniform background. Noisy projection data are acquired by the forward projection of the uniform and anatomical 3D backgrounds with/without sphere lesions and by the addition of quantum noise. Then, images are reconstructed by an FDK algorithm [2]. For each signal size, signal detection performances in transverse and longitudinal planes are measured by calculating the task SNR of a channelized Hotelling observer with Laguerre-Gauss channels. In the uniform background case, transverse planes yield higher task SNR values for all sphere diameters but 1mm. In the anatomical background case, longitudinal planes yield higher task SNR values for all signal diameters. The results indicate that it is beneficial to use longitudinal planes to detect spherical signals in anatomical backgrounds.

  20. Effects of Background Music on Objective and Subjective Performance Measures in an Auditory BCI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sijie; Allison, Brendan Z; Kübler, Andrea; Cichocki, Andrzej; Wang, Xingyu; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI) systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory, and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill) using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other) BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged.

  1. Effects of Background Music on Objective and Subjective Performance Measures in an Auditory BCI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sijie; Allison, Brendan Z.; Kübler, Andrea; Cichocki, Andrzej; Wang, Xingyu; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI) systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory, and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill) using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other) BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged. PMID:27790111

  2. Hip prostheses during pelvic irradiation: effects and corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Hazuka, M.B.; Ibbott, G.S.; Kinzie, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    Treatment of pelvic malignancies frequently includes the use of lateral, arc, or rotational fields. The presence of hip prostheses in these treatment fields will perturb the dose distribution. Correction factors for metal-based alloys used in artificial hips have not previously been reported. Prostheses constructed from frequently used alloys were obtained and measurements were made of the transmission of 4MV and 10MV photons. These measured data were compared with computed correction factors. The computer uses the ratio of tissue-maximum ratios (TMR's) method of heterogeneity correction. The computer was provided with both the physical density and the relative electron density of each prosthesis for comparison purposes, since electron densities for hip prostheses are not widely known. Correction factors determined from electron densities demonstrated better agreement with measured data. The ratio of TMR's correction algorithm does not consider the contribution of scattered radiation in the dose computations. Consequently, a small adjustment to the relative electron density of the prosthetic hip was required at lower X ray beam energies. Agreement was satisfactory for higher energy X rays, and thus no adjustment was necessary. Relative electron densities and adjusted electron densities for alloys used in artificial hips are provided for computer-aided treatment planning. Recommendations for incorporating the hip prosthesis into the treatment planning process are also provided.

  3. AdS{sub 3} backgrounds from 10D effective action of heterotic string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dominis Prester, Predrag

    2010-02-15

    We present a method for calculating solutions and corresponding central charges for backgrounds with AdS{sub 3} and S{sup k} factors in {alpha}{sup '}-exact fashion from the full tree-level low-energy effective action of heterotic string theory. Three examples are explicitly presented: AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xT{sup 4}, AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 2}xS{sup 1}xT{sup 4}, and AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 1}. Crucial property which enabled our analysis is vanishing of the Riemann tensor calculated from connection with ''{sigma}-model torsion.'' We show the following: (i) Chern-Simons terms are the only source of {alpha}{sup '} corrections not only in BPS, but also in non-BPS cases, suggesting a possible extension of general method of Kraus and Larsen, (ii) our results are in agreement with some conjectures on the form of the part of tree-level Lagrangian not connected to a mixed Chern-Simons term by supersymmetry (and present in all supersymmetric string theories), (iii) new {alpha}{sup '}-exact result for central charges in AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 1} geometry. As a tool we used our generalization of Sen's E-function formalism to AdS{sub p} with p>2, and paid special attention to proper definition of asymptotic charges.

  4. Passive remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol and atmospheric correction for the aerosol effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanré, D.; Gordon, H. R.; Nakajima, T.; Lenoble, J.; Frouin, R.; Grassl, H.; Herman, B. M.; King, M. D.; Teillet, P. M.

    1997-07-01

    The launch of ADEOS in August 1996 with POLDER, TOMS, and OCTS instruments on board and the future launch of EOS-AM 1 in mid-1998 with MODIS and MISR instruments on board start a new era in remote sensing of aerosol as part of a new remote sensing of the whole Earth system (see a list of the acronyms in the Notation section of the paper). These platforms will be followed by other international platforms with unique aerosol sensing capability, some still in this century (e.g., ENVISAT in 1999). These international spaceborne multispectral, multiangular, and polarization measurements, combined for the first time with international automatic, routine monitoring of aerosol from the ground, are expected to form a quantum leap in our ability to observe the highly variable global aerosol. This new capability is contrasted with present single-channel techniques for AVHRR, Meteosat, and GOES that although poorly calibrated and poorly characterized already generated important aerosol global maps and regional transport assessments. The new data will improve significantly atmospheric corrections for the aerosol effect on remote sensing of the oceans and be used to generate first real-time atmospheric corrections over the land. This special issue summarizes the science behind this change in remote sensing, and the sensitivity studies and applications of the new algorithms to data from present satellite and aircraft instruments. Background information and a summary of a critical discussion that took place in a workshop devoted to this topic is given in this introductory paper. In the discussion it was concluded that the anticipated remote sensing of aerosol simultaneously from several space platforms with different observation strategies, together with continuous validations around the world, is expected to be of significant importance to test remote sensing approaches to characterize the complex and highly variable aerosol field. So far, we have only partial understanding of

  5. Effect of Background Emissivity on Gas Detection in Thermal Hyperspectral Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Chilton, Lawrence K.; Metoyer, Candace N.

    2008-10-02

    Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temper- ature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on net chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plume’s physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on the background emissivity. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity have inhibiting effects on the net chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the Adaptive Matched Filter using four chemicals and three distinct background emissivities. Two chemicals (Carbontetrachloride and Tetraflourosilane) in the analysis had a very strong relationship with the background emissivities: they exhibited absorbance over a small range of wavenumbers and the background emissivities showed a consistent ordering at these wavenumbers. Analysis of simulated hyperspectral images containing these chemicals showed complete agreement with the analysis of the physics-based model that described when the background emissivities would have inhibiting effects on gas detection. The other chemicals considered (Ammonia and Tributylphosphate) exhibited very complex absorbance structure across the longwave infrared spectrum. Analysis of images containing these chemicals revealed that the the analysis of the physics-based model did not hold completely for these complex chemicals but did suggest that gas detection was dominated by their dominant absorbance features. These results provide some explanation of the effect of the background emissivity on gas detection and a more general exploration of gas absorbance/background emissivity variability and their effects on

  6. The joint effects of background selection and genetic recombination on local gene genealogies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kai; Charlesworth, Brian

    2011-09-01

    Background selection, the effects of the continual removal of deleterious mutations by natural selection on variability at linked sites, is potentially a major determinant of DNA sequence variability. However, the joint effects of background selection and genetic recombination on the shape of the neutral gene genealogy have proved hard to study analytically. The only existing formula concerns the mean coalescent time for a pair of alleles, making it difficult to assess the importance of background selection from genome-wide data on sequence polymorphism. Here we develop a structured coalescent model of background selection with recombination and implement it in a computer program that efficiently generates neutral gene genealogies for an arbitrary sample size. We check the validity of the structured coalescent model against forward-in-time simulations and show that it accurately captures the effects of background selection. The model produces more accurate predictions of the mean coalescent time than the existing formula and supports the conclusion that the effect of background selection is greater in the interior of a deleterious region than at its boundaries. The level of linkage disequilibrium between sites is elevated by background selection, to an extent that is well summarized by a change in effective population size. The structured coalescent model is readily extendable to more realistic situations and should prove useful for analyzing genome-wide polymorphism data.

  7. Atomic electron energies including relativistic effects and quantum electrodynamic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, M.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Huang, K. N.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    Atomic electron energies have been calculated relativistically. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions served as zeroth-order eigenfunctions to compute the expectation of the total Hamiltonian. A first order correction to the local approximation was thus included. Quantum-electrodynamic corrections were made. For all orbitals in all atoms with 2 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 106, the following quantities are listed: total energies, electron kinetic energies, electron-nucleus potential energies, electron-electron potential energies consisting of electrostatic and Breit interaction (magnetic and retardation) terms, and vacuum polarization energies. These results will serve for detailed comparison of calculations based on other approaches. The magnitude of quantum electrodynamic corrections is exhibited quantitatively for each state.

  8. Coping with Misinformation: Corrections, Backfire Effects, and Choice Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowsky, S.; Cook, J.; Ecker, U. K.

    2012-12-01

    The widespread prevalence and persistence of misinformation about many important scientific issues, from climate change to vaccinations or the link between HIV and AIDS, must give rise to concern. We first review the mechanisms by which such misinformation is disseminated in society, both inadvertently and purposely. We then survey and explain the cognitive factors that often render misinformation resistant to correction. We answer the question why retractions of misinformation can be so ineffective and why they can even backfire and ironically increase misbelief. We discuss the overriding role of ideology and personal worldviews in the resistance of misinformation to correction and show how their role can be attenuated. We discuss the risks associated with repeating misinformation while seeking to correct it and we point to the design of "choice architectures" as an alternative to the attempt to retract misinformation.

  9. Does correcting myths about the flu vaccine work? An experimental evaluation of the effects of corrective information.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, Brendan; Reifler, Jason

    2015-01-09

    Seasonal influenza is responsible for thousands of deaths and billions of dollars of medical costs per year in the United States, but influenza vaccination coverage remains substantially below public health targets. One possible obstacle to greater immunization rates is the false belief that it is possible to contract the flu from the flu vaccine. A nationally representative survey experiment was conducted to assess the extent of this flu vaccine misperception. We find that a substantial portion of the public (43%) believes that the flu vaccine can give you the flu. We also evaluate how an intervention designed to address this concern affects belief in the myth, concerns about flu vaccine safety, and future intent to vaccinate. Corrective information adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website significantly reduced belief in the myth that the flu vaccine can give you the flu as well as concerns about its safety. However, the correction also significantly reduced intent to vaccinate among respondents with high levels of concern about vaccine side effects--a response that was not observed among those with low levels of concern. This result, which is consistent with previous research on misperceptions about the MMR vaccine, suggests that correcting myths about vaccines may not be an effective approach to promoting immunization.

  10. Analyses and experiments of background sunlight's effects on laser detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Yin, Rui-guang; Ma, Na; Liang, Wei-wei; Li, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Background sunlight effect the technical performance of laser detection system significantly. Analyses and experiments were done to find the degree and regularity of effects of background sunlight on laser detection system. At first, we established the theoretical model of laser detection probability curve. We emulated and analysed the effects on probability curve under different sunlight intensity by the model. Moreover, we got the variation regularity of parameter in probability curve. Secondly, we proposed a prediction method of probability curve, which deduced the detecting parameter from measured data. The method can not only get the probability curve in arbitrary background sunlight by a measured probability curve in typical background sunlight, but also calculate the sensitivity of laser detection systems by probability curve at the specified probability. Thirdly, we measured the probability curves under three types of background sunlight. The illumination conditions in experiments included fine, overcast and night. These three curves can be used as reference to deduce other curves. Using model, method, and measured data mentioned above, we finally finished the analyses and appraisal of the effects of background sunlight on typical laser detection system. The research findings can provide the theoretical reference and technical support for adaptability evaluation of typical laser detection systems in different background sunlight.

  11. Weathering effects on fuel moisture sticks: corrections and recommendations.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Haines; John S. Frost

    1978-01-01

    Describes response to weathering of 100-gram (1/2-inch) fuel moisture sticks over 6-month fire season in the Northeast. Presents a chart for correcting weathered-stick values and gives replacement recommendations for those sticks used in the National Fire Danger Rating System.

  12. Effects of Psychoeducation for Offenders in a Community Correctional Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liau, Albert K.; Shively, Randy; Horn, Mary; Landau, Jennifer; Barriga, Alvaro; Gibbs, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The present study provided a randomized outcome evaluation of the psychoeducational component of the EQUIP program. The psychoeducational curriculum was implemented in a community correctional facility for adult felony offenders. The psychoeducational curriculum is designed to remedy offenders' delays in moral judgment maturity, social cognitive…

  13. The Effectiveness of Four Self-Corrected Spelling Test Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harward, Stan V.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assesses spelling achievement of fourth graders using four self-corrected test methods (visual and listwise, visual and wordwise, oral and listwise, and oral and wordwise). Finds that wordwise feedback produced significantly higher gains than listwise and no significant differences in gains between visual and oral modes, or among presentation…

  14. Effect of Background Pressure on the Plasma Oscillation Characteristics of the HiVHAc Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Lobbia, Robert B.; Brown, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    During a component compatibility test of the NASA HiVHAc Hall thruster, a number of plasma diagnostics were implemented to study the effect of varying facility background pressure on thruster operation. These diagnostics characterized the thruster performance, the plume, and the plasma oscillations in the thruster. Thruster performance and plume characteristics as functions of background pressure were previously published. This paper focuses on changes in the plasma oscillation characteristics with changing background pressure. The diagnostics used to study plasma oscillations include a high-speed camera and a set of high-speed Langmuir probes. The results show a rise in the oscillation frequency of the "breathing" mode with rising background pressure, which is hypothesized to be due to a shortening acceleration/ionization zone. An attempt is made to apply a simplified ingestion model to the data. The combined results are used to estimate the maximum acceptable background pressure for performance and wear testing.

  15. Effect of Background Pressure on the Performance and Plume of the HiVHAc Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    During the Single String Integration Test of the NASA HiVHAc Hall thruster, a number of plasma diagnostics were implemented to study the effect of varying facility background pressure on thruster operation. These diagnostics include thrust stand, Faraday probe, ExB probe, and retarding potential analyzer. The test results indicated a rise in thrust and discharge current with background pressure. There was also a decrease in ion energy per charge, an increase in multiply-charged species production, a decrease in plume divergence, and a decrease in ion beam current with increasing background pressure. A simplified ingestion model was applied to determine the maximum acceptable background pressure for thrust measurement. The maximum acceptable ingestion percentage was found to be around 1%. Examination of the diagnostics results suggest the ionization and acceleration zones of the thruster were shifting upstream with increasing background pressure.

  16. The effect of chromatic background for luminance contrast-sensitivity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li; Liao, Ningfang; Dong, Shuwen; Liao, Ting; Hu, Weigui; Lin, Kai

    2012-11-01

    The effect of chromatic background on luminance contrast-sensitivity function (CSF) is studied. We selected three background-grey, orange and yellow-green from CIE 17 color center. The mean luminance of these colors is approximately equal. We use CRT monitor display the rectangular stripe. Every rectangular stripe has six spatial frequencies (0.4, 1, 2, 3.5,7 and 14cpd) .The method of limits is used in the experiment, 5 observers, who have normal vision and test of vision is all over 1.0, participated in the experiment. The results of experiment show that the luminance contrast sensitivity on chromatic background is lower than the luminance contrast sensitivity under grey background. Fitting results show that Movshon model is better than Barten model, especially for the chromatic background. Both of the models have deviation in the high spatial frequency part.

  17. The Effects of Double Diffusion and Background Turbulence on the Persistence of Submarine Wakes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THE EFFECTS OF...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE EFFECTS OF DOUBLE DIFFUSION AND BACKGROUND TURBULENCE ON THE...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THE EFFECTS OF DOUBLE DIFFUSION AND

  18. [Effect of correction of tetrachlormethane hepatosis by complete fasting].

    PubMed

    Kuziv, O Ie; Bodnar, Ia Ia; Kuziv, P P; Klymchuk, L F; Zavads'ka, T S; Derpak, Iu Iu

    2005-01-01

    Processes of free radical lipid oxidation (FLI), endogenic intoxication, antioxidant protection system (AOP) and morphology of a liver at tetrachlormethane hepatosis and its correction by a complete fasting have been assessed. Two chains of pathogenesis of tetrachlormethane hepatosis have been determined: the metabolic chain that is accompanied by sharp activation of free radical lipid oxidation under emaciation of antioxidant protection system and increasing endotoxemia; and the ischemic chain that enhances the processes of dystrophy and necrosis of hepatocytes and neofibrous formations. The correction by a complete fasting promoted normalization of free radical lipid oxidation at simultaneous rising of antioxidant protection system function, decreasing of a level of endogenic intoxication and conservation of hepatocytes' structure, improving recovering possibilities and prevents dystrophic and necrotic changes and neofibrous formations in the liver at tetrachlormethane hepatosis.

  19. Surface-effect corrections for the solar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Solar p-mode oscillations exhibit a systematic offset towards higher frequencies due to shortcomings in the 1D stellar structure models, in particular, the lack of turbulent pressure in the superadiabatic layers just below the optical surface, arising from the convective velocity field. Aims: We study the influence of the turbulent expansion, chemical composition, and magnetic fields on the stratification in the upper layers of the solar models in comparison with solar observations. Furthermore, we test alternative ⟨3D⟩ averages for improved results on the oscillation frequencies. Methods: We appended temporally and spatially averaged ⟨3D⟩ stratifications to 1D models to compute adiabatic oscillation frequencies that we then tested against solar observations. We also developed depth-dependent corrections for the solar 1D model, for which we expanded the geometrical depth to match the pressure stratification of the solar ⟨3D⟩ model, and we reduced the density that is caused by the turbulent pressure. Results: We obtain the same results with our ⟨3D⟩ models as have been reported previously. Our depth-dependent corrected 1D models match the observations to almost a similar extent as the ⟨3D⟩ model. We find that correcting for the expansion of the geometrical depth and the reducing of the density are both equally necessary. Interestingly, the influence of the adiabatic exponent Γ1 is less pronounced than anticipated. The turbulent elevation directly from the ⟨3D⟩ model does not match the observations properly. Considering different reference depth scales for the ⟨3D⟩ averaging leads to very similar frequencies. Solar models with high metal abundances in their initial chemical composition match the low-frequency part much better. We find a linear relation between the p-mode frequency shift and the vertical magnetic field strength with δvnl = 26.21Bz [μHz/kG], which is able to render the solar activity cycles correctly.

  20. Radiative corrections to the Casimir effect at nonzero temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, E.; Robaschik, D.; Scharnhorst, K.

    1986-10-01

    Quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperatures with boundary conditions is formulated on the basis of the functional integral using the results of previous studies (Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 39, 663 (1984); Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 165, 192 (1985)). The Matsubara imaginary-time formalism and the thermal field approach of perturbation theory are used. The loop corrections to the free-energy functional are calculated in a physically reasonable limit.

  1. Effects of lump characteristics on plutonium self absorption correction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, D. C.; Wormald, M. R.; Croft, S.

    2007-07-01

    An evaluation study has been undertaken to assess the robustness of several published Pu self-absorption correction methods against variation in size, shape, density etc. for use in the gamma assay of nuclear waste. The correction methods studied are a numerical plutonium self absorption correction (PuSAC) technique, the Fleissner 2-line, Fleissner 3-line and Infinite Energy Extrapolation methods with both linear and polynomial extrapolation to 1/E=0. The performance of these methods has been compared for a limited set of measured encapsulated PuO{sub 2} sources plus a range of modelled unencapsulated Pu lumps. An indication of the magnitude of the uncertainties of the numerical PuSAC method has been determined for cases of blind assays where the Pu material, shape and distribution are unknown with the aim of ultimately applying it to real waste. The importance of the range of Pu lumps used in the baseline modelled dataset has been examined. Data are presented to illustrate how the uncertainties in the method are affected by the shape, composition, density, number and mass distribution of Pu particles in a sample for a given modelled base dataset. (authors)

  2. Effect of Background Pressure on the Plasma Oscillation Characteristics of the HiVHAc Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Lobbia, Robert B.; Brown, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    During a component compatibility test of the NASA HiVHAc Hall thruster, a high-speed camera and a set of high-speed Langmuir probes were implemented to study the effect of varying facility background pressure on thruster operation. The results show a rise in the oscillation frequency of the breathing mode with rising background pressure, which is hypothesized to be due to a shortening accelerationionization zone. An attempt is made to apply a simplified ingestion model to the data. The combined results are used to estimate the maximum acceptable background pressure for performance and wear testing.

  3. Pulse shape discrimination techniques for correcting the effects of radiation damage on germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.; Boggs, S.E.; Lin, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    For germanium detectors (GeDs), which provide the highest energy resolution for studying gamma ray line features from astrophysical sources, exposure to energetic particles in space leads to radiation damage. Trapping centers created in the GeDs, preferentially hole traps, reduce the efficiency of the transport of charge carriers and thereby degrade the energy resolution and line efficiency. In addition, the trapping may affect the performance of Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques used in background reduction. We present here computer simulations of photon interactions and charge transport in a reverse-electrode, closed-end coaxial GeD. These simulations show that radiation damage does not significantly alter the shape of the current pulses, rendering the effect on PSD performance negligible. Furthermore, the simulations show that with PSD, significant improvements in the energy resolution of radiation damaged detectors can be obtained by applying a hole trapping correction to the energy measured by the detector. PSD provides the sizes and locations of the two largest energy depositions for photons that stop within the GeDs. For moderately damaged detectors (mean hole trapping length {lambda}{sub h} = 200 cm, which is equivalent to cosmic ray irradiation of {approximately}2 years), correcting for the trapping suffered by these two depositions provides almost complete recovery of the line shape and sensitivity: undamaged resolution and relative sensitivity (1.58 keV FWEM, 1.0), damaged (2.10 keV, 0.69), corrected (1.75 keV, 0.93). Even for severely damaged detectors ({lambda}{sub h} = 50 cm), a marked improvement is obtained. These improvements translate directly into an increase in sensitivity for the detection of weak fines.

  4. A Synthesis of the Effects of Correctional Education on the Academic Outcomes of Incarcerated Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah K.

    2015-01-01

    Most evaluations of the effectiveness of correctional education use the distal outcomes of recidivism and post-release employment as the dependent variables (e.g., Aos et al., 2006; Davis et al., 2013). This synthesis sought to determine the effectiveness of correctional education at improving proximal academic outcomes among incarcerated adult…

  5. In search of chiral magnetic effect: Separating flow-driven background effects and quantifying anomaly-induced charge separations

    DOE PAGES

    Xu -Guang Huang; Yin, Yi; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-10-05

    Here we report our recent progress on the search of Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) by developing new measurements as well as by hydrodynamic simulations of CME and background effects, with both approaches addressing the pressing issue of separating flow-driven background contributions and possible CME signal in current heavy ion collision measurements.

  6. Effect of peer instruction on the likelihood for choosing the correct response to a physiology question.

    PubMed

    Relling, Alejandro E; Giuliodori, Mauricio J

    2015-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to measure the effects of individual answer (correct vs. incorrect), individual answer of group members (no vs. some vs. all correct), self-confidence about the responses (low vs. mid vs. high), sex (female vs. male students), and group size (2-4 students) on the odds for change and for correctness after peer instruction in a veterinary physiology course (n = 101 students). Data were assessed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The likelihood for change after peer instruction increased when the confidence on an individual answer was low (P < 0.01), when the answer was incorrect (P < 0.01), and when group members had different responses (P < 0.01). The likelihood for correctness after peer instruction increased when the confidence in group answers was high (P < 0.01), when the individual answer was correct (P < 0.01), and when at least one of the group members had the correct response (P < 0.01). After peer discussion, more changes were from incorrect to correct responses than vice versa (72% vs. 28%, P < 0.01). Changes to correct answers occurred after discussion with peers having both the correct individual response (76% of times) and also the incorrect individual answer (24% of times). In conclusion, the benefits of peer instruction are due to students having correct answers generally prevail in discussions. Also, students who all have incorrect answers can get the correct answer through debate and discussion.

  7. Synergic effects of 10°/s constant rotation and rotating background on visual cognitive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Siyang; Cao, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Niu, Dongbin

    In previous studies we have found that constant low-speed rotation facilitated the auditory cognitive process and constant velocity rotation background sped up the perception, recognition and assessment process of visual stimuli. In the condition of constant low-speed rotation body is exposed into a new physical state. In this study the variations of human brain's cognitive process under the complex condition of constant low-speed rotation and visual rotation backgrounds with different speed were explored. 14 university students participated in the ex-periment. EEG signals were recorded when they were performing three different cognitive tasks with increasing mental load, that is no response task, selective switch responses task and selec-tive mental arithmetic task. Rotary chair was used to create constant low-speed10/srotation. Four kinds of background were used in this experiment, they were normal black background and constant 30o /s, 45o /s or 60o /s rotating simulated star background. The P1 and N1 compo-nents of brain event-related potentials (ERP) were analyzed to detect the early visual cognitive processing changes. It was found that compared with task performed under other backgrounds, the posterior P1 and N1 latencies were shortened under 45o /s rotating background in all kinds of cognitive tasks. In the no response task, compared with task performed under black back-ground, the posterior N1 latencies were delayed under 30o /s rotating background. In the selec-tive switch responses task and selective mental arithmetic task, compared with task performed under other background, the P1 latencies were lengthened under 60o /s rotating background, but the average amplitudes of the posterior P1 and N1 were increased. It was suggested that under constant 10/s rotation, the facilitated effect of rotating visual background were changed to an inhibited one in 30o /s rotating background. Under vestibular new environment, not all of the rotating backgrounds

  8. Correcting the fundamental ion mobility equation for field effects.

    PubMed

    Siems, William F; Viehland, Larry A; Hill, Herbert H

    2016-11-14

    The fundamental ion mobility equation computes the energy-averaged collision cross section as a function of measured drift velocity, electric field strength, ion and neutral masses, and drift gas state parameters. As field strength approaches zero, in particular when the drift velocity drops below about 4% of the average ion-neutral thermal speed, the fundamental equation takes on an especially simple form because the collision frequency and average momentum transfer become indistinguishable from their thermal values. However, in modern high-performance IMS-MS instruments, ion drift velocities may be 10-50% or more of thermal speed, and analysis using the zero-field equation gives rise to erroneously large cross sections. We address this problem by developing correction factors for the zero-field equation from an improved momentum-transfer (MT) theory for ion mobility, corrected and completed herein, and from the well-known two-temperature (2T) theory. The corrected and uncorrected equations are compared by their ability to recover known hard-sphere cross sections from accurately-computed mobility data. Both MT and 2T expressions adjust for the field-driven increase in collision frequency and are noticeably superior to zero-field expression whenever the ion drift velocity is greater than ∼4% of thermal speed. The MT expression also adjusts for the mass and field dependent change in average momentum transfer, and is more accurate than the 2T first approximation whenever the mass of the ionic species is greater than about four times that of drift gas molecules, as is the case in most analytical applications of IMS coupled to MS.

  9. The Effects of Family Background, Test Scores, Personality Traits and Education on Economic Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jencks, Christopher; Rainwater, Lee

    Ten surveys of American men aged 25-64 were analyzed to determine the effects of family background, adolescent personality traits, cognitive test scores, and years of schooling on occupational status and earnings in maturity. Some of the findings follow: Data on brothers indicated that prior research has underestimated the effect of family…

  10. Effect of the mutation rate and background size on the quality of pathogen identification.

    PubMed

    Reed, Chris; Fofanov, Viacheslav; Putonti, Catherine; Chumakov, Sergei; Slezak, Tom; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2007-10-15

    Genomic-based methods have significant potential for fast and accurate identification of organisms or even genes of interest in complex environmental samples (air, water, soil, food, etc.), especially when isolation of the target organism cannot be performed by a variety of reasons. Despite this potential, the presence of the unknown, variable and usually large quantities of background DNA can cause interference resulting in false positive outcomes. In order to estimate how the genomic diversity of the background (total length of all of the different genomes present in the background), target length and target mutation rate affect the probability of misidentifications, we introduce a mathematical definition for the quality of an individual signature in the presence of a background based on its length and number of mismatches needed to transform the signature into the closest subsequence present in the background. This definition, in conjunction with a probabilistic framework, allows one to predict the minimal signature length required to identify the target in the presence of different sizes of backgrounds and the effect of the target's mutation rate on the quality of its identification. The model assumptions and predictions were validated using both Monte Carlo simulations and real genomic data examples. The proposed model can be used to determine appropriate signature lengths for various combinations of target and background genome sizes. It also predicted that any genomic signatures will be unable to identify target if its mutation rate is >5%. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Effects of bleaching and backgrounds on the flash response of the cone system.

    PubMed

    Geisler, W S

    1981-03-01

    1. Increment-threshold functions for flashed backgrounds were measured in the human fovea under several conditions: (1) during dark adaptation following full bleaches, (2) in the presence of steady adapting backgrounds and (3) 500 msec following extinction of adapting backgrounds.2. To prevent the intense flashed backgrounds from interfering with the course of dark adaptation the inter-trial interval was continuously increased during dark adaptation. This technique may prove generally useful for presenting suprathreshold stimuli during dark adaptation.3. All the increment-threshold functions measured during dark adaptation were found to be roughly shape invariant and continuously accelerating when plotted in log-log co-ordinates. Furthermore, in order to translate a function obtained at any given time into coincidence with a function obtained at any other time, it had to be translated vertically and horizontally the same number of log units. This is equivalent to adding or removing neutral density filters from in front of the eye.4. The increment-threshold functions obtained with steady adapting backgrounds were also continuously accelerating, but could not be brought into coincidence by equal vertical and horizontal translation. However, this became possible again if the adapting background was extinguished during presentation of the flashed background.5. These results contradict the equivalent-background hypothesis. None the less, they suggest that under present conditions the effects of bleaches and backgrounds may be similar except that steady backgrounds provide additional quanta which drive the visual system part of the way up its intensity-response function.6. The conclusions above were supported by applying a simple model based on the equation R = R(max). I(n) / (I(n) + I(1) (n)), which has frequently been used to describe the peak responses of retinal neurones to flashed stimuli. Virtually all of the data reported here were fitted by this simple model with

  12. The effect of atmospheric and topographic correction methods on land cover classification accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanonckelen, Steven; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Van Rompaey, Anton

    2013-10-01

    Mapping of vegetation in mountain areas based on remote sensing is obstructed by atmospheric and topographic distortions. A variety of atmospheric and topographic correction methods has been proposed to minimize atmospheric and topographic effects and should in principle lead to a better land cover classification. Only a limited number of atmospheric and topographic combinations has been tested and the effect on class accuracy and on different illumination conditions is not yet researched extensively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of coupled correction methods on land cover classification accuracy. Therefore, all combinations of three atmospheric (no atmospheric correction, dark object subtraction and correction based on transmittance functions) and five topographic corrections (no topographic correction, band ratioing, cosine correction, pixel-based Minnaert and pixel-based C-correction) were applied on two acquisitions (2009 and 2010) of a Landsat image in the Romanian Carpathian mountains. The accuracies of the fifteen resulting land cover maps were evaluated statistically based on two validation sets: a random validation set and a validation subset containing pixels present in the difference area between the uncorrected classification and one of the fourteen corrected classifications. New insights into the differences in classification accuracy were obtained. First, results showed that all corrected images resulted in higher overall classification accuracies than the uncorrected images. The highest accuracy for the full validation set was achieved after combination of an atmospheric correction based on transmittance functions and a pixel-based Minnaert topographic correction. Secondly, class accuracies of especially the coniferous and mixed forest classes were enhanced after correction. There was only a minor improvement for the other land cover classes (broadleaved forest, bare soil, grass and water). This was explained by the position

  13. Effect of background music on maximum acceptable weight of manual lifting tasks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruifeng

    2014-01-01

    This study used the psychophysical approach to investigate the impact of tempo and volume of background music on the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL), heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) of participants engaged in lifting. Ten male college students participated in this study. They lifted a box from the floor, walked 1-2 steps as required, placed the box on a table and walked back twice per minute. The results showed that the tempo of music had a significant effect on both MAWL and HR. Fast tempo background music resulted in higher MAWL and HR values than those resulting from slow tempo music. The effects of both the tempo and volume on the RPE were insignificant. The results of this study suggest fast tempo background music may be used in manual materials handling tasks to increase performance without increasing perceived exertion because of its ergogenic effect on human psychology and physiology.

  14. The effect of finite field size on classification and atmospheric correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric effect on the upward radiance of sunlight scattered from the Earth-atmosphere system is strongly influenced by the contrasts between fields and their sizes. For a given atmospheric turbidity, the atmospheric effect on classification of surface features is much stronger for nonuniform surfaces than for uniform surfaces. Therefore, the classification accuracy of agricultural fields and urban areas is dependent not only on the optical characteristics of the atmosphere, but also on the size of the surface do not account for the nonuniformity of the surface have only a slight effect on the classification accuracy; in other cases the classification accuracy descreases. The radiances above finite fields were computed to simulate radiances measured by a satellite. A simulation case including 11 agricultural fields and four natural fields (water, soil, savanah, and forest) was used to test the effect of the size of the background reflectance and the optical thickness of the atmosphere on classification accuracy. It is concluded that new atmospheric correction methods, which take into account the finite size of the fields, have to be developed to improve significantly the classification accuracy.

  15. Deformed special relativity as an effective theory of measurements on quantum gravitational backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Aloisio, R.; Grillo, A.; Galante, A.; Liberati, S.; Luzio, E.; Mendez, F.

    2006-02-15

    In this article we elaborate on a recently proposed interpretation of deformed special relativity (DSR) as an effective measurement theory in the presence of non-negligible (albeit small) quantum gravitational fluctuations. We provide several heuristic arguments to explain how such a new theory can emerge and discuss the possible observational consequences of this framework. Given that our discussion considers leading order corrections to the standard dispersion relations, our results apply to a very wide class of possible modifications of special relativity.

  16. Effect of Background Pressure on the Plasma Oscillation Characteristics of the HiVHAc Hall Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    consists of one active probe and one null probe. Data from the null probe is used to correct for capacitance effects, which allows for accurate high...axial locations are generally consistent in terms of measured oscillation frequency. Electron density and temperature are observed to decrease with...SAR 15 19b. TELEPHONE NO (include area code) 661-275-5028 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 American

  17. The effect of background music and song texts on the emotional understanding of children with autism.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, June

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of background music and song texts to teach emotional understanding to children with autism. Participants were 12 students (mean age 11.5 years) with a primary diagnosis of autism who were attending schools in Japan. Each participant was taught four emotions to decode and encode: happiness, sadness, anger, and fear by the counterbalanced treatment-order. The treatment consisted of the four conditions: (a) no contact control (NCC)--no purposeful teaching of the selected emotion, (b) contact control (CC)--teaching the selected emotion using verbal instructions alone, (c) background music (BM)--teaching the selected emotion by verbal instructions with background music representing the emotion, and singing songs (SS)--teaching the selected emotion by singing specially composed songs about the emotion. Participants were given a pretest and a posttest and received 8 individual sessions between these tests. The results indicated that all participants improved significantly in their understanding of the four selected emotions. Background music was significantly more effective than the other three conditions in improving participants' emotional understanding. The findings suggest that background music can be an effective tool to increase emotional understanding in children with autism, which is crucial to their social interactions.

  18. Effect of Refractive Correction Error on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness: A Spectralis Optical Coherence Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoli; Chen, Yutong; Liu, Xianjie; Ning, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying and assessing retinal nerve fiber layer defects are important for diagnosing and managing glaucoma. We aimed to investigate the effect of refractive correction error on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measured with Spectralis spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Material/Methods We included 68 participants: 32 healthy (normal) and 36 glaucoma patients. RNFL thickness was measured using Spectralis SD-OCT circular scan. Measurements were made with a refractive correction of the spherical equivalent (SE), the SE+2.00D and the SE–2.00D. Results Average RNFL thickness was significantly higher in the normal group (105.88±10.47 μm) than in the glaucoma group (67.67±17.27 μm, P<0.001). In the normal group, +2.00D of refractive correction error significantly affected measurements of average (P<0.001) and inferior quadrant (P=0.037) RNFL thickness. In the glaucoma group, +2.00D of refractive correction error significantly increased average (P<0.001) and individual quadrant (superior: P=0.016; temporal: P=0.004; inferior: P=0.008; nasal: P=0.003) RNFL measurements compared with those made with the proper refractive correction. However, −2.00D of refractive correction error did not significantly affect RNFL thickness measurements in either group. Conclusions Positive defocus error significantly affects RNFL thickness measurements made by the Spectralis SD-OCT. Negative defocus error did not affect RNFL measurement examined. Careful correction of refractive error is necessary to obtain accurate baseline and follow-up RNFL thickness measurements in healthy and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:28030536

  19. The effect of variations in translucency and background on color differences in CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Al Ben Ali, Abdulaziz; Kang, Kiho; Finkelman, Matthew D; Zandparsa, Roya; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of variations in translucency and background on color differences (ΔE) for different shades of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate glass ceramics. A pilot study suggested n = 10 as an appropriate sample size for the number of lithium disilicate glass ceramic cylinders per group. High-transparency (HT) and low-transparency (LT) cylinders (diameter, 12 mm; length, 13 mm) were fabricated in three ceramic shades (BL1, A2, C3) using CAD/CAM technology and were cut into specimen disks (thickness, 1.2 mm; diameter, 12 mm) for placement on Natural Die (ND1 and ND4) backgrounds. Four combinations of translucency and background color were evaluated in terms of color differences for the three ceramic shades: group 1 (HT ND1, reference), group 2 (HT ND4), group 3 (LT ND1), and group 4 (LT ND4). A spectrophotometer was used to measure the color differences. Nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis tests) were used to evaluate the color differences among the tested groups, and Mann-Whitney U tests with Bonferroni correction were used as post hoc tests. Furthermore, for each ceramic shade, the HT groups were compared to the LT groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Significant differences were present among the tested groups of the same ceramic shade (p < 0.001). The highest ΔE values were observed in the HT ND4 group for BL1, while the lowest ΔE values were found in the LT ND1 group for both A2 and C3. Further, the HT groups and the groups with a darker background (ND4) showed increased ΔE values compared with the other groups (p < 0.001). Within the limitations of this study, the results suggested that the translucency and background color significantly influenced the lithium disilicate glass ceramic color among the BL1, A2, and C3 ceramic shades. Changing the underlying color from a lighter background to a darker background resulted in increased color differences. © 2013 by the

  20. The Effects of Nearby Clusters of Galaxies on the Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkinshaw, M.

    1999-01-01

    This project proposed to use the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) DMR sky-maps to measure the anisotropies introduced into the microwave background radiation by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and Rees-Sciama effects of nearby clusters and superclusters of galaxies. We intended to seek these effects by making maps of the best-fit anisotropies on particular angular scales and comparing the apparent anisotropies near target clusters and superclusters with the statistical noise and sky variance. The locations of the clusters and superclusters were to be found using HEAO-1 (High Energy Astronomy Observatory) A2 and Einstein X-ray maps. Checks against biases were to be made using radio and X-ray sky-maps as guides to the properties of the clusters and superclusters. Any signals detected would have implications for the gas properties and baryonic masses of clusters and superclusters. The scientific background, project activities and references to published papers are included.

  1. Treatment of solutions with binary solutes using an admicellar enhanced CSTR: background solute effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chon-Lin; Lee, Jiu-Chang

    2002-04-01

    This study presents an admicellar enhanced continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Solutions containing single and binary aliphatic alcohols are introduced into this reactor for breakthrough experiments. Two phenomena occur during experiments with binary solutes: (a) a competitive effect caused by background solutes with relatively high hydrophobicity; (b) a co-solvent effect attributable to background solutes with relatively low hydrophobicity. The competition phenomenon and the corresponding mechanism involved are well demonstrated by directly monitoring the pre-adsolubilized solutes drawn out back to the solution while adsolubilizing other solutes with higher hydrophobicity. On the other hand, adsolubilization kinetics hindered by the background solute, which acts as a co-solvent, significantly alters the slopes of breakthrough curves of the target solute treated in the reactor.

  2. The effects of camera jitter for background subtraction algorithms on fused infrared-visible video streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Stefan; Scherer-Negenborn, Norbert; Thakkar, Pooja; Hübner, Wolfgang; Arens, Michael

    2016-10-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work of Becker et al.1 In their work, they analyzed the robustness of various background subtraction algorithms on fused video streams originating from visible and infrared cameras. In order to cover a broader range of background subtraction applications, we show the effects of fusing infrared-visible video streams from vibrating cameras on a large set of background subtraction algorithms. The effectiveness is quantitatively analyzed on recorded data of a typical outdoor sequence with a fine-grained and accurate annotation of the images. Thereby, we identify approaches which can benefit from fused sensor signals with camera jitter. Finally conclusions on what fusion strategies should be preferred under such conditions are given.

  3. Causes and Consequences of Genetic Background Effects Illuminated by Integrative Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic consequences of individual mutations are modulated by the wild-type genetic background in which they occur. Although such background dependence is widely observed, we do not know whether general patterns across species and traits exist or about the mechanisms underlying it. We also lack knowledge on how mutations interact with genetic background to influence gene expression and how this in turn mediates mutant phenotypes. Furthermore, how genetic background influences patterns of epistasis remains unclear. To investigate the genetic basis and genomic consequences of genetic background dependence of the scallopedE3 allele on the Drosophila melanogaster wing, we generated multiple novel genome-level datasets from a mapping-by-introgression experiment and a tagged RNA gene expression dataset. In addition we used whole genome resequencing of the parental lines—two commonly used laboratory strains—to predict polymorphic transcription factor binding sites for SD. We integrated these data with previously published genomic datasets from expression microarrays and a modifier mutation screen. By searching for genes showing a congruent signal across multiple datasets, we were able to identify a robust set of candidate loci contributing to the background-dependent effects of mutations in sd. We also show that the majority of background-dependent modifiers previously reported are caused by higher-order epistasis, not quantitative noncomplementation. These findings provide a useful foundation for more detailed investigations of genetic background dependence in this system, and this approach is likely to prove useful in exploring the genetic basis of other traits as well. PMID:24504186

  4. Causes and consequences of genetic background effects illuminated by integrative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Tack, David; Dworkin, Ian

    2014-04-01

    The phenotypic consequences of individual mutations are modulated by the wild-type genetic background in which they occur. Although such background dependence is widely observed, we do not know whether general patterns across species and traits exist or about the mechanisms underlying it. We also lack knowledge on how mutations interact with genetic background to influence gene expression and how this in turn mediates mutant phenotypes. Furthermore, how genetic background influences patterns of epistasis remains unclear. To investigate the genetic basis and genomic consequences of genetic background dependence of the scalloped(E3) allele on the Drosophila melanogaster wing, we generated multiple novel genome-level datasets from a mapping-by-introgression experiment and a tagged RNA gene expression dataset. In addition we used whole genome resequencing of the parental lines-two commonly used laboratory strains-to predict polymorphic transcription factor binding sites for SD. We integrated these data with previously published genomic datasets from expression microarrays and a modifier mutation screen. By searching for genes showing a congruent signal across multiple datasets, we were able to identify a robust set of candidate loci contributing to the background-dependent effects of mutations in sd. We also show that the majority of background-dependent modifiers previously reported are caused by higher-order epistasis, not quantitative noncomplementation. These findings provide a useful foundation for more detailed investigations of genetic background dependence in this system, and this approach is likely to prove useful in exploring the genetic basis of other traits as well.

  5. Effect of background noise on neuronal coding of interaural level difference cues in rat inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Mokri, Yasamin; Worland, Kate; Ford, Mark; Rajan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Humans can accurately localize sounds even in unfavourable signal-to-noise conditions. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this, we studied the effect of background wide-band noise on neural sensitivity to variations in interaural level difference (ILD), the predominant cue for sound localization in azimuth for high-frequency sounds, at the characteristic frequency of cells in rat inferior colliculus (IC). Binaural noise at high levels generally resulted in suppression of responses (55.8%), but at lower levels resulted in enhancement (34.8%) as well as suppression (30.3%). When recording conditions permitted, we then examined if any binaural noise effects were related to selective noise effects at each of the two ears, which we interpreted in light of well-known differences in input type (excitation and inhibition) from each ear shaping particular forms of ILD sensitivity in the IC. At high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), in most ILD functions (41%), the effect of background noise appeared to be due to effects on inputs from both ears, while for a large percentage (35.8%) appeared to be accounted for by effects on excitatory input. However, as SNR decreased, change in excitation became the dominant contributor to the change due to binaural background noise (63.6%). These novel findings shed light on the IC neural mechanisms for sound localization in the presence of continuous background noise. They also suggest that some effects of background noise on encoding of sound location reported to be emergent in upstream auditory areas can also be observed at the level of the midbrain. PMID:25865218

  6. Effect of background noise on neuronal coding of interaural level difference cues in rat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mokri, Yasamin; Worland, Kate; Ford, Mark; Rajan, Ramesh

    2015-07-01

    Humans can accurately localize sounds even in unfavourable signal-to-noise conditions. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this, we studied the effect of background wide-band noise on neural sensitivity to variations in interaural level difference (ILD), the predominant cue for sound localization in azimuth for high-frequency sounds, at the characteristic frequency of cells in rat inferior colliculus (IC). Binaural noise at high levels generally resulted in suppression of responses (55.8%), but at lower levels resulted in enhancement (34.8%) as well as suppression (30.3%). When recording conditions permitted, we then examined if any binaural noise effects were related to selective noise effects at each of the two ears, which we interpreted in light of well-known differences in input type (excitation and inhibition) from each ear shaping particular forms of ILD sensitivity in the IC. At high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), in most ILD functions (41%), the effect of background noise appeared to be due to effects on inputs from both ears, while for a large percentage (35.8%) appeared to be accounted for by effects on excitatory input. However, as SNR decreased, change in excitation became the dominant contributor to the change due to binaural background noise (63.6%). These novel findings shed light on the IC neural mechanisms for sound localization in the presence of continuous background noise. They also suggest that some effects of background noise on encoding of sound location reported to be emergent in upstream auditory areas can also be observed at the level of the midbrain.

  7. Comparing the effectiveness of error-correction strategies in discrete trial training.

    PubMed

    Turan, Michelle K; Moroz, Lianne; Croteau, Natalie Paquet

    2012-03-01

    Error-correction strategies are essential considerations for behavior analysts implementing discrete trial training with children with autism. The research literature, however, is still lacking in the number of studies that compare and evaluate error-correction procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare two error-correction strategies: Independent Probe and Delay across learners with autism in an intensive intervention program. Two studies were conducted. The first study compared the two procedures across receptive tasks for 3 individuals, and differential effects were seen across learners. The second study compared the two procedures across tact trials with two of the same learners and found that individual differences were noted, but in addition, the more effective error-correction strategy was consistent across the two verbal operants (i.e., receptive in Study 1, tacts in Study 2). These combined studies suggest the effectiveness of error-correction strategies may be individualized to the learner but may generalize across operants.

  8. The Effect of Written Corrective Feedback on Omani Students' Accuracy in the Use of English Prepositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Ajmi, Ahmed Ali Saleh

    2015-01-01

    A quasi-experimental study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of providing written corrective feedback (WCF) to Arab speakers of English on ten uses of English prepositions. Arab speakers commonly find it difficult to correctly use English prepositions, mainly due to the differences between the two languages (e.g. Ortega, 2009). Examples…

  9. The Effect of Guessing on Item Reliability under Answer-Until-Correct Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael; Moloney, James

    1978-01-01

    The answer-until-correct (AUC) procedure requires that examinees respond to a multi-choice item until they answer it correctly. Using a modified version of Horst's model for examinee behavior, this paper compares the effect of guessing on item reliability for the AUC procedure and the zero-one scoring procedure. (Author/CTM)

  10. The Effect of Age-Correction on IQ Scores among School-Aged Children Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Rachel M.; George, Wing Man; Cole, Carolyn; Marshall, Peter; Ellison, Vanessa; Fabel, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of age-correction on IQ scores among preterm school-aged children. Data from the Flinders Medical Centre Neonatal Unit Follow-up Program for 81 children aged five years and assessed with the WPPSI-III, and 177 children aged eight years and assessed with the WISC-IV, were analysed. Corrected IQ scores were…

  11. Absorbed dose dependence of the correction factors for ionization chamber cable irradiation effects.

    PubMed

    Campos, L L; Caldas, L V

    1991-03-01

    A simple method was developed, for possible use by hospital physicists, to evaluate the irradiation effects on cables and connectors during large-radiation-field dosimetry with ionization chambers and to determine correction factors for the used system or geometry. This method was based on the absorbed dose dependence of the correction factor.

  12. The Effect of Error Correction Feedback on the Collocation Competence of Iranian EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jafarpour, Ali Akbar; Sharifi, Abolghasem

    2012-01-01

    Collocations are one of the most important elements in language proficiency but the effect of error correction feedback of collocations has not been thoroughly examined. Some researchers report the usefulness and importance of error correction (Hyland, 1990; Bartram & Walton, 1991; Ferris, 1999; Chandler, 2003), while others showed that error…

  13. An Evaluation of Information Criteria Use for Correct Cross-Classified Random Effects Model Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beretvas, S. Natasha; Murphy, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors assessed correct model identification rates of Akaike's information criterion (AIC), corrected criterion (AICC), consistent AIC (CAIC), Hannon and Quinn's information criterion (HQIC), and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) for selecting among cross-classified random effects models. Performance of default values for the 5…

  14. An Evaluation of Information Criteria Use for Correct Cross-Classified Random Effects Model Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beretvas, S. Natasha; Murphy, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors assessed correct model identification rates of Akaike's information criterion (AIC), corrected criterion (AICC), consistent AIC (CAIC), Hannon and Quinn's information criterion (HQIC), and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) for selecting among cross-classified random effects models. Performance of default values for the 5…

  15. Effects of Task Interruption and Background Speech on Word Processed Writing.

    PubMed

    Keus van de Poll, Marijke; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Task interruptions and background speech, both part of the everyday situation in office environments, impair cognitive performance. The current experiments explored the combined effects of background speech and task interruptions on word processed writing-arguably, a task representative of office work. Participants wrote stories, in silence or in the presence of background speech (monologues, halfalogues and dialogues), and were occasionally interrupted by a secondary task. Writing speed was comparably low during the immediate period after the interruption (Experiments 1 and 2); it took 10-15 s to regain full writing speed. Background speech had only a small effect on performance (Experiment 1), but a dialogue was more disruptive than a halfalogue (Experiment 2). Background speech did not add to the cost caused by task interruptions. However, subjective measures suggested that speech, just as interruptions, contributed to perceived workload. The findings are discussed in view of attentional capture and interference-by-process mechanisms.© 2016 The Authors. Applied Cognitive Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The role of speech-specific properties of the background in the irrelevant sound effect.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Navin; Dorsi, Josh; George, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The irrelevant sound effect (ISE) is the finding that serial recall performance is impaired under complex auditory backgrounds such as speech as compared to white noise or silence. Several findings have demonstrated that ISE occurs with nonspeech backgrounds and that the changing-state complexity of the background stimuli is critical to ISE. In a pair of experiments, we investigate whether speech-like qualities of the irrelevant background have an effect beyond their changing-state complexity. We do so by using two kinds of transformations of speech with identical changing-state complexity: one kind that preserved speech-like information (sinewave speech and fully reversed sinewave speech) and others in which this information was distorted (two selectively reversed sinewave speech conditions). Our results indicate that even when changing-state complexity is held constant, sinewave speech conditions in which speech-like interformant relationships are disrupted, produce less ISE than those in which these relationships are preserved. This indicates that speech-like properties of the background are important beyond their changing-state complexity for ISE.

  17. Coastal Zone Color Scanner atmospheric correction algorithm: multiple scattering effects.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Castaño, D J

    1987-06-01

    An analysis of the errors due to multiple scattering which are expected to be encountered in application of the current Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) atmospheric correction algorithm is presented in detail. This was prompted by the observations of others that significant errors would be encountered if the present algorithm were applied to a hypothetical instrument possessing higher radiometric sensitivity than the present CZCS. This study provides CZCS users sufficient information with which to judge the efficacy of the current algorithm with the current sensor and enables them to estimate the impact of the algorithm-induced errors on their applications in a variety of situations. The greatest source of error is the assumption that the molecular and aerosol contributions to the total radiance observed at the sensor can be computed separately. This leads to the requirement that a value epsilon'(lambda,lambda(0)) for the atmospheric correction parameter, which bears little resemblance to its theoretically meaningful counterpart, must usually be employed in the algorithm to obtain an accurate atmospheric correction. The behavior of '(lambda,lambda(0)) with the aerosol optical thickness and aerosol phase function is thoroughly investigated through realistic modeling of radiative transfer in a stratified atmosphere over a Fresnel reflecting ocean. A unique feature of the analysis is that it is carried out in scan coordinates rather than typical earth-sun coordinates allowing elucidation of the errors along typical CZCS scan lines; this is important since, in the normal application of the algorithm, it is assumed that the same value of can be used for an entire CZCS scene or at least for a reasonably large subscene. Two types of variation of ' are found in models for which it would be constant in the single scattering approximation: (1) variation with scan angle in scenes in which a relatively large portion of the aerosol scattering phase function would be examined

  18. The Development of Morphological Awareness in Young Bilinguals: Effects of Age and L1 Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Boji Pak-Wing; Sheng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current understanding about the effect of first language (L1) background on morphological awareness (MA) development in those who are bilingual is largely limited to school-aged second-language learners. This study examined the development of MA in bilingual Mandarin-English (ManEngBi) and Spanish-English (SpaEngBi) children ages 4 to 7…

  19. The Effect of Learning Background and Imagery Cognitive Development on Visual Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Shyh-Bao; Sun, Chun-Wang

    2013-01-01

    This research looked into the effect of how cognitive development toward imagery is formed through visual perception by means of a quantitative questionnaire. The main variable was the difference between the learning backgrounds of the interviewees. A two-way ANOVA mixed design was the statistical method used for the analysis of the 2 × 4 (2 by 4)…

  20. Effects of Previewing and Providing Background Knowledge on Taiwanese College Students' Comprehension of American Short Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsiu-Chieh; Graves, Michael F.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of previewing and providing background knowledge for American short stories on Taiwanese students' comprehension of the stories and attitudes toward the treatments. Implications of the findings for reading instruction in second-language classrooms are discussed. (JL)

  1. Effects of Stimulus Characteristics and Background Music on Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning and Forgetting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Annette M. B.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effects of three stimulus variables and background music on paired-associate learning of foreign language (FL) vocabulary. The stimulus variables were the frequency and concreteness of the native language (L1) words and the (phonotactical) typicality of the FL words. Sixty-four L1-FL pairs were presented for learning six…

  2. Exploring Effects of Background Context Familiarity and Signaling on Comprehension, Recall, and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Minjung; Bruning, Roger

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the effects of different geographical background contexts and signalling for information about global warming on comprehension, recall and cognitive load. Two different geographical contexts, US and Korean, were employed to frame explanations of global warming phenomena to US students. Two signalling conditions…

  3. Effects of Age, Gender and Educational Background on Strength of Motivation for Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusurkar, Rashmi; Kruitwagen, Cas; ten Cate, Olle; Croiset, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of selection, educational background, age and gender on strength of motivation to attend and pursue medical school. Graduate entry (GE) medical students (having Bachelor's degree in Life Sciences or related field) and Non-Graduate Entry (NGE) medical students (having only completed high school),…

  4. The Effect of Learning Background and Imagery Cognitive Development on Visual Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Shyh-Bao; Sun, Chun-Wang

    2013-01-01

    This research looked into the effect of how cognitive development toward imagery is formed through visual perception by means of a quantitative questionnaire. The main variable was the difference between the learning backgrounds of the interviewees. A two-way ANOVA mixed design was the statistical method used for the analysis of the 2 × 4 (2 by 4)…

  5. Exploring Effects of Background Context Familiarity and Signaling on Comprehension, Recall, and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Minjung; Bruning, Roger

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the effects of different geographical background contexts and signalling for information about global warming on comprehension, recall and cognitive load. Two different geographical contexts, US and Korean, were employed to frame explanations of global warming phenomena to US students. Two signalling conditions…

  6. The Effects of Lesson Screen Background Color on Declarative and Structural Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Prestera, Gustavo E.

    2009-01-01

    This experimental investigation replicates previous investigations of the effects of left margin screen background color hue to signal lesson sections on declarative knowledge and extends those investigations by adding a measure of structural knowledge. Participants (N = 80) were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 computer-based lesson treatments…

  7. Effects of Teacher Educational Background and Experience on Student Achievement in the Early Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leak, James Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the relationship between teacher educational background, teacher experience, and student achievement in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade. The first essay of this dissertation, "Effects of Teacher Degree Level, Coursework, and Certification on Student Achievement in Math and Reading in Kindergarten,"…

  8. Decreasing Reading Differences in Children from Disadvantaged Backgrounds: The Effects of an Early Literacy Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagans, Kristi S.; Good, Roland H., III

    2013-01-01

    Children from low socioeconomic backgrounds (SES) are at increased risk of reading problems. Although phonological awareness consistently emerges as a critical literacy skill for children, little research exists regarding the effects of the acquisition of phonological awareness skills on decreasing the reading achievement gap between children of…

  9. Effects of Age, Gender and Educational Background on Strength of Motivation for Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusurkar, Rashmi; Kruitwagen, Cas; ten Cate, Olle; Croiset, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of selection, educational background, age and gender on strength of motivation to attend and pursue medical school. Graduate entry (GE) medical students (having Bachelor's degree in Life Sciences or related field) and Non-Graduate Entry (NGE) medical students (having only completed high school),…

  10. The Development of Morphological Awareness in Young Bilinguals: Effects of Age and L1 Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Boji Pak-Wing; Sheng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current understanding about the effect of first language (L1) background on morphological awareness (MA) development in those who are bilingual is largely limited to school-aged second-language learners. This study examined the development of MA in bilingual Mandarin-English (ManEngBi) and Spanish-English (SpaEngBi) children ages 4 to 7…

  11. The Effectiveness of Drug Abuse Treatment: Implications for Controlling AIDS/HIV Infection. Background Paper 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This background paper examines evidence for the effectiveness of treatment for drug abuse and evaluates the role of drug abuse treatment as a strategy to prevent Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) spread. Because most intravenous (IV) drug users are not in treatment, the study also examines other approaches to HIV prevention. The remainder of the…

  12. Learning in Complex Environments: The Effects of Background Speech on Early Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Brianna T. M.; Saffran, Jenny R.

    2016-01-01

    Although most studies of language learning take place in quiet laboratory settings, everyday language learning occurs under noisy conditions. The current research investigated the effects of background speech on word learning. Both younger (22- to 24-month-olds; n = 40) and older (28- to 30-month-olds; n = 40) toddlers successfully learned novel…

  13. Cognitive Interference from Background Television: Structural Effects on Verbal and Spatial Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, G. Blake

    1993-01-01

    Investigates whether background television produces structural interference with aspects of cognitive processing. Finds a significant deleterious effect on a geometric analogies and completion task involving visuo-spatial processing and marginal improvement on a parallel verbal analogy test. Shows that concurrent television exposure had no…

  14. Learning in Complex Environments: The Effects of Background Speech on Early Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Brianna T. M.; Saffran, Jenny R.

    2016-01-01

    Although most studies of language learning take place in quiet laboratory settings, everyday language learning occurs under noisy conditions. The current research investigated the effects of background speech on word learning. Both younger (22- to 24-month-olds; n = 40) and older (28- to 30-month-olds; n = 40) toddlers successfully learned novel…

  15. The Effects of Lesson Screen Background Color on Declarative and Structural Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Prestera, Gustavo E.

    2009-01-01

    This experimental investigation replicates previous investigations of the effects of left margin screen background color hue to signal lesson sections on declarative knowledge and extends those investigations by adding a measure of structural knowledge. Participants (N = 80) were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 computer-based lesson treatments…

  16. Exploring the Effect of Background Knowledge and Text Cohesion on Learning from Texts in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparinatou, Alexandra; Grigoriadou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine the effect of background knowledge and local cohesion on learning from texts. The study is based on construction-integration model. Participants were 176 undergraduate students who read a Computer Science text. Half of the participants read a text of maximum local cohesion and the other a text of minimum local cohesion.…

  17. [Contrast effects of background stimulus person on attitude similarity judgement and interpersonal attraction: a study of topic familiarity effect].

    PubMed

    Tajima, T

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a background stimulus person on attitude similarity judgement and interpersonal attraction. Mascaro and Graves (1973) argued that a contrast effect on perception of similarity mediated interpersonal attraction. In the present experiment, it was hypothesized that topic familiarity moderated the effects of a background stimulus person on attitude similarity judgement and interpersonal attraction. One hundred twenty-two (122) female students were randomly assigned to four groups, formed by two levels of topic familiarity and two levels of similarity for the background stimulus person. They saw the attitudes of two stimulus persons together, and were asked to rate perceived similarity and interpersonal attraction. Results showed that in familiar topic condition, contrast effect was not found for attitude similarity judgement, but it was found for interpersonal attraction. The finding suggested that presence of a background stimulus person immediately led to the contrast effect on interpersonal attraction.

  18. The effect of statistical wind corrections on global wave forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrant, Tom H.; Greenslade, Diana J. M.; Simmonds, Ian

    2013-10-01

    The skill of modern wave models is such that the quality of their forecasts is, to a large degree, determined by errors in the forcing wind field. This work explores the extent to which large-scale systematic biases in modelled waves from a third generation wave model can be attributed to the forcing winds. Three different sets of winds with known global bias characteristics are used to force the WAVEWATCH III model. These winds are based on the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's ACCESS model output, with different statistical corrections applied. Wave forecasts are verified using satellite altimeter data. It is found that a negative bias in modelled Significant Wave Height (Hs) has its origins primarily in the forcing, however, the reduction of systematic wind biases does not result in universal improvement in modelled Hs. A positive bias is present in the Southern Hemisphere due primarily to an overestimation of high Hs values in the Southern Ocean storm tracks. A positive bias is also present in the east Pacific and East Indian Ocean. This is due both to the over-prediction of waves in the Southern Ocean and lack of swell attenuation in the wave model source terms used. Smaller scale features are apparent, such as a positive bias off the Cape of Good Hope, and a negative bias off Cape Horn. In some situations, internal wave model error has been compensated for by error in the forcing winds.

  19. The Interaction of Genetic Background and Mutational Effects in Regulation of Mouse Craniofacial Shape.

    PubMed

    Percival, Christopher J; Marangoni, Pauline; Tapaltsyan, Vagan; Klein, Ophir; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2017-05-05

    Inbred genetic background significantly influences the expression of phenotypes associated with known genetic perturbations and can underlie variation in disease severity between individuals with the same mutation. However, the effect of epistatic interactions on the development of complex traits, such as craniofacial morphology, is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of three inbred backgrounds (129X1/SvJ, C57BL/6J, and FVB/NJ) on the expression of craniofacial dysmorphology in mice (Mus musculus) with loss of function in three members of the Sprouty family of growth factor negative regulators (Spry1, Spry2, or Spry4) in order to explore the impact of epistatic interactions on skull morphology. We found that the interaction of inbred background and the Sprouty genotype explains as much craniofacial shape variation as the Sprouty genotype alone. The most severely affected genotypes display a relatively short and wide skull, a rounded cranial vault, and a more highly angled inferior profile. Our results suggest that the FVB background is more resilient to Sprouty loss of function than either C57 or 129, and that Spry4 loss is generally less severe than loss of Spry1 or Spry2 While the specific modifier genes responsible for these significant background effects remain unknown, our results highlight the value of intercrossing mice of multiple inbred backgrounds to identify the genes and developmental interactions that modulate the severity of craniofacial dysmorphology. Our quantitative results represent an important first step toward elucidating genetic interactions underlying variation in robustness to known genetic perturbations in mice. Copyright © 2017 Percival et al.

  20. The Interaction of Genetic Background and Mutational Effects in Regulation of Mouse Craniofacial Shape

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Christopher J.; Marangoni, Pauline; Tapaltsyan, Vagan; Klein, Ophir; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2017-01-01

    Inbred genetic background significantly influences the expression of phenotypes associated with known genetic perturbations and can underlie variation in disease severity between individuals with the same mutation. However, the effect of epistatic interactions on the development of complex traits, such as craniofacial morphology, is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of three inbred backgrounds (129X1/SvJ, C57BL/6J, and FVB/NJ) on the expression of craniofacial dysmorphology in mice (Mus musculus) with loss of function in three members of the Sprouty family of growth factor negative regulators (Spry1, Spry2, or Spry4) in order to explore the impact of epistatic interactions on skull morphology. We found that the interaction of inbred background and the Sprouty genotype explains as much craniofacial shape variation as the Sprouty genotype alone. The most severely affected genotypes display a relatively short and wide skull, a rounded cranial vault, and a more highly angled inferior profile. Our results suggest that the FVB background is more resilient to Sprouty loss of function than either C57 or 129, and that Spry4 loss is generally less severe than loss of Spry1 or Spry2. While the specific modifier genes responsible for these significant background effects remain unknown, our results highlight the value of intercrossing mice of multiple inbred backgrounds to identify the genes and developmental interactions that modulate the severity of craniofacial dysmorphology. Our quantitative results represent an important first step toward elucidating genetic interactions underlying variation in robustness to known genetic perturbations in mice. PMID:28280213

  1. Corrections for matrix effects in X-ray fluorescence analysis—A tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Richard M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the basic concepts of the mathematical correction for matrix effects in X-ray fluorescence analysis. The emphasis is placed on the correction factor for matrix effects and its quantification. This correction factor is calculated using mathematical models proposed by Lachance-Traill, Claisse-Quintin and Rousseau, which can be applied in practice via an efficient calibration procedure. Each variable in these models is clearly identified so that specific numerical values can easily be substituted for calculation. This paper describes and emphasizes the application of the most effective existing models.

  2. Effects of background noise on generating coherent packets of hairpin vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sung, Hyung Jin; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    We examine the autogeneration process by which new hairpin vortices are created from a sufficiently strong hairpin vortex, leading to the formation of a hairpin packet. Emphasis is placed on the effects of background noise on packet formation. The initial conditions are given by conditionally averaged flow fields associated with the second quadrant (Q2) event in the fully turbulent channel flow direct numerical simulation (DNS) database at Reτ=395. The nonlinear evolution of the initial vortical structure is tracked by performing a spectral simulation. Background noise is introduced by adding small amplitude perturbations to the initial field or by imposing momentum forcing. The background noise gives rise to chaotic development of a hairpin packet. The hairpins become asymmetric, leading to much more complicated packet structures than are observed in the symmetric hairpin vortex train of the flow with a clean background. However, the chaotic packets show the same properties as the clean packet in terms of the rate of growth of vertical and spanwise dimensions and the distance between successive vortices, suggesting that the autogeneration mechanism is robust. The background noise leads to a decrease in the minimum value of the Q2 strength required to trigger autogeneration, indicating that background noise enhances autogeneration, especially in the buffer layer. The autogeneration process is more enhanced by the background noise with wavenumbers kx

  3. Effect of gradient expansion corrections on the expectation values

    and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csavinszky, P.

    1984-06-01

    Recently Pathak and Gadre discussed the relationship between the electron density ρ(r) and the expectation values and . In previous work by the author, using the Na atom as an example, the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac energy-density functional has been used to assess the effect of the (modified) Weizsäcker, and the combined effect of the (modified) Weizsäcker and Hodges gradient expansion corrections on ρ(r). In this paper use is made of the respective electron densities, and the effect of the gradient expansion corrections on the expectation values and is assessed. It is found that the effect of the (modified) Weizsäcker correction is significant, while the effect of the Hodges correction is more modest.

  4. Effects of background gas on sulfur hexafluoride removal by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Xiao, Hanyan; Hu, Xiongxiong; Gui, Yingang

    2016-11-01

    The effects of background gases (He, Ar, N2 and air) on SF6 removal in a dielectric barrier reactor were investigated at atmospheric pressure. A comparison among these background gases was performed in terms of discharge voltage, discharge power, mean electron energy, electron density, removal efficiency and energy yield for the destruction of SF6. Results showed that the discharge voltage of He and Ar was lower than that of N2 and air, but the difference of their discharge power was small. Compared with three other background gases, Ar had a relatively superior destruction and removal rate and energy yield since the mean electron energy and electron density in SF6/H2O/Ar plasma were both maintained at a high level. Complete removal of 2% SF6 could be achieved at a discharge power of 48.86 W with Ar and the corresponding energy yield can reach 4.8 g/kWh.

  5. Condensation of the Scalar Field with Stuckelberg and Weyl Corrections in the Background of a Planar AdS-SCHWARZSCHILD Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, D.; Setare, M. R.; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2012-09-01

    We study analytical properties of the Stuckelberg holographic superconductors with Weyl corrections. We obtain the minimum critical temperature as a function of the mass of the scalar field m2. We show that in limit of the m2 = -3, T Minc≈ 0.158047√ [3]{ρ } which is close to the numerical estimate Tc Numerical≈ 0.170√ [3]{ρ }. Further we show that the mass of the scalar field is bounded from below by the m2mc^2 where mc2 = -5.40417. This lower bound is weaker and different from the previous lower bound m2 = -3 predicted by stability analysis. We show that in the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound, the critical temperature remains finite. Explicitly, we prove that here there exists a linear relation between and the chemical potential.

  6. Intravenous correction of neonatal hypomagnesemia: effect on ionized magnesium.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, A; Orzalesi, M; Mimouni, F B

    1998-04-01

    Neonatal hypomagnesemia is defined as total magnesium (TMg) < or = 0.65 mmol/L (1.6 mg/dl). However, magnesium (Mg) deficiency and sufficiency overlap at serum values of 0.57 to 0.74 mmol/L (1.4 to 1.8 mg/dl). We hypothesized that (1) some infants with TMg < or = 0.65 mmol/L (1.6 mg/dl) have normal ionized Mg values (normal neonatal range 0.40 to 0.56 mmol/L (0.97 to 1.36 mg/dl)); (2) the dose (6.0 mg of elemental Mg/kg) used to correct hypomagnesemia does not lead to elevation of ionized Mg; (3) after intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion, ionized calcium increases in patients with low baseline ionized Mg and decreases in patients with normal baseline ionized Mg. We recruited 22 neonates with TMg < or = 1.6 mg/dl. They received intravenous sulfate (6 mg elemental Mg/kg) over a 1-hour period. Serum TMg, ionized Mg, and ionized Ca were measured before and after magnesium sulfate infusion. An ion-selective electrode was used to allow direct measurement of ionized Mg and ionized Ca. Thirteen (59%) of 22 neonates with TMg < or = 0.65 mmol/L (1.6 mg/dl) had normal IMg. In 7 (31%) of 22 cases ionized Mg increased slightly above 0.56 mmol/L (1.36 mg/dl); the maximum value was 0.61 mmol/L (1.48 mg/dl). The change in ionized Ca concentrations and the baseline ionized Mg value were inversely correlated (r = -0.79; p < 0.0001). (1) Measurement of ionized Mg should prevent overdiagnosis and treatment of hypomagnesemia. (2) The dose used in this study is safe. (3) Ionized Mg concentrations are inversely correlated to the response of ionized Ca concentrations to an Mg load.

  7. The effect of background and illumination on color identification of real, 3D objects

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Sarah R.; Olkkonen, Maria

    2013-01-01

    For the surface reflectance of an object to be a useful cue to object identity, judgments of its color should remain stable across changes in the object's environment. In 2D scenes, there is general consensus that color judgments are much more stable across illumination changes than background changes. Here we investigate whether these findings generalize to real 3D objects. Observers made color matches to cubes as we independently varied both the illumination impinging on the cube and the 3D background of the cube. As in 2D scenes, we found relatively high but imperfect stability of color judgments under an illuminant shift. In contrast to 2D scenes, we found that background had little effect on average color judgments. In addition, variability of color judgments was increased by an illuminant shift and decreased by embedding the cube within a background. Taken together, these results suggest that in real 3D scenes with ample cues to object segregation, the addition of a background may improve stability of color identification. PMID:24273521

  8. Nearest neighbor, bilinear interpolation and bicubic interpolation geographic correction effects on LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Geographical correction effects on LANDSAT image data are identified, using the nearest neighbor, bilinear interpolation and bicubic interpolation techniques. Potential impacts of registration on image compression and classification are explored.

  9. Effect of inter-crystal scatter on estimation methods for random coincidences and subsequent correction.

    PubMed

    Torres-Espallardo, I; Rafecas, M; Spanoudaki, V; McElroy, D P; Ziegler, S I

    2008-05-07

    Random coincidences can contribute substantially to the background in positron emission tomography (PET). Several estimation methods are being used for correcting them. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of techniques for random coincidence estimation, with various low-energy thresholds (LETs). Simulated singles list-mode data of the MADPET-II small animal PET scanner were used as input. The simulations have been performed using the GATE simulation toolkit. Several sources with different geometries have been employed. We evaluated the number of random events using three methods: delayed window (DW), singles rate (SR) and time histogram fitting (TH). Since the GATE simulations allow random and true coincidences to be distinguished, a comparison between the number of random coincidences estimated using the standard methods and the number obtained using GATE was performed. An overestimation in the number of random events was observed using the DW and SR methods. This overestimation decreases for LETs higher than 255 keV. It is additionally reduced when the single events which have undergone a Compton interaction in crystals before being detected are removed from the data. These two observations lead us to infer that the overestimation is due to inter-crystal scatter. The effect of this mismatch in the reconstructed images is important for quantification because it leads to an underestimation of activity. This was shown using a hot-cold-background source with 3.7 MBq total activity in the background region and a 1.59 MBq total activity in the hot region. For both 200 keV and 400 keV LET, an overestimation of random coincidences for the DW and SR methods was observed, resulting in approximately 1.5% or more (at 200 keV LET: 1.7% for DW and 7% for SR) and less than 1% (at 400 keV LET: both methods) underestimation of activity within the background region. In almost all cases, images obtained by compensating for random events in the reconstruction

  10. Leveraging Genetic-Background Effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae To Improve Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Maria; Rovinskiy, Nikolay; Zhang, Yaoping

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major obstacle to sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel production is microbe inhibition by the combinatorial stresses in pretreated plant hydrolysate. Chemical biomass pretreatment releases a suite of toxins that interact with other stressors, including high osmolarity and temperature, which together can have poorly understood synergistic effects on cells. Improving tolerance in industrial strains has been hindered, in part because the mechanisms of tolerance reported in the literature often fail to recapitulate in other strain backgrounds. Here, we explored and then exploited variations in stress tolerance, toxin-induced transcriptomic responses, and fitness effects of gene overexpression in different Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) strains to identify genes and processes linked to tolerance of hydrolysate stressors. Using six different S. cerevisiae strains that together maximized phenotypic and genetic diversity, first we explored transcriptomic differences between resistant and sensitive strains to identify common and strain-specific responses. This comparative analysis implicated primary cellular targets of hydrolysate toxins, secondary effects of defective defense strategies, and mechanisms of tolerance. Dissecting the responses to individual hydrolysate components across strains pointed to synergistic interactions between osmolarity, pH, hydrolysate toxins, and nutrient composition. By characterizing the effects of high-copy gene overexpression in three different strains, we revealed the breadth of the background-specific effects of gene fitness contributions in synthetic hydrolysate. Our approach identified new genes for engineering improved stress tolerance in diverse strains while illuminating the effects of genetic background on molecular mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Recent studies on natural variation within Saccharomyces cerevisiae have uncovered substantial phenotypic diversity. Here, we took advantage of this diversity, using it as a tool to

  11. Leveraging Genetic-Background Effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae To Improve Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Maria; Rovinskiy, Nikolay; Zhang, Yaoping; Gasch, Audrey P

    2016-10-01

    A major obstacle to sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel production is microbe inhibition by the combinatorial stresses in pretreated plant hydrolysate. Chemical biomass pretreatment releases a suite of toxins that interact with other stressors, including high osmolarity and temperature, which together can have poorly understood synergistic effects on cells. Improving tolerance in industrial strains has been hindered, in part because the mechanisms of tolerance reported in the literature often fail to recapitulate in other strain backgrounds. Here, we explored and then exploited variations in stress tolerance, toxin-induced transcriptomic responses, and fitness effects of gene overexpression in different Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) strains to identify genes and processes linked to tolerance of hydrolysate stressors. Using six different S. cerevisiae strains that together maximized phenotypic and genetic diversity, first we explored transcriptomic differences between resistant and sensitive strains to identify common and strain-specific responses. This comparative analysis implicated primary cellular targets of hydrolysate toxins, secondary effects of defective defense strategies, and mechanisms of tolerance. Dissecting the responses to individual hydrolysate components across strains pointed to synergistic interactions between osmolarity, pH, hydrolysate toxins, and nutrient composition. By characterizing the effects of high-copy gene overexpression in three different strains, we revealed the breadth of the background-specific effects of gene fitness contributions in synthetic hydrolysate. Our approach identified new genes for engineering improved stress tolerance in diverse strains while illuminating the effects of genetic background on molecular mechanisms. Recent studies on natural variation within Saccharomyces cerevisiae have uncovered substantial phenotypic diversity. Here, we took advantage of this diversity, using it as a tool to infer the effects of

  12. Effects of higher-order aberration correction on stereopsis at different viewing durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Xiao, Fei; Zhao, Junlei; Zhao, Haoxin; Hu, Yiyun; Tang, Guomao; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-07-01

    To better understand how the eye's optics affects stereopsis, we measured stereoacuity before and after higher-order aberration (HOA) correction with a binocular adaptive optics visual simulator. The HOAs were corrected either binocularly or monocularly in the better eye (the eye with better contrast sensitivity). A two-line stereo pattern served as the visual stimulus. Stereo thresholds at different viewing durations were obtained with the psychophysical method of constant stimuli. Binocular HOA correction led to significant improvement in stereoacuity. However, better eye HOA correction could bring either a bad degradation or a slight improvement in stereoacuity. As viewing duration increased, the stereo benefit approached the level of 1.0 for both binocular and better eye correction, suggesting that long viewing durations might weaken the effects of the eye's optical quality on stereopsis.

  13. A novel approach to background subtraction in contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital mammography with commercially available mammography devices: Polychromaticity correction.

    PubMed

    Contillo, Adriano; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Cardarelli, Paolo; Gambaccini, Mauro; Taibi, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography is an image subtraction technique that is able to improve the detectability of lesions in dense breasts. One of the main sources of error, when the technique is performed by means of commercial mammography devices, is represented by the intrinsic polychromaticity of the x-ray beams. The aim of the work is to propose an iterative procedure, which only assumes the knowledge of a small set of universal quantities, to take into account the polychromaticity and correct the subtraction results accordingly. In order to verify the procedure, it has been applied to an analytical simulation of a target containing a contrast medium and to actual radiographs of a breast phantom containing cavities filled with a solution of the same medium. The reconstructed densities of contrast medium were compared, showing very good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results already after the first iteration. Furthermore, the convergence of the iterative procedure was studied, showing that only a small number of iterations is necessary to reach limiting values. The proposed procedure represents an efficient solution to the polychromaticity issue, qualifying therefore as a viable alternative to inverse-map functions.

  14. A novel approach to background subtraction in contrast-enhanced dual-energy digital mammography with commercially available mammography devices: Polychromaticity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Contillo, Adriano Di Domenico, Giovanni; Cardarelli, Paolo; Gambaccini, Mauro; Taibi, Angelo

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced digital mammography is an image subtraction technique that is able to improve the detectability of lesions in dense breasts. One of the main sources of error, when the technique is performed by means of commercial mammography devices, is represented by the intrinsic polychromaticity of the x-ray beams. The aim of the work is to propose an iterative procedure, which only assumes the knowledge of a small set of universal quantities, to take into account the polychromaticity and correct the subtraction results accordingly. Methods: In order to verify the procedure, it has been applied to an analytical simulation of a target containing a contrast medium and to actual radiographs of a breast phantom containing cavities filled with a solution of the same medium. Results: The reconstructed densities of contrast medium were compared, showing very good agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experimental results already after the first iteration. Furthermore, the convergence of the iterative procedure was studied, showing that only a small number of iterations is necessary to reach limiting values. Conclusions: The proposed procedure represents an efficient solution to the polychromaticity issue, qualifying therefore as a viable alternative to inverse-map functions.

  15. A method for the blind correction of the effects of attenuation and shading in light micrographs based upon moderated histogram equalization.

    PubMed

    Entwistle, A

    2005-09-01

    A means of correcting for the effects of attenuation and shading in multi-dimensional, digital, light micrographs, blindly, i.e. without the need for additional control sets of image data that record these effects, is described. The method, termed trans-elemental moderated histogram equalization (TEMHE), works with all three types of image that are collected in light microscopy: bright objects viewed against a dark background, bright and dark objects set against a grey background and darker objects set against a light background. In its most simple form TEMHE requires that the features of interest are distributed widely and evenly throughout the image data. If, however, the pattern of attenuation or shading is extracted, smoothed and the result used to correct the original set of image data, then the only restriction is that when different classes of feature are present the boundaries between them are not approximately parallel to the axes of one, or more, of the dimensions to be corrected. Moreover, when it is possible to formulate a simple model of the pattern of attenuation or shading this is no longer a constraint. The method does need to analyse a large number of elements of image data (pixels, voxels, etc.) to function correctly but it will correct shading in single frames of image data providing that they are quite large and the overall signal-to-noise ratio is relatively high.

  16. Reexamination of mood-mediation hypothesis of background-music-dependent effects in free recall.

    PubMed

    Isarida, Toshiko K; Kubota, Takayuki; Nakajima, Saki; Isarida, Takeo

    2017-03-01

    The present study reexamined the mood-mediation hypothesis for explaining background-music-dependent effects in free recall. Experiments 1 and 2 respectively examined tempo- and tonality-dependent effects in free recall, which had been used as evidence for the mood-mediation hypothesis. In Experiments 1 and 2, undergraduates (n = 75 per experiment) incidentally learned a list of 20 unrelated words presented one by one at a rate of 5 s per word and then received a 30-s delayed oral free-recall test. Throughout the study and test sessions, a piece of music was played. At the time of test, one third of the participants received the same piece of music with the same tempo or tonality as at study, one third heard a different piece with the same tempo or tonality, and one third heard a different piece with a different tempo or tonality. Note that the condition of the same piece with a different tempo or tonality was excluded. Furthermore, the number of sampled pieces of background music was increased compared with previous studies. The results showed neither tempo- nor tonality-dependent effects, but only a background-music-dependent effect. Experiment 3 (n = 40) compared the effects of background music with a verbal association task and focal music (only listening to musical selections) on the participants' moods. The results showed that both the music tempo and tonality influenced the corresponding mood dimensions (arousal and pleasantness). These results are taken as evidence against the mood-mediation hypothesis. Theoretical implications are discussed.

  17. Effect of morphine-induced postconditioning in corrections of tetralogy of fallot

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Results of previous reports on ischemic postconditioning in animals and humans were very encouraging. Although ischemic postconditioning possessed a wide prospect of clinical application, debates on the precise ischemic postconditioning algorithm to use in clinical settings were ongoing. In this regard, pharmacological strategies were possible alternative methods. Accumulating data demonstrated that pharmacological postconditioning with morphine conferred cardioprotection in animals. This trial aimed to evaluate the effect of morphine-induced postconditioning on protection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in patients undergoing corrections of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Methods Eight-nine consecutive children scheduled for corrections of TOF were enrolled and randomly assigned to either a postconditioning group (patients received a dose of morphine (0.1 mg/kg) injected via a cardioplegia needle into the aortic root for direct and focused delivery to the heart within 1 minute starting at 3 min before aorta cross-clamp removal, n=44) or a control group (the same protocol was performed as in the postconditioning group except that patients received the same volume of saline instead, n=45). The peri-operative relevant data were investigated and analyzed, and the cardiac troponin I (cTnI) was assayed preoperatively, and then 4 h, 8 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after reperfusion. Results Morphine-induced postconditioning reduced postoperative peak cTnI release as compared to the control group (0.57 ± 0.15 versus 0.75 ± 0.20 ng/mL, p<0.0001). Morphine-induced postconditioned patients had lower peak inotropic score (5.7 ± 2.4 versus 8.4 ± 3.6, p<0.0001) and shorter duration of mechanical ventilation as well as ICU stay (20.6 ± 6.8 versus 28.5 ± 8.3 hours, p<0.0001 and 40.4 ± 10.3 versus 57.8 ± 15.2 hours, p<0.0001, respectively), while higher left ventricular ejection fraction as well as cardiac output (0.57±0.15 versus 0.51±0.13, p=0.0467 and 1

  18. Effect of the extra dimensions on the meson spectra in the perturbed background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, J.; Heshmatian, S.

    2017-05-01

    A class of the d-dimensional black holes space-time with the perturbed geometric function and dilaton field is considered to study meson spectroscopy. Holographic description of the black holes are used to investigate the meson spectra and the effective potential of mesons which described by a massless scalar field in the d-dimensional black holes with a dilaton background. The effects of perturbations and extra dimensions on the meson spectra and effective potential are investigated by using some experimental data and simulation of spectra ratios.

  19. Reducing respiratory effect in motion correction for EPI images with sequential slice acquisition order.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Puce, Aina

    2014-04-30

    Motion correction is critical for data analysis of fMRI time series. Most motion correction algorithms treat the head as a rigid body. Respiration of the subject, however, can alter the static magnetic field in the head and result in motion-like slice shifts for echo planar imaging (EPI). The delay of acquisition between slices causes a phase difference in respiration so that the shifts vary with slice positions. To characterize the effect of respiration on motion correction, we acquired fast sampled fMRI data using multi-band EPI and then simulated different acquisition schemes. Our results indicated that respiration introduces additional noise after motion correction. The signal variation between volumes after motion correction increases when the effective TR increases from 675ms to 2025ms. This problem can be corrected if slices are acquired sequentially. For EPI with a sequential acquisition scheme, we propose to divide the image volumes into several segments so that slices within each segment are acquired close in time and then perform motion correction on these segments separately. We demonstrated that the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR) was increased when the motion correction was performed on the segments separately rather than on the whole image. This enhancement of TSNR was not evenly distributed across the segments and was not observed for interleaved acquisition. The level of increase was higher for superior slices. On superior slices the percentage of TSNR gain was comparable to that using image based retrospective correction for respiratory noise. Our results suggest that separate motion correction on segments is highly recommended for sequential acquisition schemes, at least for slices distal to the chest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Correcting the short-term effect of food deprivation in a damselfly: mechanisms and costs.

    PubMed

    Campero, Melina; De Block, Marjan; Ollevier, Frans; Stoks, Robby

    2008-01-01

    1. Mass at emergence is a life-history trait strongly linked to adult fitness. Therefore, when faced with transient food shortage in the larval stage, mass-correcting mechanisms are common. 2. These correcting mechanisms may carry costs with them. On one hand, these costs may be overestimated because they can be confounded with the direct effects of the transient food shortage itself. On the other hand, costs may be underestimated by ignoring physiological costs. Another largely neglected topic is that correcting mechanisms and costs may critically depend upon other stressors that often co-occur. 3. Here, we identify the mass-correcting mechanisms and their associated costs at emergence in the damselfly Coenagrion puella, after being stressed by a transient period of starvation and a subsequent exposure to pesticide stress during the larval stage. We introduce path analysis to disentangle direct costs of starvation and the mass-correcting mechanisms in terms of immune response. 4. As predicted, we found no differences in mass at emergence. Starvation directly resulted in a costly delayed emergence and a decreased immune response at emergence. Mass-correcting mechanisms included a prolonged post-starvation period, reduced mass loss at emergence and compensatory growth, although the latter only in females under pesticide stress. 5. The mass-correcting mechanisms were associated with beneficial effects on investment in immune response, but only in the absence of pesticide stress. Under pesticide stress, these beneficial effects were mostly undone or overruled, resulting in negative effects of the mass-correcting mechanisms in terms of immune response. 6. Our results stress the importance of and introduce a statistical way of disentangling direct costs of starvation and the mass-correcting mechanisms themselves, and the importance of including physiological endpoints in this kind of studies.

  1. Attention Drainage Effect: How Background Music Effects Concentration in Taiwanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Peter Tze-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see whether different types of background music affect the performance of a reading comprehension task in Taiwanese college students. There are two major research questions in this study. First, this study tries to find out whether listening to music affect the learner's concentration when they are doing a task…

  2. Covariant and background independent functional RG flow for the effective average action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Mahmoud; Vacca, Gian Paolo

    2016-11-01

    We extend our prescription for the construction of a covariant and background-independent effective action for scalar quantum field theories to the case where momentum modes below a certain scale are suppressed by the presence of an infrared regulator. The key step is an appropriate choice of the infrared cutoff for which the Ward identity, capturing the information from single-field dependence of the ultraviolet action, continues to be exactly solvable, and therefore, in addition to covariance, manifest background independence of the effective action is guaranteed at any scale. A practical consequence is that in this framework one can adopt truncations dependent on the single total field. Furthermore we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the preservation of symmetries along the renormalization group flow.

  3. Temperature effect corrections for URAGAN based on CAO, GDAS, NOAA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, A.; Ampilogov, N.; Astapov, I.; Barbashina, N.; Borog, V.; Chernov, D.; Kovylyaeva, A.; Kokoulin, R.; Kompaniets, K.; Mannocchi, G.; Mishutina, Yu; Petrukhin, A.; Saavedra, O.; Shutenko, V.; Sit'ko, O.; Trinchero, G.; Yakovleva, E.; Yashin, I.

    2015-08-01

    For the analysis of muon flux variations caused by extra-atmospheric processes it is necessary to introduce corrections for meteorological effects. For temperature effect (TE) correction it is necessary to know the temperature profile of the atmosphere. As a rule, this profile is measured by meteorological balloons two or four times a day. Alternative sources are satellite observations and data obtained from models of atmosphere used for weather forecasting. Vertical temperature profiles obtained from NOAA satellites, GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System) and CAO data (Central Aerological Observatory, Russia) for standard isobaric levels were compared. Mean value of temperature difference for most levels does not exceed 1 K. Comparison of URAGAN data corrected for TE with CAO information, satellites and GDAS shows a good agreement. Counting rate and anisotropy of the muon flux corrected for meteorological effects for 2007-2014 are presented.

  4. The Effects of Postsecondary Correctional Education: "Final Report"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterfield, Laura; Coggeshall, Mark; Burke-Storer, Michelle; Correa, Vanessa; Tidd, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The research presented in this report examines the effect of prison-based postsecondary education (PSE) on offenders both while incarcerated and after release. Urban Institute researchers worked with the staff of four institutions in three states to conduct inmate focus groups and stakeholder interviews to explore the motivations for enrolling in…

  5. Effect of facility background gases on internal erosion of the 30-cm Hg ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Sputtering erosion of the upstream side of the molybdenum screen grid by discharge chamber ions in mercury bombardment thrusters was considered. Data which revealed that the screen grid erosion was very sensitive to the partial pressure of certain background gases in the space simulation vacuum facility were presented along with results of tests conducted to evaluate this effect. It is shown from estimates of the screen grid erosion in space that adequate lifetime for proposed missions exists.

  6. Modeling the Effects of Atmospheric Propagation for Spectral Libraries of Natural Backgrounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Laboratory, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420 dNational Air and Space Intelligence Center, 4180 Watson Way, Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433 ’Air...Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) hyperspectral datacube collected over Fort AP Hill, VA, were used to demonstrate the effects of the...transmission/compensation doublet on the spectral variability of natural backgrounds. Specifically, statistics derived from Airborne Visible and Infrared

  7. Effects of Elevated Pax6 Expression and Genetic Background on Mouse Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Chanas, Simon A.; Collinson, J. Martin; Ramaesh, Thaya; Dorà, Natalie; Kleinjan, Dirk A.; Hill, Robert E.; West, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the effects of Pax6 overexpression and its interaction with genetic background on eye development. Methods Histologic features of eyes from hemizygous PAX77+/− transgenic (high Pax6 gene dose) and wild-type mice were compared on different genetic backgrounds. Experimental PAX77+/−↔wild-type and control wild-type↔wild-type chimeras were analyzed to investigate the causes of abnormal eye development in PAX77+/− mice. Results PAX77+/− mice showed an overlapping but distinct spectrum of eye abnormalities to Pax6+/− heterozygotes (low Pax6 dose). Some previously reported PAX77+/− eye abnormalities did not occur on all three genetic backgrounds examined. Several types of eye abnormalities occurred in the experimental PAX77+/−↔wild-type chimeras, and they occurred more frequently in chimeras with higher contributions of PAX77+/− cells. Groups of RPE cells intruded into the optic nerve sheath, indicating that the boundary between the retina and optic nerve may be displaced. Both PAX77+/− and wild-type cells were involved in this ingression and in retinal folds, suggesting that neither effect was cell-autonomous. Cell-autonomous effects included failure of PAX77+/− and wild-type cells to mix normally and overrepresentation of PAX77+/− in the lens epithelium and RPE. Conclusions The extent of PAX77+/− eye abnormalities depended on PAX77+/− genotype, genetic background, and stochastic variation. Chimera analysis identified two types of cell-autonomous effects of the PAX77+/− genotype. Abnormal cell mixing between PAX77+/− and wild-type cells suggests altered expression of cell surface adhesion molecules. Some phenotypic differences between PAX77+/−↔wild-type and Pax6+/−↔wild-type chimeras may reflect differences in the levels of PAX77+/− and Pax6+/− contributions to chimeric lenses. PMID:19387074

  8. Effects on noise properties of GPS time series caused by higher-order ionospheric corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weiping; Deng, Liansheng; Li, Zhao; Zhou, Xiaohui; Liu, Hongfei

    2014-04-01

    Higher-order ionospheric (HOI) effects are one of the principal technique-specific error sources in precise global positioning system (GPS) analysis. These effects also influence the non-linear characteristics of GPS coordinate time series. In this paper, we investigate these effects on coordinate time series in terms of seasonal variations and noise amplitudes. Both power spectral techniques and maximum likelihood estimators (MLE) are used to evaluate these effects quantitatively and qualitatively. Our results show an overall improvement for the analysis of global sites if HOI effects are considered. We note that the noise spectral index that is used for the determination of the optimal noise models in our analysis ranged between -1 and 0 both with and without HOI corrections, implying that the coloured noise cannot be removed by these corrections. However, the corrections were found to have improved noise properties for global sites. After the corrections were applied, the noise amplitudes at most sites decreased, among which the white noise amplitudes decreased remarkably. The white noise amplitudes of up to 81.8% of the selected sites decreased in the up component, and the flicker noise of 67.5% of the sites decreased in the north component. Stacked periodogram results show that, no matter whether the HOI effects are considered or not, a common fundamental period of 1.04 cycles per year (cpy), together with the expected annual and semi-annual signals, can explain all peaks of the north and up components well. For the east component, however, reasonable results can be obtained only based on HOI corrections. HOI corrections are useful for better detecting the periodic signals in GPS coordinate time series. Moreover, the corrections contributed partly to the seasonal variations of the selected sites, especially for the up component. Statistically, HOI corrections reduced more than 50% and more than 65% of the annual and semi-annual amplitudes respectively at the

  9. The effects of asymmetric directional microphone fittings on acceptance of background noise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong S; Bryan, Melinda Freyaldenhoven

    2011-05-01

    The effects of asymmetric directional microphone fittings (i.e., an omnidirectional microphone on one ear and a directional microphone on the other) on speech understanding in noise and acceptance of background noise were investigated in 15 full-time hearing aid users. Subjects were fitted binaurally with four directional microphone conditions (i.e., binaural omnidirectional, right asymmetric directional, left asymmetric directional and binaural directional microphones) using Siemens Intuis Directional behind-the-ear hearing aids. Speech understanding in noise was assessed using the Hearing in Noise Test, and acceptance of background noise was assessed using the Acceptable Noise Level procedure. Speech was presented from 0° while noise was presented from 180° azimuth. The results revealed that speech understanding in noise improved when using asymmetric directional microphones compared to binaural omnidirectional microphone fittings and was not significantly hindered compared to binaural directional microphone fittings. The results also revealed that listeners accepted more background noise when fitted with asymmetric directional microphones as compared to binaural omnidirectional microphones. Lastly, the results revealed that the acceptance of noise was further increased for the binaural directional microphones when compared to the asymmetric directional microphones, maximizing listeners' willingness to accept background noise in the presence of noise. Clinical implications will be discussed.

  10. Computer program for pulsed thermocouples with corrections for radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed thermocouple was used for measuring gas temperatures above the melting point of common thermocouples. This was done by allowing the thermocouple to heat until it approaches its melting point and then turning on the protective cooling gas. This method required a computer to extrapolate the thermocouple data to the higher gas temperatures. A method that includes the effect of radiation in the extrapolation is described. Computations of gas temperature are provided, along with the estimate of the final thermocouple wire temperature. Results from tests on high temperature combustor research rigs are presented.

  11. A NEW CALCULATION OF THE IONIZING BACKGROUND SPECTRUM AND THE EFFECTS OF He II REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Lidz, Adam; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Hernquist, Lars

    2009-10-01

    The ionizing background determines the ionization balance and the thermodynamics of the cosmic gas. It is therefore a fundamental ingredient to theoretical and empirical studies of both the intergalactic medium (IGM) and galaxy formation. We present here a new calculation of its spectrum that satisfies the empirical constraints we recently obtained by combining state-of-the-art luminosity functions and intergalactic opacity measurements. In our preferred model, star-forming galaxies and quasars each contribute substantially to the H I ionizing field at z < 3, with galaxies rapidly overtaking quasars at higher redshifts as quasars become rarer. In addition to our fiducial model, we explore the physical dependences of the calculated background and clarify how recombination emission contributes to the ionization rates. We find that recombinations do not simply boost the ionization rates by the number of re-emitted ionizing photons as many of these rapidly redshift below the ionization edges and have a distribution of energies. A simple analytic model that captures the main effects seen in our numerical radiative transfer calculations is given. Finally, we discuss the effects of He II reionization by quasars on both the spectrum of the ionizing background and on the thermal history of the IGM. In regions that have yet to be reionized, the spectrum is expected to be almost completely suppressed immediately above 54.4 eV, while a background of higher energy ({approx}>0.5 keV) photons permeates the entire universe owing to the frequency dependence of the photoionization cross section. We provide an analytical model of the heat input during He II reionization and its effects on the temperature-density relation.

  12. The effect of increased ambient lighting on detection accuracy in uniform and anatomical backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Benjamin J.; Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-03-01

    Under typical dark conditions found in reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance monitor and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, minimize these visual adjustments and potentially improve reader comfort and accuracy. This paper details results from two psychophysical studies designed to determine the effect of a controlled ambient lighting increase on observer detection of subtle objects and lesions viewed on a DICOM-calibrated medical-grade LCD. The first study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on detection of subtle objects embedded within a uniform background, while the second study examined observer detection performance of subtle cancerous lesions in mammograms and chest radiographs. In both studies, observers were presented with images under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased room illuminance level (50 lux) for which the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to that of the displayed image. The display was calibrated to an effective luminance ratio of 409 for both lighting conditions. Observer detection performance under each room illuminance condition was then compared. Identification of subtle objects embedded within the uniform background improved from 59% to 67%, while detection time decreased slightly with additional illuminance. An ROC analysis of the anatomical image results revealed that observer AUC values remained constant while detection time decreased under increased illuminance. The results provide evidence that an ambient lighting increase may be possible without compromising diagnostic efficacy.

  13. Study on modeling of resist heating effect correction in EB mask writer EBM-9000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Haruyuki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Suganuma, Mizuna; Kato, Yasuo; Yashima, Jun; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Anze, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Munehiro

    2015-07-01

    Resist heating effect which is caused in electron beam lithography by rise in substrate temperature of a few tens or hundreds of degrees changes resist sensitivity and leads to degradation of local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). Increasing writing pass count and reducing dose per pass is one way to avoid the resist heating effect, but it worsens writing throughput. As an alternative way, NuFlare Technology is developing a heating effect correction system which corrects CD deviation induced by resist heating effect and mitigates LCDU degradation even in high dose per pass conditions. Our developing correction model is based on a dose modulation method. Therefore, a kind of conversion equation to modify the dose corresponding to CD change by temperature rise is necessary. For this purpose, a CD variation model depending on local pattern density was introduced and its validity was confirmed by experiments and temperature simulations. And then the dose modulation rate which is a parameter to be used in the heating effect correction system was defined as ideally irrelevant to the local pattern density, and the actual values were also determined with the experimental results for several resist types. The accuracy of the heating effect correction was also discussed. Even when deviations depending on the pattern density slightly remains in the dose modulation rates (i.e., not ideal in actual), the estimated residual errors in the correction are sufficiently small and acceptable for practical 2 pass writing with the constant dose modulation rates. In these results, it is demonstrated that the CD variation model is effective for the heating effect correction system.

  14. Adaptation in chemoreceptor cells. II. The effects of cross-adapting backgrounds depend on spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Borroni, P F; Atema, J

    1989-09-01

    1. The cross-adapting effects of chemical backgrounds on the response of primary chemoreceptor cells to superimposed stimuli were studied using NH(4) receptor cells, of known spectral tuning from the lobster (Homarus americanus). 2. Spectrum experiments: The spectral tuning of NH(4) receptor cells was investigated using NH(4)C1 and 7 other compounds selected as the most stimulatory non-best compounds for NH(4) cells from a longer list of compounds tested in previous studies. Based on their responses to the compounds tested, 3 spectral subpopulations of NH(4) Bet cells which responded second-best to Betaine (Bet; and 'pure' NH(4) cells, which responded to NH(4)C1 only (Fig.1). 3. Cross-adaptation experiments: Overall, cross-adaptation with Glu and Bet backgrounds caused suppression of response of NH(4) receptor cells to various concentrations of NH(4)C1. However, the different subpopulations of NH(4) cells were affected differently: (a) The stimulus-response functions of NH(4)-Glu cells were significantly suppressed by both a 3 micrometre (G3) and 300 micrometre (G300) Glu backgrounds. (b) The stimulus-response functions of NH(4)-Bet cells was not affected by a 3 micrometre (B3), but significantly suppressed by a 300 micrometre (B300) Bet background. (c) The stimulus-response functions of pure NH(4) cells were not affected by any of the Glu or Bet back grounds (Figs. 3, 4). 4. The stimulus-response functions of 5 cells from all different subpopulations were enhanced by cross-adaptation with the G300 and B300 back-grounds (Fig 4, Table 1). 5. Whereas self-adaptation caused parallel shifts in stimulus-response functions (Borroni and Atema 1988), cross-adaptation caused a decrease in slope of stimulus-response functions. Implications of the results from cross- and self-adaptation experiments on NH(4) receptor cells, for a receptor cell model are discussed.

  15. Effects of semax against the background of dopaminergic receptor blockade with haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Sebentsova, E A; Levitskaya, N G; Andreeva, L A; Alfeeva, L Yu; Kamenskii, A A; Myasoedov, N F

    2006-02-01

    We studied the neurotropic effects of ACTH(4-10) analog semax against the background of dopaminergic receptors blockade with haloperidol. Intranasal administration of semax (0.05, 0.2, and 0.6 mg/kg) produced virtually no effect on disturbances of orientation and exploratory reactions and motor activity caused by intraperitoneal injection of 0.2 mg/kg haloperidol. By contrast, preliminary administration of 0.05 mg/kg semax prevented haloperidol-induced disturbances in active avoidance conditioning.

  16. Cosmological Implications of the Effects of X-Ray Clusters on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, William R.

    1996-01-01

    We have been carrying forward a program to confront X-ray observations of clusters and their evolution as derived from X-ray observatories with observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition to the material covered in our previous reports (including three published papers), most recently we have explored the effects of a cosmological constant on the predicted Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from the ensemble of clusters. In this report we summarize that work from which a paper will be prepared.

  17. Effect of graded physical load on the state of the liver from morphometric data and biochemical blood indices of rats against a background of hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikityuk, B. A.; Kogan, B. I.; Yermolyev, V. A.; Tindare, L. V.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted on 100 sexually immature inbred August and Wistar male rats in order to determine the effects hypokinesia, physical load and phenamine on the liver. Weight and linear dimension fell in hypokinesia; total serum protein lowered and aldolase and cholesterol and beta-lipoprotein levels rose. Blood sugar content rose and liver glycogen fell. Interlinear differences of these indices are found. Rehabilitated physical loading against hypokinesia background diminished and at times completely prevented its negative effect. Extent of correction depended on animal species. Evidence of genotypical conditionality of organism adaptation to physical load in hypokinesia was found.

  18. The effect of hot gas in early-type galaxies on the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trester, Jeffrey J.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1989-01-01

    The effects on the cosmic microwave background which are due to Compton scattering by the hot gas contained in early-type galaxies (the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) are computed. Using the known properties of the gas deduced from X-ray observations, it is found that the fractional attenuation DeltaT/T at the center of a gas-rich galaxy is likely to be less than 10 to the -5th, which is just below current limits of detectability. A distribution function is derived for the attenuation which is due to a population of early-type galaxies out to some redshift and the expected rms fluctuations in the background on subarcmin scales are computed. These fluctuations are comparable to those intrinsic to the microwave background in the 'cold dark matter' scenario on these angular scales, but they fall orders of magnitude below the detection limits and below the level of fluctuations expected from nonlinear density perturbations at the epoch of galaxy formation.

  19. Effective medium approximation of anisotropic materials with radiative correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlček, J.; Otipka, P.; Lesňák, M.; Vávra, I.

    2015-05-01

    A measurable magneto-optical activity of nanoparticles made out of noble metals is observed when the localized plasmon waves are excited in the presence of external magnetic field. We confirmed these observations for quite general Au nanostructure on SiO2/Si substrate theoretically and by experimental way. The heterogeneous layer is formed as a field of cylindrical or spheroidal nanodots of various size having the same height and parallel symmetry axis. These properties enable to apply the Bruggeman's model of effective medium approximation, for which the size of dots (height, diameter) and fill-factor of nanodots were specified using the transmission electron microscopy image processing. Actually, this model is extended about the interaction of magnetic dipole moments simulated using discrete dipole approximation via geometrical averaging. Derived computational algorithm leads to better agreement with experimental data in the form of Kerr angles in polar configuration at visible spectral region. Obtained out-puts also illustrate the fact that extinction peak of plasmon excitation is located at the resonance wavelength of permittivity.

  20. Correction for nonlinear photon counting effects in lidar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Whiteway, J. A.; Carswell, A. I.

    1992-01-01

    Photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) employed in the photon counting (PC) mode of operation are widely used as detectors in lidar systems. In our laboratory, we have developed a versatile Nd:YAG lidar which is used for measurement of both the middle atmosphere and the troposphere. With this system, we encounter a very wide range of signal levels ranging from the extremely weak signals from the top of the mesosphere to the very strong returns from low level clouds. Although the system is capable of operating the PMT's in either the analog detection or photon counting mode, we find that often when we use photon counting we have portions of our lidar return which contain very useful information but are not within the linear operating regime of the PC system. We report the results of our efforts to explore the extent to which such high intensity PC signals can be quantitatively analyzed. In particular, a useful model relating the mean 'true' count rate and the observed count rate is presented and it's application to our system demonstrated. This model takes into account the variation in height of the PMT output pulses and the effect of the pulse height discrimination threshold.

  1. The effect of background stimulative music on behavior in Alzheimer's patients.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Naomi; Granot, Amit; Hai, Sharon; Dassa, Ayelet; Haimov, Iris

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the benefits of music therapy in Alzheimer's patients, focusing either on improvement of healthy cognitive and social skills, or reduction of agitation symptoms. The present study examined the effect of background music on both positive and negative behaviors, during a time in which patients were not occupied with any structured activity. Twenty eight participants were observed both with and without stimulative, familiar background music. Results showed both a significant increase in positive social behaviors and a significant decrease in negative behaviors related to agitation when music is played. Results demonstrate the contribution of music to enhancing general positive functioning in elderly patients with dementia, and reducing negative behaviors typical of their condition.

  2. Effects of background and classroom characteristics on the science achievement of 10-year-old students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, Malcolm

    1990-01-01

    Effects of characteristics of science classrooms on the science achievement of students were examined in the context of a simple model. The model incorporated prior attributes of the students in terms of home background, sex, and verbal and quantitative ability. The model was estimated by means of partial least squares multivariate procedures using data for 10-year-old Queensland students from the Second International Science Study. The results demonstrated the dominant influence of home background and verbal/mathematical ability. Female students tended to have lower scores after allowing for the influence of the other variables in the model. Students who stated that there were more student initiated activities in their science lessons tended to have lower achievement.

  3. Correction for partial volume effects in brain perfusion ECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koole, Michel; Staelens, Steven; Van de Walle, Rik; Lemahieu, Ignace L.

    2003-05-01

    The accurate quantification of brain perfusion for emission computed tomography data (PET-SPECT) is limited by partial volume effects (PVE). This study presents a new approach to estimate accurately the true tissue tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment. The methodology is based on the availability of additional anatomical side information and on the assumption that activity concentration within the white matter tissue compartment is constant. Starting from an initial estimate for the white matter grey matter activity, the true tracer activity within the grey matter tissue compartment is estimated by an alternating ML-EM-algorithm. During the updating step the constant activity concentration within the white matter compartment is modelled in the forward projection in order to reconstruct the true activity distribution within the grey matter tissue compartment, hence reducing partial volume averaging. Consequently the estimate for the constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment is updated based on the new estimated activity distribution in the grey matter tissue compartment. We have tested this methodology by means of computer simulations. A T1-weighted MR brainscan of a patient was segmented into white matter, grey matter and cerebrospinal fluid, using the segmentation package of the SPM-software (Statistical Parametric Mapping). The segmented grey and white matter were used to simulate a SPECT acquisition, modelling the noise and the distance dependant detector response. Scatter and attenuation were ignored. Following the above described strategy, simulations have shown it is possible to reconstruct the true activity distribution for the grey matter tissue compartment (activity/tissue volume), assuming constant activity in the white matter tissue compartment.

  4. Signal background interference effects in heavy scalar production and decay to a top-anti-top pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hespel, B.; Maltoni, F.; Vryonidou, E.

    2016-10-01

    We analyse the production of a top quark pair through a heavy scalar at the LHC. We first review the main features of the signal as well as the interference with the top-anti-top background at leading order in QCD. We then study higher order QCD effects. While the background and the signal can be obtained at NNLO and NLO in QCD respectively, that is not the case for their interference, which is currently only approximately known at NLO. In order to improve the accuracy of the prediction for the interference term, we consider the effects of extra QCD radiation, i.e. the 2 → 3 (loop-induced) processes and obtain an estimate of the NLO corrections. As a result, we find that the contribution of the interference is important both at the total cross-section level and, most importantly, for the line-shape of the heavy scalar. In particular for resonances with widths larger than a couple of percent of the resonance mass, the interference term distorts the invariant mass distribution and generically leads to a non-trivial peak-dip structure. We study this process in a simplified model involving an additional scalar or pseudoscalar resonance as well as in the Two-Higgs-Doublet-Model for a set of representative benchmarks. We present the constraints on simplified models featuring an extra scalar as set by the LHC searches for top-anti-top resonances, and the implications of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by CMS and ATLAS for the top pair production assuming a scalar or a pseudoscalar resonance.

  5. Correcting for background nitrate contamination in KCl-extracted samples during isotopic analysis of oxygen and nitrogen by the denitrifier method.

    PubMed

    Bell, Michael D; Sickman, James O

    2014-03-15

    Previous research has shown that the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas chlororaphis ssp. aureofaciens (P. aureofaciens) can be used to measure the δ(15)N and δ(18)O values of extracted soil nitrate (NO3(-)) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. We discovered that N2O production from reference blanks made in 1 M KCl increased relative to blanks made of deionized water (DIW). Further investigation showed that isotopic standards made in KCl yielded δ(15)N and δ(18)O values different from the standards prepared in DIW. Three grades of crystalline KCl were dissolved in DIW to create solutions of increasing molarity (0.1 M to 2 M), which were added to P. aureofaciens broth and measured as blanks. Reference standards USGS-32, USGS-34, and USGS-35 were then dissolved in a range of KCl concentrations to measure isotopic responses to changing KCl molarity. Reference blanks and standards created in DIW were analyzed as controls to measure the impact of KCl on the δ(15)N and δ(18)O values. The amount of N2O in the KCl blanks increased linearly with increasing molarity, but at different rates for each KCl grade. The isotopic values of the reference standards measured in KCl were systematically different from those measured in DIW, suggesting contamination by background NO3(-) in the KCl reagents. However, we also noted reduced conversion of NO3(-) into N2O as the KCl molarity increased, suggesting there is a physiological response of P. aureofaciens to KCl. There is a small amount of NO3(-) present in crystalline KCl, which can bias isotopic measurement of NO3(-) at low sample concentrations. This can be minimized by making standards and blanks in the same KCl as is used in samples, diluting all samples and standards to the appropriate NO3(-) concentration using matched KCl solutions, and adding samples and standards to the broth at a constant volume to standardize the KCl molarity in the reaction vial. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. 77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 171 RIN 3150-AJ16 Technical Corrections; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... corrections, including updating the street address for the Region I office, correcting authority citations and... rule. DATES: The correction is effective on December 5, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  7. Electroweak corrections using effective field theory: Applications to the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-10-01

    Electroweak Sudakov logarithms at high energy, of the form ({alpha}/sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}){sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub Z,W}{sup 2}, are summed using effective theory (EFT) methods. The exponentiation of Sudakov logarithms and factorization is discussed in the EFT formalism. Radiative corrections are computed to scattering processes in the standard model involving an arbitrary number of external particles. The computations include nonzero particle masses such as the t-quark mass, electroweak mixing effects which lead to unequal W and Z masses and a massless photon, and Higgs corrections proportional to the top-quark Yukawa coupling. The structure of the radiative corrections, and which terms are summed by the EFT renormalization group is discussed in detail. The omitted terms are smaller than 1%. We give numerical results for the corrections to dijet production, dilepton production, tt production, and squark pair production. The purely electroweak corrections are significant--about 15% at 1 TeV, increasing to 30% at 5 TeV, and they change both the scattering rate and angular distribution. The QCD corrections (which are well-known) are also computed with the EFT. They are much larger--about a factor of 4 at 1 TeV, increasing to a factor of 30 at 5 TeV. Mass effects are also significant; the qq{yields}tt rate is enhanced relative to the light-quark production rate by 40%.

  8. Change in effective leg length after angular deformity correction by hemiepiphyseal stapling.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Cho, Tae-Joon; Choi, In Ho; Chung, Chin Youb; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok; Bae, Jung Yun

    2010-06-01

    The hemiepiphyseal stapling has both positive and negative effects on effective leg length. The purpose of this study was to analyze change in effective leg length after angular correction by hemiepiphyseal stapling, and to validate in clinical cases. Mathematical analysis of a hemiepiphyseal stapling model was conducted. The induced formula was validated in 6 cases fulfilling the assumptions of the model. Anatomical parameters involved in this formula were measured in additional 21 cases undergoing hemiepiphyseal stapling or hemiepiphysiodesis. EFFECTIVE LEG LENGTH INCREASED OR DECREASED ACCORDING TO THREE PARAMETERS IN THIS MODEL: 1) limb length distal to the operated physis (L), 2) width of the operated physis (d), and 3) the amount of angular deformity to be corrected (theta). Actual change in effective leg length of 6 cases similar to this model coincided with the predicted change at least in its direction. L/d ratio was 4.82 +/- 0.51. Considering the narrow range of the L/d ratio, hemiepiphyseal stapling is likely to decrease effective leg length if the amount of angular correction is less than 10 degrees , whereas to increase it if the amount of angular correction is larger than 16 degrees . This should be taken into consideration when selecting the surgical method for angular deformity correction in skeletally immature patients.

  9. Effects of oxytocin on background anxiety in rats with high or low baseline startle.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Luke; Agostini, Andrew; Schulkin, Jay; Rosen, Jeffrey B

    2016-06-01

    Oxytocin has antianxiety properties in humans and rodents. However, the antianxiety effects have been variable. To reduce variability and to strengthen the antianxiety effect of oxytocin in fear-potentiated startle, two experiments were performed. First, different amounts of light-shock pairings were given to determine the optimal levels of cue-specific fear conditioning and non-predictable startle (background anxiety). Second, the antianxiety effects of oxytocin were examined in rats with high and low pre-fear conditioning baseline startle to determine if oxytocin differentially affects high and low trait anxiety rats. Baseline pre-fear conditioning startle responses were first measured. Rats then received 1, 5, or 10 light-shock pairings. Fear-potentiated startle was then tested with two trial types: light-cued startle and non-cued startle trials. In the second experiment, rats fear conditioned with 10 light-shock pairings were administered either saline or oxytocin before a fear-potentiated startle test. Rats were categorized as low or high startlers by their pre-fear conditioning startle amplitude. Ten shock pairings produced the largest non-cued startle responses (background anxiety), without increasing cue-specific fear-potentiated startle compared to one and five light-shock pairings. Cue-specific fear-potentiated startle was unaffected by oxytocin. Oxytocin reduced background anxiety only in rats with low pre-fear startle responses. Oxytocin has population selective antianxiety effects on non-cued unpredictable threat, but only in rats with low pre-fear baseline startle responses. The low startle responses are reminiscent of humans with low startle responses and high trait anxiety.

  10. Effect of Background Fluctuations on Kinetic Alfvén Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Anju; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The localization of Kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) caused by finite amplitude background density fluctuations has been studied in intermediate beta plasma. The dynamical equations are derived taking into account the ponderomotive nonlinearity of the KAW as well as background density fluctuations and then studied numerically. Numerical simulation has been performed to analyze the effect of background density fluctuations on localized structures and resulting turbulent spectrum of KAW applicable to the magnetopause. Simulation results reveal that the power spectrum deviates from Kolmogorov scaling at the transverse size of KAW, equal to ion gyroradius. Steepening of the power spectrum at shorter wavelengths may be accountable for heating and acceleration of the plasma particles. Thus the presented coupling suggests a mechanism of energy transfer from larger length-scales to smaller length-scales. The relevance of present investigation with observations collected from the THEMIS spacecraft in magnetopause is also discussed [Chaston et al., 2008]. Reference Chaston, C., J. Bonnell, J. P. McFadden, C. W. Carlson, C. Cully, O. Le Contel A. Roux, H. U. Auster, K. H. Glassmeier, V. Angelopoulos, C. T. Russell (2008), Turbulent heating and cross-field transport near the magnetopause from THEMIS, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L17S08.

  11. The effects of an exercise program consisting of taekwondo basic movements on posture correction.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sunghak; An, Changkyoo; Kim, Minho; Han, Dongwook

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of posture correctional programs using basic TaeKwonDo movements. [Subjects] The subjects were TaeKwonDo trainees attending an elementary school in B city. They were separated into experimental and control groups according to posture problems found during posture analysis. [Methods] The subjects of the training exercise program performed basic TaeKwonDo movements for 8 weeks, 3 times per week. The TaeKwonDo exercise program consisted of basic TaeKwonDo movements including Hwangso Makki, Meongye Chigi, Olgul Makki, Olgul Yop Makki, Batangson Arae Makki, Momtong An Makki and Apkubi. [Results] Hwangso Makki and Meongye Chigi movements had a significant positive effect on the correction of neck inclination. Olgul Makki, Olgul Yop Makki, Batangson Arae Makki and Momtong An Makki movements had beneficial effects on the correction of shoulder inclination. Apkubi movement had a significant beneficial effect on the correction of pelvis inclination. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that an exercise program consisting of basic TaeKwonDo movements is an effective means of posture correction.

  12. The Effects of an Exercise Program Consisting of Taekwondo Basic Movements on Posture Correction

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sunghak; An, Changkyoo; Kim, Minho; Han, Dongwook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of posture correctional programs using basic TaeKwonDo movements. [Subjects] The subjects were TaeKwonDo trainees attending an elementary school in B city. They were separated into experimental and control groups according to posture problems found during posture analysis. [Methods] The subjects of the training exercise program performed basic TaeKwonDo movements for 8 weeks, 3 times per week. The TaeKwonDo exercise program consisted of basic TaeKwonDo movements including Hwangso Makki, Meongye Chigi, Olgul Makki, Olgul Yop Makki, Batangson Arae Makki, Momtong An Makki and Apkubi. [Results] Hwangso Makki and Meongye Chigi movements had a significant positive effect on the correction of neck inclination. Olgul Makki, Olgul Yop Makki, Batangson Arae Makki and Momtong An Makki movements had beneficial effects on the correction of shoulder inclination. Apkubi movement had a significant beneficial effect on the correction of pelvis inclination. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that an exercise program consisting of basic TaeKwonDo movements is an effective means of posture correction. PMID:25364119

  13. Effects and Correction of Closed Orbit Magnet Errors in the SNS Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, S.C.; Holmes, J.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the effect and correction of three types of orbit errors in SNS: quadrupole displacement errors, dipole displacement errors, and dipole field errors. Using the ORBIT beam dynamics code, we focus on orbit deflection of a standard pencil beam and on beam losses in a high intensity injection simulation. We study the correction of these orbit errors using the proposed system of 88 (44 horizontal and 44 vertical) ring beam position monitors (BPMs) and 52 (24 horizontal and 28 vertical) dipole corrector magnets. Correction is carried out numerically by adjusting the kick strengths of the dipole corrector magnets to minimize the sum of the squares of the BPM signals for the pencil beam. In addition to using the exact BPM signals as input to the correction algorithm, we also consider the effect of random BPM signal errors. For all three types of error and for perturbations of individual magnets, the correction algorithm always chooses the three-bump method to localize the orbit displacement to the region between the magnet and its adjacent correctors. The values of the BPM signals resulting from specified settings of the dipole corrector kick strengths can be used to set up the orbit response matrix, which can then be applied to the correction in the limit that the signals from the separate errors add linearly. When high intensity calculations are carried out to study beam losses, it is seen that the SNS orbit correction system, even with BPM uncertainties, is sufficient to correct losses to less than 10-4 in nearly all cases, even those for which uncorrected losses constitute a large portion of the beam.

  14. The effect of background turbulence on the propagation of large-scale flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, Moshe

    2008-12-01

    This paper is based on an invited presentation at the Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond held in the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy (August 2007). It consists of a summary of recent investigations aimed at understanding the nature and consequences of the Darrieus-Landau instability that is prominent in premixed combustion. It describes rigorous asymptotic methodologies used to simplify the propagation problem of multi-dimensional and time-dependent premixed flames in order to understand the nonlinear evolution of hydrodynamically unstable flames. In particular, it addresses the effect of background turbulent noise on the structure and propagation of large-scale flames.

  15. Multiple effects of genetic background on variegated transgene expression in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Margaret L; McClenaghan, Margaret; Springbett, Anthea; Reid, Sarah; Lathe, Richard; Colman, Alan; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2002-01-01

    BLG/7 transgenic mice express an ovine beta-lactoglobulin transgene during lactation. Unusually, transgene expression levels in milk differ between siblings. This variable expression is due to variegated transgene expression in the mammary gland and is reminiscent of position-effect variegation. The BLG/7 line was created and maintained on a mixed CBA x C57BL/6 background. We have investigated the effect on transgene expression of backcrossing for 13 generations into these backgrounds. Variable transgene expression was observed in all populations examined, confirming that it is an inherent property of the transgene array at its site of integration. There were also strain-specific effects on transgene expression that appear to be independent of the inherent variegation. The transgene, compared to endogenous milk protein genes, is specifically susceptible to inbreeding depression. Outcrossing restored transgene expression levels to that of the parental population; thus suppression was not inherited. Finally, no generation-dependent decrease in mean expression levels was observed in the parental population. Thus, although the BLG/7 transgene is expressed in a variegated manner, there was no generation-associated accumulated silencing of transgene expression. PMID:11901126

  16. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livescu, Daniel; Gerashchenko, Sergiy

    2016-11-01

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and, when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. Compared to the Θ = 0 case, the role of Θ < 0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ > 0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of a background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  17. Multiple effects of genetic background on variegated transgene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Opsahl, Margaret L; McClenaghan, Margaret; Springbett, Anthea; Reid, Sarah; Lathe, Richard; Colman, Alan; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2002-03-01

    BLG/7 transgenic mice express an ovine beta-lactoglobulin transgene during lactation. Unusually, transgene expression levels in milk differ between siblings. This variable expression is due to variegated transgene expression in the mammary gland and is reminiscent of position-effect variegation. The BLG/7 line was created and maintained on a mixed CBA x C57BL/6 background. We have investigated the effect on transgene expression of backcrossing for 13 generations into these backgrounds. Variable transgene expression was observed in all populations examined, confirming that it is an inherent property of the transgene array at its site of integration. There were also strain-specific effects on transgene expression that appear to be independent of the inherent variegation. The transgene, compared to endogenous milk protein genes, is specifically susceptible to inbreeding depression. Outcrossing restored transgene expression levels to that of the parental population; thus suppression was not inherited. Finally, no generation-dependent decrease in mean expression levels was observed in the parental population. Thus, although the BLG/7 transgene is expressed in a variegated manner, there was no generation-associated accumulated silencing of transgene expression.

  18. Listening to speech in a background of other talkers: Effects of talker number and noise vocoding

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Stuart; Souza, Pamela; Ekelund, Caroline; Majeed, Arooj A

    2013-01-01

    Some of the most common interfering background sounds a listener experiences are the sounds of other talkers. In Experiment 1, recognition for natural Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) sentences was measured in normal-hearing adults at two fixed signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in 16 backgrounds with the same long-term spectrum: unprocessed speech babble (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 talkers), noise-vocoded versions of the babbles (12 channels), noise modulated with the wide-band envelope of the speech babbles, and unmodulated noise. All talkers were adult males. For a given number of talkers, natural speech was always the most effective masker. The greatest changes in performance occurred as the number of talkers in the maskers increased from 1 to 2 or 4, with small changes thereafter. In Experiment 2, the same targets and maskers (1, 2, and 16 talkers) were used to measure speech reception thresholds (SRTs) adaptively. Periodicity in the target was also manipulated by noise-vocoding, which led to considerably higher SRTs. The greatest masking effect always occurred for the masker type most similar to the target, while the effects of the number of talkers were generally small. Implications are drawn with reference to glimpsing, informational vs energetic masking, overall SNR, and aspects of periodicity. PMID:23556608

  19. The Effect of Uniform Background Flow on Vortex Ring Formation and Pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Paul S.; Dabiri, John O.; Gharib, Morteza

    2002-11-01

    Experimental investigations of vortex ring formation are extended to include the effects of a uniform background flow, in a manner relevant to the locomotion of aquatic animals utilizing jet propulsion. Gharib et. al. [J. Fluid Mech. 360, 121 (1998)] generated vortex rings using a piston/cylinder apparatus with relatively large discharge times to demonstrate that the vortex ring at the leading edge of the jet attains its maximum circulation at a piston stroke-to-diameter ratio L/D of 4. This "formation number" is robust over a range of piston motions and cylinder boundary conditions, and can be explained in terms of the Kelvin-Benjamin variational principle. To determine the effect of background flow on formation number and pinch-off of the leading vortex ring, uniform co-flow is established in a large annulus surrounding the vortex generator. The ratio of co-flow velocity to piston velocity is varied between 0 and 1. In addition, the co-flow is initiated at times both before and after the start of vortex ring formation. We present results for stroke ratios L/D = 2 and L/D = 8, in order to discern effects of the co-flow on the leading vortex ring in isolation and in the presence of a trailing jet.

  20. Means of eliminating background effects for defect detection and visualization in infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Rajic, Nikolas; Winfree, William P.

    2000-04-01

    Pulse infrared thermography is renowned as an effective and rapid method of nondestructive inspection. The primary difficulty in making useful interpretations of a thermal image is the presence of extraneous effects such as thermal noise, optical distortion through the thermal imaging system, and of most concern, non-uniform heating through the uneven excitation of the surface. A means for removal of background trends caused by uneven illumination is presented. It is based on a polynomial fitting technique applied to a rectangular infrared image on a line-by-line basis in either horizontal or vertical directions. The polynomial coefficients are found by choosing three key pixels through a conditional iterative technique. The proposed algorithm enables improvements in flaw visibility and assists the effective application of additional image processing techniques. The procedure is fond to remove trends without distorting real flaw indications as long as the indication spans less than 67% of the interval under examination.

  1. Evaluation and effect of various noise reduction techniques used before atmospheric correction of Hyperion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Chinmaya; Kumar, Vinay; Pandey, Kamal; Jyothi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing, in recent days, has seen the emergence of hyperspectral sensors as the helping aspect to numerous applications. Hyperspectral remote sensing often contains data with narrow spectral bandwidth (10nm) that enables the feature identification and distinction of spectral similar features. Hyperion L1R data consists of 242 bands and out of which some bands contain noise (a pattern reorganization that hinders information). After removal of these sensor errors like bad bands and dropped line error, atmospheric correction using Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Hypercubes (FLAASH) is carried out to get true ground reflectance. It was observed in the spectral reflectance curve of the obtained product is still affected with several noise and in order to remove this noise some corrections are required before atmospheric correction. In this study various noise reduction techniques like Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) are implemented to observe their effect on sensor error removed Hyperion data before carrying out atmospheric correction. At first noise reduction techniques (MNF, PCA and ICA) are applied separately to the Hyperion sensor error corrected product and then inverse of (MNF, PCA and ICA) are carried out respectively. It was observed that applying atmospheric correction after applying MNF & inverse MNF was giving better spectral profiles of the features (i.e. with less noise). From the above spectral profiles we can conclude that the data which is atmospherically corrected after applying MNF & inverse MNF is giving better results i.e. the spectral profiles of vegetation, water, urban and coal field is smooth and less noisy in comparison with the spectral profiles obtained by directly applying atmospheric correction and the spectral profiles obtained by applying PCA & inverse PCA and ICA &inverse ICA. After applying PCA & inverse PCA and then atmospheric correction the

  2. The Effects of Repeated Readings on Student Performance in the Corrective Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steventon, Candace E.; Fredrick, Laura D.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the effects of adding a repeated reading intervention in the context of the "Corrective Reading Decoding Strategies B2" program on the oral reading fluency of three alternative middle school students for practiced and nonpracticed passages. Concludes that the repeated reading had positive effects for practiced passages but not…

  3. Correcting Students' Written Grammatical Errors: The Effects of Negotiated versus Nonnegotiated Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassaji, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    A substantial number of studies have examined the effects of grammar correction on second language (L2) written errors. However, most of the existing research has involved unidirectional written feedback. This classroom-based study examined the effects of oral negotiation in addressing L2 written errors. Data were collected in two intermediate…

  4. Bias Corrections for Standardized Effect Size Estimates Used with Single-Subject Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugille, Maaike; Moeyaert, Mariola; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A multilevel meta-analysis can combine the results of several single-subject experimental design studies. However, the estimated effects are biased if the effect sizes are standardized and the number of measurement occasions is small. In this study, the authors investigated 4 approaches to correct for this bias. First, the standardized effect…

  5. The Short-Term Effects of Individual Corrective Feedback on L2 Pronunciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dlaska, Andrea; Krekeler, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of explicit individual corrective feedback (ICF) on L2 pronunciation at the micro-level in order to determine whether ICF needs to complement listening only interventions. To this purpose, the authors carried out a study which investigated the immediate effect of feedback on comprehensibility of controlled…

  6. Verification of metric theory of gravitation using beam width correction for Sagnac effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Weihan; Song Xiaojue; Gu Zhichong

    1983-10-01

    The effect of finite beam width on the Sagnac frequency shift has been calculated by Zhbairy and Scully. However, their analysis is somewhat incorrect. In the present paper, we point out the questions included in their article and give a new analysis on this subject and the corrected equations for Sagnac effect for square ring lasers.

  7. An Explanation of the Effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback in Second-Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a theoretical explanation for the effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback (WCF) in increasing second-language (L2) students' grammatical accuracy. WCF is examined via Skill Acquisition Theory (SAT) in order to account for uneven patterns of its effectiveness. As the study demonstrates, WCF is effective…

  8. Bias Corrections for Standardized Effect Size Estimates Used with Single-Subject Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugille, Maaike; Moeyaert, Mariola; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A multilevel meta-analysis can combine the results of several single-subject experimental design studies. However, the estimated effects are biased if the effect sizes are standardized and the number of measurement occasions is small. In this study, the authors investigated 4 approaches to correct for this bias. First, the standardized effect…

  9. An Explanation of the Effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback in Second-Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a theoretical explanation for the effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback (WCF) in increasing second-language (L2) students' grammatical accuracy. WCF is examined via Skill Acquisition Theory (SAT) in order to account for uneven patterns of its effectiveness. As the study demonstrates, WCF is effective…

  10. Histologic characteristics of skin cancer in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: background incidence and radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Masao; Koyama, Kojiro; Iseki, Masachika; Kobuke, Toshihiro; Yonehara, Shuji; Soda, Midori; Ron, Elaine; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Preston, Dale L; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Tokuoka, Shoji

    2005-11-10

    Skin cancers, though rare in Japan, have reportedly been on the rise, but little else is known about epidemiologic features of different histologic types of skin cancer. The Life Span Study cohort, which consists of 93,700 atomic-bomb survivors, many of whom were exposed to negligibly low radiation doses, and 26,600 people not exposed to radiation, enables a population-based study of spontaneous as well as radiation-related cancer risk. Skin tumor incident cases diagnosed between 1958 and 1987 were ascertained by linkage to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries augmented by searches of other data sources. Study pathologists reviewed tumor specimens and pathology reports and classified tumors using the World Health Organization classification scheme. They identified 274 primary incident skin cancers, of which 106 were basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 81 were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 14 were malignant melanomas. Background incidence rates and radiation effects were assessed by Poisson regression models allowing for the effects of demographic and other covariates. BCC and SCC background incidence rates were both about 3 per 100,000 per year. BCCs were mainly on the head/neck (81%), whereas SCCs occurred most frequently on the arms/legs (45%) and head/neck (29%), consistent with the presumed role played by solar UV exposure in skin cancer. The BCC rates increased significantly between 1958 and 1987, whereas the SCC rates remained unchanged. The excess absolute risk of BCC per unit skin surface area related to atomic-bomb radiation exposure did not differ between UV-exposed and shielded parts of the body, suggesting the additivity of the radiation-related and background BCC risks. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The impact of non-Planckian effects on cosmological radio background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colafrancesco, Sergio; Shehzad Emritte, Mohammad; Marchegiani, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Non-Planckian (NP) spectral modifications of the CMB radiation spectrum can be produced due to the existence of a non-zero value of the plasma frequency at the recombination epoch. We present here an analysis of NP effects on the cosmological radio background and we derive, for the first time, predictions of their amplitude on three different observables: the CMB spectrum, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in cosmic structures, and the 21-cm background temperature brightness change. We find that NP effect can manifest in the CMB spectrum at ν lesssim 400 MHz as a drastic cut-off in the CMB intensity. Using the available CMB data in the relevant ν range (i.e., mainly at lesssim 1 GHz and in the COBE-FIRAS data frequency range), we derive upper limits on the plasma frequency νp = 206, 346 and 418 MHz at 1, 2 and 3 σ confidence level, respectively. We find that the difference between the pure Planck spectrum and the one modified by NP effects is of the order of mJy/arcmin2 at ν lesssim 0.5 GHz and it becomes smaller at higher frequencies where it is ~ 0.1 mJy/arcmin2 at ν gtrsim 150 GHz, thus indicating that the experimental route to probe NP effects in the early universe is to observe the cosmological radio background at very low frequencies. We have calculated for the first time the NP SZ effect (SZNP) using the upper limits on νp allowed by the CMB data. We found that the SZNP effect shows a unique spectral feature, i.e. a peak located exactly at the plasma frequency νp and this is independent of the cluster parameters (such as its temperature or optical depth). This offers a way, therefore, to measure directly and unambiguously the plasma frequency in the early universe at the epoch of recombination by using galaxy clusters in the local universe, thus opening a unique window for the experimental exploration of plasma effects in the early universe. We have shown that the SKA-LOW has the potential to observe such a signal integrating over the central

  12. The impact of non-Planckian effects on cosmological radio background

    SciTech Connect

    Colafrancesco, Sergio; Emritte, Mohammad Shehzad; Marchegiani, Paolo E-mail: emrittes@yahoo.com

    2015-05-01

    Non-Planckian (NP) spectral modifications of the CMB radiation spectrum can be produced due to the existence of a non-zero value of the plasma frequency at the recombination epoch. We present here an analysis of NP effects on the cosmological radio background and we derive, for the first time, predictions of their amplitude on three different observables: the CMB spectrum, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in cosmic structures, and the 21-cm background temperature brightness change. We find that NP effect can manifest in the CMB spectrum at ν ∼< 400 MHz as a drastic cut-off in the CMB intensity. Using the available CMB data in the relevant ν range (i.e., mainly at ∼< 1 GHz and in the COBE-FIRAS data frequency range), we derive upper limits on the plasma frequency ν{sub p} = 206, 346 and 418 MHz at 1, 2 and 3 σ confidence level, respectively. We find that the difference between the pure Planck spectrum and the one modified by NP effects is of the order of mJy/arcmin{sup 2} at ν ∼< 0.5 GHz and it becomes smaller at higher frequencies where it is ∼ 0.1 mJy/arcmin{sup 2} at ν ∼> 150 GHz, thus indicating that the experimental route to probe NP effects in the early universe is to observe the cosmological radio background at very low frequencies. We have calculated for the first time the NP SZ effect (SZ{sub NP}) using the upper limits on ν{sub p} allowed by the CMB data. We found that the SZ{sub NP} effect shows a unique spectral feature, i.e. a peak located exactly at the plasma frequency ν{sub p} and this is independent of the cluster parameters (such as its temperature or optical depth). This offers a way, therefore, to measure directly and unambiguously the plasma frequency in the early universe at the epoch of recombination by using galaxy clusters in the local universe, thus opening a unique window for the experimental exploration of plasma effects in the early universe. We have shown that the SKA-LOW has the potential to observe such a

  13. SU-F-P-31: Dosimetric Effects of Roll and Pitch Corrections Using Robotic Table

    SciTech Connect

    Mamalui, M; Su, Z; Flampouri, S; Li, Z

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric effect of roll and pitch corrections being performed by two types of robotic tables available at our institution: BrainLabTM 5DOF robotic table installed at VERO (BrainLab&MHI) dedicated SBRT linear accelerator and 6DOF robotic couch by IBA Proton Therapy with QFixTM couch top. Methods: Planning study used a thorax phantom (CIRSTM), scanned at 4DCT protocol; targets (IGTV, PTV) were determined according to the institutional lung site-specific standards. 12 CT sets were generated with Pitch and Roll angles ranging from −4 to +4 degrees each. 2 table tops were placed onto the scans according to the modality-specific patient treatment workflows. The pitched/rolled CT sets were fused to the original CT scan and the verification treatment plans were generated (12 photon SBRT plans and 12 proton conventional fractionation lung plans). Then the CT sets were fused again to simulate the effect of patient roll/pitch corrections by the robotic table. DVH sets were evaluated for all cases. Results: The effect of not correcting the phantom position for roll/pitch in photon SBRT cases was reducing the target coverage by 2% as maximum; correcting the positional errors by robotic table varied the target coverage within 0.7%. in case of proton treatment, not correcting the phantom position led to the coverage loss up to 4%, applying the corrections using robotic table reduced the coverage variation to less than 2% for PTV and within 1% for IGTV. Conclusion: correcting the patient position by using robotic tables is highly preferable, despite the small dosimetric changes introduced by the devices.

  14. Characterization and correction of cupping effect artefacts in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, AK; McDavid, WD

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and correct the cupping effect artefact that occurs owing to the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation during image acquisition in cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods A uniform aluminium cylinder (6061) was used to demonstrate the cupping effect artefact on the Planmeca Promax 3D CBCT unit (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). The cupping effect was studied using a line profile plot of the grey level values using ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). A hardware-based correction method using copper pre-filtration was used to address this artefact caused by beam hardening and a software-based subtraction algorithm was used to address scatter contamination. Results The hardware-based correction used to address the effects of beam hardening suppressed the cupping effect artefact but did not eliminate it. The software-based correction used to address the effects of scatter resulted in elimination of the cupping effect artefact. Conclusion Compensating for the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation improves grey level uniformity in CBCT. PMID:22378754

  15. [Correction Method of Atmospheric Scattering Effect Based on Three Spectrum Bands].

    PubMed

    Ye, Han-han; Wang, Xian-hua; Jiang, Xin-hua; Bu, Ting-ting

    2016-03-01

    As a major error of CO2 retrieval, atmospheric scattering effect hampers the application of satellite products. Effect of aerosol and combined effect of aerosol and ground surface are important source of atmospheric scattering, so it needs comprehensive consideration of scattering effect from aerosol and ground surface. Based on the continuum, strong and weak absorption part of three spectrum bands O2-A, CO2 1.6 μm and 2.06 μm, information of aerosol and albedo was analyzed, and improved full physics retrieval method was proposed, which can retrieve aerosol and albedo simultaneously to correct the scattering effect. Simulation study on CO2 error caused by aerosol and ground surface albedo CO2 error by correction method was carried out. CO2 error caused by aerosol optical depth and ground surface albedo can reach up to 8%, and CO2 error caused by different types of aerosol can reach up to 10%, while these two types of error can be controlled within 1% and 2% separately by this correction method, which shows that the method can correct the scattering effect effectively. Through evaluation of the results, the potential of this method for high precision satellite data retrieval is obvious, meanwhile, some problems which need to be noticed in real application were also pointed out.

  16. Characterization and correction of cupping effect artefacts in cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A K; McDavid, W D

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and correct the cupping effect artefact that occurs owing to the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation during image acquisition in cone beam CT (CBCT). A uniform aluminium cylinder (6061) was used to demonstrate the cupping effect artefact on the Planmeca Promax 3D CBCT unit (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). The cupping effect was studied using a line profile plot of the grey level values using ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). A hardware-based correction method using copper pre-filtration was used to address this artefact caused by beam hardening and a software-based subtraction algorithm was used to address scatter contamination. The hardware-based correction used to address the effects of beam hardening suppressed the cupping effect artefact but did not eliminate it. The software-based correction used to address the effects of scatter resulted in elimination of the cupping effect artefact. Compensating for the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation improves grey level uniformity in CBCT.

  17. Written Corrective Feedback: Effects of Focused and Unfocused Grammar Correction on the Case Acquisition in L2 German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Sonja Huiying

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-three students of fourth semester German at the University of Kansas participated in the study which sought to investigate whether focused written corrective feedback (WCF) promoted the acquisition of the German case morphology over the course of a semester. Participants received teacher WCF on five two-draft essay assignments under three…

  18. Gold price effect on stock market: A Markov switching vector error correction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, Phoong Seuk; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Kun, Sek Siok

    2014-06-01

    Gold is a popular precious metal where the demand is driven not only for practical use but also as a popular investments commodity. While stock market represents a country growth, thus gold price effect on stock market behavior as interest in the study. Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Models are applied to analysis the relationship between gold price and stock market changes since real financial data always exhibit regime switching, jumps or missing data through time. Besides, there are numerous specifications of Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Models and this paper will compare the intercept adjusted Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Model and intercept adjusted heteroskedasticity Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Model to determine the best model representation in capturing the transition of the time series. Results have shown that gold price has a positive relationship with Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia stock market and a two regime intercept adjusted heteroskedasticity Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Model is able to provide the more significance and reliable result compare to intercept adjusted Markov Switching Vector Error Correction Models.

  19. An Effective Correction Method for Seriously Oblique Remote Sensing Images Based on Multi-View Simulation and a Piecewise Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyuan; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wang, Yongqi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional correction approaches are unsuitable for effectively correcting remote sensing images acquired in the seriously oblique condition which has severe distortions and resolution disparity. Considering that the extraction of control points (CPs) and the parameter estimation of the correction model play important roles in correction accuracy, this paper introduces an effective correction method for large angle (LA) images. Firstly, a new CP extraction algorithm is proposed based on multi-view simulation (MVS) to ensure the effective matching of CP pairs between the reference image and the LA image. Then, a new piecewise correction algorithm is advanced with the optimized CPs, where a concept of distribution measurement (DM) is introduced to quantify the CPs distribution. The whole image is partitioned into contiguous subparts which are corrected by different correction formulae to guarantee the accuracy of each subpart. The extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method significantly outperforms conventional approaches. PMID:27763538

  20. Effect of compression paddle tilt correction on volumetric breast density estimation.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Michiel G J; van Gils, Carla H; Lokate, Mariëtte; den Heeten, Gerard J; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2012-08-21

    For the acquisition of a mammogram, a breast is compressed between a compression paddle and a support table. When compression is applied with a flexible compression paddle, the upper plate may be tilted, which results in variation in breast thickness from the chest wall to the breast margin. Paddle tilt has been recognized as a major problem in volumetric breast density estimation methods. In previous work, we developed a fully automatic method to correct the image for the effect of compression paddle tilt. In this study, we investigated in three experiments the effect of paddle tilt and its correction on volumetric breast density estimation. Results showed that paddle tilt considerably affected accuracy of volumetric breast density estimation, but that effect could be reduced by tilt correction. By applying tilt correction, a significant increase in correspondence between mammographic density estimates and measurements on MRI was established. We argue that in volumetric breast density estimation, tilt correction is both feasible and essential when mammographic images are acquired with a flexible compression paddle.

  1. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, S.; Božović-Jelisavčić, I.; Pandurović, M.; Smiljanić, I.

    2013-05-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurements at CLIC at 3 TeV center-of-mass energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations. The angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation effects is corrected based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. The distortion of the luminosity spectrum due to the initial-state radiation is corrected by deconvolution. At the end, the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution is numerically corrected. To test the procedures, BHLUMI Bhabha event generator, and Guinea-Pig beam-beam simulation were used to generate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. The systematic effects of the beam-beam interaction on the luminosity measurement are corrected with precision of 1.4 permille in the upper 5% of the energy, and 2.7 permille in the range between 80 and 90% of the nominal center-of-mass energy.

  2. Soft-photon emission effects and radiative corrections for electromagnetic processes at very high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Higher-order electromagnetic processes involving particles at ultrahigh energies are discussed, with particular attention given to Compton scattering with the emission of an additional photon (double Compton scattering). Double Compton scattering may have significance in the interaction of a high-energy electron with the cosmic blackbody photon gas. At high energies the cross section for double Compton scattering is large, though this effect is largely canceled by the effects of radiative corrections to ordinary Compton scattering. A similar cancellation takes place for radiative pair production and the associated radiative corrections to the radiationless process. This cancellation is related to the well-known cancellation of the infrared divergence in electrodynamics.

  3. The Effects of Testing Circumstance and Education Level on MMPI-2 Correction Scale Scores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Report The Effects of Testing Circumstance and Education Level on MMPI -2 Correction Scale Scores DOT/FAA/AM-10/3 Office of Aerospace Medicine Washington...A-1 1 The effecTs of TesTing circumsTance and educaTion LeveL on mmPi -2 correcTion scaLe scores...could compromise aviation safety. Therefore, tbe FAA has selected tbe MMPI -2 as the new psychological screening test . b. The Vice Presidents for

  4. Probing the effective number of neutrino species with the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

    2008-10-15

    We discuss how much we can probe the effective number of neutrino species N{sub {nu}} with the cosmic microwave background alone. Using the data of the WMAP, ACBAR, CBI, and BOOMERANG experiments, we obtain a constraint on the effective number of neutrino species as 0.96

  5. Gravitational behavior of an effective topological field theory in a gravitational instanton background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Giandomenico

    2016-12-01

    Effective topological field theories describe the properties of Dirac fermions in the low-energy regime. In this work, we introduce a new emergent gravity model by considering Dirac fermions invariant under local de Sitter transformations in four-dimensional open manifolds. In the context of Cartan geometry, fermions couple to spacetime through a Spin(5) Cartan connection that can be decomposed in spin connection and tetrads. In presence of a gravitational instanton background, we show that the corresponding effective topological field theory becomes a dynamical gravitational theory with a positive cosmological constant and Barbero-Immirzi parameter. At the classical level and in the absence of matter, this theory is compatible with general relativity (GR).

  6. Method for correcting for isotope burn-in effects in fission neutron dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; McElroy, William N.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for correcting for effect of isotope burn-in in fission neutron dosimeters. Two quantities are measured in order to quantify the "burn-in" contribution, namely P.sub.Z',A', the amount of (Z', A') isotope that is burned-in, and F.sub.Z', A', the fissions per unit volume produced in the (Z', A') isotope. To measure P.sub.Z', A', two solid state track recorder fission deposits are prepared from the very same material that comprises the fission neutron dosimeter, and the mass and mass density are measured. One of these deposits is exposed along with the fission neutron dosimeter, whereas the second deposit is subsequently used for observation of background. P.sub.Z', A' is then determined by conducting a second irradiation, wherein both the irradiated and unirradiated fission deposits are used in solid state track recorder dosimeters for observation of the absolute number of fissions per unit volume. The difference between the latter determines P.sub.Z', A' since the thermal neutron cross section is known. F.sub.Z', A' is obtained by using a fission neutron dosimeter for this specific isotope, which is exposed along with the original threshold fission neutron dosimeter to experience the same neutron flux-time history at the same location. In order to determine the fissions per unit volume produced in the isotope (Z', A') as it ingrows during the irradiation, B.sub.Z', A', from these observations, the neutron field must generally be either time independent or a separable function of time t and neutron energy E.

  7. Bias correction of EU-ENSEMBLES precipitation data with focus on the effect of sample size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Philipp; Gutjahr, Oliver; Schefczyk, Lukas; Heinemann, Günther; Casper, Markus C.

    2015-04-01

    The precipitation output of climate models often shows a bias when compared to observed data, so that a bias correction is necessary before using it as climate forcing in impact modeling. We expect the performance of the bias correction to strongly depend on the sample size used for its calibration. This raises the question: how long does a time series need to be to achieve a sufficient bias correction? We carry out experiments using 40 years of daily precipitation data from 10 regional climate models (RCM) of the EU-ENSEMBLES project, splitting them into a 30 year calibration period and a 10 year validation period. The RCM data are bias corrected using decreasing sample sizes out of the calibration period. By applying skill scores we quantify the critical sample size ncrit, at which the quality of the bias correction becomes statistically worse compared to the correction based on 30 years. In order to analyze whether the effect of the sample size depends on the chosen correction method and the calibration period, we applied four variations of the quantile matching (QM) approach and 3 different calibration/validation periods in this study. The results show that the spread of ncrit is large, ranging from 28 years to approximately 10 years. This indicates that even a small decrease in sample size for the calibration can result in a statistical significant degradation of the bias correction. Corrections with sample sizes smaller than 10 years always perform significantly worse than the 'best fit' with 30 years. The chosen QM approach influences ncrit in dependence of its degrees of freedom: the higher the degrees of freedom the larger ncrit. We also found that the choice of the calibration period affects the ncrit values. In conclusion we recommend to use time series as long as possible for bias correction of precipitation data. However, there is a large transition zone of the critical sample size where shorter time series can perform sufficiently well, depending on

  8. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-01-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  9. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-09-30

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  10. The effect of different corrective feedback methods on the outcome and self confidence of young athletes.

    PubMed

    Tzetzis, George; Votsis, Evandros; Kourtessis, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of three corrective feedback methods, using different combinations of correction, or error cues and positive feedback for learning two badminton skills with different difficulty (forehand clear - low difficulty, backhand clear - high difficulty). Outcome and self-confidence scores were used as dependent variables. The 48 participants were randomly assigned into four groups. Group A received correction cues and positive feedback. Group B received cues on errors of execution. Group C received positive feedback, correction cues and error cues. Group D was the control group. A pre, post and a retention test was conducted. A three way analysis of variance ANOVA (4 groups X 2 task difficulty X 3 measures) with repeated measures on the last factor revealed significant interactions for each depended variable. All the corrective feedback methods groups, increased their outcome scores over time for the easy skill, but only groups A and C for the difficult skill. Groups A and B had significantly better outcome scores than group C and the control group for the easy skill on the retention test. However, for the difficult skill, group C was better than groups A, B and D. The self confidence scores of groups A and C improved over time for the easy skill but not for group B and D. Again, for the difficult skill, only group C improved over time. Finally a regression analysis depicted that the improvement in performance predicted a proportion of the improvement in self confidence for both the easy and the difficult skill. It was concluded that when young athletes are taught skills of different difficulty, different type of instruction, might be more appropriate in order to improve outcome and self confidence. A more integrated approach on teaching will assist coaches or physical education teachers to be more efficient and effective. Key pointsThe type of the skill is a critical factor in determining the effectiveness of the feedback types

  11. The Effect Of Different Corrective Feedback Methods on the Outcome and Self Confidence of Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Tzetzis, George; Votsis, Evandros; Kourtessis, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of three corrective feedback methods, using different combinations of correction, or error cues and positive feedback for learning two badminton skills with different difficulty (forehand clear - low difficulty, backhand clear - high difficulty). Outcome and self-confidence scores were used as dependent variables. The 48 participants were randomly assigned into four groups. Group A received correction cues and positive feedback. Group B received cues on errors of execution. Group C received positive feedback, correction cues and error cues. Group D was the control group. A pre, post and a retention test was conducted. A three way analysis of variance ANOVA (4 groups X 2 task difficulty X 3 measures) with repeated measures on the last factor revealed significant interactions for each depended variable. All the corrective feedback methods groups, increased their outcome scores over time for the easy skill, but only groups A and C for the difficult skill. Groups A and B had significantly better outcome scores than group C and the control group for the easy skill on the retention test. However, for the difficult skill, group C was better than groups A, B and D. The self confidence scores of groups A and C improved over time for the easy skill but not for group B and D. Again, for the difficult skill, only group C improved over time. Finally a regression analysis depicted that the improvement in performance predicted a proportion of the improvement in self confidence for both the easy and the difficult skill. It was concluded that when young athletes are taught skills of different difficulty, different type of instruction, might be more appropriate in order to improve outcome and self confidence. A more integrated approach on teaching will assist coaches or physical education teachers to be more efficient and effective. Key pointsThe type of the skill is a critical factor in determining the effectiveness of the feedback types

  12. Effects of surgical correction of neuromuscular scoliosis on gastric myoelectrical activity, emptying, and upper gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jalanko, Tuomas; Helenius, Ilkka; Pakarinen, Mikko; Puisto, Ville; Salminen, Päivi; Peltonen, Jari; Rintala, Risto; Koivusalo, Antti

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications are frequent after surgical correction of neuromuscular scoliosis, but the effects of scoliosis surgery on gastric function and upper gastrointestinal symptoms over the long term are unknown. Thirty-one children (16 spastic, 15 flaccid patients) who underwent surgical correction of neuromuscular scoliosis were included in a prospective follow-up study. Median (range) age at surgery was 14.9 (5-20) years and follow-up time 4.3 (2-8) years. Electrogastrography (n=28), gastric emptying scintigraphy (n=17), and structured upper gastrointestinal symptoms questionnaire (n=26) were evaluated before and after surgery. The results were related to patients' clinical state, type and extent of corrective spinal surgery, and gastrointestinal complications. The median main scoliosis curve of 81 degrees (51-129 degrees) was corrected to 25 degrees (1.0-85 degrees) after surgery. In electrogastrogram, power ratio increased from preoperative 1.4 (0.30-11) to postoperative 6.2 (1.2-26) in the spastic group (P=0.008), whereas in the flaccid group, power ratio remained unchanged at 2.2 (0.1-17). Patients with prolonged postoperative paralytic ileus had the most substantial increase in gastric power ratio (P=0.038). Correction of sagittal spinal balance correlated with increased postprandial normogastric activity after surgery (R=0.459; P=0.004). The gastric emptying results, upper gastrointestinal symptoms, and body mass index were not significantly altered after scoliosis surgery. Gastric myoelectrical power increased after surgical correction of spastic neuromuscular scoliosis and was associated with prolonged postoperative paralytic ileus. Correction of poor, stooped spinal balance improved gastric myoelectrical activity. The net effect of scoliosis surgery on gastric emptying, upper gastrointestinal symptoms, and clinical nutritional state was minimal.

  13. Effect of Parental Migration Background on Childhood Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Matteo; Kull, Inger; Wickman, Magnus; Wolk, Alicja; Moradi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Background. Poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, and obesity in children have important public health implications but, to date, their effects have not been studied in the growing population of children in Sweden with immigrant parents. Methods. We estimated the association between parental migration background and nutrition, physical activity, and weight in 8-year-old children born in Stockholm between 1994 and 1996 of immigrants and Swedish parents (n = 2589). Data were collected through clinical examination and questionnaires filled out by parents. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Children of immigrants complied more closely with Nordic Nutrition Recommendations compared with those of Swedes (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.11–1.64). They had higher intake of dietary fibre, vitamins C, B6, and E, folic acid, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) reflecting higher consumption of foods of plant origin, but lower intake of vitamins A and D, calcium, and iron reflecting lower consumption of dairy products. Children of immigrants had higher intake of sucrose reflecting higher consumption of sugar and sweets. Furthermore, these children had a higher risk of having low physical activity (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.06–1.62) and being overweight (OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.06–1.65) compared with children of Swedish parents. The odds of having low physical activity and being overweight were even higher in children whose parents were both immigrants. A low level of parental education was associated with increased risk of low physical activity regardless of immigration background. Conclusions. Culturally appropriate tools to capture the diverse range of ethnic foods and other lifestyle habits are needed. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the low levels of physical activity, increased weight, and lack of consumption of some important vitamins among children of immigrants

  14. Auditory-neurophysiological responses to speech during early childhood: Effects of background noise

    PubMed Central

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Davies, Evan C.; Thompson, Elaine C.; Carr, Kali Woodruff; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R.; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood is a critical period of auditory learning, during which children are constantly mapping sounds to meaning. But learning rarely occurs under ideal listening conditions—children are forced to listen against a relentless din. This background noise degrades the neural coding of these critical sounds, in turn interfering with auditory learning. Despite the importance of robust and reliable auditory processing during early childhood, little is known about the neurophysiology underlying speech processing in children so young. To better understand the physiological constraints these adverse listening scenarios impose on speech sound coding during early childhood, auditory-neurophysiological responses were elicited to a consonant-vowel syllable in quiet and background noise in a cohort of typically-developing preschoolers (ages 3–5 yr). Overall, responses were degraded in noise: they were smaller, less stable across trials, slower, and there was poorer coding of spectral content and the temporal envelope. These effects were exacerbated in response to the consonant transition relative to the vowel, suggesting that the neural coding of spectrotemporally-dynamic speech features is more tenuous in noise than the coding of static features—even in children this young. Neural coding of speech temporal fine structure, however, was more resilient to the addition of background noise than coding of temporal envelope information. Taken together, these results demonstrate that noise places a neurophysiological constraint on speech processing during early childhood by causing a breakdown in neural processing of speech acoustics. These results may explain why some listeners have inordinate difficulties understanding speech in noise. Speech-elicited auditory-neurophysiological responses offer objective insight into listening skills during early childhood by reflecting the integrity of neural coding in quiet and noise; this paper documents typical response properties

  15. Frequency-dependent effects of background noise on subcortical response timing.

    PubMed

    Tierney, A; Parbery-Clark, A; Skoe, E; Kraus, N

    2011-12-01

    The addition of background noise to an auditory signal delays brainstem response timing. This effect has been extensively documented using manual peak selection. Peak picking, however, is impractical for large-scale studies of spectrotemporally complex stimuli, and leaves open the question of whether noise-induced delays are frequency-dependent or occur across the frequency spectrum. Here we use an automated, objective method to examine phase shifts between auditory brainstem responses to a speech sound (/da/) presented with and without background noise. We predicted that shifts in neural response timing would also be reflected in frequency-specific phase shifts. Our results indicate that the addition of background noise causes phase shifts across the subcortical response spectrum (70-1000 Hz). However, this noise-induced delay is not uniform such that some frequency bands show greater shifts than others: low-frequency phase shifts (300-500 Hz) are largest during the response to the consonant-vowel formant transition (/d/), while high-frequency shifts (720-1000 Hz) predominate during the response to the steady-state vowel (/a/). Most importantly, phase shifts occurring in specific frequency bands correlate strongly with shifts in the latencies of the predominant peaks in the auditory brainstem response, while phase shifts in other frequency bands do not. This finding confirms the validity of phase shift detection as an objective measure of timing differences and reveals that this method detects noise-induced shifts in timing that may not be captured by traditional peak latency measurements.

  16. High Background Ozone Events in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Area: Effects from Central American Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, R.; Wang, S. C.; Yang, S.; Wang, Y.; Talbot, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The policy-relevant background (PRB) ozone is defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the surface ozone mixing ratio that would occur over the U.S. without North American anthropogenic emission influences. PRB ozone over the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) area may be affected by foreign sources due to its unique geographical location and meteorology. Our monitoring data revealed several high ozone events over HGB area which might be caused by Central American fire during the years of 2013-2015. To qualify the effects from Central American fire, we estimated the US, Central American and worldwide background over HGB area during those events using the GEOS-Chem global 3-D model. Anomalies in fire emissions leading to high PRB ozone were mapped through spatiotemporal sampling of the Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN) along background trajectories of air masses affecting the HGB area prior to and during the selected high PRB ozone days. Daily HGB PRB ozone estimated by researchers at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) was used as the data source to validate model results. Results showed that contribution of emission from Central American to HGB PRB ozone could be tripled during fire events compared to non-impacted fire days. Besides fire emissions from Central American, different types of meteorological events (e.g., cold fronts and thunderstorms) and high local photochemical production (e.g., heat waves and stagnation) are also found associated with high PRB ozone in HGB area during these events. Thus we imply that synthetic contribution from foreign sources and local meteorology to HGB PRB ozone warrants further investigated.

  17. Auditory-neurophysiological responses to speech during early childhood: Effects of background noise.

    PubMed

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Davies, Evan C; Thompson, Elaine C; Woodruff Carr, Kali; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R; Kraus, Nina

    2015-10-01

    Early childhood is a critical period of auditory learning, during which children are constantly mapping sounds to meaning. But this auditory learning rarely occurs in ideal listening conditions-children are forced to listen against a relentless din. This background noise degrades the neural coding of these critical sounds, in turn interfering with auditory learning. Despite the importance of robust and reliable auditory processing during early childhood, little is known about the neurophysiology underlying speech processing in children so young. To better understand the physiological constraints these adverse listening scenarios impose on speech sound coding during early childhood, auditory-neurophysiological responses were elicited to a consonant-vowel syllable in quiet and background noise in a cohort of typically-developing preschoolers (ages 3-5 yr). Overall, responses were degraded in noise: they were smaller, less stable across trials, slower, and there was poorer coding of spectral content and the temporal envelope. These effects were exacerbated in response to the consonant transition relative to the vowel, suggesting that the neural coding of spectrotemporally-dynamic speech features is more tenuous in noise than the coding of static features-even in children this young. Neural coding of speech temporal fine structure, however, was more resilient to the addition of background noise than coding of temporal envelope information. Taken together, these results demonstrate that noise places a neurophysiological constraint on speech processing during early childhood by causing a breakdown in neural processing of speech acoustics. These results may explain why some listeners have inordinate difficulties understanding speech in noise. Speech-elicited auditory-neurophysiological responses offer objective insight into listening skills during early childhood by reflecting the integrity of neural coding in quiet and noise; this paper documents typical response

  18. Te Inclusions in CZT Detectors: New Method for Correcting Their Adverse Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.U.; Hawrami, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-25

    Both Te inclusions and point defects can trap the charge carriers generated by ionizing particles in CdZnTe (CZT) detectors. The amount of charge trapped by point defects is proportional to the carriers’ drift time and can be corrected electronically. In the case of Te inclusions, the charge loss depends upon their random locations with respect to the electron cloud. Consequently, inclusions introduce fluctuations in the charge signals, which cannot be easily corrected. In this paper, we describe direct measurements of the cumulative effect of Te inclusions and its influence on the response of CZT detectors of different thicknesses and different sizes and concentrations of Te inclusions. We also discuss a means of partially correcting their adverse effects.

  19. The effects of mastery learning correctives on academic achievement and student affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeese, Sean Vincent

    This study was conducted to examine the differences in high school biology achievement and student affect towards teacher and content from the use of individualized correctives as part of mastery learning. An experimental pretest-posttest with control group design was used during the fall 2011 semester. Over a thirteen-week period, 99 students in five general-level biology classes received mastery learning instruction covering several state standards. Of the 99 students, 50 received individualized correctives based on the results of formative assessment. The other 49 students received a non-individualized study guide after the formative assessment. A written summative examination was used to measure achievement. The Instructional Affect Assessment Instrument (IAAI) was used to measure student affect. The written summative evaluation and the IAAI were administered as a pretest to assure the independence of the covariate and treatment effect. Data were analyzed with a multivariate repeated measures test and ANCOVAs. No differences were found between the individualized corrective group and the general study guide group in terms of achievement or student affect toward content or teacher. Results indicate that individualized correctives were not the key factor in mastery learning for this population and type of science content. Further study on the impact of individualized correctives in different subject areas and populations is recommended as well as additional research on the effect of repeated testing.

  20. Effect of correction of aberration dynamics on chaos in human ocular accommodation.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Karen M; Cufflin, Matthew P; Mallen, Edward A H

    2013-11-15

    We used adaptive optics to determine the effect of monochromatic aberration dynamics on the level of chaos in the accommodation control system. Four participants viewed a stationary target while the dynamics of their aberrations were either left uncorrected, defocus was corrected, or all aberrations except defocus were corrected. Chaos theory analysis was used to discern changes in the accommodative microfluctuations. We found a statistically significant reduction in the chaotic nature of the accommodation microfluctuations during correction of defocus, but not when all aberrations except defocus were corrected. The Lyapunov exponent decreased from 0.71 ± 0.07 D/s (baseline) to 0.55 ± 0.03 D/s (correction of defocus fluctuations). As the reduction of chaos in physiological signals is indicative of stress to the system, the results indicate that for the participants included in this study, fluctuations in defocus have a more profound effect than those of the other aberrations. There were no changes in the power spectrum between experimental conditions. Hence chaos theory analysis is a more subtle marker of changes in the accommodation control system and will be of value in the study of myopia onset and progression.

  1. [EFFECTIVENESS OF MODIFIED Park METHOD OF BLEPHAROPLASTY FOR CORRECTION OF MILD BLEPHAROPTOSIS].

    PubMed

    Niu, Changying; Tan, Shenxing; Wu, Caifeng; Liu, Zongyan; Zhang, Zemin; Tang, Shengjian; Liang, Xiaoqin

    2015-09-01

    To explore the effectiveness of the modified Park method of blepharoplasty for correction of mild blepharoptosis. Between October 2012 and January 2015, a new modified Park method of blepharoplasty was performed on 23 patients with foldless eyelid combined mild blepharoptosis. There were 14 males and 9 females, aged 16 to 35 years (mean, 25 years). Unilateral eyelid was involved in 16 cases, bilateral eyelids in 7 cases. The upper eyelid was located at the edge of the pupil, and the drop was 1-2 mm (mean, 1.5 mm). All incisions healed at the first stage; no obvious blood stasis and swelling occurred. The patients were followed up 4 to 26 months, with an average of 15 months. The double eyelid fold was natural and smooth, and ptosis was completely corrected; the eyelid shape and position were symmetry when in situ fixation and movement. According to "double eyelid operation effect evaluation standard discussion" method by Chinese Medical Cosmetology Association, the results were excellent in all patients. The modified Park method of blepharoplasty can achieve blepharoplasty and correcting blepharoptosis at the same time for correction of foldless eyelid combined mild blepharoptosis during operation without separated and amputated levator aponeurosis, with small surgical trauma, good controllability, and maneuverability in correction amplitude.

  2. Identification of galaxy clusters in cosmic microwave background maps using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The Planck satellite was launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency to study the properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). An expected result of the Planck data analysis is the distinction of the various contaminants of the CMB signal. Among these contaminants is the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, which is caused by the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by high energy electrons in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. Aims: We modify a public version of the JADE (Joint Approximate Diagonalization of Eigenmatrices) algorithm, to deal with noisy data, and then use this algorithm as a tool to search for SZ clusters in two simulated datasets. Methods: The first dataset is composed of simple "homemade" simulations and the second of full sky simulations of high angular resolution, available at the LAMBDA (Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis) website. The process of component separation can be summarized in four main steps: (1) pre-processing based on wavelet analysis, which performs an initial cleaning (denoising) of data to minimize the noise level; (2) the separation of the components (emissions) by JADE; (3) the calibration of the recovered SZ map; and (4) the identification of the positions and intensities of the clusters using the SExtractor software. Results: The results show that our JADE-based algorithm is effective in identifying the position and intensity of the SZ clusters, with the purities being higher then 90% for the extracted "catalogues". This value changes slightly according to the characteristics of noise and the number of components included in the input maps. Conclusions: The main highlight of our developed work is the effective recovery rate of SZ sources from noisy data, with no a priori assumptions. This powerful algorithm can be easily implemented and become an interesting complementary option to the "matched filter" algorithm (hereafter MF) widely used in SZ data analysis.

  3. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, S.; Livescu, D.

    2016-07-01

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ = 0. Compared to Θ = 0 case, the role of Θ < 0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ > 0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ < 0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  4. Behavioral deficits in an Angelman syndrome model: effects of genetic background and age.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsien-Sung; Burns, Andrew J; Nonneman, Randal J; Baker, Lorinda K; Riddick, Natallia V; Nikolova, Viktoriya D; Riday, Thorfinn T; Yashiro, Koji; Philpot, Benjamin D; Moy, Sheryl S

    2013-04-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder associated with disruption of maternally inherited UBE3A (ubiquitin protein ligase E3A) expression. At the present time, there is no effective treatment for AS. Mouse lines with loss of maternal Ube3a (Ube3a(m-/p+)) recapitulate multiple aspects of the clinical AS profile, including impaired motor coordination, learning deficits, and seizures. Thus, these genetic mouse models could serve as behavioral screens for preclinical efficacy testing, a critical component of drug discovery for AS intervention. However, the severity and consistency of abnormal phenotypes reported in Ube3a(m-/p+) mice can vary, dependent upon age and background strain, which is problematic for the detection of beneficial drug effects. As part of an ongoing AS drug discovery initiative, we characterized Ube3a(m-/p+) mice on either a 129S7/SvEvBrd-Hprt(b-m2) (129) or C57BL/6J (B6) background across a range of functional domains and ages to identify reproducible and sufficiently large phenotypes suitable for screening therapeutic compounds. The results from the study showed that Ube3a(m-/p+) mice have significant deficits in acquisition and reversal learning in the Morris water maze. The findings also demonstrated that Ube3a(m-/p+) mice exhibit motor impairment in a rotarod task, hypoactivity, reduced rearing and marble-burying, and deficient fear conditioning. Overall, these profiles of abnormal phenotypes can provide behavioral targets for evaluating effects of novel therapeutic strategies relevant to AS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    DOE PAGES

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Livescu, Daniel

    2016-07-28

    Here we studied the growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. Anmore » analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ=0. Compared to Θ=0 case, the role of Θ<0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ>0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ<0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.« less

  6. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Livescu, Daniel

    2016-07-28

    Here we studied the growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ=0. Compared to Θ=0 case, the role of Θ<0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ>0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ<0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  7. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerashchenko, S.

    2016-07-15

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ = 0. Compared to Θ = 0 case, the role of Θ < 0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ > 0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ < 0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  8. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Livescu, Daniel

    2016-07-28

    Here we studied the growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ=0. Compared to Θ=0 case, the role of Θ<0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ>0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ<0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  9. The Effect of Background Noise on the Word Activation Process in Nonnative Spoken-Word Recognition.

    PubMed

    Scharenborg, Odette; Coumans, Juul M J; van Hout, Roeland

    2017-08-07

    This article investigates 2 questions: (1) does the presence of background noise lead to a differential increase in the number of simultaneously activated candidate words in native and nonnative listening? And (2) do individual differences in listeners' cognitive and linguistic abilities explain the differential effect of background noise on (non-)native speech recognition? English and Dutch students participated in an English word recognition experiment, in which either a word's onset or offset was masked by noise. The native listeners outperformed the nonnative listeners in all listening conditions. Importantly, however, the effect of noise on the multiple activation process was found to be remarkably similar in native and nonnative listening. The presence of noise increased the set of candidate words considered for recognition in both native and nonnative listening. The results indicate that the observed performance differences between the English and Dutch listeners should not be primarily attributed to a differential effect of noise, but rather to the difference between native and nonnative listening. Additional analyses showed that word-initial information was found to be more important than word-final information during spoken-word recognition. When word-initial information was no longer reliably available word recognition accuracy dropped and word frequency information could no longer be used suggesting that word frequency information is strongly tied to the onset of words and the earliest moments of lexical access. Proficiency and inhibition ability were found to influence nonnative spoken-word recognition in noise, with a higher proficiency in the nonnative language and worse inhibition ability leading to improved recognition performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. SPATIAL DAMPING OF PROPAGATING KINK WAVES DUE TO RESONANT ABSORPTION: EFFECT OF BACKGROUND FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Goossens, M.; Terradas, J.

    2011-06-20

    Observations show the ubiquitous presence of propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves in the solar atmosphere. Waves and flows are often observed simultaneously. Due to plasma inhomogeneity in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, kink waves are spatially damped by resonant absorption. The presence of flow may affect the wave spatial damping. Here, we investigate the effect of longitudinal background flow on the propagation and spatial damping of resonant kink waves in transversely nonuniform magnetic flux tubes. We combine approximate analytical theory with numerical investigation. The analytical theory uses the thin tube (TT) and thin boundary (TB) approximations to obtain expressions for the wavelength and the damping length. Numerically, we verify the previously obtained analytical expressions by means of the full solution of the resistive MHD eigenvalue problem beyond the TT and TB approximations. We find that the backward and forward propagating waves have different wavelengths and are damped on length scales that are inversely proportional to the frequency as in the static case. However, the factor of proportionality depends on the characteristics of the flow, so that the damping length differs from its static analog. For slow, sub-Alfvenic flows the backward propagating wave gets damped on a shorter length scale than in the absence of flow, while for the forward propagating wave the damping length is longer. The different properties of the waves depending on their direction of propagation with respect to the background flow may be detected by the observations and may be relevant for seismological applications.

  11. Stabilizing effect of ionized background of trans-Alfvenic expansion of exploding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Yu.P.; Ponomarenko, A.G.; Dudnikova, G.I.; Vshivkov, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recently a lot of theoretical and numerical calculations have been performed devoted to the study of Large-Larmor-Flute Instability (LLFI). Such instability was discovered initially in laboratory and later in active experiments (AMPTE, CRRES) on expansion of a quasispherical plasma cloud in a ``vacuum`` magnetic field {rvec B}{sub 0}. In the laser-produced plasma experiments at KI-1 facility it was established for the first time, that such non-MHD instability and LHD-instability of skin-layer may effectively be suppressed by ionized background at high-Alfven Mach numbers M{sub A} {much_gt} 1 as well as in a transient regime M{sub A} {approximately} 1. In the present paper on the basis of laboratory and computer simulation the value of M{sub A} was defined more exactly and other similarity parameters characterizing the development of LLFI was founded. The laser experiments were realized in hydrogen and argon background plasmas. The computer simulations were carried out with 2D electromagnetic hybrid code. It was exposed the transition from flute increase to decrease one when M{sub A} changed from M{sub A} = 1 to M{sub A} = 3.

  12. Effects of next-nearest-neighbor hopping on the hole motion in an antiferromagnetic background

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, A.; Kumar, P. ); Strack, R.; Vollhardt, D. )

    1995-04-01

    In this paper we study the effect of next-nearest-neighbor hopping on the dynamics of a single hole in an antiferromagnetic (Neel) background. In the framework of large dimensions the Green function of a hole can be obtained exactly. The exact density of states of a hole is thus calculated in large dimensions and on a Bethe lattice with large coordination number. We suggest a physically motivated generalization to finite dimensions (e.g., 2 and 3). In [ital d]=2 we present also the momentum-dependent spectral function. With varying degree, depending on the underlying lattice involved, the discrete spectrum for holes is replaced by continuum background and a few resonances at the low-energy end. The latter are the remanents of the bound states of the [ital t]-[ital J] model. Their behavior is still largely governed by the parameters [ital t] and [ital J]. The continuum excitations are more sensitive to the energy scales [ital t] and [ital t][sub 1].

  13. The effect of geographic range on extinction risk during background and mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jonathan L; Finnegan, Seth

    2007-06-19

    Wide geographic range is generally thought to buffer taxa against extinction, but the strength of this effect has not been investigated for the great majority of the fossil record. Although the majority of genus extinctions have occurred between major mass extinctions, little is known about extinction selectivity regimes during these "background" intervals. Consequently, the question of whether selectivity regimes differ between background and mass extinctions is largely unresolved. Using logistic regression, we evaluated the selectivity of genus survivorship with respect to geographic range by using a global database of fossil benthic marine invertebrates spanning the Cambrian through the Neogene periods, an interval of approximately 500 My. Our results show that wide geographic range has been significantly and positively associated with survivorship for the great majority of Phanerozoic time. Moreover, the significant association between geographic range and survivorship remains after controlling for differences in species richness and abundance among genera. However, mass extinctions and several second-order extinction events exhibit less geographic range selectivity than predicted by range alone. Widespread environmental disturbance can explain the reduced association between geographic range and extinction risk by simultaneously affecting genera with similar ecological and physiological characteristics on global scales. Although factors other than geographic range have certainly affected extinction risk during many intervals, geographic range is likely the most consistently significant predictor of extinction risk in the marine fossil record.

  14. Effects of horseback riding exercise therapy on background electroencephalograms of elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon-Rye; Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Hyo-Cheol; Brienen, Marten; Cho, Byung-Jun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of horseback riding exercise on the background electroencephalograms of elderly people who performed horseback riding for 8 weeks. [Subjects] Twenty elderly people were divided into the horseback riding exercise and control group (n = 10 each). [Methods] The exercise was performed for 15 minutes, 3 times per week for 8 weeks. Electroencephalograms were analyzed. Post-exercise evaluation was performed after 8 weeks. [Results] After the horseback riding exercise, the relative slower alpha power index was active in the T3 and P4 domains but suppressed in the Fp1, Fp2, F3, F4, T4, and P3 domains. Moreover, the relative faster alpha power index was active in all domains of the horseback riding exercise group but was suppressed in all domains of the control group. There was a significant difference between groups in the F3 domain. [Conclusion] The alpha power index increased significantly after horseback riding exercise, suggesting the exercise improved background electroencephalogram. PMID:26311985

  15. Microwave background fluctuations due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects in pancakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, M. U.; Szalay, A. S.; Schaefer, R. K.; Gulkis, S.; Von Gronefeld, P.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate distortions in the microwave background radiation from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, produced by hot gas in large (approximately 100 Mpc) pancakes. The large-scale distribution of the pancakes is taken to be that of a Voronoi foam. Fluctuations for this scenario are estimated to be on the order of delta T/T is approximately 10(exp -5). Using computer simulations, we produce several 32 deg x 32 deg images with 0.25 deg resolution. These images show characteristic linear features produced when a pancake is viewed nearly edge-on. By calculating the two-point and the degenerate three-point correlation functions, we are able to statistically detect such non-Gaussian features even in the presence of a relatively large amount of Gaussian noise. The degenerate three-point correlation function is found to be particularly useful since it is insensitive to correlated Gaussian noise. We also smooth our data over a 7 deg Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) Gaussian window to simulate the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) observations. We find that under such low-resolution conditions, the features are highly suppressed.

  16. Effect of background rotation on the evolution of 3D internal gravity wave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Boyu; Akylas, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of background rotation on the 3D propagation of internal gravity wave beams (IGWB) is studied, assuming that variations in the along-beam and transverse directions are of long length scale relative to the beam width. The present study generalizes the asymptotic model of KA (Kataoka & Akylas 2015) who considered the analogous problem in the absence of rotation. It is shown that the role of mean vertical vorticity in the earlier analysis is now taken by the flow mean potential vorticity (MPV). Specifically, 3D variations enable resonant transfer of energy to the flow MPV, resulting in strong nonlinear coupling between a 3D IGWB and its induced mean flow. This coupling mechanism is governed by a system of two nonlinear equations of the same form as those derived in KA. Accordingly, the induced mean flow features a purely inviscid modulational component, as well as a viscous one akin to acoustic streaming; the latter grows linearly with time for a quasi-steady IGWB. On the other hand, owing to background rotation, the induced mean flow in the vicinity of the IGWB is no longer purely horizontal and develops an asymmetric behavior. Supported by NSF.

  17. Effect of background noise on perception of English speech for Japanese listeners.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi; Makishima, Kazumi; Yoshida, Masafumi; Yamagishi, Hidetoshi

    2002-04-01

    To avoid the accidents induced by confusions of non-native speech perception in the presence of noise at work, this study examined the effect of background noise on the discrimination of English speech for Japanese listeners. Normal hearing Japanese subjects, who have English learning experience to the level of college graduates, were tested with the CID W-22 word list in quiet settings and in the presence of white, low-frequency weighted (pink noise), or aircraft noise. The discrimination scores were reduced as S/N ratio decreased, and more adversely affected by background white noise than pink or aircraft noise. The individual variability of English word discrimination scores for Japanese listeners was much larger as the S/N ratio decreased. The typical confusions among phoneme were /m/, /n/, and /s/. The results of this study suggested that ineffective use of speech cues and difference in composition of English phonemes from Japanese could be responsible for degraded speech discrimination of non-native speech in noise. Moreover, it was expected that Japanese workers with age related hearing loss at higher frequencies might have great difficulty in perceiving English speech sounds in the presence of noise.

  18. The effects of spontaneous activity, background noise, and the stimulus ensemble on information transfer in neurons.

    PubMed

    Chacron, Maurice J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2003-11-01

    Information theory is playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of neural data as it can precisely quantify the reliability of stimulus-response functions. Estimating the mutual information between a neural spike train and a time varying stimulus is, however, not trivial in practice and requires assumptions about the specific computations being performed by the neuron under study. Consequently, estimates of the mutual information depend on these assumptions and their validity must be ascertained in the particular physiological context in which experiments are carried out. Here we compare results obtained using different information measures that make different assumptions about the neural code (i.e. the way information is being encoded and decoded) and the stimulus ensemble (i.e. the set of stimuli that the animal can encounter in nature). Our comparisons are carried out in the context of spontaneously active neurons. However, some of our results are also applicable to neurons that are not spontaneously active. We first show conditions under which a single stimulus provides a good sample of the entire stimulus ensemble. Furthermore, we use a recently introduced information measure that is based on the spontaneous activity of the neuron rather than on the stimulus ensemble. This measure is compared to the Shannon information and it is shown that the two differ only by a constant. This constant is shown to represent the information that the neuron's spontaneous activity transmits about the fact that no stimulus is present in the animal's environment. As a consequence, the mutual information measure based on spontaneous activity is easily applied to stimuli that mimic those seen in nature, as it does not require a priori knowledge of the stimulus ensemble. Finally, we consider the effect of noise in the animal's environment on information transmission about sensory stimuli. Our results show that, as expected, such 'background' noise will increase the

  19. Effects of a traffic noise background on judgements of aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted in which subjects judged aircraft noises in the presence of road traffic background noise. Two different techniques for presenting the background noises were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over the whole of a test session. For the other, the background noise was changed with each aircraft noise. A range of aircraft noise levels and traffic noise levels were presented to simulate typical indoor levels.

  20. Background Knowledge and Its Effect on Standardized Reading Comprehension Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awabdy, Graziella Whipple

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of the relationship between background knowledge and reading comprehension performance on standardized reading tests (the California STAR Test) was conducted with sixth, seventh, and eighth-grade ethnic minority children from low-income backgrounds (N = 68). Predictor variables examined included perceived background knowledge…

  1. Estimating leaf chlorophyll of barley at different growth stages using spectral indices to reduce soil background and canopy structure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kang; Lenz-Wiedemann, Victoria; Chen, Xinping; Bareth, Georg

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring in situ chlorophyll (Chl) content in agricultural crop leaves is of great importance for stress detection, nutritional state diagnosis, yield prediction and studying the mechanisms of plant and environment interaction. Numerous spectral indices have been developed for chlorophyll estimation from leaf- and canopy-level reflectance. However, in most cases, these indices are negatively affected by variations in canopy structure and soil background. The objective of this study was to develop spectral indices that can reduce the effects of varied canopy structure and growth stages for the estimation of leaf Chl. Hyperspectral reflectance data was obtained through simulation by a radiative transfer model, PROSAIL, and measurements from canopies of barley comprising different cultivars across growth stages using spectroradiometers. We applied a comprehensive band-optimization algorithm to explore five types of spectral indices: reflectance difference (RD), reflectance ratio (RR), normalized reflectance difference (NRD), difference of reflectance ratio (DRR) and ratio of reflectance difference (RRD). Indirectly using the multiple scatter correction (MSC) theory, we hypothesized that RRD can eliminate adverse effects of soil background, canopy structure and multiple scattering. Published indices and multivariate models such as optimum multiple band regression (OMBR), partial least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector machines for regression (SVR) were also employed. Results showed that the ratio of reflectance difference index (RRDI) optimized for simulated data significantly improved the correlation with Chl (R2 = 0.98, p < 0.0001) and was insensitive to LAI variations (1-8), compared to widely used indices such as MCARI/OSAVI (R2 = 0.64, p < 0.0001) and TCARI/OSAVI (R2 = 0.74, p < 0.0001). The RRDI optimized for barley explained 76% of the variation in Chl and outperformed multivariate models. However, the accuracy decreased when employing the indices

  2. Mutualism effectiveness and vertical transmission of symbiotic fungal endophytes in response to host genetic background.

    PubMed

    Gundel, Pedro E; Martínez-Ghersa, María A; Omacini, Marina; Cuyeu, Romina; Pagano, Elba; Ríos, Raúl; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2012-12-01

    Certain species of the Pooideae subfamily develop stress tolerance and herbivory resistance through symbiosis with vertically transmitted, asexual fungi. This symbiosis is specific, and genetic factors modulate the compatibility between partners. Although gene flow is clearly a fitness trait in allogamous grasses, because it injects hybrid vigor and raw material for evolution, it could reduce compatibility and thus mutualism effectiveness. To explore the importance of host genetic background in modulating the performance of symbiosis, Lolium multiflorum plants, infected and noninfected with Neotyphodium occultans, were crossed with genetically distant plants of isolines (susceptible and resistant to diclofop-methyl herbicide) bred from two cultivars and exposed to stress. The endophyte improved seedling survival in genotypes susceptible to herbicide, while it had a negative effect on one of the genetically resistant crosses. Mutualism provided resistance to herbivory independently of the host genotype, but this effect vanished under stress. While no endophyte effect was observed on host reproductive success, it was increased by interpopulation plant crosses. Neither gene flow nor herbicide had an important impact on endophyte transmission. Host fitness improvements attributable to gene flow do not appear to result in direct conflict with mutualism while this seems to be an important mechanism for the ecological and contemporary evolution of the symbiotum.

  3. Mutualism effectiveness and vertical transmission of symbiotic fungal endophytes in response to host genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, Pedro E; Martínez-Ghersa, María A; Omacini, Marina; Cuyeu, Romina; Pagano, Elba; Ríos, Raúl; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2012-01-01

    Certain species of the Pooideae subfamily develop stress tolerance and herbivory resistance through symbiosis with vertically transmitted, asexual fungi. This symbiosis is specific, and genetic factors modulate the compatibility between partners. Although gene flow is clearly a fitness trait in allogamous grasses, because it injects hybrid vigor and raw material for evolution, it could reduce compatibility and thus mutualism effectiveness. To explore the importance of host genetic background in modulating the performance of symbiosis, Lolium multiflorum plants, infected and noninfected with Neotyphodium occultans, were crossed with genetically distant plants of isolines (susceptible and resistant to diclofop-methyl herbicide) bred from two cultivars and exposed to stress. The endophyte improved seedling survival in genotypes susceptible to herbicide, while it had a negative effect on one of the genetically resistant crosses. Mutualism provided resistance to herbivory independently of the host genotype, but this effect vanished under stress. While no endophyte effect was observed on host reproductive success, it was increased by interpopulation plant crosses. Neither gene flow nor herbicide had an important impact on endophyte transmission. Host fitness improvements attributable to gene flow do not appear to result in direct conflict with mutualism while this seems to be an important mechanism for the ecological and contemporary evolution of the symbiotum. PMID:23346228

  4. Effects of postoperative background PCA morphine infusion on pain management and related side effects in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hung; Liu, Kang; Tan, Peng-Heng; Chia, Yuan-Yi

    2011-03-01

    To examine the effects of background morphine infusion via patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) device. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded study. University-affiliated hospital. 60 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy. Patients were randomly allocated to either the PCA group without continuous background morphine infusion (Group 1; n = 30) or the PCA group with continuous background morphine infusion (Group 2; n = 30). Pain intensity during movement and at rest, morphine consumption at indicated time intervals, and related side effects were evaluated and recorded for three postoperative days at 12-hour intervals. The degree of patient satisfaction with PCA pain management was elicited and recorded. Pain intensity during movement (VASC) at 12 and 36 hours postoperatively and pain intensity at rest from 12 to 60 hours were significantly higher in Group 2 than Group 1. PCA morphine consumption for three days postoperatively in Group 2 was significantly higher. The frequency of vomiting, nausea, and dizziness were higher in Group 2. The frequency of pruritus, urinary retention, and allodynia was similar for both groups. The degree of patient satisfaction with pain management was generally equivalent between the groups. A continuous background morphine infusion of 0.5 mg/hr did not lower pain intensity during movement or at rest, but induced higher pain intensity, higher opioid usage, and more complications such as vomiting, nausea, and dizziness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alzheimer's disease detection using 11C-PiB with improved partial volume effect correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raniga, Parnesh; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Acosta, Oscar; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rowe, Christopher; Villemagne, Victor L.; Salvado, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of 11C-PiB in research into Alzheimer's disease (AD), there are few standardized analysis procedures that have been reported or published. This is especially true with regards to partial volume effects (PVE) and partial volume correction. Due to the nature of PET physics and acquisition, PET images exhibit relatively low spatial resolution compared to other modalities, resulting in bias of quantitative results. Although previous studies have applied PVE correction techniques on 11C-PiB data, the results have not been quantitatively evaluated and compared against uncorrected data. The aim of this study is threefold. Firstly, a realistic synthetic phantom was created to quantify PVE. Secondly, MRI partial volume estimate segmentations were used to improve voxel-based PVE correction instead of using hard segmentations. Thirdly, quantification of PVE correction was evaluated on 34 subjects (AD=10, Normal Controls (NC)=24), including 12 PiB positive NC. Regional analysis was performed using the Anatomical Automatic Labeling (AAL) template, which was registered to each patient. Regions of interest were restricted to the gray matter (GM) defined by the MR segmentation. Average normalized intensity of the neocortex and selected regions were used to evaluate the discrimination power between AD and NC both with and without PVE correction. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were computed for the binary discrimination task. The phantom study revealed signal losses due to PVE between 10 to 40 % which were mostly recovered to within 5% after correction. Better classification was achieved after PVE correction, resulting in higher areas under ROC curves.

  6. Effect of the early reionization on the cosmic microwave background and cosmological parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qing-Guo; Wang, Ke

    2017-07-01

    The early reionization (ERE) is supposed to be a physical process which happens after recombination, but before the instantaneous reionization caused by the first generation of stars. We investigate the effect of the ERE on the temperature and polarization power spectra of cosmic microwave background (CMB), and adopt principal components analysis (PCA) to model-independently reconstruct the ionization history during the ERE. In addition, we also discuss how the ERE affects the cosmological parameter estimates, and find that the ERE does not impose any significant influences on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r and the neutrino mass at the sensitivities of current experiments. The better CMB polarization data can be used to give a tighter constraint on the ERE and might be important for more precisely constraining cosmological parameters in the future.

  7. Effects of electrically charged dark matter on cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Ayuki; Kohri, Kazunori; Takahashi, Tomo; Yoshida, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    We examine the possibility that dark matter consists of charged massive particles (CHAMPs) in view of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. The evolution of cosmological perturbations of CHAMPs with other components is followed in a self-consistent manner, without assuming that CHAMPs and baryons are tightly coupled. We incorporate for the first time the "kinetic recoupling" of the Coulomb scattering, which is characteristic of heavy CHAMPs. By a direct comparison of the predicted CMB temperature/polarization autocorrelations in CHAMP models and the observed spectra in the Planck mission, we show that CHAMPs leave sizable effects on them if it is lighter than 1 011 GeV . Our result can be applicable to any CHAMP as long as its lifetime is much longer than the cosmic time at the recombination (˜4 ×1 05 yr ). An application to millicharged particles is also discussed.

  8. Bilingual effects on cognitive and linguistic development: role of language, cultural background, and education.

    PubMed

    Barac, Raluca; Bialystok, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    A total of 104 six-year-old children belonging to 4 groups (English monolinguals, Chinese-English bilinguals, French-English bilinguals, Spanish-English bilinguals) were compared on 3 verbal tasks and 1 nonverbal executive control task to examine the generality of the bilingual effects on development. Bilingual groups differed in degree of similarity between languages, cultural background, and language of schooling. On the executive control task, all bilingual groups performed similarly and exceeded monolinguals; on the language tasks the best performance was achieved by bilingual children whose language of instruction was the same as the language of testing and whose languages had more overlap. Thus, executive control outcomes for bilingual children are general but performance on verbal tasks is specific to factors in the bilingual experience. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  9. Genetic Background, Maternal Age, and Interaction Effects Mediate Rates of Crossing Over in Drosophila melanogaster Females.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Chad M; Robinson, Matthew C; Aylor, David L; Singh, Nadia D

    2016-05-03

    Meiotic recombination is a genetic process that is critical for proper chromosome segregation in many organisms. Despite being fundamental for organismal fitness, rates of crossing over vary greatly between taxa. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to phenotypic variation in crossover frequency, as do genotype-environment interactions. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal age influences rates of crossing over in a genotypic-specific manner. Using classical genetic techniques, we estimated rates of crossing over for individual Drosophila melanogaster females from five strains over their lifetime from a single mating event. We find that both age and genetic background significantly contribute to observed variation in recombination frequency, as do genotype-age interactions. We further find differences in the effect of age on recombination frequency in the two genomic regions surveyed. Our results highlight the complexity of recombination rate variation and reveal a new role of genotype by maternal age interactions in mediating recombination rate.

  10. A Measurement of the z=4 Ultraviolet Background from the Proximity Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jennifer E.

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of the metagalactic HI ionization rate from the proximity effect in the spectra of 33 quasars, twelve observed with the 6.5 m Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory and supplemented with 21 additional previously published quasar spectra of similar resolution from LRIS on the 10m Keck 1 telescope at the W. M. Keck Observatory. We use a method based on flux statistics in the quasar spectra in order to mitigate sensitivity to spectral resolution. We consider uncertainties in quasar systemic redshifts and Lyman limit fluxes. We compare the measured background to previous measurements at this redshift and to models based on the contribution from quasars and star-forming galaxies.

  11. Effects of road traffic background noise on judgments of individual airplane noises. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of road-traffic background noise on judgments of individual airplane flyover noises. In the first experiment, 27 subjects judged a set of 16 airplane flyover noises in the presence of traffic-noise sessions of 30-min duration consisting of the combinations of 3 traffic-noise types and 3 noise levels. In the second experiment, 24 subjects judged the same airplane flyover noises in the presence of traffic-noise sessions of 10-min duration consisting of the combinations of 2 traffic-noise types and 4 noise levels. In both experiments the airplane noises were judged less annoying in the presence of high traffic-noise levels than in the presence of low traffic-noise levels.

  12. Bilingual Effects on Cognitive and Linguistic Development: Role of Language, Cultural Background, and Education

    PubMed Central

    Barac, Raluca; Bialystok, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    A total of 104 6-year-old children belonging to four groups (English monolinguals, Chinese-English bilinguals, French-English bilinguals, Spanish-English bilinguals) were compared on three verbal tasks and one nonverbal executive control task to examine the generality of the bilingual effects on development. Bilingual groups differed in degree of similarity between languages, cultural background, and language of schooling. On the executive control task, all bilingual groups performed similarly and exceeded monolinguals; on the language tasks the best performance was achieved by bilingual children whose language of instruction was the same as the language of testing and whose languages had more overlap. Thus, executive control outcomes for bilingual children are general but performance on verbal tasks is specific to factors in the bilingual experience. PMID:22313034

  13. Impact of genetic background and experimental reproducibility on identifying chemical compounds with robust longevity effects

    PubMed Central

    Lucanic, Mark; Plummer, W. Todd; Chen, Esteban; Harke, Jailynn; Foulger, Anna C.; Onken, Brian; Coleman-Hulbert, Anna L.; Dumas, Kathleen J.; Guo, Suzhen; Johnson, Erik; Bhaumik, Dipa; Xue, Jian; Crist, Anna B.; Presley, Michael P.; Harinath, Girish; Sedore, Christine A.; Chamoli, Manish; Kamat, Shaunak; Chen, Michelle K.; Angeli, Suzanne; Chang, Christina; Willis, John H.; Edgar, Daniel; Royal, Mary Anne; Chao, Elizabeth A.; Patel, Shobhna; Garrett, Theo; Ibanez-Ventoso, Carolina; Hope, June; Kish, Jason L; Guo, Max; Lithgow, Gordon J.; Driscoll, Monica; Phillips, Patrick C.

    2017-01-01

    Limiting the debilitating consequences of ageing is a major medical challenge of our time. Robust pharmacological interventions that promote healthy ageing across diverse genetic backgrounds may engage conserved longevity pathways. Here we report results from the Caenorhabditis Intervention Testing Program in assessing longevity variation across 22 Caenorhabditis strains spanning 3 species, using multiple replicates collected across three independent laboratories. Reproducibility between test sites is high, whereas individual trial reproducibility is relatively low. Of ten pro-longevity chemicals tested, six significantly extend lifespan in at least one strain. Three reported dietary restriction mimetics are mainly effective across C. elegans strains, indicating species and strain-specific responses. In contrast, the amyloid dye ThioflavinT is both potent and robust across the strains. Our results highlight promising pharmacological leads and demonstrate the importance of assessing lifespans of discrete cohorts across repeat studies to capture biological variation in the search for reproducible ageing interventions. PMID:28220799

  14. Non-Gaussian effects in the cosmic microwave background from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangui, Alejandro

    1994-09-01

    The presence of non-Gaussian features in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps represents one of the most long-awaited clues in the search for the actual structure of primordial radiation, still needing confirmation. These features could shed some light on the nontrivial task of distinguishing the real souce of the primeval perturbations leading to large scale structure. One of the simplest non-Gaussian signals to search is the (dimensionless) skewness scrS. Explicit computations for scrS are presented in the frame of physically motivated inflationary models (natural, intermediate, and polynomial potential inflation) in the hope of finding values in agreement with estimated quantities from large angle scale (e.g., COBE DMR) maps. In all the cases considered the non-Gaussian effects turn out to lie below the level of theoretical uncertainty (cosmic variance). The possibility of unveiling the signal for scrS with multiple-field models is also discussed.

  15. Evidence on the Effectiveness of Comprehensive Error Correction in Second Language Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Beuningen, Catherine G.; De Jong, Nivja H.; Kuiken, Folkert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of direct and indirect comprehensive corrective feedback (CF) on second language (L2) learners' written accuracy (N = 268). The study set out to explore the value of CF as a revising tool as well as its capacity to support long-term accuracy development. In addition, we tested Truscott's (e.g., 2001, 2007) claims…

  16. The Noticeability and Effectiveness of Corrective Feedback in Relation to Target Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartchava, Eva; Ammar, Ahlem

    2014-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated the noticeability and effectiveness of three corrective feedback (CF) techniques (recasts, prompts and a combination of the two) delivered in the language classroom. The participants were four groups of high-beginner college level francophone learners of English as a second language (ESL) (n = 99) and…

  17. Differential Effects of Oral and Written Corrective Feedback in the ESL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheen, Younghee

    2010-01-01

    This article examines whether there is any difference between the effect of oral and written corrective feedback (CF) on learners' accurate use of English articles. To this end, the current research presents the results of a quasi-experimental study with a pretest, immediate-posttest, delayed-posttest design, using 12 intact intermediate…

  18. Evaluating Statistical Significance Using Corrected and Uncorrected Magnitude of Effect Size Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Patricia; Lawson, Stephen

    Magnitude of effect measures (MEMs), when adequately understood and correctly used, are important aids for researchers who do not want to rely solely on tests of statistical significance in substantive result interpretation. The MEM tells how much of the dependent variable can be controlled, predicted, or explained by the independent variables.…

  19. Nonperturbative corrections to 4D string theory effective actions from SL(2,Z) duality and supersymmetry.

    PubMed

    Robles-Llana, Daniel; Rocek, Martin; Saueressig, Frank; Theis, Ulrich; Vandoren, Stefan

    2007-05-25

    We find the D(-1)- and D1-brane instanton contributions to the hypermultiplet moduli space of type IIB string compactifications on Calabi-Yau threefolds. These combine with known perturbative and world sheet instanton corrections into a single modular invariant function that determines the hypermultiplet low-energy effective action.

  20. The Effectiveness of Corrective Feedback in SLA: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shaofeng

    2010-01-01

    This study reports on a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of corrective feedback in second language acquisition. By establishing a different set of inclusion/exclusion criteria than previous meta-analyses and performing a series of methodological moves, it is intended to be an update and complement to previous meta-analyses. Altogether 33 primary…

  1. A Simulation Study on Methods of Correcting for the Effects of Extreme Response Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Eunike; Böhnke, Jan R.; Rose, Norman

    2016-01-01

    The impact of response styles such as extreme response style (ERS) on trait estimation has long been a matter of concern to researchers and practitioners. This simulation study investigated three methods that have been proposed for the correction of trait estimates for ERS effects: (a) mixed Rasch models, (b) multidimensional item response models,…

  2. The Effects of the Timing of Corrective Feedback on the Acquisition of a New Linguistic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shaofeng; Zhu, Yan; Ellis, Rod

    2016-01-01

    The article reports on a study investigating the comparative effects of immediate and delayed corrective feedback in learning the English past passive construction, a linguistic structure of which the learners had little prior knowledge. A total of 120 learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) from 4 intact classes at a Chinese middle school…

  3. Effects of Length, Complexity, and Grammatical Correctness on Stuttering in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jennifer B.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Carlo, Edna J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the effects of utterance length, syntactic complexity, and grammatical correctness on stuttering in the spontaneous speech of young, monolingual Spanish-speaking children. Method: Spontaneous speech samples of 11 monolingual Spanish-speaking children who stuttered, ages 35 to 70 months, were examined. Mean number of syllables,…

  4. The Effect of Sensory Activities on Correct Responding for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rie, Ginny L.; Heflin, L. Juane

    2009-01-01

    Sensory-based activities are commonly recommended for students with ASD, even in the absence of empirical data to substantiate their effectiveness. A single subject alternating treatment design was used to assess functional relations between sensory-based antecedent interventions and correct responding in four students with autism. As individuals…

  5. The Effects of Analytic Corrections and Revisions on College Composition Students in a Portfolio Assessment Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyden-Knudsen, Teresa

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of analytic corrections and revisions on college composition students working in a portfolio assessment setting. Subjects were 19 community college students enrolled in a transfer-level class in composition. Three of these students were from the English as a Second Language/immigrant/refugee…

  6. Effects of a High School-Based Peer-Delivered "Corrective Mathematics" Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Julie Lynn; Marchand-Martella, Nancy E.; Waldron-Soler, Kathleen; Martella, Ronald C.; Lignugaris/Kraft, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a peer-delivered "Corrective Mathematics" program ("CM"; Engelmann & Carnine, 1982) in a secondary general education classroom with students with low mathematics performance. Ten learners and 9 peer tutors participated in the study. Peer tutors instructed…

  7. The Relative Effects of Explicit Correction and Recasts on Two Target Structures via Two Communication Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of negative feedback type (i.e., explicit correction vs. recasts), communication mode (i.e., face-to-face communication vs. synchronous computer-mediated communication), and target structure salience (i.e., salient vs. nonsalient) on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. Forty-eight native speakers of…

  8. Optimal transformation for correcting partial volume averaging effects in magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Soltanian-Zadeh, H. Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI ); Windham, J.P. ); Yagle, A.E. )

    1993-08-01

    Segmentation of a feature of interest while correcting for partial volume averaging effects is a major tool for identification of hidden abnormalities, fast and accurate volume calculation, and three-dimensional visualization in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors present the optimal transformation for simultaneous segmentation of a desired feature and correction of partial volume averaging effects, while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the desired feature. It is proved that correction of partial volume averaging effects requires the removal of the interfering features from the scene. It is also proved that correction of partial volume averaging effects can be achieved merely by a linear transformation. It is finally shown that the optimal transformation matrix is easily obtained using the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization procedure, which is numerically stable. Applications of the technique to MRI simulation, phantom, and brain images are shown. They show that in all cases the desired feature is segmented from the interfering features and partial volume information is visualized in the resulting transformed images.

  9. Effects of Corrective Feedback Delivered via Wireless Technology on Preservice Teacher Performance and Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheeler, Mary Catherine; McAfee, James K.; Ruhl, Kathy L.; Lee, David L.

    2006-01-01

    In teacher preparation most supervisory feedback is deferred, allowing learners to perform skills incorrectly and delivery of on-site immediate feedback may interrupt instructional flow. This study used a multiple baseline design to examine effects of immediate, corrective feedback delivered via wireless technology on completion of three-term…

  10. Differential Effects of Oral and Written Corrective Feedback in the ESL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheen, Younghee

    2010-01-01

    This article examines whether there is any difference between the effect of oral and written corrective feedback (CF) on learners' accurate use of English articles. To this end, the current research presents the results of a quasi-experimental study with a pretest, immediate-posttest, delayed-posttest design, using 12 intact intermediate…

  11. The Noticeability and Effectiveness of Corrective Feedback in Relation to Target Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartchava, Eva; Ammar, Ahlem

    2014-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated the noticeability and effectiveness of three corrective feedback (CF) techniques (recasts, prompts and a combination of the two) delivered in the language classroom. The participants were four groups of high-beginner college level francophone learners of English as a second language (ESL) (n = 99) and…

  12. The Effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback and the Impact Lao Learners' Beliefs Have on Uptake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Stephanie; Bitchener, John

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study examining the effectiveness of written corrective feedback (CF) on the simple past tense and the impact beliefs may have on students' uptake of the feedback they receive. A seven-week study was carried out with 42 advanced EFL learners in Vientiane, Laos. Students' beliefs about written CF were first…

  13. Evidence on the Effectiveness of Comprehensive Error Correction in Second Language Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Beuningen, Catherine G.; De Jong, Nivja H.; Kuiken, Folkert

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of direct and indirect comprehensive corrective feedback (CF) on second language (L2) learners' written accuracy (N = 268). The study set out to explore the value of CF as a revising tool as well as its capacity to support long-term accuracy development. In addition, we tested Truscott's (e.g., 2001, 2007) claims…

  14. Effects of Length, Complexity, and Grammatical Correctness on Stuttering in Spanish-Speaking Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jennifer B.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Carlo, Edna J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the effects of utterance length, syntactic complexity, and grammatical correctness on stuttering in the spontaneous speech of young, monolingual Spanish-speaking children. Method: Spontaneous speech samples of 11 monolingual Spanish-speaking children who stuttered, ages 35 to 70 months, were examined. Mean number of syllables,…

  15. The Effects of Oral Repeated Reading with and without Corrective Feedback on Middle School Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhram, Diana; Ellen Monda-Amaya, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effects of oral repeated reading, with and without corrective feedback, on the fluency and comprehension skills of 60 struggling readers in 7th Grade. Comparisons were made by group on narrative and expository reading ability and by comprehension question type. Students were randomly assigned to one of two reading groups…

  16. The Effect of Direct and Indirect Corrective Feedback on Iranian EFL Learners' Spelling Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghandi, Maryam; Maghsoudi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of indirect corrective feedback on promoting Iranian high school students' spelling accuracy in English (as a foreign language). It compared the effect of direct feedback with indirect feedback on students' written work dictated by their teacher from Chicken Soup for the Mother and…

  17. The Effectiveness of Written Corrective Feedback and the Impact Lao Learners' Beliefs Have on Uptake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Stephanie; Bitchener, John

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study examining the effectiveness of written corrective feedback (CF) on the simple past tense and the impact beliefs may have on students' uptake of the feedback they receive. A seven-week study was carried out with 42 advanced EFL learners in Vientiane, Laos. Students' beliefs about written CF were first…

  18. The Effect of Two Types of Corrective Feedback on EFL Learners' Writing Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farshi, Sina Soltanabadi; Safa, Saeedeh Khalili

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two types of corrective feedback on EFL learners' writing skill. Thirty five advanced learners in three groups participated in this study. Structures of written texts were taught in all three classes during fourteen sessions of treatment; and each session, a related topic was given and the…

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Combining the Use of Corrective Feedback and High-Level Practice Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenesi, Barbara; Sana, Faria; Kim, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    A growing trend in teaching practices is to combine instructional techniques to optimize learning. If two instructional techniques can independently facilitate comprehension, it may be reasonable to assume that their combination would contribute to even greater learning. Here we examine the effects of using corrective feedback (present or absent)…

  20. Evaluating Statistical Significance Using Corrected and Uncorrected Magnitude of Effect Size Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Patricia; Lawson, Stephen

    Magnitude of effect measures (MEMs), when adequately understood and correctly used, are important aids for researchers who do not want to rely solely on tests of statistical significance in substantive result interpretation. The MEM tells how much of the dependent variable can be controlled, predicted, or explained by the independent variables.…

  1. The Relative Effects of Explicit Correction and Recasts on Two Target Structures via Two Communication Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of negative feedback type (i.e., explicit correction vs. recasts), communication mode (i.e., face-to-face communication vs. synchronous computer-mediated communication), and target structure salience (i.e., salient vs. nonsalient) on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. Forty-eight native speakers of…

  2. Effectiveness of Foundations of Reading and the Direct Instruction Reading Program Corrective Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Amanda Worley

    2013-01-01

    The Foundations of Reading course and the Direct Instruction reading program Corrective Reading are components of literacy instruction designed to meet the needs of struggling adolescent readers. An evaluation of the program's effectiveness within the district has not been conducted, and the impact on student achievement was unknown. The purpose…

  3. The effects of verbal instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback on correct posture during flute playing.

    PubMed

    Dib, Nancy Ellen; Sturmey, Peter

    2007-07-01

    A behavioral skills training package, including verbal instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback, was used to teach children correct posture, defined as keeping feet on the floor, legs parallel to each other, and the back and neck perpendicular to the floor, during flute lessons. Three typically developing girls aged 8 to 9 years participated. All three students' posture improved from 0% during baseline to nearly 100% after training for all sessions, generalization probes, and after a 1- to 2-month follow-up. The training package was proven effective in the acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of correct posture for flute playing.

  4. Effects and correction of magneto-optic spatial light modulator phase errors in an optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Hine, Butler P.; Reid, Max B.

    1992-01-01

    The optical phase errors introduced into an optical correlator by the input and filter plane magnetooptic spatial light modulators have been studied. The magnitude of these phase errors is measured and characterized, their effects on the correlation results are evaluated, and a means of correction by a design modification of the binary phase-only optical-filter function is presented. The efficacy of the phase-correction technique is quantified and is found to restore the correlation characteristics to those obtained in the absence of errors, to a high degree. The phase errors of other correlator system elements are also discussed and treated in a similar fashion.

  5. Retrieval of atmospheric methane from high spectral resolution satellite measurements: a correction for cirrus cloud effects.

    PubMed

    Bril, Andrey; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2009-04-10

    We assessed the accuracy of methane (CH(4)) retrievals from synthetic radiance spectra particular to Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite observations. We focused on estimating the CH(4) vertical column amount from an atmosphere that includes thin cirrus clouds, taking into account uncertain meteorological conditions. A photon path-length probability density function (PPDF)-based method was adapted to correct for atmospheric scattering effects in CH(4) retrievals. This method was shown to provide similar retrieval accuracy as compared to a carbon dioxide (CO(2))-proxy-based correction approach. It infers some advantages of PPDF-based method for methane retrievals under high variability of CO(2) abundance.

  6. Methods for correcting microwave scattering and emission measurements for atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komen, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Algorithms were developed to permit correction of scattering coefficient and brightness temperature for the Skylab S193 Radscat for the effects of cloud attenuation. These algorithms depend upon a measurement of the vertically polarized excess brightness temperature at 50 deg incidence angle. This excess temperature is converted to an equivalent 50 deg attenuation, which may then be used to estimate the horizontally polarized excess brightness temperature and reduced scattering coefficient at 50 deg. For angles other than 50 deg, the correction also requires use of the variation of emissivity with salinity and water temperature.

  7. A Comparison of the Effects of Implicit and Explicit Corrective Feedback on Learners` Performance in Tailor-Made Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabaghi, Azizollah

    The study investigated the effects of correction of learners` grammatical errors on acquisition. Specifically, it compared the effects of manner of correction (explicit versus implicit correction). It also investigated the relative effects of explicit and implicit correction of morphological versus syntactic features and correction of developmental early versus developmental late features. Data were collected from 56 intermediate level Iranian students of English Each participant was required to read and then retell a written text in their own words during an oral interview. During or following the interview the researcher corrected the participants on their grammatical errors implicitly (using recasts) or explicitly. Individualised tests focusing on the corrected errors were constructed and administered. Statistical analyses were conducted on the scores the participants received on their individualised tests. Results showed that the participants who received explicit correction gained significantly higher scores than those who received implicit correction. Analyses of the interactions between independent variables showed that explicit correction was more effective for the acquisition of developmental early features and implicit correction was more effective for the acquisition of developmental late features.

  8. Brain Responses before and after Intensive Second Language Learning: Proficiency Based Changes and First Language Background Effects in Adult Learners

    PubMed Central

    White, Erin Jacquelyn; Genesee, Fred; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study tracked the neuro-cognitive changes associated with second language (L2) grammar learning in adults in order to investigate how L2 processing is shaped by a learner’s first language (L1) background and L2 proficiency. Previous studies using event-related potentials (ERPs) have argued that late L2 learners cannot elicit a P600 in response to L2 grammatical structures that do not exist in the L1 or that are different in the L1 and L2. We tested whether the neuro-cognitive processes underlying this component become available after intensive L2 instruction. Korean- and Chinese late-L2-learners of English were tested at the beginning and end of a 9-week intensive English-L2 course. ERPs were recorded while participants read English sentences containing violations of regular past tense (a grammatical structure that operates differently in Korean and does not exist in Chinese). Whereas no P600 effects were present at the start of instruction, by the end of instruction, significant P600s were observed for both L1 groups. Latency differences in the P600 exhibited by Chinese and Korean speakers may be attributed to differences in L1–L2 reading strategies. Across all participants, larger P600 effects at session 2 were associated with: 1) higher levels of behavioural performance on an online grammaticality judgment task; and 2) with correct, rather than incorrect, behavioural responses. These findings suggest that the neuro-cognitive processes underlying the P600 (e.g., “grammaticalization”) are modulated by individual levels of L2 behavioural performance and learning. PMID:23300641

  9. Brain responses before and after intensive second language learning: proficiency based changes and first language background effects in adult learners.

    PubMed

    White, Erin Jacquelyn; Genesee, Fred; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study tracked the neuro-cognitive changes associated with second language (L2) grammar learning in adults in order to investigate how L2 processing is shaped by a learner's first language (L1) background and L2 proficiency. Previous studies using event-related potentials (ERPs) have argued that late L2 learners cannot elicit a P600 in response to L2 grammatical structures that do not exist in the L1 or that are different in the L1 and L2. We tested whether the neuro-cognitive processes underlying this component become available after intensive L2 instruction. Korean- and Chinese late-L2-learners of English were tested at the beginning and end of a 9-week intensive English-L2 course. ERPs were recorded while participants read English sentences containing violations of regular past tense (a grammatical structure that operates differently in Korean and does not exist in Chinese). Whereas no P600 effects were present at the start of instruction, by the end of instruction, significant P600s were observed for both L1 groups. Latency differences in the P600 exhibited by Chinese and Korean speakers may be attributed to differences in L1-L2 reading strategies. Across all participants, larger P600 effects at session 2 were associated with: 1) higher levels of behavioural performance on an online grammaticality judgment task; and 2) with correct, rather than incorrect, behavioural responses. These findings suggest that the neuro-cognitive processes underlying the P600 (e.g., "grammaticalization") are modulated by individual levels of L2 behavioural performance and learning.

  10. Effect of van der Waals corrections on DFT-computed metallic surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiter, Fatah; Bac Nguyen, Van; Tarrat, Nathalie; Benoit, Magali; Tang, Hao; Lacaze-Dufaure, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    State-of-the-art van der Waals (vdW) corrected density functional theory (DFT) is routinely used to overcome the failure of standard DFT in the description of molecule/surface long range interactions. However, the systematic use of dispersion forces to model metallic surfaces could lead to less accurate results than the standard DFT and the effect of these corrections on the metal properties should be properly evaluated. In this framework, the behavior of two widely used vdW corrected DFT methods (DFT-D2 and vdW-DF/optB86b) has been evaluated on six metals, i.e. Al, Cu, Au, Ni, Co and Fe, with respect to standard GGA-DFT and experiments. Regarding bulk properties, general trends are found for the lattice parameter, cohesive energy and magnetic moment variations when the vdW correction is introduced. Surface energies, work functions and interlayer distances of closed packed surfaces, Al(111), Cu(111), Au(111) and magnetic Ni(111), Co(0001) and Fe(110), are also strongly affected by the dispersion forces. These modifications suggest a systematic verification of the surface properties when a dispersion correction is included.

  11. Effect of mechanically simulated diaphragmatic respiratory motion on myocardial SPECT processed with and without attenuation correction.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Alexander G; Kalff, Victor; Van Every, Bruce; Risa, Borghild; Barnden, Leighton R; Kelly, Michael J

    2002-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of diaphragmatic respiratory motion on inferior wall cold artifact in myocardial SPECT and to assess the ability of attenuation correction (AC) to correct for this artifact in the presence of diaphragmatic motion. We used an anthropomorphic phantom with ventricular wall activity, variable ventricular caudal tilt, attenuating liver and spleen cold inserts, and variable vertical (diaphragmatic) motion amplitude and pattern. Cardiac SPECT images were acquired on a gamma camera with dual scanning transmission line sources and commercially available AC software (with scatter correction and iterative reconstruction). The acquired data were processed either using filtered backprojection or with the AC software. The resulting myocardial activity maps were processed with polar plots and with standardized inferior-to-anterior and anterior-to-lateral wall ratios. Subdiaphragmatic attenuation reduces inferior wall counts and this component of inferior wall artifact is fully corrected by AC relative to anterior wall counts both with and without diaphragmatic respiratory motion. In the phantom, diaphragmatic motion artifact manifests as reduction in relative count density in both the anterior wall and the inferior wall relative to the lateral wall, which is not corrected by AC. This artifact becomes more marked with increasing respiratory amplitude and its symmetry depends on the pattern of diaphragmatic motion. Images with AC acquired at small respiratory amplitudes (approximately 2 cm) in the phantom resemble images with AC found in published normal patient databases. These results support a clinical need for respiratory gating of myocardial SPECT images.

  12. Dynamics of an optomechanical system with quadratic coupling: Effect of first order correction to adiabatic elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cheng; Cui, Yuanshun; Chen, Guibin

    2016-10-01

    We explore theoretically the dynamics of an optomechanical system in which a resonantly driven cavity mode is quadratically coupled to the displacement of a mechanical resonator. Considering the first order correction to adiabatic elimination, we obtain the analytical expression of optomechanical damping rate which is negative and depends on the position of the mechanical resonator. After comparing the numerical results between the full simulation of Langevin equations, adiabatic elimination, and first order correction to adiabatic elimination, we explain the dynamics of the system in terms of overall mechanical potential and optomechanical damping rate. The antidamping induced by radiation pressure can result in self-sustained oscillation of the mechanical resonator. Finally, we discuss the time evolution of the intracavity photon number, which also shows that the effect of first order correction cannot be neglected when the ratio of the cavity decay rate to the mechanical resonance frequency becomes smaller than a critical value.

  13. Dynamics of an optomechanical system with quadratic coupling: Effect of first order correction to adiabatic elimination

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng; Cui, Yuanshun; Chen, Guibin

    2016-01-01

    We explore theoretically the dynamics of an optomechanical system in which a resonantly driven cavity mode is quadratically coupled to the displacement of a mechanical resonator. Considering the first order correction to adiabatic elimination, we obtain the analytical expression of optomechanical damping rate which is negative and depends on the position of the mechanical resonator. After comparing the numerical results between the full simulation of Langevin equations, adiabatic elimination, and first order correction to adiabatic elimination, we explain the dynamics of the system in terms of overall mechanical potential and optomechanical damping rate. The antidamping induced by radiation pressure can result in self-sustained oscillation of the mechanical resonator. Finally, we discuss the time evolution of the intracavity photon number, which also shows that the effect of first order correction cannot be neglected when the ratio of the cavity decay rate to the mechanical resonance frequency becomes smaller than a critical value. PMID:27752125

  14. Effects of Corrective Taping on Balance and Gait in Patients With Hallux Valgus.

    PubMed

    Gur, Gozde; Ozkal, Ozden; Dilek, Burcu; Aksoy, Songul; Bek, Nilgun; Yakut, Yavuz

    2017-05-01

    Taping is an effective temporary therapy for improving hallux valgus (HV) in adults. Although HV has been demonstrated to impair postural balance, there is a lack of information about how corrective taping affects balance and gait patterns in adults with HV deformity. Eighteen middle-aged female patients (average age, 53.5 years) with HV were included. Corrective tape was applied to correct HV angulation. A series of balance and gait stability tests were performed before applying tape and 1 hour after the tape was applied with a Balance Master computerized posturography device. The study involved the following tests: modified clinical test of sensory interaction and balance (mCTSIB), unilateral stance (US), limit of stability (LoS), step up/over (SUO), and walk across (WA) tests. No significant difference was found between the no-tape and taped condition in the static balance mCTSIB and US tests ( P > .05). The taping intervention resulted in significant improvement in the dynamic balance measures for the LoS test's backward reaction time and left maximum excursion ( P < .05), a significantly higher impact index bilaterally in the SUO assessment ( P < .05), and an increase in step width mean and variability in the WA test ( P < .05). Taping for correcting HV angulation had negative acute effects on dynamic balance in the SUO and WA tests and positive effects in the LoS test. Corrective taping, although a form of conservative treatment for hallux valgus, has been insufficiently studied in terms of effects on balance. Our results show that taping, as an acute effect, may impair balance in middle-aged adults when walking or ascending and descending stairs.

  15. English vowel identification in quiet and noise: effects of listeners' native language background

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Hyun; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of listener's native language (L1) and the types of noise on English vowel identification in noise. Method: Identification of 12 English vowels was measured in quiet and in long-term speech-shaped noise and multi-talker babble (MTB) noise for English- (EN), Chinese- (CN) and Korean-native (KN) listeners at various signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Results: Compared to non-native listeners, EN listeners performed significantly better in quiet and in noise. Vowel identification in long-term speech-shaped noise and in MTB noise was similar between CN and KN listeners. This is different from our previous study in which KN listeners performed better than CN listeners in English sentence recognition in MTB noise. Discussion: Results from the current study suggest that depending on speech materials, the effect of non-native listeners' L1 on speech perception in noise may be different. That is, in the perception of speech materials with little linguistic cues like isolated vowels, the characteristics of non-native listener's native language may not play a significant role. On the other hand, in the perception of running speech in which listeners need to use more linguistic cues (e.g., acoustic-phonetic, semantic, and prosodic cues), the non-native listener's native language background might result in a different masking effect. PMID:25400538

  16. Detection of trans-Planckian effects in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneboom, Nicolaas E.; Elgarøy, Øystein

    2008-02-01

    Quantum gravity effects are expected to modify the primordial density fluctuations produced during inflation and leave their imprint on the cosmic microwave background observed today. We present a new analysis discussing whether these effects are detectable, considering both currently available data and simulated results from an optimal CMB experiment. We find that the WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) data show no evidence for the particular signature considered in this work but give an upper bound on the parameters of the model. However, a hypothetical experiment shows that with proper data, the trans-Planckian effects should be detectable through alternate sampling methods. This fuzzy conclusion is a result of the nature of the oscillations, since they give rise to a likelihood hypersurface riddled with local maxima. A simple Bayesian analysis shows no significant evidence for the simulated data to prefer a trans-Planckian model. Conventional Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are not suitable for exploring this complicated landscape, but alternative methods are required to solve the problem. This, however, requires extremely high-precision data.

  17. MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD FOREGROUND CLEANING FOR COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIMETERS IN THE PRESENCE OF SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, C.; Hanany, S.; Baccigalupi, C.; Gold, B.; Jaffe, A.; Stompor, R.

    2016-03-01

    We extend a general maximum likelihood foreground estimation for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data to include estimation of instrumental systematic effects. We focus on two particular effects: frequency band measurement uncertainty and instrumentally induced frequency dependent polarization rotation. We assess the bias induced on the estimation of the B-mode polarization signal by these two systematic effects in the presence of instrumental noise and uncertainties in the polarization and spectral index of Galactic dust. Degeneracies between uncertainties in the band and polarization angle calibration measurements and in the dust spectral index and polarization increase the uncertainty in the extracted CMB B-mode power, and may give rise to a biased estimate. We provide a quantitative assessment of the potential bias and increased uncertainty in an example experimental configuration. For example, we find that with 10% polarized dust, a tensor to scalar ratio of r = 0.05, and the instrumental configuration of the E and B experiment balloon payload, the estimated CMB B-mode power spectrum is recovered without bias when the frequency band measurement has 5% uncertainty or less, and the polarization angle calibration has an uncertainty of up to 4°.

  18. Adsorption of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes: Effects of background solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Bekaroglu, S Sule Kaplan; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-03-01

    With the significant increase in the production and use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), they will be inevitably released into aquatic environments. Therefore, the fate and transport of CNTs in aqueous solutions have attracted extensive attention. In the present work, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM), solution pH and ionic strength on adsorption of three synthetic organic chemicals (SOCs) by both pristine and surface functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated. The three SOCs (phenanthrene, biphenyl, and 2-phenylphenol) with different planarity, polarity, and hydrogen/electron-donor/acceptor ability, representing typical scenarios for the SOC-CNT interactions, were employed as probe molecules. Among the three background solution characteristics examined, NOM showed the most significant effect on SOC adsorption, while solution pH and ionic strength exhibited minimal or negligible impacts. The presence of NOM greatly suppressed the SOC adsorption by CNTs, and the impact on the SWNTs was higher than that on the MWNTs. The planarity and hydrophobicity of SOCs were two important factors determining the effects of NOM, solution pH and ionic strength on their adsorption by CNTs.

  19. Evaluation of a novel correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Treichel, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-12-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements to improve the accuracy of broadband complex electrical resistivity measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference < 0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  20. Open EFTs, IR effects & late-time resummations: systematic corrections in stochastic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Holman, R.; Tasinato, G.

    2016-01-01

    Though simple inflationary models describe the CMB well, their corrections are often plagued by infrared effects that obstruct a reliable calculation of late-time behaviour. We adapt to cosmology tools designed to address similar issues in other physical systems with the goal of making reliable late-time inflationary predictions. The main such tool is Open EFTs which reduce in the inflationary case to Stochastic Inflation plus calculable corrections. We apply this to a simple inflationary model that is complicated enough to have dangerous IR behaviour yet simple enough to allow the inference of late-time behaviour. We find corrections to standard Stochastic Inflationary predictions for the noise and drift, and we find these corrections ensure the IR finiteness of both these quantities. The late-time probability distribution, {P}(φ ) , for super-Hubble field fluctuations are obtained as functions of the noise and drift and so these too are IR finite. We compare our results to other methods (such as large- N models) and find they agree when these models are reliable. In all cases we can explore in detail we find IR secular effects describe the slow accumulation of small perturbations to give a big effect: a significant distortion of the late-time probability distribution for the field. But the energy density associated with this is only of order H 4 at late times and so does not generate a dramatic gravitational back-reaction.

  1. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    DOE PAGES

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I foundmore » that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.« less

  2. Open EFTs, IR effects & late-time resummations: systematic corrections in stochastic inflation

    DOE PAGES

    Burgess, C. P.; Holman, R.; Tasinato, G.

    2016-01-26

    Though simple inflationary models describe the CMB well, their corrections are often plagued by infrared effects that obstruct a reliable calculation of late-time behaviour. Here we adapt to cosmology tools designed to address similar issues in other physical systems with the goal of making reliable late-time inflationary predictions. The main such tool is Open EFTs which reduce in the inflationary case to Stochastic Inflation plus calculable corrections. We apply this to a simple inflationary model that is complicated enough to have dangerous IR behaviour yet simple enough to allow the inference of late-time behaviour. We find corrections to standard Stochasticmore » Inflationary predictions for the noise and drift, and we find these corrections ensure the IR finiteness of both these quantities. The late-time probability distribution, P(Φ), for super-Hubble field fluctuations are obtained as functions of the noise and drift and so these too are IR finite. We compare our results to other methods (such as large-N models) and find they agree when these models are reliable. In all cases we can explore in detail we find IR secular effects describe the slow accumulation of small perturbations to give a big effect: a significant distortion of the late-time probability distribution for the field. But the energy density associated with this is only of order H4 at late times and so does not generate a dramatic gravitational back-reaction.« less

  3. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winterhalter, Wade E.

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  4. Correction of resist heating effect on variable shaped beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Suganuma, Mizuna; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kato, Yasuo; Kamikubo, Takashi; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Zable, Harold; Masuda, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Aki

    2016-04-01

    The specifications for critical dimension (CD) accuracy and line edge roughness are getting tighter to promote every photomask manufacturer to choose electron beam resists of lower sensitivity. When the resist is exposed by too many electrons, it is excessively heated up to have higher sensitivity at a higher temperature, which results in degraded CD uniformity. This effect is called "resist heating effect" and is now the most critical error source in CD control on a variable shaped beam (VSB) mask writer. We have developed an on-tool, real-time correction system for the resist heating effect. The system is composed of correction software based on a simple thermal diffusion model and computational hardware equipped with more than 100 graphical processing unit chips. We have demonstrated that the designed correction accuracy was obtained and the runtime of correction was sufficiently shorter than the writing time. The system is ready to be deployed for our VSB mask writers to retain the writing time as short as possible for lower sensitivity resists by removing the need for increased pass count.

  5. Open EFTs, IR effects & late-time resummations: systematic corrections in stochastic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C. P.; Holman, R.; Tasinato, G.

    2016-01-26

    Though simple inflationary models describe the CMB well, their corrections are often plagued by infrared effects that obstruct a reliable calculation of late-time behaviour. Here we adapt to cosmology tools designed to address similar issues in other physical systems with the goal of making reliable late-time inflationary predictions. The main such tool is Open EFTs which reduce in the inflationary case to Stochastic Inflation plus calculable corrections. We apply this to a simple inflationary model that is complicated enough to have dangerous IR behaviour yet simple enough to allow the inference of late-time behaviour. We find corrections to standard Stochastic Inflationary predictions for the noise and drift, and we find these corrections ensure the IR finiteness of both these quantities. The late-time probability distribution, P(Φ), for super-Hubble field fluctuations are obtained as functions of the noise and drift and so these too are IR finite. We compare our results to other methods (such as large-N models) and find they agree when these models are reliable. In all cases we can explore in detail we find IR secular effects describe the slow accumulation of small perturbations to give a big effect: a significant distortion of the late-time probability distribution for the field. But the energy density associated with this is only of order H4 at late times and so does not generate a dramatic gravitational back-reaction.

  6. The "residential" effect fallacy in neighborhood and health studies: formal definition, empirical identification, and correction.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Basile; Duncan, Dustin; Vallée, Julie; Vernez-Moudon, Anne; Benmarhnia, Tarik; Kestens, Yan

    2017-07-31

    Because of confounding from the urban/rural and socioeconomic organizations of territories and resulting correlation between residential and nonresidential exposures, classically estimated residential neighborhood-outcome associations capture nonresidential environment effects, overestimating residential intervention effects. Our study diagnosed and corrected this "residential" effect fallacy bias applicable to a large fraction of neighborhood and health studies. Our empirical application investigated the effect that hypothetical interventions raising the residential number of services would have on the probability that a trip is walked. Using global positioning systems (GPS) tracking and mobility surveys over 7 days (227 participants, 7440 trips), we employed a multilevel linear probability model to estimate the trip-level association between residential number of services and walking to derive a naïve intervention effect estimate; and a corrected model accounting for numbers of services at the residence, trip origin, and trip destination to determine a corrected intervention effect estimate (true effect conditional on assumptions). There was a strong correlation in service densities between the residential neighborhood and nonresidential places. From the naïve model, hypothetical interventions raising the residential number of services to 200, 500, and 1000 were associated with an increase by 0.020, 0.055, and 0.109 of the probability of walking in the intervention groups. Corrected estimates were of 0.007, 0.019, and 0.039. Thus, naïve estimates were overestimated by multiplicative factors of 3.0, 2.9, and 2.8. Commonly estimated residential intervention-outcome associations substantially overestimate true effects. Our somewhat paradoxical conclusion is that, to estimate residential effects, investigators critically need information on nonresidential places visited.

  7. Assessing the effects of variables and background selection on the capture of the tick climate niche

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Modelling the environmental niche and spatial distribution of pathogen-transmitting arthropods involves various quality and methodological concerns related to using climate data to capture the environmental niche. This study tested the potential of MODIS remotely sensed and interpolated gridded covariates to estimate the climate niche of the medically important ticks Ixodes ricinus and Hyalomma marginatum. We also assessed model inflation resulting from spatial autocorrelation (SA) and collinearity (CO) of covariates used as time series of data (monthly values of variables), principal components analysis (PCA), and a discrete Fourier transformation. Performance of the models was measured using area under the curve (AUC), autocorrelation by Moran’s I, and collinearity by the variance inflation factor (VIF). Results The covariate spatial resolution slightly affected the final AUC. Consistently, models for H. marginatum performed better than models for I. ricinus, likely because of a species-derived rather than covariate effect because the former occupies a more limited niche. Monthly series of interpolated climate always better captured the climate niche of the ticks, but the SA was around 2 times higher and the maximum VIF between covariates around 30 times higher in interpolated than in MODIS-derived covariates. Interpolated or remotely sensed monthly series of covariates always had higher SA and CO than their transformations by PCA or Fourier. Regarding the effects of background point selection on AUC, we found that selection based on a set of rules for the distance to the core distribution and the heterogeneity of the landscape influenced model outcomes. The best selection relied on a random selection of points as close as possible to the target organism area of distribution, but effects are variable according to the species modelled. Conclusion Testing for effects of SA and CO is necessary before incorporating these covariates into algorithms

  8. Visual search performance on an lcd monitor: effects of color combination of figure and icon background, shape of icon, and line width of icon border.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chen; Chiu, Tsai-Lan

    2007-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of color combinations for the figure/icon background, icon shape, and line width of the icon border on visual search performance on a liquid crystal display screen. In a circular stimulus array, subjects had to search for a target item which had a diameter of 20 cm and included one target and 19 distractors. Analysis showed that the icon shape significantly affected search performance. The correct response time was significantly shorter for circular icons than for triangular icons, for icon borders with a line width of 3 pixels than for 1 or 2 pixels, and for 2 pixels than for 1 pixel. The color combination also significantly affected the visual search performance: white/yellow, white/blue, black-red, and black/ yellow color combinations for the figure/icon background had shorter correct response times compared to yellow/blue, red/green, yellow/green, and blue/red. However, no effects were found for the line width of the icon border or the icon shape on the error rate. Results have implications for graphics-based design of interfaces, such as for mobile phones, Web sites, and PDAs, as well as complex industrial processes.

  9. Correction of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering effects in H2O dial measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansmann, A.; Bosenberg, J.

    1986-01-01

    A general method of solutions for treating effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in H2O Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements are described and discussed. Errors in vertical DIAL measuremtns caused by this laser line broadening effect can be very large and, therfore, this effect has to be accounted for accurately. To analyze and correct effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in DIAL experiments, a generalized DIAL approximation was derived starting from a lidar equation, which includes Doppler broadening. To evaluate the accuracy of H2O DIAL measurements, computer simulations were performed. It was concluded that correction of Doppler broadened Rayleigh backscattering is possible with good accuracy in most cases of tropospheric H2O DIAL measurements, but great care has to be taken when layers with steep gradients of Mie backscattering like clouds or inversion layers are present.

  10. Corrections of Enghoff's dead space formula for shunt effects still overestimate Bohr's dead space.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Santos, Arnoldo; Böhm, Stephan H; Borges, Joao Batista; Hedenstierna, Göran; Tusman, Gerardo

    2013-10-01

    Dead space ratio is determined using Enghoff's modification (VD(B-E)/VT) of Bohr's formula (VD(Bohr)/VT) in which arterial is used as a surrogate of alveolar PCO₂. In presence of intrapulmonary shunt Enghoff's approach overestimates dead space. In 40 lung-lavaged pigs we evaluated the Kuwabara's and Niklason's algorithms to correct for shunt effects and hypothesized that corrected VD(B-E)/VT should provide similar values as VD(Bohr)/VT. We analyzed 396 volumetric capnograms and arterial and mixed-venous blood samples to calculate VD(Bohr)/VT and VD(B-E)/VT. Thereafter, we corrected the latter for shunt effects using Kuwabara's (K) VD(B-E)/VT and Niklason's (N) VD(B-E)/VT algorithms. Uncorrected VD(B-E)/VT (mean ± SD of 0.70 ± 0.10) overestimated VD(Bohr)/VT (0.59 ± 0.12) (p < 0.05), over the entire range of shunts. Mean (K) VD(B-E)/VT was significantly higher than VD(Bohr)/VT (0.67 ± 0.08, bias -0.085, limits of agreement -0.232 to 0.085; p < 0.05) whereas (N)VD(B-E)/VT showed a better correction for shunt effects (0.64 ± 0.09, bias 0.048, limits of agreement -0.168 to 0.072; p < 0.05). Neither Kuwabara's nor Niklason's algorithms were able to correct Enghoff's dead space formula for shunt effects.

  11. Dielectric relaxation time of bulk water at 136-140 K, background loss and crystallization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.

    2005-04-01

    Dielectric relaxation time, τ, of ultraviscous bulk water has been determined by analyzing its loss tangent, tanδ, data, which had been measured on heating the vapor-deposited amorphous solid water and hyperquenched glassy water in our earlier studies. [Johari, Hallbrucker, and Mayer, J. Chem. Phys. 95, 2955 (1991); 97, 5851 (1992)]. As for glasses and liquids generally, the measured tanδ of water is the sum of a frequency-independent background loss and a frequency-dependent relaxational loss. A two-frequency method is provided for determining the background loss and used for obtaining the relaxational part of tanδ. After considering the structural relaxation and crystal-nuclei growth effects, τ for water has been determined. At 136±1K, it is 2.5±0.6s when a single relaxation time is (untenably) assumed, and 42±14s when a distribution of relaxation times, a characteristic of viscous liquids, is assumed, with Davidson-Cole distribution parameter of 0.75. Structural relaxation time of ˜70s for water at 136K, which was originally estimated from the DSC endotherm [Johari, Hallbrucker, and Mayer, Nature (London) 330, 552 (1987)], has been revised to ˜33s. Temperature dependence of τ could not be determined because ultraviscous water crystallizes too rapidly to cubic ice containing stacking faults and intergranular water. The study demonstrates that water is a liquid over the 136-155K range, thus removing the basis for a recent contention on its state.

  12. Analysis and correction of ground reflection effects in measured narrowband sound spectra using cepstral techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Stevens, G. H.; Leininger, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflections generate undesirable effects on acoustic measurements such as those conducted outdoors for jet noise research, aircraft certification, and motor vehicle regulation. Cepstral techniques developed in speech processing are adapted to identify echo delay time and to correct for ground reflection effects. A sample result is presented using an actual narrowband sound pressure level spectrum. The technique can readily be adapted to existing fast Fourier transform type spectrum measurement instrumentation to provide field measurements/of echo time delays.

  13. Personnel and Background Differences in Organizational Effectiveness. Interim Report for Period 14 June 1976-28 February 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, William H.; Halverson, Vicki B.

    An Air Force study examined the relationship between personnel background and several measures of organizational effectiveness. The Organizational Assessment Package (OAS) consisting of 16 background information items and 149 attitudinal items was administered to military and civilian subjects (4,786) at five Air Force bases representing six major…

  14. On instrumental errors and related correction strategies of ozonesondes: possible effect on calculated ozone trends for the nearby sites Uccle and De Bilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Malderen, Roeland; Allaart, Marc A. F.; De Backer, Hugo; Smit, Herman G. J.; De Muer, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    The ozonesonde stations at Uccle (Belgium) and De Bilt (the Netherlands) are separated by only 175 km but use different ozonesonde types (or different manufacturers for the same electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) type), operating procedures, and correction strategies. As such, these stations form a unique test bed for the Ozonesonde Data Quality Assessment (O3S-DQA) activity, which aims at providing a revised, homogeneous, consistent dataset with an altitude-dependent estimated uncertainty for each revised profile. For the ECC ozonesondes at Uccle mean relative uncertainties in the 4-6 % range are obtained. To study the impact of the corrections on the ozone profiles and trends, we compared the Uccle and De Bilt average ozone profiles and vertical ozone trends, calculated from the operational corrections at both stations and the O3S-DQA corrected profiles. In the common ECC 1997-2014 period, the O3S-DQA corrections effectively reduce the differences between the Uccle and De Bilt ozone partial pressure values with respect to the operational corrections only for the stratospheric layers below the ozone maximum. The upper-stratospheric ozone measurements at both sites are substantially different, regardless of the correction methodology used. The origin of this difference is not clear. The discrepancies in the tropospheric ozone concentrations between both sites can be ascribed to the problematic background measurement and correction at De Bilt, especially in the period before November 1998. The Uccle operational correction method, applicable to both ozonesonde types used, diminishes the relative stratospheric ozone differences of the Brewer-Mast sondes in the 1993-1996 period with De Bilt to less than 5 % and to less than 6 % in the free troposphere for the De Bilt operational corrections. Despite their large impact on the average ozone profiles, the different (sensible) correction strategies do not change the ozone trends significantly, usually only within

  15. Nutritional background changes the hypolipidemic effects of fenofibrate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Li-Jun; He, An-Yuan; Lu, Dong-Liang; Li, Jia-Min; Qiao, Fang; Li, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Chen, Li-Qiao; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferation activated receptor α (PPARα) is an important transcriptional regulator of lipid metabolism and is activated by high-fat diet (HFD) and fibrates in mammals. However, whether nutritional background affects PPARα activation and the hypolipidemic effects of PPARα ligands have not been investigated in fish. In the present two-phase study of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), fish were first fed a HFD (13% fat) or low-fat diet (LFD; 1% fat) diet for 10 weeks, and then fish from the first phase were fed the HFD or LFD supplemented with 200 mg/kg body weight fenofibrate for 4 weeks. The results indicated that the HFD did not activate PPARα or other lipid catabolism-related genes. Hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation increased significantly in the HFD and LFD groups after the fenofibrate treatment, when exogenous substrates were sufficiently provided. Only in the HFD group, fenofibrate significantly increased hepatic PPARα mRNA and protein expression, and decreased liver and plasma triglyceride concentrations. This is the first study to show that body fat deposition and dietary lipid content affects PPARα activation and the hypolipidemic effects of fenofibrate in fish, and this could be due to differences in substrate availability for lipid catabolism in fish fed with different diets. PMID:28139735

  16. Effect of Primordial Black Holes on the Cosmic Microwave Background and Cosmological Parameter Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotti, Massimo; Ostriker, Jeremiah; Mack, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of nonevaporating primordial black holes (PBHs) on the ionization and thermal history of the universe. X-rays emitted by gas accretion onto PBHs modify the cosmic recombination history, producing measurable effects on the spectrum and anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Using the third-year WMAP data and COBE FIRAS data we improve existing upper limits on the abundance of PBHs with masses > 0 . 1 M⊙ by several orders of magnitude, thus ruling out PBHs in this mass range as a significant component of the dark matter. Fitting WMAP/Planck data with cosmological models that do not allow for nonstandard recombination histories, as produced by PBHs or other early energy sources, leads to underestimating the best-fit values of the amplitude of linear density fluctuations (σ8) and the scalar spectral index (ns). We find that a fraction > 0 . 1 % - 1 % of the dark matter in 30 M⊙ PBHs produces CMB spectral distortions at a level detectable by FIRAS. Therefore, even allowing for possible modeling uncertainties, future missions measuring CMB spectral distortions will detect the imprint of dark matter if it's composed of 30 M⊙ PBHs, as suggested to interpret recent LIGO results.

  17. The effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature uncertainties on cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-03-15

    We estimate the effect of the experimental uncertainty in the measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the extraction of cosmological parameters from future CMB surveys. We find that even for an ideal experiment limited only by cosmic variance up to l=2500 for both the temperature and polarization measurements, the projected cosmological parameter errors are remarkably robust against the uncertainty of 1 mK in the firas CMB temperature monopole measurement. The maximum degradation in sensitivity is 20%, for the baryon density estimate, relative to the case in which the monopole is known infinitely well. While this degradation is acceptable, we note that reducing the uncertainty in the current temperature measurement by a factor of five will bring it down to {approx}1%. We also estimate the effect of the uncertainty in the dipole temperature measurement. Assuming the overall calibration of the data to be dominated by the dipole error of 0.2% from firas, the sensitivity degradation is insignificant and does not exceed 10% in any parameter direction.

  18. The Effects of Background and Interference Selection on Patterns of Genetic Variation in Subdivided Populations.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kai; Corcoran, Pádraic

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that most new mutations that affect fitness exert deleterious effects and that natural populations are often composed of subpopulations (demes) connected by gene flow. To gain a better understanding of the joint effects of purifying selection and population structure, we focus on a scenario where an ancestral population splits into multiple demes and study neutral diversity patterns in regions linked to selected sites. In the background selection regime of strong selection, we first derive analytic equations for pairwise coalescent times and FST as a function of time after the ancestral population splits into two demes and then construct a flexible coalescent simulator that can generate samples under complex models such as those involving multiple demes or nonconservative migration. We have carried out extensive forward simulations to show that the new methods can accurately predict diversity patterns both in the nonequilibrium phase following the split of the ancestral population and in the equilibrium between mutation, migration, drift, and selection. In the interference selection regime of many tightly linked selected sites, forward simulations provide evidence that neutral diversity patterns obtained from both the nonequilibrium and equilibrium phases may be virtually indistinguishable for models that have identical variance in fitness, but are nonetheless different with respect to the number of selected sites and the strength of purifying selection. This equivalence in neutral diversity patterns suggests that data collected from subdivided populations may have limited power for differentiating among the selective pressures to which closely linked selected sites are subject.

  19. Effective inelastic scattering cross-sections for background analysis in HAXPES of deeply buried layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O.; Zborowski, C.; Bertrand, D.; Torres, A.; Rueff, J.-P.; Ceolin, D.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2017-04-01

    Inelastic background analysis of HAXPES spectra was recently introduced as a powerful method to get access to the elemental distribution in deeply buried layers or interfaces, at depth up to 60 nm below the surface. However the accuracy of the analysis highly relies on suitable scattering cross-sections able to describe effectively the transport of photoelectrons through overlayer structures consisting of individual layers with potentially very different scattering properties. Here, we show that within Tougaard's practical framework as implemented in the Quases-Analyze software, the photoelectron transport through thick (25-40 nm) multi-layer structures with widely different cross-sections can be reliably described with an effective cross-section in the form of a weighted sum of the individual cross-section of each layer. The high-resolution core-level analysis partly provides a guide for determining the nature of the individual cross-sections to be used. We illustrate this novel approach with the practical case of a top Al/Ti bilayer structure in an AlGaN/GaN power transistor device stack before and after sucessive annealing treatments. The analysis provides reliable insights on the Ti and Ga depth distributions up to nearly 50 nm below the surface.

  20. Gravitational self-force in a Schwarzschild background and the effective one-body formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault

    2010-01-15

    We discuss various ways in which the computation of conservative gravitational self-force (GSF) effects on a point mass moving in a Schwarzschild background can inform us about the basic building blocks of the effective one-body (EOB) Hamiltonian. We display the information which can be extracted from the recently published GSF calculation of the first-GSF-order shift of the orbital frequency of the last stable circular orbit, and we combine this information with the one recently obtained by comparing the EOB formalism to high-accuracy numerical relativity data on coalescing binary black holes. The information coming from GSF data helps to break the degeneracy (among some EOB parameters) which was left after using comparable-mass numerical relativity data to constrain the EOB formalism. We suggest various ways of obtaining more information from GSF computations: either by studying eccentric orbits, or by focusing on a special zero-binding zoom-whirl orbit. We show that logarithmic terms start entering the post-Newtonian expansions of various (EOB and GSF) functions at the fourth post-Newtonian level, and we analytically compute the first logarithm entering a certain, gauge-invariant 'redshift' GSF function (defined along the sequence of circular orbits).